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Sample records for epilobium angustifolium onagraceae

  1. Phytochemistry, pharmacology and traditional uses of different Epilobium species (Onagraceae): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granica, Sebastian; Piwowarski, Jakub P; Czerwińska, Monika E; Kiss, Anna K

    2014-10-28

    The Epilobium genus (willowherb) comprises of ca. 200 species of herbaceous plants distributed around the world. Infusions prepared form willowherbs have been traditionally used externally in skin and mucosa infections and in the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Nowadays extracts from different Epilobium species are widely used by patients, however the lack of clinical studies does not allow to fully establish their efficacy. The present review summarizes published data on phytochemistry, ethnopharmacological use and pharmacological studies concerning willowherb species investigated throughout past few decades. Literature survey was performed using Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science and Reaxys databases looking for papers and patents focused on chemical composition and bioactivity of Epilobium species. Systematic research in ethnopharmacological literature in digitalized sources of academic libraries was also carried out. The chemical composition of different Epilobium species and their bioactivities are described. The detailed information on constituents isolated and detected by chromatographic methods is given. The studies show that polyphenols are main compounds occurring in Epilobium herb among which flavonoids, phenolic acids and tannins (oenothein B and oenothein A) are dominating constituents. The extracts and some isolated compounds from Epilobium sp. were shown to possess antimicrobial, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antioxidative activities. Because many studies suggest that oenothein B as dominating constituent may be responsible for Epilobium sp. pharmacological effects, its documented bioactivities were also described. The pharmacological studies performed on Epilobium justify the traditional use of this species in external and in gastrointestinal inflammations. As far as the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is considered, in the literature, there are some reports indicating that Epilobium extracts have a

  2. Epilobium angustifolium extract demonstrates multiple effects on dermal fibroblasts in vitro and skin photo-protection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszová, Ema; Cheel, José; Pávek, Stanislav; Moravcová, Martina; Hermannová, Martina; Matějková, Ilona; Spilková, Jiřina; Velebný, Vladimír; Kubala, Lukáš

    2013-09-01

    Stress-induced fibroblast senescence is thought to contribute to skin aging. Ultraviolet light (UV) radiation is the most potent environmental risk factor in these processes. An Epilobium angustifolium (EA) extract was evaluated for its capacity to reverse the senescent response of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) in vitro and to exhibit skin photo-protection in vivo. The HPLC-UV-MS analysis of the EA preparation identified three major polyphenol groups: tannins (oenothein B), phenolic acids (gallic and chlorogenic acids) and flavonoids. EA extract increased the cell viability of senescent NHDF induced by serum deprivation. It diminished connective tissue growth factor and fibronectin gene expressions in senescent NHDF. Down-regulation of the UV-induced release of both matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -3 and the tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 and -2, and also down-regulation of the gene expression of hyaluronidase 2 were observed in repeatedly UV-irradiated NHDF after EA extract treatment. Interestingly, EA extract diminished the down-regulation of sirtuin 1 dampened by UV-irradiation. The application of EA extract using a sub-irritating dose protected skin against UV-induced erythema formation in vivo. In summary, EA extract diminished stress-induced effects on NHDF, particularly on connective tissue growth factor, fibronectin and matrix metalloproteinases. These results collectively suggest that EA extract may possess anti-aging properties and that the EA polyphenols might account for these benefits.

  3. Establishment growth and bud bank formation in Epilobium angustifolium: the effects of nutrient availability, plant injury and environmental heterogeneity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Jitka; Pokorná, Adéla; Klimeš, Leoš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 2 (2009), s. 195-201 ISSN 1916-2790 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/06/0723 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : potential bud bank * adventitious root-sprouting * juvenile plant Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.904, year: 2009

  4. Epilobium angustifolium extract demonstrates multiple effects on dermal fibroblasts in vitro and skin photo-protection in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruszová, E.; Cheep, J.; Pavek, S.; Moravcová, M.; Hermanová, M.; Matějková, I.; Spilková, J.; Velebný, V.; Kubala, Lukáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 3 (2013), s. 347-359 ISSN 0231-5882 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.100/02/0123 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : CELL-PROLIFERATION * OXIDATIVE-STRESS * ANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.875, year: 2013

  5. Identification of herbarium whole-leaf samples of Epilobium species by ATR-IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strgulc Krajsek, Simona; Buh, Primoz; Zega, Anamarija; Kreft, Samo

    2008-02-01

    A simple, high-accuracy FT-IR method based on attenuated total reflection (ATR) was developed for the rapid determination of leaf samples of Epilobium species. The method is superior to other analytical techniques, since there is no need of laborious sample preparation such as grinding or extraction and solvent removal. A total of 70 herbarium specimens, belonging to all 13 Epilobium and to 2 Chamerion species growing in Slovenia, were analyzed. With the 100 most-informative wavenumbers in the range 700-1800 cm(-1), we obtained over 90% accuracy of species identification, with discriminant multivariate statistical analysis on the measurements made on whole dried leaves.

  6. Salmonella spp. dynamics in wild blueberry, Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton

    Science.gov (United States)

    A six-year field study was conducted in the two major wild, or lowbush, blueberry growing regions in Maine, Midcoast and Downeast. This study used data from two cropping cycles (four years) to model the dynamics of Salmonella spp. prevalence in wild blueberry fields (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton). ...

  7. In vitro anti-Leishmania infantum activity of essential oil from Piper angustifolium

    OpenAIRE

    Bosquiroli, Lauriane S.S.; Demarque, Daniel P.; Rizk, Yasmin S.; Cunha, Marillin C.; Marques, Maria Carolina S.; Matos, Maria de Fátima C.; Kadri, Mônica C.T.; Carollo, Carlos A.; Arruda, Carla C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Piper angustifolium Lam., Piperaceae, popularly known as "matito", "pimenta-de-macaco", "pimenta-longa" or "jagurandi" in Brazil, has been commonly used in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis-associated lesions, but there are few studies on the activity against visceral leishmaniasis-associated species. This study demonstrates the first in vitro antileishmanial activity of the P. angustifolium essential oil, of which the phytochemical profile showed the presence of sesquiterpene...

  8. In vitro anti-Leishmania infantum activity of essential oil from Piper angustifolium

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    Lauriane S.S. Bosquiroli

    Full Text Available Abstract Piper angustifolium Lam., Piperaceae, popularly known as "matito", "pimenta-de-macaco", "pimenta-longa" or "jagurandi" in Brazil, has been commonly used in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis-associated lesions, but there are few studies on the activity against visceral leishmaniasis-associated species. This study demonstrates the first in vitro antileishmanial activity of the P. angustifolium essential oil, of which the phytochemical profile showed the presence of sesquiterpenes and monoterpenes. The main compounds were spathulenol (23.8% and caryophyllene oxide (13.1%. P. angustifolium essential oil was highly active [the half maximum inhibitory concentration = 1.43 μg/ml] against intracellular amastigotes of Leishmania infantum, the etiological agent of visceral leishmaniasis in the New and Old World. Activity was obtained 24 h after addition of the oil (6.25–50 μg/ml, with a reduction of 100% in the infection index at concentrations of 25 and 50 μg/ml. P. angustifolium essential oil showed low cytotoxicity for mammalian fibroblasts and macrophages (the half maximum inhibitory concentration values of 31.67 and 48.22 μg/ml, respectively, and it was 33 and 22 times more toxic to amastigotes than to mammalian cells, as indicated by selectivity indexes. The results demonstrated that P. angustifolium essential oil is a promising alternative for the study of potential drugs for visceral leishmaniasis.

  9. Taxonomic changes in Oenothera sections Gaura and Calylophus (Onagraceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner,Warren; Krakos,Kyra; Hoch,Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The long-recognized genus Gaura was shown recently to be deeply nested within one of two major clades of Oenothera. New molecular data indicate further taxonomic changes are necessary in Oenothera sect. Gaura. We make these changes here, including three new combinations, in advance of the Onagraceae treatment for the Flora of North America. The new phylogenetic studies show that several pairs of taxa treated as subspecies in the most recent revision by Raven and Gregory (1972) had in...

  10. Effect of pine-bark mulch on lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) water demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) growers seeking an alternative and/or a complement to supplemental irrigation require accurate crop-specific information on the water conserving benefits of mulch. Twenty-eight weighing lysimeters equipped with soil moisture monitors were used at 5 sites ...

  11. Taxonomic changes in Oenothera sections Gaura and Calylophus (Onagraceae

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    Warren Wagner

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The long-recognized genus Gaura was shown recently to be deeply nested within one of two major clades of Oenothera. New molecular data indicate further taxonomic changes are necessary in Oenothera sect. Gaura. We make these changes here, including three new combinations, in advance of the Onagraceae treatment for the Flora of North America. The new phylogenetic studies show that several pairs of taxa treated as subspecies in the most recent revision by Raven and Gregory (1972 had independent origins within sect. Gaura, and are here elevated to species level (Oenothera nealleyi for Gaura suffulta subsp. nealleyi; Oenothera dodgeniana for Gaura neomexicana subsp. neomexicana; and Oenothera podocarpa for Gaura hexandra subsp. gracilis. Also, a nomenclatural problem in Oenothera sect. Calylophus is corrected by adopting the name Oenothera capillifolia Scheele for the species known previously, and nomenclaturally correct, as Calylophus berlandieri Spach. This problem necessitates a new combination Oenothera capillifolia subsp. berlandieri.

  12. Microsatellites for Oenothera gayleana and O. hartwegii subsp. filifolia (Onagraceae), and their utility in section Calylophus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Emily M; Fant, Jeremie B; Moore, Michael J; Hastings, Amy P; Larson, Erica L; Agrawal, Anurag A; Skogen, Krissa A

    2016-02-01

    Eleven nuclear and four plastid microsatellite markers were screened for two gypsum endemic species, Oenothera gayleana and O. hartwegii subsp. filifolia, and tested for cross-amplification in the remaining 11 taxa within Oenothera sect. Calylophus (Onagraceae). Microsatellite markers were tested in two to three populations spanning the ranges of both O. gayleana and O. hartwegii subsp. filifolia. The nuclear microsatellite loci consisted of both di- and trinucleotide repeats with one to 17 alleles per population. Several loci showed significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, which may be evidence of chromosomal rings. The plastid microsatellite markers identified one to seven haplotypes per population. The transferability of these markers was confirmed in all 11 taxa within Oenothera sect. Calylophus. The microsatellite loci characterized here are the first developed and tested in Oenothera sect. Calylophus. These markers will be used to assess whether pollinator foraging distance influences population genetic parameters in predictable ways.

  13. Taxonomic changes in Oenothera sections Gaura and Calylophus (Onagraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Warren L; Krakos, Kyra N; Hoch, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    The long-recognized genus Gaura was shown recently to be deeply nested within one of two major clades of Oenothera. New molecular data indicate further taxonomic changes are necessary in Oenothera sect. Gaura. We make these changes here, including three new combinations, in advance of the Onagraceae treatment for the Flora of North America. The new phylogenetic studies show that several pairs of taxa treated as subspecies in the most recent revision by Raven and Gregory (1972) had independent origins within sect. Gaura, and are here elevated to species level (Oenothera nealleyi for Gaura suffulta subsp. nealleyi; Oenothera dodgeniana for Gaura neomexicana subsp. neomexicana; and Oenothera podocarpa for Gaura hexandra subsp. gracilis). Also, a nomenclatural problem in Oenothera sect. Calylophus is corrected by adopting the name Oenothera capillifolia Scheele for the species known previously, and nomenclaturally correct, as Calylophus berlandieri Spach. This problem necessitates a new combination Oenothera capillifolia subsp. berlandieri.

  14. In vitro Antibacterial Activities of the Marine Macroalgae\\" Laurencia Snyderiae\\" and \\"Sargassum Angustifolium\\" Against Human Pathogens

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    behrouz Derakhshesh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays widespread applications of antibiotics caused to create resistant microorganisms and increased additive antibiotic resistance in all over the world. Thus, researches linked to investigate new antimicrobial agents that are produced in natural way have great significance to achieve new pharmaceutics resources. Based on many accomplished researches, some macroalgae have found to show noticeable antimicrobial and antifungal activities. Methods: In this research antimicrobial activity of organic extracts of the macroalgae "Laurencia snyderiae" and Sargassum angustifolium (which has been collected from coasts of Boushehr port was tested against 3 Gram- positive bacteria Streptococous mutans, Streptococous salivaris and Streptococous sanguis as well as 4 Gram- negative bacteria Salmonella typhi, Proteus vulgaris, Shigella flexniu and Micrococos luteus. Extraction was carried out using maceration method, methanol and chloroform extracts was obtained. Antimicrobial activities of the final extracts was tested using two methods agar disk diffusion method and serial tube dilution method (in order to determine Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC. Results: Results of bioassay showed the tested macroalgae exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against Gram- negative bacteria, S. typhi and Gram- negative bacteria M. Luteus exhibited the highest resistant against algal extracts. Conclusion: red alga L. snyderiae exhibited higher antibacterial activity than brown alga S. angustifolium against tested bacteria strains.

  15. Mating system and ploidy influence levels of inbreeding depression in Clarkia (Onagraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Brian C; Geber, Monica A

    2008-05-01

    Inbreeding depression is the reduction in offspring fitness associated with inbreeding and is thought to be one of the primary forces selecting against the evolution of self-fertilization. Studies suggest that most inbreeding depression is caused by the expression of recessive deleterious alleles in homozygotes whose frequency increases as a result of self-fertilization or mating among relatives. This process leads to the selective elimination of deleterious alleles such that highly selfing species may show remarkably little inbreeding depression. Genome duplication (polyploidy) has also been hypothesized to influence levels of inbreeding depression, with polyploids expected to exhibit less inbreeding depression than diploids. We studied levels of inbreeding depression in allotetraploid and diploid species of Clarkia (Onagraceae) that vary in mating system (each cytotype was represented by an outcrossing and a selfing species). The outcrossing species exhibited more inbreeding depression than the selfing species for most fitness components and for two different measures of cumulative fitness. In contrast, though inbreeding depression was generally lower for the polyploid species than for the diploid species, the difference was statistically significant only for flower number and one of the two measures of cumulative fitness. Further, we detected no significant interaction between mating system and ploidy in determining inbreeding depression. In sum, our results suggest that a taxon's current mating system is more important than ploidy in influencing levels of inbreeding depression in natural populations of these annual plants.

  16. Bet hedging via seed banking in desert evening primroses (Oenothera, Onagraceae): demographic evidence from natural populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Margaret E K; Ferrière, Régis; Kane, Michael J; Venable, D Lawrence

    2007-02-01

    Bet hedging is one solution to the problem of an unpredictably variable environment: fitness in the average environment is sacrificed in favor of lower variation in fitness if this leads to higher long-run stochastic mean fitness. While bet hedging is an important concept in evolutionary ecology, empirical evidence that it occurs is scant. Here we evaluate whether bet hedging occurs via seed banking in natural populations of two species of desert evening primroses (Oenothera, Onagraceae), one annual and one perennial. Four years of data on plants and 3 years of data on seeds yielded two transitions for the entire life cycle. One year was exceptionally dry, leading to reproductive failure in the sample areas, and the other was above average in precipitation, leading to reproductive success in four of five populations. Stochastic simulations of population growth revealed patterns indicative of bet hedging via seed banking, particularly in the annual populations: variance in fitness and fitness in the average environment were lower with seed banking than without, whereas long-run stochastic mean fitness was higher with seed banking than without across a wide range of probabilities of the wet year. This represents a novel, unusually rigorous demonstration of bet hedging from field data.

  17. Breeding system variation in 10 evening primroses (Oenothera sections Anogra and Kleinia; Onagraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiss, Kathryn E; Holsinger, Kent E; Evans, Margaret E K

    2010-06-01

    We examined two accounts of the relationship between breeding system and life history variation in a clade of evening primroses (Oenothera, Onagraceae): (1) selection for reproductive assurance should generate an association between self-compatibility and monocarpy and (2) phylogenetic conservatism leads to retention of breeding system and life history traits among closely related taxa. • We performed over 4000 hand pollinations under greenhouse conditions to determine the compatibility of 10 Oenothera taxa (sections Anogra [17 taxa] and Kleinia [2 taxa)] for which breeding systems had not previously been reported. We used generalized linear mixed models to evaluate the influence of pollination treatment, parents, and population on fruiting success. • Among the taxa tested, six were self-incompatible, two were variable in compatibility, and two were self-compatible. We combined these data with published studies in Anogra and Kleinia and mapped breeding system and life history onto a published phylogeny. • We found no evidence for phylogenetic conservatism, but detected considerable evolutionary lability in both traits. Additionally, we found no evidence for a consistent relationship between breeding system and life history. Only eight of 19 taxa followed the predicted association between self-incompatibility and polycarpy vs. self-compatibility and monocarpy. Instead, many taxa have retained self-incompatibility, regardless of monocarpy or polycarpy.

  18. Effects of functionally asexual reproduction on quantitative genetic variation in the evening primroses (Oenothera, Onagraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Ryan M; Johnson, Marc T J

    2014-11-01

    It has long been predicted that a loss of sexual reproduction leads to decreased heritable variation within populations and increased differentiation between populations. Despite an abundance of theory, there are few empirical tests of how sex affects genetic variation in phenotypic traits, especially for plants. Here we test whether repeated losses of two critical components of sex (recombination and segregation) in the evening primroses (Oenothera L., Onagraceae) affect quantitative genetic variation within and between populations. We sampled multiple genetic families from 3-5 populations from each of eight Oenothera species, which represented four independent transitions between sexual reproduction and a functionally asexual genetic system called "permanent translocation heterozygosity." We used quantitative genetics methods to partition genetic variation within and between populations for eight plant traits related to growth, leaf physiology, flowering, and resistance to herbivores. Heritability was, on average, 74% higher in sexual Oenothera populations than in functionally asexual populations, with plant growth rate, specific leaf area, and the percentage of leaf water content showing the strongest differences. By contrast, genetic differentiation among populations was 2.8× higher in functionally asexual vs. sexual Oenothera species. This difference was particularly strong for specific leaf area. Sexual populations tended to exhibit higher genetic correlations among traits, but this difference was weakly supported. These results support the prediction that sexual reproduction maintains higher genetic variation within populations, which may facilitate adaptive evolution. We also found partial support for the prediction that a loss of sex leads to greater population differentiation, which may elevate speciation rates. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  19. Climate and life-history evolution in evening primroses (Oenothera, Onagraceae): a phylogenetic comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Margaret E K; Hearn, David J; Hahn, William J; Spangle, Jennifer M; Venable, D Lawrence

    2005-09-01

    Evolutionary ecologists have long sought to understand the conditions under which perennial (iteroparous) versus annual (semelparous) plant life histories are favored. We evaluated the idea that aridity and variation in the length of droughts should favor the evolution of an annual life history, both by decreasing adult survival and by increasing the potential for high seedling survival via reduced plant cover. We calculated phylogenetically independent contrasts of climate with respect to life history in a clade of winter-establishing evening primroses (sections Anogra and Kleinia; Oenothera; Onagraceae), which includes seven annuals, 12 perennials, and two variable taxa. Climate variables were quantified from long-term records at weather stations near collection localities. To explicitly account for phylogenetic uncertainty, contrasts were calculated on a random sample of phylogenetic trees from the posterior distribution of a Bayesian analysis of DNA sequence data. Statements of association are based on comparing the per-tree mean contrast, which has a null expectation of zero, to a set of per-tree mean contrasts calculated on the same trees, after randomizing the climate data. As predicted, increased annual aridity, increased annual potential evapotranspiration, and decreased annual precipitation were associated with transitions to the annual habit, but these trends were not significantly different from the null pattern. Transitions to the annual habit were not significantly associated with increases in one measure of aridity in summer nor with increased summer drought, but they were associated with significantly increased maximum summer temperatures. In winter, increased aridity and decreased precipitation were significantly associated with transitions to the annual habit. Changes in life history were not significantly associated with changes in the coefficient of variation of precipitation, either on an annual or seasonal (summer vs. winter) basis. Though we

  20. Microbial degradation of phosmet on blueberry fruit and in aqueous systems by indigenous bacterial flora on lowbush blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, K M; Bushway, A A; Bushway, R J; Davis-Dentici, K

    2007-10-01

    Phosmet-adapted bacteria isolated from lowbush blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium) were evaluated for their ability to degrade phosmet on blueberry fruit and in minimal salt solutions. Microbial metabolism of phosmet by isolates of Enterobacter agglomerans and Pseudomonas fluorescens resulted in significant reductions (P blueberries and in minimal salt solutions. Thus, the role of adapted strains of E. agglomerans and P. fluorescens in degrading phosmet on blueberries represents an extensive plant-microorganism relationship, which is essential to determination of phosmet persistence under pre- and postharvest conditions.

  1. Microsatellites for Oenothera gayleana and O. hartwegii subsp. filifolia (Onagraceae), and their utility in section Calylophus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Emily M.; Fant, Jeremie B.; Moore, Michael J.; Hastings, Amy P.; Larson, Erica L.; Agrawal, Anurag A.; Skogen, Krissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Eleven nuclear and four plastid microsatellite markers were screened for two gypsum endemic species, Oenothera gayleana and O. hartwegii subsp. filifolia, and tested for cross-amplification in the remaining 11 taxa within Oenothera sect. Calylophus (Onagraceae). Methods and Results: Microsatellite markers were tested in two to three populations spanning the ranges of both O. gayleana and O. hartwegii subsp. filifolia. The nuclear microsatellite loci consisted of both di- and trinucleotide repeats with one to 17 alleles per population. Several loci showed significant deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium, which may be evidence of chromosomal rings. The plastid microsatellite markers identified one to seven haplotypes per population. The transferability of these markers was confirmed in all 11 taxa within Oenothera sect. Calylophus. Conclusions: The microsatellite loci characterized here are the first developed and tested in Oenothera sect. Calylophus. These markers will be used to assess whether pollinator foraging distance influences population genetic parameters in predictable ways. PMID:26949578

  2. Transcriptional effect of an Aframomum angustifolium seed extract on human cutaneous cells using low-density DNA chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet-Duquennoy, Mathilde; Dumas, Marc; Debacker, Adeline; Lazou, Kristell; Talbourdet, Sylvie; Franchi, Jocelyne; Heusèle, Catherine; André, Patrice; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Bonté, Frédéric; Kurfürst, Robin

    2007-06-01

    Studying photoexposed and photoprotected skin biopsies from young and aged women, it has been found that a specific zone, composed of the basal layers of the epidermis, the dermal epidermal junction, and the superficial dermis, is major target of aging and reactive oxygen species. We showed that this zone is characterized by significant variations at a transcriptional and/or protein levels. Using low-density DNA chip technology, we evaluated the effect of a natural mixture of Aframomum angustifolium seed extract containing labdane diterpenoids on these aging markers. Expression profiles of normal human fibroblasts (NHF) were studied using a customized cDNA macroarray system containing genes covering dermal structure, inflammatory responses, and oxidative stress defense mechanisms. For normal human keratinocyte (NHK) investigations, we chose OLISA technique, a sensitive and quantitative method developed by BioMérieux specifically designed to investigate cell death, proliferation, epidermal structure, differentiation, and oxidative stress defense response. We observed that this extract strongly modified gene expression profiles of treated NHK, but weakly for NHF. This extract regulated antioxidant defenses, dermal-epidermal junction components, and epidermal renewal-related genes. Using low-density DNA chip technology, we identified new potential actions of A. angustifolium seed extract on skin aging.

  3. Effect of a wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) drink intervention on markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and endothelial function in humans with cardiovascular risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riso, Patrizia; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Del Bo', Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Wild blueberries (WB) (Vaccinium angustifolium) are rich sources of polyphenols, such as flavonols, phenolic acids and anthocyanins (ACNs), reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular and degenerative diseases. This study investigated the effect of regular consumption of a WB or a placebo (PL...

  4. Radial growth and ring formation process in clonal plant Eriophorum angustifolium on postmined peatland in the Šumava Mts., Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lanta, Vojtěch; Janeček, Štěpán; Doležal, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2008), s. 44-54 ISSN 0003-3847 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/03/H034; GA ČR GA526/07/0808 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Clonal plant * Eriophorum angustifolium * Experiments Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.361, year: 2008

  5. CRECIMIENTO Y EFICIENCIA FOTOSINTÉTICA DE Ludwigia decurrens Walter (ONAGRACEAE BAJO DIFERENTES CONCENTRACIONES DE NITRÓGENO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA ANGÉLICA SANCLEMENTE

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente estudio se evaluó el crecimiento y la eficiencia fotosintética de Ludwigia decurrens (Onagraceae, a partir de la estimación de la fluorescencia de la clorofila bajo diferentes concentraciones de nitrógeno (0 mg/L, 465 mg/L y 930 mg/L en condiciones de laboratorio. Como parámetros de crecimiento se utilizaron la longitud total del tallo y el área foliar. Durante el periodo de estudio se observó un incremento en el crecimiento y la eficiencia quántica con el aumento en la concentración de nitrógeno. Sin embargo, no se presentaron diferencias significativas (p<0,05 en los valores de fluorescencia de la clorofila entre los tratamientos. Los resultados del comportamiento de la eficiencia fotosintética (Fv/Fm y el crecimiento de las plantas tratadas con diferentes concentraciones de nitrógeno, demuestran que la macrófita Ludwigia decurrens crece en ambientes relativamente altos de nitrógeno.

  6. Comparative anatomy of the leaves of Piper lepturum(Kunth) C.DC. var. lepturum and Piper lepturum var. angustifolium (C.DC.) Yunck.

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Nelson Santana de Oliveira; Pereira, Flaviane Gomes; Santos, Paulo Roberto Dias dos; Costa, Cecília Gonçalves; Guimarães, Elsie Franklin

    2015-01-01

    This study showed anatomical differences related to Piper lepturumvar. lepturum and P. lepturum var. angustifolium species, sometimes considered varieties and in other cases synonyms. For histological analysis, fully expanded leaves were collected and for analysis by scanning electron microscope (SEM), fragments from the midrib were fixed on both leaf surfaces. The two species revealed differences in plant anatomy and it was observed that the stem of P. lepturum var. lepturum showed persisten...

  7. Screening the wetland plant species Alisma plantago-aquatica, Carex rostrata and Phalaris arundinacea for innate tolerance to zinc and comparison with Eriophorum angustifolium and Festuca rubra Merlin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, David J.; Moran, Bridget M.; Otte, Marinus L.

    2005-01-01

    Several wetland plant species appear to have constitutive metal tolerance. In previous studies, populations from contaminated and non-contaminated sites of the wetland plants Typha latifolia, Phragmites australis, Glyceria fluitans and Eriophorum angustifolium were found to be tolerant to high concentrations of metals. This study screened three other species of wetland plants: Alisma plantago-aquatica, Carex rostrata and Phalaris arundinacea for innate tolerance to zinc. The degree of tolerance was compared to known zinc-tolerant E. angustifolium and Festuca rubra Merlin. It was found that A. plantago-aquatica and P. arundinacea did not posses innate tolerance to zinc, but that C. rostrata was able to tolerate elevated levels of zinc, at levels comparable to those tolerated by E. angustifolium and F. rubra Merlin. The findings support the theory that some wetland angiosperm species tend to be tolerant to exposure to high levels of metals, regardless of their origin. - Some wetland angiosperms are tolerant to high concentrations of metals, regardless of conditions in the plants' natural habitat

  8. Screening the wetland plant species Alisma plantago-aquatica, Carex rostrata and Phalaris arundinacea for innate tolerance to zinc and comparison with Eriophorum angustifolium and Festuca rubra Merlin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, David J. [Wetland Ecology Research Group, Department of Botany, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)]. E-mail: davematt00@hotmail.com; Moran, Bridget M. [Wetland Ecology Research Group, Department of Botany, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Otte, Marinus L. [Wetland Ecology Research Group, Department of Botany, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2005-03-01

    Several wetland plant species appear to have constitutive metal tolerance. In previous studies, populations from contaminated and non-contaminated sites of the wetland plants Typha latifolia, Phragmites australis, Glyceria fluitans and Eriophorum angustifolium were found to be tolerant to high concentrations of metals. This study screened three other species of wetland plants: Alisma plantago-aquatica, Carex rostrata and Phalaris arundinacea for innate tolerance to zinc. The degree of tolerance was compared to known zinc-tolerant E. angustifolium and Festuca rubra Merlin. It was found that A. plantago-aquatica and P. arundinacea did not posses innate tolerance to zinc, but that C. rostrata was able to tolerate elevated levels of zinc, at levels comparable to those tolerated by E. angustifolium and F. rubra Merlin. The findings support the theory that some wetland angiosperm species tend to be tolerant to exposure to high levels of metals, regardless of their origin. - Some wetland angiosperms are tolerant to high concentrations of metals, regardless of conditions in the plants' natural habitat.

  9. Eriophorum angustifolium and Lolium perenne metabolic adaptations to metals- and metalloids-induced anomalies in the vicinity of a chemical industrial complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Naser A; Ahmad, Iqbal; Rodrigues, Sónia M; Henriques, Bruno; Cruz, Nuno; Coelho, Cláudia; Pacheco, Mário; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Eduarda

    2013-01-01

    As plants constitute the foundation of the food chain, concerns have been raised about the possibility of toxic concentrations of metals and metalloids being transported from plants to the higher food chain strata. In this perspective, the use of important phytotoxicity endpoints may be of utmost significance in assessing the hazardous nature of metals and metalloids and also in developing ecological soil screening levels. The current study aimed to investigate the role of glutathione (GSH) and its associated enzymes in the metabolic adaptation of two grass species namely Eriophorum angustifolium Honck. and Lolium perenne L. to metals and metalloids stress in the vicinity of a chemical industrial complex (Estarreja, Portugal). Soil and plant samples were collected from contaminated (C) and non-contaminated (reference, R) sites, respectively, near and away from the Estarreja Chemical Complex, Portugal. Soils (from 0 to 10 and 10 to 20 cm depths) were analyzed for pH, organic carbon, and metals and metalloids concentrations. Plant samples were processed fresh for physiological and biochemical estimations, while oven-dried plant samples were used for metals and metalloids determinations following standard methodologies. Both soils and plants from the industrial area exhibited differential concentrations of major metals and metalloids including As, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn. In particular, L. perenne shoot displayed significantly higher and lower concentrations of Pb and As, respectively at contaminated site (vs. E. angustifolium). Irrespective of sites, L. perenne shoot exhibited significantly higher total GSH pool, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and oxidized protein (vs. E. angustifolium). Additionally, severe damages to photosynthetic pigments, proteins, cellular membrane integrity (in terms of electrolyte leakage), and lipid peroxidation were also perceptible in L. perenne shoot. Contrarily, irrespective of the sites, activities of catalase and GSH-regenerating enzyme, GSH

  10. Local topography shapes fine-scale spatial genetic structure in the Arkansas Valley evening primrose, Oenothera harringtonii (Onagraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Matthew K; Fant, Jeremie B; Skogen, Krissa A

    2014-01-01

    Identifying factors that shape the spatial distribution of genetic variation is crucial to understanding many population- and landscape-level processes. In this study, we explore fine-scale spatial genetic structure in Oenothera harringtonii (Onagraceae), an insect-pollinated, gravity-dispersed herb endemic to the grasslands of south-central and southeastern Colorado, USA. We genotyped 315 individuals with 11 microsatellite markers and utilized a combination of spatial autocorrelation analyses and landscape genetic models to relate life history traits and landscape features to dispersal processes. Spatial genetic structure was consistent with theoretical expectations of isolation by distance, but this pattern was weak (Sp = 0.00374). Anisotropic analyses indicated that spatial genetic structure was markedly directional, in this case consistent with increased dispersal along prominent slopes. Landscape genetic models subsequently confirmed that spatial genetic variation was significantly influenced by local topographic heterogeneity, specifically that geographic distance, elevation and aspect were important predictors of spatial genetic structure. Among these variables, geographic distance was ~68% more important than elevation in describing spatial genetic variation, and elevation was ~42% more important than aspect after removing the effect of geographic distance. From these results, we infer a mechanism of hydrochorous seed dispersal along major drainages aided by seasonal monsoon rains. Our findings suggest that landscape features may shape microevolutionary processes at much finer spatial scales than typically considered, and stress the importance of considering how particular dispersal vectors are influenced by their environmental context. © The American Genetic Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Divergence in eco-physiological responses to drought mirrors the distinct distribution of Chamerion angustifolium cytotypes in the Himalaya–Hengduan Mountains region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Guo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Polyploid species generally occupy harsher habitats (characterized by cold, drought and/or high altitude than diploids, but the converse was observed for Chamerion angustifolium, in which diploid plants generally inhabit higher altitudes than their polyploid derivatives. Plants at high altitudes may experience cold-induced water stress, and we therefore examined the physiological responses of diploid and hexaploid C. angustifolium to water stress to better understand the ecological differentiation of plants with different ploidy levels. We conducted a common garden experiment by subjecting seedlings of different ploidy levels to low, moderate and severe water stress. Fourteen indicators of physiological fitness were measured, and the anatomical characteristics of the leaves of each cytotype were determined. Both cytotypes were influenced by drought, and diploids exhibited higher fitness in terms of constant root:shoot ratio (R:S ratio and maximum quantum yield of PSⅡ (Fv/Fm, less reduced maximal photosynthetic rate (Amax, transpiration rate (E, intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci and stomatal conductance (gs, and higher long-term water use efficiency (WUEL under severe water stress than did hexaploids. Analysis of leaf anatomy revealed morphological adjustments for tolerating water deficiency in diploids, in the form of closely packed mesophyll cells and small conduits in the midvein. Our results indicate that diploid C. angustifolium is more tolerant of drought than hexaploid plants, ensuring the successful survival of the diploid at high altitudes. This eco-physiological divergence may facilitate the species with different cytotypes to colonize new and large geographic ranges with heterogeneous environmental conditions.

  12. The antiplasmodium effects of a traditional South American remedy: Zanthoxylum chiloperone var. angustifolium against chloroquine resistant and chloroquine sensitive strains of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Cebrian-Torrejon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Zanthoxylum chiloperone var. angustifolium Engl., Rutaceae, is used in traditional medicine to treat fungal and protozoal infections in the central area of South America. Considering the increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum in malarial ridden areas, we explored the anti-plasmodial effects of three compounds isolated from Z. chiloperone. The pyranocoumarin transavicennol and the canthinone alkaloids, canthin-6-one and 5-methoxycanthin-6-one, were found to have IC50 on chloroquine/mefloquine resistant and sensitive strains of P. falciparum of 0.5-2.7, 2.0-5.3 and 5.1-10.4 ƒÊg/mL, respectively. Moreover, the formation of heme adducts by these compounds is described by a novel alternative method based on MS-CID methods. The alkylamide sanshool was also identified, for first time in this plant, in the dichloromethanic and ethanolic extracts and the extracts were found to be notably non-toxic and displayed good anti-plasmodial effects.

  13. Wild Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) Polyphenols Target Fusobacterium nucleatum and the Host Inflammatory Response: Potential Innovative Molecules for Treating Periodontal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Lagha, Amel; Dudonné, Stéphanie; Desjardins, Yves; Grenier, Daniel

    2015-08-12

    Blueberries contain significant amounts of flavonoids to which a number of beneficial health effects in humans have been associated. The present study investigated the effect of a polyphenol-rich lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) extract on the two main etiologic components of periodontitis, a multifactorial disorder affecting the supporting structures of the teeth. Phenolic acids, flavonoids (flavonols, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols), and procyanidins made up 16.6, 12.9, and 2.7% of the blueberry extract, respectively. The blueberry extract showed antibacterial activity (MIC = 1 mg/mL) against the periodontopathogenic bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum. This property may result from the ability of blueberry polyphenols to chelate iron. Moreover, the blueberry extract at 62.5 μg/mL inhibited F. nucleatum biofilm formation by 87.5 ± 2.3%. Subsequently, the ability of the blueberry extract to inhibit the NF-κB signaling pathway in U937-3xκB cells was investigated. The blueberry extract dose-dependently inhibited the activation of NF-κB induced by F. nucleatum. In addition, a pretreatment of macrophages with the blueberry extract (62.5 μg/mL) inhibited the secretion of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 by 87.3 ± 1.3, 80.7 ± 5.6, and 28.2 ± 9.3%, respectively, following a stimulation with F. nucleatum. Similarly, the secretion of MMP-8 and MMP-9 was also dose-dependently inhibited. This dual antibacterial and anti-inflammatory action of lowbush blueberry polyphenols suggests that they may be promising candidates for novel therapeutic agents.

  14. EFECTIVIDAD DEL USO LOCAL DE INFUSION DE PIPER ANGUSTIFOLIUM (MATICO) EN COMPARACIÓN CON EL AGUA Y JABON EN LA CICATRIZACION DE LA EPISIORRAFIA EN PUERPERAS ATENDIDAS EN EL CENTRO DE SALUD CARLOS SHOWING FERRARI 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Luyo Marcellini, Delci Fiorella

    2017-01-01

    Objetivo: Determinar la Efectividad del uso local de infusión de Piper Angustifolium (matico) en comparación con el agua y jabón en la cicatrización de la Episiorrafia en puérperas atendidas en el Centro de Salud Carlos Showing Ferrari Showing Ferrari 2016. Metodología: Según la intervención del investigador será de tipo experimental. Según la planificación será de tipo prospectivo. Según la interacción de veces que se medirá las variables será de tipo longitudinal. Y según e la interacción d...

  15. Contribuciones al conocimiento de la flora de navarra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BALDA, Angel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuevos datos acerca de 58 táxones de plantas de interés, bien por su rareza en el terrirorio navarro o por la ampliación de área que suponen. De ellos, 12 se citan por primera vez para Navarra : Epilobium angustifolium, Fraxinus pennylvanica, Galinsoga quadriradiata, Gamochaeta falcata, Isatis tinctoria subsp. tinctoria, Ludwigia palustris, Lycopodeilla inundata, Pseudorchis albida, Ramonda myconi, Rynchospora alba, Rynchospora fusca y Spiranthes aestivalis

  16. Antifungal activity of medicinal plant extracts; preliminary screening studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Duncan; Taschereau, Pierre; Belland, René J; Sand, Crystal; Rennie, Robert P

    2008-01-04

    In the setting of HIV and organ transplantation, opportunistic fungal infections have become a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Thus antifungal therapy is playing a greater role in health care. Traditional plants are a valuable source of novel antifungals. To assess in vitro antifungal activity of aqueous plant extracts. The minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for each extract in the setting of human pathogenic fungal isolates. Plants were harvested and identification verified. Aqueous extracts were obtained and antifungal susceptibilities determined using serial dilutional extracts with a standardized microdilution broth methodology. Twenty-three fungal isolates were cultured and exposed to the plant extracts. Five known antifungals were used as positive controls. Results were read at 48 and 72 h. Of the 14 plants analyzed, Fragaria virginiana Duchesne, Epilobium angustifolium L. and Potentilla simplex Michx. demonstrated strong antifungal potential overall. Fragaria virginiana had some degree of activity against all of the fungal pathogens. Alnus viridis DC., Betula alleghaniensis Britt. and Solidago gigantea Ait. also demonstrated a significant degree of activity against many of the yeast isolates. Fragaria virginiana, Epilobium angustifolium and Potentilla simplex demonstrate promising antifungal potential.

  17. Generalist versus specialist pollination systems in 26 Oenothera (Onagraceae

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    Kyra Neipp Krakos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although generalized and specialized plants are often discussed as alternative states, the biological reality may better be viewed as a continuum. However, estimations of pollinator specificity have been confounded in some studies by the assumption that all floral visitors are pollinators. Failure to account for pollen load can lead to inaccurate conclusions regarding the number of pollinators with which a species actually interacts. The aim of this study was to clarify the distribution of pollination-system specialization within one clade, using a more rigorous assessment of pollen flow. The genus Oenothera has long been used as a model system for studying reproductive biology, and it provides a diversity of pollination systems and a wealth of historical data. Both floral visitation rate and pollen-load analysis of sampled pollinators, combined into a metric of pollen flow, were used to quantify the pollination systems of 26 Oenothera taxa. Metric of pollinator specialization were calculated as functions of both total pollinator taxa, and as pollinator functional groups. We found that for Oenothera, the number of floral visitors highly overestimates the number of pollinators, and is inadequate for determining or predicting pollination system specialization. We found that that pollination systems were distributed on a gradient from generalized to specialized, with more pollinator-specialized plant taxa, especially when estimated using pollinator functional groups. These results are in conflict with previous studies that depict most plant species as generalists, and this finding may be related to how prior studies have estimated specialization.

  18. Onagraceae endémicas del Perú

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    Susy Castillo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Esta es la familia de las «fucsias», la cual es reconocida en el Perú por presentar seis géneros y 76 especies (Brako & Zarucchi, 1993; Ulloa Ulloa et al., 2004, principalmente arbustos y hierbas. En este trabajo reconocemos 24 especies endémicas, la mayoría en el género Fuchsia. Las especies endémicas se encuentran mayormente en la región Bosques Muy Húmedos Montanos, entre los 1600 y 2500 m de altitud. Diez especies endémicas se encuentran representados dentro del Sistema Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas por el Estado.

  19. The correct name in Oenothera for Gauradrummondii (Onagraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Warren L; Hoch, Peter C; Zarucchi, James L

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, Wagner and Hoch proposed the new name Oenotheraxenogaura W.L.Wagner & Hoch for the species then known as Gauradrummondii (Spach) Torrey & A. Gray (non Oenotheradrummondii Hooker, 1834). However, the authors overlooked the availability of Gaurahispida Bentham (1840) for this species. Accordingly, we herewith make the appropriate new combination for this species, Oenotherahispida (Bentham) W.L.Wagner, Hoch & Zarucchi, and place Oenotheraxenogaura in synonymy.

  20. The correct name in Oenothera for Gaura drummondii (Onagraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren L. Wagner

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, Wagner and Hoch proposed the new name Oenothera xenogaura W.L.Wagner & Hoch for the species then known as Gaura drummondii (Spach Torrey & A. Gray (non O. drummondii Hooker, 1834. However, the authors overlooked the availability of Gaura hispida Bentham (1840 for this species. Accordingly, we herewith make the appropriate new combination for this species, O. hispida (Bentham W.L.Wagner, Hoch & Zarucchi, and place O. xenogaura in synonymy.

  1. The correct name in Oenothera for Gaura drummondii (Onagraceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner,Warren; Hoch,Peter C.; Zarucchi,James L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In 2007, Wagner and Hoch proposed the new name Oenothera xenogaura W.L.Wagner & Hoch for the species then known as Gaura drummondii (Spach) Torrey & A. Gray (non Oenothera drummondii Hooker, 1834). However, the authors overlooked the availability of Gaura hispida Bentham (1840) for this species. Accordingly, we herewith make the appropriate new combination for this species, Oenothera hispida (Bentham) W.L.Wagner, Hoch & Zarucchi, and place Oenothera xenogaura in synonymy.

  2. Uptake of naturally occurring radioisotopes by vegetation in a region of high radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahon, D C; Mathewes, R W [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)

    1983-05-01

    The accumulation of four naturally occurring radionuclides of the sup(238)U series, uranium, sup(226)Ra, sup(210)Pb and sup(210)Po, in 15 species of native plants was investigated. Of the plants sampled some accumulated, but none concentrated uranium or sup(226)Ra. Grouseberry (Vaccinium scoparium Leiberg) appeared to concentrate sup(210)Pb and sup(210)Po. There were marked seasonal variations in the accumulation of uranium by grass (Calamagrostis rubescens Buckl.), and of sup(210)Pb and sup(210)Po by grass and fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium L.). High positive correlations between soil and vegetation radionuclide content were found for uranium in fireweed and grouseberry in spring, sup(226)Ra in willow (Salix scouleriana L.) in spring, and uranium in fireweed in summer.

  3. Flowers visited by honey bee in southern Finland

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    Markku Käpylä

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available A list of nectar and pollen sources of honeybee (Apis mellifera L. in southern Finland based on 44 500 flower records is presented. Only the common wild and cultivated species are included, 139 species altogether. The flowering times are shown with an accuracy of two weeks. The most important food sources during spring (April—May are Salix spp., and Tussilago farfara: during early summer (late May and June Salix spp., Taraxacum officinale, Acer platanoides, Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Barbarea vulgaris, Ribes spp., Malus domestica, Sorbus aucuparia, and Geranium sylvaticum; during mid-summer Trifolium repens, T. hybridum, Rubus idaeus, Tilia cordata, Epilobium angustifolium, and Cirsium arvense; during late summer and early autumn Calluna vulgaris, Arctium tomentosum, Sonchus arvensis and Leontodon autumnalis.

  4. Microsatellite primers in Oenothera harringtonii (Onagraceae), an annual endemic to the shortgrass prairie of Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogen, Krissa A; Hilpman, Evan T; Todd, Sadie L; Fant, Jeremie B

    2012-08-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed in the annual herb, Oenothera harringtonii, to investigate patterns of genetic diversity, gene flow, and parentage within and among populations of this Colorado endemic. Ten polymorphic loci were identified in O. harringtonii and tested in four populations sampled across the range of the species. These loci contained trinucleotide repeats with 7-29 alleles per locus. Nine of the 10 loci also amplified in O. caespitosa subsp. macroglottis, O. caespitosa subsp. marginata, and O. caespitosa subsp. navajoensis. In addition, we optimized three markers developed for O. biennis and provide reports of their effectiveness in all four taxa. These results indicate the utility of these markers in O. harringtonii for future studies of genetic structure, gene flow, and parentage as well as their applicability in other members of the O. caespitosa species complex.

  5. Spatiotemporal variation in the reproductive ecology of two parapatric subspecies of Oenothera cespitosa (Onagraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Derek R; Villagra, Cristian A; Raguso, Robert A

    2010-09-01

    • Flowering plants that rely on pollinators for most of their reproduction may experience unpredictable and inconsistent availability of effective pollinators throughout their reproductive lifetime. We investigated the reproductive ecology of two subspecies of the tufted evening primrose, Oenothera cespitosa, which occupy geographically and edaphically distinct habitats in western North America: O. cespitosa subsp. navajoensis inhabits sandstone soils on open sites or rocky slopes in the Colorado Plateau and O. cespitosa subsp. cespitosa grows in clay soils on talus slopes and exposed rocky ridges in the western Great Plains and northern Rocky Mountains of the United States. • Pollen augmentation and selfing experiments, floral visitor observations, and single-visit effectiveness experiments were conducted over 4 years to examine the breeding system and spatiotemporal variation in pollinator behavior, assemblage, and abundance at different populations for each subspecies. • Both subspecies of O. cespitosa were self-incompatible and pollen-limited, suggesting that the relative abundance, effectiveness, and movement patterns of different insects as pollinators influenced the quality and quantity of seed production in these plants. Medium-sized vespertine hawkmoths (Hyles lineata, Sphinx vashti) were effective pollinators when present, as were large matinal bees (Anthophora affabilis, A. dammersi, Xylocopa tabaniformis androleuca), whereas small oligolectic Lasioglossum bees primarily functioned as pollen thieves in the evening and morning. • These findings highlight the importance of variability of pollinator composition and abundance in the evolution of plant breeding systems and reproductive success at varying spatial and temporal scales.

  6. Pollination limitation to reproductive success in the Missouri evening primrose, Oenothera macrocarpa (Onagraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody-Weis, J M; Heywood, J S

    2001-09-01

    Habitat fragmentation may result in plant populations that are less attractive to pollinators and thus susceptible to reduced reproductive output due to pollination limitation. Pollination limitation was investigated in three Missouri populations of Oenothera macrocarpa, a hawk-moth-pollinated, perennial herb. The populations represented extremes in size and habitat quality. Following supplemental pollination, mean fertilization success (proportion of ovules fertilized) across populations increased from 24.3 to 44.8% and mean seed set (proportion of ovules that matured into seed) increased from 14.7 to 27.9%. These increases were statistically significant in two of the three populations. Failure to achieve 100% fertilization and seed set following supplementation indicates that other factors, in addition to pollination, were limiting to female reproductive success. Fruit set was pollination limited in only one population. Fruits matured with as few as one seed, suggesting that fruit set was not resource limited. The degree of pollination limitation was greatest in the most disturbed population. The population located in the highest-quality habitat was not significantly pollination limited. This suggests that pollination limitation is occurring, at least in part, because of reduced pollinator activity in degraded habitats.

  7. The correct name for a subspecies of Oenothera fruticosa L. (Onagraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Wagner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1978 when Straley adopted the name Oenothera fruticosa L. subsp. glauca (Michx. Straley for one of the two recognized subspecies of O. fruticosa it was the correct name for this taxon; however, since that time the botanical code has changed so that now an autonym is treated aspriority over the name or names of the same date and rank that established it. This change means that since 1981 O. fruticosa subsp. glauca was no longer the correct name. The appropriate combination for it is made here as O. fruticosa L. subsp. tetragona (Roth W.L. Wagner. Original material for the basionym, O. tetragona, is no longer extant so a neotype is designated.

  8. Nowe stanowiska gatunków z rodzaju Oenothera (Onagraceae) w środkowej Polsce

    OpenAIRE

    Rostański, Krzysztof; Witosławski, Piotr

    2001-01-01

    As a result of research conducted in central Poland between 1999 and 2000 localities of Oenothera flaemingina Hudziok were noted, a new species for central Poland, and new localities of previously noted 14 species and permanent hybrids of the genus Oenothera L. Zadanie pt. „Digitalizacja i udostępnienie w Cyfrowym Repozytorium Uniwersytetu Łódzkiego kolekcji czasopism naukowych wydawanych przez Uniwersytet Łódzki” nr 885/P-DUN/2014 zostało dofinansowane ze środków MNiSW w ramach dzia...

  9. The correct name for a subspecies of Oenothera fruticosa L. (Onagraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Warren L

    2014-01-01

    In 1978 when Straley adopted the name Oenothera fruticosa L. subsp. glauca (Michx.) Straley for one of the two recognized subspecies of O. fruticosa it was the correct name for this taxon; however, since that time the botanical code has changed so that now an autonym is treated as having priority over the name or names of the same date and rank that established it. This change means that since 1981 O. fruticosa subsp. glauca was no longer the correct name. The appropriate combination for it is made here as O. fruticosa L. subsp. tetragona (Roth) W.L. Wagner. Original material for the basionym, O. tetragona, is no longer extant so a neotype is designated.

  10. Inhibition of Tulane Virus replication via exposure to lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) fractional components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulane Virus (TV) is a common viral surrogate for human norovirus in lab studies. In the present study, the phenotypic response of TV when exposed to fractional components extracted from lowbush blueberries was investigated. Lowbush blueberry extract (F1) was separated using a C-18 Sep-Pak cartridge...

  11. Economic Risk of Bee Pollination in Maine Wild Blueberry, Vaccinium angustifolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Eric; Hoshide, Aaron K; Drummond, Francis A; Criner, George K; Chen, Xuan

    2017-10-01

    Recent pollinator declines highlight the importance of evaluating economic risk of agricultural systems heavily dependent on rented honey bees or native pollinators. Our study analyzed variability of native bees and honey bees, and the risks these pose to profitability of Maine's wild blueberry industry. We used cross-sectional data from organic, low-, medium-, and high-input wild blueberry producers in 1993, 1997-1998, 2005-2007, and from 2011 to 2015 (n = 162 fields). Data included native and honey bee densities (count/m2/min) and honey bee stocking densities (hives/ha). Blueberry fruit set, yield, and honey bee hive stocking density models were estimated. Fruit set is impacted about 1.6 times more by native bees than honey bees on a per bee basis. Fruit set significantly explained blueberry yield. Honey bee stocking density in fields predicted honey bee foraging densities. These three models were used in enterprise budgets for all four systems from on-farm surveys of 23 conventional and 12 organic producers (2012-2013). These budgets formed the basis of Monte Carlo simulations of production and profit. Stochastic dominance of net farm income (NFI) cumulative distribution functions revealed that if organic yields are high enough (2,345 kg/ha), organic systems are economically preferable to conventional systems. However, if organic yields are lower (724 kg/ha), it is riskier with higher variability of crop yield and NFI. Although medium-input systems are stochastically dominant with lower NFI variability compared with other conventional systems, the high-input system breaks even with the low-input system if honey bee hive rental prices triple in the future. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  12. Mechanisms for success after long-term nutrient enrichment in a boreal forest understory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Nahanni Grainger

    Full Text Available Global levels of reactive nitrogen are predicted to rise in the coming decades as a result of increased deposition from the burning of fossil fuels and the large-scale conversion of nitrogen into a useable form for agriculture. Many plant communities respond strongly to increases in soil nitrogen, particularly in northern ecosystems where nitrogen levels are naturally very low. An experiment in northern Canada that was initiated in 1990 has been investigating the effects of long-term nutrient enrichment (fertilizer added annually on a boreal forest understory community. We used this experiment to investigate why some species increase in abundance under nutrient enrichment whereas others decline. We focused on four species that differed in their responses to fertilization: Mertensia paniculata and Epilobium angustifolium increased in abundance, Achillea millefolium remained relatively constant and Festuca altaica declined. We hypothesized that the two species that were successful in the new high-nutrient, light-limited environment would be taller, have higher specific leaf area, change phenology by growing earlier in the season and be more morphologically plastic than their less successful counterparts. We compared plant height, specific leaf area, growth spurt date and allocation to leaves in plants grown in control and fertilized plots. We demonstrated that each of the two species that came to dominate fertilized plots has a different combination of traits and responses that likely gave them a competitive advantage; M. paniculata has the highest specific leaf area of the four species whereas E. angustifolium is tallest and exhibits morphological plasticity when fertilized by increasing biomass allocation to leaves. These results indicate that rather than one strategy determining success when nutrients become available, a variety of traits and responses may contribute to a species' ability to persist in a nutrient-enriched boreal forest

  13. Post-disturbance plant community dynamics following a rare natural-origin fire in a Tsuga canadensis forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Murray

    Full Text Available Opportunities to directly study infrequent forest disturbance events often lead to valuable information about vegetation dynamics. In mesic temperate forests of North America, stand-replacing crown fire occurs infrequently, with a return interval of 2000-3000 years. Rare chance events, however, may have profound impacts on the developmental trajectories of forest ecosystems. For example, it has been postulated that stand-replacing fire may have been an important factor in the establishment of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis stands in the northern Great Lakes region. Nevertheless, experimental evidence linking hemlock regeneration to non-anthropogenic fire is limited. To clarify this potential relationship, we monitored vegetation dynamics following a rare lightning-origin crown fire in a Wisconsin hemlock-hardwood forest. We also studied vegetation in bulldozer-created fire breaks and adjacent undisturbed forest. Our results indicate that hemlock establishment was rare in the burned area but moderately common in the scarified bulldozer lines compared to the reference area. Early-successional, non-arboreal species including Rubus spp., Vaccinium angustifolium, sedges (Carex spp., grasses, Epilobium ciliatum, and Pteridium aquilinium were the most abundant post-fire species. Collectively, our results suggest that competing vegetation and moisture stress resulting from drought may reduce the efficacy of scarification treatments as well as the usefulness of fire for preparing a suitable seedbed for hemlock. The increasing prevalence of growing-season drought suggests that silvicultural strategies based on historic disturbance regimes may need to be reevaluated for mesic species.

  14. Do abundance and proximity of the alien Impatiens glandulifera affect pollination and reproductive success of two sympatric co-flowering native species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Jacquemart

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In invasion ecology, potential impacts of aliens on native flora are still under debate. Our aim was to determine the pollinator mediated effects of both proximity and abundance of an alien species on the reproductive success of natives. We chose the highly invasive Impatiens glandulifera and two native species: Epilobium angustifolium and Aconitum napellus ssp. lusitanicum. These species share characteristics allowing for pollination interactions: similar biotopes, overlapping flowering periods and same main pollinators. The effects of abundance (5, 25 and 100 individuals and proximity (0 and 15 m of the alien on visitation rate, insect behaviour, pollen deposition and reproductive success of both natives were investigated during 2 flowering seasons. We used centred visitation rates as they can be directly interpreted as a positive or negative effect of the invasive.Both abundance and proximity of the alien increased bumblebee visitation rates to both natives. On the other hand, abundance of the exotic species had a slight negative effect on honeybee visits to natives while its proximity had no effect. The behaviour of bumblebees changed as visitors left significantly more often the native plants for I. glandulifera when its abundance increased. As a consequence of this “inconstancy”, bees deposited considerable quantities of alien pollen on native stigmas. Nevertheless, this interspecific pollen transfer did not decrease seed set in natives. Self-compatibility and high attractiveness of both native species probably alleviate the risk of altered pollinator services and reproductive success due to the invader in natural populations.

  15. A Cytotoxic and Anti-inflammatory Campesterol Derivative from Genetically Transformed Hairy Roots of Lopezia racemosa Cav. (Onagraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Elizabeth Moreno-Anzúrez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetically transformed hairy root line LRT 7.31 obtained by infecting leaf explants of Lopezia racemosa Cav with the Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain ATCC15834/pTDT, was evaluated to identify the anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic compounds reported previously for the wild plant. After several subcultures of the LRT 7.31 line, the bio-guided fractionation of the dichloromethane–methanol (1:1 extract obtained from dry biomass afforded a fraction that showed important in vivo anti-inflammatory, and in vitro cytotoxic activities. Chemical separation of the active fraction allowed us to identify the triterpenes ursolic (1 and oleanolic (2 acids, and (23R-2α,3β,23,28-tetrahydroxy-14,15-dehydrocampesterol (3 as the anti-inflammatory principles of the active fraction. A new molecule 3 was characterized by spectroscopic analysis of its tetraacetate derivative 3a. This compound was not described in previous reports of callus cultures, in vitro germinated seedlings and wild plant extracts of whole L. racemosa plants. The anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities displayed by the fraction are associated to the presence of compounds 1–3. The present study reports the obtaining of the transformed hairy roots, the bioguided isolation of the new molecule 3, and its structure characterization.

  16. Interactions between bees and Ludwigia elegans (Camb. Hara (Onagraceae flowers at different altitudes in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Gimenes

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Populations of Ludwigia elegans (Carnb. Hara were examined in Aluminio (600m and Campos do Jordão (1520m, in the State of São Paulo. Flowers of both populations are self-incompatible and dependent on bees for pollination. Flowers of Ludwigia elegans at the Aluminio site were visited by about 30 different species of bees, and those at Campos do Jordão by 10. These results can be related to climatic differences at the two sites, especially temperature, due to their difference in altitude. Inspite of the difference in the absolute number of bee species seen at each site, Tetraglossula anthracina (Michener, 1989 (Colletidae can be considered a specialized and efficient pollinator in both areas, since it visited these flowers frequently and showed many morphological and behavioral adaptations for pollen and nectar collection.

  17. Floral nectary, nectar production dynamics and chemical composition in five nocturnal Oenothera species (Onagraceae) in relation to floral visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoń, Sebastian; Komoń-Janczara, Elwira; Denisow, Bożena

    2017-12-01

    Main conclusion The floral nectars were sucrose-dominant; however, nectar protein and amino acid contents differed, indicating that composition of nitrogenous compounds may vary considerably even between closely related plant species, irrespectively of nectary structure. Numerous zoophilous plants attract their pollinators by offering floral nectar; an aqueous solution produced by specialized secretory tissues, known as floral nectaries. Although many papers on nectaries and nectar already exist, there has been a little research into the structure of nectaries and/or nectar production and composition in species belonging to the same genus. To redress this imbalance, we sought, in the present paper, to describe the floral nectary, nectar production, and nectar composition in five nocturnal Oenothera species with respect to their floral visitors. The structure of nectaries was similar for all the species investigated, and comprised the epidermis (with nectarostomata), numerous layers of nectary parenchyma, and subsecretory parenchyma. Anthesis for a single flower was short (ca. 10-12 h), and flowers lasted only one night. The release of floral nectar commenced at the bud stage (approx. 4 h before anthesis) and nectar was available to pollinators until petal closure. Nectar concentration was relatively low (ca. 27%) and the nectar was sucrose-dominant, and composed mainly of sucrose, glucose and fructose. The protein content of the nectar was also relatively low (on average, 0.31 µg ml -1 ). Nevertheless, a great variety of amino acids, including both protein and non-protein types, was detected in the nectar profile of the investigated taxa. We noted both diurnal and nocturnal generalist, opportunistic floral insect visitors.

  18. Trade-offs between reproductive allocation and storage in species of Oenothera L. (Onagraceae) native to Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Alejandra; Cariaga, Rodrigo; González-Paleo, Luciana; Ravetta, Damián

    2008-01-01

    A trade-off between reproduction and survival arises because current reproduction diminishes levels of a limiting resource such that less can be placed in storage organs for the survival of an organism during the unfavorable season. Oenothera is a particularly suited genus for studying those kind of trade-offs because it contains species with different life-history strategies (annual, biennial and perennial). Since allocation to leaves is a major factor associated with changes in life-history, here we tested the hypothesis that Oenothera leaf attributes would affect plant reproductive effort and therefore, root reserves. We selected two groups of taxa differing in their leaf area ratio (low- and high-LAR) and we compared their pattern of resource allocation to growth, reproduction and storage. Path analysis confirmed our hypothesis that LAR is the most important variable in explaining variation in allocation to reproduction or storage. The group with high allocation to leaves assigned resources preferentially to storage while the other group allocated more resources to reproduction, as predicted. A trade-off between reproduction and storage was only confirmed for the high-LAR group. The low-LAR group showed the life-history tactic of annual plants, while the high-LAR group exhibited a strategy generally associated with perenniality.

  19. Organ-specific distribution of phenolic compounds in bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) and 'northblue' blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum x V. angustifolium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihinen, Kaisu; Jaakola, Laura; Kärenlampi, Sirpa; Hohtola, Anja

    2008-09-01

    Blueberries and bilberries are recognized as some of the best sources of flavonoids, especially anthocyanins. The contents of flavonoids (anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, flavonols) and hydroxycinnamic acids in the flower, fruit skin and pulp, leaf and rhizome of bilberry and the blueberry cultivar 'Northblue' were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography combined with diode-array detection. The most striking difference in the fruits was the predominance of hydroxycinnamic acids in blueberry, whereas in bilberry the anthocyanin content was much higher, particularly in the pulp. Differences in flavonoid contents of fruits were already apparent at the flower stage. Bilberry and blueberry leaves both contained high amounts of proanthocyanidins, flavonols and hydroxycinnamic acids. Blueberry rhizomes accumulated high amounts of hydroxycinnamic acids. All plant parts of bilberry and blueberry are potential sources of phenolic compounds for use either as dietary botanicals or by the pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Competition between Sphagnum magellanicum and Eriophorum angustifolium as affected by raised CO2 and increased N deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.M.P.D.; Klees, H.; Berendse, F.

    2002-01-01

    The competition between peat mosses (Sphagnum) and vascular plants as affected by raised CO2 and increased N deposition was studied in a glasshouse experiment by exposing peat monoliths with monocultures and mixtures of Sphagnummagellanicum and Eriophorumangustifolium to ambient (350 ppmv) or raised

  1. Ra-226 concentrations in blueberries Vaccinium angustifolium Ait. near an inactive uranium tailings site in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, N.K.; Lim, T.P.; Cloutier, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ra-226 concentrations were measured in blueberries growing around the Stanrock uranium tailings area near Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada. Elevated levels of total Ra-226 ranging between 20 to 290 mBq g -1 were observed in samples collected within 500 m from the tailings. Highest levels, approx. 285 mBq g -1 , were observed in a sample collected on a tailings spill. For sites located more than 500 m away in the upwind direction, and those situated at distances greater than 1 km downwind from the waste pile, the total Ra-226 concentrations approached background levels which were measured as 2 to 6 mBq g -1 . Approximately 17% of the total Ra-226 measured was removable by washing the samples with distilled water. Wind dispersal of the tailings material and its deposition in the form of dust on blueberries was believed to be responsible for the external contamination. Based on the ICRP recommended dose limits for oral intake of Ra-226, it was calculated that approximately 160 kg a -1 , 3350 kg a -1 and 47 kg a -1 of washed blueberries from inside and outside the influenced zone, and from the tailings spill site, respectively, would need to be consumed before the individual annual limit for the general public was exceeded. (author)

  2. Complex formation of blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) anthocyanins during freeze-drying and its influence on their biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Betanzo, Julieta; Padmanabhan, Priya; Corredig, Milena; Subramanian, Jayasankar; Paliyath, Gopinadhan

    2015-03-25

    Biological activity of polyphenols is influenced by their uptake and is highly influenced by their interactions with the food matrix. This study evaluated the complex formation of blueberry polyphenols with fruit matrixes such as pectin and cellulose and their effect on the biological and antiproliferative properties of human colon cell lines HT-29 and CRL 1790. Free or complexed polyphenols were isolated by dialyzing aqueous or methanolic blueberry homogenates. Seven phenolic compounds and thirteen anthocyanins were identified in blueberry extracts. Blueberry extracts showed varying degrees of antioxidant and antiproliferative activities, as well as α-glucosidase activity. Fruit matrix containing cellulose and pectin, or purified polygalacturonic acid and cellulose, did not retain polyphenols and showed very low antioxidant or antiproliferative activities. These findings suggest that interactions between polyphenols and the food matrix may be more complex than a simple association and may play an important role in the bioefficacy of blueberry polyphenols.

  3. Interaction between visiting bees (Hymenoptera, Apoidea) and flowers of Ludwigia elegans (Camb.) hara (Onagraceae) during the year in two different areas in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenes, M

    2003-11-01

    This study was designed to characterize the interactions between Ludwigia elegans flowers and visiting bees during two years in two areas 200 km apart, at the same latitude (approximately 22 masculine 48'S) but at different altitudes (Alumínio, 600 m, and Campos do Jordão, 1500 m), in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. As these flowers open simultaneously in the morning and lose their petals by sunset, interaction with bees occurs only during the photophase. Flowers of L. elegans were mainly visited by bees, the most frequent species being: Tetraglossula anthracina (Michener, 1989) (Colletidae), Rhophitulus sp. (Andrenidae), and Pseudagapostemon spp. (Halictidae), all considered specialized bees for collecting pollen and nectar from these flowers, as well as the generalist bee Apis mellifera Linnaeus, 1758 (Apidae). The specialist bees were temporally adjusted to the opening schedule of the flower, which occurs primarily in the morning, but shows a circannual variation. T. anthracina appears in both study areas, but only between December and April. The annual activity patterns of these specialist bees are synchronized to the phenology of L. elegans. Photoperiod and temperature cycles are suggested as the main synchronizers of both bees and plants.

  4. Interaction between visiting bees (Hymenoptera, Apoidea and flowers of Ludwigia elegans (Camb. hara (Onagraceae during the year in two different areas in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gimenes

    Full Text Available This study was designed to characterize the interactions between Ludwigia elegans flowers and visiting bees during two years in two areas 200 km apart, at the same latitude (approximately 22º48'S but at different altitudes (Alumínio, 600 m, and Campos do Jordão, 1500 m, in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. As these flowers open simultaneously in the morning and lose their petals by sunset, interaction with bees occurs only during the photophase. Flowers of L. elegans were mainly visited by bees, the most frequent species being: Tetraglossula anthracina (Michener, 1989 (Colletidae, Rhophitulus sp. (Andrenidae, and Pseudagapostemon spp. (Halictidae, all considered specialized bees for collecting pollen and nectar from these flowers, as well as the generalist bee Apis mellifera Linnaeus, 1758 (Apidae. The specialist bees were temporally adjusted to the opening schedule of the flower, which occurs primarily in the morning, but shows a circannual variation. T. anthracina appears in both study areas, but only between December and April. The annual activity patterns of these specialist bees are synchronized to the phenology of L. elegans. Photoperiod and temperature cycles are suggested as the main synchronizers of both bees and plants.

  5. Anthocyanins and phenolic acids from a wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) powder counteract lipid accumulation in THP-1-derived macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Bo', Cristian; Cao, Yi; Roursgaard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Blueberries are a rich source of anthocyanins (ACNs) and phenolic acids (PA), which are hypothesized to protect against development of atherosclerosis. The present study examined the effect of an ACN- and PA-rich fractions, obtained from a wild blueberry powder, on the capacity...... to counteract lipid accumulation in macrophages derived from monocytic THP-1 cells. In addition, we tested the capacity of pure ACNs and their metabolites to alter lipid accumulation. METHODS: THP-1-derived macrophages were incubated with fatty acids (500 μM oleic/palmitic acid, 2:1 ratio) and different...... concentrations (from 0.05 to 10 μg mL(-1)) of ACN- and PA-rich fractions, pure ACN standards (malvidin, delphinidin and cyanidin 3-glucoside), and metabolites (syringic, gallic and protocatechuic acids). Lipid accumulation was quantified with the fluorescent dye Nile red. RESULTS: Lipid accumulation was reduced...

  6. Antividad antibacteriana In vitro de extractos de piper angustifolium (matico) y matricaria chamomilla (manzanilla) en cepas de staphylococcus aureus con resistencia múltiple

    OpenAIRE

    Zuta Arriola, Noemí

    2014-01-01

    El Staphylococcus aureus es el microorganismo más importante causante de infecciones intrahospitalarias y presenta una resistencia múltiple a antibióticos, lo cual conduce a diseñar medidas de prevención dirigidas a controlar y disminuir la resistencia antibiótica. Actualmente se sabe que muchas plantas medicinales tienen actividad antibacteriana, pero su posible efecto frente a bacterias multirresistentes como es el caso de S. aures aislada de muestras clínicas no reúne mayores referencias. ...

  7. Metal and PAH concentrations in fruit of Vaccinium angustifolium Ait. (Lowbush Blueberry) : a comparison among Whitney Pier, North Sydney and supermarket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, B. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Land Resource Science

    2004-07-01

    The concentration of various metals in the fruit harvested from Lowbush blueberry plants in Whitney Pier, Sydney, Nova Scotia (NS), North Sydney (NS) and supermarket were quantified in this report. The concentrations were compared among the 3 sources to determine whether the metal and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentrations in the blueberries from Whitney Pier were higher or lower compared to the reference blueberries from North Sydney and the supermarket. Mean values for each of the analytes were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The study determined whether washed berries have lower concentrations of contaminants than unwashed berries. The risk to human health of exposure to metals and PAHs through consumption of blueberry samples was also calculated. It was concluded that concentrations of selenium and zinc are elevated in blueberries from Whitney Pier compared to berries from North Sydney and the supermarket, but are well within safe levels. Other elements such as arsenic, titanium, vanadium, lead, copper and molybdenum were similar, and only thallium was elevated in supermarket berries relative to those from Whitney Pier and North Sydney. Chromium was not detected in any samples. It was determined that there was no risk to human health from exposure to any of the metals analyzed, regardless of whether they were Whitney Pier samples or reference samples. Only 2 PAHs were detected in one of the unwashed samples from Whitney Pier. No PAHs were found in washed berries or unwashed berries from the supermarket or North Sydney. It was concluded that there was no risk to human health from exposure to any of the PAHs. Washed and unwashed samples had similar metal concentrations, indicating that surface contamination did not occur. A full methodology of the testing program was provided. 11 refs., 7 tabs., 2 figs.

  8. Different effects of anthocyanins and phenolic acids from wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) on monocytes adhesion to endothelial cells in a TNF-α stimulated proinflammatory environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Bo', Cristian; Roursgaard, Martin; Porrini, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Scope: Monocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium is a crucial step in the early stagesof atherogenesis. This study aims to investigate the capacity of an anthocyanin (ACN) andphenolic acid (PA) rich fraction (RF) of a wild blueberry, single ACNs (cyanidin, malvidin,delphinidin) and related me...

  9. Soil Nutrient Availability, Plant Nutrient Uptake, and Wild Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait. Yield in Response to N-Viro Biosolids and Irrigation Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitazaz A. Farooque

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared the impact of surface broadcasted N-Viro biosolids and inorganic fertilizer (16.5% Ammonium sulphate, 34.5% Diammonium phosphate, 4.5% Potash, and 44.5% s and/or clay filler applications on soil properties and nutrients, leaf nutrient concentration, and the fruit yield of lowbush blueberry under irrigated and nonirrigated conditions during 2008-2009 at Debert, NS, Canada. Application rates of N-Viro biosolids were more than double of inorganic fertilizer applied at a recommended N rate of 32 kg ha−1. The experimental treatments NI: N-Viro with irrigation, FI: inorganic fertilizer with irrigation, N: N-Viro without irrigation, and F: inorganic fertilizer without irrigation (control were replicated four times under a randomized complete block design. The NI treatment had the highest OM (6.68% followed by FI (6.32%, N (6.18%, and F (4.43% treatments during the year 2008. Similar trends were observed during 2009 with the highest soil OM values (5.50% for NI treatment. Supplemental irrigation resulted in a 21% increase in the ripe fruit yield. Nonsignificant effect of fertilizer treatments on most of the nutrient concentrations in soil and plant leaves, and on ripe fruits yield reflects that the performance of N-Viro was comparable with that of the inorganic fertilizer used in this study.

  10. Parameterization of the InVEST Crop Pollination Model to spatially predict abundance of wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton) native bee pollinators in Maine, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff, Shannon C.; Loftin, Cynthia S.; Drummond, Frank; Bushmann, Sara; McGill, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-native honeybees historically have been managed for crop pollination, however, recent population declines draw attention to pollination services provided by native bees. We applied the InVEST Crop Pollination model, developed to predict native bee abundance from habitat resources, in Maine's wild blueberry crop landscape. We evaluated model performance with parameters informed by four approaches: 1) expert opinion; 2) sensitivity analysis; 3) sensitivity analysis informed model optimization; and, 4) simulated annealing (uninformed) model optimization. Uninformed optimization improved model performance by 29% compared to expert opinion-informed model, while sensitivity-analysis informed optimization improved model performance by 54%. This suggests that expert opinion may not result in the best parameter values for the InVEST model. The proportion of deciduous/mixed forest within 2000 m of a blueberry field also reliably predicted native bee abundance in blueberry fields, however, the InVEST model provides an efficient tool to estimate bee abundance beyond the field perimeter.

  11. 7 CFR 1218.101 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... genus Vaccinium Corymbosum and Ashei, including the northern highbush, southern highbush, rabbit eye varieties, and any hybrid, and excluding the lowbush (native) blueberry Vaccinium Angustifolium. (c...

  12. INvENTAIRE FLORISTIqUE ET EFFET DE LA DENSITÉ DE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KyllingaerectaSchum. var. flabelliformis (Cyperaceae). +. +. +. 92. Kyllingapumila Michaux (Cyperaceae). +. +. +. 93. Lantana camara L. (verbenaceae). +. -. -. 94. Leptoderrisfasciculata(Benth.) Dunn. (Fabaceae). -. +. -. 95. Lindernia diffusa (L.) Wettst. (Scrophulariaceae). +. -. -. 96. Ludwigiaabyssinica A. Rich. (Onagraceae).

  13. 7 CFR 1218.2 - Blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... Blueberries means cultivated blueberries grown in or imported into the United States of the genus Vaccinium Corymbosum and Ashei, including the northern highbush, southern highbush, rabbit eye varieties, and any hybrid, and excluding the lowbush (native) blueberry Vaccinium Angustifolium. ...

  14. Evolutionary relationships in Vaccinium section Cyanococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The North American Vaccinium section Cyanococcus includes the ecologically and economically important blueberry species, Vaccinium corymbosum (highbush blueberry), Vaccinium angustifolium (lowbush blueberry), Vaccinium myrtilloides (velvet-leaf blueberry), and Vaccinium virgatum (rabbiteye blueberry...

  15. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on carbohydrate partitioning and plant growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulen, G; mw. Steg, K.; mw. Schalkwijk, I.; Posthumus, F.S

    2000-01-01

    The effect of elevated CO2 on changes in shoot and root soluble carbohydrate and starch content, and various growth parameters was investigated in an apoplastic (Bellis perennis) and a symplastic loader (Epilobium hirsutum). Comparison with data on other plant species, grown under the same climatic

  16. Vegetative reproduction by species with different adaptations to shallow-flooded habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenssen, J.P.M.; Menting, F.B.J.; Van der Putten, W.H.; Blom, C.W.P.M.

    2000-01-01

    In shallow flooded parts of rich fens Mentha aquatica might thrive in deeper water than Epilobium hirsutum but previous experiments have provided no clear indication that the flooding tolerance of these species differs. In this study we investigated, by measuring growth, biomass allocation and

  17. New floristic records in the Balkans: 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    -67, 92), Dipsacaceae (61), Dryopteridaceae (6, 51), Euphorbiaceae (40), Fabaceae (80, 81, 99, 100, 112, 113), Gentianaceae (82), Guttiferae (101, 114), Hypolepidaceae (7), Iridaceae (42), Isoetaceae (8), Lamiaceae (83, 84), Liliaceae s.l. (43, 44, 104), Onagraceae (7), (42), (8), (83, 84), s.l. (43, 44...

  18. New floristic records in the Balkans: 17

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarkos, G.; Christodolou, V.; Tan, Kit

    2011-01-01

    (13, 87), Dipsacaceae (138), Fabaceae (1–3, 41, 81, 82, 98, 139), Iridaceae (64, 65, 88), Juncaceae (14, 15), Lamiaceae (8, 42–45, 99, 100), Liliaceae s.l. (66–69, 104, 105, 113, 142), Linaceae (9), Loranthaceae (46), Monotropaceae (83, 110), Moraceae (129), Onagraceae (47), Orchidaceae (89, 90, 106...

  19. Phylogenetic relationships in the "grossulariae" species group of the genus Aphis (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae): Molecular evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcinaviciene, Jorga; Rakauskas, Rimantas; Pedersen, Bo Vest

    2006-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among Palaearctic Ribes and/or Onagraceae inhabiting Aphis species from five countries were examined using mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase I (CO-I) and nuclear gene elongation factor 1 a (EF-1a) sequences. There was no major conflict between the trees obtained fro...

  20. Reevaluation of Vegetational Characteristics at the CERC (Coastal Engineering Research Center) Field Research Facility, Duck, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    var. cerifera L. Wax myrtle Onagraceae *Ludiigia aZata Ell. W. - r-priurose Oenothera frticoea L. drops 0. hisniflsa Nuttall Evening primrose... Orchidaceae Spiranthee cernua ver. odorata Nodding ladies’ (Nuttall) Correll. tresses Passiflorarese *PassifZora lutea L. Passion-flower Phytolacaceat POytoZaca

  1. Area Strip Mine Reclamation Using Dredged Material: A Field Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    COMMON BEGGAR’S TICK Bidens frondosa COMMON EVENING PRIMROSE Oenothera biennis COMMON ORACH Atriplex patula COMMON REED Phraginites communis...altissima ACERACEAE BOX ELDER Acer negundo RHAMNACEAE COMMON BUCKTHORN Rhamnus cathartica A8 r ONAGRACEAE COMMON EVENING PRIMROSE Oenothera biennis

  2. Spatial distribution and changes in occurrence of some weed species in the orchard in AES Felin near Lublin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Lipecki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available From 1993 to 1997 a study of spatial distribution of most important weeds in apple orchard herbicide strips was performed. This study was continued in 1998, once the trees were cut down. As the time progressed, Epilobium adenocaulon Hausskn., Chenopodium album L., Polygonum aviculare L. and Atriplex patulum L. showed an increase in their occurrence. An opposite tendency was found with Erigeron canadensis L., Convolvulus arvensis L. and Taraxacum fficinale Web. Some species grew in patches (Convolvulus arvensis L., Chenopodium album L., Atriplex patulum L., while the others appeared sporadically throughout the orchard. In 1998, the decrease of occurrence of Epilobium Haussk. was observed. Simultaneously, this was coupled with an increase of occurrence of Taraxacum officinale Web., Erigeron caanadensis L. and Chenopodium album L. The predominating species in 1998 was Cerastium vulgatum L., followed by Lolium perenne L., Poa annua L. and Bromus mollis L.

  3. Differences in response of two Sphagnum species to elevated CO2 and nitrogen input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauhiainen, J.; Vasander, H.; Silvola, J.

    1992-01-01

    Cushions of Sphagnum fuscum and S. angustifolium were grown in the laboratory in four different CO 2 concentrations (350, 700, 1000 and 2000 ppm) and N deposition levels (0, 10, 30 and 100 kg/ha - 1 a - 1). The same N deposition levels were also applied in the field. CO 2 concentration increases both the shoot density and dry mass of S. fuscum but decreased the length increment. There was no net effect on production. For S. angustifolium, shoot density did not alter with elevated CO 2 concentration but the CO 2 induced increment in dry mass and length caused increased production. S. angustifolium suffered from nutrient deficiency on the 0kg/ha - 1 a - 1 treatment and S. fuscum had difficulties to survive at heaviest N load. No clear trends in length increment or cover was noticed in the field study during the first year

  4. Chemical and biological characterisation of solvent extracts and essential oils from leaves and fruit of two Australian species of Pittosporum (Pittosporaceae) used in aboriginal medicinal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadgrove, Nicholas John; Jones, Graham Lloyd

    2013-02-13

    Although no known medicinal use for Pittosporum undulatum Vent. (Pittosporaceae) has been recorded, anecdotal evidence suggests that Australian Aboriginal people used Pittosporum angustifolium Lodd., G. Lodd. & W. Lodd. topically for eczema, pruritis or to induce lactation in mothers following child-birth and internally for coughs, colds or cramps. Essential oil composition and bioactivity as well as differential solvent extract antimicrobial activity from Pittosporum angustifolium are investigated here first, to partially describe the composition of volatiles released in traditional applications of Pittosporum angustifolium for colds or as a lactagogue, and second to investigate antibacterial activity related to topical applications. Essential oils were also investigated from Pittosporum undulatum Vent., first to enhance essential oil data produced in previous studies, and second as a comparison to Pittosporum angustifolium. Essential oils were hydrodistilled from fruit and leaves of both species using a modified approach to lessen the negative (frothing) effect of saponins. This was achieved by floating pumice or pearlite obsidian over the mixture to crush the suds formed while boiling. Essential oil extracts were analysed using GC-MS, quantified using GC-FID then screened for antimicrobial activity using a micro-titre plate broth dilution assay (MIC). Using dichloromethane, methanol, hexane and H(2)O as solvents, extracts were produced from leaves and fruit of Pittosporum angustifolium and screened for antimicrobial activity and qualitative phytochemical character. Although the essential oil from leaves and fruit of Pittosporum undulatum demonstrated some component variation, the essential oil from fruits of Pittosporum angustifolium had major constituents that strongly varied according to the geographical location of collection, suggesting the existence of at least two chemotypes; one with high abundance of acetic acid decyl ester. This chemotype had high

  5. Crop evapotranspiration and irrigation scheduling in blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are currently 139,000 ha of blueberry worldwide, including 66,000 ha of highbush [comprises northern highbush (Vaccinium corymbosum), southern highbush (Vaccinium sp.), and rabbiteye (V. virgatum formerly V. asheii) cultivars] and 73,000 ha of lowbush blueberry (V. angustifolium). The majority...

  6. Comparison of phenolic acid profiles and anti-inflammatory effects of two major species of blueberries in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueberries (BB) contain high levels of polyphenols. Among them, phenolic acids (PAs) have been recently suggested as a group of important bioactive compounds. Highbush BB (Vaccinium corymbosum) and lowbush “wild" BB (Vaccinium angustifolium) are two predominant species in North America. The first o...

  7. Two mire species respond differently to enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation: effects on biomass allocation and root exudation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka Tiivi Mariisa; Gehrke, Carola; Michelsen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    •  Increased ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation arising from stratospheric ozone depletion may influence soil microbial communities via effects on plant carbon allocation and root exudation. •  Eriophorum angustifolium and Narthecium ossifragum plants, grown in peatland mesocosms consisting of Sphagnum...

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... and Cladophora nitellopsis of green, Polycladia myrica, Sirophysalia trinodis and Sargassum angustifolium of brown and Gracilaria canaliculata and Hypnea cervicornis of red seaweeds showed highest biomass in coastal areas of Bushehr Province. The Cheney's ratio of 2.1 indicated a temperate algal flora to this area.

  9. Triterpenes and flavonol glucuronides from Oenothera cheiranthifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Inatomi, Yuka; Murata, Hiroko; Ishida, Syun-Suke; Fujino, Yuri; Miura, Kanako; Yasuno, Yoshito; Inada, Akira; Lang, Frank A; Murata, Jin

    2007-02-01

    A new ursane-type triterpene, named as cheiranthic acid (1), was isolated from the MeOH extract of whole plants of Oenothera cheiranthifolia (Onagraceae) along with an isomeric pair of known oleanane- and ursane-type triterpenes (arjunolic acid and asiatic acid) and three flavonol glucuronide analogues (quercetin 3-O-glucuronide, its n-butyl ester, and myricetin 3-O-glucuronide). Their structures were elucidated based on spectroscopic evidence.

  10. Modulation of gene expression as a new skin anti-aging strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbourdet, Sylvie; Sadick, Neil S; Lazou, Kristell; Bonnet-Duquennoy, Mathilde; Kurfurst, Robin; Neveu, Michele; Heusèle, Catherine; André, Patrice; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Draelos, Zoe D; Perrier, Eric

    2007-06-01

    [corrected] The signs of aging may originate from natural processes or from exposure to the sun, wind, or other environmental factors. To evaluate the anti-aging effects of potential agents researchers must first identify and be able to quantify epidermal markers that change with aging. This paper summarizes the results of studies conducted to evaluate the transcriptional effects of an Aframomum angustifolium seed extract and Malva Sylvestris extract, and the antiaging efficacy of a skin care product containing the Aframomum angustifolium seed extract. The transcriptional effect of an Aframomum angustifolium seed extract on normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) and normal human fibroblasts (NHF) was evaluated in vitro with the use of a low-density DNA array technology. The Malva Sylvestris extract was studied with a commercial DNA macroarray and by a real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The in vitro anti-aging activities of the Malva sylvestris extract were compared with those of all-trans retinoic acid (RA), a well-established topical therapy for photodamage and wrinkles. The genes studied were known to be modified by RA. The anti-aging efficacy of a facial skin care product containing Aframomum angustifolium seed extract was evaluated in a single-center study using image processing analysis and in a 2-center study by evaluation of the photographs by the investigator, independent evaluators, and subjects. In general, the Aframomum angustifolium seed extract strongly modified the gene expression profiles of NHKs and weakly modified the gene expression profiles of NHFs. After incubation with Aframomum angustifolium seed extract, the expressions of 3 antioxidant genes (metallothionein 1, metallothionein 2, and thioredoxin) were increased in NHKs, while expressions of 1 antioxidant gene (glutathione peroxidase) was increased in NHFs. Concerning the Malva sylvestris extract, a cDNA macro-array technology experiment with the reconstructed

  11. Carbon balance of a boreal bog during a year with an exceptionally dry summer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, J.; Silvola, J. [Univ. of Joensuu (Finland). Dept. of Biology; Schulman, L. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Systematics; Walden, J. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland); Nykaenen, H.; Martikainen, P.J. [National Public Health Inst., Kuopio (Finland). Lab. of Environmental Microbiology

    1999-01-01

    Northern peatlands are important terrestrial carbon stores, and they show large spatial and temporal variation in the atmospheric exchange of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. Thus, annual carbon balance must be studied in detail in order to predict the climatic responses of these ecosystems. Closed-chamber methods were used to study CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} in hollow, Sphagnum angustifolium lawn. S. fuscum lawn, and hummock microsites within an ombrotrophic S. fuscum bog. Micrometeorological tower measurements were used as a reference for the CH{sub 3} efflux from the bog. Low precipitation during May--August in 1994 and a warm July--August period caused the water table to drop by more than 15 cm below the peat surface in the hollows and to 48 cm below the surface in high hummocks. Increased annual total respiration exceeded gross production and resulted in a net C loss of 4--157 g/m{sup 2} in the different microsites. Drought probably caused irreversible desiccation in some lawns of S. angustifolium and S. balticum and in S. fuscum in the hummocks, while S. balticum growing in hollows retained its moisture and even increased its photosynthetic capacity during the July--August period. Seasonal (12 May--4 October) CH{sub 4} emissions ranged from 2 g CH{sub 4}-C/m{sup 2} in drier S. fuscum hummocks and lawns to 7 and 14 g/m{sup 2} in wetter S. angustifolium-S. balticum lawns and hollows, respectively.

  12. Pollination Reservoirs in Lowbush Blueberry (Ericales: Ericaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Venturini, E. M.; Drummond, F. A.; Hoshide, A. K.; Dibble, A. C.; Stack, L. B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pollinator-dependent agriculture heavily relies upon a single pollinator?the honey bee. To diversify pollination strategies, growers are turning to alternatives. Densely planted reservoirs of pollen- and nectar-rich flowers (pollination reservoirs, hereafter ?PRs?) may improve pollination services provided by wild bees. Our focal agroecosystem, lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton), exists in a simple landscape uniquely positioned to benefit from PRs. First, we contrast b...

  13. Study of Plant Species Composition of Grasslands in Mugla Village Region (Western Rhodopes, South Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plamen S. Stoyanov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study presents data on the diversity of grass species in the region of the village of Mugla (the Western Rhodopes. One hundred forty-one species of higher plants belonging to 40families were registered. (Apiaceae, Aspleniaceae, Asteraceae, Boraginaceae, Brassicaceae,Campanulaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Cistaceae, Cyperaceae, Dipsacaceae, Equisetaceae, Ericaceae,Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, Gentianaceae, Geraniaceae, Gesneriaceae, Hypericaceae, Juncaceae,Lamiaceae, Lemnaceae, Liliaceae, Linaceae, Menyanthaceae, Oleacea, Onagraceae, Orchidaceae,Parnassiaceae, Plantaginaceae, Plumbaginaceae, Poaceae, Polygalaceae, Primulaceae,Ranunculaceae, Rosaceae, Rubiaceae, Saxifragaceae, Scrophulariaceae, Valerianaceae andViolaceae. Their conservation status was presented, as well as medicinal plants.

  14. Localization of a defensive volatile 4-hydroxy-4-methylpentan-2-one in the capitate glandular trichomes of Oenothera glazioviana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanyun Tan; Desen Li; Juan Hua; Shihong Luo; Yan Liu; Shenghong Li

    2017-01-01

    Glandular trichomes of plants produce a wide variety of secondary metabolites which are considered as major defensive chemicals. The capitate glandular trichomes of Oenothera glazioviana (Onagraceae) were collected with laser microdissection and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The volatile compound 4-hydroxy-4-methylpentan-2-one (1) was identified. We found that compound 1 displays antimicrobial, insecticidal, and phytotoxic activities. These results suggest that compound 1 might function as a defensive compound in the capitate glandular trichomes of O. glazioviana against pathogens, insect herbivores, and presumably competitive plants as well.

  15. An updated review on the Oenothera genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sumitra; Kaur, Rupinder; Sharma, Surendra Kr

    2012-07-01

    Oenothera genus (Onagraceae) has been used as a folk remedy since ancient times for the treatment of asthma, gastrointestinal disorders, neuralgia, skin diseases, and hepatic and kidney diseases. Different chemical constituents like lipids, flavonoids, tannins, steroids and triterpenes have been isolated from this genus. The various notable pharmacological activities reported from the genus are antioxidant, cytotoxic, antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antihyperlipidaemic, thrombolytic and antidiarrhoeal. The present paper is to summarize the worldwide reported biological activities and phytoconstituents associated with this genus for about 50 years and highlight the medicinally important species belonging to this genus so that these species can be further explored and used as therapeutic agents for various diseases.

  16. Localization of a defensive volatile 4-hydroxy-4-methylpentan-2-one in the capitate glandular trichomes of Oenothera glazioviana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyun Tan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Glandular trichomes of plants produce a wide variety of secondary metabolites which are considered as major defensive chemicals. The capitate glandular trichomes of Oenothera glazioviana (Onagraceae were collected with laser microdissection and analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. The volatile compound 4-hydroxy-4-methylpentan-2-one (1 was identified. We found that compound 1 displays antimicrobial, insecticidal, and phytotoxic activities. These results suggest that compound 1 might function as a defensive compound in the capitate glandular trichomes of O. glazioviana against pathogens, insect herbivores, and presumably competitive plants as well.

  17. Herbal extracts in the treatment of Diabetic Foot Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Kustova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most serious complications of diabetes is the formation of Diabetic Foot Syndrome. Herbal extracts that combine high antioxidant and antimicrobial properties can be used to treat the resulting neuropathy. The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of crude extracts isolated from plants growing in Kazakhstan, which could be used to develop products for treatment of Diabetic Foot Syndrome. Method: Different solvents, including dichloromethane and ethanol, were used to prepare plant extracts. The crude extracts from the plants were tested for antimicrobial activity using a modified version of the CLSI/NCCLS methods. All organisms were obtained from American Type Culture Collection. These included the fungi Candida glabrata ATTC 90030, the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, and Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ATCC 43300. The 2,2-diphеnyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay, 2,2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS radical scavenging assay were used to analyzed the antioxidant capacity. Results: The results clearly indicate that antibacterial and antifungal activities vary with plant species. Dichloromethane extracts produced favorable results in all assays. Epilobium hirsutum, Rhodiola quadrifida, Rumex confertus showed antifungal activity against Candida glabrata in all extracts where IC50 less than 3 μg/ml. Rumex confertus, Glycyrrhiza Uralensis and Vexibia alopecuroides showed anti-fungal activity against Staphylococcus aureus (IC50 =10.80 μg/ml, (IC50 =11.10 μg/ml, (IC50 =3.05 μg/ml and Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (IC50 =16.20 μg/ml, (IC50 =11.00 μg/ml, (IC50 =2.90 μg/ml respectively.  In spite of this, Vexibia alopecuroides extract showed no antioxidant activity. The other extracts showed a dose dependent ABTS scavenging activity. IC50 values were for the following: 6.6 μg/ml Epilobium hirsutum; 4.5 μg/ml Rumex confertus; 3.8

  18. Методика и результативность гибридизации голубики узколистной (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait. ) и голубики высокорослой (Vaccinium corymbosum L. ) на стадии виргинильных особей

    OpenAIRE

    МОРОЗОВ ОЛЕГ ВСЕВОЛОДОВИЧ

    2014-01-01

    Апробированная методика позволяет получить необходимое для дальнейших исследований количество экспериментального растительного материала. Одно из главных условий как можно более быстрое, без предварительной стратификации, выделение семян из свежесобранных ягод, сформировавшихся в результате гибридизации, и их высев в верховой слабо разложившийся торф. Достаточно высокая результативность скрещивания на стадии виргинильных особей свидетельствует о целесообразности продолжения эксперимента...

  19. Ecological Assessment of Vandenburg Air Force Base, California. Volume 2. Biological Inventory 1974/75

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    Conium maculatum 15 15 ə-100 Urtica holcserioea 15 < 1 - 1 - 5 Z-jvphularia atvata 15 •1 di ichus bullata 35 <. 1 ə turn tclmateia 15 < 1 1 - 5...33.0 Pteridium aquilir.um 22.0 Horkelia auneata 19.0 Staohys rigida 19-0 Conium maculatum 19-0 Viola queroetonon 16.5 Pterostegia dvymarioides l6...Apiastrwn angustifolium Baaaharis ep. B. Douglaaii Bras sioa sp. Caulanthup oalifomiaua Chenopodiim sp. Conium maoulatum Eriophyllum

  20. Reinvestigation of the Miocene palynoflora from the Daotaiqiao Formation of north-eastern China using SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyurt, Elvan; Grímsson, Friðgeir; Zetter, Reinhard; Leng, Qin; Bouchal, Johannes Martin

    2016-04-01

    Here we report the first results of an ongoing study on the Miocene palynoflora from the Daotaiqiao Formation of north-eastern China. Using the single grain technique, we examined individual pollen and spores using both light and scanning electron microscopy. A previous study by Grímsson et al. (2012) on Onagraceae pollen grains from this locality, using the same technique identified five different species. Such a variety of Onagraceae from a single palynoflora is unknown elsewhere. The ongoing study suggests a remarkably rich pollen and spore flora with at least 15 different types of spores, one Ginkgo and one Ephedra type pollen, 11 conifer pollen types and approximately 145 angiosperm pollen types. Spores are very rare in the samples (≤1%). Conifer pollen grains are regularly observed but are not a dominant component (ca. 16 %). The samples yield a high quantity and diversity of angiosperm pollen (ca. 80%). The conifers include representatives of Cupressaceae (2 spp.), Pinaceae (Larix, Picea, Pinus, Tsuga) and Sciadopityaceae. The angiosperm pollen cover at least 40 families. Prominent elements are pollen of the Betulaceae (Alnus, Betula, Carpinus, Corylus), Cercidiphyllaceae (Cercidiphyllum), Ericaceae (8 spp.), Eucommiaceae (Eucommia), Fagaceae (Fagus, Quercus spp., Castaneoideae), Juglandaceae (Carya, Cyclocarya, Juglans, Pterocarya), Rosaceae (11 spp.), Sapindaceae (Acer, Aesculus) and Ulmaceae (Hemiptelia, Ulmus, Zelkova). The high angiosperm pollen diversity indicates a varying landscape with a relatively high variety of niches including riparian, dry and mesic forests. Most of the potential modern analogues of the fossil taxa are currently thriving under humid temperate (Cfa- and Cwa)-climates, pointing to paleoclimate conditions not unlike those found today in the lowlands and adjacent mountain regions of the (south-) eastern United States, the humid-meridional region of western Eurasia, and central and southern China, and Honshu (Japan). References

  1. Mecanismos de repartición de recursos entre dos especies de colibríes (Coeligena prunellei - Doryfera ludoviciae en la reserva biológica Cachalú, Santander, colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Camilo Sandoval Parra

    2007-01-01

    uso de los tres estratos del bosque. Se hallaron diferencias significativas entre las medidas morfométricas del culmen expuesto, la longitud de la cuerda alar, la cola y el peso; mientras que no se encontraron diferencias entre las medidas de culmen total comisura y tarso. Los recursos florales estuvieron concentrados en el interior del bosque, con seis especies vegetales (Palicourea sp., Tillandsia sp., Guzmania sp. y Gesneriaceae entre otras, mientras que en el rastrojo solo encontramos tres (Macleania sp., Cavendishia sp., y Centropogon sp.. En las cargas de polen contamos 4.890 granos, entre los que identifique seis palinomorfos que correspondieron a Ericaceas, Campanulaceas, Onagraceas y Bromeliaceas. Los granos de polen fueron transportados en orden de proporción en la frente, en la garganta y en el pico.

  2. Development and characterization of evening primrose (Oenothera biennis oil nanoemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Railane F. Rodrigues

    Full Text Available AbstractEvening primrose (Oenothera biennis L., Onagraceae seeds oil has great economic importance due to its wide industrial application, mainly for medicines and nutraceutics. However, to our knowledge, it remains almost unexplored regarding development of innovative formulations, such as nanoemulsions. On the present study, required Hydroprophile–Lipophile Balance of evening primrose seeds oil was determined (HLB 12 and a stable nanoemulsion (Day 1: mean droplet size: 214.3 ± 0.69 nm, polydispersity index: 0.253 ± 0.012. Day 7: mean droplet size: 202.8 ± 0.23 nm, polydispersity index: 0.231 ± 0.008 was achieved. Moreover, pseudo-ternary diagram allowed delimitation of nanoemulsion region, contributing to nanobiotechnology of natural products.

  3. Growth of micropropagated lowbush blueberry with defined fungi in irradiated peat mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litten, Walter; Smagula, J.M.; Dalpe, Yolande

    1992-01-01

    There is an interest in vegetative multiplication of high-yielding clones of Vaccinium angustifolium Ait. to establish or enhance blueberry production. This study evaluates mycorrhizal inoculation as an aid in such propagation from microcuttings. Shoots of Vaccinium angustifolium (clone 7062) generated in vitro were rooted in a peat-vermiculite-perlite substrate with or without ericoid mycorrhizal fungi fortification by Hymenoscyphus ericae or Scytalidium vaccinii and with or without peat sterilization by γ irradiation. Both in irradiated peat mix inoculated with S. vaccinii and in unirradiated peat mix with H. ericae, microcuttings grew taller and branched more than with the four other treatments. The profusely rooted plantlets available from all treatments of the cuttings put on significantly more total length of stems and branches after 167 days in the greenhouse when growing with either inoculant in unirradiated peat than in the unirradiated peat without inoculation. However, the magnitude of difference might be of borderline importance in commercial nursery operations. A higher level of copper and zinc in stem tissue was observed in stem tissue of plants grown with H. ericae with or without irradiation but not with S. vaccinii

  4. Differential iridoid production as revealed by a diversity panel of 84 cultivated and wild blueberry species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, Courtney P; Kamileen, Mohamed O; Conway, Megan E; O'Connor, Sarah E; Buell, C Robin

    2017-01-01

    Cultivated blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum, Vaccinium angustifolium, Vaccinium darrowii, and Vaccinium virgatum) is an economically important fruit crop native to North America and a member of the Ericaceae family. Several species in the Ericaceae family including cranberry, lignonberry, bilberry, and neotropical blueberry species have been shown to produce iridoids, a class of pharmacologically important compounds present in over 15 plant families demonstrated to have a wide range of biological activities in humans including anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory. While the antioxidant capacity of cultivated blueberry has been well studied, surveys of iridoid production in blueberry have been restricted to fruit of a very limited number of accessions of V. corymbosum, V. angustifolium and V. virgatum; none of these analyses have detected iridoids. To provide a broader survey of iridoid biosynthesis in cultivated blueberry, we constructed a panel of 84 accessions representing a wide range of cultivated market classes, as well as wild blueberry species, and surveyed these for the presence of iridoids. We identified the iridoid glycoside monotropein in fruits and leaves of all 13 wild Vaccinium species, yet only five of the 71 cultivars. Monotropein positive cultivars all had recent introgressions from wild species, suggesting that iridoid production can be targeted through breeding efforts that incorporate wild germplasm. A series of diverse developmental tissues was also surveyed in the diversity panel, demonstrating a wide range in iridoid content across tissues. Taken together, this data provides the foundation to dissect the molecular and genetic basis of iridoid production in blueberry.

  5. Pollen loads and specificity of native pollinators of lowbush blueberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisan-Deserres, J; Girard, M; Chagnon, M; Fournier, V

    2014-06-01

    The reproduction of lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton) is closely tied to insect pollination, owing to self-incompatibility. Many species are known to have greater pollination efficiency than the introduced Apis mellifera L., commonly used for commercial purposes. In this study, we measured the pollen loads of several antophilous insect species, mostly Apoidea and Syrphidae, present in four lowbush blueberry fields in Lac-St-Jean, Québec. To measure pollen loads and species specificity toward V. angustifolium, we net-collected 627 specimens of pollinators, retrieved their pollen loads, identified pollen taxa, and counted pollen grains. We found that the sizes of pollen loads were highly variable among species, ranging from a few hundred to more than 118,000 pollen grains per individual. Bombus and Andrena species in particular carried large amounts of Vaccinium pollen and thus may have greater pollination efficiency. Also, two species (Andrena bradleyi Viereck and Andrena carolina Viereck) showed nearly monolectic behavior toward lowbush blueberry. Finally, we identified alternative forage plants visited by native pollinators, notably species of Acer, Rubus, Ilex mucronata, Ledum groenlandicum, and Taraxacum. Protecting these flowering plants should be part of management practices to maintain healthy pollinator communities in a lowbush blueberry agroecosystem.

  6. Effect of repeated mowing to reduce graminoid plant cover on the moss carpet at a Sphagnum farm in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guêné-Nanchen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sphagnum farming is defined as the sustainable production of non-decomposed Sphagnum biomass on a cyclical and renewable basis. In this article, the influence and necessity of mowing graminoid plants to optimise Sphagnum growth in Sphagnum farming basins are examined. Repeated mowing was applied to reduce graminoid plant cover at two different stages of the production cycle (one-year-old and seven-year-old Sphagnum moss carpet at the beginning of the experiment at an experimental Sphagnum farm in eastern Canada. Sphagnum growth (cover, biomass, moss layer thickness was measured after three years of mowing. In addition, a greenhouse experiment was carried out to determine whether there is a threshold for graminoid plant cover beyond which mowing becomes necessary. Sphagnum cover and biomass were not affected by repeated mowing, even if mowing reduced the cover of graminoid plants. Thus, it appears that mowing is unnecessary if the dominant vascular species is a graminoid plant such as Eriophorum angustifolium, which accumulates minimal amounts of litter. Furthermore, high cover of Eriophorum angustifolium (up to 85 % did not affect Sphagnum cover in a density-controlled greenhouse experiment. When the specific goal is Sphagnum fibre production, decisions about control of graminoid plants should be made after considering the cover, life form and litter accumulation potentials of the dominant graminoid species involved.

  7. Response Analysis of eight native species of high Andean forest with two methods of propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda Sandra Liliana; Garzon Alvaro Ernesto; Cantillo Miguel Angel; Torres Monica Patricia; Silva Luis Jairo

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this research was to generate information on the native tree species represent an alternative in the ecological restoration of the Colombian high Andean forests, according to its dynamo-genetic characteristics. We have chosen and spread the species: Baccharis latifolia (R and P), Bocconia frutescens L., Cordia cylindrostachya (R and P), Diplostephium rosmarinifolium (Benth), Drymis granadensis L f., Eupatorium angustifolium (Kunth), Palicourea vaginata Benth, and Palicourea linearifolia Wernham. The species include a morphological description of flowers, fruits and seeds, and ISTA tests. The spread experiments were made in the nurseries of the Universidad Distrital and La Florida park. For the sexual spread, we have used as treatments four gibberellins concentrations and three shadow conditions, while the vegetative spread consisted of two diameters and ive indol butiric acid (IBA) concentrations. Results have shown that pre-germination treatments are needed for Bocconia frutescens y Palicourea vaginata, in order to increase the probability and germination rate. On the other hand, shadow conditions are needed for Baccharis latifolia, Diplostephium rosmarinifolium, Drymis granadensis, Eupatorium angustifolium and Palicourea vaginata, as their seeds exhibit photoblastic characteristics. Due to the Cordia cylindrostachya and Palicourea linearifolia seed attack by insects (Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera) their sexual spread is highly limited. Finally, regarding the species response to the IBA and diameter combinations, each species responded in a different manner. Additionally, regarding the vegetative spread, the species Bocconia frutescens, Cordia cylindrostachya, Palicourea vaginata, Diplostephium rosmarinifolium and Drymis granadensis were very difficult to spread

  8. Response Analysis of eight native species of high Andean forest with two methods of propagation; Analisis de la respuesta de ocho especies nativas del bosque alto andino ante dos metodos de propagacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liliana, Castaneda Sandra; Ernesto, Garzon Alvaro; Angel, Cantillo Miguel; Patricia, Torres Monica; Jairo, Silva Luis

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this research was to generate information on the native tree species represent an alternative in the ecological restoration of the Colombian high Andean forests, according to its dynamo-genetic characteristics. We have chosen and spread the species: Baccharis latifolia (R and P), Bocconia frutescens L., Cordia cylindrostachya (R and P), Diplostephium rosmarinifolium (Benth), Drymis granadensis L f., Eupatorium angustifolium (Kunth), Palicourea vaginata Benth, and Palicourea linearifolia Wernham. The species include a morphological description of flowers, fruits and seeds, and ISTA tests. The spread experiments were made in the nurseries of the Universidad Distrital and La Florida park. For the sexual spread, we have used as treatments four gibberellins concentrations and three shadow conditions, while the vegetative spread consisted of two diameters and ive indol butiric acid (IBA) concentrations. Results have shown that pre-germination treatments are needed for Bocconia frutescens y Palicourea vaginata, in order to increase the probability and germination rate. On the other hand, shadow conditions are needed for Baccharis latifolia, Diplostephium rosmarinifolium, Drymis granadensis, Eupatorium angustifolium and Palicourea vaginata, as their seeds exhibit photoblastic characteristics. Due to the Cordia cylindrostachya and Palicourea linearifolia seed attack by insects (Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera) their sexual spread is highly limited. Finally, regarding the species response to the IBA and diameter combinations, each species responded in a different manner. Additionally, regarding the vegetative spread, the species Bocconia frutescens, Cordia cylindrostachya, Palicourea vaginata, Diplostephium rosmarinifolium and Drymis granadensis were very difficult to spread.

  9. Utilization of peatlands as possible land resource for low-input agriculture: cultivation of Vaccinium species as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonutare, Tonu; Rodima, Ako; Rannik, Kaire; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2013-04-01

    The best way of soil protection is its sustainable and expedient use, which secures soils ecological functioning. Recent years, by exploitation of peat soils for their different use, has raised important issues concerning their input to global climate change as important source of greenhouse gases (GHG) emitters. The dynamics of GHG are determined by different factors as: site specific conditions including hydrology, soil type, vegetation, area management, including meteorological and climatic conditions. Therefore, in this current paper we are presenting the study results were we estimated CO2, CH4 and N2O emissions from exhausted cultivated peatland with Vaccinium species and determined the soil chemical composition. For comparision a virgin state peatland was observed. The main goals of the paper are: (1) to present the experimental results of greenhouse gases generation and peat chemical composition (antioxidant activity of peat, C/N ratio, fiber content, water extractable phenolics) relationships on different microsites either on natural plant cover or Vaccinium species cultivation area on exhausted milled peat area; (2) to discuss how peat soil quality contributes to greenhouse gases emission; (3) and what kind of relationship reveals between low input agricultural system in which Vaccinium species are cultivated on exhausted milled peat area. The study are is located in nearby Ilmatsalu (58°23'N, 26°31'E) in South Estonia, inside of which the three microsites are determined. Microsites are different from each other by exploitation and plant cover type. 1). Natural plant cover, 2). Cultivated area with Vaccinium angustifolium x V. corymbosum, 3). Cultivated area with Vaccinium angustifolium. The determined soil type according to WRB was Fibri Dystric Histosol. The main part of study focuses on the analyses of greenhouse gases. For this purpose the closed chamber method was used. The greenhouse gas samples were collected from spring to autumn 2011 throughout

  10. Interspecific variation in anthocyanins, phenolics, and antioxidant capacity among genotypes of highbush and lowbush blueberries (Vaccinium section cyanococcus spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalt, W; Ryan, D A; Duy, J C; Prior, R L; Ehlenfeldt, M K; Vander Kloet, S P

    2001-10-01

    Recent interest in the possible protective effects of dietary antioxidant compounds against human degenerative disease has prompted investigation of foods such as blueberries (Vaccinium sp.), which have a high antioxidant capacity. Fruit obtained from genotypes of highbush blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) and lowbush blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton) were analyzed for their antioxidant capacity, their content of anthocyanins, and total phenolic compounds, to evaluate the intraspecific and interspecific variation in these parameters. The method of extraction influenced the composition of fruit extracts; the highest anthocyanin and total phenolic contents and antioxidant capacity were found in extracts obtained using a solvent of acidified aqueous methanol. Regardless of the method, lowbush blueberries were consistently higher in anthocyanins, total phenolics, and antioxidant capacity, compared with highbush blueberries. There was no relationship between fruit size and anthocyanin content in either species.

  11. Image-Analysis Based on Seed Phenomics in Sesame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad R.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The seed coat (testa structure of twenty-three cultivated (Sesamum indicum L. and six wild sesame (s. occidentale Regel & Heer., S. mulayanum Nair, S. prostratum Retz., S. radiatum Schumach. & Thonn., S. angustifolium (Oliv. Engl. and S. schinzianum Asch germplasm was analyzed from digital and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM images with dedicated software using the descriptors for computer based seed image analysis to understand the diversity of seed morphometric traits, which later on can be extended to screen and evaluate improved genotypes of sesame. Seeds of wild sesame species could conveniently be distinguished from cultivated varieties based on shape and architectural analysis. Results indicated discrete ‘cut off values to identify definite shape and contour of seed for a desirable sesame genotype along with the con-ventional practice of selecting lighter colored testa.

  12. Linking rhizospheric CH4 oxidation and net CH4 emissions in an arctic wetland based on 13CH4 labeling of mesocosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Cecilie Skov; Michelsen, Anders; Ambus, Per

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Poorly drained arctic ecosystems are potential large emitters of methane (CH4) due to their high soil organic carbon content and low oxygen availability. In wetlands, aerenchymatous plants transport CH4 from the soil to the atmosphere, but concurrently transport O2 to the rhizosphere, which...... may lead to oxidation of CH4. The importance of the latter process is largely unknown for arctic plant species and ecosystems. Here, we aim to quantify the subsurface oxidation of CH4 in a waterlogged arctic ecosystem dominated by Carex aquatilis ssp. stans and Eriophorum angustifolium, and evaluate...... during three weeks after addition of 13C-enriched CH4 below the mesocosm. Results: Most of the recovered 13C label (>98 %) escaped the ecosystem as CH4, while less than 2 % was oxidized to 13CO2. Conclusions: It is concluded that aerenchymatous plants control the overall CH4 emissions but, as a transport...

  13. Plant-beneficial elements status assessment in soil-plant system in the vicinity of a chemical industry complex: shedding light on forage grass safety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Naser A; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Eduarda; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2015-02-01

    Human health is closely linked with soils via plants, grazers, or plant-based products. This study estimated plant-beneficial elements (macronutrients: K, P; secondary macronutrients: Ca, Mg; micronutrients: Mo, Mn, Na, Ni, Se) in both soils and shoots of two forage grass species (Eriophorum angustifolium and Lolium perenne) prevalent in the vicinity of a chemical industry complex (Estarreja, Portugal). Both soils and plants from the chemical industrial areas exhibited differential concentrations of the studied elements. In soils, the role of contamination was evidenced as insignificant in context of its impact on all the tested macro and secondary macronutrients except P, and micronutrients such as Mo and Ni. In forage grass plant shoots, the role of contamination was evidenced as insignificant in relation to its impact on all the tested macro and secondary macronutrients except K. Between the two forage grass plants, high Se-harboring L. perenne cannot be recommended for its use as animal feed.

  14. FRUIT QUALITY CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME BLUEBERRY GENOTYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Ancu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Romania the blueberry breeding program started in 1982 and till now was conducted by dr. Paulina Mladin. For inducing the variability, different genetic resources of American blueberry cultivars (V. corymbosum, V. angustifolium were involved in a high number of crosses. For identify the genotype with the best fruit quality, some biometric quality indicators (average fruit weight, size index and basically chemical compounds of fruits including ascorbic acid, dry matter, ash, soluble solids, total sugar, titratable acidity, tanoid substances, pectic substances, protein crude, phosphorus and potassium were determined. Of the eleven chemical studied properties who reflected the fruits quality, for five of them were found no statistically significant differences. The purpose of this paper work was to evaluate fruit quality and to identify the valuable genotypes resulted from Romanian blueberry breeding program.

  15. Differential iridoid production as revealed by a diversity panel of 84 cultivated and wild blueberry species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney P Leisner

    Full Text Available Cultivated blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum, Vaccinium angustifolium, Vaccinium darrowii, and Vaccinium virgatum is an economically important fruit crop native to North America and a member of the Ericaceae family. Several species in the Ericaceae family including cranberry, lignonberry, bilberry, and neotropical blueberry species have been shown to produce iridoids, a class of pharmacologically important compounds present in over 15 plant families demonstrated to have a wide range of biological activities in humans including anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory. While the antioxidant capacity of cultivated blueberry has been well studied, surveys of iridoid production in blueberry have been restricted to fruit of a very limited number of accessions of V. corymbosum, V. angustifolium and V. virgatum; none of these analyses have detected iridoids. To provide a broader survey of iridoid biosynthesis in cultivated blueberry, we constructed a panel of 84 accessions representing a wide range of cultivated market classes, as well as wild blueberry species, and surveyed these for the presence of iridoids. We identified the iridoid glycoside monotropein in fruits and leaves of all 13 wild Vaccinium species, yet only five of the 71 cultivars. Monotropein positive cultivars all had recent introgressions from wild species, suggesting that iridoid production can be targeted through breeding efforts that incorporate wild germplasm. A series of diverse developmental tissues was also surveyed in the diversity panel, demonstrating a wide range in iridoid content across tissues. Taken together, this data provides the foundation to dissect the molecular and genetic basis of iridoid production in blueberry.

  16. Mosses Are Better than Leaves of Vascular Plants in Monitoring Atmospheric Heavy Metal Pollution in Urban Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanbin; Fan, Miao; Hu, Ronggui; Zhao, Jinsong; Wu, Yupeng

    2018-05-29

    Mosses and leaves of vascular plants have been used as bioindicators of environmental contamination by heavy metals originating from various sources. This study aims to compare the metal accumulation capabilities of mosses and vascular species in urban areas and quantify the suitability of different taxa for monitoring airborne heavy metals. One pleurocarpous feather moss species, Haplocladium angustifolium , and two evergreen tree species, Cinnamomum bodinieri Osmanthus fragrans , and substrate soil were sampled in the urban area of different land use types in Wuhan City in China. The concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, V, Pb, and Zn in these samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The differences of heavy metals concentration in the three species showed that the moss species was considerably more capable of accumulating heavy metals than tree leaves (3 times to 51 times). The accumulated concentration of heavy metals in the moss species depended on the metal species and land use type. The enrichment factors of metals for plants and the correlations of metals in plants with corresponding metals in soil reflected that the accumulated metals in plants stemmed mostly from atmospheric deposition, rather than the substrate soil. Anthropogenic factors, such as traffic emissions from automobile transportation and manufacturing industries, were primarily responsible for the variations in metal pollutants in the atmosphere and subsequently influenced the metal accumulation in the mosses. This study elucidated that the moss species H. angustifolium is relatively more suitable than tree leaves of C. bodinieri and O. fragrans in monitoring heavy metal pollution in urban areas, and currently Wuhan is at a lower contamination level of atmospheric heavy metals than some other cities in China.

  17. On the distribution and evaluation of Na, Mg and Cl in leaves of selected halophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pongrac, Paula; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Regvar, Marjana [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Večna pot 111, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kaligarič, Mitja [Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Koroška c. 160, SI-2000 Maribor (Slovenia); Vavpetič, Primož; Kelemen, Mitja; Grlj, Nataša [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Shelef, Oren; Golan-Goldhirsh, Avi; Rachmilevitch, Shimon [French Associates Institute for Agriculture and Biotechnology of Drylands, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research (BIDR), Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, 84990 Midreshet Ben-Gurion (Israel); Pelicon, Primož, E-mail: primoz.pelicon@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-07-01

    Diverse physiological, biochemical and morphological adaptations enable plants to survive in extreme saline environments where osmotic and ionic stresses limit growth and development. Halophytes are salt-tolerant plants that can withstand extraordinarily high levels of Na and Cl in their leaves. The tissue and cellular distribution patterns of salt ions can be linked to the underlying mechanisms of salt tolerance. Application of fast, reliable, multi-elemental and quantitative techniques such as micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) will significantly contribute to and accelerate studies of plant salt tolerance, especially as micro-PIXE also provides spatially resolved quantitative data for light elements, such as Na and Mg. The spatial concentration distributions of Na, Mg, Cl, K, P and S in leaves of four halophytes (Bassia indica, Atriplex prostrata, Spartina maritima and Limonium angustifolium) were determined using micro-PIXE, to study the salt-tolerance strategies of the selected halophytes. Different distribution patterns of the studied elements were seen in the leaves; however, in all four of these plant species, Na was excluded from photosynthetically active chlorophyl tissues. With the exception of L. angustifolium, Cl, P and S contents (representing chloride, phosphate and sulphate ionic forms, respectively) did not ensure charge balance in the leaves, which suggests other anionic compounds, such as nitrate and organic anions, have crucial roles in maintaining electroneutrality in these halophytes. By increasing soil salinisation worldwide, the possibility to reliably complement spatial distributions of Na, Mg, Cl, K, P and S with plant structural morphology will contribute significantly to our understanding of plant tolerance mechanisms at the tissue and cell levels. In addition, these kinds of studies are of particular value for designing crop plants with high salt tolerance and for the development of phytoremediation technologies.

  18. Metabolic patterns of 14C incorporation by selected vascular plants following field incubations with acetate-2-14C in two plant successional stages in Glacier Bay, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Pei-Hsing Lin

    1975-01-01

    Metabolic patterns of some vascular plants (Dryas sp., Vaccinium sp., Salix sp., Alnus sp., Epilobium sp.), occurring in successional habitats, following acetate-2- 14 C incubations in the field were demonstrated for the first time. Relative radioactivity within the alcoholic soluble fraction of each species reflects its distribution in successional communities. A high level of 14 C-sugars was present in the plants of the pioneer community; on the other hand a high level of 14 C-organic acids was present in the plants of the forest community. Three patterns, based on the relative activities of the sugar- and organic acid-pools were noted which correspond to the range and the frequency of occurrence of each species in the successional stages. Only two types of 14 C-amino acid levels were noted corresponding to the range of distribution. Plants having less than 10% relative radioactivity in amino acid-pools had a limited range of distribution and reside in only one habitat; plants having more than 10% radioactivity showed wider ranges of distribution occurring in at least two habitats. (auth.)

  19. Effects of different natural extracts in an experimental model of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterniti, Irene; Campolo, Michela; Cordaro, Marika; Siracusa, Rosalba; Filippone, Antonio; Esposito, Emanuela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2018-04-20

    To characterize the impact of inflammatory process and oxidative stress in the degree of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a common condition in which chronic inflammation plays a crucial role, we investigated the effect of different plant extract preparations in an in vivo model of BPH as new therapeutic target. BPH was made in rats with daily administration of testosterone propionate (3 mg/kg) for 14 days. Rats were randomized into different groups to receive oral administration of plant extract preparations: Serenoa repens with selenium (SeR 28.5 mg/kg associated with Se 0.005 mg/kg), Teoside (2 mg/kg), and Puryprost (14 mg/kg containing Teoside 50% 2 mg/kg and Epilobium 12 mg/kg). After 14 days, rats were killed and histological changes, prostate weight and apoptotic pathways were assayed. The results obtained demonstrated that the association of treatments reduced prostate weight and hyperplasia, while treatment with Puryprost demonstrated a greater trend of protection compared to the other treatments. Thus, our results indicate that plant extract could be considered as new useful therapy in the treatment of BPH with particular attention on Puryprost that represents a rational approach to reduce BPH through modulation of inflammatory process and anti-oxidant process.

  20. Comparative Fingerprint of Aromatic Herbs and Yeast Alcoholic Extracts used as Ingredients for Promen, a Prostate Preventive Nutraceutical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina Csernatoni

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize and identify different bioactive compounds in plant sources and yeast powders  to obtain an original nutraceutical (Promen which has beneficial effects in prostate disease prevention. Seven plant and fruit sources, namely nettle (Urtica dioica, green tea (Camellia sinensis, fluff with small flowers (Epilobium parviplorum, tomato (Solanum licopersicum,  sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides, pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima, sunflower (Helianthus annus and lyophilized beer yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Methanolic extracts were prepared using 15% plant concentration and the purified fractions were analyzed using high throughput techniques like UV-VIS spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection (HPLC-DAD and mass spectrometry LC-QTOF -MS. The majority of the investigated plants were rich in phenolic derivatives, polyphenols (flavonoid glucosides, while yeast was rich in aminoacids, peptides and vitamins B. The major compounds identified were: Juglone, Resveratrol, Quercetin, Epigallocatechin, Gallocatechin, Biochanin A, Isorhamnetin 3-O-glucoside 7-O-rhamnoside, Quercetin 3-O-galactoside 7-O-rhamnoside, Kaempferol 3,7-O-diglucoside and p-Coumaroylquinic acid. The specific biomarkers were identified for both plant extracts used as ingredients to obtain an nutraceutical  Promen. Combined UV-Vis spectroscopy, HPLC-PDA chromatography and LC-MS spectrometry are recommended as accurate, sensible and reliable tools to investigate the plants and nutraceutical fingerprints and to predict the relation between ingredients composition and their health effects.

  1. Determination of a new promising natural antifungal product against Penicillium digitatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balkan, S.

    2018-01-01

    The present study deals with the fungal infections, a great amount of food losses occur worldwide. The infections caused by Penicillium digitatum, green mold agent in Citrus fruits, are just one of those losses. In this study, determining a novel environmentally-friendly antifungal product against green mold agent is aimed. Total 39 plant species, naturally growing in Kirklareli (Turkey) were scanned in terms of antifungal activity against P. digitatum. Digitalis viridiflora, Medicago lupulina and Sambucus ebulus, inhibited the micelle development of P. digitatum completely (100%), while Lythrum salicaria, Epilobium roseum and Prunella vulgaris inhibited the micelle development over 75%. D. viridiflora has showed the least MIC value (250 mu g/ml) against P. digitatum. In SEM analysis, flattening, collapse and wrinkling effects of D. viridiflora on hyphae structure of P. digitatum were also observed during the present investigation. In the lemons treated with 8 mg/ml D. viridiflora aqueous extract, 73.99% regression in the lesion diameters has also been observed. As a result, in order to avoid green mold infection caused by P. digitatum occurring in lemon fruits, D. viridiflora can be used as a natural antifungal agent. (author)

  2. Epilobi Hirsuti Herba Extracts Influence the In Vitro Activity of Common Antibiotics on Standard Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirvu Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilobium genus has been confirmed as an effective source of natural antimicrobials. However, the influence of Epilobi hirsuti herba derived products on usual antibiotics activity has not been studied. In this study, several standardized Epilobi hirsuti herba extracts (EHE were evaluated in order to asses their potential effects on usual antibiotics tested on standard Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains in vitro. The results emphasized that the bacterial strains ranged from sensitive (MIC values between 50–200 μg GAE mL-1 (S. epidermidis ATCC 12228 to very resistant (E. coli strains, E. faecalis ATCC 29212 being practically immune to EHE. In terms of synergistic interaction, Tetracycline and Ampicillin combinations lead to the most important stimulatory effects, the diameters of the inhibition zone being even 60% bigger compared to the antibiotic alone. Synergistic effects between myricetin(galloyl derivates and Tetracycline were also revealed on P. aeruginosa and E. coli strains. Together, it clearly demonstrated not only EHE’s own antimicrobial properties, but also their capacity to influence the antimicrobial potency of some common antibiotics. These results could be useful for the area of herbal medicines and as potential candidates in managing microbial resistance, but also for physicians and pharmacists using combined antibacterial therapy.

  3. New xenophytes from La Palma (Canary Islands, Spain, with emphasis on naturalized and (potentially invasive species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Otto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Many years of field work in La Palma (western Canary Islands yielded a number of interesting new records of non-native vascular plants. Amaranthus blitoides, A. deflexus, Aptenia cordifolia, Argemone ochroleuca, Begonia schmidtiana, Capsella rubella, Cardamine hamiltonii, Centratherum punctatum, Cerastium fontanum subsp. vulgare, Chasmanthe floribunda (widely confused with C. aethiopica and Crocosmia xcrocosmiiflora in Macaronesia, Chenopodium probstii, Commelina latifolia var. latifolia, Dichondra micrantha, Dysphania anthelmintica, Epilobium ciliatum, Erigeron sumatrensis, Erodium neuradifolium, Eucalyptus globulus, Euphorbia hypericifolia, E. maculata, Gamochaeta antillana, Geranium pyrenaicum, Hedychium coronarium, Hypochaeris radicata, Kalanchoe daigremontiana, K. delagoensis, K. xhoughtonii, Kickxia commutata subsp. graeca, K. spuria subsp. integrifolia, Lactuca viminea subsp. ramosissima, Landoltia punctata, Malvastrum coromandelianum subsp. capitatospicatum, Oenothera jamesii, Orobanche nana, Oxalis latifolia, Papaver hybridum, P. setigerum, Pilea microphylla, Podranea ricasoliana, Polygonum arenastrum, Portulaca granulatostellulata, P. nicaraguensis, P. nitida, P. papillatostellulata, Rumex crispus subsp. crispus, R. pulcher subsp. pulcher, R. xpratensis, Sechium edule, Sida spinosa var. angustifolia, Silene nocturna, Solanum abutiloides, S. alatum, S. decipiens, Sonchus tenerrimus, Spergularia marina, Stellaria pallida, Tragopogon porrifolius subsp. australis, Tribulus terrestris and Trifolium repens subsp. repens are naturalized or (potentially invasive xenophytes, reported for the first time from either the Canary Islands or from La Palma. 37 additional, presumably ephemeral taxa are reported for the first time from the Canary Islands, whereas 56 ephemeral taxa are new for La Palma..

  4. Pioneer vegetation on ash dumps in Oswiecim (southern Poland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojarczuk, T.; Kuczynski, B.

    1972-01-01

    The authors found fifty-three plant species growing on the ash dumps in Oswiecim, while in 1963 twenty-two species only were encountered there. Most of the self-sown plants belong to calciphilous, ruderal and xerophilous species. The pH of the ashes amounts to 9.5. Some of them, e.g. Matricaria chamomilla are index plants for acid habitats; others were hitherto encountered in wet habitats, e.g. Rumex obtusifolias, Myricaria germanica, Epilobium roseum, and others. Their occurrence on ash dumps is possible thanks to the considerable amount of precipitation (465 mm) during the vegetative period. The mosses are the pioneers of these dumps, e.g. Funaria hygromertrica and Bryum argenteum, which usually appear on the site of fire. The authors are of the opinion that a better knowledge of the plants appearing spontaneously on dumps and waste heaps may provide many useful conclusions which will help to obtain positive results at the recultivation of spoil heaps and industrial wastes. 9 references, 3 tables.

  5. High resolution taxonomic study of the late Eocene (~34 Ma) Florissant palynoflora, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchal, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    .g. Fagaceae, Malvaceae, Onagraceae, Rosaceae, Rutaceae, Platanaceae), to group taxa into representative vegetation units, and to estimate the palaeoclimate. Preliminary results show that the Fagaceae are represented by at least 5 species (including two different Quercus types), the Malvaceae, Rosaceae and Rutaceae are represented by 3 species, and the Onagraceae and the Platanaceae by 2 species. The method used has also allowed the new discovery of the following: rarly occurring pollen grains of Asteraceae, and relatively small grains of Tetracentron (Trochodendraceae).

  6. Checklist das macrófitas aquáticas do Pantanal, Brasil Checklist of the aquatic macrophytes of the Pantanal, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vali Joana Pott

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available O Pantanal, por ser alagável, é ambiente favorável ao desenvolvimento de muitas plantas aquáticas. Para atender demandas de levantamentos florísticos regionais, fez-se a listagem das macrófitas aquáticas do Pantanal, com base em coletas depositadas nos Herbários CPAP (EMBRAPA, COR (Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, CH (Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso e K (Kew. Até o momento, foram levantadas 242 espécies, distribuídas em 106 gêneros e 54 famílias. As famílias mais numerosas são Poaceae (22 espécies, Cyperaceae(17, Leguminosae e Scrophulariaceae(14, Alismataceae e Onagraceae(13, Pontederiaceae(11, Lentibulariaceae(10, Characeae(9, emnaceae, Malvaceae e Nymphaeaceae(8. A maioria das demais famílias apresentam uma ou duas espécies cada. Quanto à forma biológica, 39% são plantas emergentes, 28% anfíbias, 11,5% flutuantes fixas, 8% flutuantes livres, 8% submersas fixas, 3,8% submersas livres e 1,7% epífítas. Os principais gêneros em número de espécies são Nymphaea, Utricularia, Echinodorus, Ludwigia, Polygonum, Aeschynomene, Cyperus, Eleocharis e Bacopa.The Pantanal, being a wetland, is a favorable environment for the development of many aquatic plants. This list of aquatic macrophytes of the Pantanal was made based on field collections, deposited at Herbarium CPAP (EMBRAPA, COR (Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, CH (Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso and K (Kew, to support regional floristic surveys. Until present, 242 species were listed, distributed within 106 genera and 54 families. The most numerous families were Poaceae (22 species Cyperaceae(17, Leguminosae and Scrophulariaceae(14, Alismataceae and Onagraceae(13, Pontederiaceae (11, Lentibulariaceae(10, Characeae(9, Lemnaceae, Malvaceae andNymphaeaceae(8. The majority of other families has one or two species each. The life form spectrum includes 39% emergent plants, 28% amphibious, 11,5% rooted floating, 8% free floating, 8% rooted submerged

  7. Distribution and content of ellagitannins in Finnish plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Johanna; Koskinen, Piia; Salminen, Juha-Pekka

    2015-08-01

    The results of a screening study, in which a total of 82 Finnish plant species were studied for their ellagitannin composition and content, are presented. The total ellagitannin content was determined by HPLC-DAD, the detected ellagitannins were further characterized by HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS and divided into four structurally different sub-groups. Thirty plant species were found to contain ellagitannins and the ellagitannin content in the crude extracts varied from few mgg(-1) to over a hundred mgg(-1). Plant families that were rich in ellagitannins (>90mgg(-1) of the crude extract) were Onagraceae, Lyhtraceae, Geraniaceae, Elaeagnaceae, Fagaceae and some species from Rosaceae. Plant species that contained moderate amounts of ellagitannins (31-89mgg(-1) of the crude extract) were representatives of the family Rosaceae. Plant species that contained low amounts of ellagitannins (1-30mgg(-1) of the crude extract) were representatives of the families Betulaceae and Myricaceae. The specific ellagitannin composition of the species allowed their chemotaxonomic classification and the comparison between the older Cronquist's classification and the nowadays preferred Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pollen grains in quaternary sediments from the Campos Basin, state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Core BU-91-GL-05

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    Aline Gonçalves de Freitas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Here, we describe pollen grains extracted from a Pleistocene-Holocene sediment core (BU-91-GL-05; 22°48'45"S; 41°54'13"W taken from the Albacora Slope (22°48'45"S; 41°54'13"W, located in the Campos Basin of the northern region of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The analysis resulted in the identification and morphological description of 46 types of pollen: one of a gymnosperm genus (Podocarpus; and 45 of angiosperm taxa across 27 families-one family of monocotyledons (Poaceae and 26 families (30 types of dicotyledons. The most common angiosperm families were Amaranthaceae (Chenopodium, Amaranthus and Gomphrena; Fabaceae (Fabaceae type, Bauhinia, Inga and Canavalia; Malpighiaceae (Tetrapteris, Heteropteris and Peixotoa; Malvaceae (Sida, Abutilon, Hibiscus and Pseudobombax; Rubiaceae (Faramea, Borreria and Psychotria; Asteraceae (Eupatorium and tribe Vernonieae; Bignoniaceae (Bignoniaceae type, Adenocalymma and Tabebuia; and Onagraceae (Fuchsia and Ludwigia. The palynoflora in this study are associated with dense montane and submontane Atlantic Forest, semideciduous forest and restinga (coastal woodland, all of which are present in the state of Rio de Janeiro. Palynological analysis can provide important data about paleovegetation and paleoclimatic changes in the studied area during the Quaternary, specifically in the last 145,000 years.

  9. [Herbal textual research of common Mongolian medicine "Du Ge Mo Nong"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jie; Zhong, Hua-Rong; Wucharila-Tu; Buhe Bater; Li, Hui-Hu; Zhong, Guo-Yue

    2016-11-01

    This study is aimed to provide the source for clinical medication by clarifing the common base of Mongolia medicinal materials "Du Ge Mo Nong". In this paper literature research and plant taxonomy method were adopted combined with investigation of the markets and clinical use status to clarify the origin of common traditional Mongolian medicine "Du Ge Mo Nong". The results showed that the Mongolian medicine "Du Ge Mo Nong" and Tibetan medicine "Du Mu Niu" were the same crude drug and originated from the seeds of Holarrhena antidysenteriaca of family Apocynaceae in earliest time. In Mongolian medicine clinic, the seed of Cynanchum thesioides of family Asclepiadaceae and the fruit of Forsythia suspense of family Oleaceae was used respectively about 18 century and recent time, as the substitutes of H. antidysenteriaca. In present standards on Mongolian material medicine, C. thesioides is including only, and H. antidysenterica is not used almost. In Tibetan medicine clinic, H. antidysenterica is being used so far. But there are various substitutes including the seeds, fruits or grass of many species classified to family Apocynaceae, Asclepiadaceae and Onagraceae from ancient time to the present, and C. forrestii and C. komarovii may be used at present. It's necessary to strengthen the arrangement on Mongolian medicine's varieties by the multidisciplinary methods including literature research, investigation of resources and the use state, and comparison of active substances and biological activities between the different substitutes,and so on. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  10. Experimental studies of adaptation in Clarkia xantiana. III. Phenotypic selection across a subspecies border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jill T; Eckhart, Vincent M; Geber, Monica A

    2015-09-01

    Sister taxa with distinct phenotypes often occupy contrasting environments in parapatric ranges, yet we generally do not know whether trait divergence reflects spatially varying selection. We conducted a reciprocal transplant experiment to test whether selection favors "native phenotypes" in two subspecies of Clarkia xantiana (Onagraceae), an annual plant in California. For four quantitative traits that differ between subspecies, we estimated phenotypic selection in subspecies' exclusive ranges and their contact zone in two consecutive years. We predicted that in the arid, pollinator-scarce eastern region, selection favors phenotypes of the native subspecies parviflora: small leaves, slow leaf growth, early flowering, and diminutive flowers. In the wetter, pollinator-rich, western range of subspecies xantiana, we expected selection for opposite phenotypes. We investigated pollinator contributions to selection by comparing naturally pollinated and pollen-supplemented individuals. For reproductive traits and for subspecies xantiana, selection generally matched expectations. The contact zone sometimes showed distinctive selection, and in ssp. parviflora selection sometimes favored nonnative phenotypes. Pollinators influenced selection on flowering time but not on flower size. Little temporal variation in selection occurred, possibly because of plastic trait responses across years. Though there were exceptions and some causes of selection remain obscure, phenotypic differentiation between subspecies appears to reflect spatially variable selection. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Chemical and Biological Significance of Oenothein B and Related Ellagitannin Oligomers with Macrocyclic Structure

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    Takashi Yoshida

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1990, Okuda et al. reported the first isolation and characterization of oenothein B, a unique ellagitannin dimer with a macrocyclic structure, from the Oenothera erythrosepala leaves. Since then, a variety of macrocyclic analogs, including trimeric–heptameric oligomers have been isolated from various medicinal plants belonging to Onagraceae, Lythraceae, and Myrtaceae. Among notable in vitro and in vivo biological activities reported for oenothein B are antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, enzyme inhibitory, antitumor, antimicrobial, and immunomodulatory activities. Oenothein B and related oligomers, and/or plant extracts containing them have thus attracted increasing interest as promising targets for the development of chemopreventive agents of life-related diseases associated with oxygen stress in human health. In order to better understand the significance of this type of ellagitannin in medicinal plants, this review summarizes (1 the structural characteristics of oenothein B and related dimers; (2 the oxidative metabolites of oenothein B up to heptameric oligomers; (3 the distribution of oenotheins and other macrocyclic analogs in the plant kingdom; and (4 the pharmacological activities hitherto documented for oenothein B, including those recently found by our laboratory.

  12. Genotype-by-environment interactions leads to variable selection on life-history strategy in Common Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M T J

    2007-01-01

    Monocarpic plant species, where reproduction is fatal, frequently exhibit variation in the length of their prereproductive period prior to flowering. If this life-history variation in flowering strategy has a genetic basis, genotype-by-environment interactions (G x E) may maintain phenotypic diversity in flowering strategy. The native monocarpic plant Common Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis L., Onagraceae) exhibits phenotypic variation for annual vs. biennial flowering strategies. I tested whether there was a genetic basis to variation in flowering strategy in O. biennis, and whether environmental variation causes G x E that imposes variable selection on flowering strategy. In a field experiment, I randomized more than 900 plants from 14 clonal families (genotypes) into five distinct habitats that represented a natural productivity gradient. G x E strongly affected the lifetime fruit production of O. biennis, with the rank-order in relative fitness of genotypes changing substantially between habitats. I detected genetic variation in annual vs. biennial strategies in most habitats, as well as a G x E effect on flowering strategy. This variation in flowering strategy was correlated with genetic variation in relative fitness, and phenotypic and genotypic selection analyses revealed that environmental variation resulted in variable directional selection on annual vs. biennial strategies. Specifically, a biennial strategy was favoured in moderately productive environments, whereas an annual strategy was favoured in low-productivity environments. These results highlight the importance of variable selection for the maintenance of genetic variation in the life-history strategy of a monocarpic plant.

  13. Polyphenolic Profile and Bioactivity Study of Oenothera speciosa Nutt. Aerial Parts

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    Siham M. El-Shenawy

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Two new flavonol glycosides, myricetin 4'-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (1 and quercetin 3'-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (2, together with a novel biflavonol compound, speciin (3, as well as eleven phenolic metabolites, namely myricitrin (4, europetin 3-O-α-L-1C4-rhamnopyranoside (5, quercitrin (6, hyperin (7, rhamnetin 3-O-β-galacto-pyranoside (8, caffeic acid (9, caffeic acid methyl ester (10, chlorogenic acid (11, chlorogenic acid methyl ester (12, gallic acid (13 and gallic acid methyl ester (14, were identified from the 80 % methanol extract of the aerial parts (leaves and stems of Oenothera speciosa Nutt. (Onagraceae. In addition myricetin (15, quercetin (16 and ellagic acid (17 were identified from the chloroform extract. The structures were established depending on their chemical and physical analyses (UV, HR-ESIMS, 1D and 2D NMR. It was found that 80 % aqueous methanol extract of O. speciosa is non-toxic to mice up to 5 g kg-1b.wt. The investigated extract exhibited significant antihyperglycaemic and anti-inflammatory activities in a dose dependant manner. Also, the 80 % methanol extract, myricitrin(4 and hyperin(7 showed potent antioxidant activity in vitro using 1,1-diphenyl 2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH radical assay.

  14. Extreme environments select for reproductive assurance: evidence from evening primroses (Oenothera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Margaret E K; Hearn, David J; Theiss, Kathryn E; Cranston, Karen; Holsinger, Kent E; Donoghue, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    Competing evolutionary forces shape plant breeding systems (e.g. inbreeding depression, reproductive assurance). Which of these forces prevails in a given population or species is predicted to depend upon such factors as life history, ecological conditions, and geographical context. Here, we examined two such predictions: that self-compatibility should be associated with the annual life history or extreme climatic conditions. We analyzed data from a clade of plants remarkable for variation in breeding system, life history and climatic conditions (Oenothera, sections Anogra and Kleinia, Onagraceae). We used a phylogenetic comparative approach and Bayesian or hybrid Bayesian tests to account for phylogenetic uncertainty. Geographic information system (GIS)-based climate data and ecological niche modeling allowed us to quantify climatic conditions. Breeding system and reproductive life span are not correlated in Anogra and Kleinia. Instead, self-compatibility is associated with the extremes of temperature in the coldest part of the year and precipitation in the driest part of the year. In the 60 yr since this pattern was anticipated, this is the first demonstration of a relationship between the evolution of self-compatibility and climatic extremes. We discuss possible explanations for this pattern and possible implications with respect to anthropogenic climate change. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Climate, niche evolution, and diversification of the "bird-cage" evening primroses (Oenothera, sections Anogra and Kleinia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Margaret E K; Smith, Stephen A; Flynn, Rachel S; Donoghue, Michael J

    2009-02-01

    We integrate climatic niche models and dated phylogenies to characterize the evolution of climatic niches in Oenothera sections Anogra and Kleinia (Onagraceae), and from that we make inferences on diversification in relation to climate. The evolution of climatic tolerances in Anogra + Kleinia has been heterogeneous, across phylogenetic groups and across different dimensions of climate. All the extant taxa occur in semiarid to arid conditions (annual precipitation of 10.1-49.1 cm and high temperatures in the warmest month of 28.5 degrees-40.1 degrees C), but there is striking variation among taxa in their climatic tolerances, especially temperature (minimum temperatures in the coldest month of -14.0 degrees to 5.3 degrees C) and summer versus winter precipitation (precipitation in the warmest quarter of 0.6-19.4 cm). Climatic disparity is especially pronounced in two subclades (californica, deltoides) that radiated in the southwestern United States and California, apparently including both divergent and convergent evolution of climatic tolerances. This niche evolution is remarkable, given the probable timescale of the radiation (approximately 1 million years). We suggest that the spatiotemporal climatic heterogeneity of western North America has served as a driver of diversification. Our data are also consistent with Axelrod's hypothesis that the spread of arid conditions in western North America stimulated diversification of arid-adapted lineages.

  16. Effects of plant sex on range distributions and allocation to reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marc T J; Smith, Stacey D; Rausher, Mark D

    2010-05-01

    Despite an abundance of theory, few empirical studies have explored the ecological and evolutionary consequences of sex. We used a comparative phylogenetic approach to examine whether transitions between sexual and asexual reproduction are associated with changes in the size and distribution of species' geographical ranges, and their investment in reproduction. Here, we reconstructed the phylogeny of the genus Oenothera sections Oenothera and Calylophus (Onagraceae), which contain 35 sexual and 30 functionally asexual species. From each species, we collected data on the geographical distribution and variation in plant traits related to reproduction. Functionally asexual species occurred at higher latitudes, but did not differ in range size, compared with sexual species. Transitions to asexuality were associated with decreased investment in floral structures, including the length of petals, floral tubes and styles. Decreased anther size and increased seed size within asexual species also suggest altered allocation to male and female fitness. The observed range shifts are consistent with superior colonization of environments by asexual species following glaciation, and the observed changes in reproductive allocation support predictions made by models relating to the evolution of selfing. Our results suggest that the evolutionary consequences of asexual reproduction might be less restrictive than previously thought.

  17. Polyphenolic profile and bioactivity study of Oenothera speciosa Nutt. aerial parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouk, Mohamed S; Moharram, Fatma A; El Dib, Rabab A; El-Shenawy, Siham M; Tawfike, Ahmed F

    2009-04-07

    Two new flavonol glycosides, myricetin 4'-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (1) and quercetin 3'-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside (2), together with a novel biflavonol compound, speciin (3), as well as eleven phenolic metabolites, namely myricitrin (4), europetin 3-O-alpha-L-(1)C(4)-rhamnopyranoside (5), quercitrin (6), hyperin (7), rhamnetin 3-O-beta-galacto-pyranoside (8), caffeic acid (9), caffeic acid methyl ester (10), chlorogenic acid (11), chlorogenic acid methyl ester (12), gallic acid (13) and gallic acid methyl ester (14), were identified from the 80 % methanol extract of the aerial parts (leaves and stems) of Oenothera speciosa Nutt. (Onagraceae). In addition myricetin (15), quercetin (16) and ellagic acid (17) were identified from the chloroform extract. The structures were established depending on their chemical and physical analyses (UV, HR-ESIMS, 1D and 2D NMR). It was found that 80 % aqueous methanol extract of O. speciosa is non-toxic to mice up to 5 g kg(-1)b wt. The investigated extract exhibited significant antihyperglycaemic and anti-inflammatory activities in a dose dependant manner. Also, the 80 % methanol extract, myricitrin(4) and hyperin(7) showed potent antioxidant activity in vitro using 1,1-diphenyl 2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical assay.

  18. Macroevolution of plant defenses against herbivores in the evening primroses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marc T J; Ives, Anthony R; Ahern, Jeffrey; Salminen, Juha-Pekka

    2014-07-01

    Plant species vary greatly in defenses against herbivores, but existing theory has struggled to explain this variation. Here, we test how phylogenetic relatedness, tradeoffs, trait syndromes, and sexual reproduction affect the macroevolution of defense. To examine the macroevolution of defenses, we studied 26 Oenothera (Onagraceae) species, combining chemistry, comparative phylogenetics and experimental assays of resistance against generalist and specialist herbivores. We detected dozens of phenolic metabolites within leaves, including ellagitannins (ETs), flavonoids, and caffeic acid derivatives (CAs). The concentration and composition of phenolics exhibited low to moderate phylogenetic signal. There were clear negative correlations between multiple traits, supporting the prediction of allocation tradeoffs. There were also positively covarying suites of traits, but these suites did not strongly predict resistance to herbivores and thus did not act as defensive syndromes. By contrast, specific metabolites did correlate with the performance of generalist and specialist herbivores. Finally, that repeated losses of sex in Oenothera was associated with the evolution of increased flavonoid diversity and altered phenolic composition. These results show that secondary chemistry has evolved rapidly during the diversification of Oenothera. This evolution has been marked by allocation tradeoffs between traits, some of which are related to herbivore performance. The repeated loss of sex appears also to have constrained the evolution of plant secondary chemistry, which may help to explain variation in defense among plants. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Pollen Performance in Clarkia Taxa with Contrasting Mating Systems: Implications for Male Gametophytic Evolution in Selfers and Outcrossers

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    Alisa A. Hove

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We tested three predictions regarding the joint evolution of pollen performance and mating system. First, due to the potential for intense intrasexual competition in outcrossing populations, we predicted that outcrossers would produce faster-growing pollen than their selfing relatives. Second, if elevated competition promotes stronger selection on traits that improve pollen performance, then, among-plant variation in pollen performance would be lower in outcrossers than in selfers. Third, given successive generations of adaptation to the same maternal genotype in selfers, we predicted that, in selfing populations (but not in outcrossing ones, pollen would perform better following self- than cross-pollinations. We tested these predictions in field populations of two pairs of Clarkia (Onagraceae sister taxa. Consistent with our predictions, one outcrosser (C. unguiculata exhibited faster pollen germination and less variation in pollen tube growth rate (PTGR among pollen donors than its selfing sister species, C. exilis. Contrary to our predictions, the selfing C. xantiana ssp. parviflora exhibited faster PTGR than the outcrossing ssp. xantiana, and these taxa showed similar levels of variation in this trait. Pollen performance following self- vs. cross-pollinations did not differ within either selfing or outcrossing taxa. While these findings suggest that mating system and pollen performance may jointly evolve in Clarkia, other factors clearly contribute to pollen performance in natural populations.

  20. Plants used by Megachile (Moureapis sp. (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae in the provisioning of their nests

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    MLT. Buschini

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in the Parque Municipal das Araucárias, located in the municipality of Guarapuava (PR from May (06 to April (07. Its aim was to investigate which plants are used by Megachile (Moureapis sp in provisioning of larvae, and to verify if this bee is oligolectic or polilectic. The collection of the plants was carried out during the bees activity period and in an area covering a 500 m radius from where the nests had been built. A sample of pollens from founded nests and from flowers was used to make permanent slides using the acetolysis method and with the aid of a light microscope, all pollen grains were examined in order to identify the plants used by this bee. A total of 80 pollen grain slides, from 16 nests were analysed. Although 99 plants were collected close to the bee's nesting site, in nest slides, the pollen of Ludwigia peruviana (36% and Ludwigia sericea (63.6% (Onagraceae accounted for 99.6% of the total amount of pollen collected. With these results we are able to conclude that Megachile (Moureapis sp is an oligolectic species and that these plants species are their important pollen source.

  1. An ecophysiological study of plants growing on the fly ash deposits from the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermal power station in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, Pavle; Mitrović, Miroslava; Djurdjević, Lola

    2004-05-01

    This ecophysiological research on the ash deposits from the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermal power station in Serbia covered 10 plant species (Tamarix gallica, Populus alba, Spiraea van-hauttei, Ambrosia artemisifolia, Amorpha fruticosa, Eupatorium cannabinum, Crepis setosa, Epilobium collinum, Verbascum phlomoides, and Cirsium arvense). This paper presents the results of a water regime analysis, photosynthetic efficiency and trace elements (B, Cu, Mn, Zn, Pb, and Cd) content in vegetative plant parts. Water regime parameters indicate an overall stability in plant-water relations. During the period of summer drought, photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm) was low, ranging from 0.429 to 0.620 for all the species that were analyzed. An analysis of the tissue trace elements content showed a lower trace metal concentration in the plants than in the ash, indicating that heavy metals undergo major concentration during the combustion process and some are not readily taken up by plants. The Zn and Pb concentrations in all of the examined species were normal whereas Cu and Mn concentrations were in the deficiency range. Boron concentrations in plant tissues were high, with some species even showing levels of more than 100 microg/g (Populus sp., Ambrosia sp., Amorpha sp., and Cirsium sp.). The presence of Cd was not detected. In general, it can be concluded from the results of this research that biological recultivation should take into account the existing ecological, vegetation, and floristic potential of an immediate environment that is abundant in life forms and ecological types of plant species that can overgrow the ash deposit relatively quickly. Selected species should be adapted to toxic B concentrations with moderate demands in terms of mineral elements (Cu and Mn).

  2. Selection of wild macrophytes for use in constructed wetlands for phytoremediation of contaminant mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guittonny-Philippe, Anna; Petit, Marie-Eléonore; Masotti, Véronique; Monnier, Yogan; Malleret, Laure; Coulomb, Bruno; Combroux, Isabelle; Baumberger, Teddy; Viglione, Julien; Laffont-Schwob, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) offer an alternative to traditional industrial wastewater treatment systems that has been proved to be efficient, cost-effective and environmentally friendly. Most of the time, CWs are planted with proliferative species such as Phragmites australis or with plants originating from nurseries, both representing a risk for the natural biodiversity conservation of aquatic ecosystems located downstream of the CWs. For the removal of metals and organic pollutant mixtures present in industrial effluents, it is necessary to select tolerant plant species that are able to produce a high aboveground biomass and to develop a healthy belowground system. Wild plant species growing in aquatic bodies at industrial outfalls could constitute suitable tolerant species to use in CWs for industrial effluent treatment. To test this hypothesis, we assessed, under laboratory conditions (using an experimental design), the tolerance to mixtures of metals (Al, As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, Zn) or/and organic pollutants (THC, PHE, PYR, LAS) of five European sub-cosmopolitan native macrophytes (Alisma lanceolatum, Carex cuprina, Epilobium hirsutum, Iris pseudacorus and Juncus inflexus) that had been collected in a polluted Mediterranean wetland, after a field study (crossing ecological relevés and analyses of contaminant concentrations in water and sediments). Our results demonstrated that research on phytoremediation of industrial effluents should focus much more on the use of native macrophytes growing at short distances from industrial discharges (such as C. cuprina in this study), and that root/shoot ratio, aerial height and proportion of green leaves are good and cost-effective indicators of plant tolerance to metals and organic pollutant mixtures in laboratory studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Search for a plant for phytoremediation--what can we learn from field and hydroponic studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabłudowska, E; Kowalska, J; Jedynak, L; Wojas, S; Skłodowska, A; Antosiewicz, D M

    2009-10-01

    The main aim of the study was to evaluate the strategies for coping with arsenic toxicity developed by the mine species (Calamagrostis arundinacea, Fragaria vesca, Stachys sylvatica, and Epilobium parviflorum), and to compare results obtained from plants exposed to arsenic present in contaminated soil (2000-3500 mg/kg dw) and in hydroponic solution (2 microM and 12 microM arsenate). Here we report basic differences in plant responses to arsenic depending on growth conditions (hydroponic/soil) with respect to uptake, root-to-shoot translocation, distribution, and detoxification/speciation. Calamagrostis has the highest level of As-tolerance among the tested species. When grown in soil, it accumulated the highest amount of As in roots and shoots relative to other species, however, when exposed to arsenic in hydroponics, it had lower As concentrations. The efficiency of arsenic root-to-shoot translocation was also different, being less effective in soil-grown Calamagrostis compared with hydroponics. Furthermore, in Calamagrostis exposed to arsenate in liquid medium, As(III) was the predominant arsenic form, in contrast to plants grown in As-contaminated soil, in which As(V) predominated. In addition, comparison of the level of phytochelatins showed that only PC2 was detected in plants from hydroponics, whereas in those from soil, additionally PC3 and PC4 were found. The results show that the basic components of a plant's response to arsenic, including uptake, accumulation as well as detoxification, change depending on the experimental conditions (arsenic in liquid medium or contaminated soil).

  4. The weed composition in an orchard as a result of long-term foliar herbicide application

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    Maria Licznar-Małańczuk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The weed composition and the dominance of individual species occurring in an orchard were assessed at the Research Station of the Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland, during the first 10 years after orchard establishment. ‘Ligol’ apple trees were planted in the spring of 2004 (3.5 × 1.2 m. Foliar herbicides were applied in 1 m wide tree rows twice or three times per each vegetation period. In the inter-row spaces, perennial grass was maintained. Ten years of maintenance of herbicide fallow contributed to a change in the weed composition in the orchard. It changed as a result of different responses of the most important weed species to the foliar herbicides. Total suppression of Elymus repens was observed in the first year after planting the trees. Convolvulus arvensis, Cirsium arvense, and other perennial weeds, completely disappeared in the succeeding periods. The maintenance of herbicide fallow did not affect the abundance of Taraxacum officinale. The percentage of the soil surface covered by Trifolium repens and Epilobium adenocaulon, perennial weeds with considerable tolerance to post-emergence herbicides, increased during the fruit-bearing period of the trees. The abundance of these weeds was significantly reduced only in the rows with the stronger growing trees on the semi-dwarf P 2 rootstock. Stellaria media was the dominant annual weed. Senecio vulgaris, Poa annua, Capsella bursa-pastoris, and Lamium spp. were also frequently observed. A significant increase in the abundance of annual and perennial weeds was found in the tree rows as a result of improved water availability after a period of high precipitation.

  5. Effects of rewetting on greenhouse gas emissions in different microtopes in a cut-over drained bog in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vybornova, Olga; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria; Kutzbach, Lars

    2016-04-01

    In peatlands, all biogeochemical processes and the amount of exported carbon and nitrogen compounds are strongly influenced by changes in the water table. Peatland drainage leads to increased peat oxidization and changes peatlands from carbon sinks to net carbon sources. Especially, the emissions of the important greenhouse gases (GHG) carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide are increased due to drainage. The currently ongoing restoration in the bog Himmelmoor (N 53° 44'20", E 9° 51'00", Quickborn) with an extent of about 6 km2 one of the largest raised bogs in Schleswig-Holstein, offers the possibility to characterize and to document the development of the fluxes at different sites before, during and after rewetting, using a method of small-scale closed chambers. Six subsites with differing water level and land use were identified: an area that was rewetted 30 years ago with Sphagnum vegetation, an area rewetted in 2009, an area with on-going peat extraction, deep peat cutting ditches refilled with peat with and without Eriophorum angustifolium vegetation and a comparatively dry peat dam. We determined that in the course of years 2014-2015 the measured N2O and CO2 fluxes varied between -0,1 and 1,9 mg m-2 h-1 and between -0,12 and 1,09 g m-2 h-1, respectively, and the highest nitrous oxide as well as carbon dioxide fluxes are typical for the dry peat dam study site. The measured CH4 fluxes were between -1,8 and 22,7 mg m-2 h-1, where the highest rates were found on the area rewetted 30 years ago and on the peat cutting ditches with Eriophorum angustifolium. Accounting for the different global warming potentials (GWP) of the measured greenhouse gases, the annual GHG balance was calculated. Emissions from all study sites ranged between 5,2 and 36 t CO2-eq ha-1 year-1 and were dominated by high emissions of CO2 (2,5 up to 25,5 t CO2-eq ha-1 year-1). Highest emission rates were found at the dry peat dam site and at the area rewetted 30 years ago. The peat dams and

  6. Isoprene emission from wetland sedges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ekberg

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available High latitude wetlands play an important role for the surface-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4, but fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC in these ecosystems have to date not been extensively studied. This is despite BVOC representing a measurable proportion of the total gaseous C fluxes at northern locations and in the face of the high temperature sensitivity of these systems that requires a much improved process understanding to interpret and project possible changes in response to climate warming. We measured emission of isoprene and photosynthetic gas exchange over two growing seasons (2005–2006 in a subarctic wetland in northern Sweden with the objective to identify the physiological and environmental controls of these fluxes on the leaf scale. The sedge species Eriophorum angustifolium and Carex rostrata were both emitters of isoprene. Springtime emissions were first detected after an accumulated diurnal mean temperature above 0°C of about 100 degree days. Maximum measured growing season standardized (basal emission rates (20°C, 1000 μmol m−2 s−1 were 1075 (2005 and 1118 (2006 μg C m−2 (leaf area h−1 in E. angustifolium, and 489 (2005 and 396 (2006 μg C m−2 h−1 in C. rostrata. Over the growing season, basal isoprene emission varied in response to the temperature history of the last 48 h. Seasonal basal isoprene emission rates decreased with leaf nitrogen (N, which may be explained by the typical growth and resource allocation pattern of clonal sedges as the leaves age. The observations were used to model emissions over the growing season, accounting for effects of temperature history, links to leaf assimilation rate and the light and temperature dependencies of the cold-adapted sedges.

  7. Hidrófitas fanerogâmicas de ecossistemas aquáticos temporários da planície costeira do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Phanerogamic hydrophytes from the temporary swampy environments of coastal plains of northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Petean Bove

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado o levantamento florístico das hidrófitas fanerogâmicas de ambientes aquáticos temporários da planície costeira do norte fluminense. O material botânico foi coletado em 27 expedições entre setembro/1998 a julho/2001, herborizado e identificado segundo a metodologia tradicional. As exsicatas foram depositadas no Herbário da Universidade do Rio de Janeiro (HUNI. Foram encontrados 113 táxons, distribuídos em 40 famílias. Os ambientes estudados podem ser caracterizados floristicamente pela família Cyperaceae, representada por 23 táxons (cerca de 20%; seguida pelas famílias Fabaceae e Onagraceae (sete táxons, Poaceae (seis táxons, Asteraceae e Scrophulariaceae (cinco táxons e Apiaceae, Lentibulariaceae e Polygonaceae (quatro táxons. Estes ambientes sofrem alterações fitofisionômicas marcantes relacionadas com a hidrogeologia. Algumas espécies são anuais, desaparecendo completamente na estiagem; outras suportam a seca, mas têm a população profundamente reduzida, alterando substancialmente a paisagem. Algumas espécies consideradas exclusivamente aquáticas foram encontradas em solo úmido, inclusive em floração. Isto demonstra a necessidade da inclusão de espécies anfíbias nos estudos da flora aquática pois, algumas vezes, a delimitação dos tipos biológicos não é muito definida, além de caracterizar de forma mais adequada estes ambientes.A floristic inventory of phanerogamic hydrophytes from the temporary swampy environments of coastal plains of northern of Rio de Janeiro State was made. The botanical vouchers were collected in 27 expeditions between September/1998 and July/2001. They were herborized and identified by the traditional methodology. The exsicatae were deposited in the UNIRIO herbarium (HUNI. One hundred and thirteen taxa, distributed among 40 families were found. The environment analyzed could be floristically characterized by the Cyperaceae, represented by 23 taxa (ca. 20%, followed

  8. Macrófitas aquáticas de ilhas flutuantes (baceiros nas sub-regiões do Abobral e Miranda, Pantanal, MS, Brasil Aquatic macrophytes of floating mats (" baceiros" in the Abobral and Miranda Pantanal Wetlands, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Otávio Pivari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A associação entre as formas biológicas flutuante e epífita, relacionadas a macrófitas aquáticas, constitui o que se chama genericamente de ilha flutuante. Esta denominação é aplicada ao estabelecimento de uma ou mais epífitas sobre indivíduos vivos de espécies flutuantes, como sinônimo de camalotal ou, ainda, para se referir à vegetação flutuante que se desenvolve sobre um solo orgânico em decomposição (histossolo. Realizou-se o levantamento das espécies presentes em cinco baceiros nas sub-regiões pantaneiras do Abobral e Miranda e o estabelecimento das similaridades florísticas entre estes, a fim de evidenciar aspectos da dinâmica sucessional de ilhas flutuantes. Foram encontradas 66 espécies de macrófitas aquáticas epífitas, distribuídas em 27 famílias, sendo Cyperaceae e Poaceae as mais representativas. O número de espécies por baceiro variou de 7 a 39, sendo os táxons comuns a todos esses Ludwigia leptocarpa (Nutt. H. Hara e Oxycaryum cubense (Poepp. & Kunth Palla, ao nível específico, e Asteraceae, Cyperaceae, Onagraceae, Poaceae e Polygonaceae, com relação às famílias. Outras formas biológicas, além da epífita, foram encontradas associadas aos baceiros, ou ainda, se mostraram adaptadas às condições do histossolo, podendo ser consideradas " epífitas casuais" . Baceiros em estágios sucessionais mais próximos apresentam maior similaridade florística e, no geral, quanto mais avançada a sucessão natural, maior a riqueza específica.The association between floating and epiphytic biological forms, regarding aquatic macrophytes, creates what are called floating mats. This concept refers to the establishment of one or more epiphytes on live individuals of floating species, as a synonym of " camalotal," or applied to floating vegetation that grows on organic soil in decomposition (histosol. A checklist of species was made of five floating mats in the Abobral and Miranda Pantanal Wetlands and

  9. UV-absorbing compounds in subarctic herbarium bryophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huttunen, S. [Botany Division, Department of Biology, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90 014 University of Oulu (Finland)]. E-mail: satu.huttunen@oulu.fi; Lappalainen, N.M. [Botany Division, Department of Biology, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90 014 University of Oulu (Finland); Turunen, J. [Botany Division, Department of Biology, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90 014 University of Oulu (Finland)

    2005-01-01

    The UV-B-absorbing compounds of herbarium specimens of 10 subarctic bryophyte species collected during the years 1926-1996 and available at the Botanical Museum, University of Oulu, were studied. We studied whether herbarium specimens reflect changes in the past radiation climate through their methanol-extractable compounds. The order of gametophytes based on the average amount of total compounds (sum of A{sub 280-320nm}) per mass from the lowest to the highest was Polytrichum commune, Pleurozium schreberi, Hylocomium splendens, Sphagnum angustifolium, Dicranum scoparium, Funaria hygrometrica, Sphagnum fuscum, Sphagnum warnstorfii, Sphagnum capillifolium and Polytrichastrum alpinum, and the amount of UV-B-absorbing compounds per specific surface area correlated with the summertime daily global radiation and latitude. P. alpinum, F. hygrometrica and three Sphagnum species seem to be good indicators for further studies. The amount of UV-B-absorbing compounds revealed no significant trends from the 1920s till the 1990s, with the exception of S. capillifolium, which showed a significant decreasing trend. - UV-B-absorbing compounds in subarctic herbarium bryophytes indicate the radiation climate of the collecting site and time.

  10. CrowdCurio: an online crowdsourcing platform to facilitate climate change studies using herbarium specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Charles G; Law, Edith; Williams, Alex C; Franzone, Brian F; Bernardos, Rebecca; Bruno, Lian; Hopkins, Claire; Schorn, Christian; Weber, Ella; Park, Daniel S; Davis, Charles C

    2017-07-01

    Phenology is a key aspect of plant success. Recent research has demonstrated that herbarium specimens can provide important information on plant phenology. Massive digitization efforts have the potential to greatly expand herbarium-based phenological research, but also pose a serious challenge regarding efficient data collection. Here, we introduce CrowdCurio, a crowdsourcing tool for the collection of phenological data from herbarium specimens. We test its utility by having workers collect phenological data (number of flower buds, open flowers and fruits) from specimens of two common New England (USA) species: Chelidonium majus and Vaccinium angustifolium. We assess the reliability of using nonexpert workers (i.e. Amazon Mechanical Turk) against expert workers. We also use these data to estimate the phenological sensitivity to temperature for both species across multiple phenophases. We found no difference in the data quality of nonexperts and experts. Nonexperts, however, were a more efficient way of collecting more data at lower cost. We also found that phenological sensitivity varied across both species and phenophases. Our study demonstrates the utility of CrowdCurio as a crowdsourcing tool for the collection of phenological data from herbarium specimens. Furthermore, our results highlight the insight gained from collecting large amounts of phenological data to estimate multiple phenophases. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Resveratrol, pterostilbene, and piceatannol in vaccinium berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimando, Agnes M; Kalt, Wilhelmina; Magee, James B; Dewey, Jim; Ballington, James R

    2004-07-28

    A study was conducted to determine the presence of resveratrol, pterostilbene, and piceatannol in Vaccinium berries. Samples representing selections and cultivars of 10 species from Mississippi, North Carolina, Oregon, and Canada were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Resveratrol was found in Vaccinium angustifolium (lowbush blueberry), Vaccinium arboretum (sparkleberry), Vaccinium ashei (rabbiteye blueberry), Vaccinium corymbosum (highbush blueberry), Vaccinium elliottii (Elliott's blueberry), Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry), Vaccinium myrtillus (bilberry), Vaccinium stamineum (deerberry), Vaccinium vitis-ideae var. vitis-ideae (lingonberry), and Vaccinium vitis-ideae var. minor (partridgeberry) at levels between 7 and 5884 ng/g dry sample. Lingonberry was found to have the highest content, 5884 ng/g dry sample, comparable to that found in grapes, 6471 ng/g dry sample. Pterostilbene was found in two cultivars of V. ashei and in V. stamineum at levels of 99-520 ng/g dry sample. Piceatannol was found in V. corymbosum and V. stamineum at levels of 138-422 ng/g dry sample. These naturally occurring stilbenes, known to be strong antioxidants and to have cancer chemopreventive activities, will add to the purported health benefits derived from the consumption of these small fruits. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  12. Profiling of iridoid glycosides in Vaccinium species by UHPLC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffels, Peter; Müller, Laura; Schieber, Andreas; Weber, Fabian

    2017-10-01

    The iridoid profile of four Vaccinium species was investigated using UHPLC-MS to obtain further information about this group of species for phytochemical characterization. Fruits of bog bilberry (Vaccinium uliginosum L.) showed 14 different iridoid glycosides with a total amount of 20mg/kg fresh weight (FW), whereas bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) contained 11 iridoid glycosides and a total amount of 127mg/kg FW. Highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) and lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium L.) contained none of the investigated iridoid glycosides. Among the different iridoids, the isomers scandoside and deacetylasperulosidic acid as well as a dihydro derivative thereof were described for the first time in the Ericaceae family. The p-coumaroyl isomers of scandoside, deacetylasperulosidic acid and dihydromonotropein are reported for the first time in V. myrtillus and V. uliginosum. Monotropein and its p-coumaroyl isomers were found for the first time in V. uliginosum. The comparison of iridoid profiles in bilberry fruit and juice samples revealed constant proportions throughout the juice processing. Quantification and profile determination of iridoids may be used for species differentiation and thus for authentication purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Leaching of radionuclides from decaying blueberry leaves: Relative rate independent of concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Evenden, W.G.

    1990-01-01

    Leaching of radionuclides from decaying vegetation has not been extensively investigated, especially for radionuclides other than 137 Cs. The authors obtained leaves of blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium x V. corymbosum) that contained over 25-fold ranges in Se, Cs, and I concentrations, as well as a small quantity of leaves containing detectable U. All were contaminated by way of root uptake. Leaching took place for a period of 1 yr in the laboratory, using leach water from forest litter. Monthly, measurements were made of the radionuclide contents and decaying leaf dry weights. The data conformed to an exponential decay model with two first-order components. In no case did the relative loss rates vary systematically with the initial tissue radionuclide concentrations. Loss rates decreased in the order Cs > I > U > dry wt. > Se. Because of the low leaching rate of Se relative to the loss of dry weight, decaying litter may actually accumulate elements such as Se. Accumulation of radionuclides in litter could have important implications for lateral transport, recycling, and direct incorporation into edible mushrooms

  14. The effect of CO{sub 2} and N-input on Sphagna with different trophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauhiainen, J; Matero, J [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology; Vasander, H [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    1997-12-31

    During recent decades the amount of nitrogen deposition in the northern hemisphere has increased markedly. This deposition may have significant impact on species composition or vitality in future. It can be hypothesised that at increasing rates of nitrogen deposition Sphagna representing various levels of trophy (ombrotrophy - mesoeutrophy) react dissimilarly. Ombrotrophic mosses might loose in competition to more nutrient tolerating or demanding species. Carbon dioxide is one of the main factors influencing plant photosynthesis and productivity. The atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2} has increased since the pre-industrial age, and this trend is predicted to continue till the next century. Sphagnum is an important CO{sub 2} sink via peat formation and one of the objectives of this study was to find out possible growth response of four Sphagnum species to increased CO{sub 2}. This experiment focused on measurements length increment and production at four N deposition and CO{sub 2} levels on an ombrotrophic Sphagnum fuscum (Schimp.) Klinggr., indifferent S. angustifolium (Russ.) C. Jens., indifferent S. magellanicum Brid. and meso-eutrophic S. warnstorfii Russow. (4 refs.)

  15. Pollination Reservoirs in Lowbush Blueberry (Ericales: Ericaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, E M; Drummond, F A; Hoshide, A K; Dibble, A C; Stack, L B

    2017-04-01

    Pollinator-dependent agriculture heavily relies upon a single pollinator-the honey bee. To diversify pollination strategies, growers are turning to alternatives. Densely planted reservoirs of pollen- and nectar-rich flowers (pollination reservoirs, hereafter "PRs") may improve pollination services provided by wild bees. Our focal agroecosystem, lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton), exists in a simple landscape uniquely positioned to benefit from PRs. First, we contrast bee visitation rates and use of three types of PR. We consider the effects of PRs on wild bee diversity and the composition of bumble bee pollen loads. We contrast field-level crop pollination services between PRs and controls four years postestablishment. Last, we calculate the time to pay for PR investment. Social bees preferentially used clover plantings; solitary bees preferentially used wildflower plantings. On average, bumble bee pollen loads in treatment fields contained 37% PR pollen. PRs significantly increased visitation rates to the crop in year 4, and exerted a marginally significant positive influence on fruit set. The annualized costs of PRs were covered by the fourth year using the measured increase in pollination services. Our findings provide evidence of the positive impact of PRs on crop pollination services. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  16. Antioxidant and metabolite profiling of North American and neotropical blueberries using LC-TOF-MS and multivariate analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunhui; Dastmalchi, Keyvan; Flores, Gema; Wu, Shi-Biao; Pedraza-Peñalosa, Paola; Long, Chunlin; Kennelly, Edward J

    2013-04-10

    There are many neotropical blueberries, and recent studies have shown that some have even stronger antioxidant activity than the well-known edible North American blueberries. Antioxidant marker compounds were predicted by applying multivariate statistics to data from LC-TOF-MS analysis and antioxidant assays of 3 North American blueberry species (Vaccinium corymbosum, Vaccinium angustifolium, and a defined mixture of Vaccinium virgatum with V. corymbosum) and 12 neotropical blueberry species (Anthopterus wardii, Cavendishia grandifolia, Cavendishia isernii, Ceratostema silvicola, Disterigma rimbachii, Macleania coccoloboides, Macleania cordifolia, Macleania rupestris, Satyria boliviana, Sphyrospermum buxifolium, Sphyrospermum cordifolium, and Sphyrospermum ellipticum). Fourteen antioxidant markers were detected, and 12 of these, including 7 anthocyanins, 3 flavonols, 1 hydroxycinnamic acid, and 1 iridoid glycoside, were identified. This application of multivariate analysis to bioactivity and mass data can be used for identification of pharmacologically active natural products and may help to determine which neotropical blueberry species will be prioritized for agricultural development. Also, the compositional differences between North American and neotropical blueberries were determined by chemometric analysis, and 44 marker compounds including 16 anthocyanins, 15 flavonoids, 7 hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, 5 triterpene glycosides, and 1 iridoid glycoside were identified.

  17. Leaching of radionuclides from decaying blueberry leaves: Relative rate independent of concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Evenden, W.G. (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada))

    Leaching of radionuclides from decaying vegetation has not been extensively investigated, especially for radionuclides other than {sup 137}Cs. The authors obtained leaves of blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium {times} V. corymbosum) that contained over 25-fold ranges in Se, Cs, and I concentrations, as well as a small quantity of leaves containing detectable U. All were contaminated by way of root uptake. Leaching took place for a period of 1 yr in the laboratory, using leach water from forest litter. Monthly, measurements were made of the radionuclide contents and decaying leaf dry weights. The data conformed to an exponential decay model with two first-order components. In no case did the relative loss rates vary systematically with the initial tissue radionuclide concentrations. Loss rates decreased in the order Cs > I > U > dry wt. > Se. Because of the low leaching rate of Se relative to the loss of dry weight, decaying litter may actually accumulate elements such as Se. Accumulation of radionuclides in litter could have important implications for lateral transport, recycling, and direct incorporation into edible mushrooms.

  18. Distinguishing Vaccinium species by chemical fingerprinting based on NMR spectra, validated with spectra collected in different laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Michelle A; Ferrier, Jonathan; Luchsinger, Sarah M; Yuk, Jimmy; Cuerrier, Alain; Balick, Michael J; Hicks, Joshua M; Killday, K Brian; Kirby, Christopher W; Berrue, Fabrice; Kerr, Russell G; Knagge, Kevin; Gödecke, Tanja; Ramirez, Benjamin E; Lankin, David C; Pauli, Guido F; Burton, Ian; Karakach, Tobias K; Arnason, John T; Colson, Kimberly L

    2014-06-01

    A method was developed to distinguish Vaccinium species based on leaf extracts using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Reference spectra were measured on leaf extracts from several species, including lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium), oval leaf huckleberry (Vaccinium ovalifolium), and cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon). Using principal component analysis, these leaf extracts were resolved in the scores plot. Analysis of variance statistical tests demonstrated that the three groups differ significantly on PC2, establishing that the three species can be distinguished by nuclear magnetic resonance. Soft independent modeling of class analogies models for each species also showed discrimination between species. To demonstrate the robustness of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for botanical identification, spectra of a sample of lowbush blueberry leaf extract were measured at five different sites, with different field strengths (600 versus 700 MHz), different probe types (cryogenic versus room temperature probes), different sample diameters (1.7 mm versus 5 mm), and different consoles (Avance I versus Avance III). Each laboratory independently demonstrated the linearity of their NMR measurements by acquiring a standard curve for chlorogenic acid (R(2) = 0.9782 to 0.9998). Spectra acquired on different spectrometers at different sites classifed into the expected group for the Vaccinium spp., confirming the utility of the method to distinguish Vaccinium species and demonstrating nuclear magnetic resonance fingerprinting for material validation of a natural health product. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Whole genome duplication affects evolvability of flowering time in an autotetraploid plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L Martin

    Full Text Available Whole genome duplications have occurred recurrently throughout the evolutionary history of eukaryotes. The resulting genetic and phenotypic changes can influence physiological and ecological responses to the environment; however, the impact of genome copy number on evolvability has rarely been examined experimentally. Here, we evaluate the effect of genome duplication on the ability to respond to selection for early flowering time in lines drawn from naturally occurring diploid and autotetraploid populations of the plant Chamerion angustifolium (fireweed. We contrast this with the result of four generations of selection on synthesized neoautotetraploids, whose genic variability is similar to diploids but genome copy number is similar to autotetraploids. In addition, we examine correlated responses to selection in all three groups. Diploid and both extant tetraploid and neoautotetraploid lines responded to selection with significant reductions in time to flowering. Evolvability, measured as realized heritability, was significantly lower in extant tetraploids (^b(T =  0.31 than diploids (^b(T =  0.40. Neotetraploids exhibited the highest evolutionary response (^b(T  =  0.55. The rapid shift in flowering time in neotetraploids was associated with an increase in phenotypic variability across generations, but not with change in genome size or phenotypic correlations among traits. Our results suggest that whole genome duplications, without hybridization, may initially alter evolutionary rate, and that the dynamic nature of neoautopolyploids may contribute to the prevalence of polyploidy throughout eukaryotes.

  20. Rewetted industrial cutaway peatlands in western Ireland: a prime location for climate change mitigation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wilson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rewetting of drained industrial peatlands may reduce greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and promote recolonisation by peat forming plant species. We investigated carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O dynamics over a three-year period in a rewetted industrial peatland in Ireland. Sample plots were established in bare peat, Juncus effusus-Sphagnum cuspidatum, Sphagnum cuspidatum and Eriophorum angustifolium dominated microsites. The relationships between fluxes and environmental variables were examined and regression models were used to provide an estimate of the annual GHG balance for each microsite. All the vegetated microsites were carbon sinks for the duration of the study. Highest uptake occurred in the Eriophorum microsite (146–583 g C m-2 yr-1, followed by Juncus-Sphagnum (35–204 g C m-2 yr-1 and Sphagnum (5–140 g C m-2 yr-1. The bare peat microsite was a source of 37–82 g C m-2 yr-1. No N2O fluxes were detected. Strong inter-annual variation was observed in all microsites, driven by variation in precipitation and subsequent changes in the position of the water table. In terms of Global Warming Potential (GWP, the microsites had either a cooling effect (Eriophorum, a close to neutral effect (Juncus-Sphagnum, Sphagnum or a warming effect (bare peat on the climate.

  1. Ozone effects on Sphagnum mosses, carbon dioxide exchange and methane emission in boreal peatland microcosms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, Riikka; Holopainen, Toini; Martikainen, Pertti J.; Silvola, Jouko

    2002-01-01

    Microcosms of a boreal peatland originating from an oligotrophic fen in Eastern Finland were fumigated under four ozone concentrations (0, 50, 100 and 150 ppb O 3 ) in laboratory growth chambers during two separate experiments (autumn and summer) for 4 and 6 weeks, respectively. Ozone effects on Sphagnum mosses and the fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane were evaluated. In both experiments, the three Sphagnum species studied showed only a few significant responses to ozone. In the autumn experiment, membrane permeability of S. angustifolium, measured as conductivity and magnesium leakage, was significantly higher under ozone fumigation (P=0.005 and 2 exchange during the 6-week-long summer experiment, but dark ecosystem respiration was transiently increased by ozone concentration of 100 ppb after 14 days of exposure (P<0.05). Fumigation with 100 ppb of ozone, however, more than doubled (P<0.05) methane emission from the peatland monoliths. Our results suggest that increasing tropospheric ozone concentration may cause substantial changes in the carbon gas cycling of boreal peatlands, even though these changes are not closely associated with the changes in Sphagnum vegetation

  2. Inhibition of Klebsiella pneumoniae growth by selected Australian plants: natural approaches for the prevention and management of ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnett, V; Sirdaarta, J; White, A; Clarke, F M; Cock, I E

    2017-04-01

    A wide variety of herbal remedies are used in traditional Australian medicine to treat inflammatory disorders, including autoimmune inflammatory diseases. One hundred and six extracts from 40 native Australian plant species traditionally used for the treatment of inflammation and/or to inhibit bacterial growth were investigated for their ability to inhibit the growth of a microbial trigger for ankylosing spondylitis (K. pneumoniae). Eighty-six of the extracts (81.1%) inhibited the growth of K. pneumoniae. The D. leichardtii, Eucalyptus spp., K. flavescens, Leptospermum spp., M. quinquenervia, Petalostigma spp., P. angustifolium, S. spinescens, S. australe, S. forte and Tasmannia spp. extracts were effective K. pneumoniae growth inhibitors, with MIC values generally <1000 µg/mL. The T. lanceolata peppercorn extracts were the most potent growth inhibitors, with MIC values as low as 16 µg/mL. These extracts were examined by non-biased GC-MS headspace analysis and comparison with a compound database. A notable feature was the high relative abundance of the sesquiterpenoids polygodial, guaiol and caryophyllene oxide, and the monoterpenoids linalool, cineole and α-terpineol in the T. lanceolata peppercorn methanolic and aqueous extracts. The extracts with the most potent K. pneumoniae inhibitory activity (including the T. lanceolata peppercorn extracts) were nontoxic in the Artemia nauplii bioassay. The lack of toxicity and the growth inhibitory activity of these extracts against K. pneumoniae indicate their potential for both preventing the onset of ankylosing spondylitis and minimising its symptoms once the disease is established.

  3. Ecosystem respiration, methane and nitrous oxide fluxes from ecotopes in a rewetted extracted peatland in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jordan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem respiration (carbon dioxide; CO2, methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O fluxes to the atmosphere were determined using an opaque closed chamber method within various ecotopes (vegetation covered, bare peat and open water in a rewetted extracted peatland and within an adjacent open poor fen in Sweden. Ecotopes had a significant impact on CO2 and CH4 fluxes to the atmosphere. Ecosystem respiration and CH4 emissions from the bare peat site, the constructed shallow lake and the open poor fen were low but were much higher from ecotopes with Eriophorum vaginatum tussocks and Eriophorum angustifolium. A combination of vascular plant cover and high soil temperatures enhanced ecosystem respiration, while a combination of vascular plant cover, high water table levels and high soil temperatures enhanced CH4 emissions. N2O emissions contributed little to total greenhouse gas (GHG fluxes from the soil-plant-water systems to the atmosphere. However, the overall climate impact of CH4 emissions from the study area did not exceed the impact of soil and plant respiration. With regard to management of extracted peatlands, the construction of a nutrient-poor shallow lake showed great potential for lowering GHG fluxes to the atmosphere.

  4. Microbial activity and biomass of peats in relation to the intrinsic organic matter composition, pH, moisture, and C and N inputs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amha Amde, Yosef

    2011-03-25

    Excessive decomposition of organic matter (OM) from the potting media (e.g. peat) is known to influence plant growth by decreasing the total porosity, altering the chemical properties (pH, electrical conductivity), and releasing organic compounds that might have phytotoxic or stimulating effects. When peats are used as constitutes of the potting media, they should, therefore, maintain stability during plant production. In this study, twenty peat samples from Estonia, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania and Sweden were evaluated for their microbial activity (measured as CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O emissions) and biomass with a special emphasis to the intrinsic organic matter composition, pH, moisture, and C and N inputs as such information on a wide range of peat samples is largely missing from published literature. Overall, the whole peat samples were broadly classified into three distinct groups using the hierarchical cluster analysis: the Irish and two of German peats produced the lowest CO{sub 2} while most peats from Finland produced the highest CO{sub 2}. With few exceptions, peats from the Baltic States occupied the middle ranges. Excessive decomposition of organic matter in the Finish peats might have unintended consequences if these peats are used for long-term pot plant production. With regard to botanical composition, peats containing Sphagnum imbricatum produced the lowest CO{sub 2} and S. angustifolium dominated peats mostly produced the highest CO{sub 2}. (orig.)

  5. Sphagnum restoration on degraded blanket and raised bogs in the UK using micropropagated source material: a review of progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J.M Caporn

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing demand for a supply of Sphagnum to re-introduce to degraded peatlands. However, available supplies of Sphagnum of the desired species are often limited. We describe the propagation of Sphagnum from vegetative material in sterile tissue culture and the introduction of juvenile mosses into the field. Sphagnum produced in the laboratory in three different forms (beads, gel and plugs was introduced to different peatland surfaces on upland degraded blanket bog and lowland cut-over peatland in northern England. On degraded blanket bog, the establishment of mixed-species Sphagnum plugs was typically 99 % while the survival of beads was much lower, ranging from little above zero on bare eroding peat to a maximum of 12 % on stabilised peat surfaces. On lowland cut-over peatland, all trials took place on peat with an expanding cover of Eriophorum angustifolium and tested Sphagnum gel as well as beads and plugs. This work showed that survival and establishment of plugs was high (99 % and greater than for beads. Sphagnum gel reached a cover of 95 % in two years. The vegetative micropropagation of Sphagnum offers an effective source of Sphagnum for re-introduction to degraded peatlands.

  6. Pupation Behavior and Predation on Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Pupae in Maine Wild Blueberry Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballman, Elissa S; Collins, Judith A; Drummond, Francis A

    2017-12-05

    Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura; Diptera: Drosophilidae) is an invasive vinegar fly and pest of soft fruits in North America, including wild blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton) in Maine. Despite its presence in the continental United States for 9 yr, little is known about its natural enemy complex. Here we report the results of a 3-yr study designed to identify naturally-occurring predators in Maine's wild blueberry fields. Experiments were conducted to determine pupation site and pupation depth to understand D. suzukii's predation vulnerability. Predation rates in the field of fully-exposed, caged, and buried pupae were measured. Pitfall traps were deployed to identify the potential predator assemblage, and laboratory experiments were conducted to determine how many pupae were consumed by commonly occurring ground beetle species (Carabidae) and field crickets (Gryllus pennsylvanicus Burmeister). The most commonly collected predators were ants, ground beetles, harvestmen, and field crickets. Significantly more pupae were found to occur in the soil compared to blueberry fruit, with most pupae in the top 0.5 cm layer of soil. Pupal predation rates in the field were high, with higher rates of predation on exposed pupae compared to buried pupae. Laboratory studies revealed that ground beetles and field crickets are likely predators of D. suzukii pupae. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Characteristics of plant concentration ratios assessed in a 64-site field survey of 23 elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Evenden, W.G.

    1990-01-01

    Many of the statistical characteristics of plant concentration ratios (CRs) and translocation factors (TFs) have not been critically assessed, especially in field surveys. The statistical characteristics, particularly the measures of variation, are important for stochastic modelling of plant uptake. The CR and TF values for 23 naturally occurring elements throughout the geographic range of one plant species, blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium), in Canada were surveyed. Although the ratios imply linear relationships, the numerator concentrations were not closely correlated with the denominator concentrations. The variation in the ratios was not clearly related to the means or to characteristics of the elements. The overall geometric standard deviation for CRs was 2.5 and for TFs was 1.6. The values of CR were intercorrelated for certain groups of elements and these groups reflected the periodic classification of elements. Thus, correlation between elements in stochastic models, which may reduce overall variability, is valid. Site variables such as soil pH, soil bulk density, soil fertility and plant growth condition were only slightly useful in statistically explaining some of the variation in CR values. (author)

  8. Fermented blueberry juice extract and its specific fractions have an anti-adipogenic effect in 3 T3-L1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Villavicencio, Mayra L; Vinqvist-Tymchuk, Melinda; Kalt, Wilhelmina; Matar, Chantal; Alarcón Aguilar, Francisco J; Escobar Villanueva, Maria Del Carmen; Haddad, Pierre S

    2017-01-06

    Obesity and Type 2 diabetes have reached epidemic status worldwide. Wild lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton) is a plant of the North American Aboriginal traditional pharmacopeia with antidiabetic potential, especially when it is fermented with Serratia vaccinii. A phytochemical fractionation scheme was used to identify potential bioactive compounds as confirmed by HPLC retention times and UV-Vis spectra. 3 T3-L1 cells were differentiated for 7 days with either Normal Blueberry Extract (NBE), Fermented Blueberry Extract (FBE/F1), seven fractions and four pure compounds. Triglyceride content was measured. Examination of selected intracellular signalling components (p-Akt, p-AMPK) and transcriptional factors (SREBP-1c and PPARγ) was carried out by Western blot analysis. The inhibitory effect of FBE/F1 on adipocyte triglyceride accumulation was attributed to total phenolic (F2) and chlorogenic acid enriched (F3-2) fractions that both inhibited by 75%. Pure compounds catechol (CAT) and chlorogenic acid (CA) also inhibited adipogenesis by 70%. Treatment with NBE, F1, F3-2, CAT and CA decreased p-AKT, whereas p-AMPK tended to increase with F1. The expression of SREBP1-c was not significantly modulated. In contrast, PPARγ decreased in all experimental groups that inhibited adipogenesis. These results demonstrate that fermented blueberry extract contains compounds with anti-adipogenic activity, which can serve to standardize nutraceutical preparations from fermented blueberry juice and to develop novel compounds with anti-obesity properties.

  9. Persistence and degradation of the herbicide hexazinone in soils of lowbush blueberry fields in Nova Scotia, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, K.I.N.; Kimball, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    Hexazinone is a broad spectrum herbicide used primarily in forestry, industrial and right-of-way weed control. Hexazinone is very water soluble. It readily leaches in soils and, depending on rainfall and slope, can be transported laterally following surface applications. Eight metabolites were extracted from 14 C-hexazinone treated soils and metabolite C was the major metabolite at each location. Hexazinone is degraded primarily by microorganisms in the soil with little degradation occurring under sterile or anaerobic conditions. The native lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) is tolerant to hexazinone at rates that give selective control of many weedy species associated with this crop. This blueberry is an important fruit crop of Maine and the Eastern Canadian provinces where commercial fields have been developed by management of wild stands originating from forests or abandoned farmland. Hexazinone is now widely used in all blueberry producing areas with thousands of hectares treated annually. The following study examines the fate of this 14 C-labelled herbicide in several typical soil types in the field and under laboratory conditions

  10. NUTRITIVE VALUES OF SOME ANNUAL CLOVERS (Trifolium sp. AT DIFFERENT GROWTH STAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A TEKELI

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted between the years of 2001-2002 in the experimental area and laboratory of Field Crops Department of Agriculture Faculty in Trakya University, Tekirdağ (Turkey. Five different clovers [Persian (Trifolium resupinatum L. var. majus Boiss., Mediterranean (T. spumosum L., narrow-leaved (T. angustifolium L., hedgehog (T. echinatum M. Bieb. and lappa (T. lappaceum L. clovers] were used. Each plot consisted of 8 rows with a length of 5 m. Row spacing of 30 cm and sowing rate of 10 kg ha-1 were used. Sowing times were on 2.25.2001 and on 2.28.2002. Plots were not irrigated and fertilized after sown and harvest. One cut was taken in both years at 4 growing stages such as pre-bud, pre-bloom, 50% bloom and full-bloom. The central 1 m-2 sections was cut at ground level for dry matter. Approximately 500g samples were dried at 55 °C for 24 hours and stored for one day at room temperature then found dry matter. Crude protein (% was determined by Kjeldahl method.

  11. Effect of NPK fertilization and elemental sulphur on growth and yield of lowbush blueberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. STARAST

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the effect of fertilizers on the pH of former arable soils and on the growth and the yield of the lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.. Lowbush blueberry fertilization experiments were established in 1999 at two locations – at Kärla, Saaremaa, West Estonia and at Vasula, Tartu County, South Estonia. Experimental sites were situated on different soils: soil pHKCl at Kärla was 5.5 and at Vasula 6.2. Elemental sulphur and acidifying fertilizers (ammonium sulfate, potassium sulfate and superphosphate were used in both plantations. Fertilizers were applied based on nutrient in the soil and sulphur was applied at 100 g m–2. Plant growth was recorded in 2001, 2002 and 2003. A positive influence of NPK fertilization on yield was found in both Kärla and Vasula, and yield were 336 g and 41 g higher compared to the control, respectively. The vegetative growth and yield of blueberry depended significantly on soil pH. Elemental sulphur increased soil acidity and on loamy sand soil did not increase plant productivity. The sulphur effect on soil pH began to decrease three years after application. Sulphur can be recommended to increase soil acidity in nutrient-rich soil but, not nutrient poor soil with light texture, where only NPK fertilizers were effective.;

  12. Forage digestibility and intake by lesser snow geese: effects of dominance and resource heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, Jerry W.; White, Robert G.; Sedinger, James S.; Robertson, Donna G.

    1996-01-01

    We measured forage intake, digestibility, and retention time for 11 free-ranging, human-imprinted lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) as they consumed underground stembases of tall cotton-grass (Eriophorum angustifolium) on an arctic staging area in northeastern Alaska. Geese fed in small patches (x̄=21.5 m2) of forage that made up ≤3% of the study area and consisted of high-quality “aquatic graminoid” and intermediate-quality “wet sedge” vegetation types. Dominant geese spent more time feeding in aquatic graminoid areas (r=0.61), but less total time feeding and more time resting than subdominant geese. Subdominant geese were displaced to areas of wet sedge where cotton-grass was a smaller proportion of underground biomass. Geese metabolized an average of 48% of the organic matter in stembases and there was a positive correlation between dominance and organic matter metabolizability (r=0.61). Total mean retention time of forage was 1.37 h and dry matter intake was 14.3 g/h. Snow geese that stage on the coastal plain of the Beaufort Sea likely use an extensive area because they consume a large mass of forage and exploit habitats that are patchily distributed and make up a small percentage of the landscape. Individual variation in nutrient absorption may result from agonistic interactions in an environment where resources are heterogeneously distributed.

  13. Continuous cadmium removal from aqueous solutions by seaweed in a packed-bed column under consecutive sorption-desorption cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, Seyed Ali; Jamali, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Packed-bed column process efficiency for cadmium adsorption from aqueous solution was investigated under different bed heights (2.6 to 7.5 cm) and feed flow rates (15 to 30 ml min -1 ). The column was filled with brown seaweed, Sargassum angustifolium. Three simplified models, including Bed Depth Service Time, Thomas, and Yoon- Nelson were employed for describing the experimental breakthrough curves as well as achieving design parameters. Bed lifetime was also evaluated in several consecutive sorption-desorption cycles. Cadmium concentration of 0.005mg l−1, as a standard limit for potable water, was considered as the breakthrough concentration. The maximum column performance was achieved 81% at 7.5 cm bed length and flow rate of 15 ml min -1 . Indeed, increasing the bed height increased the sorption performance and service time, while increasing the feed flow rate had a negative effect. Maximum sorption capacity value remained almost constant by the bed height changes; however, increase in the feed flow rate slightly decreased it. The modeling results revealed that the Yoon-Nelson model was more accurate than Thomas for describing the experimental breakthrough data, especially at low flow rates. Column service time predictions were surprisingly achieved using the Bed Depth Service Time model even at extrapolations. 20% reduction in column adsorption efficiency was observed at the end of four consecutive sorption-desorption cycles; however, desorption efficiencies were achieved more than 99% in each cycle.

  14. Continuous cadmium removal from aqueous solutions by seaweed in a packed-bed column under consecutive sorption-desorption cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, Seyed Ali; Jamali, Abbas [Persian Gulf Research Institute, Persian Gulf University, 75169, Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Packed-bed column process efficiency for cadmium adsorption from aqueous solution was investigated under different bed heights (2.6 to 7.5 cm) and feed flow rates (15 to 30 ml min{sup -1}). The column was filled with brown seaweed, Sargassum angustifolium. Three simplified models, including Bed Depth Service Time, Thomas, and Yoon- Nelson were employed for describing the experimental breakthrough curves as well as achieving design parameters. Bed lifetime was also evaluated in several consecutive sorption-desorption cycles. Cadmium concentration of 0.005mg l−1, as a standard limit for potable water, was considered as the breakthrough concentration. The maximum column performance was achieved 81% at 7.5 cm bed length and flow rate of 15 ml min{sup -1}. Indeed, increasing the bed height increased the sorption performance and service time, while increasing the feed flow rate had a negative effect. Maximum sorption capacity value remained almost constant by the bed height changes; however, increase in the feed flow rate slightly decreased it. The modeling results revealed that the Yoon-Nelson model was more accurate than Thomas for describing the experimental breakthrough data, especially at low flow rates. Column service time predictions were surprisingly achieved using the Bed Depth Service Time model even at extrapolations. 20% reduction in column adsorption efficiency was observed at the end of four consecutive sorption-desorption cycles; however, desorption efficiencies were achieved more than 99% in each cycle.

  15. Top 10 botanical ingredients in 2010 anti-aging creams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Hyland; Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2010-09-01

    New developments in the realm of skin rejuvenation such as phytotherapy are at an astounding increasing pace in the cosmeceutical market. Yet, many of these products that are classified as cosmeceuticals are tested less vigorously and do not have to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration to establish efficacy and safety. Thus, as clinicians, we must ask the question, "Is there science-based evidence to validate the mechanism of these new treatments?" We assessed the top anti-aging creams currently on the market specifically evaluating their botanical ingredients. Some of the most common botanicals that are hot off the market are: Rosmarinus officinalis, Vitis vinifera (grape seed extract), Citronellol, Limonene, Oenothera biennis (evening primrose), Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice extract), Aframomum angustifolium seed extract, Diosgenin (wild yam), N6 furfuryladenine (kinetin), and Ergothioneine. Through researching each of these botanical ingredients, we have concluded that randomized controlled trials are still needed in this area, but there is promise in some of these ingredients and science to validate them. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Biochemical Properties and Neuroprotective Effects of Compounds in Various Species of Berries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Kelly

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Several species of berries, such as blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium and lingonberries (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L., have attracted much scientific attention in recent years, especially due to their reported antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Berries, as with other types of plants, have developed metabolic mechanisms to survive various environmental stresses, some of which involve reactive oxygen species. In addition, the fruits and leaves of berries have high amounts of polyphenols, such as flavonoids, which act as potent antioxidants. These compounds could potentially be beneficial for brain aging and neurodegenerative disorders. There are now several studies documenting the beneficial effects of various berries in cell models of neurotoxicity as well as in vivo models of neurodegenerative disease. In the current review, we discuss the metabolic strategies that plants and animals have developed in order to combat reactive oxygen species. We then discuss issues of bioavailability of various compounds in mammals and provide a synopsis of studies demonstrating the neuroprotective ability of berries and polyphenols. We also summarize findings from our own research group. For example, we have detected various polyphenols in samples of blueberries and lingonberries and have found that the leaves have a much higher antioxidant capacity than the fruits. Extracts from these species have also demonstrated neuroprotective effects in cellular models of toxicity and inflammation, which are being further pursued in animal models.

  17. Revegetation dynamics after 15 years of rewetting in two extracted peatlands in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Kozlov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The restoration of extracted peatlands poses challenges with regard to their recolonisation by vegetation. The most significant problems are unstable water levels, destroyed propagule bank, and temperature fluctuations on bare peat surfaces. Rewetting is considered necessary for the re-establishment of peat-forming vegetation. Revegetation was investigated in a long-term field study at two rewetted extracted peatland sites in south-central Sweden, namely Västkärr (originally a lagg fen and Porla (originally a bog. Both sites were expanses of bare peat before rewetting. Rewetting procedures were applied in 1999 and strongly promoted plant colonisation. At Västkärr, colonisation started in the first year after rewetting, mostly by species that were not found during repeat vegetation surveys 15 years later. By 2014, Västkärr was a shallow lake surrounded by mesotrophic and eutrophic vegetation with species such as Carex rostrata, Lemna minor, Typha latifolia, Phalaris arundinacea and Phragmites australis. Revegetation of the Porla site was slower and started with Eriophorum vaginatum and Polytrichum spp. Sphagnum mosses appeared after six years and had established quite well after 13 years. A residual Sphagnum peat layer, inflowing surface water and groundwater provided spatially variable nutrient conditions. Sphagnum species and E. vaginatum established in nutrient-poor areas, while C. rostrata, P. australis and Eriophorum angustifolium colonised more nutrient-rich locations.

  18. Seasonal variations in biomass and species composition of seaweeds along the northern coasts of Persian Gulf (Bushehr Province)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadolahi-Sohrab, A.; Garavand-Karimi, M.; Riahi, H.; Pashazanoosi, H.

    2012-02-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the seasonal variations of seaweed biomass and species composition at six different sites along the coastal areas in Bushehr Province. Sampling depths varied among sites, from 0.3 to 2.0 m below mean sea level. A total of 37 (i.e., 10 Chlorophyta, 12 Phaeophyta and 15 Rhodophyta) seaweed species were collected. Studies were conducted for quantifying the seaweeds during four seasons from October 2008 until July 2009. During present research, Ulva intestinalis and Cladophora nitellopsis of green, Polycladia myrica, Sirophysalia trinodis and Sargassum angustifolium of brown and Gracilaria canaliculata and Hypnea cervicornis of red seaweeds showed highest biomass in coastal areas of Bushehr Province. The Cheney`s ratio of 2.1 indicated a temperate algal flora to this area. All sites exhibited more than 50% similarity of algal species, indicating a relatively homogenous algal distribution. Total biomass showed the highest value of 3280.7 ± 537.8 g dry wt m - 2 during summer and lowest value of 856.9 ± 92.0 g dry wt m - 2 during winter. During this study, the highest and lowest seaweed biomass were recorded on the site 2 (2473.7 ± 311.0 g dry wt m - 2) and site 5 (856.7 ± 96.8 g dry wt m - 2), respectively.

  19. The effect of CO{sub 2} and N-input on Sphagna with different trophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauhiainen, J.; Matero, J. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology; Vasander, H. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forest Ecology

    1996-12-31

    During recent decades the amount of nitrogen deposition in the northern hemisphere has increased markedly. This deposition may have significant impact on species composition or vitality in future. It can be hypothesised that at increasing rates of nitrogen deposition Sphagna representing various levels of trophy (ombrotrophy - mesoeutrophy) react dissimilarly. Ombrotrophic mosses might loose in competition to more nutrient tolerating or demanding species. Carbon dioxide is one of the main factors influencing plant photosynthesis and productivity. The atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2} has increased since the pre-industrial age, and this trend is predicted to continue till the next century. Sphagnum is an important CO{sub 2} sink via peat formation and one of the objectives of this study was to find out possible growth response of four Sphagnum species to increased CO{sub 2}. This experiment focused on measurements length increment and production at four N deposition and CO{sub 2} levels on an ombrotrophic Sphagnum fuscum (Schimp.) Klinggr., indifferent S. angustifolium (Russ.) C. Jens., indifferent S. magellanicum Brid. and meso-eutrophic S. warnstorfii Russow. (4 refs.)

  20. Prescribed burning effects on summer elk forage availability in the subalpine zone, Banff National Park, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachro, L L; Strong, W L; Gates, C C

    2005-11-01

    The effects of prescribed burning on forage abundance and suitability for elk (Cervus elaphus) during the snow-free season was evaluated in east-central Banff National Park, Canada. Six coniferous forest and mixed shrub-herb plant communities (n=144 plots), and 5223ha of burned (n=131) vegetation Burning coniferous forest stands reduced woody biomass, and increased herbaceous forage from 146 to 790 kg/ha. Increases commonly occurred in the percent cover of hairy wild rye (Leymus innovatus (Beal) Pigler) and fireweed (Chamerion angustifolium (L.) Holub.). The herbaceous components of mixed shrub-herb communities increased from 336-747 kg/ha to 517-1104 kg/ha in response to burning (Por=220% (Pburned vegetation-types were assessed as low and moderate, respectively. Potential summer carrying capacity, based on forage availability, increased from eight to 28 elk/100 km2 within burned areas, whereas spring grazing potential rose from 13 to 45 elk/100 km2. Most of the increase (73%) was attributable to changes within burned Engelmann Spruce stands, which composed 58% of the burned area.

  1. Digging Deeper: Development and evaluation of an untargeted metabolomics approach to identify biogeochemical hotspots with depth and by vegetation type in Arctic tundra soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, M.; Wullschleger, S.; Hettich, R.

    2017-12-01

    Elucidating the chemical composition of low molecular weight (LMW) dissolved organic matter (DOM), and monitoring how this bioavailable pool varies over space and time, is critical to understanding the controlling mechanisms that underlie carbon release and storage in Arctic systems. Due to analytical challenges however, relatively little is known about how this complex mixture of small molecules varies with soil depth or how it may be influenced by vegetation. In this study, we evaluated an untargeted metabolomics approach for the characterization of LMW DOM in water extracts, and applied this approach in soil cores (10-cm diam., 30-cm depth), obtained near Barrow, Alaska (71° 16' N) from the organic-rich active layer where the aboveground vegetation was primarily either Carex aquatilis or Eriophorum angustifolium, two species commonly found in tundra systems. We hypothesized that by using a discovery-based approach, spatial patterns of chemical diversity could be identified, enabling the detection of biogeochemical hotspots across scales. LMW DOM profiles from triplicate water extracts were characterized using dual-separation, nano-liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to an electrospray Orbitrap mass spectrometer in positive and negative ion modes. Both LC separations—reversed-phase and hydrophilic interaction chromatography—were achieved with gradient elutions in 15 minutes. Using a precursor and fragment mass measurement accuracy of nutrients) impact carbon fluxes in the Arctic at the landscape-scale.

  2. UV-absorbing compounds in subarctic herbarium bryophytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huttunen, S.; Lappalainen, N.M.; Turunen, J.

    2005-01-01

    The UV-B-absorbing compounds of herbarium specimens of 10 subarctic bryophyte species collected during the years 1926-1996 and available at the Botanical Museum, University of Oulu, were studied. We studied whether herbarium specimens reflect changes in the past radiation climate through their methanol-extractable compounds. The order of gametophytes based on the average amount of total compounds (sum of A 280-320nm ) per mass from the lowest to the highest was Polytrichum commune, Pleurozium schreberi, Hylocomium splendens, Sphagnum angustifolium, Dicranum scoparium, Funaria hygrometrica, Sphagnum fuscum, Sphagnum warnstorfii, Sphagnum capillifolium and Polytrichastrum alpinum, and the amount of UV-B-absorbing compounds per specific surface area correlated with the summertime daily global radiation and latitude. P. alpinum, F. hygrometrica and three Sphagnum species seem to be good indicators for further studies. The amount of UV-B-absorbing compounds revealed no significant trends from the 1920s till the 1990s, with the exception of S. capillifolium, which showed a significant decreasing trend. - UV-B-absorbing compounds in subarctic herbarium bryophytes indicate the radiation climate of the collecting site and time

  3. Ludwigia octovalvis extract improves glycemic control and memory performance in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Sheng; Lo, Jung-Hsin; Yang, Jo-Hsuan; Wang, Hao-Wei; Fan, Shou-Zen; Yen, Jui-Hung; Wang, Pei-Yu

    2017-07-31

    Ludwigia octovalvis (Jacq.) P.H. Raven (Onagraceae) extracts have historically been consumed as a healthful drink for treating various conditions, including edema, nephritis, hypotension and diabetes. We have previously shown that Ludwigia octovalvis extract (LOE) can significantly extend lifespan and improve age-related memory deficits in Drosophila melanogaster through activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Since AMPK has become a critical target for treating diabetes, we herein investigate the anti-hyperglycemic potential of LOE. Differentiated C2C12 muscle cells, HepG2 hepatocellular cells, streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice and high fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic mice were used to investigate the anti-hyperglycemic potential of LOE. The open field test and novel object recognition test were used to evaluate spontaneous motor activity and memory performance of HFD-induced diabetic mice. In differentiated C2C12 muscle cells and HepG2 hepatocellular cells, treatments with LOE and its active component (β-sitosterol) induced significant AMPK phosphorylation. LOE also enhanced uptake of a fluorescent glucose derivative (2-NBDG) and inhibited glucose production in these cells. The beneficial effects of LOE were completely abolished when an AMPK inhibitor, dorsomorphin, was added to the culture system, suggesting that LOE requires AMPK activation for its action in vitro. In streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, we found that both LOE and β-sitosterol induced an anti-hyperglycemic effect comparable to that of metformin, a drug that is commonly prescribed to treat diabetes. Moreover, LOE also improved glycemic control and memory performance of mice fed a HFD. These results indicate that LOE is a potent anti-diabetic intervention that may have potential for future clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Role of Leaf Volatiles of Ludwigia octovalvis (Jacq.) Raven in the Attraction of Altica cyanea (Weber) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Saubhik; Karmakar, Amarnath; Mukherjee, Abhishek; Barik, Anandamay

    2017-07-01

    Larvae and adults of Altica cyanea (Weber) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) feed on the rice-field weed Ludwigia octovalvis (Jacq.) Raven (Onagraceae), commonly known as willow primrose, which is considered a biocontrol agent of the weed. Volatile organic compounds from undamaged plants, plants after 4, 12, and 36 h of continuous feeding by A. cyanea larvae or adult females and after mechanical damaging were identified by GC-MS and GC-FID analyses. Twenty nine compounds were identified from undamaged plants. 2Z-Penten-1-ol, geraniol, and 1-tridecanol were present in all plants damaged by larvae. In contrast, feeding by adults caused the release of 2Z-penten-1-ol only after 12 and 36 h; whereas geraniol and 1-tridecanol appeared only after 36 h. Farnesyl acetone was detected after 12 and 36 h of feeding by larvae and after 36 h of feeding by adults. Farnesene was detected after 36 h of feeding by larvae and adults. Linalool was unique after 36 h of feeding by larvae. In Y-shaped glass tube olfactometer bioassays, A. cyanea females were attracted to volatiles after 36 h of feeding by larvae or adults compared to volatiles released by undamaged plants. The insects were attracted to five synthetic compounds: 3-hexanol, α-pinene, linalool oxide, geraniol, and phytol. Synthetic blends were more attractive than individual compounds. Compared to undamaged plants, volatiles released by plants, damaged by conspecific individuals, were more attractive to A. cyanea females, due to elevated emissions of 3-hexanol, α-pinene, linalool oxide, geraniol, and phytol.

  5. Floral humidity as a reliable sensory cue for profitability assessment by nectar-foraging hawkmoths

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Arx, Martin; Goyret, Joaquín; Davidowitz, Goggy; Raguso, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Most research on plant–pollinator communication has focused on sensory and behavioral responses to relatively static cues. Floral rewards such as nectar, however, are dynamic, and foraging animals will increase their energetic profit if they can make use of floral cues that more accurately indicate nectar availability. Here we document such a cue—transient humidity gradients—using the night blooming flowers of Oenothera cespitosa (Onagraceae). The headspace of newly opened flowers reaches levels of about 4% above ambient relative humidity due to additive evapotranspirational water loss through petals and water-saturated air from the nectar tube. Floral humidity plumes differ from ambient levels only during the first 30 min after anthesis (before nectar is depleted in wild populations), whereas other floral traits (scent, shape, and color) persist for 12–24 h. Manipulative experiments indicated that floral humidity gradients are mechanistically linked to nectar volume and therefore contain information about energy rewards to floral visitors. Behavioral assays with Hyles lineata (Sphingidae) and artificial flowers with appropriate humidity gradients suggest that these hawkmoth pollinators distinguish between subtle differences in relative humidity when other floral cues are held constant. Moths consistently approached and probed flowers with elevated humidity over those with ambient humidity levels. Because floral humidity gradients are largely produced by the evaporation of nectar itself, they represent condition-informative cues that facilitate remote sensing of floral profitability by discriminating foragers. In a xeric environment, this level of honest communication should be adaptive when plant reproductive success is pollinator limited, due to intense competition for the attention of a specialized pollinator. PMID:22645365

  6. Floral humidity as a reliable sensory cue for profitability assessment by nectar-foraging hawkmoths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Arx, Martin; Goyret, Joaquín; Davidowitz, Goggy; Raguso, Robert A

    2012-06-12

    Most research on plant-pollinator communication has focused on sensory and behavioral responses to relatively static cues. Floral rewards such as nectar, however, are dynamic, and foraging animals will increase their energetic profit if they can make use of floral cues that more accurately indicate nectar availability. Here we document such a cue--transient humidity gradients--using the night blooming flowers of Oenothera cespitosa (Onagraceae). The headspace of newly opened flowers reaches levels of about 4% above ambient relative humidity due to additive evapotranspirational water loss through petals and water-saturated air from the nectar tube. Floral humidity plumes differ from ambient levels only during the first 30 min after anthesis (before nectar is depleted in wild populations), whereas other floral traits (scent, shape, and color) persist for 12-24 h. Manipulative experiments indicated that floral humidity gradients are mechanistically linked to nectar volume and therefore contain information about energy rewards to floral visitors. Behavioral assays with Hyles lineata (Sphingidae) and artificial flowers with appropriate humidity gradients suggest that these hawkmoth pollinators distinguish between subtle differences in relative humidity when other floral cues are held constant. Moths consistently approached and probed flowers with elevated humidity over those with ambient humidity levels. Because floral humidity gradients are largely produced by the evaporation of nectar itself, they represent condition-informative cues that facilitate remote sensing of floral profitability by discriminating foragers. In a xeric environment, this level of honest communication should be adaptive when plant reproductive success is pollinator limited, due to intense competition for the attention of a specialized pollinator.

  7. Floral diversity, composition and distribution in a montane wetland in hogsback, the eastern cape province, south africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, M.Y.; Tol, J.J.V.; Maroyi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate plant species diversity, composition and distribution in a montane wetland in Hogsback, Eastern Cape province, South Africa. Twenty four circular plots with radius of 2m were established between March and August 2013 within Hogsback montane wetland. Within each sample plot, the habitat information and species present were recorded including Braun-Blanquet cover-abundance values for all species present in the plot. A total of 41 species belonging to 19 families and 36 genera were recorded. Of the documented species, 7.3% were exotic and endemic to South Africa, indicating diversity and dynamic nature of Hogsback montane wetland flora. Plant families with the highest number of species were: Poaceae (11 species), Asteraceae (six species), Onagraceae and Cyperaceae (three species each) and Lamiaceae with two species. The low number of exotic plant species recorded in Hogsback wetland (three species in total) indicates limited anthropogenic influences. Unique species recorded in Hogsback montane wetland were three species that are endemic to South Africa, namely, Alchemilla capensis Thunb., Helichrysum rosum (P.J. Bergius) Lees and Lysimachia nutans Nees. Five main floristic associations were identified from the Hierarchical Cluster Analysis. The Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) indicated that edaphic factors, particularly area covered with water, erosion category, organic matter content and water table depth were the most important environmental variables measured accounting for the vegetation pattern present in the Hogsback montane wetland. Montane wetlands have a relatively low species richness characterised by unique species compositions which are distinctive and habitat specific. (author)

  8. Are eavesdroppers multimodal? Sensory exploitation of flo-ral signals by a non-native cockroach Blatta orientalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo C. VERGARA, Alejandra TORRES-ARANEDA, Diego A. VILLAGRA, Robert A. RAGUSO, Mary T. K. ARROYO, Cristian A. VILLAGRA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of multi-modal communication has only recently been extended to innate and learned interactions between flowers and their animal visitors, and usually only to pollinators. Here we studied the relevance of floral scent and visual display of a night blooming, putatively hawkmoth-pollinated plant Oenothera acaulis (Onagraceae in the attraction of non-native cockroaches Blatta orientalis (Blattodea: Blattidae, which function as facultative floral larcenists in coastal habitats of central Chile. We experimentally decoupled visual (corolla and olfactory (fragrance stimuli by presenting paper corollas and green mesh bags, with or without a freshly-picked natural flower inside. We then contrasted the behavioral responses of roaches in these treatments with those to the natural combination of traits in actual flowers and their respective control treatments, measuring the roaches’ frequency of first visits, mean and total residence time spent in each treatment. The roaches primarily used olfactory cues when approaching O. acaulis flowers at two biologically relevant spatial scales. In addition, the presence of conspecific roaches had a strong influence on recruitment to the experimental arena, increasing the statistical differences among treatments. Our results suggest a primacy of floral fragrance over visual stimuli in the foraging responses of B. orientalis. Olfactory cues were necessary and sufficient to attract the roaches, and the visual cues presented in our manipulations only marginally increased their attraction within a 20 cm diameter of the stimulus. The full spectrum of floral visitation behavior was not elicited by the artificial flowers, suggesting the need for additional tactile or contact chemosensory stimuli not provided by paper. Although the nitrogenous scent compounds that we found in O. acaulis flowers are almost exclusively found in hawkmoth-pollinated flowers, the attractiveness of these compounds to a non

  9. Identification of cotton fleahopper (Hemiptera: Miridae) host plants in central Texas and compendium of reported hosts in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, J F; Esquivel, S V

    2009-06-01

    The cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter), is an early-season pest of developing cotton in Central Texas and other regions of the Cotton Belt. Cotton fleahopper populations develop on spring weed hosts and move to cotton as weed hosts senesce or if other weed hosts are not readily available. To identify weed hosts that were seasonably available for the cotton fleahopper in Central Texas, blooming weed species were sampled during early-season (17 March-31 May), mid-season (1 June-14 August), late-season (15 August-30 November), and overwintering (1 December-16 March) periods. The leading hosts for cotton fleahopper adults and nymphs were evening primrose (Oenothera speciosa T. Nuttall) and Mexican hat [Ratibida columnifera (T. Nuttall) E. Wooton and P. Standley], respectively, during the early season. During the mid-season, silver-leaf nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium A. Cavanilles) was consistently a host for fleahopper nymphs and adults. Woolly croton (Croton capitatus A. Michaux) was a leading host during the late season. Cotton fleahoppers were not collected during the overwintering period. Other suitable hosts were available before previously reported leading hosts became available. Eight previously unreported weed species were documented as temporary hosts. A compendium of reported hosts, which includes >160 plant species representing 35 families, for the cotton fleahopper is provided for future research addressing insect-host plant associations. Leading plant families were Asteraceae, Lamiaceae, and Onagraceae. Results presented here indicate a strong argument for assessing weed species diversity and abundance for the control of the cotton fleahopper in the Cotton Belt.

  10. Latitudinal Gradients in Induced and Constitutive Resistance against Herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstett, Daniel N; Chen, Wen; Johnson, Marc T J

    2016-08-01

    Plants are hypothesized to evolve increased defense against herbivores at lower latitudes, but an increasing number of studies report evidence that contradicts this hypothesis. Few studies have examined the evolution of constitutive and induced resistance along latitudinal gradients. When induction is not considered, underlying patterns of latitudinal clines in resistance can be obscured because plant resistance represents a combination of induced and constitutive resistance, which may show contrasting patterns with latitude. Here, we asked if there are latitudinal gradients in constitutive versus induced resistance by using genotypes of Oenothera biennis (Onagraceae) sampled along an 18° latitudinal gradient. We conducted two bioassay experiments to compare the resistance of plant genotypes against one generalist (Spodoptera exigua) and one specialist (Acanthoscelidius acephalus) herbivore. These insects were assayed on: i) undamaged control plants, ii) plants that had been induced with jasmonic acid, and iii) plants induced with herbivore damage. Additionally, we examined latitudinal gradients of constitutive and induced chemical resistance by measuring the concentrations of total phenolics, the concentration of oxidized phenolics, and the percentage of phenolics that were oxidized. Spodoptera exigua showed lower performance on plants from lower latitudes, whereas A. acephalus showed no latitudinal pattern. Constitutive total phenolics were greater in plants from lower latitudes, but induced plants showed higher total phenolics at higher latitudes. Oxidative activity was greatest at higher latitudes regardless of induction. Overall, both latitude and induction have an impact on different metrics of plant resistance to herbivory. Further studies should consider the effect of induction and herbivore specialization more explicitly, which may help to resolve the controversy in latitudinal gradients in herbivory and defense.

  11. Geographic variation in floral allometry suggests repeated transitions between selfing and outcrossing in a mixed mating plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Holly E; Hartwick, Sally M; Raguso, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    Isometric and allometric scaling of a conserved floral plan could provide a parsimonious mechanism for rapid and reversible transitions between breeding systems. This scaling may occur during transitions between predominant autogamy and xenogamy, contributing to the maintenance of a stable mixed mating system. We compared nine disjunct populations of the polytypic, mixed mating species Oenothera flava (Onagraceae) to two parapatric relatives, the obligately xenogamous species O. acutissima and the mixed mating species O. triloba. We compared floral morphology of all taxa using principal component analysis (PCA) and developmental trajectories of floral organs using ANCOVA homogeneity of slopes. The PCA revealed both isometric and allometric scaling of a conserved floral plan. Three principal components (PCs) explained 92.5% of the variation in the three species. PC1 predominantly loaded on measures of floral size and accounts for 36% of the variation. PC2 accounted for 35% of the variation, predominantly in traits that influence pollinator handling. PC3 accounted for 22% of the variation, primarily in anther-stigma distance (herkogamy). During O. flava subsp. taraxacoides development, style elongation was accelerated relative to anthers, resulting in positive herkogamy. During O. flava subsp. flava development, style elongation was decelerated, resulting in zero or negative herkogamy. Of the two populations with intermediate morphology, style elongation was accelerated in one population and decelerated in the other. Isometric and allometric scaling of floral organs in North American Oenothera section Lavauxia drive variation in breeding system. Multiple developmental paths to intermediate phenotypes support the likelihood of multiple mating system transitions. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  12. Ethanol extract of seeds of Oenothera odorata induces vasorelaxation via endothelium-dependent NO-cGMP signaling through activation of Akt-eNOS-sGC pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Yoom; Oh, Hyuncheol; Li, Xiang; Cho, Kyung Woo; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2011-01-27

    The vasorelaxant effect of ethanol extract of seeds of Oenothera odorata (Onagraceae) (one species of evening primroses) (ESOO) and its mechanisms involved were defined. Changes in vascular tension, guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) levels, and Akt expression were measured in carotid arterial rings from rats. Seeds of Oenothera odorata were extracted with ethanol (94%) and the extract was filtered, concentrated and stored at -70°C. ESOO relaxed endothelium-intact, but not endothelium-denuded, carotid arterial rings in a concentration-dependent manner. Similarly, ESOO increased cGMP levels of the carotid arterial rings. Pretreatment of endothelium-intact arterial rings with L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), or ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), blocked the ESOO-induced vasorelaxation and increase in cGMP levels. Nominally Ca(2+)-free but not L-typed Ca(2+) channel inhibition attenuated the ESOO-induced vasorelaxation. Thapsigargin, Gd(3+), and 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, modulators of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), significantly attenuated the ESOO-induced vasorelaxation and increase in cGMP levels. Further, wortmannin, an inhibitor of Akt, attenuated the ESOO-induced vasorelaxation and increases in cGMP levels and phosphorylated Akt2 expression. K(+) channel blockade with TEA, 4-aminopyridine, and glibenclamide attenuated the ESOO-induced vascular relaxation. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that ESOO relaxes vascular smooth muscle via endothelium-dependent NO-cGMP signaling through activation of the Akt-eNOS-sGC pathway. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vascular plant biodiversity of the lower Coppermine River valley and vicinity (Nunavut, Canada: an annotated checklist of an Arctic flora

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    Jeffery M. Saarela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Coppermine River in western Nunavut is one of Canada’s great Arctic rivers, yet its vascular plant flora is poorly known. Here, we report the results of a floristic inventory of the lower Coppermine River valley and vicinity, including Kugluk (Bloody Falls Territorial Park and the hamlet of Kugluktuk. The study area is approximately 1,200 km2, extending from the forest-tundra south of the treeline to the Arctic coast. Vascular plant floristic data are based on a review of all previous collections from the area and more than 1,200 new collections made in 2014. Results are presented in an annotated checklist, including citation of all specimens examined, comments on taxonomy and distribution, and photographs for a subset of taxa. The vascular plant flora comprises 300 species (311 taxa, a 36.6% increase from the 190 species documented by previous collections made in the area over the last century, and is considerably more diverse than other local floras on mainland Nunavut. We document 207 taxa for Kugluk (Bloody Falls Territorial Park, an important protected area for plants on mainland Nunavut. A total of 190 taxa are newly recorded for the study area. Of these, 14 taxa (13 species and one additional variety are newly recorded for Nunavut (Allium schoenoprasum, Carex capitata, Draba lonchocarpa, Eremogone capillaris subsp. capillaris, Sabulina elegans, Eleocharis quinqueflora, Epilobium cf. anagallidifolium, Botrychium neolunaria, Botrychium tunux, Festuca altaica, Polygonum aviculare, Salix ovalifolia var. arctolitoralis, Salix ovalifolia var. ovalifolia and Stuckenia pectinata, seven species are newly recorded for mainland Nunavut (Carex gynocrates, Carex livida, Cryptogramma stelleri, Draba simmonsii, Festuca viviparoidea subsp. viviparoidea, Juncus alpinoarticulatus subsp. americanus and Salix pseudomyrsinites and 56 range extensions are reported. The psbA-trnH and rbcL DNA sequence data were used to help identify the three Botrychium

  14. Preliminary results of studies on the distribution of invasive alien vascular plant species occurring in semi-natural and natural habitats in NW Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popiela Agnieszka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In Western Pomerania, as in other areas of Europe, alien species play an increasingly important role. In particular, invasive plants tend to spread rapidly and in large numbers which may reduce diversity of native species, leading to the phenomenon of “trivialisation of flora”, and transform ecosystems. The list of invasive species (32 taxa includes alien species occurring throughout Western Pomerania, and penetrating natural or semi-natural habitats. The second group consists of potentially invasive species (23 taxa, i.e. those distributed across the area under study and tending to increase the number of their localities in semi-natural and natural habitats, taxa invasive only locally, as well as species with missing data, which does not currently allow including them into the first group. Invasive weeds, as well as some epecophytes and archaeophytes occurring only on anthropogenic sites and tending to spread, were not taken into account. Among hemiagriophytes, the most common and troublesome ones are: Conyza canadensis, Erigeron annuus, Lolium multiflorum, Lupinus polyphyllus, Solidago canadensis, S. gigantea. Among holoagriophytes, i.e. the taxa which received the highest naturalisation status, very expansive species, successful in land colonisation, like Acer negundo, Bidens frondosa, B. connata, Clematis vitalba, Elodea canadensis, Epilobium ciliatum, Heracleum sosnowskyi, Impatiens glandulifera, I. parviflora, Padus serotina, Quercus rubra and Robinia pseudoacacia, should be given particular attention. Among the invasive and potentially invasive species, most taxa penetrate plant communities of the Artemisietea and Molinio-Arrhenatheretea class, followed by Querco-Fagetea, Vaccinio-Piceetea, Stellarietea mediae, Salicetea purpurae and Koelerio-Corynophoretea. The number of invasive species is twice as high when compared to the situation of these species in Poland; on the contrary, the number of species inhabiting anthropogenic, semi

  15. Quantifying the contribution of the root system of alpine vegetation in the soil aggregate stability of moraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Hudek

    2017-03-01

    stability was significantly increased by the presence of roots. The lowest soil aggregate stability was found with Epilobium fleischeri followed by Minuartia recurva and Leucanthemopsis alpina. The highest aggregate stability was found with the graminoid species. These results show a close relationship between the development of root systems of the studied species and soil aggregate stability, a factor which can be taken into consideration in order to improve the accuracy of existing susceptibility mapping for early warning and civilian protection.

  16. Flora pteridofítica de fragmentos florestais do Parque Estadual de Vassununga – Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, SP. Pteridophyte flora of forest fragments in Vassununga State Park – Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, São Paulo, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Áurea Maria Therezinha COLLI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta o levantamento da flora pteridofítica de dois fragmentos florestais do Parque Estadual de Vassununga, unidade de conservação localizada no município de Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, SP. Para tanto, foram realizadas onze excursões por caminhos e trilhas de fiscalização e de pesquisa. Na Gleba Maravilha, que apresenta vegetação de Floresta Estacional Semidecidual Montana e Floresta Estacional Semidecidual Aluvial com inundação temporária, foram encontradas 10 famílias, 18 gêneros e 35 espécies, sendo Pteridaceae, Thelypteridaceae, Aspleniaceae, e Polypodiaceae as famílias mais ricas com nove, sete, seis e cinco espécies, respectivamente. Na Gleba Capão da Várzea, onde ocorre a Floresta Paludosa e o Campo Antrópico, ocorreram nove famílias, 14 gêneros e 24 espécies, onde Thelypteridaceae e Polypodiaceae se apresentaram como as mais ricas, com oito e seis espécies, respectivamente. As Glebas do Parque Estadual de Vassununga com as suas diferentes fisionomias vegetais são áreas importantes para a conservação de pteridófitas na região nordeste do Estado de São Paulo, principalmente as típicas de Floresta Estacional Semidecidual Montana e de Floresta Paludosa como Blechnum brasiliense, Campyloneurum angustifolium, Cyclodium meniscioides, Osmunda regalis, Pityrogramma calomelanos e Thelypteris opposita. This work presents a survey on pteridophyte flora of two forest fragments in Vassununga State Park, a conservation unit located in the city of Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, São Paulo, Brazil. In order to carry out the survey, a series of eleven tours on old inspection and research trails were made. In the Maravilha Tract, which consists of Seasonal Semi-Deciduous Montane Forest and Seasonal Semideciduous Alluvial Forest with temporary flooding, 10 families, 18 genera, and 35 species were found, the richest families were Pteridaceae, Thelypteridaceae, Aspleniaceae, and Polypodiaceae, with nine, seven

  17. Elevated Genetic Diversity in the Emerging Blueberry Pathogen Exobasidium maculosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jane E.; Brooks, Kyle; Brannen, Phillip M.; Cline, William O.; Brewer, Marin T.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging diseases caused by fungi are increasing at an alarming rate. Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot of blueberry, caused by the fungus Exobasidium maculosum, is an emerging disease that has rapidly increased in prevalence throughout the southeastern USA, severely reducing fruit quality in some plantings. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic diversity of E. maculosum in the southeastern USA to elucidate the basis of disease emergence and to investigate if populations of E. maculosum are structured by geography, host species, or tissue type. We sequenced three conserved loci from 82 isolates collected from leaves and fruit of rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium virgatum), highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum), and southern highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum hybrids) from commercial fields in Georgia and North Carolina, USA, and 6 isolates from lowbush blueberry (V. angustifolium) from Maine, USA, and Nova Scotia, Canada. Populations of E. maculosum from the southeastern USA and from lowbush blueberry in Maine and Nova Scotia are distinct, but do not represent unique species. No difference in genetic structure was detected between different host tissues or among different host species within the southeastern USA; however, differentiation was detected between populations in Georgia and North Carolina. Overall, E. maculosum showed extreme genetic diversity within the conserved loci with 286 segregating sites among the 1,775 sequenced nucleotides and each isolate representing a unique multilocus haplotype. However, 94% of the nucleotide substitutions were silent, so despite the high number of mutations, selective constraints have limited changes to the amino acid sequences of the housekeeping genes. Overall, these results suggest that the emergence of Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot is not due to a recent introduction or host shift, or the recent evolution of aggressive genotypes of E. maculosum, but more likely as a result of an increasing host population

  18. Elevated Genetic Diversity in the Emerging Blueberry Pathogen Exobasidium maculosum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E Stewart

    Full Text Available Emerging diseases caused by fungi are increasing at an alarming rate. Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot of blueberry, caused by the fungus Exobasidium maculosum, is an emerging disease that has rapidly increased in prevalence throughout the southeastern USA, severely reducing fruit quality in some plantings. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic diversity of E. maculosum in the southeastern USA to elucidate the basis of disease emergence and to investigate if populations of E. maculosum are structured by geography, host species, or tissue type. We sequenced three conserved loci from 82 isolates collected from leaves and fruit of rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium virgatum, highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum, and southern highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum hybrids from commercial fields in Georgia and North Carolina, USA, and 6 isolates from lowbush blueberry (V. angustifolium from Maine, USA, and Nova Scotia, Canada. Populations of E. maculosum from the southeastern USA and from lowbush blueberry in Maine and Nova Scotia are distinct, but do not represent unique species. No difference in genetic structure was detected between different host tissues or among different host species within the southeastern USA; however, differentiation was detected between populations in Georgia and North Carolina. Overall, E. maculosum showed extreme genetic diversity within the conserved loci with 286 segregating sites among the 1,775 sequenced nucleotides and each isolate representing a unique multilocus haplotype. However, 94% of the nucleotide substitutions were silent, so despite the high number of mutations, selective constraints have limited changes to the amino acid sequences of the housekeeping genes. Overall, these results suggest that the emergence of Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot is not due to a recent introduction or host shift, or the recent evolution of aggressive genotypes of E. maculosum, but more likely as a result of an increasing

  19. Ecological profiles of wetland plant species in the northern Apennines (N. Italy

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    Marcello TOMASELLI

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen selected species occurring in the wetlands of the northern Apennines were studied by the ecological profile method. By this method, it is possible to identify the ecological factors mostly influencing species distribution within a particular vegetation. Moreover, it is possible to evaluate both ecological amplitude and ecological preferences of species. Ecological profiles were built for three factors (altitude, pH and electrical conductivity from a data set of 265 phytosociological relevés, used for altitude, and from a set of 92 measures, carried out in selected sites, for idrochemical variables. By numerical classification, based on chord distance and minimum variance, the ecological species groups for each factor were individuated. Subsequently, they were ordered by correspondence analysis for detecting relationships between ecological groups and classes of factors. By applying a goodness-of-fit test to ecological profiles, the species significantly deviating from uniformity were detected. They can be regarded as indicators for the corresponding ecological factor. We found seven indicator species for altitude (Carex nigra, C. rostrata, Juncus filiformis, J. alpino-articulatus, Eriophorum latifolium, E. angustifolium and Warnstorfia exannulata, four indicator species for electrical conductivity (Campylium stellatum, Carex tumidicarpa, Eriophorum latifolium and Juncus alpino-articulatus and one indicator species for pH (Sphagnum capillifolium. The ecological profiles of the wetland species in the northern Apennines were compared with those reported in literature for the same species from the Alps (namely Dolomites. In this way, a certain degree of ecological shift in several wetland species of the northern Apennines was documented. For altitude, it is possible to explain the shift considering the reduced elevational amplitude of northern Apennine wetlands with respect to those of the Alps. For pH, Sphagnum capillifolium occurs in

  20. Chemical Analysis of Extracts from Newfoundland Berries and Potential Neuroprotective Effects

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    Mohammad Z. Hossain

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Various species of berries have been reported to contain several polyphenolic compounds, such as anthocyanins and flavonols, which are known to possess high antioxidant activity and may be beneficial for human health. To our knowledge, a thorough chemical analysis of polyphenolics in species of these plants native to Newfoundland, Canada has not been conducted. The primary objective of this study was to determine the polyphenolic compounds present in commercial extracts from Newfoundland berries, which included blueberries (V. angustifolium, lingonberries (V. vitis-idaea and black currant (Ribes lacustre. Anthocyanin and flavonol glycosides in powdered extracts from Ribes lacustre and the Vaccinium species were identified using the high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC separation method with mass spectrometric (MS detection. The identified compounds were extracted from dried berries by various solvents via ultrasonication followed by centrifugation. A reverse-phase analytical column was employed to identify the retention time of each chemical component before submission for LC–MS analysis. A total of 21 phenolic compounds were tentatively identified in the three species. Further, we tested the effects of the lingonberry extract for its ability to protect neurons and glia from trauma utilizing an in vitro model of cell injury. Surprisingly, these extracts provided complete protection from cell death in this model. These findings indicate the presence of a wide variety of anthocyanins and flavonols in berries that grow natively in Newfoundland. These powdered extracts maintain these compounds intact despite being processed from berry fruit, indicating their potential use as dietary supplements. In addition, these recent findings and previous data from our lab demonstrate the ability of compounds in berries to protect the nervous system from traumatic insults.

  1. Exobasidium maculosum, a new species causing leaf and fruit spots on blueberry in the southeastern USA and its relationship with other Exobasidium spp. parasitic to blueberry and cranberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Marin Talbot; Turner, Ashley N; Brannen, Phillip M; Cline, William O; Richardson, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot of blueberry (Vaccinium section Cyanococcus) is an emerging disease that has rapidly increased in prevalence throughout the southeastern USA. To determine whether this disease is caused by a new species of Exobasidium, we studied the morphology and phylogenetic relationship of the causal fungus compared with other members of the genus, including the type species E. vaccinii and other species that parasitize blueberry and cranberry (V. macrocarpon). Both scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy were used for morphological characterization. For phylogenetic analyses, we sequenced the large subunit of the rDNA (LSU) from 10 isolates collected from leaf or fruit spots of rabbiteye blueberry (V. virgatum), highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum) and southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium interspecific hybrid) from Georgia and North Carolina and six isolates from leaf spots of lowbush blueberry (V. angustifolium) from Maine and Nova Scotia, Canada. LSU was sequenced from isolates causing red leaf disease of lowbush blueberry and red leaf spot (E. rostrupii) and red shoot (E. perenne) of cranberry. In addition, LSU sequences from GenBank, including sequences with high similarity to the emerging parasite and from Exobasidium spp. parasitizing other Vaccinium spp. and related hosts, were obtained. All sequences were aligned and subjected to phylogenetic analyses. Results indicated that the emerging parasite in the southeastern USA differs morphologically and phylogenetically from other described species and is described herein as Exobasidium maculosum. Within the southeastern USA, clustering based on host species, host tissue type (leaf or fruit) or geographic region was not detected; however, leaf spot isolates from lowbush blueberry were genetically different and likely represent a unique species. © 2014 by The Mycological Society of America.

  2. Abundance and Diversity of Wild Bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) Found in Lowbush Blueberry Growing Regions of Downeast Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushmann, Sara L; Drummond, Francis A

    2015-08-01

    Insect-mediated pollination is critical for lowbush blueberry (Ericaceae: Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton) fruit development. Past research shows a persistent presence of wild bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) providing pollination services even when commercial pollinators are present. We undertook the study to 1) provide a description of bee communities found in lowbush blueberry-growing regions, 2) identify field characteristics or farm management practices that influence those communities, 3) identify key wild bee pollinators that provide pollination services for the blueberry crop, and 4) identify non-crop plants found within the cropping system that provide forage for wild bees. During a 4-year period, we collected solitary and eusocial bees in over 40 fields during and after blueberry bloom, determining a management description for each field. We collected 4,474 solitary bees representing 124 species and 1,315 summer bumble bees representing nine species. No bumble bee species were previously unknown in Maine, yet we document seven solitary bee species new for the state. These include species of the genera Nomada, Lasioglossum, Calliopsis, and Augochloropsis. No field characteristic or farm management practice related to bee community structure, except bumble bee species richness was higher in certified organic fields. Pollen analysis determined scopal loads of 67-99% ericaceous pollen carried by five species of Andrena. Our data suggest two native ericaceous plants, Kalmia angustifolia L. and Gaylussacia baccata (Wangenheim), provide important alternative floral resources. We conclude that Maine blueberry croplands are populated with a species-rich bee community that fluctuates in time and space. We suggest growers develop and maintain wild bee forage and nest sites. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Elevated Genetic Diversity in the Emerging Blueberry Pathogen Exobasidium maculosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jane E; Brooks, Kyle; Brannen, Phillip M; Cline, William O; Brewer, Marin T

    2015-01-01

    Emerging diseases caused by fungi are increasing at an alarming rate. Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot of blueberry, caused by the fungus Exobasidium maculosum, is an emerging disease that has rapidly increased in prevalence throughout the southeastern USA, severely reducing fruit quality in some plantings. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic diversity of E. maculosum in the southeastern USA to elucidate the basis of disease emergence and to investigate if populations of E. maculosum are structured by geography, host species, or tissue type. We sequenced three conserved loci from 82 isolates collected from leaves and fruit of rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium virgatum), highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum), and southern highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum hybrids) from commercial fields in Georgia and North Carolina, USA, and 6 isolates from lowbush blueberry (V. angustifolium) from Maine, USA, and Nova Scotia, Canada. Populations of E. maculosum from the southeastern USA and from lowbush blueberry in Maine and Nova Scotia are distinct, but do not represent unique species. No difference in genetic structure was detected between different host tissues or among different host species within the southeastern USA; however, differentiation was detected between populations in Georgia and North Carolina. Overall, E. maculosum showed extreme genetic diversity within the conserved loci with 286 segregating sites among the 1,775 sequenced nucleotides and each isolate representing a unique multilocus haplotype. However, 94% of the nucleotide substitutions were silent, so despite the high number of mutations, selective constraints have limited changes to the amino acid sequences of the housekeeping genes. Overall, these results suggest that the emergence of Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot is not due to a recent introduction or host shift, or the recent evolution of aggressive genotypes of E. maculosum, but more likely as a result of an increasing host population

  4. Impact of water-level changes to aquatic vegetation in small oligotrophic lakes

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    Egert VANDEL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the effect of drastic water-level changes to the aquatic vegetation in three small oligotrophic lakes situated in Kurtna Kame Field in north-eastern Estonia. The area holds around 40 lakes in 30 km2 of which 18 lakes are under protection as Natura Habitat lakes (Natura 2000 network. The area is under a strong human impact as it is surrounded by oil shale mines, sand quarry, peat harvesting field etc. The most severe impact comes from the groundwater intake established in 1972 in the vicinity of three studied lakes. The exploitation of groundwater led to drastic water-level drops. In 1980s the water-level drops were measured to be up to 3 to 4 meters compared to the levels of 1946. Lake Martiska and Lake Kuradijärv were severely affected and only 29% and 45% of lake area respectively and 21% of initial volume remained. Both lakes were described as oligotrophic lakes before severe human impact and held characteristic macrophytes such as Isoëtes lacustris L., Sparganium angustifolium Michx and Lobelia dortmanna L. As the water level declined the lakes lost their rare characteristic species and can now be described more as a meso- or even eutrophic lakes. When the volume of groundwater abstraction decreased in the 1990s the water levels started to recover but did not reach the natural levels of pre-industrialized era. Also the vegetation did not show any signs of recovery. In 2012 the pumping rates increased again causing a new rapid decline in water levels which almost exceed the previous minimum levels. The water-level monitoring alongside with the macrophyte monitoring data gives us a good case study on how the long term abrupt water-level changes can affect the aquatic vegetation

  5. Bio-hybridization of nanobactericides with cellulose films for effective treatment against members of ESKAPE multi-drug-resistant pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Syed; Volova, Tatiana; Prudnikova, Svetlana V.; Shumilova, Anna A.; Perianova, Olga V.; Zharkov, Sergey M.; Kuzmin, Andrey; Olga, Kondratenka; Bogdan, Kiryukhin; Shidlovskiy, Ivan P.; Potkina, Zoya K.; Khohlova, Olga Y.; Lobova, Tatiana I.

    2018-03-01

    The rapid expansion of drug-resistant pathogens has created huge global impact and development of novel antimicrobial leads is one of the top priority studies in the current scenario. The present study aims to develop bio-hybridized nanocellulose films which comprise of phytogenic silver nanobactericides. The nanobactericides were synthesized by treating 1 mM silver nitrate with aqueous extract of Chamerion angustifolium which reduced the metal salt to produce polydispersed nanobactericides which were tested against the members of ESKAPE drug-resistant communities. The synthesized silver nanobactericides were subjected to characterization with UV-visible spectra which displayed maximum absorbance at 408 nm. The bio-molecular interaction of phyto-constituents to mediate synthesis and stabilization of nanobactericides was studied with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which depicted functional groups associated with nanobactericides. The crystalline nature was studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD) which showed Bragg's intensities at 2θ angle which denoted (111), (200), (220), and (311) planes. The morphological characteristics of silver nanobactericides were defined with transmission electron Microscopy (TEM) image which displayed polydispersity of silver nanobactericides with size ranging from 2 to 40 nm. The synthesized nanobactericides showed a significant activity against MRSA strain with 21 mm zone of inhibition. The minimal inhibitory concentration of silver nanobactericides to inhibit the growth of test pathogens was also determined which ranged between 0.625 and 1.25 μg/ml. The silver nanobactericides were bio-hybridized onto nanocellulose films produced by Komagataeibacter xylinus B-12068 culture strain. The films were dried to determine the mechanical properties which showed increased in Young's modulus and tensile strength in comparison with control bacterial cellulose films. Overall, the results obtained in the present investigation are

  6. The wind and fire disturbance in Central European mountain spruce forests: the regeneration after four years

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    Monika Budzáková

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A strong windstorm in November 2004 resulted in a huge blown-down spruce forest area in the southern part of the Tatra National Park in the Western Carpathians in Slovakia, Central Europe. The aim of this work is to study the vegetation composition of spruce forest at differently managed sites four years after this disturbance. Four study areas were selected for this purpose: (i an area where the fallen trees were extracted and new seedlings were planted; (ii an area, which was hit by a forest fire after the extraction; (iii an area where no active management was applied; (iv a reference forest unaffected by such disturbance. A total of 100 plots were selected, 25 of each area type. The result of DCA and CCA analyses consistently indicated that after this short period the non-extracted and extracted areas are currently most similar to the reference forest area, while the fire affected area differed. A one-way ANOVA comparing species cover for the different plot sizes indicated some significant differences between the extracted and non-extracted plots. The abundance of certain species commonly occurring in spruce forests, such as Dyopteris carthusiana agg., Vaccinium myrtillus and Avenella flexuosa, correlated weli with the non-extracted plots, compared to the extracted plots. Coverage of these species was lowest on burned plots. The lowest Shannon-Wiener’s diversity values were recorded in burned plots. This was most likely a consequence of mono-dominant competitive species spread, (mainly Chamerion angustifolium which profited from the altered ecological conditions following the fire. Although some differences were also registered in the Shannon-Wiener diversity index between the remaining research plots, however these were not statistically significant. The most important results of our investigations include the extensive influence of fire disturbance on vegetation. Study revealed that the wind-disturbed area is able to regenerate

  7. Similar diversity of Alphaproteobacteria and nitrogenase gene amplicons on two related Sphagnum mosses

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    Anastasia eBragina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphagnum mosses represent a main component in ombrotrophic wetlands. They harbor a specific and diverse microbial community with essential functions for the host. To understand extend and degree of host specificity, Sphagnum fallax and S. angustifolium, two phylogenetically closely related species, which show distinct habitat preference with respect to the nutrient level, were analyzed by a multifaceted approach. Microbial fingerprints obtained by PCR-SSCP (single-strand conformation polymorphism using universal, group-specific and functional primers were highly similar. Similarity was confirmed for colonization patterns obtained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH coupled with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM: Alphaproteobacteria were the main colonizers inside the hyaline cells of Sphagnum leaves. A deeper survey of Alphaproteobacteria by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing reveals a high diversity with Acidocella, Acidisphaera, Rhodopila and Phenylobacterium as major genera for both mosses. Pathogen defense and nitrogen fixation are important functions of Sphagnum-associated bacteria, which are fulfilled by microbial communities of both Sphagna in a similar way. NifH libraries of Sphagnum-associated microbial communities were characterized by high diversity and abundance of Alphaproteobacteria but contained also diverse amplicons of other taxa, e.g. Cyanobacteria, Geobacter and Spirochaeta. Statistically significant differences between the microbial communities of both Sphagnum species could not be discovered in any of the experimental approach. Our results show that the same close relationship, which exists between the physical, morphological and chemical characteristics of Sphagnum mosses and the ecology and function of bog ecosystems, also connects moss plantlets with their associated bacterial communities.

  8. Screening for new accumulator plants in Andes Range mines

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    Bech, Jaume; Roca, Núria

    2016-04-01

    Toxic metal pollution of waters and soils is a major environmental problem, and most conventional remediation approaches do not provide acceptable solutions. The use of plants or plant products to restore or stabilize contaminated sites, collectively known as phytoremediation, takes advantage of the natural abilities of plants to take up, accumulate, store, or degrade organic and inorganic substances. Although not a new concept, phytoremediation is currently being re-examined as an environmentally friendly, cost-effective means of reducing metal contaminated soil. Plants growing on naturally metal-enriched soils are of particular interest in this regard, since they are genetically tolerant to high metal concentrations and have an excellent adaptation to this multi-stress environment. Processes include using plants that tolerate and accumulate metals at high levels (phytoextraction) and using plants that can grow under conditions that are toxic to other plants while preventing, for example, soil erosion (phytostabilization). Soil and plant samples were taken at polymetallic mines in Peru, Ecuador and Chile. It is suggested that Plantago orbignyana Steinheil is a Pb hyperaccumulator. Moreover, unusually elevated concentrations of Pb (over 1000 mg kg-1) and Translocation Factor (TF) greater than one were also detected in shoots of 6 different plants species (Ageratina sp., Achirodine alata, Cortaderia apalothica, Epilobium denticulatum, Taraxacum officinalis and Trifolium repens) of a Caroline mine in Perú. Among the grass species (Poaceae), the highest shoot As concentration were found in Paspalum sp. (>1000 μg g-1) and Eriochola ramose (460 μg g-1) from the Cu mine in Peru and in Holcus lanatus and Pennisetum clandestinum (>200 μg g-1) from the silver mine in Ecuador. The shoot accumulation of Zn was highest in Baccharis amdatensis (>1900 μg g-1) and in Rumex crispus (1300 μg g-1) from the Ag mine in Ecuador (Bech et al., 2002). Paspalum racemosum also

  9. Hyperaccumulator of Pb in native plants growing on Peruvian mine tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Jaume; Roca, Nuria; Boluda, Rafael; Tume, Pedro; Duran, Paola; Poma, Wilfredo; Sanchez, Isidoro

    2014-05-01

    samples were taken at four locations (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4) with different levels of Pb. The Pb soil content (mean ± standard deviation) in mg•kg-1 is as follows: CA1 3992 ± 301; CA2 10128 ± 2247, CA3 14197 ± 895, CA4 16060 ± 810. The non-polluted value around the mine was Pb 124 mg•kg-1. Unusual elevated concentrations of Pb (over 1000 mg kg-1) and TF greater than one were detected in shoots of 6 different plants species (Ageratina sp., Achirodine alata, Cortaderia apalothica, Epilobium denticulatum, Taraxacum officinalis and Trifolium repens). The location CA4 has the maximum content of Pb in the shoots of Ageratina sp. (5045±77 mg•kg-1), C. apalothica (3367±188 mg•kg-1), E. denticulatum (13599±848 mg•kg-1), T. officinalis (2533±47 mg•kg-1) and T. repens (2839±231 mg•kg-1). However, the BF (Bioaccumulation Factor) was smaller than one. Despite the low BF index, the great TFs for Pb indicate that these plant species effectively translocate this metal (i.e., 2.4 for Ageratina sp., 2.3 for C. apalothica, 1.6 for T. repens, 1.5 for A. alata, 1.3 for T. officinalis and 1.2 for E. denticulatum). It seems that the BF is not a reliable index when the metal soil concentration is extremely large. Controlled-environment studies must be performed to definitively confirm the Pb hyperaccumulation character of cited plant species.

  10. Evolution of blue-flowered species of genus Linum based on high-throughput sequencing of ribosomal RNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsheva, Nadezhda L; Melnikova, Nataliya V; Kirov, Ilya V; Speranskaya, Anna S; Krinitsina, Anastasia A; Dmitriev, Alexey A; Belenikin, Maxim S; Krasnov, George S; Lakunina, Valentina A; Snezhkina, Anastasiya V; Rozhmina, Tatiana A; Samatadze, Tatiana E; Yurkevich, Olga Yu; Zoshchuk, Svyatoslav A; Amosova, Аlexandra V; Kudryavtseva, Anna V; Muravenko, Olga V

    2017-12-28

    The species relationships within the genus Linum have already been studied several times by means of different molecular and phylogenetic approaches. Nevertheless, a number of ambiguities in phylogeny of Linum still remain unresolved. In particular, the species relationships within the sections Stellerolinum and Dasylinum need further clarification. Also, the question of independence of the species of the section Adenolinum still remains unanswered. Moreover, the relationships of L. narbonense and other species of the section Linum require further clarification. Additionally, the origin of tetraploid species of the section Linum (2n = 30) including the cultivated species L. usitatissimum has not been explored. The present study examines the phylogeny of blue-flowered species of Linum by comparisons of 5S rRNA gene sequences as well as ITS1 and ITS2 sequences of 35S rRNA genes. High-throughput sequencing has been used for analysis of multicopy rRNA gene families. In addition to the molecular phylogenetic analysis, the number and chromosomal localization of 5S and 35S rDNA sites has been determined by FISH. Our findings confirm that L. stelleroides forms a basal branch from the clade of blue-flowered flaxes which is independent of the branch formed by species of the sect. Dasylinum. The current molecular phylogenetic approaches, the cytogenetic analysis as well as different genomic DNA fingerprinting methods applied previously did not discriminate certain species within the sect. Adenolinum. The allotetraploid cultivated species L. usitatissimum and its wild ancestor L. angustifolium (2n = 30) could originate either as the result of hybridization of two diploid species (2n = 16) related to the modern L. gandiflorum and L. decumbens, or hybridization of a diploid species (2n = 16) and a diploid ancestor of modern L. narbonense (2n = 14). High-throughput sequencing of multicopy rRNA gene families allowed us to make several adjustments to the

  11. Functional diversity of macrophyte communities within and between Pyrenean lakes

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    Enric BALLESTEROS

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Submersed vegetation is a common feature in about 70% Pyrenean high mountain (>1500 m a.s.l. lakes. Isoetids and soft-water elodeids are common elements of this underwater flora and can form distinct vegetation units (i.e. patches of vegetation dominated by different species within complex mosaics of vegetation in shallow waters (<7 m. Since isoetids exert a strong influence on sediment biogeochemistry due to high radial oxygen loss, we examined the small scale characteristics of the lake environment (water and sediment associated to vegetation patches in order to ascertain potential functional differences among them. To do so, we characterised the species composition and biomass of the main vegetation units from 11 lakes, defined plant communities based on biomass data, and then related each community with sediment properties (redox and dissolved nutrient concentration in the pore water and water nutrient concentration within plant canopy. We also characterised lake water and sediment in areas without vegetation as a reference. A total of twenty-one vegetation units were identified, ranging from one to five per lake. A cluster analysis on biomass species composition suggested seven different macrophyte communities that were named after the most dominant species: Nitella sp., Potamogeton praelongus, Myriophyllum alterniflorum, Sparganium angustifolium, Isoetes echinospora, Isoetes lacustris and Carex rostrata. Coupling between macrophyte communities and their immediate environment (overlying water and sediment was manifested mainly as variation in sediment redox conditions and the dominant form of inorganic nitrogen in pore-water. These effects depended on the specific composition of the community, and on the allocation between above- and belowground biomass, and could be predicted with a model relating the average and standard deviation of sediment redox potential from 0 down to -20 cm, across macrophyte communities. Differences in pore

  12. Plant diversity affects GHG fluxes in an ecological engineering experiment in a disturbed Sphagnum peatland (La Guette, France)

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    Gogo, Sébastien; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima; Leroy, Fabien; Guimbaud, Christophe; Bernard-Jannin, Léonard

    2017-04-01

    Many Sphagnum peatlands are experiencing vegetation change caused mainly by hydrological disturbances. In the context of these direct and indirect modifications, greenhouse gases (GHG) fluxes are affected by peat oxygenation, changes in litter composition (and thus decomposition) and rhizospheric processes (such as root exudates). This could lead a C sink system to switch to a source. To restore peatland functioning, ecological engineering works can be undertaken. Our study site, La Guette peatland (central France) is invaded by Molinia caerulea because a drain at the output decreased the water table depth. It was shown that it functioned as a source of C. In 2014, hydrological works were undertaken: 8 dams were installed, ditches were dug perpendicular to the water flow and back-filled with a mixture of shales and bentonite. In addition, a biodiversity experiment with 2 identical experimental stations was implemented: "downstream", close to the hydraulic works (relatively wet), "upstream", (relatively dry), with types of 3 vegetation plot (2m x 2m, n=4): 1) "control": intact vegetation (Molinia caerulea, Erica tetralix), 2) "bare" peat: vegetation and 5cm of peat were removed, 3) "Sphagnum": bare peat+Sphagnum. Our study aims to assess the effect of the vegetation treatment on the GHG fluxes. CO2 (ecosystem respiration or ER, Gross Primary Production or GPP, and Net Ecosystem Exchange) and CH4 fluxes (manual accumulation chamber), air and soil temperature, water table level, soil moisture were measured. After 18 months, half of the surface of "bare" and "Sphagnum" plots were covered by vegetation (Eriophorum angustifolium, Rynchospora alba, Trichophorum cespitosum). With time, as succession unfolds in these 2 types of station, ER and GPP increased. The sensitivity of ER to temperature increased sharply in "bare" and "Sphagnum" plots with years and became higher than the sensitivity in "control" plots. GPP increased with the total vegetation percentage cover

  13. The response of vegetation structure to active warming and precipitation reduction of the Sphagnum peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuców, Dominika; Basińska, Anna; Chojnicki, Bogdan; Gąbka, Maciej; Józefczyk, Damian; Juszczak, Radosław; Leśny, Jacek; Olejnik, Janusz; Reczuga, Monika; Samson, Mateusz; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Stróżecki, Marcin; Urbaniak, Marek; Zielińska, Małgorzata; Lamentowicz, Mariusz

    2017-04-01

    The recent climate change (e.g. increased temperature and decreased precipitation) is expected to affect biodiversity and vegetation structure of the European peatlands, as well as carbon fluxes. Our experimental study carried out in Western Poland, tests the hypothesis that the increased temperature, in particular in combination with rainfall reduction affects vegetation structure of the Sphagnum peatland, through changes in moss and vascular plants abundance. The innovative climate manipulation system was installed on the Rzecin peatland in 2014. The field site consists of four blocks: "drought" "warming and drought" "warming" and "control". The air and peat temperatures were increased in 2015 and 2016 by about 0.2 oC and 1.0 oC, respectively, using infrared radiators. Precipitation was reduced by automatic curtain operated only during the nights by about 37 % in both years. Data resulting from the analyses of digital pictures as well as Point Intercept method were used to identify changes in vegetation structure as a response to warming and drought. We observed increase in abundance of vascular plant and decrease in abundance of mosses during the very dry 2015 vegetation season. It appeared that Carex spp. (C. limosa and C. rostrata) abundance responded positively to warming, while Sphagnum spp. (S. angustifolium and S. teres) responded negatively. The "warming" block was characterized by an increase in abundance of Carex spp. by 8.3 % to 16.7 % and decreased abundance of Sphagnum spp. from 25 % to 19.4 %, whereas in the block of "warming and drought" 11.4 % to by 18.3 and 38 % to 26.9 %, respectively in the August 2015. However, we observed decrease in Sphagnum spp. abundance in the treatment with rainfall reduction in wetter 2016, and their increase in the control. Our results show how considerable changes in vegetation structure can be expected under the stress of warming and modified rainfall conditions, even after a short-term manipulation. However, it is

  14. Water level, vegetation composition, and plant productivity explain greenhouse gas fluxes in temperate cutover fens after inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minke, Merten; Augustin, Jürgen; Burlo, Andrei; Yarmashuk, Tatsiana; Chuvashova, Hanna; Thiele, Annett; Freibauer, Annette; Tikhonov, Vitalij; Hoffmann, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    Peat extraction leaves a land surface with a strong relief of deep cutover areas and higher ridges. Rewetting inundates the deep parts, while less deeply extracted zones remain at or above the water level. In temperate fens the flooded areas are colonized by helophytes such as Eriophorum angustifolium, Carex spp., Typha latifolia or Phragmites australis dependent on water depth. Reeds of Typha and Phragmites are reported as large sources of methane, but data on net CO2 uptake are contradictory for Typha and rare for Phragmites. Here, we analyze the effect of vegetation, water level and nutrient conditions on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for representative vegetation types along water level gradients at two rewetted cutover fens (mesotrophic and eutrophic) in Belarus. Greenhouse gas emissions were measured campaign-wise with manual chambers every 2 to 4 weeks for 2 years and interpolated by modelling. All sites had negligible nitrous oxide exchange rates. Most sites were carbon sinks and small GHG sources. Methane emissions generally increased with net ecosystem CO2 uptake. Mesotrophic small sedge reeds with water table around the land surface were small GHG sources in the range of 2.3 to 4.2 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1. Eutrophic tall sedge - Typha latifolia reeds on newly formed floating mats were substantial net GHG emitters in the range of 25.1 to 39.1 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr. They represent transient vegetation stages. Phragmites reeds ranged between -1.7 to 4.2 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1 with an overall mean GHG emission of 1.3 t CO2 eq. ha-1 yr-1. The annual CO2 balance was best explained by vegetation biomass, which includes the role of vegetation composition and species. Methane emissions were obviously driven by biological activity of vegetation and soil organisms. Shallow flooding of cutover temperate fens is a suitable measure to arrive at low GHG emissions. Phragmites australis establishment should be promoted in deeper flooded areas and will lead to moderate, but

  15. Holocene palaeohydrological history of the Tǎul Muced peat bog (Northern Carpathians, Romania) based on testate amoebae (Protozoa) and plant macrofossils

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    Cosmin Diaconu, Andrei; Feurdean, Angelica; Lamentowicz, Mariusz; Gałka, Mariusz; Tanţǎu, Ioan

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of past local vs. regional hydro-climate variability is a priority in climate research. This is because ecosystems and human depend on local climatic conditions and the magnitude of these climate changes is more variable at local and regional rather than at global scales. Ombrotrophic bogs are highly suitable for hydro-climate reconstructions as they are entirely dependent on the water from precipitation. We used stratigraphy, radiocarbon dating, testate amoebae (TA) and plant macrofossils on a peat profile from an ombrotrophic bog (Tǎul Muced) located in the Biosphere Reserve of the Rodna National Park Romania. We performed quantitative reconstruction of the depth to water table (DWT) and pH over the last 8000 years in a continental area of CE Europe. We identified six main stages in the development of the bog based on changes in TA assemblages in time. Wet conditions and pH between 2 and 4.5 were recorded between 4600-2750 and 1300-400 cal. yr BP, by the occurrence of Archerella flavum, Amphitrema wrightianum and Hyalosphenia papilio. This was associated to a local vegetation primarily composed of Sphagnum magellanicum and S. angustifolium. Dry stages and pH of 2.5 to 5 were inferred between 7550-4600, 2750-1300 and -50 cal. yr BP, by the dominance of Nebela militaris, Difflugia pulex and Phryganella acropodia. These overall dry conditions were also connected with increased abundance of Eriophorum vaginatum. The period between 400 and -50 cal. yr BP was characterized by a rapid shift from dry to wet conditions on the surface of the bog. Vegetation shifted from Sphagnum magellanicum to Sphagnum russowii dominated community. Our reconstruction remains in relatively good agreement with other palaeohydrological records from Central Eastern Europe. However, it shows contrasting conditions to others particularly with records from NW Europe. The valuable information regarding bog hydrology offered by our record puts an accent on the need of more regional TA

  16. Palynostratigraphical correlation of the excavated Miocene lignite seams of the Yataǧan basin (Muǧla Province, south-western Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchal, Johannes Martin; Grímsson, Friðgeir; Denk, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    (basswood, mallow family), Myricaceae (bayberry), Oleaceae (olive family), Onagraceae (evening primrose family), Plumbaginaceae (sea-lavender), Polygonaceae (docks, knotweed), Ranunculaceae (buttercup family), Rosaceae (rose family), Salicaceae (willow), Sapindaceae (maple), Sapotaceae, and Ulmaceae (elm, Zelkova). The objectives of this investigation were (1) to evaluate whether the three palynological sections were deposited at the same time, and (2) to show regional vegetation differences within a single sedimentary basin. We found three general pollen zones corresponding to different sedimentary settings and palaeoenvironments. The first pollen zone was linked to lignite formation (swamp forest, fern spores, Alnus, Decodon). The second pollen zone reflects lacustrine conditions (Typhaceae) and surrounding hinterland vegetation dominated by Fagaceae. The third pollen zone is dominated by herbaceous taxa, whereas woody taxa are less diverse and less abundant. In general, the three palynological sections are congruent in reflecting distinct pollen zones. However main vegetation types may be represented by different dominating taxa (e. g. Alnus dominace in Eskihisar and Tı naz localities while absent in Salihpaşalar) and rare taxa may differ between localities. Our results demonstrate that in order to achieve a comprehensive understanding of environmental and vegetation conditions in a sedimentary basin, a single palynological section (locality) may not capture the entirety of environmental conditions and changes.

  17. Constructing a Baseline Model of Alpine Wetlands of the Uinta Mountains, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyjasik, M.; Ford, R. L.; Bartholomew, L. M.; Welsh, S. B.; Hernandez, M.; Koerner, D.; Muir, M.

    2008-12-01

    Alpine wetlands of the Uinta Mountains, northeastern Utah, contain a variety of groundwater-dependent ecosystems. Unlike their counterparts in other areas of the Rocky Mountains, these systems have been relatively unstudied. The Reader Lakes area on the southern slope of the range was selected for detailed study because of its variety of wetland plant communities, homogenous bedrock geology, and minimal human impact. The primary goal of this interdisciplinary study is to establish the functional links between the geomorphology and hydrogeology of these high mountain wetlands and their constituent plant communities. In addition to traditional field studies and water chemistry, geospatial technologies are being used to organize and analyze both field data (water chemistry and wetland vegetation) and archived multispectral imagery (2006 NAIP images). The hydrology of these wetlands is dominated by groundwater discharge and their surface is dominated by string-and-flark morphology of various spatial scales, making these montane wetlands classic patterned fens. The drainage basin is organized into a series of large-scale stair-stepping wetlands, bounded by glacial moraines at their lower end. Wetlands are compartmentalized by a series of large strings (roughly perpendicular to the axial stream) and flarks. This pattern may be related to small ridges on the underlying ground moraine and possibly modified by beaver activity along the axial stream. Small-scale patterning occurs along the margins of the wetlands and in sloping-fen settings. The smaller-scale strings and flarks form a complex; self-regulating system in which water retention is enhanced and surface flow is minimized. Major plant communities have been identified within the wetlands for example: a Salix planifolia community associated with the peaty strings; Carex aquatilis, Carex limosa, and Eriophorum angustifolium communities associated with flarks; as well as a Sphagnum sp.- rich hummocky transition zone

  18. Redox processes in the rhizosphere of restored peatlands - The impact of vascular plant species on electrochemical properties of dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agethen, Svenja; Wolff, Franziska; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2016-04-01

    Restoration of cut over peatlands in Central Europe is challenging in a landscape overused for agriculture. Excess nutrient availability by excess fertilization triggers uncharacteristic vegetation that is one key driver for carbon cycling. Those nutrient rich systems are often dominated by graminoids, and were often found to emit substantial amounts of methane. Plants grown under nutrient rich conditions provide more labile carbon in rhizodeposition and litter that fuels methanogenesis. Such species often have aerenchyma that facilitates direct CH4 emissions to the atmosphere and therefore impair the climate cooling function of bogs. On the other hand, aerenchymatic tissue supplies oxygen to the rhizosphere, which may reduce methanogenesis or stimulate methane oxidation, as methanogenesis is a strictly anaerobic process. Which of the effects prevail is often unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test the impact of different vegetation on rhizospheric redox conditions and methanogenesis, including aerenchymatic vascular plants that are dominant in restored cut over peatlands. As ombrotrophic peat is poor in inorganic electron acceptors (EAs) to suppress methanogenesis, we analyzed the electron acceptor (EACs) and electron donor capacities (EDCs) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the rhizosphere to understand the impact of vegetation on anaerobic organic matter degradation. We planted Juncus effusus, Eriophorum vaginatum, Eriophorum angustifolium, Sphagnum (mixture of S. magellanicum, S. papillosum, S. sec. acutifolia, 1/3 each) plus non-vegetated controls; six replicates per batch; in containers with untreated homogenized peat. The plants grow under constant conditions (20° C, 12h diurnal light cycles and 80% RH). Anoxic conditions were achieved by keeping the water table at +10 cm. For monitoring, the rhizosphere is equipped with suction and gas samplers. We measure dissolved CO2 and CH4 concentrations, inorganic EAs (NO3-, Fe(III), and SO42-) and

  19. Negative cross resistance in atrazine resistant junglerice (Echinochloa colona (L. Link populations in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Elahifard

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Negative and positive cross-resistance to other herbicides have been found in triazine-resistant biotypes. Thus, negative cross-resistance has been reported to bentazone for Brassica napus L. and A. retroflexus L., and to pyridate for B. napus and Epilobium ciliatum Raf.. In contrast, positive cross-resistance to bentazone has been found in Chenopodium album L. and Solanum nigrum L.. Negative cross-resistance, i.e., herbicide-resistant plants being more sensitive to herbicides than susceptible plants, has been documented in several triazine-resistant weed biotypes. The goal of this study was to search for herbicides that exert negative cross-resistance at the whole-plant level for control of atrazine-resistant populations of E. colona. Materials and Methods Suspected resistant and susceptible seeds of junglerice to atrazine were collected from sugarcane fields and adjacent areas of Karun Agro-Industry Inc., Shushtar, southwestern of Iran in 2014 - 2015 growing season. These populations were named according to their population status and abbreviated as follows: R1, R2, R3 and S (susceptible population. All the collected seeds (R- and S-populations were stored at room temperature (25 oC. Herbicides were tebuthiuron, linuron, diuron and diuron + hexazinone. For the PRE application, 10 seeds were planted in 500-ml plastic pots containing clay:sand mix, and herbicides were applied using an flood nozzle and back sprayer calibrated to deliver 350 L ha-1 to the suspected resistant and susceptible junglerice biotypes 1 d after sowing. Plants were thinned to 4 plants per pot. The aboveground biomass was harvested 28 DAT, dried at 75 °C for 48 h, and weighed. The aboveground biomass data were expressed as a percentage of the untreated control. The experiment was a completely randomized block design with four replications and was repeated. The data were analyzed using a nonlinear regression model and R software (drc add on packeges, the three

  20. The Effect of Potassium on the Controlling of Salt in Evening Primrose (Oenothera macrocarpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Goldani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Salinity has been recognized as one of the major abiotic factors affecting crop yields in arid and semi-arid irrigated areas of the world and efforts for breeding salt-resistant crop plants have been made. Approximately one-third of the world irrigated soils and a large proportion of soils in dry land are saline. Two major effects have been identified as the probable causes of high salt toxicity in crop plant i.e., the ionic effect and the osmotic effect. The ionic effect results in alterations in enzymatic processes, disturbances in accumulation and transport of different ions or a combination of all these factors. As a result, shoot and root growing reduce and uptake of nutrient elements by plants is adversely affected. While excess Na accumulated in plants under salinity stress conditions hinders K uptake; Cl hinders NO3 uptake by plants and destroys ionic balance in plants. Evening primrose is a plant which belongs to Onagraceae. Its seed oil has a special arrangement in Glycerol molecule, so it has been used a lot in medical treatments and also feeding. Researchers showed that using the best techniques and methods in farming can increase the amount of oil in the seeds of this plant. The wrong method of agricultural activities in Iran caused increasing salt in the soil, so growing plants in this situation isn’t possible. For confronting with this phenomenon knowing and choosing kinds of plants that can resist the situation of salt is really a necessary. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted as a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with three replicates was performed with five levels of NaCl salinity on Oenothera macrocarpa (0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 mM and potassium chloride levels (zero and 15.02 mM and three times in the Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in 1390. Salt treatment to prevent osmotic shock was applied to four-leaf stage and treated with potassium was gradually

  1. Analysis of landslide overgrowing rates at Vaskiny Dachi key site, Central Yamal, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomutov, A.

    2009-04-01

    Equiesetum arvense ssp. boreale were presented, pioneer moss species (Bryum sp., Ceratodon purpureus appropriate for disturbed habitats appeared. In the "frontal zone" transformed initial communities were observed and sedge communities with Carex glareosa were developing (Rebristaya et al. 1995). In 2005 landslide shear surface was characterized by abundance of pioneer grass and chamomile-grass with herb communities on rather dry portions (Deschampsia borealis, Puccinellia sibirica, Draba hirta, Tanacetum bipinnatum, Senecio congestus), and sedge (Carex glaerosa, Carex bigelowii ssp. arctisibirica) or cottongrass (Eriophorum angustifolium, Eriophorim vaginatum) meadows in depressions, but edges of gentle troughs were overgrowing poorly. On the landslide body, initial moss cover did not recover, on separate blocks crustose lichens developed. However, everywhere in more stable herb-shrub communities with Salix polaris typical moss cover formed. In "frontal zone" sedge bogs appeared. Some activation of overgrowing was noted in 2007-2008 in connection with favorable weather conditions with warm summers in preceding 2005-2006 and relatively high summer precipitation, but shear surfaces of majority of landslides got overgrown by 30-40 % because of poorly developed organic horizon and high erosion liability of these surfaces, as well as shear surfaces of small landslides on steep slopes. Different are landslides on gentle southern slopes. Their shear surfaces got overgrown by herb, cotton grass and sedge communities by 90% while communities on landslide bodies are similar to those on surrounding undisturbed slopes. Specific are landslides with actively developing thermoerosion on shear surface. Overgrowing and thermoerosion are developing simultaneously at such landslides. At one of such landslides depth of thermoerosion gully reached to 2 m in 2008. At the same time shear surface around the gully got overgrown by pioneer grass and chamomile-grass communities with equisetum and