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Sample records for epoxy bond interface

  1. Interface Bond Improvement of Sisal Fibre Reinforced Polylactide Composites with Added Epoxy Oligomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Mingyang; Wu, Hongwu; Qiu, Feng; Wang, Xiwen

    2018-03-07

    To improve the interfacial bonding of sisal fiber-reinforced polylactide biocomposites, polylactide (PLA) and sisal fibers (SF) were melt-blended to fabricate bio-based composites via in situ reactive interfacial compatibilization with addition of a commercial grade epoxy-functionalized oligomer Joncryl ADR @ -4368 (ADR). The FTIR (Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy) analysis and SEM (scanning electron microscope) characterization demonstrated that the PLA molecular chain was bonded to the fiber surface and the epoxy-functionalized oligomer played a hinge-like role between the sisal fibers and the PLA matrix, which resulted in improved interfacial adhesion between the fibers and the PLA matrix. The interfacial reaction and microstructures of composites were further investigated by thermal and rheological analyses, which indicated that the mobility of the PLA molecular chain in composites was restricted because of the introduction of the ADR oligomer, which in turn reflected the improved interfacial interaction between SF and the PLA matrix. These results were further justified with the calculation of activation energies of glass transition relaxation (∆ E a ) by dynamic mechanical analysis. The mechanical properties of PLA/SF composites were simultaneously reinforced and toughened with the addition of ADR oligomer. The interfacial interaction and structure-properties relationship of the composites are the key points of this study.

  2. Adhesive Bonding of Aluminium Alloy A5754 by Epoxy Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Michalec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Joining thin sheets of aluminium and its alloys is a promising area in the field of joining materials. Nowadays, joining methods that do not melt the material itself are increasingly being utilised. This paper deals with adhesive bonding of aluminium alloy A5754 by two-component epoxy resins. Theresults show that joints bonded by Hysol 9466 have appropriate mechanical properties, but that joints bonded by Hysol 9492 have better thermal stability.

  3. Ultralow-Carbon Nanotube-Toughened Epoxy: The Critical Role of a Double-Layer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingwei; Chen, Chao; Feng, Yuezhan; Liao, Yonggui; Ye, Yunsheng; Xie, Xiaolin; Mai, Yiu-Wing

    2018-01-10

    Understanding the chemistry and structure of interfaces within epoxy resins is important for studying the mechanical properties of nanofiller-filled nanocomposites as well as for developing high-performance polymer nanocomposites. Despite the intensive efforts to construct nanofiller/matrix interfaces, few studies have demonstrated an enhanced stress-transferring efficiency while avoiding unfavorable deformation due to undesirable interface fractures. Here, we report an optimized method to prepare epoxy-based nanocomposites whose interfaces are chemically modulated by poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-block-poly(hexyl methacrylate) (PGMA-b-PHMA)-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (bc@fMWNTs) and also offer a fundamental explanation of crack growth behavior and the toughening mechanism of the resulting nanocomposites. The presence of block copolymers on the surface of the MWNT results in a promising double-layered interface, in which (1) the outer-layered PGMA segment provides good dispersion in and strong interface bonding with the epoxy matrix, which enhances load transfer efficiency and debonding stress, and (2) the interlayered rubbery PHMA segment around the MWNT provides the maximum removable space for nanotubes as well as triggering cavitation while promoting local plastic matrix deformation, for example, shear banding to dissipate fracture energy. An outstanding toughening effect is achieved with only a 0.05 wt % carbon nanotube loading with the bc@fMWNT, that is, needing only a 20-times lower loading to obtain improvements in fracture toughness comparable to epoxy-based nanocomposites. The enhancements of their corresponding ultimate mode-I fracture toughnesses and fracture energies are 4 times higher than those of pristine MWNT-filled epoxy. These results demonstrate that a MWNT/epoxy interface could be optimized by changing the component structure of grafted modifiers, thereby facilitating the transfer of both mechanical load and energy dissipation

  4. Bonding and impedance matching of acoustic transducers using silver epoxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kyu Tak; Lee, Chin C

    2012-04-01

    Silver epoxy was selected to bond transducer plates on glass substrates. The properties and thickness of the bonding medium affect the electrical input impedance of the transducer. Thus, the thickness of the silver epoxy bonding layer was used as a design parameter to optimize the structure for the transducer input impedance to match the 50 Ω output impedance of most radio frequency (RF) generators. Simulation and experimental results show that nearly perfect matching is achieved without using any matching circuit. At the matching condition, the transducer operates at a frequency band a little bit below the half-wavelength resonant frequency of the piezoelectric plate. In experiments, lead titanate (PT) piezoelectric plates were employed. Both full-size, 11.5 mm × 2 mm × 0.4 mm, and half-size, 5.75 mm × 2 mm × 0.4 mm, can be well matched using optimal silver epoxy thickness. The transducer assemblies demonstrate high efficiency. The conversion loss from electrical power to acoustic power in soda-lime glass is 4.3 dB. This loss is low considering the fact that the transducers operate at off-resonance by 12%. With proper choice of silver epoxy thickness, the transducer can be matched at the fundamental, the 3rd and 5th harmonic frequencies. This leads to the possible realization of triple-band transducers. Reliability was assessed with thermal cycling test according to Telcordia GR-468-Core recommendation. Of the 30 transducer assemblies tested, none broke until 2900 cycles and 27 have sustained beyond 4050 cycles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  6. Some Aspects of Thermal Transport across the Interface between Graphene and Epoxy in Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Yang, Chunhui; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Zhang, Yingyan

    2016-03-01

    Owing to the superior thermal properties of graphene, graphene-reinforced polymer nanocomposites hold great potential as the thermal interface materials (TIMs) dissipating heat for electronic packages. However, this application is greatly hindered by the high thermal resistance at the interface between graphene and polymer. In this paper, some important aspects of the improvement of the thermal transport across the interface between graphene and epoxy in graphene-epoxy nanocomposites, including the effectiveness of covalent and noncovalent functionalization, isotope doping, and acetylenic linkage in graphene are systematically investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The simulation results show that the covalent and noncovalent functionalization techniques could considerably reduce the graphene-epoxy interfacial thermal resistance in the nanocomposites. Among different covalent functional groups, butyl is more effective than carboxyl and hydroxyl in reducing the interfacial thermal resistance. Different noncovalent functional molecules, including 1-pyrenebutyl, 1-pyrenebutyric acid, and 1-pyrenebutylamine, yield a similar amount of reductions. Moreover, it is found that the graphene-epoxy interfacial thermal resistance is insensitive to the carbon isotope doping in graphene, while it can be reduced moderately by replacing the sp(2) bonds in graphene with acetylenic linkages.

  7. The Effect of High Concentration and Small Size of Nanodiamonds on the Strength of Interface and Fracture Properties in Epoxy Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir A. Haleem

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The concentration and small size of nanodiamonds (NDs plays a crucial role in the mechanical performance of epoxy-based nanocomposites by modifying the interface strength. Herein, we systemically analyzed the relation between the high concentration and small size of ND and the fracture properties of its epoxy-based nanocomposites. It was observed that there is a two-fold increase in fracture toughness and a three-fold increase in fracture energy. Rationally, functionalized-NDs (F-NDs showed a much better performance for the nanocomposite than pristine NDs (P-NDs because of additional functional groups on its surface. The F-ND/epoxy nanocomposites exhibited rougher surface in contrast with the P-ND/epoxy, indicating the presence of a strong interface. We found that the interfaces in F-ND/epoxy nanocomposites at high concentrations of NDs overlap by making a web, which can efficiently hinder further crack propagation. In addition, the de-bonding in P-ND/epoxy nanocomposites occurred at the interface with the appearance of plastic voids or semi-naked particles, whereas the de-bonding for F-ND/epoxy nanocomposites happened within the epoxy molecular network instead of the interface. Because of the strong interface in F-ND/epoxy nanocomposites, at high concentrations the de-bonding within the epoxy molecular network may lead to subsequent cracks, parallel to the parent crack, via crack splitting which results in a fiber-like structure on the fracture surface. The plastic void growth, crack deflection and subsequent crack growth were correlated to higher values of fracture toughness and fracture energy in F-ND/epoxy nanocomposites.

  8. A parametric study of surface roughness and bonding mechanisms of aluminum alloys with epoxies: a molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Termaath, Stephanie

    The marine environment is highly aggressive towards most materials. However, aluminium-magnesium alloys (Al-Mg, specifically, 5xxx series) have exceptionally long service life in such aggressive marine environments. For instance, an Al-Mg alloy, AA5083, is extensively used in naval structures because of its good mechanical strength, formability, seawater corrosion resistance and weldability. However, bonding mechanisms of these alloys with epoxies in a rough surface environment are not fully understood yet. It requires a rigorous investigation at molecular or atomic levels. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation to study an adherend surface preparation and surface bonding mechanisms of Al-Mg alloy (AA5083) with different epoxies by developing several computer models. Various distributions of surface roughness are introduced in the models and performed molecular dynamics simulations. Formation of a beta phase (Al3Mg2) , microstructures, bonding energies at the interface, bonding strengths and durability are investigated. Office of Naval Research.

  9. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Cantrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes KN of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The KN calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67 ×1017 N m−3. The average ratio KN/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043 × 1010 m−1 for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of KN via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  10. Controlled interface between carbon fiber and epoxy by molecular self-assembly method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jinmei; Huang Yudong; Liu Li; Cao Hailin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new treatment method based on molecular self-assembly on carbon fiber surface was proposed for obtaining a controlled interface between carbon fiber and epoxy matrix in composite system. To form the controlled interfacial region, the surfaces of carbon fibers were first metallized by electroless Ag plating, then were reacted with a series of thiols (different chain lengths and terminally functional groups) to form self-assembly monolayers (SAMs), which further reacted with epoxy resin to generate a strong adhesion interface. The morphology, structure and composition of untreated and treated carbon fiber surface were investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM), surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy (SERS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. SERS study showed that thiols chemisorbed on Ag/carbon fiber in the form of thiolate species via the strong S-Ag coordinative bond. XPS study further confirmed the chemisorption by an S 2p 3/2 component observed at 162.2 eV. The binding energy was characteristic of silver thiolate. The interfacial shear strength of the carbon fiber/epoxy microcomposites was evaluated by the microbond technique. The results showed that there was a direct effect of the interfacial parameters changes such as chain lengths and surface functional groups on the fiber/matrix adhesion

  11. MWCNTs/P(St-co-GMA) composite nanofibers of engineered interface chemistry for epoxy matrix nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özden-Yenigün, Elif; Menceloğlu, Yusuf Z; Papila, Melih

    2012-02-01

    Strengthened nanofiber-reinforced epoxy matrix composites are demonstrated by engineering composite electrospun fibers of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and reactive P(St-co-GMA). MWCNTs are incorporated into surface-modified, reactive P(St-co-GMA) nanofibers by electrospinning; functionalization of these MWCNT/P(St-co-GMA) composite nanofibers with epoxide moieties facilitates bonding at the interface of the cross-linked fibers and the epoxy matrix, effectively reinforcing and toughening the epoxy resin. Rheological properties are determined and thermodynamic stabilization is demonstrated for MWCNTs in the P(St-co-GMA)-DMF polymer solution. Homogeneity and uniformity of the fiber formation within the electrospun mats are achieved at polymer concentration of 30 wt %. Results show that the MWCNT fraction decreases the polymer solution viscosity, yielding a narrower fiber diameter. The fiber diameter drops from an average of 630 nm to 460 nm, as the MWCNTs wt fraction (1, 1.5, and 2%) is increased. The electrospun nanofibers of the MWCNTs/P(St-co-GMA) composite are also embedded into an epoxy resin to investigate their reinforcing abilities. A significant increase in the mechanical response is observed, up to >20% in flexural modulus, when compared to neat epoxy, despite a very low composite fiber weight fraction (at about 0.2% by a single-layer fibrous mat). The increase is attributed to the combined effect of the two factors the inherent strength of the well-dispersed MWCNTs and the surface chemistry of the electrospun fibers that have been modified with epoxide to enable cross-linking between the polymer matrix and the nanofibers.

  12. Response of fiber Bragg gratings bonded on a glass/epoxy laminate subjected to static loadings

    KAUST Repository

    Mulle, Matthieu; Moussawi, Ali; Lubineau, Gilles; Durand, Samuel; Falandry, Didier; Olivier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    measurements. Here, two adhesives were investigated, one with low viscosity and the other with high viscosity for bonding FBGs on glass/epoxy sandwich skins. First, instrumented elementary specimens were tested under tension. FBG strain results were analyzed

  13. Improved polymer nanocomposite dielectric breakdown performance through barium titanate to epoxy interface control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddabattuni, Sasidhar [Missouri University of Science and Technology (formerly the University of Missouri-Rolla), Chemistry Department, 400W. 11th Street, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Schuman, Thomas P., E-mail: tschuman@mst.edu [Missouri University of Science and Technology (formerly the University of Missouri-Rolla), Chemistry Department, 400W. 11th Street, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Dogan, Fatih [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Materials Science and Engineering Department, 1400N. Bishop Avenue, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > A covalent filler-matrix interface improves the dielectric properties of a polymer-particle nanocomposite dielectric. > A covalent interface reduced the polymer free volume around the nanoparticles as assessed through T{sub g} measurements. > Composite T{sub g} was raised and breakdown strength improved for nanocomposites with a covalent polymer-particle interface. > A larger Maxwell-Wagner (MW) relaxation correlated with reduced breakdown strengths and energy storage densities. > The MW relaxation could be considered a dielectric defect regarding breakdown strength and energy storage density. - Abstract: A composite approach to dielectric design has the potential to provide improved permittivity as well as high breakdown strength and thus afford greater electrical energy storage density. Interfacial coupling is an effective approach to improve the polymer-particle composite dielectric film resistance to charge flow and dielectric breakdown. A bi-functional interfacial coupling agent added to the inorganic oxide particles' surface assists dispersion into the thermosetting epoxy polymer matrix and upon composite cure reacts covalently with the polymer matrix. The composite then retains the glass transition temperature of pure polymer, provides a reduced Maxwell-Wagner relaxation of the polymer-particle composite, and attains a reduced sensitivity to dielectric breakdown compared to particle epoxy composites that lack interfacial coupling between the composite filler and polymer matrix. Besides an improved permittivity, the breakdown strength and thus energy density of a covalent interface nanoparticle barium titanate in epoxy composite dielectric film, at a 5 vol.% particle concentration, was significantly improved compared to a pure polymer dielectric film. The interfacially bonded, dielectric composite film had a permittivity {approx}6.3 and at a 30 {mu}m thickness achieved a calculated energy density of 4.6 J/cm{sup 3}.

  14. Improved polymer nanocomposite dielectric breakdown performance through barium titanate to epoxy interface control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddabattuni, Sasidhar; Schuman, Thomas P.; Dogan, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A covalent filler-matrix interface improves the dielectric properties of a polymer-particle nanocomposite dielectric. → A covalent interface reduced the polymer free volume around the nanoparticles as assessed through T g measurements. → Composite T g was raised and breakdown strength improved for nanocomposites with a covalent polymer-particle interface. → A larger Maxwell-Wagner (MW) relaxation correlated with reduced breakdown strengths and energy storage densities. → The MW relaxation could be considered a dielectric defect regarding breakdown strength and energy storage density. - Abstract: A composite approach to dielectric design has the potential to provide improved permittivity as well as high breakdown strength and thus afford greater electrical energy storage density. Interfacial coupling is an effective approach to improve the polymer-particle composite dielectric film resistance to charge flow and dielectric breakdown. A bi-functional interfacial coupling agent added to the inorganic oxide particles' surface assists dispersion into the thermosetting epoxy polymer matrix and upon composite cure reacts covalently with the polymer matrix. The composite then retains the glass transition temperature of pure polymer, provides a reduced Maxwell-Wagner relaxation of the polymer-particle composite, and attains a reduced sensitivity to dielectric breakdown compared to particle epoxy composites that lack interfacial coupling between the composite filler and polymer matrix. Besides an improved permittivity, the breakdown strength and thus energy density of a covalent interface nanoparticle barium titanate in epoxy composite dielectric film, at a 5 vol.% particle concentration, was significantly improved compared to a pure polymer dielectric film. The interfacially bonded, dielectric composite film had a permittivity ∼6.3 and at a 30 μm thickness achieved a calculated energy density of 4.6 J/cm 3 .

  15. Response of fiber Bragg gratings bonded on a glass/epoxy laminate subjected to static loadings

    KAUST Repository

    Mulle, Matthieu

    2015-04-22

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) may be used to monitor strain over the surface of a structure as an alternative technology to conventional strain gauges. However, FBG bonding techniques have still not been established to yield satisfactory surface measurements. Here, two adhesives were investigated, one with low viscosity and the other with high viscosity for bonding FBGs on glass/epoxy sandwich skins. First, instrumented elementary specimens were tested under tension. FBG strain results were analyzed together with digital image correlation (DIC) measurements. The influence of the bonding layer on the measured strain and on the integrity of the sensor was investigated by considering different regions of interest. Next, an instrumented structural sandwich beam was tested under four-point bending. FBG rosettes were compared to conventional strain gauge rosettes. The high viscosity adhesive demonstrated behaviors that affected FBG accuracy. Brittleness of the bonding layer and poor interface adhesion were observed using DIC and X-ray tomography. By contrast, the low viscosity adhesive demonstrated satisfactory results. The FBG strain measurements appeared to be consistent with those of DIC. The accuracy is also adequate as the FBGs and the conventional strain gauges had similar results in three directions, under tension and under compression.

  16. Interface Fracture in Adhesively Bonded Shell Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2008-01-01

    Two methods for the prediction of crack propagation through the interface of adhesively bonded shells are discussed. One is based on a fracture mechanics approach; the other is based on a cohesive zone approach. Attention is focussed on predicting the shape of the crack front and the critical...

  17. Passive characterization and active testing of epoxy bonded regenerators for room temperature magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Tian; Navickaité, Kristina; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    -layer AMR based on spherical particles is tested actively in a small reciprocating magnetic refrigerator, achieving a no-load temperature span of 16.8 °C using about 143 g of epoxy-bonded La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hy materials. Simulations based on a one-dimensional (1D) AMR model are also implemented to validate......Epoxy bonded regenerators of both spherical and irregular La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hy particles have been developed aiming at increasing the mechanical strength of active magnetic regenerators (AMR) loaded with brittle magnetocaloric materials and improving the flexibility of shaping the regenerator geometry....... Although the magnetocaloric properties of these materials are well studied, the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the epoxy bonded regenerators have seldom been investigated. This paper presents a test apparatus that passively characterizes regenerators using a liquid heat transfer fluid...

  18. Stable Failure-Inducing Micro-Silica Aqua Epoxy Bonding Material for Floating Concrete Module Connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Ho Jay Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Many recent studies in the development of floating concrete structures focused on a connection system made of modules. In the connection system, the modules are designed to be attached by pre-stressing (PS while floating on the water, which exposes them to loads on the surface of the water. Therefore, the development of a pre-connection material becomes critical to ensure successful bonding of floating concrete modules. Micro-silica mixed aqua-epoxy (MSAE was developed for this task. To find the proper MSAE mix proportion, 0% to 4% micro-silica was mixed in a standard mixture of aqua-epoxy for material testing. Also, the effect of micro-silica on the viscosity of the aqua epoxy was evaluated by controlling the epoxy silane at proportions of 0%, ±5%, and ±10%. After completion of the performance tests of the MSAE, we evaluated the effect of MSAE in a connected structure. The plain unreinforced concrete module joint specimens applied with MSAE at thicknesses of 5, 10, and 20 mm were prepared to be tested. Finally, we evaluated the performance of MSAE-applied reinforced concrete (RC module specimens connected by PS tendons, and these were compared with those of continuous RC and non-MSAE-applied beams. The results showed that the mix of micro-silica in the aqua-epoxy changed the performance of the aqua-epoxy and the mix ratio of 2% micro-silica gave a stable failure behavior. The flexural capacity of concrete blocks bonded with MSAE changed according to the bond thickness and was better than that of concrete blocks bonded with aqua-epoxy without micro-silica. Even though MSAE insignificantly increases the load-carrying capacity of the attached concrete module structure, the stress concentration reduction effect stabilized the failure of the structure.

  19. Epoxy-resin adhesive and method for bonding using such an epoxy resin adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhowmik, S.; Poulis, J.A.; Benedictus, R.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to an epoxy resin adhesive comprising a dotation of nano-substances, wherein the nano- substances are selected from the group comprising carbon-fibre nanotubes, carbon nano-fibres, silicate nano powders, and wherein the nano-substances are dispersed in the adhesive with a

  20. Irreversible bonding of polyimide and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based on a thiol-epoxy click reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Michelle V; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Elias, Anastasia L

    2016-01-01

    Polyimide is one of the most popular substrate materials for the microfabrication of flexible electronics, while polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the most widely used stretchable substrate/encapsulant material. These two polymers are essential in fabricating devices for microfluidics, bioelectronics, and the internet of things; bonding these materials together is a crucial challenge. In this work, we employ click chemistry at room temperature to irreversibly bond polyimide and PDMS through thiol-epoxy bonds using two different methods. In the first method, we functionalize the surfaces of the PDMS and polyimide substrates with mercaptosilanes and epoxysilanes, respectively, for the formation of a thiol-epoxy bond in the click reaction. In the second method, we functionalize one or both surfaces with mercaptosilane and introduce an epoxy adhesive layer between the two surfaces. When the surfaces are bonded using the epoxy adhesive without any surface functionalization, an extremely small peel strength (<0.01 N mm −1 ) is measured with a peel test, and adhesive failure occurs at the PDMS surface. With surface functionalization, however, remarkably higher peel strengths of ∼0.2 N mm −1 (method 1) and  >0.3 N mm −1 (method 2) are observed, and failure occurs by tearing of the PDMS layer. We envision that the novel processing route employing click chemistry can be utilized in various cases of stretchable and flexible device fabrication. (paper)

  1. EPR and rheological study of hybrid interfaces in gold-clay-epoxy nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelov, Verislav; Velichkova, Hristiana; Ivanov, Evgeni; Kotsilkova, Rumiana; Delville, Marie-Hélène; Cangiotti, Michela; Fattori, Alberto; Ottaviani, Maria Francesca

    2014-11-11

    With the aim to obtain new materials with special properties to be used in various industrial and biomedical applications, ternary "gold-clay-epoxy" nanocomposites and their nanodispersions were prepared using clay decorated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), at different gold contents. Nanocomposites structure was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Rheology and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used in order to evaluate the molecular dynamics in the nanodispersions, as well as dynamics at interfaces in the nanocomposites. The percolation threshold (i.e., the filler content related to the formation of long-range connectivity of particles in the dispersed media) of the gold nanoparticles was determined to be ϕp = 0.6 wt % at a fixed clay content of 3 wt %. The flow activation energy and the relaxation time spectrum illustrated the presence of interfacial interactions in the ternary nanodispersions around and above the percolation threshold of AuNPs; these interfacial interactions suppressed the global molecular dynamics. It was found that below ϕp the free epoxy polymer chains ratio dominated over the chains attracted on the gold surfaces; thus, the rheological behavior was not significantly changed by the presence of AuNPs. While, around and above ϕp, the amount of the bonded epoxy polymer chains on the gold surface was much higher than that of the free chains; thus, a substantial increase in the flow activation energy and shift in the spectra to higher relaxation times appeared. The EPR signals of the nanocomposites depended on the gold nanoparticle contents and the preparation procedure thus providing a fingerprint of the different nanostructures. The EPR results from spin probes indicated that the main effect of the gold nanoparticles above ϕp, was to form a more homogeneous, viscous and polar clay-epoxy mixture at the nanoparticle surface. The knowledge

  2. Mechanical properties considerations for use of epoxy insulators and bonded joints in neutral beam ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, D.W.; Trester, P.W.; Staley, H.G.

    1981-10-01

    In the Doublet III (D-III) neutral beam injectors, cast, rigid-epoxy insulators are joined to the AISI 304 stainless steel corona rings with semi-rigid epoxy adhesive. Selected mechanical properties of these materials were measured between 11 0 C and 65 0 C, well below the material temperature limits, to identify the trends and to confirm adequate mechanical strength for the insulators. Significant creep deformation was measured at 22 0 C. Empirical relationships were developed to predict long term strain over a range of stress and temperature of design interest. Delayed failure was observed in bonded specimens at stress levels well below the ultimate strength. In order to protect the D-III neutral beam ion source epoxy from elevated temperature effects, a chill was installed in the cooling water circuit. Outgassing measurements of the insulator epoxy were made and found to be low and primarily H 2 O

  3. Performance of thin bonded epoxy overlays on asphalt and concrete bridge deck surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This study is the evaluation of two thin bonded epoxy overlays: SafeLane (marketed by Cargill), and Flexogrid : (developed by PolyCarb). SafeLane is advertised as an anti-skid/anti-icing overlay that stores deicing chemicals for : release during wint...

  4. The pseudohydrogen bond structures between 2-F-epoxy-butane and three kinds of bimolecular

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yanzhi; Yuan Kun; Lu Lingling; Zhu Yuancheng; Dong Xiaoning

    2012-01-01

    The weak intermolecular interactions between 2-F-epoxy-butane and Iminazole, Thiazole and Oxazole were theoretically discussed by using density functional B3LYP (Becke, three-parameter, Lee- Yang-Parr)/6-311++G ** and HF (Hartree Fock)/6-311++G ** methods. The results showed that both the N…H conventional hydrogen bond and C-F…H-C pseudohydrogen bond (PHB) structures are coexisting in the three complexes. The weak intermolecular interactions energies indicate the relative stabilities of the three complexes are proportionable. The calculated results showed that the stretch vibrational frequency of C-H bond (electronic acceptor) presents blue shift, but that of C-F bond, which is intensely related to F group (electronic donor), presents red shift. Electron density topological properties demonstrates that the covalent and ionic characteristics of the C-F…H-C pseudohydrogen bond are proportional to that of convention hydrogen bond. (authors)

  5. Investigation of parameters governing the corrosion protection efficacy of fusion bonded epoxy coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Ramniceanu, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    The primary cause of corrosion in transportation structures is due to chlorides which are applied to bridge decks as deicing salts. The direct cost of corrosion damage to the countryâ s infrastructure is approximately $8.3 billion per year. One of the most common corrosion abatement methods in the United States is the barrier protection implemented through the application of fusion bonded epoxy coatings. The purpose of this study was to investigate various coating and exposure param...

  6. Performance of adhesives base on PU, Epoxy and silane in the Kevlar/alumina interface; Desempenho de adesivos a base de PU, epoxi e silano na interface Kevlar/alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noronha, K.F.; Melo, F.C.L.; Lopes, C.M.A. [Divisao de Materiais, Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Divisao de Engenharia Mecanica-Aeronautica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: cmoniz@iae.cta.br

    2010-07-01

    Hybrid ceramic/polymer composites are used for ballistic protection due to the good high-velocity impact absorption properties. The choice of the proper adhesive used to bond ceramic and polymer layers is one of the major issues for hybrid armor development due to its influence in the ballistic resistance behaviour. This work presents an adhesion study in composites of aramid textile (Kevlar) and alumina. Adhesives of different chemical nature, based on polyurethane, epoxy and silane were evaluated. T-Peel test was performed for the interface characterization and the post- failure surfaces were examined by optical microscopy. In all samples the failure occurred at the interface. The silane-based adhesive showed no interaction with the polymer, while the PU hot melt adhesive presented the highest adhesion strengths. (author)

  7. Identification of parameters of cohesive elements for modeling of adhesively bonded joints of epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottner R.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adhesively bonded joints can be numerically simulated using the cohesive crack model. The critical strain energy release rate and the critical opening displacement are the parameters which must be known when cohesive elements in MSC.Marc software are used. In this work, the parameters of two industrial adhesives Hunstman Araldite 2021 and Gurit Spabond 345 for bonding of epoxy composites are identified. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB and End Notched Flexure (ENF test data were used for the identification. The critical opening displacements were identified using an optimization algorithm where the tests and their numerical simulations were compared.

  8. Anisotropic thermal conductivity in epoxy-bonded magnetocaloric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Bruno; Sellschopp, Kai; Bierdel, Marius; Funk, Alexander; Bobeth, Manfred; Krautz, Maria; Waske, Anja

    2016-09-01

    Thermal management is one of the crucial issues in the development of magnetocaloric refrigeration technology for application. In order to ensure optimal exploitation of the materials "primary" properties, such as entropy change and temperature lift, thermal properties (and other "secondary" properties) play an important role. In magnetocaloric composites, which show an increased cycling stability in comparison to their bulk counterparts, thermal properties are strongly determined by the geometric arrangement of the corresponding components. In the first part of this paper, the inner structure of a polymer-bonded La(Fe, Co, Si)13-composite was studied by X-ray computed tomography. Based on this 3D data, a numerical study along all three spatial directions revealed anisotropic thermal conductivity of the composite: Due to the preparation process, the long-axis of the magnetocaloric particles is aligned along the xy plane which is why the in-plane thermal conductivity is larger than the thermal conductivity along the z-axis. Further, the study is expanded to a second aspect devoted to the influence of particle distribution and alignment within the polymer matrix. Based on an equivalent ellipsoids model to describe the inner structure of the composite, numerical simulation of the thermal conductivity in different particle arrangements and orientation distributions were performed. This paper evaluates the possibilities of microstructural design for inducing and adjusting anisotropic thermal conductivity in magnetocaloric composites.

  9. In-situ determination of amine/epoxy and carboxylic/epoxy exothermic heat of reaction on surface of modified carbon nanotubes and structural verification of covalent bond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Juliana C.; de Castro, Vinícius G.; Assis, Ana L. S.; Veiga, Amanda G.; Rocco, Maria Luiza M.; Silva, Glaura G.

    2018-04-01

    An effective nanofiller-matrix interaction is considered crucial to produce enhanced nanocomposites. Nevertheless, there is lack of experiments focused in the direct measurement of possible filler-matrix covalent linkage, which was the main goal of this work for a carbon nanotube (CNT)/epoxy system. CNT were functionalized with oxygenated (ox) functions and further with triethylenetetramine (TETA). An in-situ determination methodology of epoxy-CNTs heat of reaction was developed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Values of -(8.7 ± 0.4) and -(6.0 ± 0.6) J/g were observed for epoxy with CNT-ox and CNT-TETA, respectively. These results confirm the occurrence of covalent bonds for both functionalized CNTs, a very important information due to the literature generally disregard this possibility for oxygenated functions. The higher value obtained for CNT-ox can be attributed to a not complete amidation and to steric impediments in the CNT-TETA structure. The modified CNTs produced by DSC experiments were then characterized by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Thermogravimetry, which confirmed the covalent linkage. This characterization methodology can be used to verify the occurrence of covalent bonds in various nanocomposites with a quantitative evaluation, providing data for better understanding of the role of CNT functional groups and for tailoring its interface with polymers.

  10. Graphene-epoxy flexible transparent capacitor obtained by graphene-polymer transfer and UV-induced bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangermano, Marco; Chiolerio, Alessandro; Veronese, Giulio Paolo; Ortolani, Luca; Rizzoli, Rita; Mancarella, Fulvio; Morandi, Vittorio

    2014-02-01

    A new approach is reported for the preparation of a graphene-epoxy flexible transparent capacitor obtained by graphene-polymer transfer and UV-induced bonding. SU8 resin is employed for realizing a well-adherent, transparent, and flexible supporting layer. The achieved transparent graphene/SU8 membrane presents two distinct surfaces: one homogeneous conductive surface containing a graphene layer and one dielectric surface typical of the epoxy polymer. Two graphene/SU8 layers are bonded together by using an epoxy photocurable formulation based on epoxy resin. The obtained material showed a stable and clear capacitive behavior. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Advanced Nanocomposite Coatings of Fusion Bonded Epoxy Reinforced with Amino-Functionalized Nanoparticles for Applications in Underwater Oil Pipelines

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia A. Saliba; Alexandra A. P. Mansur; Herman S. Mansur

    2016-01-01

    The performance of fusion-bonded epoxy coatings can be improved through advanced composite coatings reinforced with nanomaterials. Hence, in this study a novel organic-inorganic nanocomposite finish was designed, synthesized, and characterized, achieved by adding γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane modified silica nanoparticles produced via sol-gel process in epoxy-based powder. After the curing process of the coating reinforced with nanoparticles, the formation of a homogenous novel nanocomposite w...

  12. Investigation of dielectric breakdown in silica-epoxy nanocomposites using designed interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Michael; Krentz, Timothy; Keith Nelson, J; Schadler, Linda; Wu, Ke; Breneman, Curt; Zhao, Su; Hillborg, Henrik; Benicewicz, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Adding nano-sized fillers to epoxy has proven to be an effective method for improving dielectric breakdown strength (DBS). Evidence suggests that dispersion state, as well as chemistry at the filler-matrix interface can play a crucial role in property enhancement. Herein we investigate the contribution of both filler dispersion and surface chemistry on the AC dielectric breakdown strength of silica-epoxy nanocomposites. Ligand engineering was used to synthesize bimodal ligands onto 15nm silica nanoparticles consisting of long epoxy compatible, poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) chains, and short, π-conjugated, electroactive surface ligands. Surface initiated RAFT polymerization was used to synthesize multiple graft densities of PGMA chains, ultimately controlling the dispersion of the filler. Thiophene, anthracene, and terthiophene were employed as π-conjugated surface ligands that act as electron traps to mitigate avalanche breakdown. Investigation of the synthesized multifunctional nanoparticles was effective in defining the maximum particle spacing or free space length (L f ) that still leads to property enhancement, as well as giving insight into the effects of varying the electronic nature of the molecules at the interface on breakdown strength. Optimization of the investigated variables was shown to increase the AC dielectric breakdown strength of epoxy composites as much as 34% with only 2wt% silica loading. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative Study of Interface/Interphase in Epoxy/Graphene-Based Nanocomposites by Combining STEM and EELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Hamon, Ann-Lenaig; Haghi-Ashtiani, Paul; Reiss, Thomas; Fan, Benhui; He, Delong; Bai, Jinbo

    2016-12-14

    A quantitative study of the interphase and interface of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs)/epoxy and graphene oxide (GO)/epoxy was carried out by combining scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). The interphase regions between GNPs and epoxy matrix were clearly identified by the discrepancy of the plasmon peak positions in the low energy-loss spectra due to different valence electron densities. The spectrum acquisitions were carried out along lines across the interface. An interphase thickness of 13 and 12.5 nm was measured for GNPs/epoxy and GO/epoxy, respectively. The density of the GNPs/epoxy interphase was 2.89% higher than that of the epoxy matrix. However, the density of the GO/epoxy interphase was 1.37% lower than that of the epoxy matrix. The interphase layer thickness measured in this work is in good agreement with the transition layer theory, which proposed an area with modulus linearly varying across a finite width. The results provide an insight into the interphase for carbon-based polymer composites that can help to design the functionalization of nanofillers to improve the composite properties.

  14. Photo-responsive liquid crystalline epoxy networks with exchangeable disulfide bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuzhan [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Zhang, Yuehong [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Rios, Orlando [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Keum, Jong K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kessler, Michael R. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States)

    2017-07-27

    The increasing demand for intelligent materials has driven the development of polymers with a variety of functionalities. However, combining multiple functionalities within one polymer is still challenging because of the difficulties encountered in coordinating different functional building blocks during fabrication. In this work, we demonstrate the fabrication of a multifunctional liquid crystalline epoxy network (LCEN) using the combination of thermotropic liquid crystals, photo-responsive azobenzene molecules, and exchangeable disulfide bonds. In addition to shape memory behavior enabled by the reversible liquid crystalline phase transition and photo-induced bending behavior resulting from the photo-responsive azobenzene molecules, the introduction of dynamic disulfide bonds into the LCEN resulted in a structurally dynamic network, allowing the reshaping, repairing, and recycling of the material.

  15. Mechanical properties along interfaces of bonded structures in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.H.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    Proper assessment of the mechanical properties along interfaces of bonded structures currently used in many fusion reactor designs is essential to compare the different fabrication techniques. A Mechanical Properties Microprobe (MPM) was used to measure hardness and Young's modules along the interfaces of Be/Cu bonded structure. The MPM was able to distinguish different fabrication techniques by a direct measurement of the hardness, Young's modules, and H/E 2 which reflects the ability of deformation of the interfacial region

  16. Test method to assess interface adhesion in composite bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira de Freitas, S.; Sinke, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a new type of peel tests dedicated to composite bonding: Composite Peel Tests. This test is inspired on the standard floating roller peel test widely used for metal bonding. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of the Composite Peel Test to assess interface

  17. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. • We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. • The coil is tightly bonded to cooling members by epoxy resin without the degradation. • We made a REBCO racetrack coil with the same outer dimension as the Maglev magnet. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed

  18. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi, E-mail: mizuno.katsutoshi.14@rtri.or.jp; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. • We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. • The coil is tightly bonded to cooling members by epoxy resin without the degradation. • We made a REBCO racetrack coil with the same outer dimension as the Maglev magnet. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed.

  19. Epoxy-bonded La(Fe,mn,si)13Hz As A Multi Layered Active Magnetic Regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neves Bez, Henrique; Navickaité, Kristina; Lei, Tian

    2016-01-01

    of the material may break apart during operation. In this context, we studied epoxy-bonded La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hz regenerators, in a small versatile active magnetic regeneration (AMR) test device with a 1.1 T permanent magnet source. The magnetocaloric material was in the form of packed irregular particles (250-500 µm......The high magnetocaloric effect and tunability of the Curie temperature over a broad range makes La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hz a promising magnetocaloric material for applications. Due to a volume change across the transition and the brittleness of the material as well as erosion due to fluid flow, the particles......), which were mechanically held in place by an epoxy matrix connecting the particles, improving the mechanical integrity, while allowing a continuous porosity for the fluid flow. Water with 2 wt% ENTEK FNE as anti-corrosion additive was used as the heat transfer fluid for the epoxy-bonded regenerators...

  20. Characterization of adhesion at carbon fiber-fluorinated epoxy interface and effect of environmental degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Suman

    2011-12-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymers are excellent candidates for aerospace, automobile and other mobile applications due to their high specific strength and modulus. The most prominent aerospace application of carbon fiber composites in recent times is the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, which is the world's first major commercial airliner to extensively use composite materials. The critical issue, which needs to be addressed hereby, is long-term safety. Hence, long-term durability of composite materials in such applications becomes a point of concern. Conventional polymer matrices, such as thermosetting resins, which are used as matrix material in carbon fiber composites, are susceptible to degradation in the form of chemical corrosion, UV degradation and moisture, in severe environmental conditions. Fluorinated polymers offer a viable alternative as matrix material, due to their reduced susceptibility to environmental degradation. The epoxy system used in this study is fluorinated Tetra-glycidyl methylene di-aniline (6F-TGMDA), which was developed by polymer scientists at NASA Langley Research Center. The hydrophobic nature of this epoxy makes it a potential matrix material in aerospace applications. However, its compatibility in carbon fiber-reinforced composites remains to be investigated. This study aims to characterize the interfacial properties in carbon fiber reinforced fluorinated epoxy composites. Typical interfacial characterization parameters, like interfacial shear strength, estimated from the microbond test, proved to be inadequate in accurately estimating adhesion since it assumes a uniform distribution of stresses along the embedded fiber length. Also, it does not account for any residual stresses present at the interface, which might arise due to thermal expansion differences and Poisson's ratio differences of the fiber and matrix. Hence, an analytical approach, which calculates adhesion pressure at the interface, was adopted. This required determination of

  1. Influence of Electrolytical Oxidising of Silumine Surfaces on the Quality of Bonding with Epoxy Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posmyk A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the preparation process of AC-AlSi12 aluminum alloy surface by application of anodic oxidation method. The method enables the formation of a porous oxide layer (Al2O3 which generates the substrate of durable adhesive bond with an epoxy resin. It also presents the influence of the form of silicon precipitates in the modified alloy upon anodizing process, uniform structure and thickness of the oxide layer as well as the topography of its surface which is expected to improve adhesion of the resin and silumin. The paper describes how the position of oxidized surface against the negative electrode influences the coating structure. The studied silumins are intended to form the material for casting of 3 dimensional objects whose parts will change the distribution of electric field strength that may cause non-uniform structure of the coating.

  2. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-11-01

    The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed.

  3. Total energy calculations and bonding at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louie, S.G.

    1984-08-01

    Some of the concepts and theoretical techniques employed in recent ab initio studies of the electronic and structural properties of surfaces and interfaces are discussed. Results of total energy calculations for the 2 x 1 reconstructed diamond (111) surface and for stacking faults in Si are reviewed. 30 refs., 8 figs

  4. Comparison of the degradation behaviour of fusion-bonded epoxy powder coating systems under flowing and static immersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Y.H.; Zhang, L.X.; Ke, W.

    2006-01-01

    The degradation of three different fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE) powder coating systems under flowing and static immersion condition has been monitored using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) when exposed to 3% NaCl aqueous solution at 60 o C. The aim of this project was to determine the impact of flowing condition on the degradation of the protective properties of polymer coatings during exposure to corrosive medium. Using a rotating cylinder apparatus, the immersion tests under the flowing condition were performed. The relative permittivity of coating, ε r =C c δε 0 A, where the coating capacitance C c was calculated from the high frequency data of impedance spectrum, was selected as the index to monitor property variation with immersion time. Experimental results showed that the flowing condition aggravated the deterioration of coatings. The results were interpreted in terms of a model in which flowing condition changes coating/solution interface state and then accelerates the ions to diffuse through the coating. The electrochemical results were in agreement with the final visual observation. The present investigation suggests that flowing test provides an effective accelerating way to evaluate the degradation of coating system

  5. Effect of Interfacial Bonding on Interphase Properties in SiO2/Epoxy Nanocomposite: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhikun; Lv, Qiang; Chen, Shenghui; Li, Chunling; Sun, Shuangqing; Hu, Songqing

    2016-03-23

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to explore the effect of interfacial bonding on the interphase properties of a nanocomposite system that consists of a silica nanoparticle and the highly cross-linked epoxy matrix. For the structural properties, results show that interfacial covalent bonding can broaden the interphase region by increasing the radial effect range of fluctuated mass density and oriented chains, as well as strengthen the interphase region by improving the thermal stability of interfacial van der Waals excluded volume and reducing the proportion of cis conformers of epoxy segments. The improved thermal stability of the interphase region in the covalently bonded model results in an increase of ∼21 K in the glass transition temperature (Tg) compared to that of the pure epoxy. It is also found that interfacial covalent bonding mainly restricts the volume thermal expansion of the model at temperatures near or larger than Tg. Furthermore, investigations from mean-square displacement and fraction of immobile atoms point out that interfacial covalent and noncovalent bonding induces lower and higher mobility of interphase atoms than that of the pure epoxy, respectively. The obtained critical interfacial bonding ratio when the interphase and matrix atoms have the same mobility is 5.8%. These results demonstrate that the glass transitions of the interphase and matrix will be asynchronous when the interfacial bonding ratio is not 5.8%. Specifically, the interphase region will trigger the glass transition of the matrix when the ratio is larger than 5.8%, whereas it restrains the glass transition of the matrix when the ratio is smaller than 5.8%.

  6. GROUT-CONCRETE INTERFACE BOND PERFORMANCE: EFFECT OF INTERFACE MOISTURE ON THE TENSILE BOND STRENGTH AND GROUT MICROSTRUCTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Varga, I; Muñoz, J F; Bentz, D P; Spragg, R P; Stutzman, P E; Graybeal, B A

    2018-05-01

    Bond between two cementitious materials is crucial in applications such as repairs, overlays, and connections of prefabricated bridge elements (PBEs), to name just a few. It is the latter that has special interest to the authors of this paper. After performing a dimensional stability study on grout-like materials commonly used as connections between PBEs, it was observed that the so-called 'non-shrink' cementitious grouts showed a considerable amount of early-age shrinkage. This might have negative effects on the integrity of the structure, due not only to the grout material's early degradation, but also to a possible loss of bond between the grout and the prefabricated concrete element. Many factors affect the bond strength between two cementitious materials (e.g., grout-concrete), the presence of moisture at the existing concrete substrate surface being one of them. In this regard, pre-moistening the concrete substrate surface prior to the application of the grout material is sometimes recommended for bond enhancement. This topic has been the focus of numerous research studies in the past; however, there is still controversy among practitioners on the real benefits that this practice might provide. This paper evaluates the tensile bond performance of two non-shrink cementitious grouts applied to the exposed aggregate surface of a concrete substrate, and how the supply of moisture at the grout-concrete interface affects the bond strength. "Pull-off" bond results show increased tensile bond strength when the concrete surface is pre-moistened. Reasons to explain the observed increased bond strength are given after a careful microstructural analysis of the grout-concrete interface. Interfaces where sufficient moisture is provided to the concrete substrate such that moisture movement from the grout is prevented show reduced porosity and increased hydration on the grout side of the interface, which is thought to directly contribute to the increased tensile bond

  7. SEM examination and analysis of the interface character in surface modified aramid-epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.; Khan, M.B.; Hussain, R.

    2011-01-01

    The surface of Kevlar fibers is chemically modified by treatment with Phthalic anhydride (PA) and the effect is examined by SEM for the laser cut, three point bending and interlaminar shear delaminated surfaces. The surface modification improved the adhesion to epoxy resin that clearly leads to cohesive fracture as opposed to interfacial failure in the untreated specimen. SEM reveals marginal surface roughening of fibers without compromising their strength. The interface modification technique described in this paper is attractive thermodynamically as it does not compromise surface free energy of the polymer matrix or that of the fiber itself to enhance wet ability. (author)

  8. Advanced Nanocomposite Coatings of Fusion Bonded Epoxy Reinforced with Amino-Functionalized Nanoparticles for Applications in Underwater Oil Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Saliba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of fusion-bonded epoxy coatings can be improved through advanced composite coatings reinforced with nanomaterials. Hence, in this study a novel organic-inorganic nanocomposite finish was designed, synthesized, and characterized, achieved by adding γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane modified silica nanoparticles produced via sol-gel process in epoxy-based powder. After the curing process of the coating reinforced with nanoparticles, the formation of a homogenous novel nanocomposite with the development of interfacial reactions between organic-inorganic and inorganic-inorganic components was observed. These hybrid nanostructures produced better integration between nanoparticles and epoxy matrix and improved mechanical properties that are expected to enhance the overall performance of the system against underwater corrosion.

  9. Toughness amplification in copper/epoxy joints through pulsed laser micro-machined interface heterogeneities

    KAUST Repository

    Hernandez Diaz, Edwin

    2017-11-21

    This work addresses the mechanics of debonding along copper/epoxy joints featuring patterned interfaces. Engineered surface heterogeneities with enhanced adhesion properties are generated through pulsed laser irradiation. Peel tests are carried out to ascertain the effect of patterns shape and area fraction on the mechanical response. Experimental results are evaluated with the support of three-dimensional finite element simulations based on the use of cohesive surfaces. Results discussion is largely framed in terms of effective peel force and energy absorbed to sever the samples. It is shown that surface heterogeneities act as sites of potential crack pinning able to trigger crack initiation, propagation and arrest. Surface patterns ultimately enable a remarkable increase in the effective peel force and dissipated energy with respect to baseline homogeneous sanded interface.

  10. Toughness amplification in copper/epoxy joints through pulsed laser micro-machined interface heterogeneities

    KAUST Repository

    Diaz, Edwin Hernandez; Alfano, Marco; Pulungan, Ditho Ardiansyah; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    This work addresses the mechanics of debonding along copper/epoxy joints featuring patterned interfaces. Engineered surface heterogeneities with enhanced adhesion properties are generated through pulsed laser irradiation. Peel tests are carried out to ascertain the effect of patterns shape and area fraction on the mechanical response. Experimental results are evaluated with the support of three-dimensional finite element simulations based on the use of cohesive surfaces. Results discussion is largely framed in terms of effective peel force and energy absorbed to sever the samples. It is shown that surface heterogeneities act as sites of potential crack pinning able to trigger crack initiation, propagation and arrest. Surface patterns ultimately enable a remarkable increase in the effective peel force and dissipated energy with respect to baseline homogeneous sanded interface.

  11. A modified bonded-interface technique with improved features for studying indentation damage of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, I.M.

    1998-01-01

    A modified 'bonded-interface' technique with improved features for studying contact damage of ceramic (Al 2 O 3 graded Al 2 TiO 5 /Al 2 O 3 , Ti 3 SiC 2 ) and non-ceramic (epoxy, tooth) materials is developed and compared with the conventional method. This technique enables the surface damage around and below an indentor to be studied. When used in conjunction with Nomarski illumination and atomic force microscopy, this technique can reveal substantial information on the topography of indentation surface damage. In particular, it is ideal for monitoring the evolution of deformation-micro fracture damage of quasi-plastic materials. The technique is much less sophisticated, less time consuming, and user-friendly. It does not require a highly experience user to be proficient in the procedure. When compared with the conventional tool- clamp method, this modified technique gives similar, if not, identical results. Copyright (1998) Australasian Ceramic Society

  12. Mullite/Mo interfaces formed by Intrusion bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolome, Jose F.; Diaz, Marcos; Moya, Jose S.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-04-30

    The microstructure and strength of Mo/mullite interfaces formed by diffusion bonding at 1650 C has been analyzed. Interfacial metal-ceramic interlocking contributes to flexural strength of approx. 140 MPa as measured by 3 point bending. Saturation of mullite with MoO2 does not affect the interfacial strength.

  13. Comprehensive physical analysis of bond wire interfaces in power modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup; Kristensen, Peter Kjær

    2016-01-01

    causing failures. In this paper we present a review on the set of our experimental and theoretical studies allowing comprehensive physical analysis of changes in materials under active power cycling with focus on bond wire interfaces and thin metallisation layers. The developed electro-thermal and thermo...

  14. Mullite/Mo interfaces formed by Intrusion bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolome, Jose F.; Diaz, Marcos; Moya, Jose S.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure and strength of Mo/mullite interfaces formed by diffusion bonding at 1650oC has been analyzed. Interfacial metal-ceramic interlocking contributes to flexural strength of approx. 140 MPa as measured by 3 point bending. Saturation of mullite with MoO2 does not affect the interfacial strength.

  15. Comparative TEM study of bonded silicon/silicon interfaces fabricated by hydrophilic, hydrophobic and UHV wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznicek, A.; Scholz, R.; Senz, S.; Goesele, U.

    2003-01-01

    Wafers of Czochralski-grown silicon were bonded hydrophilically, hydrophobically and in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) at room temperature. Wafers bonded hydrophilically adhere together by hydrogen bonds, those bonded hydrophobically by van der Waals forces and UHV-bonded ones by covalent bonds. Annealing the pre-bonded hydrophilic and hydrophobic wafer pairs in argon for 2 h at different temperatures increases the initially low bonding energy. UHV-bonded wafer pairs were also annealed to compare the results. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations show nano-voids at the interface. The void density depends on the initial bonding strength. During annealing the shape, coverage and density of the voids change significantly

  16. Advantages, disadvantages and PQT results of FBE (Fusion Bonded Epoxy) 2L and FBE 3L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koebsch, Andre; Cunha, Bruno Rocha Marques da; Nunes, Erik Barbosa; Haverroth, Guilherme Eller [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Campos, Paulo Herinque [Bredero Shaw, Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-12-19

    The pipeline operating companies' requirements has divided the anti corrosive coating industry in two big groups. Europe, Asia and South America had decided to use tree layers polyethylene (3LPE). In the other hand North America and England are users of Fusion Bonded Epoxy (FBE). The coating characteristics guided this division. The 3LPE presents a better mechanical resistance, a small demand of cathodic protection current but the application costs involved are greater. The FBE has a small mechanic resistance, greater demand of cathodic protection current but its application cost is lower. In the effort for finding better mechanic performance of the FBE product the industry developed the 2L-FBE. This new product show better requirements as better mechanical resistance, smaller cathodic protection current required and medium application costs when compared to the traditional FBE. This paper intends to describe this new technology's PQT results that were carried out by PETROBRAS and Bredero Shaw - Brazil to be used on produced water injection pipelines. It'll show also a table with vantages and disadvantages about each coating. (author)

  17. Rational interface design of epoxy-organoclay nanocomposites: role of structure-property relationship for silane modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Alex N; Lieber, Danielle; Hua, Inez; Howarter, John A

    2014-04-01

    Montmorillonite was modified by three silane surfactants with different functionalities to investigate the role of surfactant structure on the properties of a final epoxy-organoclay nanocomposite. N-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane (APDMES), an aminated monofunctional silane, was chosen as a promising surfactant for several reasons: (1) it will bond to silica in montmorillonite, (2) it will bond to epoxide groups, and (3) to overcome difficulties found with trifunctional aminosilane bonding clay layers together and preventing exfoliation. A trifunctional and non-aminated version of APDMES, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and n-propyldimethylmethoxysilane (PDMMS), respectively, was also studied to provide comparison to this rationally chosen surfactant. APDMES and APTES were grafted onto montmorillonite in the same amount, while PDMMS was barely grafted (nanocomposite gallery spacing was not dependent on the surfactant used. Different concentrations of APDMES modified montmorillonite yielded different properties, as concentration decreased glass transition temperature increased, thermal stability increased, and the storage modulus decreased. Storage modulus, glass transition temperature, and thermal stability were more similar for epoxy-organoclay composites modified with the same concentration of silane surfactant, neat epoxy, and epoxy-montmorillonite nanocomposite. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation of the bonding strength and bonding mechanisms of SOFCs interconnector-electrode interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Ševeček, O.; Frandsen, L. H.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Molin, S.; Cannio, M.; Hjelm, J.; Hendriksen, P. V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 162, č. 1 (2016), s. 250-253 ISSN 0167-577X Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Metal-ceramic bond strength * Schwickerath crack-initiation test * SOC interfaces Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.572, year: 2016

  19. A new approach for enhancement of the corrosion protection properties and interfacial adhesion bonds between the epoxy coating and steel substrate through surface treatment by covalently modified amino functionalized graphene oxide film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parhizkar, N.; Shahrabi, T.; Ramezanzadeh, B.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •The steel substrate was treated by a covalently modified amino functionalized graphene oxide (fGO) film. •Deposition of fGO film at the interface of steel and epoxy could effectively improve the adhesion strength and corrosion protection properties. •More stable and stronger interfacial bonds was obtained when treating the interface by fGO film. -- Abstract: This study introduces a novel surface treatment approach of steel substrate by covalent modification of graphene oxide (fGO) nanosheets with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane to improve the adhesion and corrosion protection properties of an epoxy coating. The effect of fGO film on the epoxy coating performance was studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), Pull-off adhesion, salt spray and cathodic delamination tests. Results revealed that deposition of fGO film on steel surface can effectively improve the adhesion strength and corrosion protection properties and reduce the cathodic delamination rate of the epoxy coating.

  20. Silane coupling agent for attaching fusion-bonded epoxy to steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchoquessi Diodjo, Madeleine R; Belec, Lénaïk; Aragon, Emmanuel; Joliff, Yoann; Lanarde, Lise; Perrin, François-Xavier

    2013-07-24

    We describe the possibility of using γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) to increase the durability of epoxy powder coating/steel joints. The curing temperature of epoxy powder coatings is frequently above 200 °C, which is seen so far as a major limitation for the use of the heat-sensitive aminosilane coupling agent. Despite this limitation, we demonstrate that aminosilane is a competitive alternative to traditional chromate conversion to enhance the durability of epoxy powder coatings/steel joints. Fourier-transform reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (FT-RAIRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to identify the silane deposition conditions that influence the adhesion of epoxy powder coatings on steel. We show that AFM analysis provides highly sensitive measurements of mechanical property development and, as such, the degree of condensation of the silane. The joint durability in water at 60 °C was lower when the pH of the γ-APS solution was controlled at 4.6 using formic acid, rather than that at natural pH (10.6). At the curing temperature of 220 °C, oxidation of the carbon adjacent to the amine headgroup of γ-APS gives amide species by a pseudofirst-order kinetics. However, a few amino functionalities remain to react with oxirane groups of epoxy resin and, thus, strengthen the epoxy/silane interphase. The formation of ammonium formate in the acidic silane inhibits the reaction between silane and epoxy, which consequently decreases the epoxy/silane interphase cohesion. We find that the nanoroughness of silane deposits increases with the cure temperature which is beneficial to the wet stability of the epoxy/steel joints, due to increased mechanical interlocking.

  1. Interface structure of Be/DSCu diffusion bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, T.; Iwadachi, T. [NGK Insulators Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium is used as plasma facing components of the first wall on ITER. Dispersion-Strengthened Copper (DSCu) is used as heat sink material by joining to Be because DSCu has high thermal conductivity and strength. In this study, Be/DSCu diffusion bonding tests using the interlayer of Al, Ni, Nb, Ti, Zr and Be-Cu alloy have been conducted to choose the suitable interlayer materials. As a result of the shear strength tests, Be/DSCu joints by using Be-Cu alloy interlayer showed the strength of about 200 MPa. Diffusion bonding tests using Be-Cu alloy interlayer or no interlayer (direct bonding) at the range of temperature from 600degC to 850degC have been conducted to identify the effect of bonding temperature and time on interface formation and strength. The thickness of diffusion layer was proportional to a square root of bonding time by diffusion controlled process. The shear strength is controlled by the formation of intermetallic layer at Be side. (author)

  2. Replication technique for examining defects in the interface of a metal-to-glass ceramic bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, R.K.

    1978-01-01

    Epoxy replicas were made of the interface of a molybdenum and glass-ceramic assembly and examined by scanning electron microscopy. Replications of this interface were produced by first removing the molybdenum from four assemblies using a nitric acid-based etchant. The glass-ceramic insulators that remained were pressure encapsulated in epoxy. After curing, the glass-ceramics were etched from the epoxy in an hydrogen fluoride-based acid etchant. The resulting replicas resembled the texture of the molybdenum surface with the interface defects shown in detail as projections. This process revealed some unusual interface problems which appeared to be associated with the evolution of gas from the molybdenum piece parts

  3. Phase formation at bonded vanadium and stainless steel interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, T.S.E.

    1992-01-01

    The interface between vanadium bonded to stainless steel was studies to determine whether a brittle phase formed during three joining operations. Inertia friction welds between V and 21-6-9 stainless steel were examined using TEM. In the as-welded condition, a continuous, polygranular intermetallic layer about 0.25 μm thick was present at the interface. This layer grew to about 50 μm thick during heat treatment at 1000 degrees C for two hours. Analysis of electron diffraction patterns confirmed that this intermetallic was the ω phase. The interface between vanadium and type 304, SANDVIK SAF 2205, and 21-6-9 stainless steel bonded by a co-extrusion process had intermetallic particles at the interface in the as-extruded condition. Heat treatment at 1000 degrees C for two hours caused these particles to grow into continuous layers in all three cases. Based on the appearance, composition and hardness of this interfacial intermetallic, it was also concluded to be ω phase. Bonding V to type 430 stainless steel by co-extrusion caused V-rich carbides to form at the interface due to the higher concentration of C in the type 430 than in the other stainless steels investigated. The carbide particles initially present grew into a continuous layer during a two-hour heat treatment at 1000 degrees C. Co-hipping 21-6-9 stainless steel tubing with V rod resulted in slightly more concentric specimens than the co-extruded ones, but a continuous layer of the ω phase formed during the hipping operation. This brittle layer could initiate failure during subsequent forming operations. The vanadium near the stainless steel interface in the co-extruded and co-hipped tubing in some cases was harder than before heat treatment. It was concluded that this hardening was due to thermal straining during cooling following heat treatment and that thermal strains might present a greater problem than seen here when longer tubes are used in actual applications

  4. An improved interfacial bonding model for material interface modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liqiang; Wang, Xiaodu; Zeng, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    An improved interfacial bonding model was proposed from potential function point of view to investigate interfacial interactions in polycrystalline materials. It characterizes both attractive and repulsive interfacial interactions and can be applied to model different material interfaces. The path dependence of work-of-separation study indicates that the transformation of separation work is smooth in normal and tangential direction and the proposed model guarantees the consistency of the cohesive constitutive model. The improved interfacial bonding model was verified through a simple compression test in a standard hexagonal structure. The error between analytical solutions and numerical results from the proposed model is reasonable in linear elastic region. Ultimately, we investigated the mechanical behavior of extrafibrillar matrix in bone and the simulation results agreed well with experimental observations of bone fracture. PMID:28584343

  5. Estimation of interface resistivity in bonded Si for the development of high performance radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Ikuo; Yamashita, Makoto; Nomiya, Seiichiro; Onabe, Hideaki

    2007-01-01

    For the development of high performance radiation detectors, direct bonding of Si wafers would be an useful method. Previously, p-n bonded Si were fabricated and they showed diode characteristics. The interface resistivity was, however, not investigated in detail. For the study of interface resistivity, n-type Si wafers with different resistivities were bonded. The resistivity of bonded Si wafers were measured and the interface resistivity was estimated by comparing with the results of model calculations. (author)

  6. A Unique Method to Describe the Bonding Strength in a Bonded Solid–Solid Interface by Contact Acoustic Nonlinearity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian-Jun, Chen; De, Zhang; Yi-Wei, Mao; Jian-Chun, Cheng

    2009-01-01

    We present a unique method to describe the bonding strength at a bonded solid–solid interface in a multilayered composite material by contact acoustic nonlinearity (CAN) parameter. A CAN model on the bonded solid–solid interface is depicted. It can be seen from the model that CAN parameter is very sensitive to the bonding strength at the interface. When an incident focusing acoustic longitudinal wave scans the interface in two dimensions, the transmitted wave can be used to extract CAN parameter. The contour of the bonding strength for a sample is obtained by CAN parameter. The results show that the region with weak bonding strength can be easily distinguished from the contour

  7. Microstructure and properties of hot roll bonding layer of dissimilar metals. 2. Bonding interface microstructure of Zr/stainless steel by hot roll bonding and its controlling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuyama, Masanori; Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Taka, Takao; Nakasuji, Kazuyuki; Nakao, Yoshikuni; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi.

    1996-01-01

    The hot roll bonding of zirconium and stainless steel inserted with tantalium was investigated using the newly developed rolling mill. The effect of hot rolling temperatures of zirconium/stainless steel joints on bonding interface structure was evaluated. Intermetallic compound layer containing cracks was observed at the bonding interface between stainless steel and tantalium when the rolling temperature was above 1373K. The hardness of the bonding layer of zirconium and tantalium bonded above 1273K was higher than tantalium or zirconium base metal in spite of absence of intermetallic compound. The growth of reaction layer at the stainless steel and tantalium interface and at the tantalium and zirconium interface was conforming a parabolic low when that was isothermally heated after hot roll bonding, and the growth rate was almost same as that of static diffusion bonding without using hot roll bonding process. It is estimated that the strain caused by hot roll bonding gives no effect on the growth of reaction layer. It was confirmed that the dissimilar joint of zirconium and stainless steel with insert of tantalium having the sound bonding interface were obtained at the suitable bonding temperature of 1173K by the usage of the newly developed hot roll bonding process. (author)

  8. Preparation of novel, nanocomposite stannoxane-based organic-inorganic epoxy polymers containing ionic bonds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strachota, Adam; Ribot, F.; Matějka, Libor; Whelan, P.; Starovoytova, Larisa; Pleštil, Josef; Steinhart, Miloš; Šlouf, Miroslav; Hromádková, Jiřina; Kovářová, Jana; Špírková, Milena; Strachota, Beata

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2012), s. 221-237 ISSN 0024-9297 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500701; GA ČR GAP108/11/2151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : stannoxane * organic-inorganic hybrid * epoxy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.521, year: 2012

  9. Propagation of waves at the loosely bonded interface of two porous elastic half-spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajuddin, M.

    1993-10-01

    Employing Biot's theory for wave propagation in porous solids, the propagation of waves at the loosely bonded interface between two poroelastic half-spaces is examined theoretically. The analogous study of Stoneley waves for smooth interface and bonded interface form a limiting case. The results due to classical theory are shown as a special case. (author). 13 refs

  10. Proposal of guideline for bonding to prevention of hydrogen embrittlement at Ta/Zr bond interface. Hydrogen embrittlement in SUS304ULC/Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Kazuyoshi; Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence condition of hydrogen embrittlement cracking at Ta/Zr bond interface was investigated with respect to the hydrogen content and applied stress in order to propose a guideline for the explosive bonding procedure to prevention of hydrogen embrittlement. Hydrogen charging test was conducted for SUS304ULC/Ta/Zr explosive bonded joints applied the different flexural strains. A hydrogen embrittlement crack occurred in the Zr substrate at Ta/Zr bond interface after hydrogen charging, and it was initiated at shorter charging times when the augmented strain was increased. The occurrence condition of hydrogen embrittlement cracking at Ta/Zr bond interface was shifted to lower stress and hydrogen content with an increase in the amount of explosive during bonding. It was suggested that hydrogen embrittlement in Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint could be inhibited by reducing the initial hydrogen content in Ta substrate less than approx. 5 ppm. (author)

  11. On the enhancement of bond toughness for Al/epoxy T-peel joints with laser treated substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Alfano, Marco

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the present work is to quantify the enhancement of bond toughness of Al/epoxy joints associated to substrates laser irradiation. For this reason a potential based cohesive model is employed and cohesive elements are implemented within the finite element framework. The influence of the cohesive properties on the predicted global response of the joints is firstly analyzed. The coupling between adherents plasticity and the cohesive properties is then discussed. It is shown that the global response is mainly affected by cohesive energy (the bond toughness) and cohesive strength. In turn, a proper cost function is defined which quantifies the deviation between numerical and experimental total dissipated energy. Based on a sensitivity analysis of the as-defined cost function, it is shown that an accurate estimation of the bond toughness can be expected from global data. The situation is different for the cohesive strength, whose estimation could require more advanced experimental observations or additional tests. The results reported in the present work allow us to conclude, in a reliable manner, that the laser surface treatment can lead to a large improvement of bond toughness. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  12. Interface bonding of SA508-3 steel under deformation and high temperature diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Shao, Chunjuan; Sun, Mingyue

    2018-05-01

    There are mainly two parameters affecting high temperature interface bonding: deformation and diffusion. To study these two parameters, interface bonding of SA508-3 bainitic steel at 1100°C are simulated by gleeble3500 thermal simulator. The results show that interface of SA508-3 steel can be bonded under deformation and high temperature. For a specimen pressed at 1100°C without further high temperature diffusion, a reduction ratio of 30% can make the interface begun to bond, but the interface is still part of the grain boundary and small grains exist near the interface. When reduction ratio reaches 50%, the interface can be completely bonded and the microstructure near the interface is the same as that of the base material. When deformation is small, long time diffusion can also help the interface bonding. The results show that when the diffusion time is long enough, the interface under small deformation can also be bonded. For a specimen holding for 24h at 1100°C, only 13% reduction ratio is enough for interface bonding.

  13. Electronic structure imperfections and chemical bonding at graphene interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Brian Joseph

    nanomaterial with lateral dimensions in the hundreds of microns if not larger, with a corresponding atomic vertical thickness poses significant difficulties. Graphene's unique structure is dominated by surface area or potentially hybridized interfaces; consequently, the true realization of this remarkable nanomaterial in device constructs relies on engineering graphene interfaces at the surface in order to controllably mold the electronic structure. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and the transmission mode analogue scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) are particularly useful tools to study the unoccupied states of graphene and graphene interfaces. In addition, polarized NEXAFS and STXM studies provide information on surface orientation, bond sterics, and the extent of substrate alignment before and after interfacial hybridization. The work presented in this dissertation is fundamentally informed by NEXAFS and STXM measurements on graphene/metal, graphene/dielectric, and graphene/organic interfaces. We start with a general review of the electronic structure of freestanding graphene and graphene interfaces in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we investigate freestanding single-layer graphene via STXM and NEXAFS demonstrating that electronic structure heterogeneities from synthesis and processing are ubiquitous in 2-dimensional graphene. We show the mapping of discrete charge transfer regions as a result of doped impurities that decorate the surfaces of graphene and that transfer processing imparts local electronic corrugations or ripples. In corroboration with density functional theory, definitive assignments to the spectral features, global steric orientations of the localized domains, and quantitative charge transfer schemes are evidenced. In the following chapters, we deliberately (Chapter 3) incorporate substitutional nitrogen into reduced graphene oxide to induce C--N charge redistribution and improve global conductivity, (Chapter 4

  14. Electronic properties of interfaces produced by silicon wafer hydrophilic bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trushin, Maxim

    2011-07-15

    The thesis presents the results of the investigations of electronic properties and defect states of dislocation networks (DNs) in silicon produced by wafers direct bonding technique. A new insight into the understanding of their very attractive properties was succeeded due to the usage of a new, recently developed silicon wafer direct bonding technique, allowing to create regular dislocation networks with predefined dislocation types and densities. Samples for the investigations were prepared by hydrophilic bonding of p-type Si (100) wafers with same small misorientation tilt angle ({proportional_to}0.5 ), but with four different twist misorientation angles Atw (being of < , 3 , 6 and 30 , respectively), thus giving rise to the different DN microstructure on every particular sample. The main experimental approach of this work was the measurements of current and capacitance of Schottky diodes prepared on the samples which contained the dislocation network at a depth that allowed one to realize all capabilities of different methods of space charge region spectroscopy (such as CV/IV, DLTS, ITS, etc.). The key tasks for the investigations were specified as the exploration of the DN-related gap states, their variations with gradually increasing twist angle Atw, investigation of the electrical field impact on the carrier emission from the dislocation-related states, as well as the establishing of the correlation between the electrical (DLTS), optical (photoluminescence PL) and structural (TEM) properties of DNs. The most important conclusions drawn from the experimental investigations and theoretical calculations can be formulated as follows: - DLTS measurements have revealed a great difference in the electronic structure of small-angle (SA) and large-angle (LA) bonded interfaces: dominating shallow level and a set of 6-7 deep levels were found in SA-samples with Atw of 1 and 3 , whereas the prevalent deep levels - in LA-samples with Atw of 6 and 30 . The critical twist

  15. Ultraclean Si/Si interface formation by surface preparation and direct bonding in ultrahigh vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansson, Karin; Grey, Francois; Bengtsson, Stefan

    1998-01-01

    Silicon surfaces have been cleaned and bonded in ultrahigh vacuum, at a pressure in the 10(-10) Torr range. The bonded interfaces show extremely low contamination levels as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Nevertheless, a potential barrier could be detected at the interface by spreading...

  16. Effects of interface edge configuration on residual stress in the bonded structures for a divertor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, K.; Nagata, K.; Shibui, M.; Tachikawa, N.; Araki, M.

    1998-01-01

    Residual stresses in the interface region, that developed at the cool down during the brazing, were evaluated for several bonded structures to assess the mechanical strength of the bonded interface, using thermoelasto-plastic stress analysis. Normal stress components of the residual stresses around the interface edge of graphite-copper (C-Cu) bonded structures were compared for three types of bonded features such as flat-type, monoblock-type and saddle-type. The saddle-type structure was found to be favorable for its relatively low residual stress, easy fabrication accuracy on bonded interface and armor replacement. Residual stresses around the interface edge in three armor materials/copper bonded structures for a divertor plate were also examined for the C-Cu, tungsten-copper (W-Cu) and molybdenum alloy-copper (TZM-Cu), varying the interface wedge angle from 45 to 135 . An optimal bonded configuration for the least value of residual stress was found to have a wedge angle of 45 for the C-Cu, and 135 for both the W-Cu and TZM-Cu bonded ones. (orig.)

  17. Fatigue of the Resin-Enamel Bonded Interface and the Mechanisms of Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Mutluay, Mustafa Murat; Majd, Hessam; Ryou, Heonjune; Arola, Dwayne

    2013-01-01

    The durability of adhesive bonds to enamel and dentin and the mechanisms of degradation caused by cyclic loading are important to the survival of composite restorations. In this study a novel method of evaluation was used to determine the strength of resin-enamel bonded interfaces under both static and cyclic loading, and to identify the mechanisms of failure. Specimens with twin interfaces of enamel bonded to commercial resin composite were loaded in monotonic and cyclic 4-point flexure to failure within a hydrated environment. Results for the resin-enamel interface were compared with those for the resin composite (control) and values reported for resin-dentin adhesive bonds. Under both modes of loading the strength of the resin-enamel interface was significantly (p≤0.0001) lower than that of the resin composite and the resin-dentin bonded interface. Fatigue failure of the interface occurred predominately by fracture of enamel, adjacent to the interface, and not due to adhesive failures. In the absence of water aging or acid production of biofilms, the durability of adhesive bonds to enamel is lower than that achieved in dentin bonding. PMID:23571321

  18. Effect of calcium hydroxide and double and triple antibiotic pastes on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealer to root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Merve; Arslan, Hakan; Topcuoglu, Hüseyin Sinan; Tuncay, Oznur

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of calcium hydroxide (CH) and triple (TAP) and double (DAP) antibiotic pastes on the bond strength of an epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus Jet; Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany) to the root canal dentin. Sixty-four single-rooted human mandibular premolars were decoronated and prepared using the rotary system to size 40. The specimens were randomly divided into a control group (without intracanal dressing) and 3 experimental groups that received an intracanal dressing with either CH, DAP, or TAP (n = 16). The intracanal dressing was removed by rinsing with 10 mL 17% EDTA followed by 10 mL 2.5% sodium hypochlorite. The root canals were then obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus Jet sealer. A push-out test was used to measure the bond strength between the root canal dentin and the sealer. The data were analyzed using 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests to detect the effect of the independent variables (intracanal medicaments and root canal thirds) and their interactions on the push-out bond strength of the root canal filling material to the root dentin (P = .05). The push-out bond strength values were significantly affected by the intracanal medicaments (P .05). In the middle and apical third, the bond strength of the TAP group was higher than those of the CH and DAP groups (P < .05). The DAP and CH did not affect the bond strength of the epoxy resin-based sealer. Additionally, the TAP improved the bond strength of the epoxy resin-based sealer in the middle and apical thirds. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Microstructure of bonding interface for resistance welding of Zr-based metallic glass sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Toshio; Ikeuchi, Kenji; Shimada, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Akira; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa

    2009-01-01

    Resistance welding of Zr 55 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 5 metallic glass sheets was investigated at 723 K in a supercooled liquid region. The welding time was changed from 5 s to 20 s at 723 K. The joint interface of the metallic glass was no defect and no crack. X-ray diffraction technique of the bonding interface of specimens was performed. The specimens showed halo patterns showing existence of only glassy phase, when the welding time was 5 s and 10 s. X-ray diffraction patterns of specimen bonded for 20 s showed crystalline peaks with halo patterns for the welding for 20 s. The crystalline phase at the bonding interface was small. Transmission electron micrograph at the bonding interface showed nanostructures of NiZr 2 and Al 5 Ni 3 Zr 2 . (author)

  20. Two component injection moulding: an interface quality and bond strength dilemma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2008-01-01

    on quality parameters of the two component parts. Most engineering applications of two component injection moulding calls for high bond strength between the two polymers, on the other hand a sharp and well-defined interface between the two polymers are required for applications like selective metallization...... of polymers, parts for micro applications and also for the aesthetic purpose of the final product. The investigation presented in this paper indicates a dilemma between obtaining reasonably good bond strength and at the same time keeping the interface quality suitable for applications. The required process...... conditions for a sharp and well-defined interface are exactly the opposite of what is congenial for higher bond strength. So in the production of two component injection moulded parts, there is a compromise to make between the interface quality and the bond strength of the two polymers. Also the injection...

  1. The impact of interface bonding efficiency on high-burnup spent nuclear fuel dynamic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hao, E-mail: jiangh@ornl.gov; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • To investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on its dynamic performance. • Flexural rigidity, EI = M/κ, estimated from FEA results were benchmarked with SNF dynamic experimental results, and used to evaluate interface bonding efficiency. • Interface bonding efficiency can significantly dictate the SNF system rigidity and the associated dynamic performance. • With consideration of interface bonding efficiency and fuel cracking, HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with SNF static and dynamic experimental data. - Abstract: Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on system dynamic performance. Bending moments M were applied to FEA model to evaluate the system responses. From bending curvature, κ, flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI = M/κ. The FEA simulation results were benchmarked with experimental results from cyclic integrated reversal bending fatigue test (CIRFT) of HBR fuel rods. The consequence of interface debonding between fuel pellets and cladding is a redistribution of the loads carried by the fuel pellets to the clad, which results in a reduction in composite rod system flexural rigidity. Therefore, the interface bonding efficiency at the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces can significantly dictate the SNF system dynamic performance. With the consideration of interface bonding efficiency, the HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with CIRFT test data.

  2. Controlled planar interface synthesis by ultrahigh vacuum diffusion bonding/deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M. J.; Carpenter, R. W.; Cox, M. J.; Xu, J.

    2000-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) diffusion bonding/deposition instrument was designed and constructed, which can produce homophase and heterophase planar interfaces from a wide array of materials. The interfaces are synthesized in situ by diffusion bonding of two substrates with or without various interfacial layers, at temperatures up to about 1500 degree sign C. Substrate surfaces can be heat treated, ion-beam sputter cleaned, and chemically characterized in situ by Auger electron spectroscopy prior to deposition and/or bonding. Bicrystals can be synthesized by bonding two single-crystal substrates at a specified orientation. Interfacial layers can be deposited by electron beam evaporation and/or sputter deposition in any layered or alloyed combination on the substrates before bonding. The instrument can accommodate cylindrical and/or wafer type specimens whose sizes are sufficient for fracture mechanical testing to measure interface bond strength. A variety of planar interfaces of metals, semiconductors, and ceramics were synthesized. Examples of bonded stainless steel/Ti/stainless steel, Si/Si, and sapphire/sapphire interfaces are presented. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society

  3. Stabilization of gamma-irradiated poly(vinyl chloride) by epoxy compounds. III. Conjugated double bonds and degree of unsaturation in gamma-irradiated PVC-stabilizer mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerke, G.; Lerke, I.; Szymanski, W.

    1983-01-01

    The concentration of conjugated polyene sequences was studied in γ-irradiated PVC with 4% admixture of four epoxy stabilizers: diglycidyl ether of 2,2-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methylphenyl)propane (I), styrene oxide (1,2-epoxy ethyl benzene) (IV), epoxidized ricinus oil (VI), and epoxidized soybean oil (Drapex 6.8) (VII). As in the former investigations (Papers I and II), the process of the formation of the polyenes occurs in two stages. The concentration of polyene sequences with n double bonds, H/sub n/ the total amount of polyene sequences, ΣH/sub n/, the average length of the polyene sequence, n, and the extents of reaction x and p, were computed. The stabilizing effect of all compounds used agrees with the increasing content of epoxy groups. The addition of stabilizers diminishes the value of n. The decrease of the fraction of long sequences and the increase of short ones occurs. Apart from the binding of evolved HCl, the protective effect towards the macromolecules of PVC consists mainly in the inhibition of growth of chain dehydrochlorination by the epoxy groups

  4. Experimental Study on Fatigue Behaviour of BFRP-Concrete Bond Interfaces under Bending Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhe Xie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP composites are increasingly being used to retrofit concrete structures by external bonding. For such strengthened members, the BFRP-concrete interface plays the crucial role of transferring stresses. This study aims to investigate the fatigue behaviour of the interface under bending load. A series of tests were conducted on BFRP-concrete bonded joint, including static, fatigue, and postfatigue loading. The fatigue failure modes, the development of deflection, the evolution of BFRP strains, and the propagation of interfacial cracks were analysed. In addition, the debonding-induced fatigue life of BFRP-concrete bonded joints was studied. Finally, a new model of fatigue life was proposed by defining the effective fatigue bond stress. The results showed that the fatigue experience has a significant effect on the BFRP strength especially near the root of concrete transverse crack and on the bond performance of the adhesive near the interface crack tip. There are two main fatigue failure modes: BFRP rupture and BFRP debonding. The fatigue damage development of the bond interface has three stages: rapid, stable, and unstable growth. The proposed model for the debonding-induced fatigue life is more conservative for the BFRP-concrete bonded joints under pure shear load than for those under bending load.

  5. Strength and leak testing of plasma activated bonded interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, M.M.; Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De

    2002-01-01

    on detection of changes in membrane deflections. The detection limit for leak was 8E-13 mbar l/s. For comparison, strength and leak tests were also performed with regular fusion bonded wafers annealed at 1100 degreesC. The PAB was found to withstand post-processing steps such as RCA cleaning, 24 h in de......-ionised water (DIW), 24 h in 2.5% HF, 24 h in acetone and 60 s in a resist developer. By analysing the thin silicon oxide present on the surfaces to be bonded with optical methods, the influence of pre-cleaning and activation process parameters was investigated....

  6. Morphology and stress at silicon-glass interface in anodic bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jiali [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety (MOE), School of Mechanical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Cai, Cheng [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Ming, Xiaoxiang [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety (MOE), School of Mechanical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Yu, Xinhai, E-mail: yxhh@ecust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety (MOE), School of Mechanical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhao, Shuangliang, E-mail: szhao@ecust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Tu, Shan-Tung [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety (MOE), School of Mechanical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu, Honglai [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Amorphous SiO{sub 2} is the most probable silica morphology generated in anodic bonding. • Amorphous SiO{sub 2} thickness at the interface is at least 2 nm for 90 min anodic bonding. • Silicon oxidation rate at the interface is 0.022 nm min{sup −1} from 30 to 90 min. - Abstract: The morphologies and structural details of formed silica at the interface of silicon-glass anodic bonding determine the stress at the interface but they have been rarely clarified. In this study, a miniaturized anodic bonding device was developed and coupled with a Raman spectrometer. The silicon-glass anodic bonding was carried out and the evolution of the stress at the bonding interface was measured in situ by a Raman spectrometer. In addition, large-scale atomistic simulations were conducted by considering the formed silica with different morphologies. The most conceivable silica morphology was identified as the corresponding silicon-glass interfacial stress presents qualitatively agreement with the experimental observation. It was found that amorphous SiO{sub 2} is the silica morphology generated in anodic bonding. The amorphous SiO{sub 2} thickness is at least 2 nm in the case of 90 min anodic bonding at 400 °C with the DC voltage of −1000 V. The combination of experimental and simulation results can ascertain the silicon oxidation reaction rate in anodic bonding process, and under the above-mentioned condition, the reaction rate was estimated as 0.022 nm min{sup −1} from 30 to 90 min.

  7. Interface strength and degradation of adhesively bonded porous aluminum oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahami, S.T.; de Kok, John M.M.; Gudla, Visweswara C.; Ambat, Rajan; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    For more than six decades, chromic acid anodizing has been the main step in the surface treatment of aluminum for adhesively bonded aircraft structures. Soon this process, known for producing a readily adherent oxide with an excellent corrosion resistance, will be banned by strict international

  8. Fatigue aging of adhesive bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLollis, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    A year long study has been made of the effect of fatigue on the bond between two epoxy encapsulant formulations and a fused alumina disc. The variables studied included isothermal aging at temperatures up to and including the cure temperature and cyclic thermal aging from +74 to -54 0 C. The encapsulants were glass microballoon filled epoxies differing only in curing agents. One was cured with an aromatic amine eutectic (Shell Curing Agent Z). The other was cured with diethanolamine. The Z cured encapsulant bond failed completely at the bond interface with little or no aging; infrared evidence indicated a soluble interlayer as a possible cause of failure. The diethanolamine cured encapsulant survived a year of isothermal aging with little or no evidence of bond degradation. Cyclic thermal aging resulted in gradual bond failure with time. An extrapolation of the cyclic aging data indicates that the stresses induced by thermal cycling would result in complete bond failure in about 1200 days

  9. Interface strength and degradation of adhesively bonded porous aluminum oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Abrahami, Shoshan; M. M. de Kok, John; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy

    2017-01-01

    For more than six decades, chromic acid anodizing has been the main step in the surface treatment of aluminum for adhesivelybonded aircraft structures. Soon this process, known for producing a readily adherent oxide with an excellent corrosion resistance,will be banned by strict international....... The relationship between the anodizing conditions insulfuric and mixtures of sulfuric and phosphoric acid electrolytes and the formation and durability of bonding under variousenvironmental conditions was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the oxide features. Selectedspecimens were...... studied with transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to measureresin concentration within structurally different porous anodic oxide layers as a function of depth. Results show that there are twocritical morphological aspects for strong and durable bonding. First...

  10. Mechanism of forming interfacial intermetallic compounds at interface for solid state diffusion bonding of dissimilar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, P.; Liu, D.

    2006-01-01

    The formation of brittle intermetallic compounds at the interfaces of diffusion bonds is the main cause which leads to poor bond strength. Therefore, it is very important to study and establish the formation and growth model of intermetallic compounds at the interfaces for the control process of diffusion bonding. In this paper, according to the diffusion kinetics and the thermodynamics, the principle of formation of intermetallic compounds at interfaces in the multi-component diffusion couple, the flux-energy principle, is put forward. In the light of diffusion theory, the formation capacity of the phase at the interfaces is determined by specific properties of the composition in the diffusion couple and the composition ratio of the formed phase is in agreement with the diffusion flux. In accordance with the flux-energy principle, the microstructure of the Ni/TC4 interface is Ni/TiNi 3 /TiNi/Ti 2 Ni/TC4, the microstructure of the TC4/00Cr18Ni9Ti interface is 00Cr18Ni9Ti/TiFe 2 /TiFe/Ti 2 Fe/TC4, and the microstructure of the TiAl/40Cr interface is 40Cr/TiC/Ti 3 Al + FeAl + FeAl 2 /TiAl. Multi-intermetallic compounds with the equivalent flux-energy can be formed at the interfaces at the same time

  11. Experimental Study on Bond Behavior of FRP-Concrete Interface in Hygrothermal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the technique of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP composite material strengthened reinforced concrete structures is widely used in the field of civil engineering, durability of the strengthened structures has attracted more attention in recent years. Hygrothermal environment has an adverse effect on the bond behavior of the interface between FRP and concrete. This paper focuses on the bond durability of carbon fiber laminate- (CFL- concrete interface in hygrothermal condition which simulates the climate characteristic in South China. Twenty 100 mm × 100 mm × 720 mm specimens were divided into 6 groups based on different temperature and humidity. After pretreatment in hygrothermal environment, the specimens were tested using double shear method. Strain gauges bonded along the CFL surface and linear variation displacement transducers (LVDTs were used to measure longitudinal strains and slip of the interface. Failure mode, ultimate capacity, load-deflection relationship, and relative slip were analyzed. The bond behavior of FRP-concrete interface under hygrothermal environment was studied. Results show that the ultimate bearing capacity of the interface reduced after exposure to hygrothermal environments. The decreasing ranges were up to 27.9% after exposure at high temperature and humidity (60°C, 95% RH. The maximum strains (εmax of the specimens pretreated decreased obviously which indicated decay of the bond behavior after exposure to the hygrothermal environment.

  12. Nano features of Al/Au ultrasonic bond interface observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Hongjun; Li Mingyu; Kim, Jong-Myung; Kim, Dae-Won; Wang Chunqing

    2008-01-01

    Nano-scale interfacial details of ultrasonic AlSi1 wire wedge bonding to a Au/Ni/Cu pad were investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The intermetallic phase Au 8 Al 3 formed locally due to diffusion and reaction activated by ultrasound at the Al/Au bond interface. Multilayer sub-interfaces roughly parallel to the wire/pad interface were observed among this phase, and interdiffusional features near the Au pad resembled interference patterns, alternately dark and bright bars. Solid-state diffusion theory cannot be used to explain why such a thick compound formed within milliseconds at room temperature. The major formation of metallurgical bonds was attributed to ultrasonic cyclic vibration

  13. Developing a laser shockwave model for characterizing diffusion bonded interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Smith, James A.; Rabin, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However, because the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on a specimen's surface is intractably complex, the shock wave energy is inferred from the surface velocity measured on the backside of the fuel plate and the depth of the impression left on the surface by the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses generated at the interfaces, a finite element method (FEM) model is being utilized. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop and validate the model by comparing numerical and experimental results for back surface velocities and front surface depressions in a single aluminum plate representative of the fuel cladding

  14. Developing a laser shockwave model for characterizing diffusion bonded interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, Jeffrey M., E-mail: Jeffrey.Lacy@inl.gov; Smith, James A., E-mail: Jeffrey.Lacy@inl.gov; Rabin, Barry H., E-mail: Jeffrey.Lacy@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-31

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However, because the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on a specimen's surface is intractably complex, the shock wave energy is inferred from the surface velocity measured on the backside of the fuel plate and the depth of the impression left on the surface by the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses generated at the interfaces, a finite element method (FEM) model is being utilized. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop and validate the model by comparing numerical and experimental results for back surface velocities and front surface depressions in a single aluminum plate representative of the fuel cladding.

  15. Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces for High-Temperature Packaging (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devoto, D.

    2014-11-01

    The thermal performance and reliability of sintered-silver is being evaluated for power electronics packaging applications. This will be experimentally accomplished by the synthesis of large-area bonded interfaces between metalized substrates that will be subsequently subjected to thermal cycles. A finite element model of crack initiation and propagation in these bonded interfaces will allow for the interpretation of degradation rates by a crack-velocity (V)-stress intensity factor (K) analysis. The experiment is outlined, and the modeling approach is discussed.

  16. Magnetocaloric effect, thermal conductivity, and magnetostriction of epoxy-bonded La(Fe0.88Si0.12)13 hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K.; Murayama, D.; Takeshita, M.; Ura, Y.; Abe, S.; Numazawa, T.; Takata, H.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kuriiwa, T.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic materials with large magnetocaloric effect are significantly important for magnetic refrigeration. La(Fe0.88Si0.12)13 compounds are one of the promising magnetocaloric materials that have a first order magnetic phase transition. Transition temperature of hydrogenated La(Fe0.88Si0.12)13 increased up to room temperature region while keeping metamagnetic transition properties. From view point of practical usage, bonded composite are very attractive and their properties are important. We made epoxy bonded La(Fe0.88Si0.12)13 hydrides. Magnetocaloric effect was studied by measuring specific heat, magnetization, and temperature change in adiabatic demagnetization. The composite had about 20% smaller entropy change from the hydrogenated La(Fe0.88Si0.12)13 powder in 2 T. Thermal conductivity of the composite was several times smaller than La(Fe,Si)13. The small thermal conductivity was explained due to the small thermal conductivity of epoxy. Thermal conductivity was observed to be insensitive to magnetic field in 2 T. Thermal expansion and magnetostriction of the composite material were measured. The composite expanded about 0.25% when it entered into ferromagnetic phase. Magnetostriction of the composite in ferromagnetic phase was about 0.2% in 5 T and much larger than that in paramagnetic phase. The composite didn’t break after about 100 times magnetic field changes in adiabatic demagnetization experiment even though it has magnetostriction.

  17. High-Performance Epoxy-Resin-Bonded Magnets Produced from the Sm2Fe17Nx Powders Coated by Copper and Zinc Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Kenji; Machida, Ken-ichi; Adachi, Gin-ya

    2001-04-01

    Fine powders of Sm2Fe17Nx coated with copper metal reduced from CuCl2 and/or zinc metal subsequently derived by photo-decomposition of diethylzinc [Zn(C2H5)2] were prepared, and their magnetic properties were characterized in addition to those of epoxy-resin-bonded magnets produced from the coated powders (Cu/Sm2Fe17Nx, Zn/Sm2Fe17Nx and Zn/Cu/Sm2Fe17Nx). The remanence (Br) and maximum energy product [(\\mathit{BH})max] of double metal-coated Zn/Cu/Sm2Fe17Nx powders were maintained at higher levels than those of single Zn metal-coated Sm2Fe17Nx ones (Zn/Sm2Fe17Nx) even after heat treatment at 673 K since the oxidation resistance and thermal stability were effectively improved by formation of the thick and uniform protection layer on the surface of Sm2Fe17Nx particles. Moreover, the epoxy-resin-bonded magnets produced from the Zn/Cu/Sm2Fe17Nx powders possessed good corrosion resistance in air at 393 K which it resulted in the smaller thermal irreversible flux loss than that of uncoated and single Zn metal-coated Sm2Fe17Nx powders in the temperature range of above 393 K.

  18. Determination of the bonding strength in solid oxide fuel cells' interfaces by Schwickerath crack initiation test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Sevecek, O.; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2017-01-01

    An adaptation of the Schwickerath crack initiation test (ISO 9693) was used to determine the bonding strength between an anode support and three different cathodes with a solid oxide fuel cell interconnect. Interfacial elemental characterization of the interfaces was carried out by SEM/EDS analys...

  19. Role of intermetallics on the mechanical fatigue behavior of Cu–Al ball bond interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassnig, A., E-mail: alice.lassnig@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Wien (Austria); Pelzer, R. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Siemensstrae 2, 9500 Villach (Austria); Gammer, C. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Wien (Austria); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Khatibi, G. [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology and Analytics, Getreidemarkt 9, 1060 Wien (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    The mechanical fatigue behavior of Cu–Al interfaces occurring in thermosonic ball bonds –typically used in microelectronic packages for automotive applications – is investigated by means of a specially designed fatigue test technique. Fully reversed cyclic shear stresses are induced at the bond interface, leading to subsequent fatigue lift off failure and revealing the weakest site of the bond. A special focus is set on the role of interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMC) on the fatigue performance of such interfaces. Therefore fatigue life curves were obtained for three representative microstructural states: The as-bonded state is compared to two annealed states at 200 °C for 200 h and at 200 °C for 2000 h respectively. In the moderately annealed state two IMC layers (Al{sub 2}Cu, Al{sub 4}Cu{sub 9}) could be identified, whereas in the highly aged state the original pad metallization was almost entirely consumed and AlCu is formed as a third IMC. Finally, the crack path is traced back as a function of interfacial microstructure by means of electron microscopy techniques. Whereas conventional static shear tests reveal no significant decrease of the bond shear force with increased IMC formation the fatigue tests prove a clear degradation in the cyclic mechanical performance. It can be concluded that during cycling the crack deflects easily into the formed intermetallics, leading to early failure of the ball bonds due to their brittle nature. - Highlights: • High cycle fatigue of various miniaturized Cu–Al interfaces is investigated. • Interfacial intermetallic compounds consist of Al2Cu, AlCu and Al4Cu9. • Static shear strength shows minor dependency on interfacial phase formation. • Fatigue tests prove significant degradation with intermetallic compound evolution. • Fatigue fracture surface analysis reveal microstructure dependent crack path.

  20. Role of intermetallics on the mechanical fatigue behavior of Cu–Al ball bond interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassnig, A.; Pelzer, R.; Gammer, C.; Khatibi, G.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical fatigue behavior of Cu–Al interfaces occurring in thermosonic ball bonds –typically used in microelectronic packages for automotive applications – is investigated by means of a specially designed fatigue test technique. Fully reversed cyclic shear stresses are induced at the bond interface, leading to subsequent fatigue lift off failure and revealing the weakest site of the bond. A special focus is set on the role of interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMC) on the fatigue performance of such interfaces. Therefore fatigue life curves were obtained for three representative microstructural states: The as-bonded state is compared to two annealed states at 200 °C for 200 h and at 200 °C for 2000 h respectively. In the moderately annealed state two IMC layers (Al 2 Cu, Al 4 Cu 9 ) could be identified, whereas in the highly aged state the original pad metallization was almost entirely consumed and AlCu is formed as a third IMC. Finally, the crack path is traced back as a function of interfacial microstructure by means of electron microscopy techniques. Whereas conventional static shear tests reveal no significant decrease of the bond shear force with increased IMC formation the fatigue tests prove a clear degradation in the cyclic mechanical performance. It can be concluded that during cycling the crack deflects easily into the formed intermetallics, leading to early failure of the ball bonds due to their brittle nature. - Highlights: • High cycle fatigue of various miniaturized Cu–Al interfaces is investigated. • Interfacial intermetallic compounds consist of Al2Cu, AlCu and Al4Cu9. • Static shear strength shows minor dependency on interfacial phase formation. • Fatigue tests prove significant degradation with intermetallic compound evolution. • Fatigue fracture surface analysis reveal microstructure dependent crack path

  1. Bond-diluted interface between semi-infinite Potts bulks: criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcanti, S.B.; Tsallis, C.

    1986-01-01

    Within a real space renormalisation group framework, we discuss the criticality of a system constituted by two (not necessarily equal) semi-infinite ferromagnetic q-state Potts bulks separated by an interface. This interface is a bond-diluted Potts ferromagnet with a coupling constant which is in general different from those of both bulks. The phase diagram presents four physically different phases, namely the paramagnetic one, and the surface, single bulk and double bulk ferromagnetic ones. These various phases determine a multicritical surface which contains a higher order multicritical line. The critical concentration P c that is the concentration of the interface bonds which surface magnetic ordering is possible even if the bulks are disordered. An interesting feature comes out which is that P c varies continuously with J 1 /J s and J 2 /J s . The standard two-dimensional percolation concentration is recovered for J 1 =J 2 =0. (author) [pt

  2. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowlton, W.B.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 angstrom Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 angstrom, 500 angstrom, and 300 angstrom per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 angstrom/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 angstrom/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study

  3. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, W.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  4. Fusion bonded epoxy mainline and field joint coatings performance from the X100 field trial – A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadoon, A.N.K.; Thompson, I.

    2012-01-01

    Operating and distribution companies are potentially interested in the use of high and ultra-high strength steels for the transportation of high pressure gas. The ultra-high strength X100 grade steel was commercially developed as a potential option to meet this. However, there has been limited industry wide use of X100 to date. BP carried out a 2 year field trial to demonstrate the operational capacity and integrity of a large diameter (48 inch/1219 mm) high pressure pipeline constructed from X100 grade steel. The 800 m pipeline was buried in a clay backfill and exposed to wet ground conditions associated with the North of England. Flow pressure cycling was carried out, using water, to simulate 40 years of operational service. A 200 m section of the pipeline was exposed to three different potential (cathodic protection) zones for the duration of the trial: zero potential, intermediate potential (−850 to −950 mV) and high potential (−1200 to −1300 mV). This section also had damage and defects induced which are typically associated with bad installation and commissioning. An area of potential concern is the degradation of the mechanical properties (strain ageing) due to the external coating application temperature. Thus, a low coating application temperature is deemed desirable. The mainline and field joint coatings employed for the trial were fusion bonded epoxy (FBE). Both of these have been used in other BP projects, with a good track record. They were applied at a lower application temperature of 220 °C, compared to the more typical 230–240 °C. The lower application temperature was within the manufacturers approved application and curing temperature range. The lower temperature was used to assess the ultimate performance properties of the mainline and field joint FBE coatings. Mainline and field joint coating samples were taken from the three different potential zones and extensive testing and characterisation carried out. This paper presents and

  5. Fusion bonded epoxy mainline and field joint coatings performance from the X100 field trial - A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadoon, A.N.K., E-mail: ammer.jadoon@bp.com [BP Exploration and Production Technology, Chertsey Road, Sunbury TW16-7LN (United Kingdom); Thompson, I. [GL Industrial Services UK, Holywell Park, Loughborough LE11-3GR (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-15

    Operating and distribution companies are potentially interested in the use of high and ultra-high strength steels for the transportation of high pressure gas. The ultra-high strength X100 grade steel was commercially developed as a potential option to meet this. However, there has been limited industry wide use of X100 to date. BP carried out a 2 year field trial to demonstrate the operational capacity and integrity of a large diameter (48 inch/1219 mm) high pressure pipeline constructed from X100 grade steel. The 800 m pipeline was buried in a clay backfill and exposed to wet ground conditions associated with the North of England. Flow pressure cycling was carried out, using water, to simulate 40 years of operational service. A 200 m section of the pipeline was exposed to three different potential (cathodic protection) zones for the duration of the trial: zero potential, intermediate potential (-850 to -950 mV) and high potential (-1200 to -1300 mV). This section also had damage and defects induced which are typically associated with bad installation and commissioning. An area of potential concern is the degradation of the mechanical properties (strain ageing) due to the external coating application temperature. Thus, a low coating application temperature is deemed desirable. The mainline and field joint coatings employed for the trial were fusion bonded epoxy (FBE). Both of these have been used in other BP projects, with a good track record. They were applied at a lower application temperature of 220 Degree-Sign C, compared to the more typical 230-240 Degree-Sign C. The lower application temperature was within the manufacturers approved application and curing temperature range. The lower temperature was used to assess the ultimate performance properties of the mainline and field joint FBE coatings. Mainline and field joint coating samples were taken from the three different potential zones and extensive testing and characterisation carried out. This paper

  6. Computer simulation of hydrogen diffusion and hydride precipitation at Ta/Zr bond interface. Hydrogen embrittlement in SUS304ULC/Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Kazuyoshi; Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2010-01-01

    The concentration of hydrogen and precipitation of zirconium hydrides in Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint were analysed by computer simulation. Numerical model of hydride precipitation under hydrogen diffusion was simplified by the alternate model coupled the macroscopic hydrogen diffusion with the microscopic hydride precipitation. Effects of the initial hydrogen content in Ta, working degree of Zr and post-bond heat treatment on the hydrogen diffusion and hydride precipitation were investigated. Hydrogen was rapidly diffused from Ta substrate into Zr after explosive bonding and temporarily concentrated at Ta/Zr bond interface. Zirconium hydrides were precipitated and grew at Ta/Zr bond interface, and the precipitation zone of hydrides was enlarged with the lapse of time. The precipitation of zirconium hydrides was promoted when the initial hydrogen content in Ta and working degree of Zr were increased. The concentration of hydrogen and precipitation of hydrides at the bond interface were reduced and diminished by post-bond heat treatment at 373 K. It was deduced that hydrogen embrittlement in Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint was caused by the precipitation of zirconium hydrides and concentration of hydrogen at Ta/Zr bond interface during the diffusion of hydrogen containing in Ta substrate. (author)

  7. Characterization of intermetallic compounds in Cu-Al ball bonds: thermo-mechanical properties, interface delamination and corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbels, G.H.M.; Kouters, M.H.M.; Dos Santos Ferreira, O.

    2012-01-01

    In high power automotive electronics copper wire bonding is regarded as the most promising alternative for gold wire bonding in 1st level interconnects. In the Cu-Al ball bond interface the growth of intermetallic compounds can deteriorate the electrical and mechanical properties of the

  8. Interfacial Bonding Energy on the Interface between ZChSnSb/Sn Alloy Layer and Steel Body at Microscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmei Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the performance of bonding on the interface between ZChSnSb/Sn and steel body, the interfacial bonding energy on the interface of a ZChSnSb/Sn alloy layer and the steel body with or without Sn as an intermediate layer was calculated under the same loadcase using the molecular dynamics simulation software Materials Studio by ACCELRYS, and the interfacial bonding energy under different Babbitt thicknesses was compared. The results show that the bonding energy of the interface with Sn as an intermediate layer is 10% larger than that of the interface without a Sn layer. The interfacial bonding performances of Babbitt and the steel body with Sn as an intermediate layer are better than those of an interface without a Sn layer. When the thickness of the Babbitt layer of bushing is 17.143 Å, the interfacial bonding energy reaches the maximum, and the interfacial bonding performance is optimum. These findings illustrate the bonding mechanism of the interfacial structure from the molecular level so as to ensure the good bonding properties of the interface, which provides a reference for the improvement of the bush manufacturing process from the microscopic point of view.

  9. Interfacial Bonding Energy on the Interface between ZChSnSb/Sn Alloy Layer and Steel Body at Microscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianmei; Xia, Quanzhi; Ma, Yang; Meng, Fanning; Liang, Yinan; Li, Zhixiong

    2017-09-25

    To investigate the performance of bonding on the interface between ZChSnSb/Sn and steel body, the interfacial bonding energy on the interface of a ZChSnSb/Sn alloy layer and the steel body with or without Sn as an intermediate layer was calculated under the same loadcase using the molecular dynamics simulation software Materials Studio by ACCELRYS, and the interfacial bonding energy under different Babbitt thicknesses was compared. The results show that the bonding energy of the interface with Sn as an intermediate layer is 10% larger than that of the interface without a Sn layer. The interfacial bonding performances of Babbitt and the steel body with Sn as an intermediate layer are better than those of an interface without a Sn layer. When the thickness of the Babbitt layer of bushing is 17.143 Å, the interfacial bonding energy reaches the maximum, and the interfacial bonding performance is optimum. These findings illustrate the bonding mechanism of the interfacial structure from the molecular level so as to ensure the good bonding properties of the interface, which provides a reference for the improvement of the bush manufacturing process from the microscopic point of view.

  10. Nylon and teflon scribe effect on NBR to Chemlok 233 and NBR to NBR bond interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, S. K.

    1990-01-01

    A study was requested by Manufacturing Engineering to determine what effects marking with nylon (6/6) and Teflon scribes may have on subsequent bonding. Witness panel bond specimens were fabricated by the development lab to test both acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) to Chemlok and NBR to NBR after controlled exposure. The nylon rod used as a scribe tool demonstrates virtually no bond deterioration when used to scribe lines on either the Chemlok to NBR surfaces or the NBR to NBR interface. Lab test results indicate that the nylon rod-exposed samples produce tensile and peel values very similar to the control samples and the Teflon exposed samples produce tensile and peel values much lower than the control samples. Visual observation of the failure surfaces of the tested samples shows that Teflon scribing produces an obvious contamination to the surface and the nylon produces no effect. Photographs of test samples are provided. It is concluded that Teflon stock used as a scribe tool on a Chemlok 233 to NBR surface or an NBR to NBR surface has a detrimental effect on the bond integrity on either of these bond interfaces. Therefore, it is recommended that the nylon rod continue to be used where a scribe line is required in the redesigned solid rocket motor segment insulation layup operations. The use of Teflon scribes should not be considered.

  11. The epoxy resin variation effect on microstructure and physical properties to improve bonded NdFeB flux magnetic density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusnaeni, N.; Sarjono, Priyo; Muljadi; Noer, Nasrudin

    2016-01-01

    NdFeB magnets have been fabricated from a mixture of powder NdFeB (MPQ-B+) and epoxy resins (ER) with a variation of 0% wt, 2% wt, 4% wt and 6% wt. The pellets samples were made by pressing 4 tons of the mixture powder at room temperature before curing at 100°C for 1 hour. The SEM-EDX results showed the microstructure with ER were evenly smeared the NdFeB magnetic particles due to higher percent C and lower transition metals value. Sample with 2% wt epoxy resin was able to achieve the highest density of 5.35 g/cm 3 and the highest magnetic flux of 2121 Gauss. The magnetic properties characterization using the permagraph indicates that the sample pellets with 2% wt epoxy resin has a value of remanence (Br) = 4.92 kG, coercivity (Hc) = 7.76 kOe, and energy product (Bhmax) = 4.58 MGOe. Despite low remanence value in the pellet samples, the resistance to demagnetization value was still acceptable. (paper)

  12. The epoxy resin variation effect on microstructure and physical properties to improve bonded NdFeB flux magnetic density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnaeni, N.; Sarjono, Priyo; Muljadi; Noer, Nasrudin

    2016-11-01

    NdFeB magnets have been fabricated from a mixture of powder NdFeB (MPQ-B+) and epoxy resins (ER) with a variation of 0% wt, 2% wt, 4% wt and 6% wt. The pellets samples were made by pressing 4 tons of the mixture powder at room temperature before curing at 100°C for 1 hour. The SEM-EDX results showed the microstructure with ER were evenly smeared the NdFeB magnetic particles due to higher percent C and lower transition metals value. Sample with 2% wt epoxy resin was able to achieve the highest density of 5.35 g/cm3 and the highest magnetic flux of 2121 Gauss. The magnetic properties characterization using the permagraph indicates that the sample pellets with 2% wt epoxy resin has a value of remanence (Br) = 4.92 kG, coercivity (Hc) = 7.76 kOe, and energy product (Bhmax) = 4.58 MGOe. Despite low remanence value in the pellet samples, the resistance to demagnetization value was still acceptable.

  13. Thermal Performance and Reliability Characterization of Bonded Interface Materials (BIMs): Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVoto, D.; Paret, P.; Mihalic, M.; Narumanchi, S.; Bar-Cohen, A.; Matin, K.

    2014-08-01

    Thermal interface materials are an important enabler for low thermal resistance and reliable electronics packaging for a wide array of applications. There is a trend towards bonded interface materials (BIMs) because of their potential for low thermal resistivity (< 1 mm2K/W). However, BIMs induce thermomechanical stresses in the package and can be prone to failures and integrity risks. Deteriorated interfaces can result in high thermal resistance in the package and degradation and/or failure of the electronics. DARPA's Thermal Management Technologies program has addressed this challenge, supporting the development of mechanically-compliant, low resistivity nano-thermal interface (NTI) materials. In this work, we describe the testing procedure and report the results of NREL's thermal performance and reliability characterization of an initial sample of four different NTI-BIMs.

  14. Influence of aramid fiber moisture regain during atmospheric plasma treatment on aging of treatment effects on surface wettability and bonding strength to epoxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Yu; Wang Chunxia; Qiu Yiping

    2007-01-01

    One of the main differences between a low-pressure plasma treatment and an atmospheric pressure plasma treatment is that in atmosphere, the substrate material may absorb significant amount of water which may potentially influence the plasma treatment effects. This paper investigates how the moisture absorbed by aramid fibers during the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment influences the aging behavior of the modified surfaces. Kevlar 49 fibers with different moisture regains (MR) (0.5, 3.5 and 5.5%, respectively) are treated with atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) with helium as the carrier gas and oxygen as the treatment gas. Surface wettability and chemical compositions, and interfacial shear strengths (IFSS) to epoxy for the aramid fibers in all groups are determined using water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and micro-bond pull out tests, respectively. Immediately after the plasma treatment, the treated fibers have substantially lower water contact angles, higher surface oxygen and nitrogen contents, and larger IFSS to epoxy than those of the control group. At the end of 30 day aging period, the fibers treated with 5.5% moisture regain had a lower water contact angle and more polar groups on the fiber surface, leading to 75% improvement of IFSS over the control fibers, while those for the 0.5 and 3.5% moisture regain groups were only 30%

  15. Intermetallic bonds and midgap interface states at epitaxial Al/GaAs(001) junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxisch, T.; Baldereschi, A.; Binggeli, N.

    2003-03-01

    Using first-principles pseudopotential calculations, we have investigated the nature of the electronic states with energies within the semiconductor bandgap of abrupt, defect-free As-terminated Al/GaAs(001) junctions. While bonding-/antibonding-like semiconductor evanescent states occur near the valence-/conduction-band edges, the semiconductor midgap region is characterized by a new type of electronic states, not accounted for by commonly accepted models. These states, which correspond to intermetallic bonds between the outermost Ga cations of the semiconductor and Al atoms of the metal, occur near the Fermi energy. They are localized at the interface and are located around the J-point of the Brillouin zone. These new interface states derive from an interaction between localized states of the Al(001) surface and bulk GaAs conduction band states, mediated by localized states of the unreconstructed As-terminated GaAs(001) surface. (author)

  16. Interface bond relaxation on the thermal conductivity of Si/Ge core-shell nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weifeng; He, Yan; Ouyang, Gang, E-mail: gangouy@hunnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications(SICQEA), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Sun, Changqing [School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2016-01-15

    The thermal conductivity of Si/Ge core-shell nanowires (CSNWs) is investigated on the basis of atomic-bond-relaxation consideration and continuum mechanics. An analytical model is developed to clarify the interface bond relaxation of Si/Ge CSNWs. It is found that the thermal conductivity of Si core can be modulated through covering with Ge epitaxial layers. The change of thermal conductivity in Si/Ge CSNWs should be attributed to the surface relaxation and interface mismatch between inner Si nanowire and outer Ge epitaxial layer. Our results are in well agreement with the experimental measurements and simulations, suggesting that the presented method provides a fundamental insight of the thermal conductivity of CSNWs from the atomistic origin.

  17. Formation of Me–O–Si covalent bonds at the interface between polysilazane and stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amouzou, Dodji, E-mail: adodji@gmail.com [Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Fourdrinier, Lionel; Maseri, Fabrizio [CRM-Group, Boulevard de Colonster, B 57, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Sporken, Robert [Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Natural metal-oxides, hydroxides are detected on the top surface of steel substrates we tested. • Polysilazane reacts with hydroxide functional groups on steel substrates to form Cr–O–Si and Fe–O–Si covalent bonds. • Covalent bonding between steel and polysilazane at the interface was probed using spectroscopic techniques. - Abstract: In earlier works, we demonstrated the potential of polysilazane (PSZ) coatings for a use as insulating layers in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells prepared on steels substrates and showed a good adhesion between PSZ coatings and both AISI316 and AISI430 steels. In the present paper, spectroscopic techniques are used to elucidate the reason of such adhesion. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate surfaces for the two steel substrates and showed the presence of metal oxides and metal hydroxides at the top surface. XPS has been also used to probe interfaces between substrates and PSZ, and metallosiloxane (Me–O–Si) covalent bonds have been detected. These results were confirmed by Infra-Red Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) analyses since vibrations related to Cr–O–Si and Fe–O–Si compounds were detected. Thus, the good adhesion between steel substrates and PSZ coatings was explained by covalent bonding through chemical reactions between PSZ precursors and hydroxide functional groups present on top surface of the two types of steel. Based on these results, an adhesion mechanism between steel substrates and PSZ coatings is proposed.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of diffusion bonding of Al–Cu interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chang; Li, Dongxu; Tao, Xiaoma; Chen, Hongmei; Ouyang, Yifang

    2014-01-01

    The effects of temperature on diffusion bonding of Al–Cu interface have been investigated by using molecular dynamics (MD) technique with the embedded atomic method (EAM) potentials. The simulated results indicate that the Cu atoms predominantly diffuse into the Al side in the process of diffusion bonding, and the thickness of the interfacial region depends on temperature, with higher temperatures resulting in larger thickness. In the course of diffusion bonding, the interfacial region became disordered. In addition, the Cu atoms diffuse at low ratios but can deeply diffuse into the interior of Al, and the Al atoms diffuse at high ratios but hardly diffuse into the interior of Cu. The results show that the appropriate temperature range for diffusion bonding of Al–Cu interface is 750–800 K, and the diffusion activation energies of Al and Cu are 0.77 eV and 0.50 eV, respectively. Finally, in this work, three diffusion mechanisms of Cu atoms in Al lattice have been found and the main diffusion mechanism is the nearest neighbor hopping mechanism. (paper)

  19. Influence of elastomeric seal plate surface chemistry on interface integrity in biofouling-prone systems: Evaluation of a hydrophobic "easy-release" silicone-epoxy coating for maintaining water seal integrity of a sliding neoprene/steel interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolina, Vincent L.

    Attenuated Internal Reflection (MAIR-IR) and Microscopic Infrared Spectroscopy for organic surface compositional details, light microscopy for wear area quantification, and profilometry for surface roughness estimation and wear depth quantification. Pin-on-disc dynamic Coefficient of Friction (CoF) measurements provided data relevant to forecasts of seal integrity in dry, wet and biofouling-influenced sliding contact. Actual wear of neoprene seal material against uncoated and coated steel surfaces, wet and dry, was monitored after both rotary and linear cyclic wear testing, demonstrating significant reductions in elastomer wear areas and depths (and resultant volumes) when the coating was present. Coating the steel eliminated a 270% increase in neoprene surface area wear and an 11-fold increase in seal abrasive volume loss associated with underwater rusting in rotary experiments. Linear testing results confirm coating efficacy by reducing wear area in both loading regimes by about half. No coating delamination was observed, apparently due to a differential distribution of silicone and epoxy ingredients at the air-exposed vs. steel-bonded interfaces demonstrated by IR and EDS methods. Frictional testing revealed higher Coefficients of Friction (CoF) associated with the low-speed sliding of Neoprene over coated rather than uncoated steel surfaces in a wet environment, indicating better potential seal adhesion between the hydrophobic elastomer and coating than between the elastomer and intrinsically hydrophilic uncoated steel. When zebra mussel biofouling debris was present in the articulating joints, CoF was reduced as a result of a water channel path produced between the articulating surfaces by the retained biological matter. Easier release of the biofouling from the low-CST coated surfaces restored the seal integrity more rapidly with further water rinsing. Rapid sliding diminished these biofouling-related differences, but revealed a significant advantage in reducing the Co

  20. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Yoshio Furuse

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1 rinsing with water and drying; (G2 application of an adhesive system; (G3 rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4 rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (p<0.05. Similar values to the original bond strength were obtained after abrasion and application of adhesive (G3 or etching and application of silane and adhesive (G4. If contamination occurs, a surface treatment is required to guarantee an adequate interaction between the resin increments.

  1. A metallization and bonding approach for high performance carbon nanotube thermal interface materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, Robert; Graham, Samuel; Cola, Baratunde A; Fisher, Timothy; Xu Xianfan; Gall, Ken

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed to create vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) thermal interface materials that can be attached to a variety of metallized surfaces. VACNT films were grown on Si substrates using standard CVD processing followed by metallization using Ti/Au. The coated CNTs were then bonded to metallized substrates at 220 deg. C. By reducing the adhesion of the VACNTs to the growth substrate during synthesis, the CNTs can be completely transferred from the Si growth substrate and used as a die attachment material for electronic components. Thermal resistance measurements using a photoacoustic technique showed thermal resistances as low as 1.7 mm 2 K W -1 for bonded VACNT films 25-30 μm in length and 10 mm 2 K W -1 for CNTs up to 130 μm in length. Tensile testing demonstrated a die attachment strength of 40 N cm -2 at room temperature. Overall, these metallized and bonded VACNT films demonstrate properties which are promising for next-generation thermal interface material applications.

  2. Rotary friction welding of dissimilar joints and bonding interface characterization by EDX and XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Eder Paduan; Dollinger, Christian Avila [Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Marcuzzo, Jossano Saldanha; Baldan, Mauricio Ribeiro; Toledo, Rafael Cardoso; Piorino Neto, Francisco; An, Chen Ying, E-mail: eder.padua@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Welding of dissimilar materials has been a challenge to engineering. The study and development of new union processes that meet the requirements of projects in the aerospace, nuclear and aviation sector are of great importance to the scientific and productive means. The Rotary friction welding process (RFW) is a process of union that occurs in the solid state, without occurrence of fusion between the parties, and that have like the main bonding mechanisms the diffusion and mechanical mixture. This work has as objective the obtaining of dissimilar joints involving AA 6351-T6 alloy and stainless steel AISI 304l for applications in the aerospace area. The joints obtained by RFW who had procedures and qualified welding process have undergone the techniques of Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) for analysis of the bonding interface. Were obtained joints with superior mechanical properties the AA 6351-T6 alloy, with the fracture occurring in aluminum away from the bonding interface. The analyses carried out by EDX and XPS have shown the occurrence of interdiffusion among the main elements of the materials involved. The Rotary friction welding process proved to be a great method for obtaining of joints between dissimilar materials that are not possible by fusion welding processes. (author)

  3. Three-Dimensional Bioprinting of Oppositely Charged Hydrogels with Super Strong Interface Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huijun; Tan, Yu Jun; Liu, Sijun; Li, Lin

    2018-04-04

    A novel strategy to improve the adhesion between printed layers of three-dimensional (3D) printed constructs is developed by exploiting the interaction between two oppositely charged hydrogels. Three anionic hydrogels [alginate, xanthan, and κ-carrageenan (Kca)] and three cationic hydrogels [chitosan, gelatin, and gelatin methacrylate (GelMA)] are chosen to find the optimal combination of two oppositely charged hydrogels for the best 3D printability with strong interface bonding. Rheological properties and printability of the hydrogels, as well as structural integrity of printed constructs in cell culture medium, are studied as functions of polymer concentration and the combination of hydrogels. Kca2 (2 wt % Kca hydrogel) and GelMA10 (10 wt % GelMA hydrogel) are found to be the best combination of oppositely charged hydrogels for 3D printing. The interfacial bonding between a Kca layer and a GelMA layer is proven to be significantly higher than that of the bilayered Kca or bilayered GelMA because of the formation of polyelectrolyte complexes between the oppositely charged hydrogels. A good cell viability of >96% is obtained for the 3D-bioprinted Kca-GelMA construct. This novel strategy has a great potential for 3D bioprinting of layered constructs with a strong interface bonding.

  4. Rotary friction welding of dissimilar joints and bonding interface characterization by EDX and XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Eder Paduan; Dollinger, Christian Avila; Marcuzzo, Jossano Saldanha; Baldan, Mauricio Ribeiro; Toledo, Rafael Cardoso; Piorino Neto, Francisco; An, Chen Ying

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Welding of dissimilar materials has been a challenge to engineering. The study and development of new union processes that meet the requirements of projects in the aerospace, nuclear and aviation sector are of great importance to the scientific and productive means. The Rotary friction welding process (RFW) is a process of union that occurs in the solid state, without occurrence of fusion between the parties, and that have like the main bonding mechanisms the diffusion and mechanical mixture. This work has as objective the obtaining of dissimilar joints involving AA 6351-T6 alloy and stainless steel AISI 304l for applications in the aerospace area. The joints obtained by RFW who had procedures and qualified welding process have undergone the techniques of Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) for analysis of the bonding interface. Were obtained joints with superior mechanical properties the AA 6351-T6 alloy, with the fracture occurring in aluminum away from the bonding interface. The analyses carried out by EDX and XPS have shown the occurrence of interdiffusion among the main elements of the materials involved. The Rotary friction welding process proved to be a great method for obtaining of joints between dissimilar materials that are not possible by fusion welding processes. (author)

  5. Adhesion of pineapple-leaf fiber to epoxy matrix: The role of surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusran Payae

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers are considered to have potential use as reinforcing agents in polymer composite materials because of their principle benefits: moderate strength and stiffness, low cost, and be an environmental friendly, degradable, and renewablematerial. Due to their inherently hydrophilic nature, they are prone to absorb moisture, which can plasticise or weaken theadhesion of fibers to the surrounding matrix and by this affect the performance of composites used in atmospheric humidity,particularly at elevated temperatures. The surface treatments are often applied to the fiber to improve the bond strengthbetween the fibers and matrix. This work discussed the effect of sodium hydroxide (NaOH treatment and epoxy resin as acompatibilizing agent on interface properties of pineapple leaf fiber (PALF-epoxy composites. A single-fiber fragmentationtest coupled with data reduction technique was employed to assess interface quality in terms of apparent interfacial shearstrength (IFSS or a of untreated, NaOH, and epoxy resin treated PALFs-epoxy composites. Tensile properties of untreatedand treated PALFs were also examined. It was found that both treatments substantially increase a, corresponding to animproved level of adhesion. The improvement in the level of adhesion for the alkali and epoxy treated fiber composites wasdue to an increase in the physical bonding between the alkali treated fibers and the matrix, and due to a promoted compatibilitybetween the epoxy treated fibers and matrix, respectively.

  6. Fracture toughness versus micro-tensile bond strength testing of adhesive-dentin interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, Jan; Luehrs, Anne-Katrin; Poitevin, André; Van Ende, Annelies; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2013-06-01

    To assess interfacial fracture toughness of different adhesive approaches and compare to a standard micro-tensile bond-strength (μTBS) test. Chevron-notched beam fracture toughness (CNB) was measured following a modified ISO 24370 standard. Composite bars with dimensions of 3.0×4.0×25 mm were prepared, with the adhesive-dentin interface in the middle. At the adhesive-dentin interface, a chevron notch was prepared using a 0.15 mm thin diamond blade mounted in a water-cooled diamond saw. Each specimen was loaded until failure in a 4-point bend test setup and the fracture toughness was calculated according to the ISO specifications. Similarly, adhesive-dentin micro-specimens (1.0×1.0×8-10 mm) were stressed in tensile until failure to determine the μTBS. A positive correlation (r(2)=0.64) was observed between CNB and μTBS, which however was only nearly statistically significant, mainly due to the dissimilar outcome of Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE). While few μTBS specimens failed at the adhesive-dentin interface, almost all CNB specimens failed interfacially at the notch tip. Weibull moduli for interfacial fracture toughness were much higher than for μTBS (3.8-11.5 versus 2.7-4.8, respectively), especially relevant with regard to early failures. Although the ranking of the adhesives on their bonding effectiveness tested using CNB and μTBS corresponded well, the outcome of CNB appeared more reliable and less variable. Fracture toughness measurement is however more laborious and requires specific equipment. The μTBS nevertheless appeared to remain a valid method to assess bonding effectiveness in a versatile way. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasma Treated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Lian

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Plasma nanocoating of allylamine were deposited on the surfaces of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs to provide desirable functionalities and thus to tailor the surface characteristics of MWCNTs for improved dispersion and interfacial adhesion in epoxy matrices. Plasma nanocoated MWCNTs were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, surface contact angle, and pH change measurements. Mechanical testing results showed that epoxy reinforced with 1.0 wt % plasma coated MWCNTs increased the tensile strength by 54% as compared with the pure epoxy control, while epoxy reinforced with untreated MWCNTs have lower tensile strength than the pure epoxy control. Optical and electron microscopic images show enhanced dispersion of plasma coated MWCNTs in epoxy compared to untreated MWCNTs. Plasma nanocoatings from allylamine on MWCNTs could significantly enhance their dispersion and interfacial adhesion in epoxy matrices. Simulation results based on the shear-lag model derived from micromechanics also confirmed that plasma nanocoating on MWCNTs significantly improved the epoxy/fillers interface bonding and as a result the increased composite strength.

  8. Interface bonding in silicon oxide nanocontacts: interaction potentials and force measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierez-Kien, M.; Craciun, A. D.; Pinon, A. V.; Le Roux, S.; Gallani, J. L.; Rastei, M. V.

    2018-04-01

    The interface bonding between two silicon-oxide nanoscale surfaces has been studied as a function of atomic nature and size of contacting asperities. The binding forces obtained using various interaction potentials are compared with experimental force curves measured in vacuum with an atomic force microscope. In the limit of small nanocontacts (typically contact area which is altered by stretching speeds. The mean unbinding force is found to decrease as the contact spends time in the attractive regime. This contact weakening is featured by a negative aging coefficient which broadens and shifts the thermal-induced force distribution at low stretching speeds.

  9. Experimental Study on Bond-Slip Behavior of Bamboo Bolt-Modified Slurry Interface under Pull-Out Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of bamboo bolt-modified slurry interfaces based on 26 in situ axial pull-out tests intended to highlight the mechanical behavior of interface under a fracture mode. Three impact factors are analyzed: anchorage length, bolt diameter, and bolt hole diameter, using the same materials of bamboo and modified slurry. The result shows that the interface between the bamboo bolt and anchoring agent is the control interface of an anchorage system, and the local behavior of the interface involves four stages: elastic, soften, friction, and decoupling. Distribution law and change trend of slippage, stress, and strain of anchoring interface along with the axial direction of an anchor bolt were analyzed. The result shows that there is effective anchoring length limit in this kind of interface, and that the complete decoupling phenomenon should not be neglected. Through a comparative analysis of the existing bond-slip model and interface bond-slip curve, and considering the correspondence of the strain-slip curve and trilinear bond-slip model simultaneously, a modified trilinear bond-slip model has been proposed. The friction section of this model is limited, and shearing stress in the complete decoupling section is zero.

  10. Effect of antioxidants on the dentin interface bond stability of adhesives exposed to hydrolytic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotti, Valéria B; Feitosa, Victor P; Sauro, Salvatore; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Leal, Fernanda B; Stansbury, Jeffrey W; Correr, Américo B

    2015-02-01

    This study assessed the effect of antioxidants vitamin C (Vit. C), vitamin E (Vit. E) and quercetin (Querc) on the dentin bonding performance, degree of conversion, and rate of polymerization of three commercial adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond 2 [SB], Clearfil SE Bond [CSE], Adper Easy Bond [EB]). Human premolars were restored using antioxidant-doped adhesives. The samples were stored for 24 h in distilled water or 6 months under simulated pulpal pressure. Teeth were cut into sticks and the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentin was tested in a universal testing machine. Qualitative nanoleakage analysis was performed from a central stick of each restored tooth. Degree of conversion and rate of polymerization of adhesive systems were evaluated in triplicate using real-time FT-IR. Although the inclusion of the antioxidants negatively affected the μTBS over 24 h, the antioxidant-doped adhesives maintained (SB-Vit. C, SB-Vit. E, CSE-Vit. C, EB-Querc) or increased (SB-Querc, CSE-Vit. E, CSE-Querc, EB-Vit. E, and EB-Vit. C) their μTBS during 6 months of storage. Only the μTBS of Adper Single Bond 2 dropped significantly after 6 months among the control groups. Slight changes in the nanoleakage pattern after aging were observed in all groups, except for the EB-control group, which showed a noteworthy increase in nanoleakage after 6 months, and for EB-Vit. C, which presented a remarkable decrease. A lower degree of conversion was obtained with all antioxidants in SB and EB, except for the EB-Vit. E group. Similar degrees of conversion were attained in control and experimental groups for CSE. The rate of polymerization was reduced in antioxidant-doped adhesives. The performance of antioxidants changed according to the adhesive system to which they were added, and antioxidant-doped adhesives appear to have a positive effect on the adhesive interface durability, since their bond strength obtained after 24 h was maintained or increased over time.

  11. Bond strength and Raman analysis of the zirconia-feldspathic porcelain interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Carla Müller; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Lia Mondelli, Rafael Francisco; Tabata, Americo Sheitiro; de Souza Santos, Juliete; Sanches Borges, Ana Flávia

    2014-10-01

    Zirconia has the best mechanical properties of the available ceramic systems. However, the stability of the zirconia-feldspathic porcelain interface may be jeopardized by the presence of the chipping and debonding of the feldspathic porcelain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of 3 cold isostatic pressed zirconia materials and a feldspathic veneer by analyzing their interface with micro-Raman spectroscopy. The test groups were experimental zirconia, Zirkonzahn zirconia, and Schuetz zirconia. Blocks of partially sintered zirconia were cut into disks (n=20) and then veneered with a feldspathic porcelain. Half of the specimens from each group (n=10) were incubated in 37°C water for 24 hours, and the other half were thermocycled. All the specimens were then subjected to shear testing. The fractured areas were analyzed with optical stereomicroscopy and classified as adhesive, cohesive, or an adhesive-cohesive failure. Spectral patterns were examined to detect bands related to the zirconia and feldspathic porcelain phases. The shear strength data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA. No significant differences in shear bond strength were observed among the 3 groups, regardless of whether or not the specimens were thermocycled. Adhesive failures were the most prevalent types of failure (70%). Raman spectra were clearly distinguished for all the materials, which showed the presence of tetragonal and monoclinic phases. The controlled production of the experimental zirconia did not influence the results of the bond strength. Raman analysis suggested a process of interdiffusion by the presence of peaks associated with the zirconia and feldspathic ceramics. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of cerium-based conversion treatment on the cathodic delamination and corrosion protection performance of carbon steel-fusion-bonded epoxy coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramezanzadeh, B., E-mail: ramezanzadeh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Surface Coatings and Corrosion, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rostami, M. [Department of Nanomaterials and Nanocoatings, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Steel surface was treated by Ce and acid phosphoric solutions. • Ce treatment considerably enhanced the surface energy and produce nanoscale roughness. • Ce treated samples showed enhanced adhesion to FBE coating. • Ce treatment of steel significantly reduced the FBE cathodic delamination rate. • Ce treated sample showed enhanced corrosion resistance. - Abstract: The effect of surface pre-treatment of pipe surface by green cerium compound and phosphoric acid solution on the fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE) coating performance was studied. The composition and surface morphology of the steel samples treated by acid and Ce solutions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Also, the surface free energy was evaluated on these samples through contact angle measurements. In addition, the effect of Ce and acid washing procedures on the adhesion properties and corrosion protection performance of the FBE was examined by pull-off, salt spray and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests. Results showed that compared to acid washing, the chemical treatment by Ce solution noticeably increased the surface free energy of steel, improved the adhesion properties of FBE, decreased the cathodic delamination rate of FBE, and enhanced the coating corrosion resistance compared to the acid washed samples.

  13. Statics and dynamics of free and hydrogen-bonded OH groups at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila Verde, Ana; Bolhuis, Peter G; Campen, R Kramer

    2012-08-09

    We use classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of two water models (SPC/E and TIP4P/2005) to investigate the orientation and reorientation dynamics of two subpopulations of OH groups belonging to water molecules at the air/water interface at 300 K: those OH groups that donate a hydrogen bond (called "bonded") and those that do not (called "free"). Free interfacial OH groups reorient in two distinct regimes: a fast regime from 0 to 1 ps and a slow regime thereafter. Qualitatively similar behavior was reported by others for free OH groups near extended hydrophobic surfaces. In contrast, the net reorientation of bonded OH groups occurs at a rate similar to that of bulk water. This similarity in reorientation rate results from compensation of two effects: decreasing frequency of hydrogen-bond breaking/formation (i.e., hydrogen-bond exchange) and faster rotation of intact hydrogen bonds. Both changes result from the decrease in density at the air/water interface relative to the bulk. Interestingly, because of the presence of capillary waves, the slowdown of hydrogen-bond exchange is significantly smaller than that reported for water near extended hydrophobic surfaces, but it is almost identical to that reported for water near small hydrophobic solutes. In this sense water at the air/water interface has characteristics of water of hydration of both small and extended hydrophobic solutes.

  14. Investigation of Interface Bonding Mechanism of an Explosively Welded Tri-Metal Titanium/Aluminum/Magnesium Plate by Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. T.; Wang, W. X.; Zhou, J.; Cao, X. Q.; Yan, Z. F.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, W.

    2018-04-01

    A tri-metal titanium/aluminum/magnesium (Ti/Al/Mg) cladding plate, with an aluminum alloy interlayer plate, was fabricated for the first time by explosive welding. Nanoindentation tests and associated microstructure analysis were conducted to investigate the interface bonding mechanisms of the Ti/Al/Mg cladding plate. A periodic wavy bonding interface (with an amplitude of approximately 30 μm and a wavelength of approximately 160 μm) without a molten zone was formed between the Ti and Al plates. The bonding interface between the Al and the Mg demonstrated a similar wavy shape, but the wave at this location was much larger with an amplitude of approximately 390 μm and a wavelength of approximately 1580 μm, and some localized melted zones also existed at this location. The formation of the wavy interface was found to result from a severe deformation at the interface, which was caused by the strong impact or collision. The nanoindentation tests showed that the material hardness decreased with increasing distance from the bonding interface. Material hardness at a location was found to be correlated with the degree of plastic deformation at that site. A larger plastic deformation was correlated with an increase in hardness.

  15. Annealing effects on recombinative activity of nickel at direct silicon bonded interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Takuto, E-mail: tkojima@toyota-ti.ac.jp; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya, 468-8511 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    By performing capacitance transient analyses, the recombination activity at a (110)/(100) direct silicon bonded (DSB) interface contaminated with nickel diffused at different temperatures, as a model of grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon, was studied. The trap level depth from the valence band, trap density of states, and hole capture cross section peaked at an annealing temperature of 300 °C. At temperatures ⩾400 °C, the hole capture cross section increased with temperature, but the density of states remained unchanged. Further, synchrotron-based X-ray analyses, microprobe X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses were performed. The analysis results indicated that the chemical phase after the sample was annealed at 200 °C was a mixture of NiO and NiSi{sub 2}.

  16. Covalently Bonded Graphene-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid for High-Performance Thermal Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jie; Walther, Jens H.; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    The remarkable thermal properties of graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been the subject of intensive investigations for the thermal management of integrated circuits. However, the small contact area of CNTs and the large anisotropic heat conduction of graphene have hindered...... their applications as effective thermal interface materials (TIMs). Here, a covalently bonded graphene–CNT (G-CNT) hybrid is presented that multiplies the axial heat transfer capability of individual CNTs through their parallel arrangement, while at the same time it provides a large contact area for efficient heat...... extraction. Through computer simulations, it is demonstrated that the G-CNT outperforms few-layer graphene by more than 2 orders of magnitude for the c-axis heat transfer, while its thermal resistance is 3 orders of magnitude lower than the state-of-the-art TIMs. We show that heat can be removed from the G...

  17. Annealing effects on recombinative activity of nickel at direct silicon bonded interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Takuto; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    By performing capacitance transient analyses, the recombination activity at a (110)/(100) direct silicon bonded (DSB) interface contaminated with nickel diffused at different temperatures, as a model of grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon, was studied. The trap level depth from the valence band, trap density of states, and hole capture cross section peaked at an annealing temperature of 300 °C. At temperatures ⩾400 °C, the hole capture cross section increased with temperature, but the density of states remained unchanged. Further, synchrotron-based X-ray analyses, microprobe X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses were performed. The analysis results indicated that the chemical phase after the sample was annealed at 200 °C was a mixture of NiO and NiSi 2

  18. Interaction of water with epoxy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-07-01

    The chemistries of reactants, plasticizers, solvents and additives in an epoxy paint are discussed. Polyamide additives may play an important role in the absorption of molecular iodine by epoxy paints. It is recommended that the unsaturation of the polyamide additive in the epoxy cure be determined. Experimental studies of water absorption by epoxy resins are discussed. These studies show that absorption can disrupt hydrogen bonds among segments of the polymers and cause swelling of the polymer. The water absorption increases the diffusion coefficient of water within the polymer. Permanent damage to the polymer can result if water causes hydrolysis of ether linkages. Water desorption studies are recommended to ascertain how water absorption affects epoxy paint.

  19. Ultrathin silicon oxynitride layer on GaN for dangling-bond-free GaN/insulator interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Kengo; Yayama, Tomoe; Miyazaki, Takehide; Taoka, Noriyuki; Shimizu, Mitsuaki

    2018-01-23

    Despite the scientific and technological importance of removing interface dangling bonds, even an ideal model of a dangling-bond-free interface between GaN and an insulator has not been known. The formation of an atomically thin ordered buffer layer between crystalline GaN and amorphous SiO 2 would be a key to synthesize a dangling-bond-free GaN/SiO 2 interface. Here, we predict that a silicon oxynitride (Si 4 O 5 N 3 ) layer can epitaxially grow on a GaN(0001) surface without creating dangling bonds at the interface. Our ab initio calculations show that the GaN/Si 4 O 5 N 3 structure is more stable than silicon-oxide-terminated GaN(0001) surfaces. The electronic properties of the GaN/Si 4 O 5 N 3 structure can be tuned by modifying the chemical components near the interface. We also propose a possible approach to experimentally synthesize the GaN/Si 4 O 5 N 3 structure.

  20. Durable bonds at the adhesive/dentin interface: an impossible mission or simply a moving target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    SPENCER, Paulette; Jonggu PARK, Qiang YE; MISRA, Anil; BOHATY, Brenda S.; SINGH, Viraj; PARTHASARATHY, Ranga; SENE, Fábio; de Paiva GONÇALVES, Sérgio Eduardo; LAURENCE, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Composite restorations have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries and increased frequency of replacement as compared to dental amalgam. Penetration of bacterial enzymes, oral fluids, and bacteria into the crevices between the tooth and composite undermines the restoration and leads to recurrent decay and failure. The gingival margin of composite restora tions is particularly vulnerable to decay and at this margin, the adhesive and its seal to dentin provides the primary barrier between the prepared tooth and the environment. The intent of this article is to examine physico-chemical factors that affect the integrity and durability of the adhesive/dentin interfacial bond; and to explore how these factors act synergistically with mechanical forces to undermine the composite restoration. The article will examine the various avenues that have been pursued to address these problems and it will explore how alterations in material chemistry could address the detrimental impact of physico-chemical stresses on the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:24855586

  1. Quantitative Studies on PDMS-PDMS Interface Bonding with Piranha Solution and its Swelling Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon-Lai Chiang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a low-cost yet effective method of irreversible bonding between two elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS interfaces using Piranha solution is investigated. Piranha solutions at a weight ratio of 3:1 using different acids and hydrogen peroxide were attempted. The average tensile strengths of the device bonded with concentrated sulfuric acid-based piranha solution and nitric acid-based piranha solution were found to be 200 ± 20 kPa and 100 ± 15 kPa respectively. A PDMS surface treated with Piranha Solution demonstrated an increase in hydrophilicity. In addition, relatively straightforward swelling studies of PDMS using a weight loss method with common organic solvents were also investigated. Experimental results show that hexane, toluene, ethyl acetate, n-propyl alcohol and acetone swell PDMS significantly over a duration of up to 1 h and above; PDMS samples reached a steady state of swelling only after 5 min of immersion in other solvents. This will enable researchers to develop devices for the future according to the interaction between the material and the solvents in contact.

  2. Evaluation of bonding strength of porcelain to some commercial nickel-base dental alloys and comparing their interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Asghari Salavat

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: To replace the replacing of deleterious elements from the chemical composition of dental alloys. The added new elements should control through the oxide layer and the formation of Cr2O3 in porcelain-alloy interfaces for adequate bond strength.

  3. Revealing the Interface Structure and Bonding Mechanism of Coupling Agent Treated WPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuping Rao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the interfacial optimisation of wood plastic composites (WPC based on recycled wood flour and polyethylene by employing maleated and silane coupling agents. The effect of the incorporation of the coupling agents on the variation of chemical structure of the composites were investigated by Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR and Solid state 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR analyses. The results revealed the chemical reactions that occurred between the coupling agents and raw materials, which thus contributed to the enhancement of compatibility and interfacial adhesion between the constituents of WPC. NMR results also indicated that there existed the transformation of crystalline cellulose to an amorphous state during the coupling agent treatments, reflecting the inferior resonance of crystalline carbohydrates. Fluorescence Microscope (FM and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM analyses showed the improvements of wood particle dispersion and wettability, compatibility of the constituents, and resin penetration, and impregnation of the composites after the coupling agent treatments. The optimised interface of the composites was attributed to interdiffusion, electrostatic adhesion, chemical reactions, and mechanical interlocking bonding mechanisms.

  4. Effect of Endodontic Retreatment on Push-out Bond Strength and Quality of Fiber Postbonding Interface of Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrine, Rina Andréa; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Kato, Augusto Shoji; Fontana, Carlos Eduardo; Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; De Martin, Alexandre Sigrist; Bueno, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of endodontic retreatment on push-out bond strength and dentin interface of two resin cements used for fiber postcementation during endodontic retreatment. The root canals of 40 extracted human canines were prepared, obturated and divided into four groups (n = 10). Gutta-percha was partially removed and fiber posts were immediately cemented in groups 1 and 2 using Panavia F with ED Primer and RelyX™ U200, respectively. In groups 3 and 4, the root canal access was sealed with temporary restorative cement, specimens were stored for 30 days, endodontically retreated, and fiber posts were cemented using the resin cements applied to groups 1 and 2, respectively. Push-out tests and scanning electron microscopy analyses of different areas were performed. Data from push-out bond strengths were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests. Higher bond strength values were detected in the apical third for group 1 than group 3 (p 0.05). Comparisons between different thirds in the same group revealed a higher bond strength in the apical third for group 1. Scanning electron microscopy showed formation of hybrid layer and extensive resin tags in group 1. No hybrid layer was observed in groups 2 and 4. Endodontic retreatment had adverse effects on the push-out bond strength and dentinal interface of Panavia F with ED Primer when used for fiber postcementation specifically in the apical third, but not on RelyX™ U200. A significant interaction was detected between endodontic retreatment and resin cement, which indicated that endodontic retreatment might adversely affect the push-out bond strength and dentinal interface of Panavia F with ED Primer when used for fiber postcementation specifically in the apical third.

  5. Bond Behavior of Wet-Bonded Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Concrete Interface Subjected to Moisture

    OpenAIRE

    Yiyan Lu; Tao Zhu; Shan Li; Zhenzhen Liu

    2018-01-01

    The use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials to strengthen concrete structures has become popular in coastal regions with high humidity levels. However, many concrete structures in these places remain wet as a result of tides and wave-splashing, so they cannot be completely dried before repair. Therefore, it is vital to investigate the effects of moisture on the initial and long-term bond behavior between CFRP and wet concrete. This research assesses the effects of mo...

  6. Shear Bond Strengths and Morphological Evaluation of Filled and Unfilled Adhesive Interfaces to Enamel and Dentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Vajihesadat; Fathi, Mohammadhosein; Ataei, Ebrahim; Khodaeian, Niloufar; Askari, Navid

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory study shear bond strengths of three filled and one unfilled adhesive systems to enamel and dentine were compared. Forty-eight extracted intact noncarious human mandibular molars were randomly assigned to two groups of 24 one for bonding to enamel and the other for bonding to dentine. Buccal and lingual surfaces of each tooth were randomly assigned for application of each one of filled (Prime & Bond NT (PBNT), Optibond Solo Plus (OBSP), and Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB)) and unfilled (Single Bond (SB)) adhesive systems (n = 12). A universal resin composite was placed into the translucent plastic cylinders (3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in length) and seated against the enamel and dentine surfaces and polymerized for 40 seconds. Shear bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine, and the results were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, t-test, and Tukey HSD post hoc test with a 5% level of significance.There were no statistically significant differences in bond strength between the adhesive systems in enamel, but CSEB and SB exhibited significantly higher and lower bond strength to dentine, respectively, than the other tested adhesive systems while there were no statistically significant differences between PBNT and OBSP. PMID:23209471

  7. Shear Bond Strengths and Morphological Evaluation of Filled and Unfilled Adhesive Interfaces to Enamel and Dentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this laboratory study shear bond strengths of three filled and one unfilled adhesive systems to enamel and dentine were compared. Forty-eight extracted intact noncarious human mandibular molars were randomly assigned to two groups of 24 one for bonding to enamel and the other for bonding to dentine. Buccal and lingual surfaces of each tooth were randomly assigned for application of each one of filled (Prime & Bond NT (PBNT, Optibond Solo Plus (OBSP, and Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and unfilled (Single Bond (SB adhesive systems (n=12. A universal resin composite was placed into the translucent plastic cylinders (3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in length and seated against the enamel and dentine surfaces and polymerized for 40 seconds. Shear bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine, and the results were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, t-test, and Tukey HSD post hoc test with a 5% level of significance.There were no statistically significant differences in bond strength between the adhesive systems in enamel, but CSEB and SB exhibited significantly higher and lower bond strength to dentine, respectively, than the other tested adhesive systems while there were no statistically significant differences between PBNT and OBSP.

  8. Interfacial bonding and electronic structure of GaN/GaAs interface: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Ruyue; Zhang, Zhaofu; Wang, Changhong; Li, Haobo; Dong, Hong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Weichao; Xie, Xinjian

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of GaN interfacing with GaAs is crucial for GaN to be an effective interfacial layer between high-k oxides and III-V materials with the application in high-mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices. Utilizing first principles calculations, here, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the GaN/GaAs interface with respect to the interfacial nitrogen contents. The decrease of interfacial N contents leads to more Ga dangling bonds and As-As dimers. At the N-rich limit, the interface with N concentration of 87.5% shows the most stability. Furthermore, a strong band offsets dependence on the interfacial N concentration is also observed. The valance band offset of N7 with hybrid functional calculation is 0.51 eV. The electronic structure analysis shows that significant interface states exist in all the GaN/GaAs models with various N contents, which originate from the interfacial dangling bonds and some unsaturated Ga and N atoms. These large amounts of gap states result in Fermi level pinning and essentially degrade the device performance

  9. Chip-package nano-structured copper and nickel interconnections with metallic and polymeric bonding interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankur

    developed to address the IC packaging requirements beyond the ITRS projections and to introduce innovative design and fabrication concepts that will further advance the performance of the chip, the package, and the system board. The nano-structured interconnect technology simultaneously packages all the ICs intact in wafer form with quantum jump in the number of interconnections with the lowest electrical parasitics. The intrinsic properties of nano materials also enable several orders of magnitude higher interconnect densities with the best mechanical properties for the highest reliability and yet provide higher current and heat transfer densities. Nano-structured interconnects provides the ability to assemble the packaged parts on the system board without the use of underfill materials and to enable advanced analog/digital testing, reliability testing, and burn-in at wafer level. This thesis investigates the electrical and mechanical performance of nanostructured interconnections through modeling and test vehicle fabrication. The analytical models evaluate the performance improvements over solder and compliant interconnections. Test vehicles with nano-interconnections were fabricated using low cost electro-deposition techniques and assembled with various bonding interfaces. Interconnections were fabricated at 200 micron pitch to compare with the existing solder joints and at 50 micron pitch to demonstrate fabrication processes at fine pitches. Experimental and modeling results show that the proposed nano-interconnections could enhance the reliability and potentially meet all the system performance requirements for the emerging micro/nano-systems.

  10. Bond efficacy and interface morphology of self-etching adhesives to ground enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdalla, A.I.; El Zohairy, A.A.; Mohsen, M.M.A.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared the microshear bond strengths to ground enamel of three one-step self-etching adhesive systems, a self-etching primer system and an etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Materials and Methods: Three self-etching adhesives, Futurabond DC (Voco), Clearfil S Tri Bond (Kuraray)

  11. Bonding Strength of Ni/Ni3Al Interface with Different Lattice Misfit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping PENG; Caixing ZHENG; Shaochang HAN; Zhaohui JIN; Rui YANG; Zhuangqi HU

    2003-01-01

    The interfacial binding covalent bond density (CBD) and the local environmental total bond order (LTBO) of the Ni/Ni3Alinterface with different lattice misfits (δ) were calculated by using first-principles discrete variation Xα method. It was foundthat

  12. Adhesion of epoxy primer to hydrotalcite conversion coated AA2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Robert Benton, III

    Hydrotalcite-based (HT) conversion coatings are being developed as an environmentally benign alternative to chromate conversion coatings (CCC). Accelerated exposure tests were conducted on epoxy primed, HT-modified AA2024 to gauge service performance. HT-based conversion coatings did not perform as well as the CCC when used with an epoxy primer. The current HT chemistries are optimized for stand-alone corrosion protection, however additional research into the primer/HT interactions is necessary before they can be implemented within a coating scheme. The relative contribution of mechanical and physico-chemical interactions in controlling adhesion has been investigated in this study. Practical adhesion tests were used to assess the dry and wet bond strength of epoxy primer on HT coatings using the pull-off tensile strength (POTS) as the figure of merit. The practical adhesion of HT coated samples generally fell between that observed for the CCC and bare AA2024. Laboratory testing was done to assess the physical and chemical properties of HT coatings. Contact angle measurements were performed using powders representative of different HT chemistries to evaluate the dispersive and acid-base character of the surface. The wet POTS correlated with the electrodynamic (dipole + dispersive) parameter of the surface tension. The HT surfaces were found to be predominantly basic. Given the basicity of epoxy, these results indicate that increasing the acidic character of HT coatings may increase the adhesion performance. This was supported by electrokinetic measurements in which the dry POTS was found to increase with decreasing conversion coating iso-electric point. The correlations with the dry and wet state adhesion are interpreted as indicating that dry state adhesion is optimized by minimizing unfavorable polar interactions between the basic epoxy and HT interfaces. Wet state adhesion, where polar interactions are disrupted, is dictated by non-polar bonding. FTIR

  13. Interface bonding of NiCrAlY coating on laser modified H13 tool steel surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, M. S.; Aqida, S. N.; Ismail, I.

    2016-06-01

    Bonding strength of thermal spray coatings depends on the interfacial adhesion between bond coat and substrate material. In this paper, NiCrAlY (Ni-164/211 Ni22 %Cr10 %Al1.0 %Y) coatings were developed on laser modified H13 tool steel surface using atmospheric plasma spray (APS). Different laser peak power, P p, and duty cycle, DC, were investigated in order to improve the mechanical properties of H13 tool steel surface. The APS spraying parameters setting for coatings were set constant. The coating microstructure near the interface was analyzed using IM7000 inverted optical microscope. Interface bonding of NiCrAlY was investigated by interfacial indentation test (IIT) method using MMT-X7 Matsuzawa Hardness Tester Machine with Vickers indenter. Diffusion of atoms along NiCrAlY coating, laser modified and substrate layers was investigated by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) using Hitachi Tabletop Microscope TM3030 Plus. Based on IIT method results, average interfacial toughness, K avg, for reference sample was 2.15 MPa m1/2 compared to sample L1 range of K avg from 6.02 to 6.96 MPa m1/2 and sample L2 range of K avg from 2.47 to 3.46 MPa m1/2. Hence, according to K avg, sample L1 has the highest interface bonding and is being laser modified at lower laser peak power, P p, and higher duty cycle, DC, prior to coating. The EDXS analysis indicated the presence of Fe in the NiCrAlY coating layer and increased Ni and Cr composition in the laser modified layer. Atomic diffusion occurred in both coating and laser modified layers involved in Fe, Ni and Cr elements. These findings introduce enhancement of coating system by substrate surface modification to allow atomic diffusion.

  14. Bond efficacy and interface morphology of self-etching adhesives to ground enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ali I; El Zohairy, Ahmed A; Abdel Mohsen, Mohamed M; Feilzer, Albert J

    2010-02-01

    This study compared the microshear bond strengths to ground enamel of three one-step self-etching adhesive systems, a self-etching primer system and an etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Three self-etching adhesives, Futurabond DC (Voco), Clearfil S Tri Bond (Kuraray) and Hybrid bond (Sun-Medical), a self-etching primer, Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray), and an etch-and-rinse system, Admira Bond (Voco), were selected. Thirty human molars were used. The root of each tooth was removed and the crown was sectioned into halves. The convex enamel surfaces were reduced by polishing on silicone paper to prepare a flat surface. The bonding systems were applied on this surface. Prior to adhesive curing, a hollow cylinder (2.0 mm height/0.75 mm internal diameter) was placed on the treated surfaces. A resin composite was then inserted into the tube and cured. After water storage for 24 h, the tube was removed and shear bond strength was determined in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were analyzed with ANOVA and the Tukey.-Kramer test at a 59 degrees confidence level. The enamel of five additional teeth was ground, and the etching component of each adhesive was applied and removed with absolute ethanol instead of being light cured. These teeth and selected fractured surfaces were examined by SEM. Adhesion to ground enamel of the Futurabond DC (25 +/- 3.5 MPa) and Clearfil SE Bond (23 +/- 2.9 MPa) self-etching systems was not significantly different from the etch-and-rinse system Admira Bond (27 +/- 2.3 MPa). The two self-etching adhesives Clearfil S Tri bond and Hybrid Bond demonstrated significantly lower bond strengths (14 +/- 1.4 MPa; 11 +/- 1.9 MPa) with no significant differences between them (p adhesive systems are dependent on the type of adhesive system. Some of the new adhesive systems showed bond strength values comparable to that of etch-and-rinse systems. There was no correlation between bond strength and morphological changes in

  15. Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces for High-Temperature Packaging. Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVoto, Douglas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Current generation automotive power electronics packages utilize silicon devices and lead-free solder alloys. To meet stringent technical targets for 2020 and beyond (for cost, power density, specific power, efficiency and reliability), wide-bandgap devices are being considered since they offer advantages such as operation at higher frequencies, voltages, and temperatures. Traditional power electronics packages must be redesigned to utilize the full potential of wide-bandgap devices, and the die- and substrate-attach layers are key areas where new material development and validation is required. Present solder alloys do not meet the performance requirements for these new package designs while also meeting cost and hazardous substance restrictions. Sintered silver (Ag) promises to meet the needs for die- and substrate-attach interfaces but synthesis optimization and reliability evaluation must be completed. Sintered Ag material was proposed as an alternative solution in power electronics packages almost 20 years back. However, synthesis pressure requirements up 40 MPa caused a higher complexity in the production process and more stringent flatness specifications for the substrates. Recently, several manufacturers have developed sintered Ag materials that require lower (3-5 MPa) or even no bonding pressures. Degradation mechanisms for these sintered Ag materials are not well known and need to be addressed. We are addressing these aspects to some extent in this project. We are developing generalized (i.e., independent of geometry) stress intensity factor versus cycles-to-failure relations for sintered Ag. Because sintered Ag is a relatively new material for automotive power electronics, the industry currently does not have a good understanding of recommended synthesis parameters or expected reliability under prescribed conditions. It is an important deliverable of this project to transfer findings to industry to eliminate barriers to using sintered Ag as a viable and

  16. Principle and modelling of Transient Current Technique for interface traps characterization in monolithic pixel detectors obtained by CMOS-compatible wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronuzzi, J.; Mapelli, A.; Moll, M.; Sallese, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of monolithic silicon radiation detectors, a fabrication process based on a recently developed silicon wafer bonding technique at low temperature was proposed. Ideally, this new process would enable direct bonding of a read-out electronic chip wafer on a highly resistive silicon substrate wafer, which is expected to present many advantages since it would combine high performance IC's with high sensitive ultra-low doped bulk silicon detectors. But electrical properties of the bonded interface are critical for this kind of application since the mobile charges generated by radiation inside the bonded bulk are expected to transit through the interface in order to be collected by the read-out electronics. In this work, we propose to explore and develop a model for the so-called Transient Current Technique (TCT) to identify the presence of deep traps at the bonded interface. For this purpose, we consider a simple PIN diode reversely biased where the ultra-low doped active region of interest is set in full depletion. In a first step, Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD is used to evaluate the soundness of this technique for interface traps characterization such as it may happen in bonded interfaces. Next, an analytical model is developed in details to give a better insight into the physics behind the TCT for interface layers. Further, this can be used as a simple tool to evidence what are the relevant parameters influencing the TCT signal and to set the basis for preliminary characterizations.

  17. Hydrogen bond dynamical properties of adsorbed liquid water monolayers with various TiO2 interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Niall J.; Kavathekar, Ritwik S.; MacElroy, J. M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Equilibrium classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate the hydrogen-bonding kinetics of water in contact with rutile-(110), rutile-(101), rutile-(100), and anatase-(101) surfaces at room temperature (300 K). It was observed that anatase-(101) exhibits the longest-lived hydrogen bonds in terms of overall persistence, followed closely by rutile-(110). The relaxation times, defined as the integral of the autocorrelation of the hydrogen bond persistence function, were also longer for these two cases, while decay of the autocorrelation function was slower. The increased number and overall persistence of hydrogen bonds in the adsorbed water monolayers at these surfaces, particularly for anatase-(101), may serve to promote possible water photolysis activity thereon.

  18. Mechanical properties of uniaxial natural fabric Grewia tilifolia reinforced epoxy based composites: Effects of chemical treatment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jayaramudu, J

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chemical treatment on the mechanical, morphological, and chemical resistance properties of uniaxial natural fabrics, Grewia tilifolia/epoxy composites, were studied. In order to enhance the interfacial bonding between the epoxy matrix...

  19. Molecular Mechanics of the Moisture Effect on Epoxy/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lik-ho Tam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The strong structural integrity of polymer nanocomposite is influenced in the moist environment; but the fundamental mechanism is unclear, including the basis for the interactions between the absorbed water molecules and the structure, which prevents us from predicting the durability of its applications across multiple scales. In this research, a molecular dynamics model of the epoxy/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT nanocomposite is constructed to explore the mechanism of the moisture effect, and an analysis of the molecular interactions is provided by focusing on the hydrogen bond (H-bond network inside the nanocomposite structure. The simulations show that at low moisture concentration, the water molecules affect the molecular interactions by favorably forming the water-nanocomposite H-bonds and the small cluster, while at high concentration the water molecules predominantly form the water-water H-bonds and the large cluster. The water molecules in the epoxy matrix and the epoxy-SWCNT interface disrupt the molecular interactions and deteriorate the mechanical properties. Through identifying the link between the water molecules and the nanocomposite structure and properties, it is shown that the free volume in the nanocomposite is crucial for its structural integrity, which facilitates the moisture accumulation and the distinct material deteriorations. This study provides insights into the moisture-affected structure and properties of the nanocomposite from the nanoscale perspective, which contributes to the understanding of the nanocomposite long-term performance under the moisture effect.

  20. Molecular Mechanics of the Moisture Effect on Epoxy/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Lik-Ho; Wu, Chao

    2017-10-13

    The strong structural integrity of polymer nanocomposite is influenced in the moist environment; but the fundamental mechanism is unclear, including the basis for the interactions between the absorbed water molecules and the structure, which prevents us from predicting the durability of its applications across multiple scales. In this research, a molecular dynamics model of the epoxy/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) nanocomposite is constructed to explore the mechanism of the moisture effect, and an analysis of the molecular interactions is provided by focusing on the hydrogen bond (H-bond) network inside the nanocomposite structure. The simulations show that at low moisture concentration, the water molecules affect the molecular interactions by favorably forming the water-nanocomposite H-bonds and the small cluster, while at high concentration the water molecules predominantly form the water-water H-bonds and the large cluster. The water molecules in the epoxy matrix and the epoxy-SWCNT interface disrupt the molecular interactions and deteriorate the mechanical properties. Through identifying the link between the water molecules and the nanocomposite structure and properties, it is shown that the free volume in the nanocomposite is crucial for its structural integrity, which facilitates the moisture accumulation and the distinct material deteriorations. This study provides insights into the moisture-affected structure and properties of the nanocomposite from the nanoscale perspective, which contributes to the understanding of the nanocomposite long-term performance under the moisture effect.

  1. Determination of the bonding strength in solid oxide fuel cells’interfaces by Schwickerath crack initiation test

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Ševeček, O.; Frandsen, L. H.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Molin, S.; Charlas, B.; Hjelm, J.; Cannio, M.; Hendriksen, P. V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 11 (2017), s. 3565-3578 ISSN 0955-2219 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Schwickerath crack-initiation test * Three-point bending test * SOFC interfaces * Metal-ceramic bond strength Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016 https://apps.webofknowledge.com/full_record.do?product=WOS&search_mode=GeneralSearch&qid=3&SID=S1ftxS2ACYn8QwRNK3P&page=1&doc=1

  2. First-principles investigation of the structure and synergistic chemical bonding of Ag and Mg at the Al | Ω interface in a Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lipeng; Irving, Douglas L.; Zikry, Mohammed A.; Brenner, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Density functional theory was used to characterize the atomic structure and bonding of the Al | Ω interface in a Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy. The most stable interfacial structure was found to be connected by Al-Al bonds with a hexagonal Al lattice on the surface of the Ω phase sitting on the vacant hollow sites of the Al {1 1 1} matrix plane. The calculations predict that when substituted separately for Al at this interface, Ag and Mg do not enhance the interface stability through chemical bonding. Combining Ag and Mg, however, was found to chemically stabilize this interface, with the lowest-energy structure examined being a bi-layer with Ag atoms adjacent to the Al matrix and Mg adjacent to the Ω phase. This study provides an atomic arrangement for the interfacial bi-layer observed experimentally in this alloy.

  3. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2007-01-01

    of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin...

  4. Effect of water absorption on the mechanical properties of nanoclay filled recycled cellulose fibre reinforced epoxy hybrid nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Alamri, H.

    2013-01-01

    Recycled cellulose fibre (RCF) reinforced epoxy/clay nanocomposites were successfully synthesized with different weight percentages (0%, 1%, 3% and 5%) of organoclay platelets (30B). The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of water absorption on the physical and mechanical properties of the RCF reinforced epoxy/clay nanocomposites. TEM images indicated a well-intercalated structure of nanoclay/epoxy matrix with some exfoliated regions. Water absorption was found to decrease as the clay content increased. The flexural strength, flexural modulus and fracture toughness significantly decreased as a result of water absorption. However, the properties of impact strength and impact toughness were found to increase after exposing to water. The addition of nanoclay slightly minimized the effect of moisture on the mechanical properties. SEM images showed that water absorption severely damaged the cellulose fibres and the bonding at fibres-matrix interfaces in wet composites. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A strategy to synthesize graphene-incorporated lignin polymer composite materials with uniform graphene dispersion and covalently bonded interface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Duong, Le Dai; Ma, Yifei; Sun, Yan; Hong, Sung Yong; Kim, Ye Chan; Suhr, Jonghwan; Nam, Jae-Do

    2017-08-01

    Graphene-incorporated polymer composites have been demonstrated to have excellent mechanical and electrical properties. In the field of graphene-incorporated composite material synthesis, there are two main obstacles: Non-uniform dispersion of graphene filler in the matrix and weak interface bonding between the graphene filler and polymer matrix. To overcome these problems, we develop an in-situ polymerization strategy to synthesize uniformly dispersed and covalently bonded graphene/lignin composites. Graphene oxide (GO) was chemically modified by 4,4'-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) to introduce isocyanate groups and form the urethane bonds with lignin macromonomers. Subsequential polycondensation reactions of lignin groups with caprolactone and sebacoyl chloride bring about a covalent network of modified GO and lignin-based polymers. The flexible and robust lignin polycaprolactone polycondensate/modified GO (Lig-GOm) composite membranes are achieved after vacuum filtration, which have tunable hydrophilicity and electrical resistance according to the contents of GOm. This research transforms lignin from an abundant biomass into film-state composite materials, paving a new way for the utilization of biomass wastes.

  6. Control activity of yeast geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase from dimer interface through H-bonds and hydrophobic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Kang; Teng, Kuo-Hsun; Lin, Sheng-Wei; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Liang, Po-Huang

    2013-04-23

    Previously we showed that yeast geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) becomes an inactive monomer when the first N-terminal helix involved in dimerization is deleted. This raises questions regarding why dimerization is required for GGPPS activity and which amino acids in the dimer interface are essential for dimerization-mediated activity. According to the GGPPS crystal structure, three amino acids (N101, N104, and Y105) located in the helix F of one subunit are near the active site of the other subunit. As presented here, when these residues were replaced individually with Ala caused insignificant activity changes, N101A/Y105A and N101A/N104A but not N104A/Y105A showed remarkably decreased k(cat) values (200-250-fold). The triple mutant N101A/N104A/Y105A displayed no detectable activity, although dimer was retained in these mutants. Because N101 and Y105 form H-bonds with H139 and R140 in the other subunit, respectively, we generated H139A/R140A double mutant and found it was inactive and became monomeric. Therefore, the multiple mutations apparently influence the integrity of the catalytic site due to the missing H-bonding network. Moreover, Met111, also on the highly conserved helix F, was necessary for dimer formation and enzyme activity. When Met111 was replaced with Glu, the negative-charged repulsion converted half of the dimer into a monomer. In conclusion, the H-bonds mainly through N101 for maintaining substrate binding stability and the hydrophobic interaction of M111 in dimer interface are essential for activity of yeast GGPPS.

  7. Heteromolecular metal–organic interfaces: Electronic and structural fingerprints of chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Schröder, Sonja; Kumpf, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a study of molecular donor–acceptor blends adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1). • Geometric and electronic structure of blends and pristine phases are compared. • The surface bonding of the acceptor is strengthened, that of the donor weakened. • But counter intuitively, the acceptor (donor) bond length becomes larger (smaller). • This contradiction is resolved by a model based on charge transfer via the surface. - Abstract: Beside the fact that they attract highest interest in the field of organic electronics, heteromolecular structures adsorbed on metal surfaces, in particular donor–acceptor blends, became a popular field in fundamental science, possibly since some surprising and unexpected behaviors were found for such systems. One is the apparent breaking of a rather fundamental rule in chemistry, namely that stronger chemical bonds go along with shorter bond lengths, as it is, e.g., well-known for the sequence from single to triple bonds. In this review we summarize the results of heteromolecular monolayer structures adsorbed on Ag(1 1 1), which – regarding this rule – behave in a counterintuitive way. The charge acceptor moves away from the substrate while its electronic structure indicates a stronger chemical interaction, indicated by a shift of the formerly lowest unoccupied molecular orbital toward higher binding energies. The donor behaves in the opposite way, it gives away charge, hence, electronically the bonding to the surface becomes weaker, but at the same time it also approaches the surface. It looks as if the concordant link between electronic and geometric structure was broken. But both effects can be explained by a substrate-mediated charge transfer from the donor to the acceptor. The charge reorganization going along with this transfer is responsible for both, the lifting-up of the acceptor molecule and the filling of its LUMO, and also for the reversed effects at the donor molecules. In the end, both molecules

  8. Epoxy Nanocomposites Containing Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cong; Mullins, Michael; Hawkins, Spencer; Kotaki, Masaya; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2018-01-10

    Zeolitic imidazole framework-8 (ZIF-8) is utilized as a functional filler and a curing agent in the preparation of epoxy nanocomposites. The imidazole group on the surface of the ZIF-8 initiates epoxy curing, resulting in covalent bonding between the ZIF-8 crystals and epoxy matrix. A substantial reduction in dielectric constant and increase in tensile modulus were observed. The implication of the present study for utilization of metal-organic framework to improve physical and mechanical properties of polymeric matrixes is discussed.

  9. Structure and strength at the bonding interface of a titanium-segmented polyurethane composite through 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate for artificial organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Harumi; Doi, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Equo; Yoneyama, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Hanawa, Takao

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the structure and strength at the bonding interface of a titanium (Ti)-segmented polyurethane (SPU) composite through (3-trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (gamma-MPS) for artificial organs. The effects of the thickness of the gamma-MPS layer on the shear bonding strength between Ti and SPU were investigated. Ti disks were immersed in various concentrations of gamma-MPS solutions for several immersion times. The depth profiles of elements and the thickness of the gamma-MPS layer were determined by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and ellipsometry, respectively. The bonding stress at the Ti/gamma-MPS/SPU interface was evaluated with a shear bonding test. Furthermore, the fractured surface of a Ti-SPU composite was observed by optical microscopy and characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Consequently, the thickness of the gamma-MPS layer was controlled by the concentration of the gamma-MPS solution and immersion time. The shear bonding stress at the interface increased with the increase of the thickness of the gamma-MPS layer. Therefore, the control of the thickness of the gamma-MPS layer is significant to increase the shear bonding stress at the Ti/gamma-MPS/SPU interface. These results are significant to create composites for artificial organs consisting of other metals and polymers. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Feasibility of using ultrasonic pulse velocity to measure the bond between new and old concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fareed Hameed Majeed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Connecting new and old concrete is required in many practical situations, such as repairing, strengthening or extending existing reinforced concrete buildings or members. In addition to using this technique at construction joints. It is obvious the practical difficulties to measure the bond attained at the interface surface between the new and old concrete. Doing the destructive shear test at the interface surface is not an option in most practical cases due to its destructive character. So, this paper aims to study the feasibility of using the nondestructive ultrasonic pulse velocity to evaluate the bond attained at the interface surface between new and old concrete. An experimental work has been done to 24 specimens of normal and high strength concrete, with and without using an epoxy bonding agent at the interface that connect the two materials. The results of experiments clearly shown that this method can be used to evaluate the acquired bond between the new and old concrete.

  11. [Interface bond and compatibility between GI-II glass/alumina composite and Vitadur alpha veneering porcelain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yukun; Chao, Yonglie; Liao, Yunmao

    2002-01-01

    Multiple layer techniques were commonly employed in fabricating all-ceramic restorations. Bond and compatibility between layers were vitally important for the clinical success of the restorations. The purposes of this study were to investigate the bond of the interface between the GI-II glass/alumina composite and Vitadur alpha veneering porcelain, and to study the thermal compatibility between them. Prepared a bar shaped specimen of GI-II glass/alumina composite 25 mm x 5 mm x 1 mm in size, with bottom surface pre-notched. The upper surface was veneered with Vitadur alpha veneering porcelain (0.2 mm opaque dentin and 0.6 mm dentin porcelain), then fractured and the fracture surface were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron microprobe analyzer (EMPA) with electron beam of 10 micrometer in diameter; ten all-ceramic single crowns for an upper right central incisor were fabricated and the temperatures of thermal shock resistance were tested. SEM observation showed tight bond between the composite and the porcelain; The results of EMPA showed that penetration of Na, Al elements from glass/alumina into veneering porcelain and Si, K, Ca elements from veneering porcelain into glass/alumina occurred after sintering baking; The temperature of thermal shock resistance for anterior crowns in this study was 158 +/- 10.3 degrees C, cracks were mainly distributed in veneering porcelain with thicker layer. Chemical bond exists between the GI-II glass/alumina composite and Vitadur alpha veneering porcelain, and there is good thermal compatibility between them.

  12. Crystallographic studies evidencing the high energy tolerance to disrupting the interface disulfide bond of thioredoxin 1 from white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Acevedo, Adam A; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2014-12-15

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a small 12-kDa redox protein that catalyzes the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins from different biological systems. A recent study of the crystal structure of white leg shrimp thioredoxin 1 from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvTrx) revealed a dimeric form of the protein mediated by a covalent link through a disulfide bond between Cys73 from each monomer. In the present study, X-ray-induced damage in the catalytic and the interface disulfide bond of LvTrx was studied at atomic resolution at different transmission energies of 8% and 27%, 12.8 keV at 100 K in the beamline I-24 at Diamond Light Source. We found that at an absorbed dose of 32 MGy, the X-ray induces the cleavage of the disulfide bond of each catalytic site; however, the interface disulfide bond was cleaved at an X-ray adsorbed dose of 85 MGy; despite being the most solvent-exposed disulfide bond in LvTrx (~50 Å2). This result clearly established that the interface disulfide bond is very stable and, therefore, less susceptible to being reduced by X-rays. In fact, these studies open the possibility of the existence in solution of a dimeric LvTrx.

  13. Crystallographic Studies Evidencing the High Energy Tolerance to Disrupting the Interface Disulfide Bond of Thioredoxin 1 from White Leg Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A. Campos-Acevedo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin (Trx is a small 12-kDa redox protein that catalyzes the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins from different biological systems. A recent study of the crystal structure of white leg shrimp thioredoxin 1 from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvTrx revealed a dimeric form of the protein mediated by a covalent link through a disulfide bond between Cys73 from each monomer. In the present study, X-ray-induced damage in the catalytic and the interface disulfide bond of LvTrx was studied at atomic resolution at different transmission energies of 8% and 27%, 12.8 keV at 100 K in the beamline I-24 at Diamond Light Source. We found that at an absorbed dose of 32 MGy, the X-ray induces the cleavage of the disulfide bond of each catalytic site; however, the interface disulfide bond was cleaved at an X-ray adsorbed dose of 85 MGy; despite being the most solvent-exposed disulfide bond in LvTrx (~50 Å2. This result clearly established that the interface disulfide bond is very stable and, therefore, less susceptible to being reduced by X-rays. In fact, these studies open the possibility of the existence in solution of a dimeric LvTrx.

  14. Evaluación de la adherencia de uniones adhesivas metálicas con adhesivos epoxídicos modificados Evaluation of the adherence of bonded metallic joints with modified epoxy adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiberto González Garcia

    2008-03-01

    agents. The adhesive properties were investigated using the epoxy resins as independent systems as well as the modified resin. The adhesive properties of modified and unmodified epoxy resins were studied using steel alloy (ASTM A36 as adherent. The adherence has been evaluated using three geometric assays of steel-steel bonded joints. The rheological behavior of the adhesives was investigated under isothermal conditions. The rheological parameters associated with the curing reaction such as reaction rate, pot life and gel time of the pure adhesives were related to the chemical structure of the curing agents. The cloud point and the gel time of the modified adhesives were related to the morphology and the reaction rate, respectively. The morphology was characterized by scanning electronic microscopy. The adherence of the adhesive joints at different mechanical solicitations was related to the generated morphology by the dispersed phase of each modifier and the networks structures of the epoxy adhesives.

  15. Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces for High-temperature Packaging: Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVoto, Douglas J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-19

    As maximum device temperatures approach 200 °Celsius, continuous operation, sintered silver materials promise to maintain bonds at these high temperatures without excessive degradation rates. A detailed characterization of the thermal performance and reliability of sintered silver materials and processes has been initiated for the next year. Future steps in crack modeling include efforts to simulate crack propagation directly using the extended finite element method (X-FEM), a numerical technique that uses the partition of unity method for modeling discontinuities such as cracks in a system.

  16. Effect of tack coat on bonding characteristics at interface between asphalt concrete layers; Asphalt concrete no sokan fuchaku ni okeru tack concrete no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachiya, Y. [Port and Harbour Research Inst., Kanagawa (Japan); Umeno, S. [Ministry of Transport, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, K. [Nagaoka National College of Technology, Niigata (Japan)

    1997-08-20

    The effect of tack coat on bonding characteristics at the interface between surface and base layers was studied for airport asphalt pavement. In a fracture behavior, shear stress is first caused by horizontal loading at the interface between surface and base layers, resulting in peeling of the layers in the case of poor bonding. Further loading under the above condition results in fracture of asphalt concrete layers by bending or tensile actions. The bonding strength between layers decreases with an increase in interval of construction between surface and base layers, while the bonding strength between layers increases with sufficient curing of tack coat. Curing for 1 hour in the daytime and 6 hours or more in the nighttime is sufficient for evaporation of water content in asphalt emulsion. The use of conventional asphalt emulsion for the sandy interface as tack coat deduces the bonding strength in the case of poor curing. Asphalt emulsion containing high-penetration rubber can improve the bonding strength. 12 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Interface characteristic during bonding of Be and HR-1 stainless steel by hot pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hui; Kang Renmu; Zhou Shangqi; Kong Jilan; Zhang Pengcheng

    2010-01-01

    Be and HR-I stainless steel was diffusion bonded by hot pressing. The microstructure,composition and phase distribution and mechanical properties of the joints were analyzed using the optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy(SEM), scanning auger microspectroscopy(SAM) and x-ray diffraction(XRD), and the effect of different interlayer materials Cu and Al and Ag-Cu alloy was also discussed. The results show that it is not easy to joint Be and HR-1 stainless when Al was used as the interlayer material, but good joints can be obtained using Cu and Ag and Cu alloy as the interlayer materials, because the formation of Be-Fe brittle intermetallic compounds was prevented. Ag-Cu alloy is the best interlayer materials among them, as it can reduce the mutual diffusion between Be and Fe. (authors)

  18. Probabilistic analysis of the influence of the bonding degree of the stem-cement interface in the performance of cemented hip prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, M A; Grasa, J; García-Aznar, J M; Bea, J A; Doblaré, M

    2006-01-01

    The long-term behavior of the stem-cement interface is one of the most frequent topics of discussion in the design of cemented total hip replacements, especially with regards to the process of damage accumulation in the cement layer. This effect is analyzed here comparing two different situations of the interface: completely bonded and debonded with friction. This comparative analysis is performed using a probabilistic computational approach that considers the variability and uncertainty of determinant factors that directly compromise the damage accumulation in the cement mantle. This stochastic technique is based on the combination of probabilistic finite elements (PFEM) and a cumulative damage approach known as B-model. Three random variables were considered: muscle and joint contact forces at the hip (both for walking and stair climbing), cement damage and fatigue properties of the cement. The results predicted that the regions with higher failure probability in the bulk cement are completely different depending on the stem-cement interface characteristics. In a bonded interface, critical sites appeared at the distal and medial parts of the cement, while for debonded interfaces, the critical regions were found distally and proximally. In bonded interfaces, the failure probability was higher than in debonded ones. The same conclusion may be established for stair climbing in comparison with walking activity.

  19. Characterization of Epoxy Functionalized Graphite Nanoparticles and the Physical Properties of Epoxy Matrix Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Bauer, Jonathan L.; Maryanski, Michael J.; Heimann, Paula J.; Barlow, Jeremy P.; Gosau, Jan-Michael; Allred, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach to the functionalization of graphite nanoparticles. The technique provides a mechanism for covalent bonding between the filler and matrix, with minimal disruption to the sp2 hybridization of the pristine graphene sheet. Functionalization proceeded by covalently bonding an epoxy monomer to the surface of expanded graphite, via a coupling agent, such that the epoxy concentration was measured as approximately 4 wt.%. The impact of dispersing this material into an epoxy resin was evaluated with respect to the mechanical properties and electrical conductivity of the graphite-epoxy nanocomposite. At a loading as low as 0.5 wt.%, the electrical conductivity was increased by five orders of magnitude relative to the base resin. The material yield strength was increased by 30% and Young s modulus by 50%. These results were realized without compromise to the resin toughness.

  20. Moisture Absorption Characteristics of Epoxy Based Adhesive Reinforced with CTBN and Ceramic Particles for Bonded-in Timber Connection: Fickian or Non-Fickian Behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Z; Ansell, M P; Smedley, D

    2011-01-01

    For in-situ bonding of pultruded rod into timber structural members, such as in the construction of bonded-in timber connection, strengthening and repair of timber structures, the adhesive used must be thixotropic, room temperature cure, environmentally stable and friendly and applied at without pressure. This study investigates the moisture absorption characteristics of three adhesives specially formulated for bonded-in timber connections where the adhesives are reinforced with nano- and micro-particles denoted as CB10TSS (standard adhesive), Albipox (CB10TSS/CTBN) and Timberset (ceramics filled adhesive) with the aim to improve mechanical properties and raise glass transition temperature. The effect of high temperatures and high humidity on the properties of adhesives were determined following conditioning at different temperatures (20 deg. C, 30 deg. C and 50 deg. C) and relative humidities (65%, 75% and 95%) and soaking in water at 20 deg. C In all cases the properties of Albipox were least affected by environment but Timberset exhibited the lowest moisture uptake. Exposure to humid environments at temperatures 20 deg. C and 30 deg. C for CB10TSS and Albipox and 50deg. C for Timberset resulted in water uptake characterized as Fickian which had only a modest effect on properties. However, exposure to humid environments at temperature (50 deg. C) which is higher than Tg resulted in non-Fickian uptake of water for CB10TSS and Albipox and a more adverse effect on properties.

  1. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy analyses of GaAs/Si interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Häussler, Dietrich [Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kaiserstraße 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany); Houben, Lothar [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Essig, Stephanie [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstraße 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Kurttepeli, Mert [Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kaiserstraße 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany); Dimroth, Frank [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstraße 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Jäger, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.jaeger@tf.uni-kiel.de [Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Kaiserstraße 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) investigations have been applied to investigate the structure and composition fluctuations near interfaces in wafer-bonded multi-junction solar cells. Multi-junction solar cells are of particular interest since efficiencies well above 40% have been obtained for concentrator solar cells which are based on III-V compound semiconductors. In this methodologically oriented investigation, we explore the potential of combining aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field STEM imaging (HAADF-STEM) with spectroscopic techniques, such as EELS and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), and with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), in order to analyze the effects of fast atom beam (FAB) and ion beam bombardment (IB) activation treatments on the structure and composition of bonding interfaces of wafer-bonded solar cells on Si substrates. Investigations using STEM/EELS are able to measure quantitatively and with high precision the widths and the fluctuations in element distributions within amorphous interface layers of nanometer extensions, including those of light elements. Such measurements allow the control of the activation treatments and thus support assessing electrical conductivity phenomena connected with impurity and dopant distributions near interfaces for optimized performance of the solar cells. - Highlights: • Aberration-corrected TEM and EELS reveal structural and elemental profiles across GaAs/Si bond interfaces in wafer-bonded GaInP/GaAs/Si - multi-junction solar cells. • Fluctuations in elemental concentration in nanometer-thick amorphous interface layers, including the disrubutions of light elements, are measured using EELS. • The projected widths of the interface layers are determined on the atomic scale from STEM-HAADF measurements. • The effects of atom and ion beam activation treatment on the bonding

  2. Prediction of brittle fracture of epoxy-aluminum flanging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korbel J.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fracture mechanical approach for estimation of critical bending load of different types of aluminum-epoxy flanging and comparison with experimental measurements. For this purpose, several designs of the flanges were investigated. The flanges were glued to the epoxy bars and adhesive-epoxy interface was considered as a bi-material notch. Prediction of the failure is based on generalized stress intensity factor and generalized fracture toughness.

  3. Dentin bond strength and nanoleakage of the adhesive interface after intracoronal bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Vanessa; Sebold, Maicon; Shinohara, Mirela Sanae; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega Rodrigues; Giannini, Marcelo

    2018-04-01

    This study evaluated dentin bond strength (BS) and nanoleakage of non- and pre-etched dentin immediately (T 0 ,), 7 days (T 7 ), and 14 days (T 14 ) after bleaching. Bovine incisors (150) were selected and half of them submitted to intrapulpal dentin etching (e). Non- and pre-etched dentin were subjected to the following (n = 15): no bleaching/control (C); 35% carbamide peroxide (CP); 35% hydrogen peroxide (35% HP); 25% hydrogen peroxide (25% HP); and sodium perborate (SP). Bleaching agents were applied to the pulp chamber four times within a 72-h interval. Afterwards, pulp chamber dentin was prepared for the BS test at different evaluation times (n = 5): T 0 , T 7 , and T 14 . Composite blocks were built on pulp chamber and sectioned in slices. Slices were reduced to an hour-glass shape with a cross-sectional area of 0.8 mm 2 and submitted to microtensile BS test. Two additional specimens for each group were prepared for nanoleakage evaluation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results were analyzed by ANOVA (two-way) and Dunnett's test (p bleaching for both sound and pre-etched dentin (p bleached dentin increased for all groups, whereas the pre-etched SPe group presented BS similar to the Ce. Nanoleakage within the hybrid layer was perceptible immediately after bleaching, although a decrease in nanoleakage was observed for all groups at T 14 . Adhesive restorations should be performed 7-14 days after bleaching, according to the bleaching agent used. Intracoronal bleaching should be performed preferably with sodium perborate if previous dentin etching is applied. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Non-destructive examination of the bonding interface in DEMO divertor fingers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richou, Marianne; Missirlian, Marc; Vignal, Nicolas; Cantone, Vincent; Hernandez, Caroline; Norajitra, Prachai; Spatafora, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • SATIR tests on DEMO divertor fingers (integrating or not He cooling system). • Millimeter size artificial defects were manufactured. • Detectability of millimeter size artificial defects was evaluated. • SATIR can detect defect in DEMO divertor fingers. • Simulations are well correlated to SATIR tests. -- Abstract: Plasma facing components (PFCs) with tungsten (W) armor materials for DEMO divertor require a high heat flux removal capability (at least 10 MW/m 2 in steady-state conditions). The reference divertor PFC concept is a finger with a tungsten tile as a protection and sacrificial layer brazed to a thimble made of tungsten alloy W – 1% La 2 O 3 (WL10). Defects may be located at the W thimble to W tile interface. As the number of fingers is considerable (>250,000), it is then a major issue to develop a reliable control procedure in order to control with a non-destructive examination the fabrication processes. The feasibility for detecting defect with infrared thermography SATIR test bed is presented. SATIR is based on the heat transient method and is used as an inspection tool in order to assess component heat transfer capability. SATIR tests were performed on fingers integrating or not the complex He cooling system (steel cartridge with jet holes). Millimeter size artificial defects were manufactured and their detectability was evaluated. Results of this study demonstrate that the SATIR method can be considered as a relevant non-destructive technique examination for the defect detection of DEMO divertor fingers

  5. Interface behaviour of Al2O3/Ti joints produced by liquid state bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemus R, J.; Guevara L, A. O.; Zarate M, J.

    2014-08-01

    The main objective of this work was to determine various aspects during brazing of Al 2 O 3 samples to commercially titanium alloy grade 4 with biocompatibility properties, using a Au-foil as joining element. Al 2 O 3 ceramic was previously produced by sintering of powder cylindrical shape at 1550 grades C for 120 minutes. Previously to joining experiments, the surface of Al 2 O 3 samples were coating, by chemical vapor depositions (CVD) process, with a Mo layer of 2 and 4 μm thick and then stacked together with the Ti samples. Joining experiments were carried out on Al 2 O 3 -Mo/Au/Ti combinations at temperature of 1100 grades C using different holding times under vacuum atmosphere. The experimental results show a successful joining Mo-Al 2 O 3 to Ti. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (Sem) revealed that joining of Al 2 O 3 to metal occurred by the formation of a homogeneous diffusion zone with no interfacial cracking or porosity at the interface. Results by electron probe micro analysis (EPMA) of Al 2 O 3 -Mo/Au/Ti combinations revealed that Mo traveled inside the joining elements and remained as solid solutions, however during cooling process Mo had a tendency to stay as a precipitate phase and atomic distributions of elements show a concentration line of Mo inside the joining element Au. On the other hand, well interaction of Ti with Au form different phases; like Ti 3 Au and Ti Au. (author)

  6. Principle and modelling of Transient Current Technique for interface traps characterization in monolithic pixel detectors obtained by CMOS-compatible wafer bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Bronuzzi, J.; Moll, M.; Sallese, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of monolithic silicon radiation detectors, a fabrication process based on a recently developed silicon wafer bonding technique at low temperature was proposed. Ideally, this new process would enable direct bonding of a read-out electronic chip wafer on a highly resistive silicon substrate wafer, which is expected to present many advantages since it would combine high performance IC's with high sensitive ultra-low doped bulk silicon detectors. But electrical properties of the bonded interface are critical for this kind of application since the mobile charges generated by radiation inside the bonded bulk are expected to transit through the interface in order to be collected by the read-out electronics. In this work, we propose to explore and develop a model for the so-called Transient Current Technique (TCT) to identify the presence of deep traps at the bonded interface. For this purpose, we consider a simple PIN diode reversely biased where the ultra-low doped active region of interest is set ...

  7. Optimization of interfacial properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via a modified polyacrylate emulsion sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Xiaomin; Zhu, Bo; Cai, Xun; Liu, Jianjun; Qiao, Kun; Yu, Junwei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An improved interfacial adhesion in CF/EP composite by FSMPA sizing was put forward. • Sized CFs featured promotions of wettability, chemical activity and mechanical property. • A sizing mechanism containing chemical interaction and physical absorption was proposed. - Abstract: The adhesion behavior of epoxy resin to carbon fibers has always been a challenge, on account of the inertness of carbon fibers and the lack of reactive functional groups. In this work, a modified polyacrylate sizing agent was prepared to modify the interface between the carbon fiber and the epoxy matrix. The surface characteristics of carbon fibers were investigated to determine chemical composition, morphology, wettability, interfacial phase analysis and interfacial adhesion. Sized carbon fibers featured improved wettability and a slightly decreased surface roughness due to the coverage of a smooth sizing layer, compared with the unsized ones. Moreover, the content of surface activated carbon atoms increased from 12.65% to 24.70% and the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fiber/epoxy composites raised by 14.2%, indicating a significant improvement of chemical activity and mechanical property. SEM images of the fractured surface of composites further proved that a gradient interfacial structure with increased thicknesses was formed due to the transition role of the sizing. Based on these results, a sizing mechanism consisting of chemical interaction bonding and physical force absorption was proposed, which provides an efficient and feasible method to solve the poor adhesion between carbon fiber and epoxy matrix.

  8. Optimization of interfacial properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites via a modified polyacrylate emulsion sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Xiaomin [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhu, Bo, E-mail: zhubo@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Cai, Xun, E-mail: caixunzh@sdu.edu.cn [School of Computer Science and Technology, Shandong University, Jinan 250101 (China); Liu, Jianjun [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Qiao, Kun [Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Yu, Junwei [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Carbon Fiber Engineering Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • An improved interfacial adhesion in CF/EP composite by FSMPA sizing was put forward. • Sized CFs featured promotions of wettability, chemical activity and mechanical property. • A sizing mechanism containing chemical interaction and physical absorption was proposed. - Abstract: The adhesion behavior of epoxy resin to carbon fibers has always been a challenge, on account of the inertness of carbon fibers and the lack of reactive functional groups. In this work, a modified polyacrylate sizing agent was prepared to modify the interface between the carbon fiber and the epoxy matrix. The surface characteristics of carbon fibers were investigated to determine chemical composition, morphology, wettability, interfacial phase analysis and interfacial adhesion. Sized carbon fibers featured improved wettability and a slightly decreased surface roughness due to the coverage of a smooth sizing layer, compared with the unsized ones. Moreover, the content of surface activated carbon atoms increased from 12.65% to 24.70% and the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of carbon fiber/epoxy composites raised by 14.2%, indicating a significant improvement of chemical activity and mechanical property. SEM images of the fractured surface of composites further proved that a gradient interfacial structure with increased thicknesses was formed due to the transition role of the sizing. Based on these results, a sizing mechanism consisting of chemical interaction bonding and physical force absorption was proposed, which provides an efficient and feasible method to solve the poor adhesion between carbon fiber and epoxy matrix.

  9. Investigation on Bond-Slip Behavior of Z-Pin Interfaces in X-Cor® Sandwich Structures Using Z-Pin Pull-Out Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hangying; Xiao, Jun; Chu, Qiyi

    2018-05-01

    The Z-Pin interfacial bond properties play an important role in the structural performance of X-Cor® sandwich structures. This paper presents an experimental investigation on bond-slip behavior of Z-Pin interfaces using Z-Pin pull-out test. Based on the experimental data the whole Z-Pin pull-out process consists of three stages: initial bonding, debonding and frictional sliding. Comparative experimental study on the influence of design parameters on bond-slip behavior of Z-Pin interfaces has also been performed. Numerical analyses were conducted with the ABAQUS finite element (FE) program to simulate the Z-Pins bond-slip response of the pull-out test. The Z-Pins interfacial bond-slip behavior was implemented using nonlinear spring elements characterized with the constitutive relation from experimental results. Numerical results were validated by comparison with experimental data, and reasonably good agreement was achieved between experimental and analytical pull-out force-slip curves.

  10. A facile route for irreversible bonding of plastic-PDMS hybrid microdevices at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Linzhi; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2010-05-21

    Plastic materials do not generally form irreversible bonds with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) regardless of oxygen plasma treatment and a subsequent thermal process. In this paper, we perform plastic-PDMS bonding at room temperature, mediated by the formation of a chemically robust amine-epoxy bond at the interfaces. Various plastic materials, such as poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), polycarbonate (PC), polyimide (PI), and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) were adopted as choices for plastic materials. Irrespective of the plastic materials used, the surfaces were successfully modified with amine and epoxy functionalities, confirmed by the surface characterizations such as water contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and chemically robust and irreversible bonding was successfully achieved within 1 h at room temperature. The bonding strengths of PDMS with PMMA and PC sheets were measured to be 180 and 178 kPa, respectively, and their assemblies containing microchannel structures endured up to 74 and 84 psi (510 and 579 kPa) of introduced compressed air, respectively, without destroying the microdevices, representing a robust and highly stable interfacial bonding. In addition to microchannel-molded PDMS bonded with flat plastic substrates, microchannel-embossed plastics were also bonded with a flat PDMS sheet, and both types of bonded assemblies displayed sufficiently robust bonding, tolerating an intense influx of liquid whose per-minute injection volume was nearly 1000 to 2000 times higher than the total internal volume of the microchannel used. In addition to observing the bonding performance, we also investigated the potential of surface amine and epoxy functionalities as durable chemical adhesives by observing their storage-time-dependent bonding performances.

  11. Surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Dharmalingam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fly ash, an inorganic alumino silicate has been used as filler in epoxy matrix, but it reduces the mechanical properties due to its poor dispersion and interfacial bonding with the epoxy matrix. To improve its interfacial bonding with epoxy matrix, surface treatment of fly ash was done using surfactant sodium lauryl sulfate and silane coupling agent glycidoxy propyl trimethoxy silane. An attempt is also made to reduce the particle size of fly ash using high pressure pulverizer. To improve fly ash dispersion in epoxy matrix, the epoxy was modified by mixing with amine containing liquid silicone rubber (ACS. The effect of surface treated fly ash with varying filler loadings from 10 to 40% weight on the mechanical, morphological and thermal properties of modified epoxy composites was investigated. The surface treated fly ash was characterized by particle size analyzer and FTIR spectra. Morphological studies of surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites indicate good dispersion of fillers in the modified epoxy matrix and improves its mechanical properties. Impact strength of the surface treated fly ash filled modified epoxy composites show more improvement than unmodified composites.

  12. Effects of Nanofillers on the Thermo-Mechanical Properties and Chemical Resistivity of Epoxy Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchudan, Raji; Pandurangan, Arumugam; Joo, Jin

    2015-06-01

    MWCNTs was synthesized using Ni-Cr/MgO by CVD method and were purified. The purified MWCNT was used as a filler material for the fabrication of epoxy nanocomposites. The epoxy nanocomposites with different amount (wt% = 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0) of nanofillers (CB, SiO2 and MWCNTs) were prepared by casting method. The effects of nanofillers on the properties of neat epoxy matrix were well studied. The thermal properties of nanocomposites were studied using DSC, TGA and flame retardant, and also the mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength, compressive strength, impact strength, determination of hardness and chemical resistance were studied extensively. Based on the experiment's results, 2 wt% MWCNTs loading in epoxy resin showed the highest improvement in tensile strength, as compared to neat epoxy and to other epoxy systems (CB/epoxy, SiO2/epoxy). Improvements in tensile strength, glass transition temperature and decomposition temperature were observed by the addition of MWCNTs. The mechanical properties of the epoxy nanocomposites were improved due to the interfacial bonding between the MWCNTs and epoxy resin. Strain hardening behavior was higher for MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites compared with CB/epoxy and SiO2/epoxy nanocomposites. The investigation of thermal and mechanical properties reveals that the incorporation of MWCNTs into the epoxy nanocomposites increases its thermal stability to a great extent. Discrete increase of glass transition temperature of nanocomposites is linearly dependent on MWCNTs content. Due to strong interfacial bonding between MWCNTs and epoxy resin, the chemical resistivity of MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites is superior to neat epoxy and other epoxy systems.

  13. Improving 6061-Al Grain Growth and Penetration across HIP-Bonded Clad Interfaces in Monolithic Fuel Plates: Initial Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackenberg, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McCabe, Rodney J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Montalvo, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clarke, Kester D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dvornak, Matthew J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Edwards, Randall L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Crapps, Justin M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trujillo, R. Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aikin, Beverly [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vargas, Victor D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hollis, Kendall J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lienert, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Forsyth, Robert T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harada, Kiichi L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-05-06

    Grain penetration across aluminum-aluminum cladding interfaces in research reactor fuel plates is desirable and was obtained by a legacy roll-bonding process, which attained 20-80% grain penetration. Significant grain penetration in monolithic fuel plates produced by Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) fabrication processing is equally desirable but has yet to be attained. The goal of this study was to modify the 6061-Al in such a way as to promote a much greater extent of crossinterface grain penetration in monolithic fuel plates fabricated by the HIP process. This study documents the outcomes of several strategies attempted to attain this goal. The grain response was characterized using light optical microscopy (LOM) electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) as a function of these prospective process modifications done to the aluminum prior to the HIP cycle. The strategies included (1) adding macroscopic gaps in the sandwiches to enhance Al flow, (2) adding engineering asperities to enhance Al flow, (3) adding stored energy (cold work), and (4) alternative cleaning and coating. Additionally, two aqueous cleaning methods were compared as baseline control conditions. The results of the preliminary scoping studies in all the categories are presented. In general, none of these approaches were able to obtain >10% grain penetration. Recommended future work includes further development of macroscopic grooving, transferred-arc cleaning, and combinations of these with one another and with other processes.

  14. Durability of polymer/metal interfaces under cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Tianbao

    Fatigue crack growth along metal/epoxy interface was examined in an aqueous environment and under mixed-mode conditions. A stress corrosion cracking mechanism was identified in this process. The fatigue crack growth rate in an aqueous environment was increased by several orders of magnitude and the fatigue threshold decreased by a factor of 10. The loss of adhesion in the aqueous environment was induced by the hydration of the surface oxide which resulted in a hydroxide with poor adhesion to the substrate metal. Self-assembled monolayer of long chain alkyl phosphonic acid and amino phosphonic acid were synthesized to enhance the adhesion and improve the durability of Al/epoxy interfacial bonding system. The same approach was taken to promote adhesion between copper and epoxy, where a two-component coupling system of 11-mercapto-1-undercanol and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane provided the most significant improvement in the copper/epoxy adhesion. The mixed-mode was applied by a piezoelectric actuator. Subcritical crack growth was observed along the epoxy/aluminum interface and the growth rate was found to depend on the magnitude of the applied electric field. Kinetics of the crack growth was correlated with the piezoelectric driving force. The resulting crack growth behavior was compared with the results from the conventional mechanical testing technique. Large differences were found between these two methods. Using this newly developed technique, effects of loading mode and frequency were studied. The fatigue resistance was found to increase with the mode II component and was expressed as a function of the KII/K I ratio. A strong frequency effect was observed for the subcritical crack growth along the Al/Epoxy interface, their fatigue resistance increased with the testing frequency.

  15. Accurate characterization and understanding of interface trap density trends between atomic layer deposited dielectrics and AlGaN/GaN with bonding constraint theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanan, Narayanan; Lee, Bongmook; Misra, Veena, E-mail: vmisra@ncsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, 2410 Campus Shore Drive, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Many dielectrics have been proposed for the gate stack or passivation of AlGaN/GaN based metal oxide semiconductor heterojunction field effect transistors, to reduce gate leakage and current collapse, both for power and RF applications. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is preferred for dielectric deposition as it provides uniform, conformal, and high quality films with precise monolayer control of film thickness. Identification of the optimum ALD dielectric for the gate stack or passivation requires a critical investigation of traps created at the dielectric/AlGaN interface. In this work, a pulsed-IV traps characterization method has been used for accurate characterization of interface traps with a variety of ALD dielectrics. High-k dielectrics (HfO{sub 2}, HfAlO, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) are found to host a high density of interface traps with AlGaN. In contrast, ALD SiO{sub 2} shows the lowest interface trap density (<2 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}) after annealing above 600 °C in N{sub 2} for 60 s. The trend in observed trap densities is subsequently explained with bonding constraint theory, which predicts a high density of interface traps due to a higher coordination state and bond strain in high-k dielectrics.

  16. Thin and thick layers of resin-based sealer cement bonded to root dentine compared: Adhesive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Epita S; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Harold H

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate tensile and shear bond strengths of one epoxy (AH) and two methacrylate resin-based sealers (EZ and RS) in thin and thick layers bonded to root dentine. An alignment device was prepared for accurate positioning of 20 root dentine cylinders in a predefined gap of 0.1 or 1 mm. Sealer was placed in the interface. Bond strength tests were conducted. Mode of failures and representative surfaces were evaluated. Data were analysed using anova and post-hoc tests, with P thick layer of sealer produced higher bond strength, except for the shear bond strength of EZ. Significant differences between thin and thick layers were found only in tensile bond strengths of AH and RS. Mixed type of failure was constantly found with all sealers. Bond strengths of thick layers of resin-based sealers to root dentine tended to be higher than with thin layers. © 2015 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  17. Spectrally- and Time-Resolved Sum Frequency Generation (STiR-SFG): a new tool for ultrafast hydrogen bond dynamics at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benderskii, Alexander; Bordenyuk, Andrey; Weeraman, Champika

    2006-03-01

    The recently developed spectrally- and time-resolved Sum Frequency Generation (STiR-SFG) is a surface-selective 3-wave mixing (IR+visible) spectroscopic technique capable of measuring ultrafast spectral evolution of vibrational coherences. A detailed description of this measurement will be presented, and a noniterative method or deconvolving the laser pulses will be introduced to obtain the molecular response function. STiR-SFG, combined with the frequency-domain SFG spectroscopy, was applied to study hydrogen bonding dynamics at aqueous interfaces (D2O/CaF2). Spectral dynamics of the OD-stretch on the 50-150 fs time scale provides real-time observation of ultrafast H-bond rearrangement. Tuning the IR wavelength to the blue or red side of the OD-stretch transition, we selectively monitor the dynamics of different sub-ensembles in the distribution of the H-bond structures. The blue-side excitation (weaker H-bonding) shows monotonic red-shift of the OD-frequency. In contrast, the red-side excitation (stronger H-bonding structures) produces a blue-shift and a recursion, which may indicate the presence of an underdamped intermolecular mode of interfacial water. Effect of electrolyte concentration on the H-bond dynamics will be discussed.

  18. Effect of La2O3 addition on interface chemistry between 4YSZ top layer and Ni based alloy bond coat in thermal barrier coating by EB PVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Young; Yang, Young-Hwan; Kim, Seong-Won; Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Jang, Byung-Koog; Lim, Dae-Soon; Oh, Yoon-Suk

    2014-11-01

    The effect of a 5 mol% La2O3 addition on the forming behavior and compositional variation at interface between a 4 mol% Yttria (Y2O3) stabilized ZrO2 (4YSZ) top coat and bond coat (NiCrAlY) as a thermal barrier coating (TBC) has been investigated. Top coats were deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB PVD) onto a super alloy (Ni-Cr-Co-Al) substrate without pre-oxidation of the bond coat. Top coats are found to consist of dense columnar grains with a thin interdiffusion layer between metallic bond coats. In the as-received 4YSZ coating, a thin interdiffusion zone at the interface between the top and bond coats was found to consist of a Ni-Zr intermetallic compound with a reduced quantity of Y, Al or O elements. On the other hand, in the case of an interdiffusion area of 5 mol% La2O3-added 4YSZ coating, it was found that the complicated composition and structure with La-added YSZ and Ni-Al rich compounds separately. The thermal conductivity of 5 mol% La2O3-added 4YSZ coating (- 1.6 W/m x k at 1100 degrees C) was lower than a 4YSZ coating (- 3.2 W/m x k at 1100 degrees C) alone.

  19. Paramagnetic epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Vazquez Barreiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates that macrocycles can be used as crosslinking agents for curing epoxy resins, provided that they have appropriate organic functionalities. As macrocycles can complex metal ions in their structure, this curing reaction allows for the introduction of that metal ion into the resin network. As a result, some characteristic physical properties of the metallomacrocycle could be transferred to the new material. The bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE, n = 0 and hemin (a protoporphyrin IX containing the Fe(III ion, and an additional chloride ligand have been chosen. The new material has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Fe(III remains in the high-spin state during the curing process and, consequently, the final material exhibits the magnetic characteristics of hemin. The loss of the chlorine atom ligand during the cure of the resin allows that Fe(III can act as Lewis acid, catalyzing the crosslinking reactions. At high BADGE n = 0/hemin ratios, the formation of ether and ester bonds occurs simultaneously during the process.

  20. Effects of Novel Structure Bonding Materials on Properties of Aeronautical Acrylic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Zhisheng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Novel structure bonding materials, J-351 epoxy adhesive film with low curing temperature and liquid modified acrylate SY-50s adhesive were chosen and characterized. The effects of adhesives on the mechanical properties of acrylic were studied. The results reveal that both adhesives have excellent bonding properties to acrylic. The stress-solvent crazing value of J-351 is higher than that of SY-50s. With the application of adhesive on the surface, mechanical properties of acrylic are declined. Casting acrylic shows more drastic decline than that of oriented acrylic. Through the characterization of fracture surface, we find that fracture of tensile sample derives from the side with adhesive. Mechanical properties of acrylic are more sensitive to SY-50s, because the liquid adhesive presents integrate bonding interface with acrylic. The interface between J-351 and acrylic is clear, making acrylic insensitive to J-351 film. Edge attachment strength of samples bonded with J-351 are higher than that of samples bonded with SY-50s due to the effects of adhesives on acrylic. J-351 epoxy adhesive film presents preferable application performance in the structure bonding of aeronautical acrylic.

  1. Physical, structural and thermomechanical properties of oil palm nano filler/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, N., E-mail: naheedchem@gmail.com [Laboratory of Biocomposite Technology, Institute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Products(INTROP), Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Paridah, M.T. [Laboratory of Biocomposite Technology, Institute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Products(INTROP), Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Abdan, K. [Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang Selangor (Malaysia); Ibrahim, N.A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-12-01

    The present research study deals with the fabrication of kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites by the incorporation of oil palm nano filler, montmorillonite (MMT) and organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT) at 3% loading, through hand lay-up technique. Effect of adding different nano fillers on the physical (density), structural [X-ray diffraction (XRD)] and thermomechanical analysis (TMA) of kenaf/epoxy composites were carried out. Density results revealed that the incorporation of nano filler in the kenaf/epoxy composites increases the density which in turn increases the hardness of the hybrid nanocomposites. XRD analysis confirmed the presence of nano fillers in the structure of their respective fabricated hybrid nanocomposites. All hybrid nanocomposites displayed lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) with respect to kenaf/epoxy composites. Overall results predicted that the properties improvement in nano OPEFB/kenaf/epoxy was quite comparable to MMT/kenaf/epoxy but relatively lesser to OMMT/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites and higher with respect to kenaf/epoxy composites. The improvement ascribed due to improved interfacial bonding or cross linking between kenaf fibers and epoxy matrix by addition of nano filler. - Highlights: • Nano OPEFB/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites were fabricated by hand lay-up. • Effect of nano OPEFB on density & structure of kenaf/epoxy were investigated. • Thermal expansion coefficients of kenaf/epoxy and hybrid nanocomposites evaluated. • Comparative studies were made with MMT and OMMT kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites.

  2. Physical, structural and thermomechanical properties of oil palm nano filler/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saba, N.; Paridah, M.T.; Abdan, K.; Ibrahim, N.A.

    2016-01-01

    The present research study deals with the fabrication of kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites by the incorporation of oil palm nano filler, montmorillonite (MMT) and organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT) at 3% loading, through hand lay-up technique. Effect of adding different nano fillers on the physical (density), structural [X-ray diffraction (XRD)] and thermomechanical analysis (TMA) of kenaf/epoxy composites were carried out. Density results revealed that the incorporation of nano filler in the kenaf/epoxy composites increases the density which in turn increases the hardness of the hybrid nanocomposites. XRD analysis confirmed the presence of nano fillers in the structure of their respective fabricated hybrid nanocomposites. All hybrid nanocomposites displayed lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) with respect to kenaf/epoxy composites. Overall results predicted that the properties improvement in nano OPEFB/kenaf/epoxy was quite comparable to MMT/kenaf/epoxy but relatively lesser to OMMT/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites and higher with respect to kenaf/epoxy composites. The improvement ascribed due to improved interfacial bonding or cross linking between kenaf fibers and epoxy matrix by addition of nano filler. - Highlights: • Nano OPEFB/kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites were fabricated by hand lay-up. • Effect of nano OPEFB on density & structure of kenaf/epoxy were investigated. • Thermal expansion coefficients of kenaf/epoxy and hybrid nanocomposites evaluated. • Comparative studies were made with MMT and OMMT kenaf/epoxy hybrid nanocomposites.

  3. Formation of interfacial network structure via photo-crosslinking in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Deng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of diblock copolymers (poly(n-butylacrylate-co-poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate-b-poly(glycidyl methacrylate ((PnBA-co-PHEA-b-PGMA, containing a random copolymer block PnBA-co-PHEA, were successfully synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP. After being chemically grafted onto carbon fibers, the photosensitive methacrylic groups were introduced into the random copolymer, giving a series of copolymers (poly(n-butylacrylate-co-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl acrylate-b-poly(glycidyl methacrylate((PnBA-co-PMEA-b-PGMA. Dynamic mechanical analysis indicated that the random copolymer block after ultraviolet (UV irradiation was a lightly crosslinked polymer and acted as an elastomer, forming a photo-crosslinked network structure at the interface of carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Microbond test showed that such an interfacial network structure greatly improved the cohesive strength and effectively controlled the deformation ability of the flexible interlayer. Furthermore, three kinds of interfacial network structures, i physical crosslinking by H-bonds, ii chemical crosslinking by photopolymerization, and iii interpenetrating crosslinked network by photopolymerization and epoxy curing reaction were received in carbon fiber/epoxy composite, depending on the various preparation processes.

  4. Microstructural Characterization of the U-9.1Mo Fuel/AA6061 Cladding Interface in Friction-Bonded Monolithic Fuel Plates Irradiated in the RERTR-6 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Medvedev, Pavel; Madden, James; Wachs, Dan; Clark, Curtis; Meyer, Mitch

    2015-09-01

    Low-enrichment (235U < 20 pct) U-Mo monolithic fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. The earliest design for this fuel that was investigated via reactor testing consisted of a nominally U-10Mo fuel foil encased in AA6061 (Al-6061) cladding. For a fuel design to be deemed adequate for final use in a reactor, it must maintain dimensional stability and retain fission products throughout irradiation, which means that there must be good integrity at the fuel foil/cladding interface. To investigate the nature of the fuel/cladding interface for this fuel type after irradiation, fuel plates were fabricated using a friction bonding process, tested in INL's advanced test reactor (ATR), and then subsequently characterized using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Results of this characterization showed that the fuel/cladding interaction layers present at the U-Mo fuel/AA6061 cladding interface after fabrication became amorphous during irradiation. Up to two main interaction layers, based on composition, could be found at the fuel/cladding interface, depending on location. After irradiation, an Al-rich layer contained very few fission gas bubbles, but did exhibit Xe enrichment near the AA6061 cladding interface. Another layer, which contained more Si, had more observable fission gas bubbles. In the samples produced using a focused ion beam at the interaction zone/AA6061 cladding interface, possible indications of porosity/debonding were found, which suggested that the interface in this location is relatively weak.

  5. Wettability of nano-epoxies to UHMWPE fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neema, S; Salehi-Khojin, A; Zhamu, A; Zhong, W H; Jana, S; Gan, Y X

    2006-07-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers have a unique combination of outstanding mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. However, as reinforcements for manufacturing high performance composite materials, UHMWPE fibers have poor wettability with most polymers. As a result, the interfacial bonding strength between the fibers and polymer matrices is very low. Recently, developing so-called nano-matrices containing reactive graphitic nanofibers (r-GNFs) has been proposed to promote the wetting of such matrices to certain types of fiber reinforcements. In this work, the wettability of UHMWPE fibers with different epoxy matrices including a nano-epoxy, and a pure epoxy was investigated. Systematic experimental work was conducted to determine the viscosity of the epoxies, the contact angle between the epoxies and the fibers. Also obtained are the surface energy of the fibers and the epoxies. The experimental results show that the wettability of the UHMWPE fibers with the nano-epoxy is much better than that of the UHMWPE fibers with the pure epoxy.

  6. Spectroscopic Evidence for a H Bond Network at Y356 Located at the Subunit Interface of Active E. coli Ribonucleotide Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, Thomas U; Ravichandran, Kanchana R; Stubbe, JoAnne; Kasanmascheff, Müge; Bennati, Marina

    2017-07-18

    The reaction catalyzed by E. coli ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) composed of α and β subunits that form an active α2β2 complex is a paradigm for proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes in biological transformations. β2 contains the diferric tyrosyl radical (Y 122 ·) cofactor that initiates radical transfer (RT) over 35 Å via a specific pathway of amino acids (Y 122 · ⇆ [W 48 ] ⇆ Y 356 in β2 to Y 731 ⇆ Y 730 ⇆ C 439 in α2). Experimental evidence exists for colinear and orthogonal PCET in α2 and β2, respectively. No mechanistic model yet exists for the PCET across the subunit (α/β) interface. Here, we report unique EPR spectroscopic features of Y 356 ·-β, the pathway intermediate generated by the reaction of 2,3,5-F 3 Y 122 ·-β2/CDP/ATP with wt-α2, Y 731 F-α2, or Y 730 F-α2. High field EPR (94 and 263 GHz) reveals a dramatically perturbed g tensor. [ 1 H] and [ 2 H]-ENDOR reveal two exchangeable H bonds to Y 356 ·: a moderate one almost in-plane with the π-system and a weak one. DFT calculation on small models of Y· indicates that two in-plane, moderate H bonds (r O-H ∼1.8-1.9 Å) are required to reproduce the g x value of Y 356 · (wt-α2). The results are consistent with a model, in which a cluster of two, almost symmetrically oriented, water molecules provide the two moderate H bonds to Y 356 · that likely form a hydrogen bond network of water molecules involved in either the reversible PCET across the subunit interface or in H + release to the solvent during Y 356 oxidation.

  7. Mechanical properties of graphene oxide (GO/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivan Ismael Abdullah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of graphene oxide (GO on composites based on epoxy resin were analyzed. Different contents of GO (1.5–6 vol.% were added to epoxy resin. The GO/epoxy composite was prepared using the casting method and was prepared under room temperature. Mechanical tests’ results such as tensile test, impact test and hardness test show enhancements of the mechanical properties of the GO/epoxy composite. The experimental results clearly show an improvement in the Young’s modulus, tensile strength and hardness. The impact strength was seen to decrease, pointing to brittleness increase of the GO/epoxy composite. A microstructure analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis was also performed, which showed how GO impeded the propagation of cracks in the composite. From the SEM images we observed the interface between the GO and the epoxy composite. As can be seen from this research, the GO/epoxy composites can be used for a large number of applications. The results of this research are a strong evidence for GO/epoxy composites being a potential candidate for use in a variety of industrial applications, especially for automobile parts, aircraft components, and electronic parts such as supercapacitors, transistors, etc.

  8. Effects of Interface Coating and Nitride Enhancing Additive on Properties of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fiber Reinforced Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishana T.; Hull, David R.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Babuder, Raymond

    2000-01-01

    Strong and tough Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites (SiC/ RBSN) have been fabricated by the fiber lay-up approach. Commercially available uncoated and PBN, PBN/Si-rich PBN, and BN/SiC coated SiC Hi-Nicalon fiber tows were used as reinforcement. The composites contained approximately 24 vol % of aligned 14 micron diameter SiC fibers in a porous RBSN matrix. Both one- and two-dimensional composites were characterized. The effects of interface coating composition, and the nitridation enhancing additive, NiO, on the room temperature physical, tensile, and interfacial shear strength properties of SiC/RBSN matrix composites were evaluated. Results indicate that for all three coated fibers, the thickness of the coatings decreased from the outer periphery to the interior of the tows, and that from 10 to 30 percent of the fibers were not covered with the interface coating. In the uncoated regions, chemical reaction between the NiO additive and the SiC fiber occurs causing degradation of tensile properties of the composites. Among the three interface coating combinations investigated, the BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced RBSN matrix composite showed the least amount of uncoated regions and reasonably uniform interface coating thickness. The matrix cracking stress in SiC/RBSN composites was predicted using a fracture mechanics based crack bridging model.

  9. Improvement of Interfacial Adhesion of Incorporated Halloysite-Nanotubes in Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy-Based Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Woo Lee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The heart of composite materials depends on the characteristics of their interface. The physical properties of composite materials are often described by the rule of mixtures, representing the average physical properties of the reinforcement and the matrix resin. However, in practical applications there are situations which arise where the rule of mixtures is not followed. This is because when an external energy applied to the composite material is transferred from the matrix to the reinforcement, the final physical properties are affected by the interface between them rather than the intrinsic properties of both the reinforcement and the matrix. The internal bonding strength of the interface of these composites can be enhanced by enhancing the bonding strength by adding a small amount of material at the interface. In this study, the mechanical properties were evaluated by producing a carbon fiber-reinforced composite material and improved by dispersing halloysite nanotubes (HNTs and the epoxy resin using an ultrasonic homogenizer. The interfacial bond strength increased with the addition of HNT. On the other hand, the addition of HNTs more than 3 wt % did not show the reinforcing effect by HNT agglomeration.

  10. Temperature-dependent interface characteristic of silicon wafer bonding based on an amorphous germanium layer deposited by DC-magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Shaoying; Lin, Shaoming; Ye, Yujie; Mao, Danfeng; Huang, Wei; Xu, Jianfang; Li, Cheng; Chen, Songyan

    2018-03-01

    We report a near-bubble-free low-temperature silicon (Si) wafer bonding with a thin amorphous Ge (a-Ge) intermediate layer. The DC-magnetron-sputtered a-Ge film on Si is demonstrated to be extremely flat (RMS = 0.28 nm) and hydrophilic (contact angle = 3°). The effect of the post-annealing temperature on the surface morphology and crystallinity of a-Ge film at the bonded interface is systematically identified. The relationship among the bubble density, annealing temperature, and crystallinity of a-Ge film is also clearly clarified. The crystallization of a-Ge film firstly appears at the bubble region. More interesting feature is that the crystallization starts from the center of the bubbles and sprawls to the bubble edge gradually. The H2 by-product is finally absorbed by intermediate Ge layer with crystalline phase after post annealing. Moreover, the whole a-Ge film out of the bubble totally crystallizes when the annealing time increases. This Ge integration at the bubble region leads to the decrease of the bubble density, which in turn increases the bonding strength.

  11. Development of simulation approach for two-dimensional chiral molecular self-assembly driven by hydrogen bond at the liquid/solid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuan; Yao, Man; Hao, Ce; Wan, Lijun; Wang, Yunhe; Chen, Ting; Wang, Dong; Wang, Xudong; Chen, Yonggang

    2017-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) chiral self-assembly system of 5-(benzyloxy)-isophthalic acid derivative/(S)-(+)-2-octanol/highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was studied. A combined density functional theory/molecular mechanics/molecular dynamics (DFT/MM/MD) approach for system of 2D chiral molecular self-assembly driven by hydrogen bond at the liquid/solid interface was thus proposed. Structural models of the chiral assembly were built on the basis of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images and simplified for DFT geometry optimization. Merck Molecular Force Field (MMFF) was singled out as the suitable force field by comparing the optimized configurations of MM and DFT. MM and MD simulations for hexagonal unit model which better represented the 2D assemble network were then preformed with MMFF. The adhesion energy, evolution of self-assembly process and characteristic parameters of hydrogen bond were obtained and analyzed. According to the above simulation, the stabilities of the clockwise and counterclockwise enantiomorphous networks were evaluated. The calculational results were supported by STM observations and the feasibility of the simulation method was confirmed by two other systems in the presence of chiral co-absorbers (R)-(-)-2-octanol and achiral co-absorbers 1-octanol. This theoretical simulation method assesses the stability trend of 2D enantiomorphous assemblies with atomic scale and can be applied to the similar hydrogen bond driven 2D chirality of molecular self-assembly system.

  12. Evaluation of bond strength of isothermally aged plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Jin; Lee, Dong Hoon; Koo, Jae Mean; Song, Sung Jin; Seok, Chang Sung [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mun Young [Korea Plant Service and Engineering Co., Ltd., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    In this study, disk type of thermal barrier coating system for gas turbine blade was isothermally aged in the furnace changing exposure time and temperature. For each aging condition, bond tests for three samples were conducted for evaluating degradation of adhesive or cohesive strength of thermal barrier coating system. For as-sprayed condition, the location of fracture in the bond test was in the middle of epoxy which have bond strength of 57 MPa. As specimens are degraded by thermal aging, bond strength gradually decreased and the location of failure was also changed from within top coat at the earlier stage of thermal aging to the interface between top coat and TGO at the later stage due to the delamination in the coating.

  13. Morphology of resin-dentin interfaces after Er,Cr:YSGG laser and acid etching preparation and application of different bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Franziska; Buchmair, Alfred; Körpert, Wolfram; Marvastian, Leila; Wernisch, Johann; Moritz, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this study was to show the modifications in the ultrastructure of the dentin surface morphology following different surface treatments. The stability of the adhesive compound with dentin after laser preparation compared with conventional preparation using different bonding agents was evaluated. An Er,Cr:YSGG laser and 36% phosphoric acid in combination with various bonding systems were used. A total of 100 caries-free human third molars were used in this study. Immediately after surgical removal teeth were cut using a band saw and 1-mm thick dentin slices were created starting at a distance of 4 mm from the cusp plane to ensure complete removal of the enamel. The discs were polished with silicon carbide paper into rectangular shapes to a size of 6 × 4 mm (±0,2 mm).The discs as well as the remaining teeth stumps were stored in 0.9% NaCl at room temperature. The specimens were divided into three main groups (group I laser group, group II etch group, group III laser and etch group) and each group was subdivided into three subgroups which were allocated to the different bonding systems (subgroup A Excite, subgroup B Scotchbond, subgroup C Syntac). Each disc and the corresponding tooth stump were treated in the same way. After preparation the bonding composite material was applied according to the manufacturers' guidelines in a hollow tube of 2 mm diameter to the disc as well as to the corresponding tooth stump. Shear bond strength testing and environmental scanning electron microscopy were used to assess the morphology and stability of the resin-dentin interface. The self-etching bonding system showed the highest and the most constant shear values in all three main groups, thus enabling etching with phosphoric acid after laser preparation to be avoided. Thus we conclude that laser preparation creates a surface texture that allows prediction of the quality of the restoration without the risk of negative influences during the following treatment steps. This

  14. Number series of atoms, interatomic bonds and interface bonds defining zinc-blende nanocrystals as function of size, shape and surface orientation: Analytic tools to interpret solid state spectroscopy data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk König

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs experience stress and charge transfer by embedding materials or ligands and impurity atoms. In return, the environment of NCs experiences a NC stress response which may lead to matrix deformation and propagated strain. Up to now, there is no universal gauge to evaluate the stress impact on NCs and their response as a function of NC size dNC. I deduce geometrical number series as analytical tools to obtain the number of NC atoms NNC(dNC[i], bonds between NC atoms Nbnd(dNC[i] and interface bonds NIF(dNC[i] for seven high symmetry zinc-blende (zb NCs with low-index faceting: {001} cubes, {111} octahedra, {110} dodecahedra, {001}-{111} pyramids, {111} tetrahedra, {111}-{001} quatrodecahedra and {001}-{111} quadrodecahedra. The fundamental insights into NC structures revealed here allow for major advancements in data interpretation and understanding of zb- and diamond-lattice based nanomaterials. The analytical number series can serve as a standard procedure for stress evaluation in solid state spectroscopy due to their deterministic nature, easy use and general applicability over a wide range of spectroscopy methods as well as NC sizes, forms and materials.

  15. Number series of atoms, interatomic bonds and interface bonds defining zinc-blende nanocrystals as function of size, shape and surface orientation: Analytic tools to interpret solid state spectroscopy data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    König, Dirk, E-mail: dirk.koenig@unsw.edu.au [Integrated Materials Design Centre (IMDC) and School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering (SPREE), University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2016-08-15

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) experience stress and charge transfer by embedding materials or ligands and impurity atoms. In return, the environment of NCs experiences a NC stress response which may lead to matrix deformation and propagated strain. Up to now, there is no universal gauge to evaluate the stress impact on NCs and their response as a function of NC size d{sub NC}. I deduce geometrical number series as analytical tools to obtain the number of NC atoms N{sub NC}(d{sub NC}[i]), bonds between NC atoms N{sub bnd}(d{sub NC}[i]) and interface bonds N{sub IF}(d{sub NC}[i]) for seven high symmetry zinc-blende (zb) NCs with low-index faceting: {001} cubes, {111} octahedra, {110} dodecahedra, {001}-{111} pyramids, {111} tetrahedra, {111}-{001} quatrodecahedra and {001}-{111} quadrodecahedra. The fundamental insights into NC structures revealed here allow for major advancements in data interpretation and understanding of zb- and diamond-lattice based nanomaterials. The analytical number series can serve as a standard procedure for stress evaluation in solid state spectroscopy due to their deterministic nature, easy use and general applicability over a wide range of spectroscopy methods as well as NC sizes, forms and materials.

  16. Seawater Durability of Nano-Montmorillonite Modified Single-Lap Joining Epoxy Composite Laminates

    OpenAIRE

    ULUS, Hasan; KAYBAL, Halil Burak; DEMİR, Okan; TATAR, Ahmet Caner; SENYURT, Muhammed Ali; AVCI, Ahmet

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate of nano-montmorillonite modified epoxy composite single-lap bonded joints, after being exposed to seawater immersion in order to understand the effect of seawater environment on their performance. To prepare the nano adhesives, nano montmorillonite (2 wt %) was incorporated into epoxy resin. Composite bonded specimens which manufactured with VARIM (Vacuum Assisted Resin Infusion Method) were prepared accordance with ASTM D5868-01 and immersed in ...

  17. Interfacial Strength and Physical Properties of Functionalized Graphene - Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Heimann, Paula; Scheiman, Daniel; Adamson, Douglas H.; Aksay, Iihan A.; Prud'homme, Robert K.

    2006-01-01

    The toughness and coefficient of thermal expansion of a series of functionalized graphene sheet - epoxy nanocomposites are investigated. Functionalized graphene sheets are produced by splitting graphite oxide into single graphene sheets through a rapid thermal expansion process. These graphene sheets contain approx. 10% oxygen due to the presence of hydroxide, epoxide, and carboxyl functional groups which assist in chemical bond formation with the epoxy matrix. Intrinsic surface functionality is used to graft alkyl amine chains on the graphene sheets, and the addition of excess hardener insures covalent bonding between the epoxide matrix and graphene sheets. Considerable improvement in the epoxy dimensional stability is obtained. An increase in nanocomposite toughness is observed in some cases.

  18. Gold Nanospheres Dispersed Light Responsive Epoxy Vitrimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitrimers represent a new class of smart materials. They are covalently crosslinked like thermosets, yet they can be reprocessed like thermoplastics. The underlying mechanism is the rapid exchange reactions which form new bonds while breaking the old ones. So far, heating is the most widely used stimulus to activate the exchange reaction. Compared to heating, light not only is much more convenient to achieve remote and regional control, but can also offer fast healing. Gold nanospheres are excellent photothermal agents, but they are difficult to disperse into vitrimers as they easily aggregate. In this paper, we use polydopamine to prepare gold nanospheres. The resultant polydopamine-coated gold nanospheres (GNS can be well dispersed into epoxy vitrimers, endowing epoxy vitrimers with light responsivity. The composites can be reshaped permanently and temporarily with light at different intensity. Efficient surface patterning and healing are also demonstrated.

  19. Transversely Compressed Bonded Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The load capacity of bonded joints can be increased if transverse pressure is applied at the interface. The transverse pressure is assumed to introduce a Coulomb-friction contribution to the cohesive law for the interface. Response and load capacity for a bonded single-lap joint was derived using...

  20. Qgui: A high-throughput interface for automated setup and analysis of free energy calculations and empirical valence bond simulations in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Andberg, Tor Arne Heim; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2015-07-01

    Structural information and activity data has increased rapidly for many protein targets during the last decades. In this paper, we present a high-throughput interface (Qgui) for automated free energy and empirical valence bond (EVB) calculations that use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for conformational sampling. Applications to ligand binding using both the linear interaction energy (LIE) method and the free energy perturbation (FEP) technique are given using the estrogen receptor (ERα) as a model system. Examples of free energy profiles obtained using the EVB method for the rate-limiting step of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by trypsin are also shown. In addition, we present calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots to obtain the thermodynamic activation enthalpy and entropy with Qgui from running a large number of EVB simulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Wire bonding in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Harman, George G

    2010-01-01

    Wire Bonding in Microelectronics, Third Edition, has been thoroughly revised to help you meet the challenges of today's small-scale and fine-pitch microelectronics. This authoritative guide covers every aspect of designing, manufacturing, and evaluating wire bonds engineered with cutting-edge techniques. In addition to gaining a full grasp of bonding technology, you'll learn how to create reliable bonds at exceedingly high yields, test wire bonds, solve common bonding problems, implement molecular cleaning methods, and much more. Coverage includes: Ultrasonic bonding systems and technologies, including high-frequency systems Bonding wire metallurgy and characteristics, including copper wire Wire bond testing Gold-aluminum intermetallic compounds and other interface reactions Gold and nickel-based bond pad plating materials and problems Cleaning to improve bondability and reliability Mechanical problems in wire bonding High-yield, fine-pitch, specialized-looping, soft-substrate, and extreme-temperature wire bo...

  2. Evaluation of epoxy for use on NuSTAR optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    An, H.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Doll, M.

    2009-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer (SMEX) mission which employs two focusing optics. The optics are composed of stacks of thin mirror shells and spacers. Epoxy is used to bond the mirror shells to the spacers and is a crucial component in determining...

  3. Fracture Toughness and Shear Strength of the Bonded Interface Between an Aluminium Alloy Skin and a FRP Patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Shinde, Prakash Sonyabapu; Bhoyar, Gaurav

    2018-05-01

    The existing techniques to determine the fracture properties such as critical energy release rate in mode I (GIc) and mode II (GIIc) of an interface between two sheets of same material were modified to determine these properties between the sheets of dissimilar materials and thickness. In addition, the interface shear strength (ISS) was also determined. Experiments were carried out on the specimens made of a pre-cracked thin aluminium alloy skin and a Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) patch. Two kinds of surface preparation of the aluminium skin were employed; (i) emery-paper roughened surface (ERS) and (ii) Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) treated surface (NTS). GIc of ERS specimen was found to be 36.1 J/m2, while it was found to be much higher for NTS specimens, that is, 87.3 J/m2. GIIc was found to be 282.4 J/m2 for ERS specimens and much higher as 734.5 J/m2 for NTS specimens. ISS was determined as 32.6 MPa for ERS specimen and significantly higher for NTS specimen, that is, 44.5 MPa. The micrographs obtained from a field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and the surface roughness test showed that the NTS was significantly rougher than the ERS, explaining the higher values of all the three kinds of NTS specimens.

  4. Influence of moisture on the transverse mechanical behavior of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites at 250C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, R.E.; Roylance, D.K.

    1982-01-01

    The magnitude of moisture effects on the transverse tensile properties of Kevlar 49/Fiberite 934 epoxy composites was examined. The transverse tensile test was selected so that failure modes could be determined by scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that saturation moisture concentrations cause substantial reductions in transverse properties at 25 C compared to dry control values. Ultimate strength and elongation are observed to decrease respectively by 35 and 27 percent. Composite transverse stiffness is less sensitive to moisture, but is degraded by 14 percent. Microscopy of the fracture surfaces reveals that property reductions are accompanied by a change in failure mode from an interface dominated mechanism in the dry condition to one of filament splitting at saturation moisture contents. Increased filament compliance and the splitting failure mode may be a consequence of moisture interrupting the interchain hydrogen bonding of the Kevlar 49 filaments

  5. Design and development of graphite/epoxy feed line for use of cryogenic propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremer, J.S.; Kreiner, J.H.; Mosallam, A.S.

    1998-01-01

    The development of lightweight composite cryogenic ines is a critical technology for single-stage-to-orbit launch vehicles such as the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). To achieve weight goals, a significant effort will be required to develop feed line designs that can reliably replace today's stainless steel configurations. A number of technical problems exist, including the large coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) differential between the composite and interfacing metallic materials and the ability to seal against composite materials in a cryogenic environment. This paper reports the results of a development efforts undertaken to design, build, and test a graphite/epoxy propellant feed line to carry liquid hydrogen (-423 degree F). The design incorporates a reusable cryogenic insulation system and a secondarily bonded/co-cured splice joint

  6. An investigation of the compressive strength of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, S. V.; Rosen, B. W.; Rice, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate the effect of a wide range of variables including matrix properties, interface properties, fiber prestressing, secondary reinforcement, and others on the ultimate compressive strength of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites. Scanning electron microscopy is used to assess the resulting failure surfaces. In addition, a theoretical study is conducted to determine the influence of fiber anisotropy and lack of perfect bond between fiber and matrix on the shear mode microbuckling. The experimental evaluation of the effect of various constituent and process characteristics on the behavior of these unidirectional composites in compression did not reveal any substantial increase in strength. However, theoretical evaluations indicate that the high degree of fiber anisotropy results in a significant drop in the predicted stress level for internal instability. Scanning electron microscope data analysis suggests that internal fiber failure and smooth surface debonding could be responsible for the measured low compressive strengths.

  7. The influence of adherent surface preparation on bond durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, A.N.; Arnott, D.R.; Olsson-Jacques, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: One of the major factors limiting the use of adhesive bonding is the problem associated with the production of adhesive joints that can maintain their initial strength over long periods of time in hostile environments. It is well known that the adherent surface preparation method is critical to the formation of a durable adhesive bond. Work presented in this paper focuses on the critical aspects of the surface preparation of aluminium employed for the manufacture of aluminium-epoxy joints. The surface preparation procedure examined is currently employed by the RAAF for repairs requiring metal to adhesive bonding. The influence of each step in the surface preparation on the ultimate bond durability performance of the adhesive joint is examined by a combination of methods. Double cantilever wedge style adhesive joints are loaded in mode 1 opening and then exposed to a humid environment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements of the aluminium adherent before bonding provides information about the adherent surface chemistry. XPS is also employed to analyse the surfaces of the bonded specimens post failure to establish the locus of fracture. This approach provides important information regarding the properties influencing bond durability as well as the bond failure mechanisms. A two step bond degradation model was developed to qualitatively describe the observed bond durability performance and fracture data. The first step involves controlled moisture ingress by stress induced microporosity of the adhesive in the interfacial region. The second step determines the locus of fracture through the relative dominance of one of three competitive processes, viz: oxide degradation, polymer desorption, or polymer degradation. A key element of the model is the control exercised over the interfacial microporosity by the combined interaction of stress and the relative densities of strong and weak linkages at the metal to adhesive interface

  8. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  9. Charge accumulation in the buried oxide of SOI structures with the bonded Si/SiO2 interface under γ-irradiation: effect of preliminary ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumova, O V; Fomin, B I; Ilnitsky, M A; Popov, V P

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of preliminary boron or phosphorous implantation on charge accumulation in the buried oxide of SOI-MOSFETs irradiated with γ-rays in the total dose range (D) of 10 5 –5 × 10 7 rad. The buried oxide was obtained by high-temperature thermal oxidation of Si, and it was not subjected to any implantation during the fabrication process of SOI structures. It was found that implantation with boron or phosphorous ions, used in fabrication technologies of SOI-MOSFETs, increases the concentration of precursor traps in the buried oxide of SOI structures. Unlike in the case of boron implantation, phosphorous implantation leads to an increased density of states at the Si/buried SiO 2 interface during subsequent γ-irradiation. In the γ-irradiated SOI-MOSFETs, the accumulated charge density and the density of surface states in the Si/buried oxide layer systems both vary in proportion to k i ln D. The coefficients k i for as-fabricated and ion-implanted Si/buried SiO 2 systems were evaluated. From the data obtained, it was concluded that a low density of precursor hole traps was a factor limiting the positive charge accumulation in the buried oxide of as-fabricated (non-implanted) SOI structures with the bonded Si/buried SiO 2 interface. (paper)

  10. Effect of different irrigation protocols on the radicular dentin interface and bond strength with a metacrylate-based endodontic sealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Lisandro; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Correa; Raucci Neto, Walter; Teixeira, Cleonice Silveira; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião; Alfredo, Edson

    2014-06-01

    This study assessed the influence of different endodontic chemical substances on the adhesion of the Epiphany SE/Resilon system (with and without resinous solvent) to radicular dentin walls, using the push-out test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Forty-eight root canals of human canines were prepared biomechanically with ProTaper rotary files (crown-down technique) and the radicular dentin was treated with either 17% EDTA, 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX) or 2.5% NaOCl (control). The root canals were filled with Resilon cones and Epiphany SE sealer with and without resinous solvent. Six groups of eight canals each had their roots sectioned transversally to obtain 1-mm thick slices. Data were subjected to statistical analysis by ANOVA and Tukey's tests. The specimens treated with 17% EDTA (1.59 ± 0.91) presented higher bond strength (P Treatment of root canal walls with 17% EDTA, and addition of a resinous solvent to Epiphany SE produced the highest adhesion to radicular dentin. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Significant improvement of thermal stability of glucose 1-dehydrogenase by introducing disulfide bonds at the tetramer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Haitao; Gao, Fen; Liu, Danfeng; Li, Zeli; Xu, Xiaohong; Wu, Min; Zhao, Yuhua

    2013-12-10

    Rational design was applied to glucose 1-dehydrogenase (LsGDH) from Lysinibacillus sphaericus G10 to improve its thermal stability by introduction of disulfide bridges between subunits. One out of the eleven mutants, designated as DS255, displayed significantly enhanced thermal stability with considerable soluble expression and high specific activity. It was extremely stable at pH ranging from 4.5 to 10.5, as it retained nearly 100% activity after incubating at different buffers for 1h. Mutant DS255 also exhibited high thermostability, having a half-life of 9900min at 50°C, which was 1868-fold as that of its wild type. Moreover, both of the increased free energy of denaturation and decreased entropy of denaturation of DS255 suggested that the enzyme structure was stabilized by the engineered disulfide bonds. On account of its robust stability, mutant DS255 would be a competitive candidate in practical applications of chiral chemicals synthesis, biofuel cells and glucose biosensors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fracture behavior of α-zirconium phosphate-based epoxy nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sue, H.-J.; Gam, K.T.; Bestaoui, N.; Clearfield, A.; Miyamoto, M.; Miyatake, N.

    2004-01-01

    The fracture behaviors of α-zirconium phosphate (α-ZrP) based epoxy nanocomposites, with and without core-shell rubber (CSR) toughening, were investigated. The state of exfoliation and dispersion of α-ZrP nanofiller in epoxy were characterized using X-ray scattering and various microscopy tools. The level of enhancement in storage moduli of epoxy nanocomposite against neat epoxy is found to depend on the state of exfoliation of α-ZrP as well as the damping characteristics of the epoxy matrix. The fracture process in epoxy nanocomposite is dominated by preferred crack propagation along the weak intercalated α-ZrP interfaces, and the presence of α-ZrP does not alter the fracture toughness of the epoxy matrix. However, the toughening using CSR can significantly improve the fracture toughness of the nanocomposite. The fracture mechanisms responsible for such a toughening effect in CSR-toughened epoxy nanocomposite are rubber particle cavitation, followed by shear banding of epoxy matrix. The ductility and toughenability of epoxy do not appear to be affected by the incorporation of α-ZrP. Approaches for producing toughened high performance polymer nanocomposites are discussed

  13. Fatigue life extension of epoxy materials using ultrafast epoxy-SbF5 healing system introduced by manual infiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. J. Ye

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is devoted to the verification of the capability of epoxy-SbF5 system as a healing chemistry for rapidly retarding and/or arresting fatigue cracks in epoxy materials at room temperature. Owing to the very fast curing speed of epoxy catalyzed by SbF5, epoxy monomer and the hardener (ethanol solution of SbF5–ethanol complex are successively infiltrated into the fracture plane under cyclic loading during the tension-tension fatigue test. As a result, the mechanisms including hydrodynamic pressure crack tip shielding, polymeric wedge and adhesive bonding of the healing agent are revealed. It is found that the healing agent forms solidified wedge at the crack tip within 20 s after start of polymerization of the epoxy monomer, so that the highest healing effect is offered at the moment. The epoxy-SbF5 system proves to be effective in rapidly obstructing fatigue crack propagation (despite that its cured version has lower fracture toughness than the matrix, and satisfies the requirement of constructing fast self-healing polymeric materials.

  14. Interface behaviour of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ti joints produced by liquid state bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemus R, J.; Guevara L, A. O.; Zarate M, J., E-mail: jlruiz@umich.mx [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Ciudad Universitaria, Edificio U, 58060 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    The main objective of this work was to determine various aspects during brazing of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples to commercially titanium alloy grade 4 with biocompatibility properties, using a Au-foil as joining element. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic was previously produced by sintering of powder cylindrical shape at 1550 grades C for 120 minutes. Previously to joining experiments, the surface of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples were coating, by chemical vapor depositions (CVD) process, with a Mo layer of 2 and 4 μm thick and then stacked together with the Ti samples. Joining experiments were carried out on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Mo/Au/Ti combinations at temperature of 1100 grades C using different holding times under vacuum atmosphere. The experimental results show a successful joining Mo-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Ti. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (Sem) revealed that joining of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to metal occurred by the formation of a homogeneous diffusion zone with no interfacial cracking or porosity at the interface. Results by electron probe micro analysis (EPMA) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Mo/Au/Ti combinations revealed that Mo traveled inside the joining elements and remained as solid solutions, however during cooling process Mo had a tendency to stay as a precipitate phase and atomic distributions of elements show a concentration line of Mo inside the joining element Au. On the other hand, well interaction of Ti with Au form different phases; like Ti{sub 3}Au and Ti Au. (author)

  15. Studies on Fracture Behavior of Epoxy/DWNT Nanocomposites by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Shadlou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The nanoscale fracture behavior of epoxy-based nanocomposites reinforced with double-walled carbon nanotube (DWNT was investigated by molecular dynamics (MD simulations technique. In order to prepare a nanocomposite model including polymer and DWNT, the exact atomic structure of epoxy was adopted as in previous experimental studies made by authors. Tersoff and Amber potential, which are well known potentials, were used for simulation of polymer and DWNT, respectively. Among different available methods to simulate the cross-linking process, a technique was adopted with closer similarity to what happens in real conditions. Therefore, when some especial atoms of monomer and hardener molecules were closer than a specific potential distance, the chemical bonds were created between them. To verify the prepared model, a pull-out simulation was carried out and the results were compared with those of previous studies. It was found that although a rather wide range for interface strength has been presented by different researchers and different techniques, the strength obtained in this study is in the middle of this range. In addition, the fracture energy obtained from the simulations for pure epoxy was compared with that of experimental results and good agreement was obtained. To evaluate the effect of nanocomposite structure at nanometer scale, DWNT was modeled in three different angles relative to the loading direction, including 0°, 45°and 90°. It was found that when DWNT is parallel with the loading direction (i.e. 90° it has the least impact on the fracture energy. The maximum fracture energy was obtained when MWNT was at 45° relative to loading direction. These results were compared with the theories provided for conventional composites.

  16. Control of O-H bonds at a-IGZO/SiO2 interface by long time thermal annealing for highly stable oxide TFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Kwon Jeon

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We report two-step annealing, high temperature and sequent low temperature, for amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO thin-film transistor (TFT to improve its stability and device performance. The annealing is carried out at 300 oC in N2 ambient for 1 h (1st step annealing and then at 250 oC in vacuum for 10 h (2nd step annealing. It is found that the threshold voltage (VTH changes from 0.4 V to -2.0 V by the 1st step annealing and to +0.6 V by 2nd step annealing. The mobility changes from 18 cm2V-1s-1 to 25 cm2V-1s-1 by 1st step and decreases to 20 cm2V-1s-1 by 2nd step annealing. The VTH shift by positive bias temperature stress (PBTS is 3.7 V for the as-prepared TFT, and 1.7 V for the 1st step annealed TFT, and 1.3 V for the 2nd step annealed TFT. The XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth analysis indicates that the reduction in O-H bonds at the top interface (SiO2/a-IGZO by 2nd step annealing appears, which is related to the positive VTH shift and smaller VTH shift by PBTS.

  17. Control of O-H bonds at a-IGZO/SiO2 interface by long time thermal annealing for highly stable oxide TFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae Kwon; Um, Jae Gwang; Lee, Suhui; Jang, Jin

    2017-12-01

    We report two-step annealing, high temperature and sequent low temperature, for amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) to improve its stability and device performance. The annealing is carried out at 300 oC in N2 ambient for 1 h (1st step annealing) and then at 250 oC in vacuum for 10 h (2nd step annealing). It is found that the threshold voltage (VTH) changes from 0.4 V to -2.0 V by the 1st step annealing and to +0.6 V by 2nd step annealing. The mobility changes from 18 cm2V-1s-1 to 25 cm2V-1s-1 by 1st step and decreases to 20 cm2V-1s-1 by 2nd step annealing. The VTH shift by positive bias temperature stress (PBTS) is 3.7 V for the as-prepared TFT, and 1.7 V for the 1st step annealed TFT, and 1.3 V for the 2nd step annealed TFT. The XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) depth analysis indicates that the reduction in O-H bonds at the top interface (SiO2/a-IGZO) by 2nd step annealing appears, which is related to the positive VTH shift and smaller VTH shift by PBTS.

  18. Electrically detected magnetic resonance of carbon dangling bonds at the Si-face 4H-SiC/SiO2 interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, G.; Cottom, J.; Meszaros, R.; Koch, M.; Pobegen, G.; Aichinger, T.; Peters, D.; Hadley, P.

    2018-04-01

    SiC based metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) have gained a significant importance in power electronics applications. However, electrically active defects at the SiC/SiO2 interface degrade the ideal behavior of the devices. The relevant microscopic defects can be identified by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) or electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). This helps to decide which changes to the fabrication process will likely lead to further increases of device performance and reliability. EDMR measurements have shown very similar dominant hyperfine (HF) spectra in differently processed MOSFETs although some discrepancies were observed in the measured g-factors. Here, the HF spectra measured of different SiC MOSFETs are compared, and it is argued that the same dominant defect is present in all devices. A comparison of the data with simulated spectra of the C dangling bond (PbC) center and the silicon vacancy (VSi) demonstrates that the PbC center is a more suitable candidate to explain the observed HF spectra.

  19. Contact allergy to epoxy resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil

    2012-01-01

    Background. Epoxy resin monomers are strong skin sensitizers that are widely used in industrial sectors. In Denmark, the law stipulates that workers must undergo a course on safe handling of epoxy resins prior to occupational exposure, but the effectiveness of this initiative is largely unknown...... in an educational programme. Conclusion. The 1% prevalence of epoxy resin contact allergy is equivalent to reports from other countries. The high occurrence of epoxy resin exposure at work, and the limited use of protective measures, indicate that reinforcement of the law is required....

  20. Thermal conductive epoxy enhanced by nanodiamond-coated carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Jiang, Guohua

    2017-11-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) particles were coated on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical reactions. Reliable bonding was formed by the combination of acyl chloride on NDs and amine group on CNTs. ND coated CNTs (CNT-ND) were dispersed into epoxy to fabricate thermal conductive resins. The results show that the surface energy of CNTs is decreased by the coated NDs, which is contributed to the excellent dispersion of CNT-NDs in the epoxy matrix. The heat-transfer channels were built by the venous CNTs cooperating with the coated NDs, which not only plays an effective role of heat conduction for CNTs and NDs, but also avoids the electrical leakage by the protection of NDs surrounding outside of CNTs. Electrical and thermal conductance measurements demonstrate that the influence of the CNT-ND incorporation on the electrical conductance is minor, however, the thermal conductivity is improved significantly for the epoxy filled with CNT-ND.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Effect of a metal primer on the bond strength of the resin-metal interface Efeito de um primer para metais sobre a força de união da interface metal-resina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Pinheiro de Freitas

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength between a metallic alloy (Co-Cr-Mo - Remanium CD and a resin cement (Rely X TM and to evaluate the mode of fracture after testing, forty couples of metallic-alloy disks were melted, regularized, polished, submitted to four thermal cycles (Vacuum, 960ºC, 8 minutes and randomly separated into four groups. Each group received a different type of treatment: Group PSP: Polished with sandpaper 600; Group PCP: Polished with sandpaper 600 and application of the metal primer Alloy Primer (Kuraray; Group JSP: Sandblasted with 100µm aluminum oxide; Group JCP: Sandblasted with 100mm aluminum oxide and treated with a metal Primer. The groups were cemented and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 36 hours and submitted to the shear bond strength test. The mean and standard deviation (in Kgf/cm² obtained for each group was: PSP 4.0/0.4; PCP 88.9/33.6; JSP 163.2/27.6; JCP 144.5/54.0. After the statistical analysis the authors concluded that: the highest values were obtained for the sandblasted groups (JSP, JCP, regardless of the primer application; the Alloy Primer increased the retention between the Rely X cement and the polished surface of the Co-Cr-Mo alloy, yet its bond strength was not greater than that obtained with sandblasting; all specimens showed adhesive failures in the tested interface.Para avaliar o efeito de diferentes tratamentos superficiais sobre a resistência ao cisalhamento da união entre uma liga metálica (Co-Cr-Mo - Remanium CD e um cimento resinoso (Rely X TM e analisar o tipo de fratura durante a separação dos espécimes, quarenta pares de discos metálicos foram fundidos, regularizados e polidos, submetidos a quatro ciclos térmicos (vácuo, 960ºC, 8 minutos e divididos aleatoriamente em quatro grupos. Cada grupo recebeu um tipo de tratamento: Grupo PSP: Polimento com lixa d'água Nº 600; Grupo PCP: Polimento com lixa 600 e aplicação do

  2. Bonded stacked-ring insulator for the Antares electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stine, R.D.; Allen, G.R.; Eaton, E.; Weinstein, B.

    1982-01-01

    A large diameter insulator utilizing epoxy bonding which has sufficient mechanical strength to support the 3000 kg cathode/grid assembly was developed. Bonding the insulator simplifies the handling and reduces the number of 0-ring seals to a minimum. We have described the material selection, bonding techniques and electrical design approach

  3. Liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite material for dental application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yun-Yuan; Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Su, Wei-Fang; Chen, Min-Huey

    2015-01-01

    Novel liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposites, which exhibit reduced polymerization shrinkage and effectively bond to tooth structures, can be applied in esthetic dentistry, including core and post systems, direct and indirect restorations, and dental brackets. The purposes of this study were to investigate the properties of liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposites including biocompatibility, microhardness, and frictional forces of bracket-like blocks with different filler contents for further clinical applications. In this study, we evaluated liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials that exhibited various filler contents, by assessing their cell activity performance using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and their microhardness with or without thermocycling. We also evaluated the frictional force between bracket-like duplicates and commercially available esthetic bracket systems using Instron 5566. The liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials showed good biocompatibility. The materials having high filler content demonstrated greater microhardness compared with commercially available bracket materials, before and after the thermocycling treatment. Thus, manufacturing processes are important to reduce frictional force experienced by orthodontic brackets. The microhardness of the bracket-like blocks made by our new material is superior to the commercially available brackets, even after thermocycling. Our results indicate that the evaluated liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials are of an appropriate quality for application in dental core and post systems and in various restorations. By applying technology to refine manufacturing processes, these new materials could also be used to fabricate esthetic brackets for orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The Influences of Overlap Length, Bond Line Thickness and Pretreatmant on the Mechanical Properties of Adhesives : Focussing on Bonding Glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervloed, J.; Kwakernaak, A.; Poulis, H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the influences of overlap length, bond line thickness and pretreatment on the mechanical properties of adhesive bonds. In order to determine the bond strength, lap shear tests were performed. The researched adhesives are a 2 component epoxy and MS polymer. The smallest overlap

  5. Electrically Conductive Epoxy Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Bai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive adhesives are widely used in electronic packaging applications such as die attachment and solderless interconnections, component repair, display interconnections, and heat dissipation. The effects of film thickness as functions of filler volume fraction, conductive filler size, shape, as well as uncured adhesive matrix viscosity on the electrical conduction behavior of epoxy-based adhesives are presented in this work. For this purpose, epoxy-based adhesives were prepared using conductive fillers of different size, shape, and types, including Ni powder, flakes, and filaments, Ag powder, and Cu powder. The filaments were 20 μm in diameter, and 160 or 260 μm in length. HCl and H3PO4 acid solutions were used to etch and remove the surface oxide layers from the fillers. The plane resistance of filled adhesive films was measured using the four-point method. In all cases of conductive filler addition, the planar resistivity levels for the composite adhesive films increased when the film thickness was reduced. The shape of resistivity-thickness curves was negative exponential decaying type and was modeled using a mathematical relation. The relationships between the conductive film resistivities and the filler volume fractions were also derived mathematically based on the experimental data. Thus, the effects of surface treatment of filler particles, the type, size, shape of fillers, and the uncured epoxy viscosity could be included empirically by using these mathematical relations based on the experimental data. By utilizing the relations we proposed to model thickness-dependent and volume fraction-dependent conduction behaviors separately, we were able to describe the combined and coupled volume fraction-film thickness relationship mathematically based on our experimental data.

  6. Occupational exposure to epoxy resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwoert, J.; Kersting, K.

    2014-01-01

    Products based on epoxy resins as a binder have become popular in various settings, among which the construction industry and in windmill blade production, as a result of their excellent technical properties. However, due to the same properties epoxy products are a notorious cause of allergic skin

  7. Evaluation of ionic liquid epoxy carbon fiber composites in a cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyne, Christopher T.; Henry, Christopher R.; Kaukler, William F.; Grugel, R. N.

    2018-03-01

    A novel ionic liquid epoxy (ILE) was used to fabricate carbon fiber composite discs which were then subjected to biaxial strain testing in liquid nitrogen. The ILE composite showed a greater strain-to-failure at cryogenic temperatures when compared to a commercial epoxy. This result is likely an effect, as shown in micrographs, of the strong ILE bonding with the carbon fibers as well as it exhibiting plastic deformation at the fracture surface.

  8. Electrically detected magnetic resonance study of the Ge dangling bonds at the Ge(1 1 1)/GeO2 interface after capping with Al2O3 layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paleari, S.; Molle, A.; Accetta, F.; Lamperti, A.; Cianci, E.; Fanciulli, M.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical activity of Ge dangling bonds is investigated at the interface between GeO 2 -passivated Ge(1 1 1) substrate and Al 2 O 3 grown by atomic layer deposition, by means of electrically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy (EDMR). The Al 2 O 3 /GeO 2 /Ge stacked structure is promising as a mobility booster for the post-Si future electronic devices. EDMR proved to be useful in characterizing interface defects, even at the very low concentrations of state-of-the-art devices ( 10 cm −2 ). In particular, it is shown that capping the GeO 2 -passivated Ge(1 1 1) with Al 2 O 3 has no impact on the microstructure of the Ge dangling bond.

  9. Electrically detected magnetic resonance study of the Ge dangling bonds at the Ge(1 1 1)/GeO{sub 2} interface after capping with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paleari, S., E-mail: s.paleari6@campus.unimib.it [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan (Italy); Molle, A. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, I-20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Accetta, F. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan (Italy); Lamperti, A.; Cianci, E. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, I-20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Fanciulli, M., E-mail: marco.fanciulli@unimib.it [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milan (Italy); Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, I-20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    The electrical activity of Ge dangling bonds is investigated at the interface between GeO{sub 2}-passivated Ge(1 1 1) substrate and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grown by atomic layer deposition, by means of electrically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy (EDMR). The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GeO{sub 2}/Ge stacked structure is promising as a mobility booster for the post-Si future electronic devices. EDMR proved to be useful in characterizing interface defects, even at the very low concentrations of state-of-the-art devices (<10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}). In particular, it is shown that capping the GeO{sub 2}-passivated Ge(1 1 1) with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has no impact on the microstructure of the Ge dangling bond.

  10. Simulation of debonding in Al/epoxy T-peel joints using a potential-based cohesive zone model

    KAUST Repository

    Alfano, Marco; Furgiuele, Franco; Lubineau, Gilles; Paulino, Glaucio H.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a cohesive zone model of fracture is employed to study debonding in plastically deforming Al/epoxy T-peel joints. In order to model the adhesion between the bonded metal strips, the Park-Paulino-Roesler (PPR) potential based cohesive model (J Mech Phys Solids, 2009;57:891-908) is employed, and interface elements are implemented in a finite element com-mercial code. A study on the influence of the cohesive properties (i.e. cohesive strength, fracture energy, shape parameter and slope indicator) on the predicted peel-force versus displacement plots reveals that the numerical results are mostly sensitive to cohesive strength and fracture energy. In turn, these parameters are tuned until a match between experimental and simulated load displacement curves is achieved.

  11. Simulation of debonding in Al/epoxy T-peel joints using a potential-based cohesive zone model

    KAUST Repository

    Alfano, Marco

    2011-06-10

    In this work, a cohesive zone model of fracture is employed to study debonding in plastically deforming Al/epoxy T-peel joints. In order to model the adhesion between the bonded metal strips, the Park-Paulino-Roesler (PPR) potential based cohesive model (J Mech Phys Solids, 2009;57:891-908) is employed, and interface elements are implemented in a finite element com-mercial code. A study on the influence of the cohesive properties (i.e. cohesive strength, fracture energy, shape parameter and slope indicator) on the predicted peel-force versus displacement plots reveals that the numerical results are mostly sensitive to cohesive strength and fracture energy. In turn, these parameters are tuned until a match between experimental and simulated load displacement curves is achieved.

  12. Nanoindentation study of interphases in epoxy/amine thermosetting systems modified with thermoplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Jose Angel; Blanco, Miren; Zalakain, Iñaki; Mondragon, Iñaki

    2009-08-15

    The characterization of a mixture of epoxy/amine with different stoichiometric ratios was carried out by means of nanoindentation. The epoxy system was composed by diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A and 4,4'-methylene bis-(3-chloro 2,6-diethylaniline). Diffusion through interface formed by epoxy/amine system in stoichiometric ratio and several thermoplastic polymers was also analyzed by means of stiffness analysis, as studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and coupled nanoindentation tests. Used thermoplastics were an amorphous, atactic polystyrene, and two semicrystalline, syndiotactic polystyrene and poly(phenylene sulfide). Larger range diffusion was obtained in epoxy/amine systems modified with atactic polystyrene while the study of the influence of stoichiometric ratio suggests that the excess of epoxy generated stiffer material. In addition, larger indentation loads resulted in higher apparent stiffness because of the more number of polymer chains that had to re-accommodate owing to the increase in contact area.

  13. The influence of stiffeners on axial crushing of glass-fabric-reinforced epoxy composite shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vasanthanathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A generic static and impact experimental procedure has been developed in this work aimed at improving the stability of glass fabric reinforced epoxy shell structures by bonding with axial stiffeners. Crashworthy structures fabricated from composite laminate with stiffeners would offer energy absorption superior to metallic structures under compressive loading situations. An experimental material characterisation of the glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite under uni-axial tension has been carried out in this study. This work provides a numerical simulation procedure to describe the static and dynamic response of unstiffened glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite shell (without stiffeners and stiffened glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite shell (with axial stiffeners under static and impact loading using the Finite Element Method. The finite element calculation for the present study was made with ANSYS®-LS-DYNA® software. Based upon the experimental and numerical investigations, it has been asserted that glass fabric reinforced epoxy shells stiffened with GFRP stiffeners are better than unstiffened glass fabric reinforced epoxy shell and glass fabric reinforced epoxy shell stiffened with aluminium stiffeners. The failure surfaces of the glass fabric reinforced epoxy composite shell structures tested under impact were examined by SEM.

  14. Non-silicon substrate bonding mediated by poly(dimethylsiloxane) interfacial coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hainan [Department of BioNano Technology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Nae Yoon, E-mail: nylee@gachon.ac.kr [Department of BioNano Technology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Medical Center, Inchon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    Graphical abstract: Low-molecular-weight PDMS coating on the surfaces of non-silicon substrates such as thermoplastics ensures permanent sealing with a silicone elastomer, PDMS, simply by surface oxidization followed by ambient condition bonding, mediated by a robust siloxane bond formation at the interface. - Highlights: • Non-silicon thermoplastic was bonded with poly(dimethylsiloxane) silicone elastomer. • Low-molecular-weight PDMS interfacial layer was chemically coated on thermoplastic. • Bonding was realized by corona treatment and physical contact under ambient condition. • Bonding is universally applicable regardless of thermoplastic type and property. • Homogeneous PDMS-like microchannel was obtained inside the thermoplastic-PDMS microdevice. - Abstract: In this paper, we introduce a simple and robust strategy for bonding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with various thermoplastic substrates to fabricate a thermoplastic-based closed microfluidic device and examine the feasibility of using the proposed method for realizing plastic–plastic bonding. The proposed bonding strategy was realized by first coating amine functionality on an oxidized thermoplastic surface. Next, the amine-functionalized surface was reacted with a monolayer of low-molecular-weight PDMS, terminated with epoxy functionality, by forming a robust amine-epoxy bond. Both the PDMS-coated thermoplastic and PDMS were then oxidized and permanently assembled at 25 °C under a pressure of 0.1 MPa for 15 min, resulting in PDMS-like surfaces on all four inner walls of the microchannel. Surface characterizations were conducted, including water contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and fluorescence measurement, to confirm the successful coating of the thin PDMS layer on the plastic surface, and the bond strength was analyzed by conducting a peel test, burst test, and leakage test. Using the proposed method, we could successfully bond various thermoplastics such

  15. Epoxy-based carbon nanotubes reinforced composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available of the three major epoxy resin producers worldwide [May, 1987]. Epoxy resin is most commonly used as a matrix for advanced composites due to their superior thermal, mechanical and electrical properties; dimensional stability and chemical resistance. Epoxy... and modifiers to create products with an almost unlimited range and variety of performance properties [The epoxy book, 2000]. Epoxy resins are widely used as high-grade synthetic resins, for example, in the electronics, aeronautics and astronautic industries...

  16. Effect of Hygrothermal Aging on the Mechanical Properties of Fluorinated and Nonfluorinated Clay-Epoxy Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamim, Salah U; Singh, Raman P

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophilic nature of epoxy polymers can lead to both reversible and irreversible/permanent changes in epoxy upon moisture absorption. The permanent changes leading to the degradation of mechanical properties due to combined effect of moisture and elevated temperature on EPON 862, Nanomer I.28E, and Somasif MAE clay-epoxy nanocomposites are investigated in this study. The extent of permanent degradation on fracture and flexural properties due to the hygrothermal aging is determined by drying the epoxy and their clay-epoxy nanocomposites after moisture absorption. Significant permanent damage is observed for fracture toughness and flexural modulus, while the extent of permanent damage is less significant for flexural strength. It is also observed that permanent degradation in Somasif MAE clay-epoxy nanocomposites is higher compared to Nanomer I.28E clay-epoxy nanocomposites. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed that both clays retained their original chemical structure after the absorption-desorption cycle without undergoing significant changes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the fracture surfaces provide evidence that Somasif MAE clay particles offered very little resistance to crack propagation in case of redried specimens when compared to Nanomer I.28E counterpart. The reason for the observed higher extent of permanent degradation in Somasif MAE clay-epoxy system has been attributed to the weakening of the filler-matrix interface.

  17. Boron--epoxy tubular structure members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, W. B. J.; Nelson, P. T.; Lindkvist, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Composite materials fabricate thin-walled tubular members which have same load-carrying capabilities as aluminum, titanium, or other metals, but are lighter. Interface between stepped end fitting and tube lends itself to attachments by primary as well as secondary bonding. Interlaminar shear and hoop stress buildup in attachment at end fitting is avoided.

  18. A molecular dynamics study on the interaction between epoxy and functionalized graphene sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melro, Liliana Sofia S. F. P.; Pyrz, Ryszard; Jensen, Lars Rosgaard

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between graphene and epoxy resin was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The interfacial shear strength and pull out force were calculated for functionalised graphene layers (carboxyl, carbonyl, and hydroxyl) and epoxy composites interfaces. The influence of functional...... groups, as well as their distribution and coverage density on the graphene sheets were also analysed through the determination of the Young's modulus. Functionalisation proved to be detrimental to the mechanical properties, nonetheless according to interfacial studies the interaction between graphene...

  19. Los cambios de temperatura en los revestimientos epoxi II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Cánovas, M.

    1970-04-01

    Full Text Available This article is the second part of a previous paper published by the author in no. 189 of this magazine. It describes the tests carried out to check the theoretical results published in the earlier article. The tests have consisted in submitting concrete slabs covered with a layer of epoxi mortar to certain thermal conditions, to check the behaviour of the covering in the face of thermal changes. In all the tests, described in detail in the article, the epoxi layer has behaved extremely well, and no bonding failure has been observed, nor failures in the concrete base or in the epoxi layer.Este artículo es la segunda parte de un trabajo publicado por el autor en el número 189 de esta revista, y en él se realiza una descripción de los ensayos prácticos llevados a cabo para complementar el estudio teórico publicado en aquella primera parte. Los ensayos han consistido en someter a placas de hormigón revestidas de una Kipa de mor tero epoxi a determinadas condiciones térmicas, con el fin de poder comprobar el comportamiento del revestimiento frente a los cambios de temperatura. En todos los ensayos realizados y que, con detalle, están descritos en este artículo, el comportamiento de los revestimientos de mortero epoxi ha sido excelente, no habiéndose notado ningún fallo de adherencia, ni roturas en la base de hormigón, ni en la capa de mortero epoxi.

  20. Effect of carbon nanotube functionalization on mechanical and thermal properties of cross-linked epoxy-carbon nanotube nanocomposites: role of strengthening the interfacial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ketan S; Khabaz, Fardin; Khare, Rajesh

    2014-05-14

    We have used amido-amine functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that form covalent bonds with cross-linked epoxy matrices to elucidate the role of the matrix-filler interphase in the enhancement of mechanical and thermal properties in these nanocomposites. For the base case of nanocomposites of cross-linked epoxy and pristine single-walled CNTs, our previous work (Khare, K. S.; Khare, R. J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 7444-7454) has shown that weak matrix-filler interactions cause the interphase region in the nanocomposite to be more compressible. Furthermore, because of the weak matrix-filler interactions, the nanocomposite containing dispersed pristine CNTs has a glass transition temperature (Tg) that is ∼66 K lower than the neat polymer. In this work, we demonstrate that in spite of the presence of stiff CNTs in the nanocomposite, the Young's modulus of the nanocomposite containing dispersed pristine CNTs is virtually unchanged compared to the neat cross-linked epoxy. This observation suggests that the compressibility of the matrix-filler interphase interferes with the ability of the CNTs to reinforce the matrix. Furthermore, when the compressibility of the interphase is reduced by the use of amido-amine functionalized CNTs, the mechanical reinforcement due to the filler is more effective, resulting in a ∼50% increase in the Young's modulus compared to the neat cross-linked epoxy. Correspondingly, the functionalization of the CNTs also led to a recovery in the Tg making it effectively the same as the neat polymer and also resulted in a ∼12% increase in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite containing functionalized CNTs compared to that containing pristine CNTs. These results demonstrate that the functionalization of the CNTs facilitates the transfer of both mechanical load and thermal energy across the matrix-filler interface.

  1. Stronger Fire-Resistant Epoxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohlen, George M.; Parker, John A.; Kumar, Devendra

    1988-01-01

    New curing agent improves mechanical properties and works at lower temperature. Use of aminophenoxycyclotriphosphazene curing agents yields stronger, more heat- and fire-resistant epoxy resins. Used with solvent if necessary for coating fabrics or casting films.

  2. Flame resistant hybrid epoxy composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Śliwa, R.; Oleksy, M.; Heneczkowski, M.; Oliwa, R.; Budzik, G.; Kozik, B.; Markowska, O.; Strachota, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 10 (2015), s. 667-670 ISSN 0032-2725 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : epoxy resin * quaternary phosphonium salts * modified bentonite Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.718, year: 2015

  3. Role of the Co-based microwires/polymer matrix interface on giant magneto impedance response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estévez, Diana; Li, Jiawei; Liu, Gang; Man, Qikui; Chang, Chuntao; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Co-based microwires-epoxy interface was modified with silane and GMI was evaluated. • XPS confirmed the adhesion of silane onto the wires by Si–O–Si and Fe–O–Si bonds. • GMI curves for treated samples exhibited two-peak behavior and higher GMI ratio. • GMI variation was explained by the change of the surface magnetic anisotropy. • GMI could potentially be used as a surface scanning technique. - Abstract: The interface of Co-based microwires-epoxy composites was modified by applying silane treatment on the surface of the wires and their magneto impedance (MI) response was evaluated. The aim of the surface treatment was to modify the residual stresses that coexist at the microwires/polymer matrix interface and hence the magnetic anisotropy. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy confirmed the covalent attachment of silane molecule onto the wires surface by the presence of Si–O–Si and Fe–O–Si. The MI curve changed from single peak for untreated samples to double peak behavior for treated samples with a significant improvement of MI ratio. Additionally, the magnitude of the anisotropy field increased with the frequency, which may imply a strongly non-uniform stress distribution towards the surface. The MI variation was explained by the change of the surface magnetic anisotropy owing to the modification of the microwires/polymer matrix interface

  4. Hydrogen interaction kinetics of Ge dangling bonds at the Si0.25Ge0.75/SiO2 interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stesmans, A.; Nguyen Hoang, T.; Afanas'ev, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen interaction kinetics of the GeP b1 defect, previously identified by electron spin resonance (ESR) as an interfacial Ge dangling bond (DB) defect occurring in densities ∼7 × 10 12  cm −2 at the SiGe/SiO 2 interfaces of condensation grown (100)Si/a-SiO 2 /Ge 0.75 Si 0.25 /a-SiO 2 structures, has been studied as function of temperature. This has been carried out, both in the isothermal and isochronal mode, through defect monitoring by capacitance-voltage measurements in conjunction with ESR probing, where it has previously been demonstrated the defects to operate as negative charge traps. The work entails a full interaction cycle study, comprised of analysis of both defect passivation (pictured as GeP b1 -H formation) in molecular hydrogen (∼1 atm) and reactivation (GeP b1 -H dissociation) in vacuum. It is found that both processes can be suitably described separately by the generalized simple thermal (GST) model, embodying a first order interaction kinetics description based on the basic chemical reactions GeP b1  + H 2  → GeP b1 H + H and GeP b1 H → GeP b1  + H, which are found to be characterized by the average activation energies E f  = 1.44 ± 0.04 eV and E d  = 2.23 ± 0.04 eV, and attendant, assumedly Gaussian, spreads σE f  = 0.20 ± 0.02 eV and σE d  = 0.15 ± 0.02 eV, respectively. The substantial spreads refer to enhanced interfacial disorder. Combination of the separately inferred kinetic parameters for passivation and dissociation results in the unified realistic GST description that incorporates the simultaneous competing action of passivation and dissociation, and which is found to excellently account for the full cycle data. For process times t a  ∼ 35 min, it is found that even for the optimum treatment temperature ∼380 °C, only ∼60% of the GeP b1 system can be electrically silenced, still far remote from device grade level. This

  5. Dynamic strain distribution measurement and crack detection of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint under cyclic loading using embedded FBG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Xiaoguang; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Wada, Daichi; Kanai, Makoto; Ohsawa, Isamu; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic strain distribution measurement of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint was carried out in a cyclic load test using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor embedded into the adhesive/adherend interface along the overlap length direction. Unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) substrates were bonded by epoxy resin to form the joint, and the FBG sensor was embedded into the surface of one substrate during its curing. The measurement was carried out with a sampling rate of 5 Hz by the sensing system, based on the optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) throughout the test. A finite element analysis (FEA) was performed for the measurement evaluation using a three-dimensional model, which included the embedded FBG sensor. The crack detection method, based on the longitudinal strain distribution measurement, was introduced and performed to estimate the cracks that occurred at the adhesive/adherend interface in the test. (paper)

  6. Cure monitoring of epoxy resin by using fiber bragg grating sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Hyuk [KEPCO, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Hyun [Dept. of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In several industrial fields, epoxy resin is widely used as an adhesive for co-curing and manufacturing various structures. Controlling the manufacturing process is required for ensuring robust bonding performance and the stability of the structures. A fiber optic sensor is suitable for the cure monitoring of epoxy resin owing to the thready shape of the sensor. In this paper, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor was applied for the cure monitoring of epoxy resin. Based on the experimental results, it was demonstrated that the FBG sensor can monitor the status of epoxy resin curing by measuring the strain caused by volume shrinkage and considering the compensation of temperature. In addition, two types of epoxy resin were used for the cure-monitoring; moreover, when compared to each other, it was found that the two types of epoxy had different cure-processes in terms of the change of strain during the curing. Therefore, the study proved that the FBG sensor is very profitable for the cure-monitoring of epoxy resin.

  7. Synthesis of polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin J

    2014-10-07

    The synthesis of a polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy uses a one-step cure by applying an external stimulus to release the acid from the polyoxometalate and thereby catalyze the cure reaction of the epoxy resin. Such polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites afford the cured epoxy unique properties imparted by the intrinsic properties of the polyoxometalate. For example, polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites can be used as corrosion resistant epoxy coatings, for encapsulation of electronics with improved dielectric properties, and for structural applications with improved mechanical properties.

  8. A biomimetic approach to enhancing interfacial interactions: polydopamine-coated clay as reinforcement for epoxy resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Phua, Si Lei; Teo, Jun Kai Herman; Toh, Cher Ling; Lau, Soo Khim; Ma, Jan; Lu, Xuehong

    2011-08-01

    A facile biomimetic method was developed to enhance the interfacial interaction in polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites. By mimicking mussel adhesive proteins, a monolayer of polydopamine was constructed on clay surface by a controllable coating method. The modified clay (D-clay) was incorporated into an epoxy resin, it is found that the strong interfacial interactions brought by the polydopamine benefits not only the dispersion of the D-clay in the epoxy but also the effective interfacial stress transfer, leading to greatly improved thermomechanical properties at very low inorganic loadings. Rheological and infrared spectroscopic studies show that the interfacial interactions between the D-clay and epoxy are dominated by the hydrogen bonds between the catechol-enriched polydopamine and the epoxy.

  9. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Petersen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo

  10. Tailored SWCNT functionalization optimized for compatibility with epoxy matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Rubi, Y; Kingston, C T; Daroszewska, M; Barnes, M; Simard, B; Gonzalez-Dominguez, J M; Ansón-Casaos, A; Martinez, M T; Hubert, P; Cattin, C

    2012-01-01

    We have modified single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with well defined matrix-based architectures to improve interface interaction in SWCNT/epoxy composites. The hardener and two pre-synthesized oligomers containing epoxy and hardener moieties were covalently attached to the SWCNT walls by in situ diazonium or carboxylic coupling reactions. In this way, SWCNTs bearing amine or epoxide-terminated fragments of different molecular weights, which resemble the chemical structure of the cured resin, were synthesized. A combination of characterization techniques such as Raman and infrared absorption (FTIR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis and coupled thermogravimetry-FTIR spectroscopy were used to identify both the functional groups and degree of functionalization of SWCNTs synthesized by the laser ablation and arc-discharge methods. Depending on the type of reaction employed for the chemical functionalization and the molecular weight of the attached fragment, it was possible to control the degree of functionalization and the electronic properties of the functionalized SWCNTs. Improved dispersion of SWCNTs in the epoxy matrix was achieved by direct integration without using solvents, as observed from optical microscopy and rheology measurements of the SWCNT/epoxy mixtures. Composite materials using these fillers are expected to exhibit improved properties while preserving the thermosetting architecture. (paper)

  11. Nanocellulose composites with enhanced interfacial compatibility and mechanical properties using a hybrid-toughened epoxy matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Pei-Yu; Barros, Luizmar de Assis; Yan, Ning; Sain, Mohini; Qing, Yan; Wu, Yiqiang

    2017-12-01

    Although there is a growing interest in utilizing nanocellulose fibres (NCFs) based composites for achieving a higher sustainability, mechanical performance of these composites is limited due to the poor compatibility between fibre reinforcement and polymer matrices. Here we developed a bio-nanocomposite with an enhanced fibre/resin interface using a hybrid-toughened epoxy. A strong reinforcing effect of NCFs was achieved, demonstrating an increase up to 88% in tensile strength and 298% in tensile modulus as compared to neat petro-based P-epoxy. The toughness of neat P-epoxy was improved by 84% with the addition of 10wt% bio-based E-epoxy monomers, which also mitigated the amount of usage of bisphenol A (BPA). The morphological analyses showed that the hybrid epoxy improved the resin penetration and fibre distribution significantly in the resulting composites. Thus, our findings demonstrated the promise of developing sustainable and high performance epoxy composites combing NCFs with a hybrid petro-based and bio-based epoxy resin system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Protection of Steel Rebar in Salt-Contaminated Cement Mortar Using Epoxy Nanocomposite Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Huu Nguyen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy reinforced with two kinds of nanoparticles dealing with nano-SiO2 and nano-Fe2O3 was coated on steel rebar embedded in a chloride contaminated cement mortar. NaCl was added to the fresh Portland cement paste (at 0.3% and 0.5% by weight of cement to simulate the chloride contamination at the critical level. The effect of incorporating nanoparticles on the corrosion resistance of epoxy-coated steel rebar was investigated by linear potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. For the 0.3 wt.% chloride mortars, the electrochemical monitoring of the coated steel rebars during immersion for 56 days in 0.1 M NaOH solutions suggested the beneficial role of nano-Fe2O3 particles in significantly improving the corrosion resistance of the epoxy-coated rebar. After 56 days of immersion, the nano-Fe2O3 reduced the corrosion current of epoxy-coated rebar by a factor of 7.9. When the chloride concentration in the cement mortar was 0.5 wt.%, the incorporation of nanoparticles into the epoxy matrix did not enhance the corrosion resistance of epoxy coating for the rebar. At this critical level, chloride ions initiated rebar corrosion through nanoparticles at the epoxy/rebar interface.

  13. Hydrogen bonds between the alpha and beta subunits of the F1-ATPase allow communication between the catalytic site and the interface of the beta catch loop and the gamma subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Kathryn W; Frasch, Wayne D

    2006-09-19

    F(1)-ATPase mutations in Escherichia coli that changed the strength of hydrogen bonds between the alpha and beta subunits in a location that links the catalytic site to the interface between the beta catch loop and the gamma subunit were examined. Loss of the ability to form the hydrogen bonds involving alphaS337, betaD301, and alphaD335 lowered the k(cat) of ATPase and decreased its susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n) inhibition, while mutations that maintain or strengthen these bonds increased the susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n) inhibition and lowered the k(cat) of ATPase. These data suggest that hydrogen bonds connecting alphaS337 to betaD301 and betaR323 and connecting alphaD335 to alphaS337 are important to transition state stabilization and catalytic function that may result from the proper alignment of catalytic site residues betaR182 and alphaR376 through the VISIT sequence (alpha344-348). Mutations betaD301E, betaR323K, and alphaR282Q changed the rate-limiting step of the reaction as determined by an isokinetic plot. Hydrophobic mutations of betaR323 decreased the susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n)() inhibition and lowered the number of interactions required in the rate-limiting step yet did not affect the k(cat) of ATPase, suggesting that betaR323 is important to transition state formation. The decreased rate of ATP synthase-dependent growth and decreased level of lactate-dependent quenching observed with alphaD335, betaD301, and alphaE283 mutations suggest that these residues may be important to the formation of an alternative set of hydrogen bonds at the interface of the alpha and beta subunits that permits the release of intersubunit bonds upon the binding of ATP, allowing gamma rotation in the escapement mechanism.

  14. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (∼70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (∼42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ∼50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility

  15. Nanosilica reinforced epoxy floor coating composites: preparation and thermophysical characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Mohammad Alavi Nikje

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, flooring grade epoxy/nanoSiO2 nanocomposites were prepared by in-situ polymerization method. Nano silica was treated by coupling agent in order to surface treating and introducing of reactive functional groups to achieving adequate bonding between polar inorganic nano particles and epoxy organic polymer. γ-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (Amino A-100 was used as an effective and commercially available coupling agent and nano silica treated in acetone media. SEM observations of cured samples revealed that the nano silica was completely dispersed into polymer matrix into nanoscale particles. Thermal and physical properties of prepared samples were investigated and data showed improvements in physical and mechanical properties of the flooring samples in comparison with unfilled resin.

  16. Preparation and Various Characteristics of Epoxy/Alumina Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozako, Masahiro; Ohki, Yoshimichi; Kohtoh, Masanori; Okabe, Shigemitsu; Tanaka, Toshikatsu

    Epoxy/ alumina nanocomposites were newly prepared by dispersing 3, 5, 7, and 10 weight (wt) % boehmite alumina nanofillers in a bisphenol-A epoxy resin using a special two-stage direct mixing method. It was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy imaging that the nanofillers were homogeneously dispersed in the epoxy matrix. Dielectric, mechanical, and thermal properties were investigated. It was elucidated that nanofillers affects various characteristics of epoxy resins, when they are nanostructrued. Such nano-effects we obtained are summarized as follows. Partial discharge resistance increases as the filler content increases; e.g. 7 wt% nanofiller content creates a 60 % decrease in depth of PD-caused erosion. Weibull analysis shows that short-time electrical treeing breakdown time is prolonged to 265 % by 5 wt% addition of nanofillers. But there was more data scatter in nanocomposites than in pure epoxy. Permittivity tends to increase from 3.7 to 4.0 by 5 wt% nanofiller addition as opposed to what was newly found in the recent past. Glass transition temperature remains unchanged as 109 °C. Mechanical properties such as flexural strength and flexural modulus increase; e.g. flexural strength and flexural modulus are improved by 5 % and 8 % with 5 wt% content, respectively. Excess addition causes a reverse effect. It is concluded from permittivity and glass transition temperature characteristics that interfacial bonding seems to be more or less weak in the nanocomposite specimens prepared this time, even though mechanical strengths increase. There is a possibility that the nanocomposites specimens will be improved in interfacial quality.

  17. Epoxy-based carbon nanotubes reinforced composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available of the three major epoxy resin producers worldwide [May, 1987]. Epoxy resin is most commonly used as a matrix for advanced composites due to their superior thermal, mechanical and electrical properties; dimensional stability and chemical resistance. Epoxy... are electrical insulators, and the widespread use of the epoxy resins for many high-performance applications is constrained because of their inherent brittleness, delamination and fracture toughness limitations. There were quite a few approaches to enhance...

  18. Six-month evaluation of adhesives interface created by a hydrophobic adhesive to acid-etched ethanol-wet bonded dentine with simplified dehydration protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Fernanda T; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Breschi, Lorenzo; Tay, Franklin R; Braga, Roberto R

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of simplified dehydration protocols, in the absence of tubular occlusion, on bond strength and interfacial nanoleakage of a hydrophobic experimental adhesive blend to acid-etched, ethanol-dehydrated dentine immediately and after 6 months. Molars were randomly assigned to 6 treatment groups (n=5). Under pulpal pressure simulation, dentine crowns were acid-etched with 35% H(3)PO(4) and rinsed with water. Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose was used for the control group. The remaining groups had their dentine surface dehydrated with ethanol solutions: group 1=50%, 70%, 80%, 95% and 3x100%, 30s for each application; group 2 the same ethanol sequence with 15s for each solution; groups 3, 4 and 5 used 100% ethanol only, applied in seven, three or one 30s step, respectively. After dehydration, a primer (50% BisGMA+TEGDMA, 50% ethanol) was used, followed by the neat comonomer adhesive application. Resin composite build-ups were then prepared using an incremental technique. Specimens were stored for 24h, sectioned into beams and stressed to failure after 24h or after 6 months of artificial ageing. Interfacial silver leakage evaluation was performed for both storage periods (n=5 per subgroup). Group 1 showed higher bond strengths at 24h or after 6 months of ageing (45.6+/-5.9(a)/43.1+/-3.2(a)MPa) and lower silver impregnation. Bond strength results were statistically similar to control group (41.2+/-3.3(ab)/38.3+/-4.0(ab)MPa), group 2 (40.0+/-3.1(ab)/38.6+/-3.2(ab)MPa), and group 3 at 24h (35.5+/-4.3(ab)MPa). Groups 4 (34.6+/-5.7(bc)/25.9+/-4.1(c)MPa) and 5 (24.7+/-4.9(c)/18.2+/-4.2(c)MPa) resulted in lower bond strengths, extensive interfacial nanoleakage and more prominent reductions (up to 25%) in bond strengths after 6 months of ageing. Simplified dehydration protocols using one or three 100% ethanol applications should be avoided for the ethanol-wet bonding technique in the absence of tubular occlusion, as they showed decreased bond strength, more

  19. Fabrication of High Gas Barrier Epoxy Nanocomposites: An Approach Based on Layered Silicate Functionalized by a Compatible and Reactive Modifier of Epoxy-Diamine Adduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Wei

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available To solve the drawbacks of poor dispersion and weak interface in gas barrier nanocomposites, a novel epoxy-diamine adduct (DDA was synthesized by reacting epoxy monomer DGEBA with curing agent D400 to functionalize montmorillonite (MMT, which could provide complete compatibility and reactivity with a DGEBA/D400 epoxy matrix. Thereafter, sodium type montmorillonite (Na-MMT and organic-MMTs functionalized by DDA and polyether amines were incorporated with epoxy to manufacture nanocomposites. The effects of MMT functionalization on the morphology and gas barrier property of nanocomposites were evaluated. The results showed that DDA was successfully synthesized, terminating with epoxy and amine groups. By simulating the small-angle neutron scattering data with a sandwich structure model, the optimal dispersion/exfoliation of MMT was observed in a DDA-MMT/DGEBA nanocomposite with a mean radius of 751 Å, a layer thickness of 30.8 Å, and only two layers in each tactoid. Moreover, the DDA-MMT/DGEBA nanocomposite exhibited the best N2 barrier properties, which were about five times those of neat epoxy. Based on a modified Nielsen model, it was clarified that this excellent gas barrier property was due to the homogeneously dispersed lamellas with almost exfoliated structures. The improved morphology and barrier property confirmed the superiority of the adduct, which provides a general method for developing gas barrier nanocomposites.

  20. Improvement of fatigue resistance of epoxy composite with microencapsulated epoxy-SbF5 self-healing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. J. Ye

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid retardation and arresting of fatigue crack are successfully realized in the epoxy composite containing microencapsulated epoxy and ethanol solution of antimony pentafluoride-ethanol complex (SbF5·HOC2H5/HOC2H5. The effects of (i microcapsules induced-toughening, (ii hydrodynamic pressure crack tip shielding offered by the released healing agent, and (iii polymeric wedge and adhesive bonding of cured healing agent account for extension of fatigue life of the material. The two components of the healing agent can quickly react with each other soon after rupture of the microcapsules, and reconnect the crack only 20 seconds as of the test. The applied stress intensity range not only affects the healing efficiency, but also can be used to evaluate the healing speed. The present work offers a very fast healing system, and sets up a framework for characterizing speed of self-healing.

  1. Interfacial characteristics of an epoxy composite reinforced with phosphoric acid-functionalized Kevlar fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Xia, Y. C.

    2010-07-01

    A Kevlar fiber was functionalized with the phosphoric acid (PA) of different concentrations. The surface characteristics of the fiber were examined by using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the PA functionalization considerably increased the bond strength between the Kevlar fiber and an epoxy matrix.

  2. Cooperative program for design, fabrication, and testing of graphite/epoxy composite helicopter shafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C. C.; Baker, D. J.; Corvelli, N.; Thurston, L.; Clary, R.; Illg, W.

    1971-01-01

    The fabrication of UH-1 helicopter tail rotor drive shafts from graphite/epoxy composite materials is discussed. Procedures for eliminating wrinkles caused by lack of precure compaction are described. The development of the adhesive bond between aluminum end couplings and the composite tube is analyzed. Performance tests to validate the superiority of the composite materials are reported.

  3. A competitive binding between O2 and epoxy with carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Jung Tsai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Simulation and observation reveal a competitive binding between O2 and epoxy with carbon nanotubes. Air absorption limits tube-polymer interacting coverage and weakens the van der Waals forces. As O2 is removed the tube-polymer strongly couples and coupling is conformed in a parallel fashion. Electron microscopy verifies tubes to be weakly bonded with polymer and band-shifts of raman arise from air pressure acting on C-C bonds.

  4. Remarkable changes in interface O vacancy and metal-oxide bonds in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by long time annealing at 250 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Um, Jae Gwang; Jang, Jin, E-mail: jjang@khu.ac.kr [Advanced Display Research Center and Department of Information Display, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-08

    We have studied the effect of long time post-fabrication annealing on negative bias illumination stress (NBIS) of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film-transistors. Annealing for 100 h at 250 °C increased the field effect mobility from 14.7 cm{sup 2}/V s to 17.9 cm{sup 2}/V s and reduced the NBIS instability remarkably. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the oxygen vacancy and OH were found to exist at the interfaces of a-IGZO with top and bottom SiO{sub 2}. Long time annealing helps to decrease the vacancy concentration and increase the metal-oxygen bonds at the interfaces; this leads to increase in the free carrier concentrations in a-IGZO and field-effect mobility. X-ray reflectivity measurement indicated the increment of a-IGZO film density of 5.63 g cm{sup −3} to 5.83 g cm{sup −3} (3.4% increase) by 100 h annealing at 250 °C. The increase in film density reveals the decrease of O vacancy concentration and reduction of weak metal-oxygen bonds in a-IGZO, which substantially helps to improve the NBIS stability.

  5. Remarkable changes in interface O vacancy and metal-oxide bonds in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by long time annealing at 250 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Um, Jae Gwang; Jang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the effect of long time post-fabrication annealing on negative bias illumination stress (NBIS) of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film-transistors. Annealing for 100 h at 250 °C increased the field effect mobility from 14.7 cm 2 /V s to 17.9 cm 2 /V s and reduced the NBIS instability remarkably. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the oxygen vacancy and OH were found to exist at the interfaces of a-IGZO with top and bottom SiO 2 . Long time annealing helps to decrease the vacancy concentration and increase the metal-oxygen bonds at the interfaces; this leads to increase in the free carrier concentrations in a-IGZO and field-effect mobility. X-ray reflectivity measurement indicated the increment of a-IGZO film density of 5.63 g cm −3 to 5.83 g cm −3 (3.4% increase) by 100 h annealing at 250 °C. The increase in film density reveals the decrease of O vacancy concentration and reduction of weak metal-oxygen bonds in a-IGZO, which substantially helps to improve the NBIS stability

  6. Corrosion protection of the reinforcing steels in chloride-laden concrete environment through epoxy/polyaniline–camphorsulfonate nanocomposite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pour-Ali, Sadegh; Dehghanian, Changiz; Kosari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Epoxy/polyaniline–camphorsulfonate nanocomposite coating well protects steel rebar. • Coating performance is evaluated by impedance measurements up to 1 year. • Ultimate bond strength between the coated rebars and concrete is measured. • Self-compacting concrete shows better anticorrosive property compared to normal one. - Abstract: In this study, an epoxy/polyaniline–camphorsulfonate nanocomposite (epoxy/PANI–CSA) is employed to protect reinforcing steels in chloride-laden concrete environment. The synthesized nanocomposite was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Bare, epoxy-coated and epoxy/PANI–CSA nanocomposite-coated steel rebars were embedded in normal and self-compacting concretes. To evaluate their corrosion behaviors, open circuit potential and impedance measurements were performed for the duration of 1 year. Ultimate bond strength of concrete with the reinforcement bars were measured in corroded and uncorroded conditions. It was found that epoxy/PANI–CSA coating provides good corrosion resistance and durable bond strength with concrete for steel rebars

  7. Mechanism of adhesion of epoxy resin to steel surface; Tekko hyomen to epoxy jushino secchaku mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, M. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-08-01

    In the present research, an adhesion-breaking test and a molecular-scale model experiment were conducted to elucidate the adhesion mechanism of epoxy resin (R) to the cold rolled steel sheet (CR) and galvanized steel sheet (GI). As for the adhesive joint strength in the humid environment, the GI is inferior in residual strength to the CR. The GI joint fracture is an interfacial fracture between the plating and adhesive agent, while the CR joint fracture is a combination of cohesive fracture and interfacial fracture. It is attributable to the difference in adhesion mechanism of R and degradation due to humidity between the surface solely of zinc and iron-containing surface. The adhesion state of R to the zinc oxide and iron oxide was observed by temperature-programed desorption in an ultrahigh vacuum. On each of both oxides, the R chemically adsorbs through bond scission between the phenoxy oxide and carbon. If the water dissociatively adsorbs onto the surface, the bond is destroyed between the zinc oxide and R. The formation of interfacial chemical bond contributes to the adhesion of R to the CR and GI. In case of GI, this band is destroyed by the interfacial infiltration of water, while it is not done in case of CR. The CR excels the GI in adhesive durability. 20 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Interfacial fracture of dentin adhesively bonded to quartz-fiber reinforced composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Renata M.; Rahbar, Nima; Soboyejo, Wole

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of interfacial failure in a multilayered structure consisting of a dentin/resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced composite (FRC). Slices of dentin close to the pulp chamber were sandwiched by two half-circle discs made of a quartz-fiber reinforced composite, bonded with bonding agent (All-bond 2, BISCO, Schaumburg) and resin cement (Duo-link, BISCO, Schaumburg) to make Brazil-nut sandwich specimens for interfacial toughness testing. Interfacial fracture toughness (strain energy release rate, G) was measured as a function of mode mixity by changing loading angles from 0 deg. to 15 deg. The interfacial fracture surfaces were then examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) to determine the failure modes when loading angles changed. A computational model was also developed to calculate the driving forces, stress intensity factors and mode mixities. Interfacial toughness increased from ∼ 1.5 to 3.2 J/m 2 when the loading angle increases from ∼ 0 to 15 deg. The hybridized dentin/cement interface appeared to be tougher than the resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced epoxy. The Brazil-nut sandwich specimen was a suitable method to investigate the mechanical integrity of dentin/cement/FRC interfaces.

  9. Three-Dimensional Graphene Foam Induces Multifunctionality in Epoxy Nanocomposites by Simultaneous Improvement in Mechanical, Thermal, and Electrical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embrey, Leslie; Nautiyal, Pranjal; Loganathan, Archana; Idowu, Adeyinka; Boesl, Benjamin; Agarwal, Arvind

    2017-11-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) macroporous graphene foam based multifunctional epoxy composites are developed in this study. Facile dip-coating and mold-casting techniques are employed to engineer microstructures with tailorable thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties. These processing techniques allow capillarity-induced equilibrium filling of graphene foam branches, creating epoxy/graphene interfaces with minimal separation. Addition of 2 wt % graphene foam enhances the glass transition temperature of epoxy from 106 to 162 °C, improving the thermal stability of the polymer composite. Graphene foam aids in load-bearing, increasing the ultimate tensile strength by 12% by merely 0.13 wt % graphene foam in an epoxy matrix. Digital image correlation (DIC) analysis revealed that the graphene foam cells restrict and confine the deformation of the polymer matrix, thereby enhancing the load-bearing capability of the composite. Addition of 0.6 wt % graphene foam also enhances the flexural strength of the pure epoxy by 10%. A 3D network of graphene branches is found to suppress and deflect the cracks, arresting mechanical failure. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) of the composites demonstrated their vibration damping capability, as the loss tangent (tan δ) jumps from 0.1 for the pure epoxy to 0.24 for ∼2 wt % graphene foam-epoxy composite. Graphene foam branches also provide seamless pathways for electron transfer, which induces electrical conductivity exceeding 450 S/m in an otherwise insulator epoxy matrix. The epoxy-graphene foam composite exhibits a gauge factor as high as 4.1, which is twice the typical gauge factor for the most common metals. Simultaneous improvement in thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties of epoxy due to 3D graphene foam makes epoxy-graphene foam composite a promising lightweight and multifunctional material for aiding load-bearing, electrical transport, and motion sensing in aerospace, automotive, robotics, and smart device structures.

  10. Epoxy cracking in the epoxy-impregnated superconducting winding: nonuniform dissipation of stress energy in a wire-epoxy matrix model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, O.; Iwasa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The authors present the epoxy-crack-induced temperature data of copper wires imbedded in wire-epoxy resin composite model at 4.2 K. The experimental results show that the epoxy-crackinduced temperature rise is higher in the copper wires than in the epoxy matrix, indicating that in stress-induced wire-epoxy failure, stress energy stored in the wire-epoxy matrix is preferrentially dissipated in the wire. A plausible mechanism of the nonuniform dissipation is presented

  11. Improvement of interfacial adhesion and nondestructive damage evaluation for plasma-treated PBO and Kevlar fibers/epoxy composites using micromechanical techniques and surface wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joung-Man; Kim, Dae-Sik; Kim, Sung-Ryong

    2003-08-15

    Comparison of interfacial properties and microfailure mechanisms of oxygen-plasma treated poly(p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole (PBO, Zylon) and poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA, Kevlar) fibers/epoxy composites were investigated using a micromechanical technique and nondestructive acoustic emission (AE). The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) and work of adhesion, Wa, of PBO or Kevlar fiber/epoxy composites increased with oxygen-plasma treatment, due to induced hydrogen and covalent bondings at their interface. Plasma-treated Kevlar fiber showed the maximum critical surface tension and polar term, whereas the untreated PBO fiber showed the minimum values. The work of adhesion and the polar term were proportional to the IFSS directly for both PBO and Kevlar fibers. The microfibril fracture pattern of two plasma-treated fibers appeared obviously. Unlike in slow cooling, in rapid cooling, case kink band and kicking in PBO fiber appeared, whereas buckling in the Kevlar fiber was observed mainly due to compressive and residual stresses. Based on the propagation of microfibril failure toward the core region, the number of AE events for plasma-treated PBO and Kevlar fibers increased significantly compared to the untreated case. The results of nondestructive AE were consistent with microfailure modes.

  12. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spera, D.A. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (USA). Lewis Research Center); Esgar, J.B. (Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Cleveland, OH (USA)); Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.D. (Gougeon Bros., Bay City, MI (USA))

    1990-05-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue and strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 in. by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications. 9 refs.

  13. Latent Hardeners for the Assembly of Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank; Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.; Mercado, Zoar; Galloway, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale composite structures are commonly joined by secondary bonding of molded-and-cured thermoset components. This approach may result in unpredictable joint strengths. In contrast, assemblies made by co-curing, although limited in size by the mold, result in stable structures, and are certifiable for commercial aviation because of structural continuity through the joints. Multifunctional epoxy resins were prepared that should produce fully-cured subcomponents with uncured joining surfaces, enabling them to be assembled by co-curing in a subsequent out-of-autoclave process. Aromatic diamines were protected by condensation with a ketone or aldehyde to form imines. Properties of the amine-cured epoxy were compared with those of commercially available thermosetting epoxy resins and rheology and thermal analysis were used to demonstrate the efficacy of imine protection. Optimum conditions to reverse the protecting chemistry in the solid state using moisture and acid catalysis were determined. Alternative chemistries were also investigated. For example, chain reaction depolymerization and photoinitiated catalysts would be expected to minimize liberation of volatile organic content upon deprotection and avoid residual reactive species that could damage the resin. Results from the analysis of protected and deprotected resins will be presented.

  14. Influence of artificial aging on the shear bond strength of zirconia-composite interfaces after pretreatment with new 10-MDP adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    p.c pott

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This in-vitro study investigates the bond strength of different zirconia composites  with three different modern adhesive systems after artificial aging using thermocycling and water storage. Methods: A total of 90 specimens of zirconia (InCoris, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim were ground using a 165 µm grit rotating diamond disc. Thirty specimens were additionally treated with either Futurabond U “FBU” (VOCO GmbH, or Futurabond M+ “FBM” (VOCO GmbH or Futurabond M+ in combination with the DCA activator “FBMD” (VOCO GmbH. One of the three different types of composites – BifixSE “BS”, BifixQM “BQ” or GrandioSO “G” (VOCO GmbH – was bonded to the ten specimens of each group. All of the specimens underwent artificial aging using thermocycling between 5°C and 55°C for 5000 cycles followed by water storage for 100 days. Shear bond strength (SBS was determined in a universal testing machine. The type of failure was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. The data were compared to existing data without artificial aging. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey test. Results: FBM and FBMD had higher SBS than FBU in combination with all tested composites, except BifixSE. In nearly all groups, artificial aging had no effect, with the exception of the combination of FBMD with BifixSE, in which there was a significant decrease in SBS after the aging process (p

  15. X-ray imaging inspection of fiberglass reinforced by epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rique, A.M.; Machado, A.C.; Oliveira, D.F.; Lopes, R.T.; Lima, I.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work was to study the voids presented in bonded joints in order to minimize failures due to low adhesion of the joints in the industry field. One of the main parameters to be characterized is the porosity of the glue, since these pores are formed by several reasons in the moment of its adhesion, which are formed by composite of epoxy resin reinforced by fiberglass. For such purpose, it was used high energy X-ray microtomography and the results show its potential effective in recognizing and quantifying directly in 3D all the occlusions regions presented at glass fiber-epoxy adhesive joints

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Epoxy Resin Cross-Linked with High Wood Pyrolysis Bio-Oil Substitution by Acetone Pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of cost effective solvents may be necessary to store wood pyrolysis bio-oil in order to stabilize and control its viscosity, but this part of the production system has not been explored. Conversely, any rise in viscosity during storage, that would occur without a solvent, will add variance to the production system and render it cost ineffective. The purpose of this study was to modify bio-oil with a common solvent and then react the bio-oil with an epoxy for bonding of wood without any loss in properties. The acetone pretreatment of the bio-oil/epoxy mixture was found to improve the cross-linking potential and substitution rate based on its mechanical, chemical, and thermal properties. Specifically, the bio-oil was blended with epoxy resin at weight ratios ranging from 2:1 to 1:5 and were then cured. A higher bio-oil substitution rate was found to lower the shear bond strength of the bio-oil/epoxy resins. However, when an acetone pretreatment was used, it was possible to replace the bio-oil by as much as 50% while satisfying usage requirements. Extraction of the bio-oil/epoxy mixture with four different solvents demonstrated an improvement in cross-linking after acetone pretreatment. ATR-FTIR analysis confirmed that the polymer achieved a higher cross-linked structure. DSC and TGA curves showed improved thermal stability with the addition of the acetone pretreatment. UV-Vis characterization showed that some functional groups of the bio-oil to epoxy system were unreacted. Finally, when the resin mixture was utilized to bond wood, the acetone pretreatment coupled with precise tuning of the bio-oil:epoxy ratio was an effective method to control cross-linking while ensuring acceptable bond strength.

  17. Lap shear strength of selected adhesives (epoxy, varnish, B-stage glass cloth) in liquid nitrogen and at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froelich, K.J.; Fitzpatrick, C.M.

    1976-12-01

    The adhesives included several epoxy resins, a varnish, and a B-stage glass cloth (a partially cured resin in a fiberglass cloth matrix). Several parameters critical to bond strength were varied: adhesive and adherend differences, surface preparation, coupling agents, glass cloth, epoxy thickness, fillers, and bonding pressure and temperature. The highest lap shear strengths were obtained with the B-shear glass cloth at both liquid nitrogen and room temperatures with values of approximately 20 MPa (3000 psi) and approximately 25.5 MPa (3700 psi) respectively

  18. Characterization of Hybrid Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcha, Shelly; Dotan, Ana; Kenig, Samuel; Dodiuk, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the effect of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) content and its surface treatment on thermo-mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites. MWCNTs were surface treated and incorporated into two epoxy systems. MWCNT's surface treatments were based on: (a) Titania coating obtained by sol-gel process and (b) a nonionic surfactant. Thermo-mechanical properties improvement was obtained following incorporation of treated MWCNT. It was noticed that small amounts of titania coated MWCNT (0.05 wt %) led to an increase in the glass transition temperature and stiffness. The best performance was achieved adding 0.3 wt % titania coated MWCNT where an increase of 10 °C in the glass transition temperature and 30% in storage modulus were obtained. PMID:28348313

  19. Hydrophobic Modification of Layered Clays and Compatibility for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Jen Lin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the intercalation and exfoliation of layered clays with polymeric intercalating agents involving poly(oxypropylene-amines and the particular uses for epoxy nanocomposites are reviewed. For intercalation, counter-ionic exchange reactions of clays including cationic layered silicates and anionic Al-Mg layered double hydroxide (LDH with polymeric organic ions afforded organoclays led to spatial interlayer expansion from 12 to 92 Å (X-ray diffraction as well as hydrophobic property. The inorganic clays of layered structure could be modified by the poly(oxypropyleneamine-salts as the intercalating agents with molecular weights ranging from 230 to 5,000 g/mol. Furthermore, natural montmorillonite (MMT clay could be exfoliated into thin layer silicate platelets (ca. 1 nm thickness in one step by using polymeric types of exfoliating agents. Different lateral dimensions of MMT, synthetic fluorinated Mica and LDH clays had been cured into epoxy nanocomposites. The hydrophobic amine-salt modification resulting in high spacing of layered or exfoliation of individual clay platelets is the most important factor for gaining significant improvements of properties. In particular, these modified clays were reported to gain significant improvements such as reduced coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE, enhanced thermal stability, and hardness. The utilization of these layered clays for initiating the epoxy self-polymerization was also reported to have a unique compatibility between clay and organic resin matrix. However, the matrix domain lacks of covalently bonded crosslink and leads to the isolation of powder material. It is generally concluded that the hydrophobic expansion of the clay inter-gallery spacing is the crucial step for enhancing the compatibility and the ultimate preparation of the advanced epoxy materials.

  20. Hydrophobic Modification of Layered Clays and Compatibility for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiang-Jen; Chan, Ying-Nan; Lan, Yi-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on the intercalation and exfoliation of layered clays with polymeric intercalating agents involving poly(oxypropylene)-amines and the particular uses for epoxy nanocomposites are reviewed. For intercalation, counter-ionic exchange reactions of clays including cationic layered silicates and anionic Al-Mg layered double hydroxide (LDH) with polymeric organic ions afforded organoclays led to spatial interlayer expansion from 12 to 92 Å (X-ray diffraction) as well as hydrophobic property. The inorganic clays of layered structure could be modified by the poly(oxypropylene)amine-salts as the intercalating agents with molecular weights ranging from 230 to 5,000 g/mol. Furthermore, natural montmorillonite (MMT) clay could be exfoliated into thin layer silicate platelets (ca. 1 nm thickness) in one step by using polymeric types of exfoliating agents. Different lateral dimensions of MMT, synthetic fluorinated Mica and LDH clays had been cured into epoxy nanocomposites. The hydrophobic amine-salt modification resulting in high spacing of layered or exfoliation of individual clay platelets is the most important factor for gaining significant improvements of properties. In particular, these modified clays were reported to gain significant improvements such as reduced coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), enhanced thermal stability, and hardness. The utilization of these layered clays for initiating the epoxy self-polymerization was also reported to have a unique compatibility between clay and organic resin matrix. However, the matrix domain lacks of covalently bonded crosslink and leads to the isolation of powder material. It is generally concluded that the hydrophobic expansion of the clay inter-gallery spacing is the crucial step for enhancing the compatibility and the ultimate preparation of the advanced epoxy materials.

  1. A damage mechanics based general purpose interface/contact element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chengyong

    Most of the microelectronics packaging structures consist of layered substrates connected with bonding materials, such as solder or epoxy. Predicting the thermomechanical behavior of these multilayered structures is a challenging task in electronic packaging engineering. In a layered structure the most complex part is always the interfaces between the strates. Simulating the thermo-mechanical behavior of such interfaces, is the main theme of this dissertation. The most commonly used solder material, Pb-Sn alloy, has a very low melting temperature 180sp°C, so that the material demonstrates a highly viscous behavior. And, creep usually dominates the failure mechanism. Hence, the theory of viscoplasticity is adapted to describe the constitutive behavior. In a multilayered assembly each layer has a different coefficient of thermal expansion. Under thermal cycling, due to heat dissipated from circuits, interfaces and interconnects experience low cycle fatigue. Presently, the state-of-the art damage mechanics model used for fatigue life predictions is based on Kachanov (1986) continuum damage model. This model uses plastic strain as a damage criterion. Since plastic strain is a stress path dependent value, the criterion does not yield unique damage values for the same state of stress. In this dissertation a new damage evolution equation based on the second law of thermodynamic is proposed. The new criterion is based on the entropy of the system and it yields unique damage values for all stress paths to the final state of stress. In the electronics industry, there is a strong desire to develop fatigue free interconnections. The proposed interface/contact element can also simulate the behavior of the fatigue free Z-direction thin film interconnections as well as traditional layered interconnects. The proposed interface element can simulate behavior of a bonded interface or unbonded sliding interface, also called contact element. The proposed element was verified against

  2. Synthesis of Polyurethane/Silica Modified Epoxy Polymer Based on 1,3-Propanediol for Coating Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutviasari Nuraini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the synthesis of polyurethane/silica modified epoxy polymer using 1,3-propanediol has been conducted. Synthesis of polymers made by reaction of tolonate and 1,3-propanediol (ratio NCO/OH=2.5 as the building blocks of polyurethane with diglycidyl ether bisphenol A (DGEBA epoxy and catalyst dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTL.The total weight of the polyurethane used was 20% (w/w of the total epoxy. Based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR and 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR spectra indicated the existence of a new bond that is formed from the reaction of isocyanate group and hydroxyl group, where the hydroxyl groups derived from epoxy and 1,3-propanediol. The addition of silica (5, 10, and 15% w/w to epoxy into the epoxy-modified polyurethane has been carried out through sol-gel reaction of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS. The isocyanate conversion rate for the addition of silica 5, 10, and 15% are 95.69; 100, and 100%, respectively. The morphology and element identification by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (SEM/EDX, showed that Si element has been successfully added in the polymer. From the tensile strength and elongation analysis, also thermal stability analysis using Thermal Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA, the increase of silica amount into the polyurethane modified epoxy did not significantly affect to thermal properties, but decrease the tensile strength of the polymer.

  3. Enhancing the Heat Transfer Efficiency in Graphene-Epoxy Nanocomposites Using a Magnesium Oxide-Graphene Hybrid Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fei-Peng; Yang, Wen; Zhang, Fang; Tang, Chak-Yin; Liu, Sheng-Peng; Yin, Le; Law, Wing-Cheung

    2015-07-08

    Composite materials, such as organic matrices doped with inorganic fillers, can generate new properties that exhibit multiple functionalities. In this paper, an epoxy-based nanocomposite that has a high thermal conductivity and a low electrical conductivity, which are required for the use of a material as electronic packaging and insulation, was prepared. The performance of the epoxy was improved by incorporating a magnesium oxide-coated graphene (MgO@GR) nanomaterial into the epoxy matrix. We found that the addition of a MgO coating not only improved the dispersion of the graphene in the matrix and the interfacial bonding between the graphene and epoxy but also enhanced the thermal conductivity of the epoxy while preserving the electrical insulation. By adding 7 wt % MgO@GR, the thermal conductivity of the epoxy nanocomposites was enhanced by 76% compared with that of the neat epoxy, and the electrical resistivity was maintained at 8.66 × 10(14) Ω m.

  4. Preparation and properties of novel epoxy/graphene oxide nanosheets (GON) composites functionalized with flame retardant containing phosphorus and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kuo-Yi; Kuan, Chen-Feng; Kuan, Hsu-Chiang; Chen, Chia-Hsun; Shen, Ming-Yuan; Yang, Jia-Ming; Chiang, Chin-Lung

    2014-01-01

    2-(Diphenylphosphino)ethyltriethoxy silane (DPPES) was grafted onto the surface of graphene oxide nanosheets (GON) via a condensation reaction. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy verify that DPPES did not only covalently bond to GON as a functionalization moiety, but partly restored its conjugated structure as a reducing agent. DPPES on graphene sheets oxide was observed by transmission electron microscopy, and contributed to the favorable dispersion of DPPES-GON in nonpolar toluene. Additionally, the flame retardancy and thermal stability of epoxy/DPPES-GON nanocomposites that contain various weight fractions of DPPES-GON were studied using the limiting oxygen index test, UL-94 test and by thermogravimetric analysis in nitrogen. The composites containing 10 wt% DPPES-GON can pass V-0 rating in UL-94 test. Adding 10 wt% DPPES-GON in epoxy greatly increased the char yield and LOI by 42% and 80%, respectively. Epoxy/DPPES-GON nanocomposites with phosphorus, silicon and graphene layer structures were found to exhibit much greater flame retardancy than neat epoxy. The synergistic effects among silicon, phosphorus and GON can improve the flame retardancy of epoxy resin. - Highlights: • Flame retardant was grafted on the surface of graphene oxide nanosheets (GON) by the condensation reaction. • The synergistic effect between silicon, phosphorus and GON improved the flame retardance of epoxy resin. • Epoxy composites have excellent flame retardance at low additive concentrations

  5. Characterization of Low Density Glass Filled Epoxies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quesenberry, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    This report discusses the experimental determination and modeling of several thermophysical and mechanical properties of glass filled epoxy composite systems for potential use as electronic potting compounds...

  6. Thermally activated, single component epoxy systems

    KAUST Repository

    Unruh, David A.

    2011-08-23

    A single component epoxy system in which the resin and hardener components found in many two-component epoxies are combined onto the same molecule is described. The single molecule precursor to the epoxy resin contains both multiple epoxide moieties and a diamine held latent by thermally degradable carbamate linkages. These bis-carbamate "single molecule epoxies" have an essentially infinite shelf life and access a significant range in curing temperatures related to the structure of the carbamate linkages used. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  7. Thermally activated, single component epoxy systems

    KAUST Repository

    Unruh, David A.; Pastine, Stefan J.; Moreton, Jessica C.; Frechet, Jean

    2011-01-01

    A single component epoxy system in which the resin and hardener components found in many two-component epoxies are combined onto the same molecule is described. The single molecule precursor to the epoxy resin contains both multiple epoxide moieties and a diamine held latent by thermally degradable carbamate linkages. These bis-carbamate "single molecule epoxies" have an essentially infinite shelf life and access a significant range in curing temperatures related to the structure of the carbamate linkages used. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  8. Effective functionalization of carbon nanotubes for bisphenol F epoxy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A brand-new type of multifunctional nanocomposites with high DC conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength was fabricated. Ionic liquid functionalized Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs-IL were embedded into epoxy matrix with covalent bonding by the attached epoxy groups. The highest DC conductivity was 8.38 x 10-3 S.m-1 with 1.0 wt. (% loading of CNTs-IL and the tensile strength was increased by 36.4% only at a 0.5 wt. (% concentration. A mixing solvent was used to disperse CNTs-IL in the epoxy monomer. The dispersion and distribution of CNTs-IL in the polymer matrix were measured by utilizing both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively.

  9. Analysis and Testing of Bisphenol A—Free Bio-Based Tannin Epoxy-Acrylic Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayesteh Jahanshahi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A tannin-based epoxy acrylate resin was prepared from glycidyl ether tannin (GET and acrylic acid. The influence of the reaction condition for producing tannin epoxy acrylate was studied by FT-MIR, 13C-NMR, MALDI-TOF spectroscopy and shear strength. The best reaction conditions for producing tannin epoxy acrylate resin without bisphenol A was by reaction between GET and acrylic acid in the presence of a catalyst and hydroquinone at 95 °C for 12 h. FT-MIR, 13C-NMR and MALDI-TOF analysis have confirmed that the resin has been prepared under these conditions. The joints bonded with this resin were tested for block shear strength. The results obtained indicated that the best strength performance was obtained by the bioepoxy-acrylate adhesive resin prepared at 95 °C for a 12-h reaction.

  10. Bond Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  11. Elastic properties, reaction kinetics, and structural relaxation of an epoxy resin polymer during cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heili, Manon; Bielawski, Andrew; Kieffer, John

    The cure kinetics of a DGEBA/DETA epoxy is investigated using concurrent Raman and Brillouin light scattering. Raman scattering allows us to monitor the in-situ reaction and quantitatively assess the degree of cure. Brillouin scattering yields the elastic properties of the system, providing a measure of network connectivity. We show that the adiabatic modulus evolves non-uniquely as a function of cure degree, depending on the cure temperature and the molar ratio of the epoxy. Two mechanisms contribute to the increase in the elastic modulus of the material during curing. First, there is the formation of covalent bonds in the network during the curing process. Second, following bond formation, the epoxy undergoes structural relaxation toward an optimally packed network configuration, enhancing non-bonded interactions. We investigate to what extent the non-bonded interaction contribution to structural rigidity in cross-linked polymers is reversible, and to what extent it corresponds to the difference between adiabatic and isothermal moduli obtained from static tensile, i.e. the so-called relaxational modulus. To this end, we simultaneously measure the adiabatic and isothermal elastic moduli as a function of applied strain and deformation rate.

  12. Carbon black reinforced C8 ether linked bismaleimide toughened electrically conducting epoxy nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandhakini, M.; Chandramohan, A.; Jayanthi, K.; Alagar, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlight: • The toughness of the epoxy is improved with C8e-BMI. • Conduction through ohmic contact chain takes the leading mechanism for electrical conduction instead of tunneling with 5 wt% CB. • The phase segregation between epoxy/C8 e-BMI improves the toughness of the nanocomposite. • Both toughening and flexibilization effect is responsible for improvement in impact strength. • The largest challenge of appropriate balance between the electrical conductivity and mechanical behavior is attained in a cost effective manner. - Abstract: The present work deals with the toughening of brittle epoxy matrix with C8 ether linked bismaleimide (C8 e-BMI) and then study the reinforcing effect of carbon black (CB) in enhancing the conducting properties of insulating epoxy matrix. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman analysis indicate the formation of strong covalent bonds between CB and C8 e-BMI/epoxy matrix. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analysis indicate the event of phase separation in 5 wt% CB loaded epoxy C8 e-BMI nanocomposites. The impact strength increased up to 5 wt% of CB loading with particle pull and crack deflection to be driving mechanism for enhancing the toughness of the nanocomposite and beyond 5 wt% the impact strength started to decrease due to aggregation of CB. The dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) also indicates the toughness of the nanocomposites was improved with 5 wt% of CB loading due to the phase segregation between epoxy and C8 e-BMI in the presence of CB. The electrical conductivity was also increased with 5 wt% of CB due to classical conduction by ohmic chain contact

  13. Silica Treatments: A Fire Retardant Strategy for Hemp Fabric/Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Branda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, for the first time, inexpensive waterglass solutions are exploited as a new, simple and ecofriendly chemical approach for promoting the formation of a silica-based coating on hemp fabrics, able to act as a thermal shield and to protect the latter from heat sources. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR and solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR analysis confirm the formation of –C–O–Si– covalent bonds between the coating and the cellulosic substrate. The proposed waterglass treatment, which is resistant to washing, seems to be very effective for improving the fire behavior of hemp fabric/epoxy composites, also in combination with ammonium polyphosphate. In particular, the exploitation of hemp surface treatment and Ammonium Polyphosphate (APP addition to epoxy favors a remarkable decrease of the Heat Release Rate (HRR, Total Heat Release (THR, Total Smoke Release (TSR and Specific Extinction Area (SEA (respectively by 83%, 35%, 45% and 44% as compared to untreated hemp/epoxy composites, favoring the formation of a very stable char, as also assessed by Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA. Because of the low interfacial adhesion between the fabrics and the epoxy matrix, the obtained composites show low strength and stiffness; however, the energy absorbed by the material is higher when using treated hemp. The presence of APP in the epoxy matrix does not affect the mechanical behavior of the composites.

  14. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin [Centre for Advanced Materials Technology (CAMT), School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Zhang, Ming-Qiu [Key Laboratory of Polymeric Composite and Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2016-03-09

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  15. Scheming of microwave shielding effectiveness for X band considering functionalized MWNTs/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, S.; Saha, S.

    2016-02-01

    Present typescript encompasses anextraordinary electrical and mechanical behaviors of carboxylic (-COOH) functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNTs)/epoxy composites at low wt.% (0,5, 0,75, 1wt.%). Functionalization on the surface of the nanotube assists MWNTs in dispersing it into epoxy polymer in a respectable manner, Fabricated composites are exposed to different characterization techniques in order to examine the overall physical properties, Microwave shielding effectiveness (SE) for X band (8-12 GHz) and the flexural properties have been premeditated to predict the electrical and mechanical performances. It was found that the total SE of the nanocomposites was increased with the positive gradient of MWNT contents, The best result was recorded for 1 wt.% MWNT loading (SE of about 51,72 dB).In addition, incorporation of nanofillers enhanced the flexural modulus, flexural strength and micro-hardness of the resulting composites while comparing with neat epoxy, Nanocomposites with 0,75 wt,% MWNT loading demonstrated an incrementof 101% in modulus than that of neat epoxy, Theincrement in mechanical properties was due to achievement of good dispersion quality, effective bonding between MWNTs and epoxy polymer analyzed by micrographs of fracture surfaces

  16. Scheming of microwave shielding effectiveness for X band considering functionalized MWNTs/epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, S; Saha, S

    2016-01-01

    Present typescript encompasses anextraordinary electrical and mechanical behaviors of carboxylic (-COOH) functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNTs)/epoxy composites at low wt.% (0,5, 0,75, 1wt.%). Functionalization on the surface of the nanotube assists MWNTs in dispersing it into epoxy polymer in a respectable manner, Fabricated composites are exposed to different characterization techniques in order to examine the overall physical properties, Microwave shielding effectiveness (SE) for X band (8-12 GHz) and the flexural properties have been premeditated to predict the electrical and mechanical performances. It was found that the total SE of the nanocomposites was increased with the positive gradient of MWNT contents, The best result was recorded for 1 wt.% MWNT loading (SE of about 51,72 dB).In addition, incorporation of nanofillers enhanced the flexural modulus, flexural strength and micro-hardness of the resulting composites while comparing with neat epoxy, Nanocomposites with 0,75 wt,% MWNT loading demonstrated an incrementof 101% in modulus than that of neat epoxy, Theincrement in mechanical properties was due to achievement of good dispersion quality, effective bonding between MWNTs and epoxy polymer analyzed by micrographs of fracture surfaces (paper)

  17. Elaboration, structural and optical investigations of ZnO/epoxy nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, S.; Namouchi, F.; Guermazi, H.

    2015-07-01

    Hybrid nanocomposites were elaborated by incorporating ZnO nanoparticles into a transparent epoxy polymer matrix, using the direct dispersion method. The effect of the nanoparticles on the structural and optical properties of the polymer matrix was investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman and UV-Visible spectroscopies. Nanocomposites FTIR spectra showed a variation of band intensities attributed to nanoparticles agglomeration within the polymer. The UV-Visible measurements showed a redshift on the band gap energy of the nanocomposites differently from neat epoxy resin, caused by interactions between ZnO NPs and polymer chains. Raman spectra confirm these interactions and the formation of hydrogen bonds in the nanocomposites. The UV-Visible transmittance spectra revealed that addition of a very low concentration (0.2wt%) of ZnO nanoparticles to a transparent epoxy matrix would maintain high visible-light transparency. The decrease of transmittance with increasing ZnO percentage is due to light scattering which originates from the agglomeration of nanoparticles in the matrix, the mismatch between the refractive index of ZnO and that of the epoxy matrix, and the increase of the surface roughness of the nanocomposite with increasing ZnO addition. Moreover, the UV-vis absorption spectra revealed that adding more than 1wt% ZnO leads to the improvement of the UV shielding properties of the nanocomposites. These results prove that the elaborated ZnO/epoxy nanocomposites can be used as UV shielding materials.

  18. Grafting of polyethylenimine onto cellulose nanofibers for interfacial enhancement in their epoxy nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiangqi; Li, Qingye; Zhang, Xiaofang; Xiao, Meijie; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Canhui

    2017-02-10

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) were surface-modified with polyethyleneimine (PEI), which brought plentiful amine groups on the surface of CNFs, leading to a reduced hydrogen bond density between CNFs and consequently less CNFs agglomerates. The amine groups could also react with the epoxy as an effective curing agent that could increase the interfacial crosslinking density and strengthen interfacial adhesion. The tensile strength and Young's modulus of CNFs-PEI/Epoxy nanocomposites were 88.1% and 237.6% higher than those of neat epoxy, respectively. The tensile storage modulus of the nanocomposites also increased significantly at the temperature either below or above the Tg. The coefficient of thermal expansion for the CNFs-PEI/Epoxy nanocomposites was 22.2ppmK -1 , much lower than that of the neat epoxy (88.6ppmK -1 ). In addition, the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites was observed to increase as well. The exceptional and balanced properties may provide the nanocomposites promising applications in automotive, construction and electronic devices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Ming-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  20. Inflatable Module Seal Interface Development and Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a repeatable low permeable sealing interface evaluating O-ring, RTV bond and flowed RTV bond methods. Advanced Bladder materials (ArmorFlex, Nanoclay, etc)...

  1. Two-component bond for coating materials coming into contact with radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, L.; Fajfr, K.

    1989-01-01

    The two-component bonding agent consists of an epoxy resin of the diane-bis-glycidyl ether type and an amine hardener containing benzyl alcohol and bis-2-ethylhexyl phthalate. The claimed bond features high radiation stability and very good decontaminability. Thanks to low viscosity of the bond, pigmented reactor-plastics can be prepared. The procedure is described of applying the bond onto a concrete surface. (E.S.)

  2. Subcritical crack growth along polymer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurumurthy, Charavana Kumara

    2000-10-01

    The adhesion characteristics have been investigated for a polyimide (PI)/model epoxy (ME) interface that is important for microelectronic applications. The fracture toughness (G*c) of this interface has been measured using an asymmetric double cantilever beam (ADCB) technique. The G*c is low, 10-25 J/m 2, and is sensitive to the mechanical phase angle psi. A modified ADCB setup has been used to measure the subcritical crack growth velocity v due to the stress-assisted water attack (SAWA) at various relative humidities (RH) and temperatures (T) as a function of its driving force (the strain energy release rate) G*. The threshold G* decreases remarkably. Above the threshold log v rises linearly with √ G* (a hydrolysis controlled regime) but then enters a regime where the crack velocity is almost independent of √G*, i.e., v = v* (a transport controlled regime). A model for SAWA has been developed based on thermally-activated kinetics for hydrolysis of the ester covalent bonds that bridge from one side to the other of the interface. A new technique has been developed for the determination of the fatigue crack growth under thermal (T) and hydro-thermal (HT) conditions as a function of the range in the strain energy release rate (DeltaG). Under T-fatigue, the fatigue crack growth per unit temperature cycle (da/dN) increases as a power of DeltaG, i.e., a Paris law relationship holds. The HT da/dN measured is higher than da/dN under T-fatigue conditions and has been successfully modeled as a summation of two components: (a) the da/dN due to T-fatigue and (b) the da/dN due to the SAWA along the interface for a given T-cycle. A surface modification procedure that converts a thin interpenetrated by a solvent cast ME is used to strengthen ME/PI interface. The G* c increases with the interpenetration distance w. Increasing w also improves the resistance of the PI/ME interface to SAWA with the threshold G* increasing and the water transport controlled velocity (v

  3. Study on the role of laser surface irradiation on damage and decohesion of Al/epoxy joints

    KAUST Repository

    Alfano, Marco; Lubineau, Gilles; Furgiuele, Franco M.; Paulino, Glá ucio Hermogenes

    2012-01-01

    In this work we investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the bond toughness of aluminum/epoxy bonded joints. The evolution of substrate surface morphology and wettability, for various sets of laser process parameters (i.e. laser power, line spacing, scan speed), was investigated by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurements. A proper combination of power, line spacing and scan speed was then selected and adhesive bonded Al/epoxy T-peel joints were prepared and tested. For comparison, similar samples were produced using substrates with classical grit blasting surface treatment. Finally, post-failure SEM analyses of fracture surfaces were performed, and in order to typify the increase in bond toughness of the joints, finite element simulations were carried out using a potential based cohesive zone model of fracture. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Study on the role of laser surface irradiation on damage and decohesion of Al/epoxy joints

    KAUST Repository

    Alfano, Marco

    2012-12-01

    In this work we investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the bond toughness of aluminum/epoxy bonded joints. The evolution of substrate surface morphology and wettability, for various sets of laser process parameters (i.e. laser power, line spacing, scan speed), was investigated by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurements. A proper combination of power, line spacing and scan speed was then selected and adhesive bonded Al/epoxy T-peel joints were prepared and tested. For comparison, similar samples were produced using substrates with classical grit blasting surface treatment. Finally, post-failure SEM analyses of fracture surfaces were performed, and in order to typify the increase in bond toughness of the joints, finite element simulations were carried out using a potential based cohesive zone model of fracture. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Effect of functionalization of graphene nanoplatelets on the mechanical response of graphene/epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi-Moghadam, B.; Sharafimasooleh, M.; Shadlou, S.; Taheri, F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new functionalization strategy for GNPs, using trimethoxysilane is introduced. • Bond quality between GNP and silane agent is verified by the Raman spect. and TGA. • The functionaliz’n effects on mechanical properties of GNP/epoxy were investigated. • The functionaliz’n effects on the fracture mechanisms of GNP/epoxy investigated. • GNP dispersion quality is also evaluated using SEM micrographs and XRD. - Abstract: This study introduces a new strategy for functionalizing graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) by bonding a silane agent to its structure. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the proposed method, epoxy resin specimens reinforced with silane modified GNPs (G-Si) are prepared at different weight contents of nanoparticles along with three other types of GNPs (unmodified GNP, graphene oxide GNP [GO], and amino functionalized GNP [G-NH 2 ]). The nanocomposites’ mechanical properties, such as the elastic modulus, ultimate strength, modulus of toughness and fracture toughness are evaluated and compared for different types of functionalization. Raman spectroscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are employed to characterize the chemical and structural changes of the functionalized GNPs. The results show that nanocomposites containing G-Si and G-NH 2 provide the best results for most of the mentioned properties. The functionalization of GNPs gives the most promising results for fracture toughness of epoxy, showing an 82% increase, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs and XRD analysis reveal that an improved dispersion status is obtained by GNP functionalization

  6. Thermoset epoxy polymers from renewable resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Anthony [Madison, NJ; Jaffe, Michael [Maplewood, NJ; Zhang, Yi [Harrison, NJ; Catalani, Luiz H [Carapicuiba, BR

    2009-11-17

    Novel thermoset epoxy polymers using the bisglycidyl ethers of anhydrosugars, such as isosorbide, isomannide, and isoidide, are disclosed. The bisglycidyl ethers are useful as substitutes for bisphenol A in the manufacture of thermoset epoxy ethers. The anhydrosugars are derived from renewable sources and the bisglycidyl ethers are not xenoestrogenic and the thermoset curing agents are likewise derived form renewable resources.

  7. EPOXI at comet Hartley 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A'Hearn, Michael F; Belton, Michael J S; Delamere, W Alan; Feaga, Lori M; Hampton, Donald; Kissel, Jochen; Klaasen, Kenneth P; McFadden, Lucy A; Meech, Karen J; Melosh, H Jay; Schultz, Peter H; Sunshine, Jessica M; Thomas, Peter C; Veverka, Joseph; Wellnitz, Dennis D; Yeomans, Donald K; Besse, Sebastien; Bodewits, Dennis; Bowling, Timothy J; Carcich, Brian T; Collins, Steven M; Farnham, Tony L; Groussin, Olivier; Hermalyn, Brendan; Kelley, Michael S; Kelley, Michael S; Li, Jian-Yang; Lindler, Don J; Lisse, Carey M; McLaughlin, Stephanie A; Merlin, Frédéric; Protopapa, Silvia; Richardson, James E; Williams, Jade L

    2011-06-17

    Understanding how comets work--what drives their activity--is crucial to the use of comets in studying the early solar system. EPOXI (Extrasolar Planet Observation and Deep Impact Extended Investigation) flew past comet 103P/Hartley 2, one with an unusually small but very active nucleus, taking both images and spectra. Unlike large, relatively inactive nuclei, this nucleus is outgassing primarily because of CO(2), which drags chunks of ice out of the nucleus. It also shows substantial differences in the relative abundance of volatiles from various parts of the nucleus.

  8. The effect of alkaline treatment on tensile properties of sugar palm fibre reinforced epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachtiar, D.; Sapuan, S.M.; Hamdan, M.M.

    2008-01-01

    A study on the effect of alkaline treatment on tensile properties of sugar palm fibre reinforced epoxy composites is presented in this paper. The treatment was carried out using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at two different concentrations and three different soaking times. The hydrophilic nature of sugar palm fibre makes it difficult to adhere to hydrophobic epoxy and therefore posed the problem of interfacial bonding between fibre and matrix and such treatment was needed to alleviate such problem. The composite specimens were tested for tensile property determination. Some fractured specimens were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM) to study the microstructure of the materials. Inconsistent results were obtained for tensile strengths, which indicate that the treatment is not very effective yet to improve the interfacial bonding. However, for tensile modulus, the results are much higher than untreated fibre composite specimens, which proved the effectiveness of the treatment

  9. Parental Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paul de Cock

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the early parent–child bonding relationship can be valuable in research and practice. Retrospective dimensional measures of parental bonding provide a means for assessing the experience of the early parent–child relationship. However, combinations of dimensional scores may provide information that is not readily captured with a dimensional approach. This study was designed to assess the presence of homogeneous groups in the population with similar profiles on parental bonding dimensions. Using a short version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI, three parental bonding dimensions (care, authoritarianism, and overprotection were used to assess the presence of unobserved groups in the population using latent profile analysis. The class solutions were regressed on 23 covariates (demographics, parental psychopathology, loss events, and childhood contextual factors to assess the validity of the class solution. The results indicated four distinct profiles of parental bonding for fathers as well as mothers. Parental bonding profiles were significantly associated with a broad range of covariates. This person-centered approach to parental bonding has broad utility in future research which takes into account the effect of parent–child bonding, especially with regard to “affectionless control” style parenting.

  10. Self-healing woven glass fabric/epoxy composites with the healant consisting of micro-encapsulated epoxy and latent curing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Tao; Zhou Lin; Rong Minzhi; Zhang Mingqiu

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports a study of self-healing woven glass fabric reinforced epoxy composites. The healing agent was a two-component one synthesized in the authors' laboratory, which consisted of epoxy-loaded urea-formaldehyde microcapsules as the polymerizable binder and CuBr 2 (2-methylimidazole) 4 (CuBr 2 (2-MeIm) 4 ) as the latent hardener. Both the microcapsules and the matching catalyst were pre-embedded and pre-dissolved in the composites' matrix, respectively. When the microcapsules are split by propagating cracks, the uncured epoxy can be released into the damaged areas and then consolidated under the catalysis of CuBr 2 (2-MeIm) 4 that was homogeneously distributed in the composites' matrix on a molecular scale. As a result, the cracked faces can be bonded together. The influence of the content of the self-healing agent on the composites' tensile properties, interlaminar fracture toughness and healing efficiency was evaluated. It was found that a healing efficiency over 70% relative to the fracture toughness of virgin composites was obtained in the case of 30 wt% epoxy-loaded microcapsules and 2 wt% latent hardener

  11. Strength of Al and Al-Mg/alumina bonds prepared using ultrahigh vacuum diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.E.; Campbell, G.H.; Wien, W.L.; Stoner, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have measured the cross-breaking strength of Al and Al-Mg alloys bonded with alumina. Diffusion bonding of Al and Al-Mg alloys requires significantly more bonding time than previously thought to obtain complete bonding. In contrast to previous diffusion bonding studies, fracture morphologies are similar to those obtained in bonds formed by liquid phase reaction; i.e., bonds are as strong or stronger than the ceramic; and fracture tends to propagate in the metal for pure Al and near the interface in the ceramic for the alloys. There are indications that the fracture morphology depends on Mg content and therefore on plasticity in the metal

  12. Positron annihilation analysis of epoxy/hydroxyl terminated butyl nitrile rubber (EP/HTBN) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Minfeng; Chen Ning; Ji Genzhong; Sun Xudong; Zhao Rener; Xiao Huiquan; Qi Chenze; Wang Baoyi

    2007-01-01

    The free volume properties of epoxy/hydroxyl terminated butyl nitrile rubber (EP/HTBN) have been studied by means of positron annihilation technique. The toughness effect is found to be correlated with the content of HTBN and the free volume properties of the EP/HTBN interfaces. When the content of HTBN component is 5%, the free volume size in the interface is close to that of EP, and the toughness effect is strong. But with further addition of HTBN, holes with big size free volume are formed in the interface, and the toughness effect is limited. (authors)

  13. Durability of adhesive bonds to uranium alloys, tungsten, tantalum, and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childress, F.G.

    1975-01-01

    Long-term durability of epoxy bonds to alloys of uranium (U-Nb and Mulberry), nickel-plated uranium, thorium, tungsten, tantalum, tantalum--10 percent tungsten, and aluminum was evaluated. Significant strengths remain after ten years of aging; however, there is some evidence of bond deterioration with uranium alloys and thorium stored in ambient laboratory air

  14. The application of epoxy resin coating in grounding grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Chen, Z. R.; Xi, L. J.; Wang, X. Y.; Wang, H. F.

    2018-01-01

    Epoxy resin anticorrosion coating is widely used in grounding grid corrosion protection because of its wide range of materials, good antiseptic effect and convenient processing. Based on the latest research progress, four kinds of epoxy anticorrosive coatings are introduced, which are structural modified epoxy coating, inorganic modified epoxy coating, organic modified epoxy coating and polyaniline / epoxy resin composite coating. In this paper, the current research progress of epoxy base coating is analyzed, and prospected the possible development direction of the anti-corrosion coating in the grounding grid, which provides a reference for coating corrosion prevention of grounding materials.

  15. Effects of Graphene Oxide and Chemically-Reduced Graphene Oxide on the Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Epoxy Amine Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Monteserín

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Composites based on epoxy/graphene oxide (GO and epoxy/reduced graphene oxide (rGO were investigated for thermal-mechanical performance focusing on the effects of the chemical groups present on nanoadditive-enhanced surfaces. GO and rGO obtained in the present study have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD demonstrating that materials with different oxidation degrees have been obtained. Thereafter, GO/epoxy and rGO/epoxy nanocomposites were successfully prepared and thoroughly characterized by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. A significant increase in the glass transition temperature was found in comparison with the neat epoxy. The presence of functional groups on the graphene surface leads to chemical interactions between these functional groups on GO and rGO surfaces with the epoxy, contributing to the possible formation of covalent bonds between GO and rGO with the matrix. The presence of oxidation groups on GO also contributes to an improved exfoliation, intercalation, and distribution of the GO sheets in the composites with respect to the rGO based composites.

  16. Dissimilar Impact Welding of 6111-T4, 5052-H32 Aluminum Alloys to 22MnB5, DP980 Steels and the Structure-Property Relationship of a Strongly Bonded Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bert; Vivek, Anupam; Presley, Michael; Daehn, Glenn S.

    2018-03-01

    The ability to weld high-strength aluminum to high-strength steel is highly desired for vehicle lightweighting but difficult to attain by conventional means. In this work, vaporizing foil actuator welding was used to successfully weld four Al/Fe combinations consisting of high-strength alloys: AA5052-H32, AA6111-T4, DP980, and 22MnB5. Flyer velocities up to 727 m/s were reached using 10 kJ input energy. In lap-shear testing, samples primarily failed in base aluminum near the aluminum's native strength, showing that the welds were stronger than a base metal and that the base metal was not significantly weakened by the welding process. A particularly strong weld area was studied by transmission electron microscopy to shed light on the microstructural features of strong impact welds. It was found to be characterized by a continuously bonded, fully crystalline interface, extremely fine (nanoscale) grains, mesoscopic as well as microscopic wavy features, and lack of large continuous intermetallic compounds.

  17. Introducing ionic and/or hydrogen bonds into the SAM//Ga2O3 top-interface of Ag(TS)/S(CH2)nT//Ga2O3/EGaIn junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Carleen M; Liao, Kung-Ching; Yoon, Hyo Jae; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Baghbanzadeh, Mostafa; Simeone, Felice C; Whitesides, George M

    2014-06-11

    Junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/S(CH2)nT//Ga2O3/EGaIn (where S(CH2)nT is a self-assembled monolayer, SAM, of n-alkanethiolate bearing a terminal functional group T) make it possible to examine the response of rates of charge transport by tunneling to changes in the strength of the interaction between T and Ga2O3. Introducing a series of Lewis acidic/basic functional groups (T = -OH, -SH, -CO2H, -CONH2, and -PO3H) at the terminus of the SAM gave values for the tunneling current density, J(V) in A/cm(2), that were indistinguishable (i.e., differed by less than a factor of 3) from the values observed with n-alkanethiolates of equivalent length. The insensitivity of the rate of tunneling to changes in the terminal functional group implies that replacing weak van der Waals contact interactions with stronger hydrogen- or ionic bonds at the T//Ga2O3 interface does not change the shape (i.e., the height or width) of the tunneling barrier enough to affect rates of charge transport. A comparison of the injection current, J0, for T = -CO2H, and T = -CH2CH3--two groups having similar extended lengths (in Å, or in numbers of non-hydrogen atoms)--suggests that both groups make indistinguishable contributions to the height of the tunneling barrier.

  18. Epoxy resin systems for FGD units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brytus, V.; Puglisi, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses ongoing research work which is directed towards epoxy resins and curing agents which are designed to withstand aggressive environments. This work includes not only a chemical description of the materials involved, but the application testing necessary to verify the usefulness of these systems. It demonstrates that new high performance epoxy systems are superior to those which traditionally come to mind when one thinks epoxy. Finally, it discusses the results of testing designed specifically to screen candidates for use in FGD units

  19. Self-Sensing of Single Carbon Fiber/Carbon Nanotube-Epoxy Composites Using Electro-Micromechanical Techniques and Acoustic Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joung Man; Jang, Jung Hoon; Wang, Zuo Jia; Kwon, Dong Jun; Park, Jong Kyu; Lee, Woo Il

    2010-01-01

    Self-sensing on micro-failure, dispersion degree and relating properties, of carbon nanotube(CNT)/epoxy composites, were investigated using wettability, electro-micromechanical technique with acoustic emission(AE). Specimens were prepared from neat epoxy as well as composites with untreated and acid-treated CNT. Degree of dispersion was evaluated comparatively by measuring volumetric electrical resistivity and its standard deviation. Apparent modulus containing the stress transfer was higher for acid-treated CNT composite than for the untreated case. Applied cyclic loading responded well for a single carbon fiber/CNT-epoxy composite by the change in contact resistivity. The interfacial shear strength between a single carbon fiber and CNT-epoxy, determined in a fiber pullout test, was lower than that between a single carbon fiber and neat epoxy. Regarding on micro-damage sensing using electrical resistivity measurement with AE, the stepwise increment in electrical resistivity was observed for a single carbon fiber/CNT-epoxy composite. On the other hand, electrical resistivity increased infinitely right after the first carbon fiber breaks for a single carbon fiber/neat epoxy composite. The occurrence of AE events of added CNT composites was much higher than the neat epoxy case, due to microfailure at the interfaces by added CNTs

  20. Erosion protection of carbon-epoxy composites by plasma-sprayed coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, F.; Fagoaga, I.; Oregui, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper deals with the production of plasma-sprayed erosion-resistant coatings on carbon-fibre - epoxy composites, and the study of their erosion behaviour. The heat sensitivity of the composite substrate requires a specific spraying procedure in order to avoid its degradation. In addition, several bonding layers were studied to allow spraying of the protective coatings. Two different functional coatings were sprayed onto an aluminium-glass bonding layer, a WC-12Co cermet and an Al 2 O 3 ceramic oxide. The microstructure and properties of these coatings were studied and their erosion behaviour determined experimentally in an erosion-testing device. (orig.)

  1. The electron beam cure of epoxy paste adhesives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.D.; Janke, C.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1998-01-01

    Recently developed epoxy paste adhesives were electron beam cured and experimentally explored to determine their suitability for use in an aerospace-quality aircraft component. There were two major goals for this program. The first was to determine whether the electron beam-curable past adhesives were capable of meeting the requirements of the US Air Force T-38 supersonic jet trainer composite windshield frame. The T-38 windshield frame's arch is currently manufactured by bonding thin stainless steel plies using an aerospace-grade thermally-cured epoxy film adhesive. The second goal was to develop the lowest cost hand layup and debulk process that could be used to produce laminated steel plies with acceptable properties. The laminate properties examined to determine adhesive suitability include laminate mechanical and physical properties at room, adhesive tack, out-time capability, and the debulk requirements needed to achieve these properties. Eighteen past adhesives and four scrim cloths were experimentally examined using this criteria. One paste adhesive was found to have suitable characteristics in each of these categories and was later chosen for the manufacture of the T-38 windshield frame. This experimental study shows that by using low-cost debulk and layup processes, the electron beam-cured past adhesive mechanical and physical properties meet the specifications of the T-38 composite windshield frame

  2. Ionic Liquid Epoxy Composite Cryotanks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this work is to determine the optimal process for manufacturing lightweight linerless cryogenic storage tanks using ionic liquid epoxy composite...

  3. Action of ionizing radiation on epoxy resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Voorde, M. E.

    1970-12-01

    The resistance of classical and experimental epoxy resins to irradiation was studied. The resistance to irradiation of epoxy resins of diverse compositions as well as the development of resins having a radioresistance that approaches that of certain ceramics are discussed. Sources of irradiation and the techniques of dosimetry used are described. The structures of certain epoxy resins and of hardeners are given. The preparation of these resins and their physical properties is described. The effects of radiation on epoxy resins, as well as conditions of irradiation, and suggested mechanisms for degradation of the irradiated resins are discussed. The relationship between chemical structure of the resins and their physical properties is evaluated. (115 references) (JCB)

  4. Los morteros epoxi en la construcción

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Cánovas, Manuel

    1968-02-01

    Full Text Available Epoxi resins are being increasingly applied in construction in recent years. This is due to their excellent properties and an improving technology, which enables these resins to be applied to more delicate and difficult uses. This article describes the work done by the author as part of an extensive program of experimental work at the Instituto Eduardo Torroja laboratory. This program of work refers particularly to mortars with a low content of epoxi resins. By this is meant a mixture of none fine aggregate with the least quantity of resin necessary to obtain a suitable bond. The investigation involved a study of the proportioning of sand and resin, the relation between proportioning, the age and the mechanical strength and also the physical properties of the resulting mortars.Desde hace unos años las resinas epoxi están encontrando una mayor aplicación en el campo de la construcción. Esto es debido a sus excelentes propiedades y a una tecnología cada vez más perfeccionada, las cuales permiten realizar, con éxito, muchas de sus aplicaciones a problemas cada día más difíciles y delicados. El autor da cuenta, en este artículo, de los trabajos que ha realizado sobre morteros epoxi como parte de un amplio plan de ensayos experimentales que el Instituto Eduardo Torroja lleva a cabo en sus laboratorios. Este estudio se refiere a los morteros epoxídicos pobres, entendiéndose por tales, la mezcla de árido exento de finos con la mínima cantidad de resina precisa para su confección. En el mismo se estudian las influencias de: la granulometría de la arena en la cantidad de resina a emplear; de la dosificación y de la edad en la resistencia mecánica, así como de las propiedades físicas de los morteros así formados.

  5. Improvement of epoxy resin properties by incorporation of TiO2 nanoparticles surface modified with gallic acid esters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radoman, Tijana S.; Džunuzović, Jasna V.; Jeremić, Katarina B.; Grgur, Branimir N.; Miličević, Dejan S.; Popović, Ivanka G.; Džunuzović, Enis S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanocomposites of epoxy resin and TiO 2 nanoparticles surface modified with gallates. • The T g of epoxy resin was increased by incorporation of surface modified TiO 2 . • WVTR of epoxy resin decreased in the presence of surface modified TiO 2 nanoparticles. • WVTR of nanocomposites was reduced with increasing gallates hydrophobic chain length. • Modified TiO 2 nanoparticles react as oxygen scavengers, inhibiting steel corrosion. - Abstract: Epoxy resin/titanium dioxide (epoxy/TiO 2 ) nanocomposites were obtained by incorporation of TiO 2 nanoparticles surface modified with gallic acid esters in epoxy resin. TiO 2 nanoparticles were obtained by acid catalyzed hydrolysis of titanium isopropoxide and their structural characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Three gallic acid esters, having different hydrophobic part, were used for surface modification of the synthesized TiO 2 nanoparticles: propyl, hexyl and lauryl gallate. The gallate chemisorption onto surface of TiO 2 nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, while the amount of surface-bonded gallates was determined using thermogravimetric analysis. The influence of the surface modified TiO 2 nanoparticles, as well as the length of hydrophobic part of the gallate used for surface modification of TiO 2 nanoparticles, on glass transition temperature, barrier, dielectric and anticorrosive properties of epoxy resin was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, water vapor transmission test, dielectric spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization measurements. Incorporation of surface modified TiO 2 nanoparticles in epoxy resin caused increase of glass transition temperature and decrease of the water vapor permeability of epoxy resin. The water vapor transmission rate of epoxy/TiO 2 nanocomposites was reduced with increasing hydrophobic part chain length of

  6. Strengthening of Concrete Structures with cement based bonded composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Polymers). The method is very efficient and has achieved world wide attention. However, there are some drawbacks with the use of epoxy, e.g. working environment, compatibility and permeability. Substituting the epoxy adherent with a cement based bonding agent will render a strengthening system...... with improved working environment and better compatibility to the base concrete structure. This study gives an overview of different cement based systems, all with very promising results for structural upgrading. Studied parameters are structural retrofit for bending, shear and confinement. It is concluded...

  7. Relationships between nanostructure and dynamic-mechanical properties of epoxy network containing PMMA-modified silsesquioxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new class of organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposites was obtained by blending PMMA-modified silsesquioxane hybrid materials with epoxy matrix followed by curing with methyl tetrahydrophthalic anhydride. The hybrid materials were obtained by sol-gel method through the hydrolysis and polycondensation of the silicon species of the hybrid precursor, 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS, simultaneously to the polymerization of the methacrylate (MMA groups covalently bonded to the silicon atoms. The nanostructure of these materials was investigated by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and correlated to their dynamic mechanical properties. The SAXS results revealed a hierarchical nanostructure consisting on two structural levels. The first level is related to the siloxane nanoparticles spatially correlated in the epoxy matrix, forming larger hybrid secondary aggregates. The dispersion of siloxane nanoparticles in epoxy matrix was favored by increasing the MMA content in the hybrid material. The presence of small amount of hybrid material affected significantly the dynamic mechanical properties of the epoxy networks.

  8. Mechanical Characterization and Water Absorption Behaviour of Interwoven Kenaf/PET Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Hybrid Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakubu Dan-mallam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of interwoven fabric for composite production is a novel approach that can be adopted to address the challenges of balanced mechanical properties and water absorption behaviour of polymer composites. In this paper, kenaf and PET (polyethylene terephthalate fibre were selected as reinforcing materials to develop the woven fabric, and low viscosity epoxy resin was chosen as the matrix. Vacuum infusion process was adopted to produce the hybrid composite due to its superior advantages over hand lay-up technique. The weight percentage composition of the Epoxy/kenaf/PET hybrid composite was maintained at 70/15/15 and 60/20/20, respectively. A significant increase in tensile strength and elastic modulus of approximately 73% and 53% was recorded in relation to neat epoxy. Similarly, a substantial increase in flexural, impact, and interlaminar properties was also realized in relation to neat epoxy. This enhancement in mechanical properties may be attributed to the interlocking structure of the interwoven fabric, individual properties of kenaf and PET fibres, strong interfacial bonding, and resistance of the fibres to impact loading. The water absorption of the composites was studied by prolonged exposure in distilled water, and the moisture absorption pattern was found to follow Fickian behaviour.

  9. Carbon nanotube modification using gum arabic and its effect on the dispersion and tensile properties of carbon nanotubes/epoxy nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man Tae; Park, Ho Seok; Hui, David; Rhee, Kyong Yop

    2011-08-01

    In this study, the effects of a MWCNT treatment on the dispersion of MWCNTs in aqueous solution and the tensile properties of MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites were investigated. MWCNTs were treated using acid and gum arabic, and MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites were fabricated with 0.3 wt.% unmodified, oxidized and gum-treated MWCNTs. The dispersion states of the unmodified, oxidized, and Gum-treated MWCNTs were characterized in distilled water. The tensile strengths and elastic modulus of the three nanocomposites were determined and compared. The results indicated that the gum treatment produced better dispersion of the MWCNTs in distilled water and that gum-treated MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites had a better tensile strength and elastic modulus than did the unmodified and acid-treated MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites. Scanning electron microscope examination of the fracture surface showed that the improved tensile properties of the gum-treated MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites were attributed to the improved dispersion of MWCNTs in the epoxy and to interfacial bonding between nanotubes and the epoxy matrix.

  10. Low-temperature Au/a-Si wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Errong; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Yuelin

    2011-01-01

    The Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/a-Si/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, which can also be used for the bonding of non-silicon material, was investigated for the first time in this paper. The bond quality test showed that the bond yield, bond repeatability and average shear strength are higher for this bonding structure. The interfacial microstructure analysis indicated that the Au-induced crystallization of the amorphous silicon process leads to big Si grains extending across the bond interface and Au filling the other regions of the bond interface, which result into a strong and void-free bond interface. In addition, the Au-induced crystallization reaction leads to a change in the IR images of the bond interface. Therefore, the IR microscope can be used to evaluate and compare the different bond strengths qualitatively. Furthermore, in order to verify the superiority of the bonding structure, the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–a-Si/SiO 2 /Si (i.e. no Ti/Au layer on the a-Si surface) and Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/SiO 2 /Si bonding structures (i.e. Au thermocompression bonding) were also investigated. For the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–a-Si/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, the poor bond quality is due to the native oxide layer on the a-Si surface, and for the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, the poor bond quality is caused by the wafer surface roughness which prevents intimate contact and limits the interdiffusion at the bond interface.

  11. Contact allergy to epoxy (meth)acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Jungewelter, Soile; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Kuuliala, Outi; Jolanki, Riitta

    2009-07-01

    Contact allergy to epoxy (meth)acrylates, 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]propane (bis-GMA), 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-acryloxypropoxy)phenyl]-propane (bis-GA), 2,2-bis[4-(methacryl-oxyethoxy)phenyl] propane (bis-EMA), 2,2-bis[4-(methacryloxy)phenyl]-propane (bis-MA), and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) is often manifested together with contact allergy to diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resin. To analyse patterns of concomitant allergic reactions to the five epoxy (meth)acrylates in relation to exposure. We reviewed the 1994-2008 patch test files at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) for reactions to the five epoxy (meth)acrylates, and examined the patients' medical records for exposure. Twenty-four patients had an allergic reaction to at least one of the studied epoxy (meth)acrylates, but specific exposure was found only in five patients: two bis-GMA allergies from dental products, two bis-GA allergies from UV-curable printing inks, and one bis-GA allergy from an anaerobic glue. Only 25% of the patients were negative to DGEBA epoxy resin. The great majority of allergic patch test reactions to bis-GMA, bis-GA, GMA and bis-EMA were not associated with specific exposure, and cross-allergy to DGEBA epoxy resin remained a probable explanation. However, independent reactions to bis-GA indicated specific exposure. Anaerobic sealants may induce sensitization not only to aliphatic (meth)acrylates but also to aromatic bis-GA.

  12. Influence of the molecular structure on hydrolyzability of epoxy resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pays, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    EDF has decided to use glass reinforced composites for certain pipework in Pressurized Water Reactors (service water, emergency-supplied service water, fine pipe works, etc...) as a replacement for traditional materials. In practice, steel is prone to rapid corrosion in these circuits; introducing composites could prove economically viable if their long term behaviour can be demonstrated. However, composite materials can undergo deterioration in service through hydrolysis of the resin or the fibre-matrix interface. Different resins can be chosen depending on the programmed use. A first study has covered the hydrolyzability of polyester and vinyl ester resins. The present document undertakes the resistance to hydrolysis of epoxy resins, concentrating on those reputed to withstand high temperatures. This research uses model monomer, linking the molecular structure of the materials to their resistance to hydrolysis. (author)

  13. Effect of Zirconia Nanoparticles in Epoxy-Silica Hybrid Adhesives to Join Aluminum Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Jesús Figueroa-Lara

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This research presents the interaction of the epoxy polymer diglicydil ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA with silica (SiO2 nanoparticles plus zirconia (ZrO2 nanoparticles obtained via the sol-gel method in the synthesis of an epoxy-silica-zirconia hybrid adhesive cured with polyamide. ZrO2 nanoparticles were added to the epoxy-silica hybrid adhesive produced in situ to modify the apparent shear strength of two adhesively bonded aluminum specimens. The results showed that the addition of different amounts of ZrO2 nanoparticles increased the shear strength of the adhesively bonded aluminum joint, previously treated by sandblasting, immersion in hot water and silanized with a solution of hydrolyzed 3-glycidoxipropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS. The morphology and microstructure of the nanoparticles and aluminum surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and elemental analysis was performed with the Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS detector; the chemical groups were investigated during the aluminum surface modification using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR.

  14. Curing behaviour of epoxy resin/graphite composites containing ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Baochun; Wan Jingjing; Lei Yanda; Jia Demin

    2009-01-01

    By adopting the isoconversional method, subtle changes in the curing activation energy (E α ) among epoxy resin/graphite composites by the inclusion of expanded graphite (EG), ionic liquid of 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIm]PF 6 ) or their combination are shown in the whole conversion range. At lower concentrations (1 phr) of EG, compared with the E α of the neat epoxy resin, the composite with EG has a lower E α before the gelation, and a higher E α after the gelation. At higher concentrations of EG, however, in the whole conversion range, the composite with EG shows a higher E α compared with the neat epoxy resin. As the curing proceeded, a peculiar increase in E α is found in systems containing [BMIm]PF 6 . Due to the formation of hydrogen bonding between [BMIm]PF 6 and the hardener (Jeffamine), the reactivity of Jeffamine is considerably decreased, leading to a much higher E α in [BMIm]PF 6 -containing systems, especially at higher conversion. In systems containing a combination of [BMIm]PF 6 and EG, due to the interactions between EG and [BMIm]PF 6 , the shielding effect provided by the well-dispersed EG sheets constrains the formation of the hydrogen bonding between [BMIm]PF 6 and Jeffamine, leading to lowered E α compared with that for the system containing [BMIm]PF 6 only.

  15. Synthesis and Mechanical Properties Investigation of Nano TiO2/Glass/Epoxy Hybrid Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Salehi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of epoxy and glass/epoxy filled with 0.25, 0.5 and 1 vol% of TiO2 nanoparticles have been studied using tensile and three-point bending tests. For the TiO2/epoxy nanocomposites, the results showed that the strength and stiffness were improved, though the strain at ultimate strength point and breaking strain decreased. Moreover, the hybrid nanocomposites composed of 4 layers of woven E-glass fabric and TiO2/epoxy matrix were fabricated and cut onaxis and 45° off-axis by water jet. The results of tensile and three-point bending tests indicated a remarkable improvement in the strength and stiffness that could not be related to the mechanical improvement of the matrix. The samples containing 1 vol% nano TiO2 were improved relative to samples without the nanoparticles. The tensile strength of the on-axis and off-axis samples containing 1 vol% TiO2 increased by about 25.9% and 17.9%, in the order given, compared to that of the glass/epoxy specimens. In three-point bending test, the strength of the on-axis and off-axis specimens was improved 26% and 23.2%, respectively. In addition, the tensile stiffness of the onaxis and off-axis samples containing 1 vol% TiO2 increased, respectively, by about 14.4% and 17.5% compared to that of the glass/epoxy specimens. Also for the same on-axis and off-axis samples the three-point bending stiffness increased about 19.8% and 14.6%, respectively. The whole investigation on the microstructure of the hybrid nanocomposites illustrated that stronger interfaces between the fiber and TiO2/epoxy matrix were formed and improvement was noticed on mechanical properties of ternary composite compared to those of the fiber/epoxy composites. The analysis of damage zones of hybrid nanocomposites showed that the surface area of the damaged zone declined considerably due to the brittle behavior of TiO2-filled specimens but the area below the stress-strain curve, showing energy absorption during the test

  16. Toughening of Epoxy Adhesives by Combined Interaction of Carbon Nanotubes and Silsesquioxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Barra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The extensive use of adhesives in many structural applications in the transport industry and particularly in the aeronautic field is due to numerous advantages of bonded joints. However, still many researchers are working to enhance the mechanical properties and rheological performance of adhesives by using nanoadditives. In this study the effect of the addition of Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS compounds, either Glycidyl Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (GPOSS or DodecaPhenyl Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (DPHPOSS to Tetraglycidyl Methylene Dianiline (TGMDA epoxy formulation, was investigated. The formulations contain neither a tougher matrix such as elastomers nor other additives typically used to provide a closer match in the coefficient of thermal expansion in order to discriminate only the effect of the addition of the above-mentioned components. Bonded aluminium single lap joints were made using both untreated and Chromic Acid Anodisation (CAA-treated aluminium alloy T2024 adherends. The effects of the different chemical functionalities of POSS compounds, as well as the synergistic effect between the MWCNT and POSS combination on adhesion strength, were evaluated by viscosity measurement, tensile tests, Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA, single lap joint shear strength tests, and morphological investigation. The best performance in the Lap Shear Strength (LSS of the manufactured joints has been found for treated adherends bonded with epoxy adhesive containing MWCNTs and GPOSS. Carbon nanotubes have been found to play a very effective bridging function across the fracture surface of the bonded joints.

  17. Influence of carbamide peroxide-based bleaching agents on the bond strength of resin-enamel/dentin interfaces Influência de agentes clareadores à base de peróxido de carbamida na resistência de união entre resina-esmalte/dentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cavalli

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available In this bond strength study, a bleaching agent containing 10% carbamide peroxide was applied over composite-teeth bonded interfaces of two adhesive systems applied to enamel and dentin. Sixteen human third molars were used for bonding procedures. Single Bond (SB and Clearfil SE Bond (CB were applied to enamel and dentin according to the manufacturers' instructions. A resin composite cube-like structure was incrementally built on the bonded surfaces. The restored teeth were sectioned into 0.7 mm thick slices that were trimmed at enamel or dentin bonded interfaces to an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 0.5 mm². Specimens were assigned to 8 groups (n = 10 according to the following factors under study: dental substrate (enamel and dentin; adhesive system (SB and CB and treatment (10% carbamide peroxide and not bleached/control. The bleaching gel (Opalescence was applied at the bonded interfaces for 6 hours during 14 days and after daily treatment specimens were stored in artificial saliva. Unbleached specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 14 days. Specimens were tested for tension and the data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p Este estudo avaliou a resistência de união de dois sistemas adesivos ao esmalte e à dentina após a aplicação de agente clareador sobre a união compósito-dente. Dezesseis terceiros molares humanos foram usados nos procedimentos restauradores. Single Bond (SB e Clearfil SE Bond (CB foram aplicados no esmalte e na dentina de acordo com as instruções dos fabricantes. Um bloco de compósito foi construído nas superfícies tratadas com os adesivos. Os dentes restaurados foram seccionados em fatias com espessura de 0,7 mm, que receberam constrição na interface de união num formato de ampulheta, com área de secção transversal de ± 0,5 mm². Os espécimes foram distribuídos em 8 grupos (n = 10 de acordo com os fatores em estudo: substrato dental (esmalte e

  18. Enhancing structural integrity of adhesive bonds through pulsed laser surface micro-machining

    KAUST Repository

    Diaz, Edwin Hernandez

    2015-06-01

    Enhancing the effective peel resistance of plastically deforming adhesive joints through laser-based surface micro-machining Edwin Hernandez Diaz Inspired by adhesion examples commonly found in nature, we reached out to examine the effect of different kinds of heterogeneous surface properties that may replicate this behavior and the mechanisms at work. In order to do this, we used pulsed laser ablation on copper substrates (CuZn40) aiming to increase adhesion for bonding. A Yb-fiber laser was used for surface preparation of the substrates, which were probed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Heterogeneous surface properties were devised through the use of simplified laser micromachined patterns which may induce sequential events of crack arrest propagation, thereby having a leveraging effect on dissipation. The me- chanical performance of copper/epoxy joints with homogeneous and heterogeneous laser micromachined interfaces was then analyzed using the T-peel test. Fractured surfaces were analyzed using SEM to resolve the mechanism of failure and adhesive penetration within induced surface asperities from the treatment. Results confirm positive modifications of the surface morphology and chemistry from laser ablation that enable mechanical interlocking and cohesive failure within the adhesive layer. Remarkable improvements of apparent peel energy, bond toughness, and effective peel force were appreciated with respect to sanded substrates as control samples.

  19. Sliding wear behavior of E-glass-epoxy/MWCNT composites: An experimental assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranadh Bobbili

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This investigation has evaluated the sliding wear properties of E-glass-epoxy/MWCNT (multiwalled carbon nanotube composite and Epoxy/MWCNT composite. Four different reinforcements (0, 0.5,1 and 1.5 wt % of MWCNTs are dispersed into an epoxy resin. Design of experiments (DOE and Analysis of variance (ANOVA are employed to understand the relationship between control factors (Percentage of reinforcement, Sliding distance, Sliding velocity and Normal load and response measures (specific wear rate and friction coefficient. The control variables such as sliding distance (300, 600, 900 and 1200 m and normal loads of 10, 15, 20 and 25 N and at sliding velocities of 1, 2, 3 and 4 m/s are chosen for this study. It is observed that that the specific wear rate and friction coefficient can be reduced by the addition of MWCNTs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM is used to observe the worn surfaces of the samples. Compared with neat epoxy, the composites with MWCNTs showed a lower mass loss, friction coefficient and wear rate and these parameters decreased with the increase of MWCNT percentage. Microscopic investigation of worn out sample fracture surface has revealed that fiber debonding happens when the stresses at the fiber matrix interface exceeds the interfacial strength, causing the fiber to debond from the matrix. The optimum control variables have been derived to reduce both wear and friction coefficient of composites.

  20. Effect of silane coupling agent on interfacial adhesion of copper/glass fabric/epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langroudi, A. E.; Yousefi, A. A.; Kabiri, Kourosh

    2003-01-01

    The effect of silane coupling agent on the peel strength of copper/prep reg/copper composites was investigated. The composite consisted of one or two sheets of prepress covered by two copper plates. The prep reg was prepared by hand dry-lay-up technique using an epoxy resin and an electrical resistant glass fabric (e-glass style 2165). 4,4'-methylene dianiline. An aromatic amine, was used as curing agent. curing times for prep reg and composite at 120 d ig C and 170 d ig C were 15 min and 1 h, respectively. γ-aminopropyl trimethoxy silane was used as coupling agent. The effect of aminopropyl trimethoxy silane on the adhesion of epoxy/glass and epoxy/copper interfaces was investigated by two methods. In the first method, the surface of the glass fabric and/or the copper plates were treated by aminopropyl trimethoxy silane. In the second method, aminopropyl trimethoxy silane was directly added to epoxy resin. In addition, the effect of additional resin on the adhesion strength was also studied by the latter method

  1. Enhancement of mechanical and electrical properties of continuous-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with stacked graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveh, Naum; Shepelev, Olga; Kenig, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Impregnation of expandable graphite (EG) after thermal treatment with an epoxy resin containing surface-active agents (SAAs) enhanced the intercalation of epoxy monomer between EG layers and led to further exfoliation of the graphite, resulting in stacks of few graphene layers, so-called "stacked" graphene (SG). This process enabled electrical conductivity of cured epoxy/SG composites at lower percolation thresholds, and improved thermo-mechanical properties were measured with either Kevlar, carbon or glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Several compositions with SAA-modified SG led to higher dynamic moduli especially at high temperatures, reflecting the better wetting ability of the modified nanoparticles. The hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the SAA dictates the surface energy balance. More hydrophilic SAAs promoted localization of the SG at the Kevlar/epoxy interface, and morphology seems to be driven by thermodynamics, rather than the kinetic effect of viscosity. This effect was less obvious with carbon or glass fibers, due to the lower surface energy of the carbon fibers or some incompatibility with the glass-fiber sizing. Proper choice of the surfactant and fine-tuning of the crosslink density at the interphase may provide further enhancements in thermo-mechanical behavior.

  2. Enhancement of mechanical and electrical properties of continuous-fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with stacked graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naum Naveh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Impregnation of expandable graphite (EG after thermal treatment with an epoxy resin containing surface-active agents (SAAs enhanced the intercalation of epoxy monomer between EG layers and led to further exfoliation of the graphite, resulting in stacks of few graphene layers, so-called “stacked” graphene (SG. This process enabled electrical conductivity of cured epoxy/SG composites at lower percolation thresholds, and improved thermo-mechanical properties were measured with either Kevlar, carbon or glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Several compositions with SAA-modified SG led to higher dynamic moduli especially at high temperatures, reflecting the better wetting ability of the modified nanoparticles. The hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the SAA dictates the surface energy balance. More hydrophilic SAAs promoted localization of the SG at the Kevlar/epoxy interface, and morphology seems to be driven by thermodynamics, rather than the kinetic effect of viscosity. This effect was less obvious with carbon or glass fibers, due to the lower surface energy of the carbon fibers or some incompatibility with the glass-fiber sizing. Proper choice of the surfactant and fine-tuning of the crosslink density at the interphase may provide further enhancements in thermo-mechanical behavior.

  3. Effect of carbon nanotube dispersion on glass transition in cross-linked epoxy-carbon nanotube nanocomposites: role of interfacial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ketan S; Khare, Rajesh

    2013-06-20

    We have used atomistic molecular simulations to study the effect of nanofiller dispersion on the glass transition behavior of cross-linked epoxy-carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites. Specific chemical interactions at the interface of CNTs and cross-linked epoxy create an interphase region, whose impact on the properties of their nanocomposites increases with an increasing extent of dispersion. To investigate this aspect, we have compared the volumetric, structural, and dynamical properties of three systems: neat cross-linked epoxy, cross-linked epoxy nanocomposite containing dispersed CNTs, and cross-linked epoxy nanocomposite containing aggregated CNTs. We find that the nanocomposite containing dispersed CNTs shows a depression in the glass transition temperature (Tg) by ~66 K as compared to the neat cross-linked epoxy, whereas such a large depression is absent in the nanocomposite containing aggregated CNTs. Our results suggest that the poor interfacial interactions between the CNTs and the cross-linked epoxy matrix lead to a more compressible interphase region between the CNTs and the bulk matrix. An analysis of the resulting dynamic heterogeneity shows that the probability of percolation of immobile domains becomes unity near the Tg calculated from volumetric properties. Our observations also lend support to the conceptual analogy between polymer nanocomposites and the nanoconfinement of polymer thin films.

  4. Preparation, Characterization, Thermal, and Flame-Retardant Properties of Green Silicon-Containing Epoxy/Functionalized Graphene Nanosheets Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yuan Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, silane was grafted onto the surface of graphene nanosheets (GNSs through free radical reactions, to form Si-O-Et functional groups that can undergo the sol-gel reaction. To improve the compatibility between the polymer matrix and the fillers, epoxy monomer was modified using a silane coupling agent; then, the functionalized GNSs were added to the modified epoxy to improve the thermal stability and strengthen the flame-retardant character of the composites. High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectrometry reveals that when the double bonds in VTES are grafted to the surfaces of GNSs. Solid-state 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance presents that the distribution of the signal associated with the T3 structure is wide and significant, indicating that the functionalization reaction of the silicone in the modified epoxy and VTES-GNSs increases the network-like character of the structures. Thermal gravimetric analysis, the integral procedure decomposition temperature, and limiting oxygen index demonstrate that the GNSs composites that contained silicon had a higher thermal stability and stronger flame-retardant character than pure epoxy. The dynamic storage modulus of all of the m-GNSs containing composites was significantly higher than that of the control epoxy, and the modulus of the composites increased with the concentration of m-GNSs.

  5. Mechanical Properties Analysis Of Composite Magnetic Base On hexa ferrite And Polyester Or Epoxy Matrix With Silane Additive Addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudirman; Ridwan; Mujamilah; K K, Aloma; Rembulan, Marisa; Fitriyanti

    2003-01-01

    Application of composite magnetic especially hexa ferrite magnet for industry and home industry in Indonesia has been used. Research purposes were making composite magnetic by mixing hexa ferrite powder with polyester or epoxy and studying the effect of coupling agent 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APE) addition on mechanical properties of composite magnetic. The coupling agent may increase bonding properties between magnetic powder and matrix polymer, so that tensile strength of magnetic composite will increase without decreasing the magnetic properties. Magnetic powder (SrM or BaM) wich be coated by coupling agent were added to matrix polyester and mekpo or epoxy and versamid, mixed until homogen then pressing into to the dumbbell form molding. For epoxy matrix, pressing was done in hot press at 70 deg. C and 150 kg/cm 2 following by cooling in cold press, while for polyester matrix pressing was done in hydraulic press and following by curing at 70 deg. C in an oven for 1 hour. The composition of magnetic powder were varied to 30, 40 and 50% volume fraction and coupling agent were varied to 5, 10 and 15 ml for every volume fraction. The result showed that 10 ml added of coupling agent was give best mechanical properties both polyester and epoxy matrix. However generally, increasing of magnetic powder content decreased the tensile strength of magnetic composite. The properties of magnetic composite SrM was better than BaM either in polyester or epoxy matrix

  6. Bonds Boom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Cathryn

    1989-01-01

    The combined effect of the "Serrano" decision and Proposition 13 left California school districts with aging, overcrowded facilities. Chico schools won a $18.5 million general obligation bond election for facilities construction. With $11 billion needed for new school construction, California will need to tap local sources. A sidebar…

  7. Magnetic Properties of NdFe10Mo2-N Bonded Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Wei; Hu, Bo-Ping; Han, Zhong-Fan; Jin, Han-Min; Fu, Quan

    1997-06-01

    The dependence of remanence and coercivity on the magnetizing field is studied for isotropic and anisotropic epoxy resin bonded magnets. It was found that the coercivity of the NdFe10Mo2-N bonded magnet is mainly controlled by nucleation of reversed magnetic domains. Variation of iHc with Zn content and heat treatment conditions is studied. The value of 0 iHc obtained in the best Zn-bonded condition is about 0.15 T higher than before bonding. The variation of the amount of α-Fe with processing conditions is demonstrated for anisotropic Zn-bonded magnets.

  8. Nanocomposites with Liquid-Like Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Dispersed in Epoxy Resin without Solvent Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid-like multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs were prepared with as-received carboxylic MWNTs-COOH and poly(ethylene oxide-block-poly(propylene oxide-block-poly(ethylene oxide (PEO-b-PPO-b-PEO through hydrogen bonding. The sample has liquid-like behavior above 58°C. The MWNTs content is 26.6 wt%. The liquid-like MWNTs nanofluids were incorporated into epoxy matrix with solvent-free process and dispersed well. When the liquid-like MWNTs nanofluids content is up to 1 wt%, the impact toughness of the nanocomposite is 153% higher than the pure epoxy matrix.

  9. Using Diffusion Bonding in Making Piezoelectric Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, Frank E.

    2003-01-01

    A technique for the fabrication of piezoelectric actuators that generate acceptably large forces and deflections at relatively low applied voltages involves the stacking and diffusion bonding of multiple thin piezoelectric layers coated with film electrodes. The present technique stands in contrast to an older technique in which the layers are bonded chemically, by use of urethane or epoxy agents. The older chemical-bonding technique entails several disadvantages, including the following: It is difficult to apply the bonding agents to the piezoelectric layers. It is difficult to position the layers accurately and without making mistakes. There is a problem of disposal of hazardous urethane and epoxy wastes. The urethane and epoxy agents are nonpiezoelectric materials. As such, they contribute to the thickness of a piezoelectric laminate without contributing to its performance; conversely, for a given total thickness, the performance of the laminate is below that of a unitary piezoelectric plate of the same thickness. The figure depicts some aspects of the fabrication of a laminated piezoelectric actuator by the present diffusion- bonding technique. First, stock sheets of the piezoelectric material are inspected and tested. Next, the hole pattern shown in the figure is punched into the sheets. Alternatively, if the piezoelectric material is not a polymer, then the holes are punched in thermoplastic films. Then both faces of each punched piezoelectric sheet or thermoplastic film are coated with a silver-ink electrode material by use of a silkscreen printer. The electrode and hole patterns are designed for minimal complexity and minimal waste of material. After a final electrical test, all the coated piezoelectric layers (or piezoelectric layers and coated thermoplastic films) are stacked in an alignment jig, which, in turn, is placed in a curved press for the diffusion-bonding process. In this process, the stack is pressed and heated at a specified curing temperature

  10. Biomechanical properties of an advanced new carbon/flax/epoxy composite material for bone plate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Zahra S; El Sawi, Ihab; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Rad; Bougherara, Habiba

    2013-04-01

    This work is part of an ongoing program to develop a new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy (CF/flax/epoxy) hybrid composite material for use as an orthopaedic long bone fracture plate, instead of a metal plate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of this new novel composite material. The composite material had a "sandwich structure", in which two thin sheets of CF/epoxy were attached to each outer surface of the flax/epoxy core, which resulted in a unique structure compared to other composite plates for bone plate applications. Mechanical properties were determined using tension, three-point bending, and Rockwell hardness tests. Also, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the failure mechanism of specimens in tension and three-point bending tests. The results of mechanical tests revealed a considerably high ultimate strength in both tension (399.8MPa) and flexural loading (510.6MPa), with a higher elastic modulus in bending tests (57.4GPa) compared to tension tests (41.7GPa). The composite material experienced brittle catastrophic failure in both tension and bending tests. The SEM images, consistent with brittle failure, showed mostly fiber breakage and fiber pull-out at the fractured surfaces with perfect bonding at carbon fibers and flax plies. Compared to clinically-used orthopaedic metal plates, current CF/flax/epoxy results were closer to human cortical bone, making the material a potential candidate for use in long bone fracture fixation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Aging in CTBN modified epoxy resin stocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creed, K.E. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The cause of degradation in the glass transition temperature (T/sub G/) of a partially crystallized polymer was investigated. Sample epoxy resin filled capacitors were cured at 90 0 C for 24 hours, then stored at room atmospheric conditions. These showed typical degradation in T/sub G/ after storage for one month. One set of epoxy resin castings was stored at room atmosphere and another set was stored in a dry box at 0% relative humidity and 27 0 C. The samples at room atmospheric conditions showed typical degradation in T/sub G/, while the T/sub G/ for those stored in the dry box increased. Further tests were then made on epoxy resin castings at various curing temperatures and times at both room atmosphere and 0% humidity. Resulting data indicated that absorption of moisture during storage was the predominant cause of T/sub G/ degradation, with stress relaxation another, though smaller, contributing factor

  12. Spall Strength Measurements in Transparent Epoxy Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Jonathan; Rahmat, Meysam; Petel, Oren

    2017-06-01

    Polymer nanocomposites are seeing more frequent use in transparent armour applications. The role of the microstructure on the performance of these materials under dynamic tensile loading conditions is of particular interest. In the present study, a series of plate impact experiments was conducted in order to evaluate the dynamic response of an epoxy (EPON 828) cured with two differed hardeners. The purpose was to compare the role of these hardeners on the dynamic performance of the resulting transparent epoxy. The material response was resolved with a multi-channel photonic Doppler velocimeter. This system was used to determine the shock Hugoniot and dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the materials. The experimental results are presented in reference to spall theory and are evaluated against results predicted by an analytical model of the impacts. While varying the hardener did not change the shock Hugoniot of the epoxy, it did have an effect on the measured spall strengths.

  13. Epoxy Nanocomposites filled with Carbon Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gallego, M; Yuste-Sanchez, V; Sanchez-Hidalgo, R; Verdejo, R; Lopez-Manchado, M A

    2018-01-10

    Over the past decades, the development of high performance lightweight polymer nanocomposites and, in particular, of epoxy nanocomposites has become one the greatest challenges in material science. The ultimate goal of epoxy nanocomposites is to extrapolate the exceptional intrinsic properties of the nanoparticles to the bulk matrix. However, in spite of the efforts, this objective is still to be attained at commercially attractive scales. Key aspects to achieve this are ultimately the full understanding of network structure, the dispersion degree of the nanoparticles, the interfacial adhesion at the phase boundaries and the control of the localization and orientation of the nanoparticles in the epoxy system. In this Personal Account, we critically discuss the state of the art and evaluate the strategies to overcome these barriers. © 2018 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Relationship between thin-film bond strength as measured by a scratch test, and indentation hardness for bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, Shusuke; Rawls, H Ralph; Hotta, Masato

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate thin-film bond strength between a bonding agent and human dentin, using a scratch test, and the characteristics and accuracy of measurement. One-step bonding agents (BeautiBond; Bond Force; Adper Easy Bond; Clearfil tri-S Bond) and two-step bonding agents (Cleafil SE Bond; FL-Bond II) were investigated in this study. Flat dentin surfaces were prepared for extracted human molars. The dentin surfaces were ground and bonding agents were applied and light cured. The thin-film bond strength test of the specimens was evaluated by the critical load at which the coated bonding agent failed and dentin appeared. The scratch mark sections were then observed under a scanning electron microscope. Indentation hardness was evaluated by the variation in depth under an applied load of 10gf. Data were compared by one-way ANOVA with the Scheffé's post hoc multiple comparison test (pstrength and indentation hardness were analyzed using analysis of correlation and covariance. The thin-film bond strength of two-step bonding agents were found to be significantly higher than that of one-step bonding agents with small standard deviations. Scratch marks consistently showed adhesive failure in the vicinity of the bonding agent/dentin interface. The indentation hardness showed a trend that two-step bonding agents have greater hardness than one-step bonding agents. A moderately significant correlation (r(2)=0.31) was found between thin-film bond strength and indentation hardness. Thin-film bond strength test is a valid and reliable means of evaluating bond strength in the vicinity of the adhesive interface and is more accurate than other methods currently in use. Further, the thin-film bond strength is influenced by the hardness of the cued bonding agent. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Performance of a new one-step multi-mode adhesive on etched vs non-etched enamel on bond strength and interfacial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goes, Mario Fernando; Shinohara, Mirela Sanae; Freitas, Marcela Santiago

    2014-06-01

    To compare microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and interfacial morphology of a new one-step multimode adhesive with a two-step self-etching adhesive and two etch-and-rinse adhesives systems on enamel. Thirty human third molars were sectioned to obtain two enamel fragments. For μTBS, 48 enamel surfaces were ground using 600-grit SiC paper and randomly assigned into 6 groups (n = 8): nonetched Scotchbond Universal [SBU]; etched SBU [SBU-et]; non-etched Clearfil SE Bond [CSE]; etched CSE [CSE-et]; Scotchbond Multi-PURPOSE [SBMP]; Excite [EX]. The etched specimens were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 30 s, each adhesive system was applied according to manufacturers' instructions, and composite resin blocks (Filtek Supreme Plus, 3M ESPE) were incrementally built up. Specimens were sectioned into beams with a cross-sectional area of 0.8-mm2 and tested under tension (1 mm/min). The data were analyzed with oneway ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD (α = 0.05). For interface analysis, two samples from each group were embedded in epoxy resin, polished, and then observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The μTBS values (in MPa) and the standard deviations were: SBU = 27.4 (8.5); SBU-et = 33.6 (9.3); CSE = 28.5 (8.3); CSE-et = 34.2 (9.0); SBMP = 30.4 (11.0); EX = 23.3 (8.2). CSE-et and SBU-et presented the highest bond strength values, followed by SBMP, CSE, and SBU which did not differ significantly from each other. EX showed the statistically significantly lowest bond strength values. SEM images of interfaces from etched samples showed long adhesive-resin tags penetrating into demineralized enamel. Preliminary etching of enamel significantly increased bond strength for the new one-step multimode adhesive SBU and two-step self-etching adhesive CSE.

  16. Atomistic modeling of thermomechanical properties of SWNT/Epoxy nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Nicholas; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to compute thermomechanical properties of cured epoxy resins reinforced with pristine and covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes. A DGEBA-DDS epoxy network was built using the ‘dendrimer’ growth approach where 75% of available epoxy sites were cross-linked. The epoxy model is verified through comparisons to experiments, and simulations are performed on nanotube reinforced cross-linked epoxy matrix using the CVFF force field in LAMMPS. Full stiffness matrices and linear coefficient of thermal expansion vectors are obtained for the nanocomposite. Large increases in stiffness and large decreases in thermal expansion were seen along the direction of the nanotube for both nanocomposite systems when compared to neat epoxy. The direction transverse to nanotube saw a 40% increase in stiffness due to covalent functionalization over neat epoxy at 1 K whereas the pristine nanotube system only saw a 7% increase due to van der Waals effects. The functionalized SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite showed an additional 42% decrease in thermal expansion along the nanotube direction when compared to the pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. The stiffness matrices are rotated over every possible orientation to simulate the effects of an isotropic system of randomly oriented nanotubes in the epoxy. The randomly oriented covalently functionalized SWNT/Epoxy nanocomposites showed substantial improvements over the plain epoxy in terms of higher stiffness (200% increase) and lower thermal expansion (32% reduction). Through MD simulations, we develop means to build simulation cells, perform annealing to reach correct densities, compute thermomechanical properties and compare with experiments.

  17. Electroactive polymer gels based on epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samui, A. B.; Jayakumar, S.; Jayalakshmi, C. G.; Pandey, K.; Sivaraman, P.

    2007-04-01

    Five types of epoxy gels have been synthesized from common epoxy resins and hardeners. Fumed silica and nanoclay, respectively, were used as fillers and butyl methacrylate/acrylamide were used as monomer(s) for making interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) in three compositions. Swelling study, tensile property evaluation, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and electroactive property evaluation were done. The gels have sufficient mechanical strength and the time taken for bending to 20° was found to be 22 min for forward bias whereas it was just 12 min for reverse bias.

  18. Immobilization of spent resin with epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gultom, O.; Suryanto; Sayogo; Ramdan

    1997-01-01

    immobilization of spent resin using epoxy resin has been conducted. The spent resin was mixtured with epoxy resin in variation of concentration, i.e., 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 weight percent of spent resin. The mixture were pour into the plastic tube, with a diameter of 40 mm and height of 40 mm. The density, compressive strength and leaching rate were respectively measured by quanta chrome, paul weber apparatus and gamma spectrometer. The results showed that the increasing of waste concentration would be decreased the compressive strength, and increased density by immobilized waste. The leaching rate of 137 Cs from waste product was not detected in experiment (author)

  19. Kevlar 49/Epoxy COPV Aging Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, James K.; Salem, Jonathan L.; Thesken, John C.; Russell, Richard W.; Littell, Justin; Ruggeri, Charles; Leifeste, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA initiated an effort to determine if the aging of Kevlar 49/Epoxy composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPV) affected their performance. This study briefly reviews the history and certification of composite pressure vessels employed on NASA Orbiters. Tests to evaluate overwrap tensile strength changes compared 30 year old samples from Orbiter vessels to new Kevlar/Epoxy pressure vessel materials. Other tests include transverse compression and thermal analyses (glass transition and moduli). Results from these tests do not indicate a noticeable effect due to aging of the overwrap materials.

  20. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Lee, Elizabeth (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Kallam, Alekhya (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Majumdar, Partha (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J. (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Celina, Mathias C.; Bahr, James (North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND); Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  1. Role of Interphase in the Mechanical Behavior of Silica/Epoxy Resin Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Hua

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A nanoscale representative volume element has been developed to investigate the effect of interphase geometry and property on the mechanical behavior of silica/epoxy resin nanocomposites. The role of interphase–matrix bonding was also examined. Results suggested that interphase modulus and interfacial bonding conditions had significant influence on the effective stiffness of nanocomposites, while its sensitivities with respect to both the thickness and the gradient property of the interphase was minimal. The stiffer interphase demonstrated a higher load-sharing capacity, which also increased the stress distribution uniformity within the resin nanocomposites. Under the condition of imperfect interfacial bonding, the effective stiffness of nanocomposites was much lower, which was in good agreement with the documented experimental observations. This work could shed some light on the design and manufacturing of resin nanocomposites.

  2. The study of a Mg-rich epoxy primer for protection of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Xiangyu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Zuo Yu, E-mail: zuoy@mail.buct.edu.c [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhao Xuhui; Tang Yuming; Feng Xingguo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: {yields} A Mg-rich epoxy primer was prepared by adding pure magnesium particles in epoxy coating. Cross scratch testing results showed that in 3% NaCl solution the Mg-rich primer showed better protection for AZ91D magnesium alloy than the same epoxy primer without Mg addition. {yields} The open circuit potential of AZ91D alloy in NaCl solution decreased after coated with Mg-rich coating, suggesting that cathodic protection effect of the Mg-rich coating on AZ91D alloy was present. {yields} EIS studies showed that during the immersion tests of AZ91D alloy with Mg-rich coating the magnesium particles in coating dissolved with the charge-transfer resistance R{sub ct} at the magnesium particle/coating interface decreased and the double-layer capacitance Q{sub dl} increased. While the coating resistance remained stable for a long time and corrosion of the AZ91D alloy substrate was obviously delayed. - Abstract: A Mg-rich epoxy primer was prepared by adding pure magnesium particles to an epoxy coating. The coating properties were studied with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The Mg-rich primer showed better protection for AZ91D magnesium alloy than the same epoxy primer without Mg addition. The open circuit potential measurements showed cathodic protection effect of the Mg-rich primer on AZ91D alloy. Cross scratch testing showed that the Mg-rich primer provided better protection for the substrate than original epoxy coating. The precipitation of Mg(OH){sub 2} in the coating also provided some degree of barrier protection.

  3. The study of a Mg-rich epoxy primer for protection of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiangyu; Zuo Yu; Zhao Xuhui; Tang Yuming; Feng Xingguo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → A Mg-rich epoxy primer was prepared by adding pure magnesium particles in epoxy coating. Cross scratch testing results showed that in 3% NaCl solution the Mg-rich primer showed better protection for AZ91D magnesium alloy than the same epoxy primer without Mg addition. → The open circuit potential of AZ91D alloy in NaCl solution decreased after coated with Mg-rich coating, suggesting that cathodic protection effect of the Mg-rich coating on AZ91D alloy was present. → EIS studies showed that during the immersion tests of AZ91D alloy with Mg-rich coating the magnesium particles in coating dissolved with the charge-transfer resistance R ct at the magnesium particle/coating interface decreased and the double-layer capacitance Q dl increased. While the coating resistance remained stable for a long time and corrosion of the AZ91D alloy substrate was obviously delayed. - Abstract: A Mg-rich epoxy primer was prepared by adding pure magnesium particles to an epoxy coating. The coating properties were studied with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The Mg-rich primer showed better protection for AZ91D magnesium alloy than the same epoxy primer without Mg addition. The open circuit potential measurements showed cathodic protection effect of the Mg-rich primer on AZ91D alloy. Cross scratch testing showed that the Mg-rich primer provided better protection for the substrate than original epoxy coating. The precipitation of Mg(OH) 2 in the coating also provided some degree of barrier protection.

  4. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  5. Surface and buried interfacial structures of epoxy resins used as underfills studied by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Anne V; Holden, Brad; Kristalyn, Cornelius; Fuller, Mike; Wilkerson, Brett; Chen, Zhan

    2011-05-01

    Flip chip technology has greatly improved the performance of semiconductor devices, but relies heavily on the performance of epoxy underfill adhesives. Because epoxy underfills are cured in situ in flip chip semiconductor devices, understanding their surface and interfacial structures is critical for understanding their adhesion to various substrates. Here, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to study surface and buried interfacial structures of two model epoxy resins used as underfills in flip chip devices, bisphenol A digylcidyl ether (BADGE) and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE). The surface structures of these epoxies were compared before and after cure, and the orientations of their surface functional groups were deduced to understand how surface structural changes during cure may affect adhesion properties. Further, the effect of moisture exposure, a known cause of adhesion failure, on surface structures was studied. It was found that the BADGE surface significantly restructured upon moisture exposure while the BDDGE surface did not, showing that BADGE adhesives may be more prone to moisture-induced delamination. Lastly, although surface structure can give some insight into adhesion, buried interfacial structures more directly correspond to adhesion properties of polymers. SFG was used to study buried interfaces between deuterated polystyrene (d-PS) and the epoxies before and after moisture exposure. It was shown that moisture exposure acted to disorder the buried interfaces, most likely due to swelling. These results correlated with lap shear adhesion testing showing a decrease in adhesion strength after moisture exposure. The presented work showed that surface and interfacial structures can be correlated to adhesive strength and may be helpful in understanding and designing optimized epoxy underfill adhesives.

  6. Diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding. At least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces is coated with nickel. A coated surface portion is positioned in a contiguous relationship with another surface portion and subjected to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure. A force is applied on the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other. The contiguous surface portions are heated to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, and the applied force is decreased while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature. A portion of the applied force is maintained at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions

  7. Multidimensional Nanocomposites of Epoxy Reinforced with 1D and 2D Carbon Nanostructures for Improve Fracture Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juventino López-Barroso

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid nanocomposites based on epoxy reinforced with a combination of 1D and 2D carbon nanomaterials for improving impact resistance are reported. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and oxidized-multi-walled carbon nanotubes are used as 1D nanoreinforcements, and graphene derivative materials such as graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide are utilized as 2D nanoreinforcements. In this research, the impact resistance of epoxy matrix reinforced with 1D or 2D and the mixture of both nanomaterials is studied. The research is focused on evaluation of the influence of adding different combinations of nanomaterials into epoxy resin and their Izod impact response. Moreover, fracture surface of nanocomposites is observed by scanning electron microscopy. Images show differences between the surfaces of brittle nature on thermoset epoxy polymer and tough nanocomposites. Synergy created with 1D and 2D nanomaterials produces stable dispersions in the processing, reflected in the interface. The interactions in nanocomposites are evidenced by infrared spectra, principally on the peaks related to oxygenated functional groups present in nanomaterials and absent in polymer matrix. Consequently, an increase of 138% in fracture strength of nanocomposites is exhibited, in comparison to the neat epoxy matrix. In addition, hybrid nanocomposites were synthesized in two different methods to evaluate the influence of manufacturing method on final properties of nanocomposites.

  8. Boride ceramics covalent functionalization and its effect on the thermal conductivity of epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhi-Qiang, E-mail: yuzhiqiang@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai (China); Wu, Yicheng [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai (China); Wei, Bin; Baier, Horst [Institute of Lightweight Structures, Technical University Munich (TUM), Boltzmannstr. 15, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Zirconium diboride/aluminium oxide (ZrB{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) composite particles were functionalized with epoxide functionalized γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane by the covalent bonding approach to improve the interfacial compatibility of composite particles in epoxy matrix. The composites of epoxy resin filled with functionalized ZrB{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared by in situ bulk condensation polymerization of bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin in the presence of ZrB{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The heat-conducting properties of composites were investigated by the finite element method (FEM) and the thermal conductivity test. The finite-element program ANSYS was used for this numerical analysis, and three-dimensional spheres-in-cube lattice array models were built to simulate the microstructure of composite materials for different filler contents. The thermal conductivity of composites was determined by laser flash method (LFA447 Nanoflash), using the measured heat capacity and thermal diffusivity, with separately entered density data. The results show that the effective chemical bonds are formed between ZrB{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane after the surface functionalization. The interfacial compatibility and bonding of modified particles with the epoxy matrix are improved. The thermal conductivities of functionalized composites with 3 vol% and 5 vol% loading are increased by 8.3% and 12.5% relative to the unmodified composites, respectively. Comparison of experimental values and calculated values of the thermal conductivity, the average relative differences are under 5%. The predictive values of thermal conductivity of epoxy composites are in reasonable agreement with the experimental values. - Highlights: • The surfaces of ZrB{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were functionalized by silane coupling agents. • The thermal conductivity (TC) of modified epoxy composites is improved significantly. • The FEM values of TC are in

  9. Surface flashover performance of epoxy resin microcomposites improved by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yin; Min, Daomin [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Li, Shengtao, E-mail: stli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Li, Zhen; Xie, Dongri [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, Xuan [Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectric and its Application, Ministry of Education, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150040 (China); Lin, Shengjun [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Pinggao Group Company Ltd., State Grid High Voltage Switchgear Insulation Materials Laboratory, Pingdingshan 467001 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Epoxy resin microcomposites were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV. • Surface flashover voltage increase with the increase of electron beam energy. • Both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. • Deposition energy in epoxy resin microcomposites increases with electron beam energy, and surface trap properties are determined by deposition energy. • The influence of surface conductivity and trap distribution on flashover voltage is discussed. - Abstract: The influencing mechanism of electron beam irradiation on surface flashover of epoxy resin/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} microcomposite was investigated. Epoxy resin/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} microcomposite samples with a diameter of 50 mm and a thickness of 1 mm were prepared. The samples were irradiated by electron beam with energies of 10 and 20 keV and a beam current of 5 μA for 5 min. Surface potential decay, surface conduction, and surface flashover properties of untreated and irradiated samples were measured. Both the decay rate of surface potential and surface conductivity decrease with an increase in the energy of electron beam. Meanwhile, surface flashover voltage increase. It was found that both the untreated and irradiated samples have two trap centers, which are labeled as shallow and deep traps. The increase in the energy and density of deep surface traps enhance the ability to capture primary emitted electrons. In addition, the decrease in surface conductivity blocks electron emission at the cathode triple junction. Therefore, electron avalanche at the interface between gas and an insulating material would be suppressed, eventually improving surface flashover voltage of epoxy resin microcomposites.

  10. Protein-ligand interfaces are polarized: discovery of a strong trend for intermolecular hydrogen bonds to favor donors on the protein side with implications for predicting and designing ligand complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschka, Sebastian; Wolf, Alex J; Bemister-Buffington, Joseph; Kuhn, Leslie A

    2018-04-01

    Understanding how proteins encode ligand specificity is fascinating and similar in importance to deciphering the genetic code. For protein-ligand recognition, the combination of an almost infinite variety of interfacial shapes and patterns of chemical groups makes the problem especially challenging. Here we analyze data across non-homologous proteins in complex with small biological ligands to address observations made in our inhibitor discovery projects: that proteins favor donating H-bonds to ligands and avoid using groups with both H-bond donor and acceptor capacity. The resulting clear and significant chemical group matching preferences elucidate the code for protein-native ligand binding, similar to the dominant patterns found in nucleic acid base-pairing. On average, 90% of the keto and carboxylate oxygens occurring in the biological ligands formed direct H-bonds to the protein. A two-fold preference was found for protein atoms to act as H-bond donors and ligand atoms to act as acceptors, and 76% of all intermolecular H-bonds involved an amine donor. Together, the tight chemical and geometric constraints associated with satisfying donor groups generate a hydrogen-bonding lock that can be matched only by ligands bearing the right acceptor-rich key. Measuring an index of H-bond preference based on the observed chemical trends proved sufficient to predict other protein-ligand complexes and can be used to guide molecular design. The resulting Hbind and Protein Recognition Index software packages are being made available for rigorously defining intermolecular H-bonds and measuring the extent to which H-bonding patterns in a given complex match the preference key.

  11. Protein-ligand interfaces are polarized: discovery of a strong trend for intermolecular hydrogen bonds to favor donors on the protein side with implications for predicting and designing ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschka, Sebastian; Wolf, Alex J.; Bemister-Buffington, Joseph; Kuhn, Leslie A.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding how proteins encode ligand specificity is fascinating and similar in importance to deciphering the genetic code. For protein-ligand recognition, the combination of an almost infinite variety of interfacial shapes and patterns of chemical groups makes the problem especially challenging. Here we analyze data across non-homologous proteins in complex with small biological ligands to address observations made in our inhibitor discovery projects: that proteins favor donating H-bonds to ligands and avoid using groups with both H-bond donor and acceptor capacity. The resulting clear and significant chemical group matching preferences elucidate the code for protein-native ligand binding, similar to the dominant patterns found in nucleic acid base-pairing. On average, 90% of the keto and carboxylate oxygens occurring in the biological ligands formed direct H-bonds to the protein. A two-fold preference was found for protein atoms to act as H-bond donors and ligand atoms to act as acceptors, and 76% of all intermolecular H-bonds involved an amine donor. Together, the tight chemical and geometric constraints associated with satisfying donor groups generate a hydrogen-bonding lock that can be matched only by ligands bearing the right acceptor-rich key. Measuring an index of H-bond preference based on the observed chemical trends proved sufficient to predict other protein-ligand complexes and can be used to guide molecular design. The resulting Hbind and Protein Recognition Index software packages are being made available for rigorously defining intermolecular H-bonds and measuring the extent to which H-bonding patterns in a given complex match the preference key.

  12. Crack propagation studies and bond coat properties in thermal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High threshold load at the interface between the ceramic layer and the bond coat was required to propagate the crack further into the bond coat. Once the threshold load was surpassed the crack propagated into the brittle bond coat without an appreciable increase in the load. At temperatures of 800°C the crack propagated ...

  13. Structure phenomena in the bond zone of explosively bonded plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livne, Z.

    1979-12-01

    In the bond areas of couples of explosively bonded plates, there are often zones, generally designated as ''molten pockets'', which have undergone melting and solidification. The object of the present study was to investigate molten pockets, which have a decisive effect on bond quality. The experimental samples for the study were chosen in consideration of the mutual behaviour of the plates constituting the couples, according to their equilibrium phase diagrams. To facilitate the investigation, large plates were bonded under conditions that enabled to to obtain wavy bond zones that included relatively large molten pockets. To clarify the complex nature of molten pockets and their surroundings, a wide variety of methods were employed. It was found that the shape and composition of molten pockets largely depend upon the mechanism of formation of both the bond wave and the molten pockets. It was also found that the composition of molten pockets is not homogeneous, which is manifest in the modification of the composition of the pockets, the solidification morphology, the phases, which have been identified by X-ray diffraction, and the bond strenght and hardness. Moreover, the different solidification morphologies revealed by metallography were found to depend upon the types of plates bonded, the bonding conditions and the location of pockets in the wavy interface. For molten pockets, cooling rates of 10 4 to 10 5 (degC/sec) have been deduced from interdendritic spacing, and found to be in good agreement with calculations after a mathematical model. It seems that the fast cooling rates and the steep temperature gradients are at the origin of the particular solidification phenomena observed in molten pockets

  14. Self-assembly of a superparamagnetic raspberry-like silica/iron oxide nanocomposite using epoxy-amine coupling chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Manuel; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2015-02-28

    The fabrication of colloidal nanocomposites would benefit from controlled hetero-assembly of ready-made particles through covalent bonding. Here we used epoxy-amine coupling chemistry to promote the self-assembly of superparamagnetic raspberry-like nanocomposites. This adaptable method induced the covalent attachment of iron oxide nanoparticles sparsely coated with amine groups onto epoxylated silica cores in the absence of other reactants.

  15. An experimental study on the impact collapse characteristics of CF/Epoxy circular tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.N.; Im, K.H.; Park, J.W.; Yang, I.Y.

    2003-01-01

    This study is to investigate the energy absorption characteristics of CF/Epoxy (Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy Resin) circular tubes in static and impact tests. The experimental results varied significantly as a function of interlaminar number, orientation angle of outer and trigger. When a CFRP composite tube is crushed, static/impact energy is consumed by friction between the loading plate and the splayed fronds of the tube, by fracture of the fibers, matrix and their interface, and the response is complex and depends on the interaction among the different mechanisms, such as transverse shearing, laminar bending and local buckling. The collapse mode depended upon orientation angle of outer of CFRP tubes and loading status(static/impact). Typical collapse modes of CFRP tubes are wedge collapse mode, splaying collapse mode and fragmentation collapse mode

  16. Influence of particle surface properties on the dielectric behavior of silica/epoxy nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Lihong; Zheng Liaoying; Li Guorong; Zeng Jiangtao; Yin Qingrui

    2008-01-01

    Silica/epoxy composites have been widely used in functional electric device applications. Silica nanoparticles, both unmodified and modified with the coupling agent KH-550, were used to prepare epoxy composites. Dielectric measurements showed that nanocomposites exhibit a higher dielectric constant than the control sample, and had more obvious dielectric relaxation characteristics. Results showed that particle surface properties have a profound effect on the dielectric behavior of the nanocomposites. These characteristics are attributed to the local ununiformity of the microstructure caused by the large interface area and the interaction between the filler and the matrix. This phenomenon is explained in terms of prolonging chemical chains created during the curing process. The mechanism is discussed with measurements of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)

  17. Radiation damage on high polymer epoxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, H M [Royal Military Coll. of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The effect of irradiation in a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor on the adhesive strength of epoxy resins was studied using the ASTM D897 standard testing procedure. Although the results were variable, indicating the doses were not well defined, nevertheless, there was evidence of strengthening associated with radiation-induced crosslinking. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Epoxy adhesive plays crucial role at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Epoxy adhesives are set to play a vital role in Europe's biggest-ever scientific experiment at the European Centrefor Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, thereby helping scientists gain a better understanding of the origins of the universe." (1/2 page)

  19. Epoxy adhesive plays crucial role at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Epoxy adhesives are set to play a vital role in Europe's biggest-ever scientific experiment at the European Centre for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, thereby helping scientists gain a better understanding of the origins of the universe." (1 page)

  20. Adhesion between coating layers based on epoxy and silicone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jacob R.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Kiil, Søren

    2007-01-01

    The adhesion between a silicon tie-coat and epoxy primers, used in marine coating systems, has been studied in this work. Six epoxy coatings (with varying chain lengths of the epoxy resins), some of which have shown problems with adhesion to the tie-coat during service life, have been considered....... The experimental investigation includes measurements of the surface tension of the tie-coat and the critical surface tensions of the epoxies, topographic investigation of the surfaces of cured epoxy coatings via atomic force microscopy (AFM), and pull-off tests for investigating the strength of adhesion...... to the silicon/epoxy systems. Calculations for determining the roughness factor of the six epoxy coatings (based on the AFM topographies) and the theoretical work of adhesion have been carried out. The coating surfaces are also characterized based on the van Oss-Good theory. Previous studies on the modulus...

  1. Effection of UV-LED Illuminant on the Curation of Photolatent-amidine Mixed with Bisphenol A Epoxy Acrylate under Printing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Huawei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to make photocuring ink or coating cured by UV-LED illuminant, we synthesized (4-((hexahydropyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrimidin-1 (2H-ylmethylphenyl(phenylmethanone(PL -DBN and (4-((octahydropyrimido[1,2-a]azepin-1(2H-ylmethylphenyl(phenylmet hanone(PL -DBU as photoinitiators. Different mass fraction of the photoinitiators was mixed with bisphenol A epoxy acrylate, cured by different wavelengths and power of UV-LED illuminant,and investigated the curing effects of photoinitiators on bisphenol A epoxy acrylate. The results show that the conversion of C=C double bonds of bisphenol A epoxy acrylate will increase as the mass fraction of the photoinitiators or the power of UV-LED illuminant increase. In the same conditions, the curing effect of using 365nm UV-LED illuminant on bisphenol A epoxy acrylate is better than using 395nm UV-LED illuminant. PL-DBU has a better curing effect on the bisphenol A epoxy acrylate rather than PL-DBN. When using the 8W/cm2 of 365nm UV-LED illuminant to cure a mixture of 3% PL-DBU and 97% bisphenol A epoxy acrylate, it will be dry completely in 2 seconds, moreover, the conversion reach 79%.

  2. Reactive fillers based on SWCNTs functionalized with matrix-based moieties for the production of epoxy composites with superior and tunable properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González-Domínguez, Jose M; Ansón-Casaos, A; Martínez, M Teresa; Martínez-Rubí, Yadienka; Simard, Benoit; Díez-Pascual, Ana M; Gómez-Fatou, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Composite materials based on epoxy matrix and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are able to exhibit outstanding improvements in physical properties when using a tailored covalent functionalization with matrix-based moieties containing terminal amines or epoxide rings. The proper choice of grafted moiety and integration protocol makes it feasible to tune the composite physical properties. At 0.5 wt% SWCNT loading, these composites exhibit up to 65% improvement in storage modulus, 91% improvement in tensile strength, and 65% improvement in toughness. A 15 °C increase in the glass transition temperature relative to the parent matrix was also achieved. This suggests that a highly improved interfacial bonding between matrix and filler, coupled to improved dispersion, are achieved. The degradation temperatures show an upshift in the range of 40–60 °C, which indicates superior thermal performance. Electrical conductivity ranges from ∼10 −13 to ∼10 −3 S cm −1 , which also shows the possibility of tuning the insulating or conductive behaviour of the composites. The chemical affinity of the functionalization moieties with the matrix and the unchanged molecular structure at the SWCNT/matrix interface are responsible for such improvements. (paper)

  3. Comparison of interfacial properties of electrodeposited single carbon fiber/epoxy composites using tensile and compressive fragmentation tests and acoustic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joung-Man; Kim, Jin-Won; Yoon, Dong-Jin

    2002-03-01

    Interfacial and microfailure properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites were evaluated using both tensile fragmentation and compressive Broutman tests with an aid of acoustic emission (AE). A monomeric and two polymeric coupling agents were applied via the electrodeposition (ED) and the dipping applications. A monomeric and a polymeric coupling agent showed significant and comparable improvements in interfacial shear strength (IFSS) compared to the untreated case under both tensile and compressive tests. Typical microfailure modes including cone-shaped fiber break, matrix cracking, and partial interlayer failure were observed under tension, whereas the diagonal slipped failure at both ends of the fractured fiber exhibited under compression. Adsorption and shear displacement mechanisms at the interface were described in terms of electrical attraction and primary and secondary bonding forces. For both the untreated and the treated cases AE distributions were separated well in tension, whereas AE distributions were rather closely overlapped in compression. It might be because of the difference in molecular failure energies and failure mechanisms between tension and compression. The maximum AE voltage for the waveform of either carbon or large-diameter basalt fiber breakages in tension exhibited much larger than that in compression. AE could provide more likely the quantitative information on the interfacial adhesion and microfailure.

  4. Positron beam analysis of polymer/metal interfaces under stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escobar Galindo, R.; van Veen, A.; Garcia, A.A.; Schut, H.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Triftshauser, W; Kogel, G; Sperr, P

    2001-01-01

    The polymers Epoxy and Poly(Methyl MethAcrylate) spin coated on Interstitial Free (IF) steel were subjected to external stresses and studied using the Delft Variable Energy Positron (VEP) beam facility. The polymer/metal interface was identified using an S-W map. After tensile experiments vacancy

  5. Mechanical properties of unidirectional oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, C. S.; Yeo, C. W.; Sahari, B.; Salit, M. S.; Aziz, N. Abdul

    2017-06-01

    Natural fibers have proven to be an excellent reinforcement material for various polymers. In this study, OPEFB fiber with unidirectional alignment was incorporated in epoxy and an investigation on tensile and flexural characteristics of the composite has been carried out. A fiber surface modification utilizing alkaline treatment with 1 sodium hydroxide solution was used in order to increase the fiber matrix bond in the composite. The investigation was carried out for 0°, 45° and 90° fiber orientation. Result showed that the higher the angle of the fiber orientation, the higher the tensile strength and flexural strength the composite will yield.

  6. The use of Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) in the crack propagation analysis of epoxy resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, D. P.; Al-Hassani, A. H. M.; Richardson, M. O. W.

    The ESPI (electronic speckle pattern interferometry) technique at high magnification levels is demonstrated to be of considerable value in interpreting the fracture behaviour of epoxy resins. The fracture toughness of powder coating system at different thicknesses has been measured using a TDCB (tapered double cantilever beam) technique and the deformation zone at the tip of the moving crack monitored. Initial indications are that a mechanistic changeover occurs at a critical bond (coating) thickness and that this is synonymous with the occurence of a fracture toughness maximum, which in turn is associated with a deformation zone of specific diameter.

  7. Composite Laser Ceramics by Advanced Bonding Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin; Kamimura, Tomosumi; Honda, Sawao; Iwamoto, Yuji

    2018-02-09

    Composites obtained by bonding materials with the same crystal structure and different chemical compositions can create new functions that do not exist in conventional concepts. We have succeeded in bonding polycrystalline YAG and Nd:YAG ceramics without any interstices at the bonding interface, and the bonding state of this composite was at the atomic level, similar to the grain boundary structure in ceramics. The mechanical strength of the bonded composite reached 278 MPa, which was not less than the strength of each host material (269 and 255 MPa). Thermal conductivity of the composite was 12.3 W/mK (theoretical value) which is intermediate between the thermal conductivities of YAG and Nd:YAG (14.1 and 10.2 W/mK, respectively). Light scattering cannot be detected at the bonding interface of the ceramic composite by laser tomography. Since the scattering coefficients of the monolithic material and the composite material formed by bonding up to 15 layers of the same materials were both 0.10%/cm, there was no occurrence of light scattering due to the bonding. In addition, it was not detected that the optical distortion and non-uniformity of the refractive index variation were caused by the bonding. An excitation light source (LD = 808 nm) was collimated to 200 μm and irradiated into a commercial 1% Nd:YAG single crystal, but fracture damage occurred at a low damage threshold of 80 kW/cm². On the other hand, the same test was conducted on the bonded interface of 1% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics fabricated in this study, but it was not damaged until the excitation density reached 127 kW/cm². 0.6% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics showed high damage resistance (up to 223 kW/cm²). It was concluded that composites formed by bonding polycrystalline ceramics are ideal in terms of thermo-mechanical and optical properties.

  8. Evaluation of Impact Strength of Epoxy Based Hybrid Composites Reinforced with E-Glass/Kevlar 49

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUBHAN ALIJOGI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In hybridization different fibers are stacked layer by layer to produce laminates have specific strength and stiffness and employed in light weight high strength applications. Physically mean fabricated hybrid composites used in aerospace, under water, body armors and armed forces establishment. In present work drop-weight impact response of hybrid composites were investigated by making laminates of hybrid composites. In Hybridization layers of E-glass (roving and Kevlar 49 fabrics stacked with epoxy resin. The layers formulation was set up by hand layup method. Impregnationsof epoxy resin of commercial grade (601A in fabrics were accomplished by VRTM (Vacuum Bagging Resin Transfer Molding technique. Layup placementof Glass fibers/ Kevlar at 0°/90°, 45°/45° and 30°/60° were set for this work. Mechanical properties such as impact strength, bear resistance and break resistance were analyzed by usingASTM D-256 and D-3763 standard.Experimental investigation was conducted using instrumented Dart impact and Izod Impact test. E-glass/Kevlar 49 at layup 0°/90°and 30°/60°exhibited improvedimpact strength than 45°/45°. The surface morphology and fractography were also investigated by capturing different images of Specimens by using the SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy. The fiberreinforcement and matrix fracture were also observed by using SEM.The SEM images suggest that epoxy resin tightly bonded with Kevlar fibers whereas Glass fibers were pulled out from laminations.

  9. Evaluation of impact strength of epoxy based hybrid composites reinforced with e-glass/kevlar 49

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jogi, S.A.; Memon, I.A.; Baloch, M.; Chandio, A.D.

    2017-01-01

    In hybridization different fibers are stacked layer by layer to produce laminates have specific strength and stiffness and employed in light weight high strength applications. Physically mean fabricated hybrid composites used in aerospace, under water, body armors and armed forces establishment. In present work drop-weight impact response of hybrid composites were investigated by making laminates of hybrid composites. In Hybridization layers of E-glass (roving) and Kevlar 49 fabrics stacked with epoxy resin. The layers formulation was set up by hand layup method. Impregnations of epoxy resin of commercial grade (601A) in fabrics were accomplished by VRTM (Vacuum Bagging Resin Transfer Molding) technique. Layup placementof Glass fibers/ Kevlar at 0 degree/90 degree, 45 degree/45 degree and 30 degree/60 degree were set for this work. Mechanical properties such as impact strength, bear resistance and break resistance were analyzed by using ASTM D-256 and D-3763 standard. Experimental investigation was conducted using instrumented Dart impact and Izod Impact test. E-glass/Kevlar 49 at layup 0 degree/90 degree and 30 degree/60 degree exhibited improvedimpact strength than 45 degree/45 degree. The surface morphology and fractography were also investigated by capturing different images of Specimens by using the SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The fiberreinforcement and matrix fracture were also observed by using SEM.The SEM images suggest that epoxy resin tightly bonded with Kevlar fibers whereas Glass fibers were pulled out from laminations. (author)

  10. Influence of Nanoclay Dispersion Methods on the Mechanical Behavior of E-Glass/Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh V. Hosur

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Common dispersion methods such as ultrasonic sonication, planetary centrifugal mixing and magnetic dispersion have been used extensively to achieve moderate exfoliation of nanoparticles in polymer matrix. In this study, the effect of adding three roll milling to these three dispersion methods for nanoclay dispersion into epoxy matrix was investigated. A combination of each of these mixing methods with three roll milling showed varying results relative to the unmodified polymer laminate. A significant exfoliation of the nanoparticles in the polymer structure was obtained by dispersing the nanoclay combining three roll milling to magnetic and planetary centrifugal mixing methods. This exfoliation promoted a stronger interfacial bond between the matrix and the fiber, which increased the final properties of the E-glass/epoxy nanocomposite. However, a combination of ultrasound sonication and three roll milling on the other hand, resulted in poor clay exfoliation; the sonication process degraded the polymer network, which adversely affected the nanocomposite final properties relative to the unmodified E-glass/epoxy polymer.

  11. Development of microwave absorbing materials prepared from a polymer binder including Japanese lacquer and epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamaru, T.; Katsumata, H.; Uekusa, S.; Ooyagi, H.; Ishimura, T.; Miyakoshi, T.

    Microwave absorption composites were synthesized from a poly urushiol epoxy resin (PUE) mixed with one of microwave absorbing materials; Ni-Zn ferrite, Soot, Black lead, and carbon nano tube (CNT) to investigate their microwave absorption properties. PUE binders were specially made from Japanese lacquer and epoxy resin, where Japanese lacquer has been traditionally used for bond and paint because it has excellent beauty. Japanese lacquer solidifies with oxygen contained in air's moisture, which has difficulty in making composite, but we improved Japanese lacquer's solidification properties by use of epoxy resin. We made 10 mm thickness composite samples and cut them into toroidal shape to measure permittivity, permeability, and reflection loss in frequencies ranging from 50 Hz to 20 GHz. Electric magnetic absorber's composites synthesized from a PUE binders mixed either with Soot or CNT showed significantly higher wave absorption over -27 dB than the others at frequencies around 18 GHz, although Japanese lacquer itself doesn't affect absorption. This means Japanese lacquer can be used as binder materials for microwave absorbers.

  12. Signal analysis approach to ultrasonic evaluation of diffusion bond quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Graham; Chinn, Diane

    1999-01-01

    Solid state bonds like the diffusion bond are attractive techniques for joining dissimilar materials since they are not prone to the defects that occur with fusion welding. Ultrasonic methods can detect the presence of totally unbonded regions but have difficulty sensing poor bonded areas where the substrates are in intimate contact. Standard ultrasonic imaging is based on amplitude changes in the signal reflected from the bond interface. Unfortunately, amplitude alone is not sensitive to bond quality. We demonstrated that there is additional information in the ultrasonic signal that correlates with bond quality. In our approach, we interrogated a set of dissimilar diffusion bonded samples with broad band ultrasonic signals. The signals were digitally processed and the characteristics of the signals that corresponded to bond quality were determined. These characteristics or features were processed with pattern recognition algorithms to produce predictions of bond quality. The predicted bond quality was then compared with the destructive measurement to assess the classification capability of the ultrasonic technique

  13. Modification of (DGEBA epoxy resin with maleated depolymerised natural rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DEGBA type epoxy resin has been modified with maleated depolymerised natural rubber (MDPR. MDPR was prepared by grafting maleic anhydride onto depolymerised natural rubber. MDPR has been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. MDPR was blended with epoxy resin at three different ratios (97/3, 98/2 and 99/1, by keeping the epoxy resin component as the major phase and maleated depolymerised natural rubber component as the minor phase. The reaction between the two blend components took place between the acid/anhydride group in the MDPR and the epoxide group of the epoxy resin. The proposed reaction schemes were supported by the FT-IR spectrum of the uncured Epoxy/MDPR blends. The neat epoxy resin and Epoxy/MDPR blends were cured by methylene dianiline (DDM at 100°C for three hours. Thermal, morphological and mechanical properties of the neat epoxy and the blends were investigated. Free volume studies of the cured, neat epoxy and Epoxy/MDPR blends were correlated with the morphological and mechanical properties of the same systems using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Studies.

  14. Correlation of mechanical properties with nondestructive evaluation of babbitt metal/bronze composite interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, Y.; Liaw, P. K.; Taszarek, B. J.; Frohlich, S.; Gungor, M. N.

    1988-09-01

    Interfaces of the babbitt metal-bronze composite were examined ultrasonically and were fractured using the Chalmers test method. It was found that the ultrasonic results correlated with the bond strength, the ductility, and the degree of bonding at the tested interface. Specifically, high ultrasonic reflection percentages were associated with low bond strength, low ductility, and low percentages of bonded regions. The fracture mechanism in the bonded area of the babbitt-bronze interface is related to the presence of the intermetallic compound, Cu6Sn5, at the interface. It is suggested that the non-destructive ultrasonic technique can detect the bond integrity of babbitted metals.

  15. Influence of the silica fillers on the ageing of epoxy resins under irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benard, F.

    2004-01-01

    Various studies were carried out on the ageing of epoxy resins under irradiations. In all cases, pure polymers were studied. The aim of our work managed by the CEA and the CNRS consists on studying the part of fillers and particularly the part of silica on ageing process under electron beam irradiations. Because of their wide use in industrial applications and especially in nuclear environment, the DGEBA-TETA resins (Diglycidylether of Bisphenol A - Triethylenetetramine) were chosen. Those epoxy resins are difficult to analyse because of their insolubility. Some pure and nano-metric silica filled chemical models which chemical structure very close to the one the DGEBA/TETA resin were synthesized and analysed with classical methods in organic chemistry. A major phenomenon of rupture of the C-O and C-N chemical bonds with creation of phenolic extremities, methylketone extremities, of primary and tertiary amines and notably enamine functions were revealed by the analyses. The quantitative 1 H and 13 C NMR analyses revealed the screen effect due to the silica and the reactions between the chemical species created by the irradiations and the silica surface. Thermic and thermodynamic analyses of the different epoxy resins in function of the irradiation dose and of the kind of silica showed the decrease of the glass transition temperature, of the relaxation temperature and of the crosslink density confirming the major phenomenon of bond ruptures during irradiations. With silica, the decrease of the crosslink density is slowed. This phenomenon can be explained with interactions between the nano-metric silica surface and the epoxy resin offsetting the effect of the chain rupture on the resin mechanical properties. The 13 C solid state NMR analyses confirmed the choice of the chemical models and permitted to detect the chemical species created by the irradiations. The analyse of the polarization transfers with 13 C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy revealed the stiffening of the nano

  16. Bond strength of compomers to dentin using acidic primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, W H; You, C; Powers, J M

    1999-10-01

    To determine the in vitro bond strengths of seven compomer/bonding agent restorative systems to human dentin. Seven compomer/bonding agents were bonded to human dentin, stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, and debonded in tension. Bonding conditions were with and without phosphoric acid etching, with and without the use of combined primer/bonding agents, and under moist and wet bond interfaces. Without phosphoric acid etching, F2000/F2000 Compomer Primer/Adhesive and F2000/Single Bond Dental Adhesive System were less sensitive to dentin wetness. With moist dentin, bond strengths of Dyract/Prime & Bond 2.1, Dyract AP/Prime & Bond 2.1, Hytac/OSB light-curing, one-component bonding agent, F2000/Single Bond, and Freedom/STAE single component light-cured dentin/enamel adhesive system, were improved with phosphoric acid etching. Also, with moist dentin, the bond strength of F2000/F2000 Compomer Primer/Adhesive in the 3M Clicker dispensing system was higher without phosphoric acid etching, whereas bonds of Compoglass/Syntac Single-component were not affected by phosphoric acid etching. Bonding did not occur without primer/bonding agent, regardless of surface condition or use of phosphoric acid etching.

  17. Effects of swelling forces on the durability of wood adhesive bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake M. Hofferber; Edward Kolodka; Rishawn Brandon; Robert J. Moon; Charles R. Frihart

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of wood swelling on performance of wood-adhesive bonds (resorcinol formaldehyde, epoxy, emulsion polymerisocyanate), for untreated and acetylated wood. Effects of these treatments on measured strain anisotropy and swelling stress were measured and then related to compressive shear strength and percentage wood...

  18. Liquid coated melt-spun Nd-Fe-B powders for bonded magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Gaiffi, S.; Kirk, D.; Young, K.; Herchenroeder, J.; Berwald, T.

    1999-04-01

    The liquid coating (LC) has been employed to apply epoxy and lubricant over the surface of rapidly solidified Nd-Fe-B powder particles. The LC led to an improvement of physical and magnetic properties for the powders and magnets compared to the dry blending and the encapsulation methods. The LC powders have excellent flowability and can be used for bonded magnets requiring very close tolerances; further bonded magnets made using this powder posses higher strength.

  19. Room temperature Cu-Cu direct bonding using surface activated bonding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T.H.; Howlader, M.M.R.; Itoh, T.; Suga, T.

    2003-01-01

    Thin copper (Cu) films of 80 nm thickness deposited on a diffusion barrier layered 8 in. silicon wafers were directly bonded at room temperature using the surface activated bonding method. A low energy Ar ion beam of 40-100 eV was used to activate the Cu surface prior to bonding. Contacting two surface-activated wafers enables successful Cu-Cu direct bonding. The bonding process was carried out under an ultrahigh vacuum condition. No thermal annealing was required to increase the bonding strength since the bonded interface was strong enough at room temperature. The chemical constitution of the Cu surface was examined by Auger electron spectroscope. It was observed that carbon-based contaminations and native oxides on copper surface were effectively removed by Ar ion beam irradiation for 60 s without any wet cleaning processes. An atomic force microscope study shows that the Ar ion beam process causes no surface roughness degradation. Tensile test results show that high bonding strength equivalent to bulk material is achieved at room temperature. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscope observations reveal the presence of void-free bonding interface without intermediate layer at the bonded Cu surfaces

  20. Evaluating the integrity of the reinforced concrete structure repaired by epoxy injection using simulated transfer function of impact-echo response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chia-Chi; Yu, Chih-peng; Wu, Jiunn-Hong; Hsu, Keng-Tsan; Ke, Ying-Tsu [Chaoyang University of Technology, Department of Construction Engineering, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-18

    Cracks and honeycombs are often found inside reinforced concrete (RC) structure caused by excessive external force, or improper casting of concrete. The repairing method usually involves epoxy injection. The impact-echo method, which is a sensitive for detecting of the interior voids, may not be applicable to assess the integrity of the repaired member as both air and epoxy are less in acoustic impedances. In this study, the repaired RC structure was evaluated by the simulated transfer function of the IE displacement waveform where the R-wave displacement waveform is used as a base of a simulated force-time function. The effect of different thickness of the epoxy layer to the amplitude corresponding to the interface is studied by testing on specimen containing repaired naturally delaminated cracks with crack widths about 1 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm. The impact-echo responses were compared with the drilling cores at the test positions. The results showed the cracks were not fully filled with epoxy when the peak amplitude corresponding to the interface dropped less than 20%. The peak corresponding to the thicker epoxy layer tends to be larger in amplitude. A field study was also performed on a column damaged by earthquake before and after repairing.

  1. Investigation of nanoscopic free volume and interfacial interaction in an epoxy resin/modified clay nanocomposite using positron annihilation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pushkar N; Sudarshan, Kathi; Sharma, Sandeep K; Maheshwari, Priya; Rath, Sangram K; Patri, Manoranjan; Pujari, Pradeep K

    2012-12-07

    Epoxy/clay nanocomposites are synthesized using clay modified with the organic modifier N,N-dimethyl benzyl hydrogenated tallow quaternary ammonium salt (Cloisite 10A). The purpose is to investigate the influence of the clay concentration on the nanostructure, mainly on the free-volume properties and the interfacial interactions, of the epoxy/clay nanocomposite. Nanocomposites having 1, 3, 5 and 7.5 wt. % clay concentrations are prepared using the solvent-casting method. The dispersion of clay silicate layers and the morphologies of the fractured surfaces in the nanocomposites are studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The observed XRD patterns reveal an exfoliated clay structure in the nanocomposite with the lowest clay concentration (≤1 wt. %). The ortho-positronium lifetime (τ(3)), a measure of the free-volume size, as well as the fractional free volume (f(v)) are seen to decrease in the nanocomposites as compared to pristine epoxy. The intensity of free positron annihilation (I(2)), an index of the epoxy-clay interaction, decreases with the addition of clay (1 wt. %) but increases linearly at higher clay concentrations. Positron age-momentum correlation measurements are also carried out to elucidate the positron/positronium states in pristine epoxy and in the nanocomposites. The results suggest that in the case of the nanocomposite with the studied lowest clay concentration (1 wt. %), free positrons are primarily localized in the epoxy-clay interfaces, whereas at higher clay concentrations, annihilation takes place from the intercalated clay layers. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Interface Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...... significant source of design errors. Awide range of interface specifications are possible, the simplest form is a syntactical check of parameter types.However, today it is possible to do more sophisticated forms involving semantic checks....

  3. Epoxy polyurethane nanocomposites filled with fullerite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhnova, R.A.; Galatenko, N.A.; Lukashevich, S.A.; Shirokov, O.D.; Levenets', Je.G.

    2015-01-01

    New nanocomposite materials based on epoxy polyurethane (EPU) containing nanoscale fullerite in its composition are produced. The influence of small impurities of fullerite on physical and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites is established. The effect of a nanofiller and its concentration on the structure and properties of the composite and the ability to biodegradation in vitro is studied. The developed nanocomposites exhibit the biodegradability, and the presence of nanofillers in the EPU facilitates the course of the process

  4. Sol-gel bonding of silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbe, C.J.; Cassidy, D.J.; Triani, G.; Latella, B.A.; Mitchell, D.R.G.; Finnie, K.S.; Short, K.; Bartlett, J.R.; Woolfrey, J.L.; Collins, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Sol-gel bonds have been produced between smooth, clean silicon substrates by spin-coating solutions containing partially hydrolysed silicon alkoxides. The two coated substrates were assembled and the resulting sandwich fired at temperatures ranging from 60 to 600 deg. C. The sol-gel coatings were characterised using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy, while the corresponding bonded specimens were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were characterised using both microindentation and tensile testing. Bonding of silicon wafers has been successfully achieved at temperatures as low as 60 deg. C. At 300 deg. C, the interfacial fracture energy was 1.55 J/m 2 . At 600 deg. C, sol-gel bonding provided superior interfacial fracture energy over classical hydrophilic bonding (3.4 J/m 2 vs. 1.5 J/m 2 ). The increase in the interfacial fracture energy is related to the increase in film density due to the sintering of the sol-gel interface with increasing temperature. The superior interfacial fracture energy obtained by sol-gel bonding at low temperature is due to the formation of an interfacial layer, which chemically bonds the two sol-gel coatings on each wafer. Application of a tensile stress on the resulting bond leads to fracture of the samples at the silicon/sol-gel interface

  5. Biobased Epoxy Nanocomposites Derived from Lignin-Based Monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shou; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2015-07-13

    Biobased epoxy nanocomposites were synthesized based on 2-methoxy-4-propylphenol (dihydroeugenol, DHE), a molecule that has been obtained from the lignin component of biomass. To increase the content of hydroxyl groups, DHE was o-demethylated using aqueous HBr to yield propylcatechol (DHEO), which was subsequently glycidylated to epoxy monomer. Optimal conditions in terms of yield and epoxy equivalent weight were found to be 60 °C with equal NaOH/phenolic hydroxyl molar ratio. The structural evolution from DHE to cured epoxy was followed by (1)H NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The nano-montmorillonite modified DHEO epoxy exhibited improved storage modulus and thermal stability as determined from dynamic mechanical analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. This study widens the synthesis routes of biobased epoxy thermosets from lignin-based molecules.

  6. Interface models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders P.; Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for specifying interfaces between concurrently executing modules of a computing system. The model does not prescribe a particular type of communication protocol and is aimed at describing interfaces between both software and hardware modules or a combination of the two....... The model describes both functional and timing properties of an interface...

  7. Studies on mechanical, thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of untreated (raw) and treated coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh Kumar, S.M.; Duraibabu, D.; Subramanian, K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • UTCSE and TCSE composites have been fabricated by compression molding technique. • The prepared specimens were characterized by FTIR, DMA, TGA and SEM techniques. • TCSE composite showed higher mechanical properties compared to UTCSE composite. • DMA showed that TCSE composite exhibited higher storage modulus than UTCSE composite. • TCSE composite showed higher thermal stability than UTCSE composite. - Abstract: The untreated (raw) coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy (UTCSE) composite and treated coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy (TCSE) composite have been fabricated using hand layup followed by compression molding technique. The prepared specimens were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The prepared specimens are cut as per ASTM Standards to measure tensile, flexural and impact strengths by using universal testing machine and izod impact tester respectively. The treated coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy composite (TCSE) posses higher mechanical strength and thermal stability compared to untreated (raw) coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy composite (UTCSE). In the SEM fracture analysis, TCSE composite showed better fiber–matrix bonding and absence of voids compared to UTCSE composite

  8. Carbon nanotube epoxy nanocomposites: the effects of interfacial modifications on the dynamic mechanical properties of the nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoonessi, Mitra; Lebrón-Colón, Marisabel; Scheiman, Daniel; Meador, Michael A

    2014-10-08

    Surface functionalization of pretreated carbon nanotubes (CNT) using aromatic, aliphatic, and aliphatic ether diamines was performed. The pretreatment of the CNT consisted of either acid- or photo-oxidation. The acid treated CNT had a higher initial oxygen content compared to the photo-oxidized CNT and this resulted in a higher density of functionalization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to verify the presence of the oxygenated and amine moieties on the CNT surfaces. Epoxy/0.1 wt % CNT nanocomposites were prepared using the functionalized CNT and the bulk properties of the nanocomposites were examined. Macroscale correlations between the interfacial modification and bulk dynamic mechanical and thermal properties were observed. The amine modified epoxy/CNT nanocomposites exhibited up to a 1.9-fold improvement in storage modulus (G') below the glass transition (Tg) and up to an almost 4-fold increase above the Tg. They also exhibited a 3-10 °C increase in the glass transition temperature. The aromatic diamine surface modified epoxy/CNT nanocomposites resulted in the largest increase in shear moduli below and above the Tg and the largest increase in the Tg. Surface examination of the nanocomposites with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed indications of a greater adhesion of the epoxy resin matrix to the CNT, most likely due to the covalent bonding.

  9. Preparation and characterization of carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber to reinforce epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Feng; Lu, Chunxiang; Li, Yonghong; Guo, Jinhai; Lu, Xiaoxuan; Lu, Huibin; He, Shuqing; Yang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → CNTs were uniformly grown onto the carbon fibers. → No obvious mechanical properties of carbon fiber were observed after CNT growth. → The IFSS of multiscale epoxy composite was measured by single fiber pull-out tests. → Observing fractography of composite, the fracture modes of CNTs were discussed. -- Abstract: The multiscale carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber was prepared by a newly developed aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope were carried out to characterize this multiscale material. Compared with the original carbon fibers, the fabrication of this hybrid fiber resulted in an almost threefold increase of BET surface area to reach 2.22 m 2 /g. Meanwhile, there was a slight degradation of fiber tensile strength within 10%, while the fiber modulus was not significantly affected. The interfacial shearing strength of a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite with carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber and an epoxy matrix was determined from the single fiber pull-out tests of microdroplet composite. Due to an efficient increase of load transfer at the fiber/matrix interfaces, the interracial shear strength of composite reinforced by carbon nanotube-hybridized carbon fiber is almost 94% higher than that of one reinforced by the original carbon fiber. Based on the fractured morphologies of the composites, the interfacial reinforcing mechanisms were discussed through proposing different types of carbon nanotube fracture modes along with fiber pulling out from epoxy composites.

  10. Debonding characteristics of adhesively bonded woven Kevlar composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    The fatigue damage mechanism of an adhesively bonded joint between fabric reinforced composite adherends was investigated with cracked-lap-shear specimens. Two bonded systems were studied: fabric Kevlar 49/5208 epoxy adherends bonded together with either EC 3445 or FM-300 adhesive. For each bonded system, two specimen geometries were tested. In all specimens tested, fatigue damage occurred in the form of cyclic debonding; however, the woven Kevlar specimens gave significantly slower debond growth rates and higher fracture toughness than previously found in the nonwoven adherend specimens. The surfaces for the woven adherends were not smooth; rather, they had regular crests (high spots) and troughs (low spots) due to the weave pattern. Radiographs of the specimens and examination of their failure surfaces revealed that fiber bridging occurred between the crests of the two adherends in the debonded region. The observed improvements in debond growth resistance and static fracture toughness are attributed to this bridging.

  11. Rapid microwave processing of epoxy nanocomposites using carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Luhyna, Nataliia; Inam, Fawad; Winnington, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Microwave processing is one of the rapid processing techniques for manufacturing nanocomposites. There is very little work focussing on the addition of CNTs for shortening the curing time of epoxy nanocomposites. Using microwave energy, the effect of CNT addition on the curing of epoxy nanocomposites was researched in this work. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to determine the degree of cure for epoxy and nanocomposite samples. CNT addition significantly reduced the duration ...

  12. Corrosion Protection of Steel by Epoxy-Organoclay Nanocomposite Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Domna Merachtsaki; Panagiotis Xidas; Panagiotis Giannakoudakis; Konstantinos Triantafyllidis; Panagiotis Spathis

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to study the corrosion behavior of steel coated with epoxy-(organo) clay nanocomposite films. The investigation was carried out using salt spray exposures, optical and scanning electron microscopy examination, open circuit potential, and electrochemical impedance measurements. The mechanical, thermomechanical, and barrier properties of pristine glassy epoxy polymer and epoxy-clay nanocomposites were examined. The degree of intercalation/exfoliation of clay ...

  13. Atomistic modeling of thermomechanical properties of SWNT/Epoxy nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasanella, Nicholas; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to compute thermomechanical properties of cured epoxy resins reinforced with pristine and covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes. A DGEBA-DDS epoxy network was built using the ‘dendrimer’ growth approach where 75% of available epoxy sites were cross-linked. The epoxy model is verified through comparisons to experiments, and simulations are performed on nanotube reinforced cross-linked epoxy matrix using the CVFF force field in LAMMPS. Full stiffness matrices and linear coefficient of thermal expansion vectors are obtained for the nanocomposite. Large increases in stiffness and large decreases in thermal expansion were seen along the direction of the nanotube for both nanocomposite systems when compared to neat epoxy. The direction transverse to nanotube saw a 40% increase in stiffness due to covalent functionalization over neat epoxy at 1 K whereas the pristine nanotube system only saw a 7% increase due to van der Waals effects. The functionalized SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite showed an additional 42% decrease in thermal expansion along the nanotube direction when compared to the pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. The stiffness matrices are rotated over every possible orientation to simulate the effects of an isotropic system of randomly oriented nanotubes in the epoxy. The randomly oriented covalently functionalized SWNT/Epoxy nanocomposites showed substantial improvements over the plain epoxy in terms of higher stiffness (200% increase) and lower thermal expansion (32% reduction). Through MD simulations, we develop means to build simulation cells, perform annealing to reach correct densities, compute thermomechanical properties and compare with experiments. (paper)

  14. Accelerated thermal aging of rubber modified epoxy encapsulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayre, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    A program is outlined to enable prediction of physical properties of rubber modified epoxy encapsulants over the life time of the extended life neutron generators. Preliminary results show that the chief aging phenomenon occurring is increased crosslink density of the epoxy matrix. No changes in the rubber phase have been detected. The effect of increased epoxy crosslink density has been higher volume resistivity at 66 0 C, increased tensile strength, and decreased ultimate elongation

  15. Positron lifetime study of electron-irradiated epoxy resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suevegh, K.; Vertes, A.; Wojnarovits, L.; Foeldiak, G.; Liszkai, L.; Kajcsos, Zs.

    1990-01-01

    Two bisphenol-A type epoxy resins were irradiated by electron beam and studied afterwards by positron lifetime spectroscopy. An interesting result is that despite of the considerable amount of free-radicals, no inhibition of positronium formation was observed in the two epoxies. Nevertheless, several serious differences were detected between the studied polymers. The results suggest that the radiation-resistant properties of epoxies depend strongly on the amount of the curing agent. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs

  16. Failure behavior of nano-SiO2 fillers epoxy coating under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Li; Cui Yu; Li Ying; Zhang Tao; Wang Fuhui

    2012-01-01

    The failure of organic coating (epoxy resin filled with 5 mass% nano-SiO 2 particles) on mild steel under high hydrostatic pressure (35 atm) has been studied compared with that under atmospheric pressure (1 atm), using impedance measurements, gravimetric testing, adhesion testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that high hydrostatic pressure accelerated the failure of the organic coating by promoting diffusion of water in the coating, which speeds up water spread and electrochemical reactions at the interface. The roughness of the coating and steel has been discussed from point of view of their respective fractal dimensions D fc and D fdl , as deduced from impedance measurements

  17. Proposal of new bonding technique 'Instantaneous Liquid Phase (ILP) Bonding'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yue-Chang; Nakagawa, Hiroji; Matsuda, Fukuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    A new bonding technique named ''Instantaneous Liquid Phase (ILP) bonding'' suitable mainly for welding dissimilar materials was proposed by which instantaneous melting of one or two of the faying surfaces is utilized. The processes of ILP bonding are mainly consisted of three stages, namely the first stage forming thin liquid layer by rapid heating, the second stage joining both specimens by thin liquid layer, and the third stage cooling the specimens rapidly to avoid the formation of brittle layer. The welding temperatures of the specimens to be welded in ILP bonding are generally differentiated from each other. ILP bonding was applied for a variety of combinations of dissimilar materials of aluminum, aluminum alloys, titanium, titanium alloy, carbon steel, austenitic stainless steel, copper and tungsten, and for similar materials of stainless steel and nickel-base alloy. There were no microvoids in these welding joints, and the formation of brittle layer at the bonding interface was suppressed. The welded joints of Al + Ti, Cu + carbon steel and Cu + austenitic stainless steel showed the fracture in base metal having lower tensile strength. Further, the welded joints of Al + carbon steel, Al alloy + Ti, Al alloy + carbon steel or + austenitic stainless steel, Ti + carbon steel or + austenitic stainless steel showed better tensile properties in the comparison with diffusion welding. Furthermore, ILP bonding was available for welding same materials susceptible to hot cracking. Because of the existence of liquid layer, the welding pressure required was extremely low, and preparation of faying surface by simple tooling or polishing by no.80 emery paper was enough. The change in specimen length before and after welding was relatively little, only depending on the thickness of liquid layer. The welding time was very short, and thus high welding efficiency was obtained. (author)

  18. Controlled Contamination of Epoxy Composites with PDMS and Removal by Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank; Ledesma, Rodolfo; Cataldo, Daniel; Lin, Yi; Wohl, Christopher; Gupta, Mool; Connell, John

    2016-01-01

    Surface preparation is critical to the performance of adhesively bonded composites. During manufacturing, minute quantities of mold release compounds are inevitably deposited on faying surfaces and may compromise bond performance. To ensure safety, mechanical fasteners and other crack arrest features must be installed in the bondlines of primary structures, which negates some advantages of adhesively bonded construction. Laser ablation is an automated, repeatable, and scalable process with high potential for the surface preparation of metals and composites in critical applications such as primary airframe structures. In this study, laser ablation is evaluated on composite surfaces for the removal of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a common mold release material. Composite panels were contaminated uniformly with PDMS film thicknesses as low as 6.0 nm as measured by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. Bond performance was assessed by mechanical testing using a 250 F cure, epoxy adhesive and compared with pre-bond surface inspection results. Water contact angle, optically stimulated electron emission, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy were used to characterize contaminated and laser ablated surfaces. The failure mode obtained from double cantilever beam tests correlated well with surface characterization data. The test results indicated that even low levels of PDMS were not completely removed by laser ablation.

  19. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  20. Halloysite reinforced epoxy composites with improved mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Muhammad Jawwad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs reinforced epoxy composites with improved mechanical properties were prepared. The prepared HNTs reinforced epoxy composites demonstrated improved mechanical properties especially the fracture toughness and flexural strength. The flexural modulus of nanocomposite with 6% mHNTs loading was 11.8% higher than that of neat epoxy resin. In addition, the nanocomposites showed improved dimensional stability. The prepared halloysite reinforced epoxy composites were characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. The improved properties are attributed to the unique characteristics of HNTs, uniform dispersion of reinforcement and interfacial coupling.

  1. Mechanical Reinforcement of Epoxy Composites with Carbon Fibers and HDPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, R.; Chang, Q.; Huang, X.; Li, J.

    2018-01-01

    Silanized carbon fibers (CFs) and a high-density polyethylene with amino terminal groups (HDPE) were introduced into epoxy resins to fabricate high-performance composites. A. mechanical characterization of the composites was performed to investigate the effect of CFs in cured epoxy/HDPE systems. The composites revealed a noticeable improvement in the tensile strength, elongation at break, flexural strength, and impact strength in comparison with those of neat epoxy and cured epoxy/HDPE systems. SEM micrographs showed that the toughening effect could be explained by yield deformations, phase separation, and microcracking.

  2. Design of carbon nanofiber embedded conducting epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantayat, Subhra; Sarkar, Niladri; Rout, Dibyaranjan; Swain, Sarat K.

    2017-01-01

    Acid treated carbon nanofiber (t-CNF) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites were fabricated by hand lay-up method with various wt % of t-CNF loadings. Pristine or unmodified carbon nano fibers (u-CNFs) were made compatible with epoxy matrix by means of mixed acid treatment. Fabricated nanocomposites were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposites were measured as a function of t-CNF content. Effect of acid treated CNFs on to the mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites was justified by comparing the mechanical properties of epoxy/t-CNF and epoxy/u-CNF nanocomposites with same loading level. The electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy resin with a threshold at 1 wt % of t-CNF. Substantial improvement in thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of the synthesized epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites may be suitable for fabricating electronic devices. - Highlights: • Epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites are characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM, AFM and TEM. • Electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy with a threshold at 1 wt% of t-CNF. • Tensile strength is enhanced by 40% due to dispersion of t-CNF. • Synthesized nanocomposites are suitable for fabricating electronic devises.

  3. Understanding the thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of epoxy nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarathi, R.; Sahu, R.K.; Rajeshkumar, P.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, the electrical, mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy nanocomposite materials were studied. The electrical insulation characteristics were analyzed through short time breakdown voltage test, accelerated electrical ageing test, and by tracking test. The breakdown voltage increases with increase in nano-clay content up to 5 wt%, under AC and DC voltages. The volume resistivity, permittivity and tan(δ) of the epoxy nanocomposites were measured. The Weibull studies indicate that addition of nanoclay upto 5 wt% enhances the characteristic life of epoxy nanocomposite insulation material. The tracking test results indicate that the tracking time is high with epoxy nanocomposites as compared to pure epoxy. Ageing studies were carried out to understand the surface characteristic variation through contact angle measurement. The hydrophobicity of the insulating material was analysed through contact angle measurement. The diffusion coefficients of the material with different percentage of clay in epoxy nanocomposites were calculated. The exfoliation characteristics in epoxy nanocomposites were analyzed through wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) studies. The thermal behaviour of the epoxy nanocomposites was analyzed by carrying out thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) studies. Heat deflection temperature of the material was measured to understand the stability of the material for intermittent temperature variation. The dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results indicated that storage modulus of the material increases with small amount of clay in epoxy resin. The activation energy of the material was calculated from the DMA results

  4. Design of carbon nanofiber embedded conducting epoxy resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantayat, Subhra [Department of Chemistry, Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla, Sambalpur 768018, Odisha (India); School of Applied Sciences, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar 751024, Odisha (India); Sarkar, Niladri [Department of Chemistry, Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla, Sambalpur 768018, Odisha (India); Rout, Dibyaranjan [School of Applied Sciences, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar 751024, Odisha (India); Swain, Sarat K., E-mail: swainsk2@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemistry, Veer Surendra Sai University of Technology, Burla, Sambalpur 768018, Odisha (India)

    2017-01-15

    Acid treated carbon nanofiber (t-CNF) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites were fabricated by hand lay-up method with various wt % of t-CNF loadings. Pristine or unmodified carbon nano fibers (u-CNFs) were made compatible with epoxy matrix by means of mixed acid treatment. Fabricated nanocomposites were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposites were measured as a function of t-CNF content. Effect of acid treated CNFs on to the mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites was justified by comparing the mechanical properties of epoxy/t-CNF and epoxy/u-CNF nanocomposites with same loading level. The electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy resin with a threshold at 1 wt % of t-CNF. Substantial improvement in thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of the synthesized epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites may be suitable for fabricating electronic devices. - Highlights: • Epoxy/t-CNF nanocomposites are characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM, AFM and TEM. • Electrical conductivity was achieved by epoxy with a threshold at 1 wt% of t-CNF. • Tensile strength is enhanced by 40% due to dispersion of t-CNF. • Synthesized nanocomposites are suitable for fabricating electronic devises.

  5. Effect of the hardener to epoxy monomer ratio on the water absorption behavior of the DGEBA/TETA epoxy system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrton Alef Castanheira Pereira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The water absorption behavior of the DGEBA/TETA epoxy system was evaluated as a function of the epoxy monomer to amine hardener ratio. Weight gain versus immersion time curves were obtained and the experimental points were fitted using Fickian and Non-Fickian diffusion models. The results obtained showed that for all epoxy monomer to hardener ratios analyzed water diffusion followed non-Fickian behavior. It was possible to correlate the water absorption behavior to the macromolecular structure developed when the epoxy/ hardener ratio was varied. All epoxy/hardener ratios present a two-phase macromolecular structure, composed of regions with high crosslink density and regions with lower crosslinking. Epoxy rich systems have a more open macromolecular structure with a lower fraction of the dense phase than the amine rich systems, which present a more compact two-phase structure.

  6. Bond strength of masonry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluijm, van der R.; Vermeltfoort, A.Th.

    1992-01-01

    Bond strength is not a well defined property of masonry. Normally three types of bond strength can be distinguished: - tensile bond strength, - shear (and torsional) bond strength, - flexural bond strength. In this contribution the behaviour and strength of masonry in deformation controlled uniaxial

  7. UV resistibility of a nano-ZnO/glass fibre reinforced epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Tsz-ting; Lau, Kin-tak; Tam, Wai-yin; Leng, Jinsong; Etches, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A GFRE composite with UV resistibility is introduced. • The bonding behaviour and UV resistibility of the composite were studied upon the addition of nano-ZnO particles. • The solvent effect in the dispersion of nano-ZnO particles was also studied. • The nano-ZnO/GFRE composite shows effective UV absorption with enhanced bonding behaviour. - Abstract: The harmfulness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation (UVR) to human health and polymer degradation has been the focus recently in all engineering industries. A polymer-based composite filled with nano-ZnO particles can enhance its UV resistibility. It has been found that the use of appropriate amount of nano-ZnO/Isopropyl alcohol solvent to prepare a UV resistant nano-ZnO/glass fibre reinforced epoxy (ZGFRE) composite can effectively block the UV transmission with negligible influence on the crystal structure of its resin system. This paper aims at investigating the interfacial bonding behaviour and UV resistibility of a ZGFRE composite. The solvent effect in relation to the dispersion properties of ZnO in the composite is also discussed. XRD results indicated that 20 wt% Isopropyl alcohol was an effective solvent for filling nano-ZnO particles into an epoxy. SEM examination also showed that the bonding behaviour between glass fibre and matrix was enhanced after filling 20 wt% nano-ZnO particles with 20 wt% Isopropyl alcohol into the composite. Samples filled with 20 wt% nano-ZnO/Isopropyl alcohol and 40 wt% nano-ZnO/Isopropyl alcohol has full absorption of UVA (315–400 nm), UVB (280–315 nm) and a part of UVC (190–280 nm)

  8. Molecular characterization of composite interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, H.

    1982-01-01

    The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy was applied to elucidate the molecular structures of the glass/matrix interface. The various interfaces and interphases were studied. It is found that the structure of the silane in a treating solution is important in determining the structure of the silane on glass fibers, influences the macroscopic properties of composites. The amount of silane on glass fibers, the state of hydrogen bonding, orientation, copolymerization of the organicfunctionality with the matrix, curing of the silane, and effect of water on the interface were investigated. It is shown that the molecular approach is useful to interpret and predict physicomechanical properties of composites

  9. Comparison of structural health assessment capabilities in epoxy – carbon black and epoxy – carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    F. Inam; B. R. Bhat; N. Luhyna; T. Vo

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for comparing structural health of different types of brittle epoxy nanocomposites filled with carbon nanostructured fillers is presented. Epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon black (CB) and epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite bars were prepared by calendering and thermal curing. Nanocomposite bars were subjected to Vickers diamond indentation to produce sub-surface damage. Electrical conductivities were analysed by 4-point method to estimate the structural damage caused by...

  10. Fracture toughness of dentin/resin-composite adhesive interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, L E; Pilliar, R M

    1993-05-01

    The reliability and validity of tensile and shear bond strength determinations of dentin-bonded interfaces have been questioned. The fracture toughness value (KIC) reflects the ability of a material to resist crack initiation and unstable propagation. When applied to an adhesive interface, it should account for both interfacial bond strength and inherent defects at or near the interface, and should therefore be more appropriate for characterization of interface fracture resistance. This study introduced a fracture toughness test for the assessment of dentin/resin-composite bonded interfaces. The miniature short-rod specimen geometry was used for fracture toughness testing. Each specimen contained a tooth slice, sectioned from a bovine incisor, to form the bonded interface. The fracture toughness of an enamel-bonded interface was assessed in addition to the dentin-bonded interfaces. Tensile bond strength specimens were also prepared from the dentin surfaces of the cut bovine incisors. A minimum of ten specimens was fabricated for each group of materials tested. After the specimens were aged for 24 h in distilled water at 37 degrees C, the specimens were loaded to failure in an Instron universal testing machine. There were significant differences (p adhesives tested. Generally, both the fracture toughness and tensile bond strength measurements were highest for AllBond 2, intermediate for 3M MultiPurpose, and lowest for Scotchbond 2. Scanning electron microscopy of the fractured specimen halves confirmed that crack propagation occurred along the bond interface during the fracture toughness test. It was therefore concluded that the mini-short-rod fracture toughness test provided a valid method for characterization of the fracture resistance of the dentin-resin composite interface.

  11. Electrochemical and anticorrosion behaviors of hybrid functionalized graphite nano-platelets/tripolyphosphate in epoxy-coated carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Somayeh; Shariatpanahi, Homeira; Taromi, Faramarz Afshar; Neshati, Jaber

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • FGNP was combined with TPP to obtain a hybrid nano-particle. • TEM image showed uniform distribution of the hybrid nanoparticles in epoxy coating. • FGNP is a substrate for linking of TPP anions by hydrogen bonding. • FGNP as an accelerator, provides rapid iron phosphate passive film formation. • The hybrid nano-particle can provide long-term corrosion protection. - Abstract: Functionalized graphite nano-platelets (FGNP) were combined with tripolyphosphate (TPP) to gain a hybrid nano-particle (FGNP-TPP) with homogenous dispersion in epoxy, resulting in an excellent anti-corrosion coating for carbon steel substrate. Characterization analyses of the hybrid nano-particle were performed by FT-IR, SEM, XRD and TEM. TPP was linked to FGNP nano-particles by hydrogen bondings. Different epoxy coatings formulated with 1 wt.% of FGNP, FGNP-TPP and TPP were evaluated. Electrochemical investigations, salt spray and pull-off tests showed that the hybrid nano-particle can provide long-term corrosion protection compared to FGNP and TPP due to synergistic effect between FGNP as an accelerator and TPP as a corrosion inhibitor to produce a uniform and stable iron-phosphate passive film with high surface coverage.

  12. Electrochemical and anticorrosion behaviors of hybrid functionalized graphite nano-platelets/tripolyphosphate in epoxy-coated carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Somayeh, E-mail: somaye.mohammadi32@aut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shariatpanahi, Homeira [Corrosion Department, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 18745-4163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taromi, Faramarz Afshar [Department of Polymer Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Neshati, Jaber [Corrosion Department, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), P.O. Box 18745-4163, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • FGNP was combined with TPP to obtain a hybrid nano-particle. • TEM image showed uniform distribution of the hybrid nanoparticles in epoxy coating. • FGNP is a substrate for linking of TPP anions by hydrogen bonding. • FGNP as an accelerator, provides rapid iron phosphate passive film formation. • The hybrid nano-particle can provide long-term corrosion protection. - Abstract: Functionalized graphite nano-platelets (FGNP) were combined with tripolyphosphate (TPP) to gain a hybrid nano-particle (FGNP-TPP) with homogenous dispersion in epoxy, resulting in an excellent anti-corrosion coating for carbon steel substrate. Characterization analyses of the hybrid nano-particle were performed by FT-IR, SEM, XRD and TEM. TPP was linked to FGNP nano-particles by hydrogen bondings. Different epoxy coatings formulated with 1 wt.% of FGNP, FGNP-TPP and TPP were evaluated. Electrochemical investigations, salt spray and pull-off tests showed that the hybrid nano-particle can provide long-term corrosion protection compared to FGNP and TPP due to synergistic effect between FGNP as an accelerator and TPP as a corrosion inhibitor to produce a uniform and stable iron-phosphate passive film with high surface coverage.

  13. Preparation and characterization of rubbery epoxy/multiwall carbon nanotubes composites using amino acid salt assisted dispersion technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Jagtap

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy/multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT composites were prepared using sodium salt of 6-aminohexanoic acid (SAHA modified MWCNT and its effect properties of related composites were investigated. The composite prepared using a polar solvent, tetrahydrofuran exhibits better mechanical properties compared to those prepared using less polar solvent and without using solvent. The tensile properties and dynamic storage modulus was found to be increased as a result of modification of MWCNT with SAHA. This improvement in the tensile properties and dynamic mechanical properties of epoxy/MWCNT composite is a combined effect of cation-π interaction and chemical bonding. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and Raman spectroscopy were used to explain cation-π interaction between SAHA with MWCNT and chemical bonding of SAHA with epoxy resin. The effect of modification of MWCNT on morphology of a nanocomposite was confirmed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The present approach does not disturb the ! electron clouds of MWCNT as opposed to chemical functionalization strategy.

  14. Mechanical Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Beams Bonded with External Carbon Fiber Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribniak, Viktor; Tamulenas, Vytautas; Ng, Pui-Lam; Arnautov, Aleksandr K; Gudonis, Eugenijus; Misiunaite, Ieva

    2017-06-17

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams internally reinforced with steel bars and externally bonded with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets fixed by adhesive and hybrid jointing techniques. In particular, attention is paid to the load resistance and failure modes of composite beams. The steel fibers were used to avoiding the rip-off failure of the concrete cover. The CFRP sheets were fixed to the concrete surface by epoxy adhesive as well as combined with various configurations of small-diameter steel pins for mechanical fastening to form a hybrid connection. Such hybrid jointing techniques were found to be particularly advantageous in avoiding brittle debonding failure, by promoting progressive failure within the hybrid joints. The use of CFRP sheets was also effective in suppressing the localization of the discrete cracks. The development of the crack pattern was monitored using the digital image correlation method. As revealed from the image analyses, with an appropriate layout of the steel pins, brittle failure of the concrete-carbon fiber interface could be effectively prevented. Inverse analysis of the moment-curvature diagrams was conducted, and it was found that a simplified tension-stiffening model with a constant residual stress level at 90% of the strength of the SFRC is adequate for numerically simulating the deformation behavior of beams up to the debonding of the CFRP sheets.

  15. Measurements of interface fracture properties of composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashkenazi, D.; Bank-Sills, L.; Travitzky, N.; Eliasi, R.

    1998-01-01

    In this investigation, interface Fracture properties are measured. To this end, glass/epoxy Brazilian disk specimens are studied. In order to calibrate the specimen, a numerical procedure is used. The finite element method is employed to derive stress intensity factors as a function of loading angle and crack length. By means of the weight friction method together with finite elements, a correction to the stress intensity factors for residual thermal stresses is obtained. These are combined to determine the critical interface energy release rate as a function of phase angle Tom the measured load and crack length at Fracture. A series of tests on a glass/epoxy material pair were carried out. It may be observed from the results that the residual thermal stresses resulting from the material mismatch greatly affect the interface toughness values

  16. Hydrogen release at metal-oxide interfaces: A first principle study of hydrogenated Al/SiO{sub 2} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jianqiu, E-mail: jianqiu@vt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Tea, Eric; Li, Guanchen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hin, Celine [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road-MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen release process at the Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface has been investigated. • A mathematical model that estimates the hydrogen release potential has been proposed. • Al atoms, Al−O bonds, and Si−Al bonds are the major hydrogen traps at the Al/SiO{sub 2} interface. • Hydrogen atoms are primarily release from Al−H and O−H bonds at the Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface. - Abstract: The Anode Hydrogen Release (AHR) mechanism at interfaces is responsible for the generation of defects, that traps charge carriers and can induce dielectric breakdown in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors. The AHR has been extensively studied at Si/SiO{sub 2} interfaces but its characteristics at metal-silica interfaces remain unclear. In this study, we performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to study the hydrogen release mechanism at the typical Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface. We found that interstitial hydrogen atoms can break interfacial Al−Si bonds, passivating a Si sp{sup 3} orbital. Interstitial hydrogen atoms can also break interfacial Al−O bonds, or be adsorbed at the interface on aluminum, forming stable Al−H−Al bridges. We showed that hydrogenated O−H, Si−H and Al−H bonds at the Al/SiO{sub 2} interfaces are polarized. The resulting bond dipole weakens the O−H and Si−H bonds, but strengthens the Al−H bond under the application of a positive bias at the metal gate. Our calculations indicate that Al−H bonds and O−H bonds are more important than Si−H bonds for the hydrogen release process.

  17. Atomistic Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Nicholas A.; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2016-05-01

    The Green-Kubo method was used to investigate the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature for epoxy/single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanocomposites. An epoxy network of DGEBA-DDS was built using the `dendrimer' growth approach, and conductivity was computed by taking into account long-range Coulombic forces via a k-space approach. Thermal conductivity was calculated in the direction perpendicular to, and along the SWNT axis for functionalized and pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposites. Inefficient phonon transport at the ends of nanotubes is an important factor in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites, and for this reason discontinuous nanotubes were modeled in addition to long nanotubes. The thermal conductivity of the long, pristine SWNT/epoxy system is equivalent to that of an isolated SWNT along its axis, but there was a 27% reduction perpendicular to the nanotube axis. The functionalized, long SWNT/epoxy system had a very large increase in thermal conductivity along the nanotube axis (~700%), as well as the directions perpendicular to the nanotube (64%). The discontinuous nanotubes displayed an increased thermal conductivity along the SWNT axis compared to neat epoxy (103-115% for the pristine SWNT/epoxy, and 91-103% for functionalized SWNT/epoxy system). The functionalized system also showed a 42% improvement perpendicular to the nanotube, while the pristine SWNT/epoxy system had no improvement over epoxy. The thermal conductivity tensor is averaged over all possible orientations to see the effects of randomly orientated nanotubes, and allow for experimental comparison. Excellent agreement is seen for the discontinuous, pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. These simulations demonstrate there exists a threshold of the SWNT length where the best improvement for a composite system with randomly oriented nanotubes would transition from pristine SWNTs to functionalized SWNTs.

  18. Transient and steady-state currents in epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillermin, Christophe; Rain, Pascal; Rowe, Stephen W

    2006-01-01

    Charging and discharging currents have been measured in a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy resin with and without silica fillers, below and above its glass transition temperature T g = 65 deg. C. Both transient and steady-state current densities have been analysed. The average applied fields ranged from 3 to 35 kV mm -1 with a sample thickness of 0.5 mm. Above T g , transient currents suggested a phenomenon of charge injection forming trapped space charges even at low fields. Steady-state currents confirmed that the behaviour was not Ohmic and suggested Schottky-type injection. Below T g , the current is not controlled by the metal-dielectric interface but by the conduction in the volume: the current is Ohmic at low fields and both transient and steady-state currents suggest a phenomenon of space-charge limited currents at high fields. The field threshold is similar in the filler-free and the filled resin. Values in the range 12-17 kV mm -1 have been measured

  19. Transient and steady-state currents in epoxy resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillermin, Christophe [Schneider Electric Industries S.A.S., 37 quai Paul-Louis Merlin, 38050 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rain, Pascal [Laboratoire d' Electrostatique et de Materiaux Dielectriques (LEMD), CNRS, 25 avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rowe, Stephen W [Schneider Electric Industries S.A.S., 37 quai Paul-Louis Merlin, 38050 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2006-02-07

    Charging and discharging currents have been measured in a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy resin with and without silica fillers, below and above its glass transition temperature T{sub g} = 65 deg. C. Both transient and steady-state current densities have been analysed. The average applied fields ranged from 3 to 35 kV mm{sup -1} with a sample thickness of 0.5 mm. Above T{sub g}, transient currents suggested a phenomenon of charge injection forming trapped space charges even at low fields. Steady-state currents confirmed that the behaviour was not Ohmic and suggested Schottky-type injection. Below T{sub g}, the current is not controlled by the metal-dielectric interface but by the conduction in the volume: the current is Ohmic at low fields and both transient and steady-state currents suggest a phenomenon of space-charge limited currents at high fields. The field threshold is similar in the filler-free and the filled resin. Values in the range 12-17 kV mm{sup -1} have been measured.

  20. Effect of nanoscale surface roughness on the bonding energy of direct-bonded silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, N.; Spearing, S. M.

    2003-11-01

    Direct wafer bonding of silicon wafers is a promising technology for manufacturing three-dimensional complex microelectromechanical systems as well as silicon-on-insulator substrates. Previous work has reported that the bond quality declines with increasing surface roughness, however, this relationship has not been quantified. This article explicitly correlates the bond quality, which is quantified by the apparent bonding energy, and the surface morphology via the bearing ratio, which describes the area of surface lying above a given depth. The apparent bonding energy is considered to be proportional to the real area of contact. The effective area of contact is defined as the area sufficiently close to contribute to the attractive force between the two bonding wafers. Experiments were conducted with silicon wafers whose surfaces were roughened by a buffered oxide etch solution (BOE, HF:NH4F=1:7) and/or a potassium hydroxide solution. The surface roughness was measured by atomic force microscopy. The wafers were direct bonded to polished "monitor" wafers following a standard RCA cleaning and the resulting bonding energy was measured by the crack-opening method. The experimental results revealed a clear correlation between the bonding energy and the bearing ratio. A bearing depth of ˜1.4 nm was found to be appropriate for the characterization of direct-bonded silicon at room temperature, which is consistent with the thickness of the water layer at the interface responsible for the hydrogen bonds that link the mating wafers.

  1. Interface failure by cavity growth to coalescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    For a thin metal layer between ceramics ductile failure by the growth of voids along one of the interfaces is studied numerically. An axisymmetric cell model is used to represent an array of uniformly distributed hemispherical interface voids. The bonding to the ceramics gives rise to highly cons...

  2. Mechanics of wafer bonding: Effect of clamping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. T.; Thouless, M. D.; Spearing, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    A mechanics-based model is developed to examine the effects of clamping during wafer bonding processes. The model provides closed-form expressions that relate the initial geometry and elastic properties of the wafers to the final shape of the bonded pair and the strain energy release rate at the interface for two different clamping configurations. The results demonstrate that the curvature of bonded pairs may be controlled through the use of specific clamping arrangements during the bonding process. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the strain energy release rate depends on the clamping configuration and that using applied loads usually leads to an undesirable increase in the strain energy release rate. The results are discussed in detail and implications for process development and bonding tool design are highlighted.

  3. Understanding Bonds - Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rimmer, Nina Røhr

    2016-01-01

    Undervisningsmateriale. A bond is a debt security, similar to an ”I Owe You document” (IOU). When you purchase a bond, you are lending money to a government, municipality, corporation, federal agency or other entity known as the issuer. In return for the loan, the issuer promises to pay you...... a specified rate of interest during the life of the bond and to repay the face value of the bond (the principal) when it “matures,” or comes due. Among the types of bonds you can choose from are: Government securities, municipal bonds, corporate bonds, mortgage and asset-backed securities, federal agency...... securities and foreign government bonds....

  4. Protection of MOS capacitors during anodic bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schjølberg-Henriksen, K.; Plaza, J. A.; Rafí, J. M.; Esteve, J.; Campabadal, F.; Santander, J.; Jensen, G. U.; Hanneborg, A.

    2002-07-01

    We have investigated the electrical damage by anodic bonding on CMOS-quality gate oxide and methods to prevent this damage. n-type and p-type MOS capacitors were characterized by quasi-static and high-frequency CV-curves before and after anodic bonding. Capacitors that were bonded to a Pyrex wafer with 10 μm deep cavities enclosing the capacitors exhibited increased leakage current and interface trap density after bonding. Two different methods were successful in protecting the capacitors from such damage. Our first approach was to increase the cavity depth from 10 μm to 50 μm, thus reducing the electric field across the gate oxide during bonding from approximately 2 × 105 V cm-1 to 4 × 104 V cm-1. The second protection method was to coat the inside of a 10 μm deep Pyrex glass cavity with aluminium, forming a Faraday cage that removed the electric field across the cavity during anodic bonding. Both methods resulted in capacitors with decreased interface trap density and unchanged leakage current after bonding. No change in effective oxide charge or mobile ion contamination was observed on any of the capacitors in the study.

  5. Effect of water absorption on the mechanical properties of nanoclay filled recycled cellulose fibre reinforced epoxy hybrid nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Alamri, H.; Low, I.M.

    2013-01-01

    . The addition of nanoclay slightly minimized the effect of moisture on the mechanical properties. SEM images showed that water absorption severely damaged the cellulose fibres and the bonding at fibres-matrix interfaces in wet composites. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd

  6. Pressure bonding molybdenum alloy (TZM) to reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffsmith, S.A.; Landingham, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Topping cycles could boost the energy efficiencies of a variety of systems by using what is now waste heat. One such topping cycle uses a ceramic helical expander and would require that a reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) rotor be bonded to a shaft of TZM (Mo-0.5 wt % Ti-0.08 wt % Zr). Coupon studies show that TZM can be bonded to RBSN at 1300 0 C and 69 MPa if there is an interlayer of MoSi 2 . A layer of finely ground (10 μm) MoSi 2 facilitates bond formation and provides a thicker bond interface. The hardness and grain structure of the TZM and RBSN were not affected by the temperature and pressure required to bond the coupons

  7. Realtime 3D stress measurement in curing epoxy packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Jacob; Hyldgård, A.; Birkelund, Karen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to characterize stress in microsystem packaging. A circular p-type piezoresistor is implemented on a (001) silicon chip. We use the circular stress sensor to determine the packaging induced stress in a polystyrene tube filled with epoxy. The epoxy curing process...

  8. Flexural Properties of Activated Carbon Filled Epoxy Nano composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, H.P.S.A.; Khalil, H.P.S.A.; Alothman, O.Y.; Paridah, M.T.; Zainudin, E.S.

    2014-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) filled epoxy nano composites obtained by mixing the desired amount of nano AC viz., bamboo stem, oil palm empty fruit bunch, and coconut shell from agricultural biomass with the epoxy resin. Flexural properties of activated carbons filled epoxy nano composites with 1 %, and 5 % filler loading were measured. In terms of flexural strength and modulus, a significant increment was observed with addition of 1 % vol and 5 % vol nano-activated carbon as compared to neat epoxy. The effect of activated carbon treated by two chemical agents (potassium hydroxide and phosphoric acid) on the flexural properties of epoxy nano composites were also investigated. Flexural strength of activated carbon-bamboo stem, activated carbon-oil palm, and activated carbon-coconut shell reinforced epoxy nano composites showed almost same value in case of 5 % potassium hydroxide activated carbon. Flexural strength of potassium hydroxide activated carbon-based epoxy nano composites was higher than phosphoric acid activated carbon. The flexural toughness of both the potassium hydroxide and phosphoric acid activated carbon reinforced composites range between 0.79 - 0.92 J. It attributed that developed activated carbon filled epoxy nano composites can be used in different applications. (author)

  9. Epoxy modified bitumen : Chemical hardening and its interpretation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolidis, P.; Pipintakos, G.; van de Ven, M.F.C.; Liu, X.; Erkens, Sandra; Scarpas, Athanasios

    2018-01-01

    Epoxy modified bitumen (EMB) is a promising technology for long lasting paving materials ensuring higher resistance to rutting, oxygen- and moisture-induced damage. In this paper, an analysis of the chemical reactions that take place during the chemical hardening process (curing) of epoxy modified

  10. Environmental Degradation and Durability of Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman P. Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This experimental investigation reports on the durability of epoxy-clay nanocomposites upon exposure to multiple environments. Nanocomposites are fabricated by mixing the clay particles using various combinations of mechanical mixing, high-shear dispersion, and ultrasonication. Clay morphology is characterized using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Specimens of both neat epoxy and the epoxy-clay nanocomposite are subjected to two environmental conditions: combined UV radiation and condensation on 3-hour repeat cycle and constant temperature-humidity, for a total exposure duration of 4770 hours. The presence of nanoscale clay inhibits moisture uptake, as demonstrated by exposure to constant temperature-humidity. Nonetheless, both materials lose mass under exposure to combined UV radiation and condensation due to the erosion of epoxy by a synergistic process. Surprisingly, the epoxy-clay specimens exhibit greater mass loss, as compared to neat epoxy. Mechanical testing shows that either environment does not significant affect the flexure modulus of either material. On the other hand, both materials undergo degradation in flexural strength when exposed to either environment. However, the epoxy-clay nanocomposite retains 37% more flexure strength than the neat epoxy after 4072 hours of exposure.

  11. Design and analysis of MEMS MWCNT / epoxy strain sensor using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gaurav Sapra

    2017-06-20

    Jun 20, 2017 ... In this paper, highly sensitive MEMS-based multi- walled (MWCNT)/epoxy strain sensor has been designed using ... This paper also discusses the process flow for fabricating MWCNT/epoxy thin film ... stone bridge, i.e., connected to the gold metal pad of the sensor. The change in resistance with respect to.

  12. Chemical changes and tensile and electrical properties of epoxy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The properties of epoxy rsesin can be improved by the use of nanofiller such as carbon black (CB), The nanocomposite was synthesized by dispersion via sonication and shear mixing. The morphology, surface chemistry and the structure of CB and the epoxy/CB nanocomposites were investigated using XPS, FTIR, FESEM, ...

  13. Environmental Degradation and Durability of Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.P.; Zunjarrao, S.C.; Pandey, G.; Khait, M.; Korach, C.S.

    2010-01-01

    This experimental investigation reports on the durability of epoxy-clay nanocomposites upon exposure to multiple environments. Nanocomposites are fabricated by mixing the clay particles using various combinations of mechanical mixing, high-shear dispersion, and ultrasonication. Clay morphology is characterized using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Specimens of both neat epoxy and the epoxy-clay nanocomposite are subjected to two environmental conditions: combined UV radiation and condensation on 3-hour repeat cycle and constant temperature-humidity, for a total exposure duration of 4770 hours. The presence of nanoscale clay inhibits moisture uptake, as demonstrated by exposure to constant temperature-humidity. Nonetheless, both materials lose mass under exposure to combined UV radiation and condensation due to the erosion of epoxy by a synergistic process. Surprisingly, the epoxy-clay specimens exhibit greater mass loss, as compared to neat epoxy. Mechanical testing shows that either environment does not significant affect the flexure modulus of either material. On the other hand, both materials undergo degradation in flexural strength when exposed to either environment. However, the epoxy-clay nanocomposite retains 37% more flexure strength than the neat epoxy after 4072 hours of exposure.

  14. UV irradiation improves the bond strength of resin cement to fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bo; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Jianfeng; Chen, Li; Li, Deli; Tan, Jianguo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the effect of UV irradiation on the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement. Twelve epoxy-based glass fiber posts were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (Cont.): No surface treatment. Group 2 (Low-UV): UV irradiation was conducted from a distance of 10 cm for 10 min. Group 3 (High-UV): UV irradiation was conducted from a distance of 1 cm for 3 min. A resin cement (CLEARFIL SA LUTING) was used for the post cementation to form resin slabs which contained fiber posts in the center. Microtensile bond strengths were tested and the mean bond strengths (MPa) were 18.81 for Cont. group, 23.65 for Low-UV group, 34.75 for High-UV group. UV irradiation had a significant effect on the bond strength (pUV irradiation demonstrates its capability to improve the bond strength between epoxy-based glass fiber posts and resin cement.

  15. Microstructure and bonding mechanism of Al/Ti bonded joint using Al-10Si-1Mg filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Woong H.; Bong, Ha H.; Hong, Soon H.

    2003-01-01

    The microstructures and liquid state diffusion bonding mechanism of cp-Ti to 1050 Al using an Al-10.0wt.%Si-1.0wt.%Mg filler metal with 100 μm in thickness have been investigated at 620 deg. C under 1x10 -4 Torr. The effects of bonding process parameters on microstructure of bonded joint have been analyzed by using an optical microscope, AES, scanning electron microscopy and EDS. The interfacial bond strength of Al/Ti bonded joints was measured by the single lap shear test. The results show that the bonding at the interface between Al and filler metal proceeds by wetting the Al with molten filler metal, and followed by removal of oxide layer on surface of Al. The interface between Al and filler metal moved during the isothermal solidification of filler metal by the diffusion of Si from filler metal into Al layer. The interface between Al and filler metal became curved in shape with increasing bonding time due to capillary force at grain boundaries. The bonding at the interface between Ti and filler metal proceeds by the formation of two different intermetallic compound layers, identified as Al 5 Si 12 Ti 7 and Al 12 Si 3 Ti 5 , followed by the growth of the intermetallic compound layers. The interfacial bond strength at Al/Ti joint increased with increasing bonding time up to 25 min at 620 deg. C. However, the interfacial bond strength of Al/Ti joint decreased after bonding time of 25 min at 620 deg. C due to formation of cavities in Al near Al/intermetallic interfaces

  16. Space charge dynamic of irradiated cyanate ester/epoxy at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaohe; Tu, Youping; Fan, Linzhen; Yi, Chengqian; Wu, Zhixiong; Li, Laifeng

    2018-03-01

    Glass fibre reinforced polymers (GFRPs) have been widely used as one of the main electrical insulating structures for superconducting magnets. A new type of GFRP insulation material using cyanate ester/epoxy resin as a matrix was developed in this study, and the samples were irradiated by Co-60 for 1 MGy and 5 MGy dose. Space charge distributed within the sample were tested using the pulsed electroacoustic method, and charge concentration was found at the interfaces between glass fibre and epoxy resin. Thermally stimulated current (TSC) and dc conduction current were also tested to evaluate the irradiation effect. It was supposed that charge mobility and density were suppressed at the beginning due to the crosslinking reaction, and for a higher irradiation dose, molecular chain degradation dominated and led to more sever space charge accumulation at interfaces which enhance the internal electric field higher than the external field, and transition field for conduction current was also decreased by irradiation. Space charge dynamic at cryogenic temperature was revealed by conduction current and TSC, and space charge injection was observed for the irradiated samples at 225 K, which was more obvious for the irradiated samples.

  17. Organic interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelman, W.A.; Tempelman, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the consequences for product designers resulting from the replacement of traditional interfaces by responsive materials. Part 1 presents a theoretical framework regarding a new paradigm for man-machine interfacing. Part 2 provides an analysis of the opportunities offered by new

  18. Interface Realisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pold, Søren

    2005-01-01

    This article argues for seeing the interface as an important representational and aesthetic form with implications for postmodern culture and digital aesthetics. The interface emphasizes realism due in part to the desire for transparency in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and partly...

  19. Impact of ultrasonic assisted triangular lattice like arranged dispersion of nanoparticles on physical and mechanical properties of epoxy-TiO2 nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyat, M S; Ghosh, P K

    2018-04-01

    Emerging ex-situ technique, ultrasonic dual mixing (UDM) offers unique and hitherto unapproachable opportunities to alter the physical and mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites. In this study, triangular lattice-like arranged dispersion of TiO 2 nanoparticles (average size ∼ 48 nm) in the epoxy polymer has been attained via concurrent use of a probe ultra-sonicator and 4 blades pitched impeller which collectively named as UDM technique. The UDM processing of neat epoxy reveals the generation of triangular lattice-like arranged nanocavities with nanoscale inter-cavity spacing. The UDM processing of epoxy-TiO 2 nanocomposites reveals two unique features such as partial and complete entrapping of the nanoparticles by the nanocavities leading the arranged dispersion of particles in the epoxy matrix. Pristine TiO 2 nanoparticles were dispersed in the epoxy polymer at loading fractions of up to 20% by weight. The results display that the arranged dispersion of nanoparticles is very effective at enhancing the glass transition temperature (T g ) and tensile properties of the epoxy at loading fractions of 10 wt%. We quantify a direct relationship among three important parameters such as nanoparticle content, cluster size, and inter-particle spacing. Our results offer a novel understanding of these parameters on the T g and tensile properties of the epoxy nanocomposites. The tensile fracture surfaces revealed several toughening mechanisms such as particle pull-out, plastic void growth, crack deflection, crack bridging and plastic deformation. We show that a strong nanoparticle-matrix interface led to the enhanced mechanical properties due to leading toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, plastic deformation and particle pull-out. We showed that the UDM has an inordinate prospective to alter the dispersion state of nanoparticles in viscous polymer matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Study on Tensile Properties of Nanoreinforced Epoxy Polymer: Macroscopic Experiments and Nanoscale FEM Simulation Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenqing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of nanosilica contents on mechanical properties of the epoxy matrix with some nanoparticle aggregations was studied in macroscopic experiments and nanoscale simulation, particularly with regard to the effective modulus and ultimate stress. Three analytical models were used to obtain the effective elastic modulus of nanoparticle-reinforced composites. Based on Monte-Carlo method, the special program for the automatic generation of 2D random distribution particles without overlapping was developed for nanocomposite modeling. Weight fractions of nanoparticles were converted to volume fractions, in order to coordinate the content unit in the simulation. In numerical analysis, the weak interface strengthening and toughening mechanism was adopted. Virtual crack closure technique (VCCT and extended finite element method (XFEM were used to simulate phenomena of nanoparticle debonding and matrix crack growth. Experimental and simulation results show a good agreement with each other. By way of simulation, the weak interface toughening and strengthening mechanism of nanocomposites is confirmed.

  1. Comparisons of NDT Methods to Inspect Cork and Cork filled Epoxy Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingbloom, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Sheet cork and cork filled epoxy provide external insulation for the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) on the Nation's Space Transportation System (STS). Interest in the reliability of the external insulation bonds has increased since the Columbia incident. A non-destructive test (NDT) method that will provide the best inspection for these bonds has been under evaluation. Electronic Shearography has been selected as the primary NDT method for inspection of these bond lines in the RSRM production flow. ATK Launch Systems Group has purchased an electronic shearography system that includes a vacuum chamber that is used for evaluation of test parts and custom vacuum windows for inspection of full-scale motors. Although the electronic shearography technology has been selected as the primary method for inspection of the external bonds, other technologies that exist continue to be investigated. The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) NDT department has inspected several samples for comparison with electronic shearography with various inspections systems in their laboratory. The systems that were evaluated are X-ray backscatter, terahertz imaging, and microwave imaging. The samples tested have some programmed flaws as well as some flaws that occurred naturally during the sample making process. These samples provide sufficient flaw variation for the evaluation of the different inspection systems. This paper will describe and compare the basic functionality, test method and test results including dissection for each inspection technology.

  2. Improving adhesion of copper/epoxy joints by pulsed laser ablation

    KAUST Repository

    Hernandez, Edwin

    2015-10-19

    The purpose of the present work is to analyze the effect of pulsed laser ablation on copper substrates (CuZn40) deployed for adhesive bonding. Surface pre-treatment was carried using an Yb-fiber laser beam. Treated surfaces were probed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The mechanical performance of CuZn40/epoxy bonded joints was assessed using the T-peel test coupon. In order to resolve the mechanisms of failure and adhesive penetration within surface asperities induced by the laser treatment, fracture surfaces were surveyed using SEM. Finite element simulations, based on the use of the cohesive zone model of fracture, were carried out to evaluate the variation of bond toughness. Results indicated that the laser ablation process effectively modifies surface morphology and chemistry and enables enhanced mechanical interlocking and cohesive failure within the adhesive layer. Remarkable improvements of apparent peel energy and bond toughness were observed with respect to control samples with sanded substrates.

  3. Improving adhesion of copper/epoxy joints by pulsed laser ablation

    KAUST Repository

    Hernandez, Edwin; Alfano, Marco; Lubineau, Gilles; Buttner, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to analyze the effect of pulsed laser ablation on copper substrates (CuZn40) deployed for adhesive bonding. Surface pre-treatment was carried using an Yb-fiber laser beam. Treated surfaces were probed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The mechanical performance of CuZn40/epoxy bonded joints was assessed using the T-peel test coupon. In order to resolve the mechanisms of failure and adhesive penetration within surface asperities induced by the laser treatment, fracture surfaces were surveyed using SEM. Finite element simulations, based on the use of the cohesive zone model of fracture, were carried out to evaluate the variation of bond toughness. Results indicated that the laser ablation process effectively modifies surface morphology and chemistry and enables enhanced mechanical interlocking and cohesive failure within the adhesive layer. Remarkable improvements of apparent peel energy and bond toughness were observed with respect to control samples with sanded substrates.

  4. The Effect of an Active Diluent on the Properties of Epoxy Resin and Unidirectional Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodilov, V. I.; Gorbatkina, Y. A.; Kuperman, A. M.

    2003-11-01

    The influence of an active diluent on the properties of an epoxy matrix and carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) is investigated. The physicomechanical properties of an ED-20 epoxy resin modified with diglycidyl ether of diethylene glycol (DEG-1), the adhesion strength at the epoxy matrix-steel wire interface, and the mechanical properties of unidirectional CFRP are determined. The concentration of DEG-1 was varied from 0 to 50 wt.%. The properties of the matrix, the interface, and the composites are compared. It is stated that the matrix strength affects the strength of unidirectional CFRP in bending and not their strength in tension, compression, and shear. The latter fact seems somewhat unexpected. The interlaminar fracture toughness of the composites investigated correlates with the ultimate elongation of the binder. A comparison between the concentration dependences of adhesion strength and the strength of CFRP shows that the matrices utilized provide such a high interfacial strength that the strength of CFRP no longer depends on the adhesion of its constituents.

  5. Epoxy Crosslinked Silica Aerogels (X-Aerogels)

    Science.gov (United States)

    fabrizio, Eve; Ilhan, Faysal; Meador, Mary Ann; Johnston, Chris; Leventis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    NASA is interested in the development of strong lightweight materials for the dual role of thermal insulator and structural component for space vehicles; freeing more weight for useful payloads. Aerogels are very-low density materials (0.010 to 0.5 g/cc) that, due to high porosity (meso- and microporosity), can be, depending on the chemical nature of the network, ideal thermal insulators (thermal conductivity approx. 15 mW/mK). However, aerogels are extremely fragile. For practical application of aerogels, one must increase strength without compromising the physical properties attributed to low density. This has been achieved by templated growth of an epoxy polymer layer that crosslinks the "pearl necklace" network of nanoparticles: the framework of a typical silica aerogel. The requirement for conformal accumulation of the epoxy crosslinker is reaction both with the surface of silica and with itself. After cross-linking, the strength of a typical aerogel monolith increases by a factor of 200, in the expense of only a 2-fold increase in density. Strength is increased further by coupling residual unreacted epoxides with diamine.

  6. Extremely low temperature properties of epoxy GFRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadotani, Kenzo; Nagai, Matao; Aki, Fumitake.

    1983-01-01

    The examination of fiber-reinforced plastics, that is, plastics such as epoxy, polyester and polyimide reinforced with high strength fibers such as glass, carbon, boron and steel, for extremely low temperature use began from the fuel tanks of rockets. Therafter, the trial manufacture of superconducting generators and extremely low temperature transformers and the manufacture of superconducting magnets for nuclear fusion experimental setups became active, and high performance FRPs have been adopted, of which the extremely low temperature properties have been sufficiently grasped. Recently, the cryostats made of FRPs have been developed, fully utilizing such features of FRPs as high strength, high rigidity, non-magnetic material, insulation, low heat conductivity, light weight and the freedom of molding. In this paper, the mechanical properties at extremely low temperature of the plastic composite materials used as insulators and structural materials for extremely low temperature superconducting equipment is outlined, and in particular, glass fiber-reinforced epoxy laminates are described somewhat in detail. The fracture strain of GFRP at extremely low temperature is about 1.3 times as large as that at room temperature, but at extremely low temperature, clear cracking occurred at 40% of the fracture strain. The linear thermal contraction of GFRP showed remarkable anisotropy. (Kako, I.)

  7. Comparison of structural health assessment capabilities in epoxy – carbon black and epoxy – carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Inam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for comparing structural health of different types of brittle epoxy nanocomposites filled with carbon nanostructured fillers is presented. Epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon black (CB and epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon nanotube (CNT nanocomposite bars were prepared by calendering and thermal curing. Nanocomposite bars were subjected to Vickers diamond indentation to produce sub-surface damage. Electrical conductivities were analysed by 4-point method to estimate the structural damage caused by indentation. For comprehensive comparison, fracture toughness and percolation threshold were analysed as well. Because of the systematically induced indentation damage, a sharp decrease of 89% was observed in the electrical conductivity of epoxy – CNT nanocomposite as compared to 25% in the electrical conductivity of epoxy – CB nanocomposite. CNTs impart superior damage sensing capability in brittle nanocomposite structures, in comparison to CB, due to their high aspect ratio (fibrous nature and high electrical conductivity.

  8. Bonding techniques for flexural strengthening of R.C. beams using CFRP laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Morsy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of an alternative method of attaching FRP laminates to reinforced concrete beams by the way of fasting steel rivets through the FRP laminate and concrete substrate. Five full scale R.C. beams were casted and strengthened in flexural using FRP laminate bonded with conventional epoxy and compared with other beams strengthened with FRP laminate and bonded with fastener “steel rivets” of 50 mm length and 10 mm diameter. Based on experimental evidence the beam strengthened with conventional bonding methods failed due to de-bonding with about 13% increase over the un-strengthened beam. On the other hand, the beams strengthened with FRP laminate and bonded by four steel fastener rivets only failed by de-bonding also but at higher flexural capacity with increase 19% over the un-strengthened beam.

  9. Effects of water on mortar-brick bond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, C.J.W.P.

    1995-01-01

    The quality of bond in masonry is, to a large extent, a function of the (i) the hydration conditions and (ii) the mortar composition of the mortar-brick interface. For insight into the effects of these parameters on bond performance it is essential to dispose of quantitative information about water

  10. Microprocessor interfacing

    CERN Document Server

    Vears, R E

    2014-01-01

    Microprocessor Interfacing provides the coverage of the Business and Technician Education Council level NIII unit in Microprocessor Interfacing (syllabus U86/335). Composed of seven chapters, the book explains the foundation in microprocessor interfacing techniques in hardware and software that can be used for problem identification and solving. The book focuses on the 6502, Z80, and 6800/02 microprocessor families. The technique starts with signal conditioning, filtering, and cleaning before the signal can be processed. The signal conversion, from analog to digital or vice versa, is expl

  11. Bonding silicon nitride using glass-ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobedoe, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon nitride has been successfully bonded to itself using magnesium-aluminosilicate glass and glass-ceramic. For some samples, bonding was achieved using a diffusion bonder, but in other instances, following an initial degassing hold, higher temperatures were used in a nitrogen atmosphere with no applied load. For diffusion bonding, a small applied pressure at a temperature below which crystallisation occurs resulted in intimate contact. At slightly higher temperatures, the extent of the reaction at the interface and the microstructure of the glass-ceramic joint was highly sensitive to the bonding temperature. Bonding in a nitrogen atmosphere resulted in a solution-reprecipitation reaction. A thin layer of glass produced a ''dry'', glass-free joint, whilst a thicker layer resulted in a continuous glassy join across the interface. The chromium silicide impurities within the silicon nitride react with the nucleating agent in the glass ceramic, which may lead to difficulty in producing a fine glass-ceramic microstructure. Slightly lower temperatures in nitrogen resulted in a polycrystalline join but the interfacial contact was poor. It is hoped that one of the bonds produced may be developed to eventually form part of a graded joint between silicon nitride and a high temperature nickel alloy. (orig.)

  12. Facilitation of Nanoscale Thermal Transport by Hydrogen Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Thermal transport performance at the nanoscale and/or of biomaterials is essential to the success of many new technologies including nanoelectronics, biomedical devices, and various nanocomposites. Due to complicated microstructures and chemical bonding, thermal transport process in these materials has not been well understood yet. In terms of chemical bonding, it is well known that the strength of atomic bonding can significantly affect thermal transport across materials or across interfaces...

  13. Epoxy Adhesives for Stator Magnet Assembly in Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, George M.

    2004-01-01

    As NASA seeks to fulfill its goals of exploration and understanding through missions planned to visit the moons of Saturn and beyond, a number of challenges arise from the idea of deep space flight. One of the first problems associated with deep space travel is electrical power production for systems on the spacecraft. Conventional methods such as solar power are not practical because efficiency decreases substantially as the craft moves away from the Sun. The criterion for power generation during deep space missions are very specific, the main points requiring high reliability, low mass, minimal vibration and a long lifespan. A Stirling generator, although fairly old in concept, is considered to be a potential solution for electrical power generation for deep space flight. A Stirling generator works on the same electromagnetic principles of a standard generator, using the linear motion of the alternator through the stationary stator which produces electric induction. The motion of the alternator, however, is produced by the heating and cooling dynamics of pressurized gases. Essentially heating one end and cooling another of a contained gas will cause a periodic expansion and compression of the gas from one side to the other, which a displacer translates into linear mechanical motion. NASA needs to confirm that the materials used in the generator will be able to withstand the rigors of space and the life expectancy of the mission. I am working on the verification of the epoxy adhesives used to bond magnets to the steel lamination stack to complete the stator; in terms of in-service performance and durability under various space environments. Understanding the proper curing conditions, high temperature properties, and degassing problems as well as production difficulties are crucial to the long term success of the generator. system and steel substrate used in the stator. To optimize the curing conditions of the epoxies, modulated differential scanning calorimetry

  14. Hybrid FSWeld-bonded joint fatigue behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertora, Enrico; Mandolfino, Chiara; Gambaro, Carla; Pizzorni, Marco

    2018-05-01

    Aluminium alloys, widely used in aeronautics, are increasingly involved in the automotive industry due to the good relationship between mechanical strength and specific weight. The lightening of the structures is the first objective, which allows the decreasing in the weight in motion. The use of aluminium alloys has also seen the introduction of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) technique for the production of structural overlapping joints. FSW allows us to weld overlap joints free from defects, but with the presence of a structural notch further aggravated by the presence of a "hook" defect near the edge of the weld. Furthermore, FSW presents a weld penetration area connected to the tool geometry and penetration. The experimental activity will be focused on the combination of two different joining techniques, which can synergistically improve the final joint resistance. In particular, the welding and bonding process most commonly known as weld-bonding is defined as a hybrid process, as it combines two different junction processes. In this paper we analyse FSWelded AA6082 aluminium alloy overlapped joint with the aim of quantitatively evaluating the improvement provided by the presence of an epoxy adhesive between the plates. After optimising the weld-bonding process, the mechanical behaviour of welded joints will be analysed by static and dynamic tests. The presence of the adhesive should limit the negative effect of the structural notch inevitable in a FSW overlapped joint.

  15. The failure mode of natural silk epoxy triggered composite tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshkour, R A; Ariffin, A K; Zulkifli, R; Sulong, A B; Azhari, C H

    2012-01-01

    In this study the quasi static compression test over natural silk epoxy triggered composite tubes has been carried out, the natural silk epoxy composite tubes consist of 24 layer of woven natural silk as reinforcement and thermoset epoxy resin as matrix which both of them i e natural silk and epoxy have excellent mechanical properties More over the natural silk have better moisture resistance in comparison with other natural reinforcements, the length of tubes are 50, 80 and 120 mm The natural silk epoxy composite tubes are associated with an external trigger which includes 4 steel pieces welded on downside flat plate fixture The hand lay up fabrication method has been used to make the natural silk epoxy composite tubes Instron universal testing machine with 250 KN load capacity has been employed to accomplish this investigation The failure modes of natural silk epoxy triggered composite tubes has been investigated by representative photographs which has been taken by a high resolution camera(12 2 Mp) during the quasi static compression test, from the photographs is observed the failure modes is progressive local buckling

  16. Enhancement of mechanical properties of epoxy/graphene nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanuddin, N. I. C.; Zaman, I.; Rozlan, S. A. M.; Karim, M. A. A.; Manshoor, B.; Khalid, A.; Chan, S. W.; Meng, Q.

    2017-10-01

    Graphene is a novel class of nanofillers possessing outstanding characteristics including most compatible with most polymers, high absolute strength, high aspect ratio and cost effectiveness. In this study, graphene was used to reinforce epoxy as a matrix, to enhance its mechanical properties. Two types of epoxy composite were developed which are epoxy/graphene nanocomposite and epoxy/modified graphene nanocomposite. The fabrication of graphene was going through thermal expansion and sonication process. Chemical modification was only done for modified graphene where 4,4’-Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) is used. The mechanical properties of both nanocomposite, such as Young’s modulus and maximum stress were investigated. Three weight percentage were used for this study which are 0.5 wt%, 1.0 wt% and 1.5 wt%. At 0.5 wt%, modified and unmodified shows the highest value compared to neat epoxy, where the value were 8 GPa, 6 GPa and 0.675 GPa, respectively. For maximum stress, neat epoxy showed the best result compared to both nanocomposite due to the changes of material properties when adding the filler into the matrix. Therefore, both nanocomposite increase the mechanical properties of the epoxy, however modification surface of graphene gives better improvement.

  17. Predicting the mechanical behaviour of Kevlar/epoxy and carbon/epoxy filament-wound tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazeneuve, C.; Joguet, P.; Maile, J. C.; Oytana, C.

    1992-11-01

    The axial, hoop and shear moduli and failure conditions of carbon/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy filament-wound tubes have been determined through respective applications of internal pressure, tension and torsion. The introduction in the laminated plate theory of a gradual reduction in individual moduli makes it possible to overcome the limitations of the theory and enables accurate predictions to be made of the linear and non-linear stress/strain curves of 90 deg +/- 0/90 deg tubes. The existence of a dominant layer in the failure of the multilayered tubes has been shown experimentally. When associated with a failure criterion applied to the dominant layer, the new model permits the prediction of tube failure. Agreement between calculated and experimental data is better than 5 percent.

  18. A novel fabrication of a high performance SiO(2)-graphene oxide (GO) nanohybrids: Characterization of thermal properties of epoxy nanocomposites filled with SiO(2)-GO nanohybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeri, S Z; Ramezanzadeh, B; Asghari, M

    2017-05-01

    In this study it has been aimed to enhance the thermal resistance of epoxy coating through incorporation of SiO 2 -GO nanohybrids. SiO 2 -GO nanohybrids were synthesized through one-step sol-gel route using a mixture of Tetraethylorthosilane (TEOS) and 3-Aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) silanes. The SiO 2 -GO nanohybrids were prepared at various hydrolysis times of 24, 48 and 72h. Then 0.2wt.% of GO and SiO 2 -GO nanohybrids were separately incorporated into the epoxy coating. Results revealed that amino functionalized SiO 2 nanoparticles with particle size around 20-30nm successfully synthesized on the basal plane of GO. Results showed significant improvement of dispersion and interfacial interactions between nanohybrids and epoxy composite arising from covalent bonding between the SiO 2 -GO and the epoxy matrix. It was found that the thermal resistance of SiO 2 -GO nanohybrids and SiO 2 -GO/Epoxy nanocomposite was noticeably higher than GO and epoxy matrix, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interface Anywhere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current paradigms for crew interfaces to the systems that require control are constrained by decades old technologies which require the crew to be physically near an...

  20. Mobility restrictions and glass transition behaviour of an epoxy resin under confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemour, A; Sanctuary, R; Baller, J

    2015-04-07

    Confinement can have a big influence on the dynamics of glass formers in the vicinity of the glass transition. Already 40 to 50 K above the glass transition temperature, thermal equilibration of glass formers can be strongly influenced by the confining substrate. We investigate the linear thermal expansion and the specific heat capacity cp of an epoxy resin (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A, DGEBA) in a temperature interval of 120 K around the glass transition temperature. The epoxy resin is filled into controlled pore glasses with pore diameters between 4 and 111 nm. Since DGEBA can form H-bonds with silica surfaces, we also investigate the influence of surface silanization of the porous substrates. In untreated substrates a core/shell structure of the epoxy resin can be identified. The glass transition behaviours of the bulk phase and that of the shell phase are different. In silanized substrates, the shell phase disappears. At a temperature well above the glass transition, a second transition is found for the bulk phase - both in the linear expansion data as well as in the specific heat capacity. The cp data do not allow excluding the glass transition of a third phase as being the cause for this transition, whereas the linear expansion data do so. The additional transition temperature is interpreted as a separation between two regimes: above this temperature, macroscopic flow of the bulk phase inside the porous structure is possible to balance the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between DGEBA and the substrate. Below the transition temperature, this degree of freedom is hindered by geometrical constraints of the porous substrates. Moreover, this second transition could also be found in the linear expansion data of the shell phase.