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Sample records for epileptic seizures caused

  1. Predicting epileptic seizures in advance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Moghim

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6-0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling, is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance.

  2. Temporal epileptic seizures and occupational exposure to solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, M; Bælum, Jesper; Bonde, J P

    1994-01-01

    Long term exposure to organic solvents is usually not considered as a possible cause of chronic epileptic seizures. A case that shows a remarkable coincidence between exposure to organic solvents and occurrence of epileptic seizures is reported. The man was a 58 year old sign writer with lifelong...

  3. Automated differentiation between epileptic and non-epileptic convulsive seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was the clinical validation of an automated algorithm based on surface electromyography (EMG) for differentiation between convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). Forty-four consecutive episodes with convulsive events were automatically analyzed with the a......%) and 18 PNESs (95%). The overall diagnostic accuracy was 95%. This algorithm is useful for distinguishing between epileptic and psychogenic convulsive seizures....

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid findings after epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate ictally-induced CSF parameter changes after seizures in adult patients without acute inflammatory diseases or infectious diseases associated with the central nervous system. In total, 151 patients were included in the study. All patients were admitted to our department of neurology following acute seizures and received an extensive work-up including EEG, cerebral imaging, and CSF examinations. CSF protein elevation was found in most patients (92; 60.9%) and was significantly associated with older age, male sex, and generalized seizures. Abnormal CSF-to-serum glucose ratio was found in only nine patients (5.9%) and did not show any significant associations. CSF lactate was elevated in 34 patients (22.5%) and showed a significant association with focal seizures with impaired consciousness, status epilepticus, the presence of EEG abnormalities in general and epileptiform potentials in particular, as well as epileptogenic lesions on cerebral imaging. Our results indicate that non-inflammatory CSF elevation of protein and lactate after epileptic seizures is relatively common, in contrast to changes in CSF-to-serum glucose ratio, and further suggest that these changes are caused by ictal activity and are related to seizure type and intensity. We found no indication that these changes may have further-reaching pathological implications besides their postictal character.

  5. Accelerometry based detection of epileptic seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsen, T.M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Epileptic seizures are the manifestation of abnormal hypersynchronous discharges of cortical neurons that impair brain function. Most of the people affected can be treated successfully with drug therapy or neurosurgical procedures. But there

  6. Clinical Microbiological Aspects of Epileptic Seizures in the Tropical Countries with Specific Focus on Nigeria

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    Ijeoma Kanu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder; however, in Nigeria and other tropical regions, the causes of epileptic seizures differ greatly in etiology. This paper is an attempt to highlight some possible microbiological aspects of epileptic seizures. A literature review was carried out to identify the extent to which microbial infections were involved in the elicitation of epileptic seizures. Data were collected from several clinics in the community and hospitals in Nigeria and correlated with the evidence from the literature review. It was found that different microbial agents including viral, bacterial, protozoa, and fungal agents were involved in several aspects of epileptic seizures. Malaria was found to cause more than 88% of childhood epileptic seizures and 12% of adult seizures. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in more than 40% of adult patients. Partial seizures were uncommon. Cases of epileptic seizures associated with bacteria (e.g., brucellosis, viral, fungal, and protozoa infections were frequently reported. Malaria, tapeworm, and cysticercosis were some of the common infectious causes of epilepsy; however, in some cases, the cause remained unknown. From these findings, it was evident that microbiological aspects of epilepsies are possible research areas that might be developed. It is believed that the unraveling of the various microbiological factors in epileptic seizures would have important implications for understanding the underlying neurobiology, evaluating treatment strategies, and perhaps planning health-care resources for the affected. It will also help to improve the prognostic factors in initial seizure symptomatic etiology and presence of any structural cerebral abnormalities.

  7. Effect of epileptic seizures on the cerebrospinal fluid--A systematic retrospective analysis.

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    Tumani, Hayrettin; Jobs, Catherine; Brettschneider, Johannes; Hoppner, Anselm C; Kerling, Frank; Fauser, Susanne

    2015-08-01

    Analyses of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are obligatory when epileptic seizures manifest for the first time in order to exclude life-threatening causes or treatable diseases such as acute infections or autoimmune encephalitis. However, there are only few systematic investigations on the effect of seizures themselves on CSF parameters and the significance of these parameters in differential diagnosis. CSF samples of 309 patients with epileptic and 10 with psychogenic seizures were retrospectively analyzed. CSF samples were collected between 1999 and 2008. Cell counts, the albumin quotient, lactate and Tau-protein levels were determined. Findings were correlated with seizure types, seizure etiology (symptomatic, cryptogenic, occasional seizure), and seizure duration. Pathological findings were only observed in patients with epileptic but not with psychogenic seizures. The lactate concentration was elevated in 14%, the albumin quotient in 34%, and the Tau protein level in 36% of CSF samples. Cell counts were only slightly elevated in 6% of patients. Different seizure types influenced all parameters except for the cell count: In status epilepticus highest, in simple partial seizures lowest values were seen. Symptomatic partial and generalized epileptic seizures had significantly higher Tau-protein levels than cryptogenic partial seizures. In patients with repetitive and occasional epileptic seizures, higher Tau-protein levels were seen than in those with psychogenic seizures. Duration of epileptic seizures was positively correlated with the albumin quotient, lactate and Tau-protein levels. High variability of investigated CSF parameters within each subgroup rendered a clear separation between epileptic and psychogenic seizures impossible. Elevated cell counts are infrequently observed in patients with epileptic seizures and should therefore not uncritically be interpreted as a postictal phenomenon. However, blood-CSF barrier disruption, increased glucose metabolism

  8. Biomarkers of epileptic seizures and epilepsy

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    Bogdan Lorber

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to review biological markers, their importance and usefulness in the diagnosis of epileptic seizure or epilepsy. Assessed are also their prognostic value, their use in the evaluation of antiepileptic therapy effect and some other useful properties. The article reviews prolactin, neuron specific enolase, S–100 protein, creatin kinase, laminin, matrix metalloproteinase, nesfatin–1, ghrelin, obestatin and chromogranin A. The authors stress the need for further research studies in this area.

  9. Unsupervised EEG analysis for automated epileptic seizure detection

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    Birjandtalab, Javad; Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2016-07-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder which can, if not controlled, potentially cause unexpected death. It is extremely crucial to have accurate automatic pattern recognition and data mining techniques to detect the onset of seizures and inform care-givers to help the patients. EEG signals are the preferred biosignals for diagnosis of epileptic patients. Most of the existing pattern recognition techniques used in EEG analysis leverage the notion of supervised machine learning algorithms. Since seizure data are heavily under-represented, such techniques are not always practical particularly when the labeled data is not sufficiently available or when disease progression is rapid and the corresponding EEG footprint pattern will not be robust. Furthermore, EEG pattern change is highly individual dependent and requires experienced specialists to annotate the seizure and non-seizure events. In this work, we present an unsupervised technique to discriminate seizures and non-seizures events. We employ power spectral density of EEG signals in different frequency bands that are informative features to accurately cluster seizure and non-seizure events. The experimental results tried so far indicate achieving more than 90% accuracy in clustering seizure and non-seizure events without having any prior knowledge on patient's history.

  10. Video electroencephalography monitoring differentiates between epileptic and non-epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Mette Borch; Erdal, Jesper; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is often misdiagnosed and approximately one in every four patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy does not have epilepsy, but instead non-epileptic seizures. Video electroencephalography monitoring (VEM) is the gold standard for differentiation between epileptic and non...

  11. Daytime encopresis associated with gland mal epileptic seizures: case report.

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    Oyatsi, D P

    2005-08-01

    Sphincteric incontinence of stool and urine are not unusual features of generalised epileptic seizures. Isolated secondary encopresis as a manifestation of an epileptic seizure is unusual. This report is of, a four year old boy, with daytime secondary non-retentive encopresis. The onset of encopresis was preceded by several episodes of nocturnal generalised tonic clonic epileptic seizures. An electroencephalogram showed features consistent with complex partial seizures. He was commenced on anti-epileptic treatment with phenytoin sodium, and by the third day of treatment, the patient had achieved stool control.

  12. Epileptic seizures precipited by eating: a case report

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    Fernando Carlos Aleixo Sepulveda

    1981-03-01

    Full Text Available The case of one 23 year-old girl who had epileptic manifestations is reported. At first, generalized tonic seizures; afterwards, epileptic seizures precipited by eating. The electroencephalograms showed left temporal lobe disfunctions. Different types of drugs were used with no sucess. The best results were obtained by association of sodium valproate, clonazepan and phenobarbital. Comments are made about clinic and etiopathogenesis, believing the authors in the hipothesis of nervous structures chronic hiperactivity. To Walker8 the hiperactivity was reached by hormones production under neural control of specific cerebral centers. The continuous bombardment of epileptic discharges to hypothalamic centers is the probably responsible by epileptic seizures precipited by eating.

  13. [Subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures in an alcoholic patient].

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    Kozian, R; Otto, F G

    2000-09-01

    We introduce a case of a 66 year-old male with chronic alcoholism who suffered from confusion, Wernicke-aphasia and epileptic seizures. Several EEG revealed periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges. The patient's case resembles the symptoms of a subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures which can occur in alcoholics.

  14. Mortality predictors of epilepsy and epileptic seizures among hospitalized elderly

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    Telma M. R Assis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy and epileptic seizures are common brain disorders in the elderly and are associated with increased mortality that may be ascribed to the underlying disease or epilepsy-related causes.Objective To describe mortality predictors of epilepsy and epileptic seizures in elderly inpatients.Method Retrospective analysis was performed on hospitalized elderly who had epilepsy or epileptic seizures, from January 2009 to December 2010. One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled.Results The most common etiology was ischemic stroke (37%, followed by neoplasias (13%, hemorrhagic stroke (12%, dementias (11.4% and metabolic disturbances (5.5%. In a univariate analysis, disease duration (p = 0.04, status epilepticus (p < 0.001 and metabolic etiology (p = 0.005 were associated with mortality. However after adjustment by logistic regression, only status epilepticus remained an independent predictor of death (odds ratio = 13; 95%CI = 2.3 to 72; p = 0.004.Conclusion In this study status epilepticus was an independent risk factor for death during hospitalization.

  15. Schizencephaly Associated with Polymicrogirya – Cause for Late-Onset Epileptic Seizures in Adult. A Case Report.

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    Lungu Mihaela

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the case of a 61-year old female patient, with no history of neurological illness, who presents a rapid onset of two convulsive seizures, triggered by a psychological trauma. The first convulsive seizure is repeated within 24 hours.

  16. Epileptic peri-ictal psychosis, a reversible cause of psychosis.

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    González Mingot, C; Gil Villar, M P; Calvo Medel, D; Corbalán Sevilla, T; Martínez Martínez, L; Iñiguez Martínez, C; Santos Lasaosa, S; Mauri Llerda, J A

    2013-03-01

    Epileptic psychoses are categorised as peri-ictal and interictal according to their relationship with the occurrence of seizures. There is a close temporal relationship between peri-ictal psychosis and seizures, and psychosis may present before (preictal), during (ictal) or after seizures (postictal). Epileptic psychoses usually have acute initial and final phases, with a short symptom duration and complete remission with a risk of recurrence. There is no temporal relationship between interictal or chronic psychosis and epileptic seizures. Another type of epileptic psychosis is related to the response to epilepsy treatment: epileptic psychosis caused by the phenomenon of forced normalisation (alternative psychosis), which includes epileptic psychosis secondary to epilepsy surgery. Although combination treatment with antiepileptic and neuroleptic drugs is now widely used to manage this condition, there are no standard treatment guidelines for epileptic psychosis. We present 5 cases of peri-ictal epileptic psychosis in which we observed an excellent response to treatment with levetiracetam. Good control was achieved over both seizures and psychotic episodes. Levetiracetam was used in association with neuroleptic drugs with no adverse effects, and our patients did not require high doses of the latter. Categorising psychotic states associated with epilepsy according to their temporal relationship with seizures is clinically and prognostically useful because it provides important information regarding disease treatment and progression. The treatment of peri-ictal or acute mental disorders is based on epileptic seizure control, while the treatment of interictal or chronic disorders has more in common with managing disorders which are purely psychiatric in origin. In addition to improving the patient's quality of life and reducing disability, achieving strict control over seizures may also prevent the development of interictal psychosis. For this reason, we believe that

  17. Epileptic Seizure Forewarning by Nonlinear Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    Nicolet Biomedical Inc. (NBI) is collaborating with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to convert ORNL's patented technology for forewarning of epileptic seizures to a clinical prototype. This technical report describes the highlights of the first year's effort. The software requirements for the clinical device were specified from which the hardware specifications were obtained. ORNL's research-class FORTRAN was converted to run under a graphical user interface (GUI) that was custom-built for this application by NBI. The resulting software package was cloned to desktop computers that are being tested in five different clinical sites. Two hundred electroencephalogram (EEG) datasets from those clinical sites were provided to ORNL for detailed analysis and improvement of the forewarning methodology. Effort under this CRADA is continuing into the second year as planned

  18. Definition and classification of epilepsy. Classification of epileptic seizures 2016

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    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, especially in childhood and adolescence. The incidence varies from 15 to 113 cases per 100 000 population with the maximum among children under 1 year old. The prevalence of epilepsy is high, ranging from 5 to 8 cases (in some regions – 10 cases per 1000 children under 15 years old. Classification of the disease has great importance for diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. The article presents a novel strategy for classification of epileptic seizures, developed in 2016. It contains a number of brand new concepts, including a very important one, saying that some seizures, previously considered as generalized or focal only, can be, in fact, both focal and generalized. They include tonic, atonic, myoclonic seizures and epileptic spasms. The term “secondarily generalized seizure” is replace by the term “bilateral tonic-clonic seizure” (as soon as it is not a separate type of epileptic seizures, and the term reflects the spread of discharge from any area of cerebral cortex and evolution of any types of focal seizures. International League Against Epilepsy recommends to abandon the term “pseudo-epileptic seizures” and replace it by the term “psychogenic non-epileptic seizures”. If a doctor is not sure that seizures have epileptic nature, the term “paroxysmal event” should be used without specifying the disease. The conception of childhood epileptic encephalopathies, developed within this novel classification project, is one of the most significant achievements, since in this case not only the seizures, but even epileptiform activity can induce severe disorders of higher mental functions. In addition to detailed description of the new strategy for classification of epileptic seizures, the article contains a comprehensive review of the existing principles of epilepsy and epileptic seizures classification.

  19. The determinants of seizure severity in Nigerian epileptics | Imam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This assesses generalisation of seizures, falls, injuries, urinary incontinence, warning interval before loss of consciousness, automatisms and time of recovery on a graded scale. Results: The most frequent indices of seizure severity in Nigerian epileptics is the generalisation of seizures in 85.7% of subjects, incontinence of ...

  20. Epileptic seizures due to multiple cerebral cavernomatosis

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    Spasić Mirjana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cavernous angiomas are angiographically occult vascular malformations that are present in 0.4−0.9 % of people, and represent around 5% of all cerebrovascular malformations. They can be single or multiple, and sporadic or familial. The presence of multiple lesions is more frequent in familial cavernomatosis. Ten to 30 % are associated with familial clustering. Case report. We presented the case of a 43-year-old man, admitted to the Emergency Department due to unprovoked seizure during the wide awake and everyday activities. Neurological examination was with no focal signs. A 32-channel standard digital EEG was without any significant changes of normal baseline activity. After sleep deprivation EEG showed multifocal, bilateral and asymmetric polyspikes and sharpwaves activity. Hyperventilation induced generalized epileptiform discharges. MRI scan demonstrated multiple small cavernous angiomas. Neuropsychological testing demonstrated a delayed memory impairment. Neurosurgery treatment was not recommended, and the therapy with valproate 1 250 mg/day had an excellent efficacy with no singnificant adverse effects. Conclusion. This patient considered as a rare case with multiple cavernomatosis highlights the importance of neuroradiological examination in adult patients with the first epileptic seizure but with no focal neurological signs. .

  1. Detection of Epileptic Seizures with Multi-modal Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    convulsive seizures tested. Another study was performed, involving quantitative parameters in the time and frequency domain. The study showed, that there are several differences between tonic seizures and the tonic phase of GTC seizures and furthermore revealed differences of the epileptic (tonic and tonic...... phase of GTC) and simulated seizures. This was valuable information concerning a seizure detection algorithm, and the findings from this research provided evidence for a change in the definition of these seizures by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). Our final study presents a novel...

  2. Epileptic seizures in patients with a posterior circulation infarct

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    Yüksel Kaplan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of seizures and the clinical features of patients with seizures related to a posterior circulation infarct (POCI. METHODS: We reviewed all ischemic stroke patients admitted to our clinic between January 2011 and January 2012. The patients’ database information was retrospectively analyzed. Fifty-five patients with a POCI were included in the study. We reviewed all patients with epileptic seizures related to a POCI. Age, gender, recurrent stroke, risk factors, etiology, radiographic localization, the seizure type and onset time, and the electroencephalographic findings of patients were evaluated. We excluded all patients who had precipitating conditions during seizures such as taking drugs, acid-base disturbances, electrolyte imbalance, and history of epilepsy. RESULTS: Seizures were observed in four patients (3 male, 1 female with a POCI related epileptic seizures (7.2%. The etiology of strokes was cardiac-embolic in 3 patients and vertebral artery dissection in 1 patient. Seizures occurred in 2 patients as presenting finding, in 1 patient within 7 days, and 1 patient within 28 days. Primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in 3 patients and simple partial seizures with secondary generalization in 1 patient. Three patients had cerebellum infarction at the left hemisphere. One patient had lateral medullary infarction at the right side. The electroencephalographic findings of patients were normal. CONCLUSION: Studies involving patients with seizures related to a POCI are novel and few in number. Three patients with seizure had cerebellum infarction. The cerebellum in these patients may contribute via different mechanisms over seizure activity.

  3. Multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis for epileptic patient in seizure and seizure free status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Dutta, Srimonti; Chakraborty, Sayantan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We analyze EEG of patients during seizure and in seizure free interval. • Data from different sections of the brain and seizure activity was analyzed. • Assessment of cross-correlation in seizure and seizure free interval using MF-DXA technique. - Abstract: This paper reports a study of EEG data of epileptic patients in terms of multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis (MF-DXA). The EEG clinical data were obtained from the EEG Database available with the Clinic of Epileptology of the University Hospital of Bonn, Germany. The data sets (C, D, and E) were taken from five epileptic patients undergoing presurgical evaluations. The data sets consist of intracranial EEG recordings during seizure-free intervals (interictal periods) from within the epileptogenic zone (D) and from the hippocampal formation of the opposite hemisphere of the epileptic patients’ brain, respectively (C). The data set (E) was recorded during seizure activity (ictal periods). MF-DXA is a very rigorous and robust tool for assessment of cross-correlation among two nonlinear time series. The study reveals the degree of cross-correlation is more among seizure and seizure free interval in epileptogenic zone. These data are very significant for diagnosis, onset and prognosis of epileptic patients

  4. Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte: did he have seizures? Psychogenic or epileptic or both?

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    Hughes, John R

    2003-12-01

    Napoleon Bonaparte was a general in the French army at 24 years of age, later conquering most of Europe. He was one of the greatest military geniuses the world has ever known, but also an extremely intelligent individual. Did he have seizures? The evidence shows that he had both psychogenic and epileptic attacks. The psychogenic attacks were likely related to the tremendous stress in his life, and the epileptic seizures were the result of chronic uremia from a severe urethral stricture caused by gonorrhea that was transmitted from his wife, Empress Josephine.

  5. Recognition of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: a curable neurophobia?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2013-02-01

    Diagnosing psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) remains challenging. The majority of \\'PNES status\\' cases are likely to be seen in the emergency department or similar non-specialised units, where patients are initially assessed and managed by physicians of varying expertise in neurology.

  6. Preictal Dynamics of EEG Complexity in Intracranially Recorded Epileptic Seizure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bob, P.; Roman, R.; Světlák, M.; Kukleta, M.; Chládek, Jan; Brázdil, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 23 (2014), el151:1-4 ISSN 0025-7974 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : EEG * epileptic Seizure Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment Impact factor: 5.723, year: 2014

  7. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: our video-EEG experience.

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    Nežádal, Tomáš; Hovorka, Jiří; Herman, Erik; Němcová, Iveta; Bajaček, Michal; Stichová, Eva

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the number of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) in our patients with a refractory seizure disorder, to determine the 'typical' PNES semiology using video-EEG monitoring and describe other PNES parameters. We evaluated prospectively 596 patients with pharmacoresistant seizures. All these patients underwent continuous video-EEG monitoring. In consenting patients, we used suggestive seizure provocation. We assessed seizure semiology, interictal EEG, brain MRI, psychiatric co-morbidities, personality profiles, and seizure outcome. In the sample of 596 monitored patients, we detected 111 (19.3%) patients with PNES. Of the 111 patients with PNES, 86.5% had spontaneous and 76.5% had provoked seizures. The five most typical symptoms were: initially closed eyelids (67.6%), rapid tremor (47.7%), asynchronous limb movement (37.8%), preictal pseudosleep (33.3%), and side-to-side head movement (32.4%). Interictal EEG was rated as abnormal in 46.2% and with epileptiform abnormality in 9%. Brain MRI was abnormal in 32 (28.8%) patients. Personality disorders (46.8%), anxiety (39.6%), and depression (12.6%) were the most frequent additional psychiatric co-morbidities. PNES outcome after at least 2 years is reported; 22.5% patients was seizure-free; one-third had markedly reduced seizure frequency. We have not seen any negative impact of the provocative testing on the seizure outcome. Video-EEG monitoring with suggestive seizure provocation supported by clinical psychiatric and psychological evaluation significantly contributes to the correct PNES diagnosis, while interictal EEG and brain MRI are frequently abnormal. Symptoms typical for PNES, as opposed to epileptic seizures, could be distinguished.

  8. Autism spectrum disorder and epileptic encephalopathy: common causes, many questions.

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    Srivastava, Siddharth; Sahin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a particularly severe form of epilepsy, associated with cognitive and behavioral deficits, including impaired social-communication and restricted, repetitive behaviors that are the hallmarks of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the genetic landscape of epileptic encephalopathies is growing and demonstrates overlap with genes separately implicated in ASD. However, many questions remain about this connection, including whether epileptiform activity itself contributes to the development of ASD symptomatology. In this review, we compiled a database of genes associated with both epileptic encephalopathy and ASD, limiting our purview to Mendelian disorders not including inborn errors of metabolism, and we focused on the connection between ASD and epileptic encephalopathy rather than epilepsy broadly. Our review has four goals: to (1) discuss the overlapping presentations of ASD and monogenic epileptic encephalopathies; (2) examine the impact of the epilepsy itself on neurocognitive features, including ASD, in monogenic epileptic encephalopathies; (3) outline many of the genetic causes responsible for both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy; (4) provide an illustrative example of a final common pathway that may be implicated in both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy. We demonstrate that autistic features are a common association with monogenic epileptic encephalopathies. Certain epileptic encephalopathy syndromes, like infantile spasms, are especially linked to the development of ASD. The connection between seizures themselves and neurobehavioral deficits in these monogenic encephalopathies remains open to debate. Finally, advances in genetics have revealed many genes that overlap in ties to both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy and that play a role in diverse central nervous system processes. Increased attention to the autistic features of monogenic epileptic encephalopathies is warranted for

  9. Automatic Epileptic Seizure Onset Detection Using Matching Pursuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Thomas Lynggaard; Olsen, Ulrich L.; Conradsen, Isa

    2010-01-01

    . The combination of Matching Pursuit and SVM for automatic seizure detection has never been tested before, making this a pilot study. Data from red different patients with 6 to 49 seizures are used to test our model. Three patients are recorded with scalp electroencephalography (sEEG) and three with intracranial...... electroencephalography (iEEG). A sensitivity of 78-100% and a detection latency of 5-18s has been achieved, while holding the false detection at 0.16-5.31/h. Our results show the potential of Matching Pursuit as a feature xtractor for detection of epileptic seizures....

  10. Serum Prolactin in Diagnosis of Epileptic Seizures

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies in databases and references concerning serum prolactin levels (PRL in patients with suspected seizures were rated for quality and analyzed by members of the Therapeutics Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Epileptic seizures in Neuro-Behcet disease: why some patients develop seizure and others not?

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    Kutlu, Gulnihal; Semercioglu, Sencer; Ucler, Serap; Erdal, Abidin; Inan, Levent E

    2015-03-01

    Behcet disease (BD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder. Neuro BD (NBD) is seen in approximately 5% of all patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency, type and prognosis of epileptic seizures in different forms of NBD. All files of 42 patients with NBD were evaluated between 2006 and 2012, retrospectively. The demographic data, the presentation of NBD, clinical findings including seizures, EEG and neuroimaging findings were reviewed. The mean age of patients was 35.02±8.43 years. Thirty (71.4%) patients were male; the remaining 12 of them were female. Twenty-four patients had brainstem lesions; 16 patients had cerebral venous thrombosis. Spinal cord involvement was seen in two patients. Seven patients had epileptic seizures (six partial onset seizures with or without secondary generalization). Six of them had cerebral sinus thrombosis (CVT). Four patients had a seizure as the first symptom of the thrombosis. One patient had late onset seizure due to chronic venous infarct. The other patient with seizure had brainstem involvement. The remaining was diagnosed as epilepsy before the determination of NBD. CVT seen in BD seems to be the main risk factor for epileptic seizures in patients with NBD. The prognosis is usually good especially in patients with CVT. Epileptic seizures in patients with brainstem involvement may be an indicator for poor prognosis. Superior sagittal thrombosis or cortical infarct would be predictor of seizures occurrence because of the high ratio in patients with seizures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hyperspherical Manifold for EEG Signals of Epileptic Seizures

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    Tahir Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical modelling of EEG signals of epileptic seizures presents a challenge as seizure data is erratic, often with no visible trend. Limitations in existing models indicate a need for a generalized model that can be used to analyze seizures without the need for apriori information, whilst minimizing the loss of signal data due to smoothing. This paper utilizes measure theory to design a discrete probability measure that reformats EEG data without altering its geometric structure. An analysis of EEG data from three patients experiencing epileptic seizures is made using the developed measure, resulting in successful identification of increased potential difference in portions of the brain that correspond to physical symptoms demonstrated by the patients. A mapping then is devised to transport the measure data onto the surface of a high-dimensional manifold, enabling the analysis of seizures using directional statistics and manifold theory. The subset of seizure signals on the manifold is shown to be a topological space, verifying Ahmad's approach to use topological modelling.

  13. Local cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism during seizure in spontaneously epileptic El mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Chisa; Ochi, Hironobu; Yamagami, Sakae; Kawabe, Joji; Kobashi, Toshiko; Okamura, Terue; Yamada, Ryusaku

    1995-01-01

    Local cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism were examined in spontaneously epileptic El mice using autoradiography with 125 I-IMP and 14 C-DG in the interictal phase and during seizure. El (+) mice that developed generalized tonic-clonic convulsions and El (-) mice that received no stimulation and had no history of epileptic seizures were examined. The seizure non-susceptible, maternal strain ddY mice were used as control. Uptake ratios for IMP and DG in mouse brain were calculated using the autoradiographic density. In the interictal phase, the pattern of local cerebral blood flow of El (+) mice was similar to that of ddY and El (-) mice, and glucose metabolism in the hippocampus was higher in El (+) mice than in El (-) and ddY mice, but flow and metabolism were nearly matched. During seizure, no significant changed blood flow and increased glucose metabolism in the hippocampus, the epileptic focus, and no markedly changed blood flow and depressed glucose metabolism in other brain regions were observed and considered to be flow-metabolism uncoupling. These observations have never been reported in clinical or experimental studies of epilepsy. Seizures did not cause large regional differences in cerebral blood flow. Therefore, only glucose metabolism is useful for detection of the focus of secondary generalized seizures in El mice, and appeared possibly to be related to the pathophysiology of secondary generalized epilepsy in El mice. (author)

  14. Coprolalia as a manifestation of epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot-Tarrús, Andreu; Mousavi, Seyed Reza; Dove, Carin; Hayman-Abello S, Susan; Hayman-Abello, Brent; Derry, Paul A; Diosy, David C; McLachlan, Richard S; Burneo, Jorge G; Steven, David A; Mirsattari, Seyed M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the lateralizing and localizing value of ictal coprolalia and brain areas involved in its production. A retrospective search for patients manifesting ictal coprolalia was conducted in our EMU database. Continuous video-EEG recordings were reviewed, and EEG activity before and during coprolalia was analyzed using independent component analysis (ICA) technique and was compared to the seizures without coprolalia among the same patients. Nine patients were evaluated (five women), eight with intracranial video-EEG recordings (icVEEG). Four had frontal or temporal lesions, and five had normal MRIs. Six patients showed impairment in the language functions and five in the frontal executive tasks. Two hundred six seizures were reviewed (60.7% from icVEEG). Ictal coprolalia occurred in 46.6% of them, always associated with limbic auras or automatisms. They arose from the nondominant hemisphere in five patients, dominant hemisphere in three, and independently from the right and left hippocampus-parahippocampus in one. Electroencephalographic activity always involved orbitofrontal and/or mesial temporal regions of the nondominant hemisphere when coprolalia occurred. Independent component analysis of 31 seizures in seven patients showed a higher number of independent components in the nondominant hippocampus-parahippocampus before and during coprolalia and in the dominant lateral temporal region in those seizures without coprolalia (p=0.009). Five patients underwent surgery, and all five had an ILAE class 1 outcome. Ictal coprolalia occurs in both males and females with temporal or orbitofrontal epilepsy and has a limited lateralizing value to the nondominant hemisphere but can be triggered by seizures from either hemisphere. It involves activation of the paralimbic temporal-orbitofrontal network. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures in alcoholism (SESA): case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, F G; Kozian, R

    2001-10-01

    The case of a 66-year-old patient is reported in view of the rarity of his condition: a case of subacute encephalopathy with seizures in alcoholics (SESA syndrome), described first in 1981 by Niedermeyer, et al. Wernicke-type aphasia, epileptic seizures (generalized tonic-clonic) and PLEDs EEG pattern dominated the neurological picture, in addition to hepatomegaly and rhabdomyolysis. This condition differs from all other known CNS complications in chronic alcoholism and is withdrawal-independent. It is prognostically favorable as far as the syndrome as such is concerned.

  16. Acute Pancreatitis Case Presented with Epileptic Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uygar Utku

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis, defined as the acute non-bacte¬rial inflammatory condition of the pancreas. A 53-year-old woman was admitted to our emergency service after a first episode of generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no past medical history. The initial laboratory findings showed a low serum calcium level (5.8 mg/dL normal value 8.8-10.2 mg/dL. High Amylase-802 U/L, Lipase-489 U/L levels. CT abdomen showed pancreatic edema and inflammation suggestive of acute pancreatitis. This case report demonstrates a rare but important differential diagnosis in generalised tonic-clonic seizures of adult onset

  17. Epileptic seizure detection in EEG signal with GModPCA and support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Abeg Kumar; Banka, Haider

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders caused by recurrent seizures. Electroencephalograms (EEGs) record neural activity and can detect epilepsy. Visual inspection of an EEG signal for epileptic seizure detection is a time-consuming process and may lead to human error; therefore, recently, a number of automated seizure detection frameworks were proposed to replace these traditional methods. Feature extraction and classification are two important steps in these procedures. Feature extraction focuses on finding the informative features that could be used for classification and correct decision-making. Therefore, proposing effective feature extraction techniques for seizure detection is of great significance. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is a dimensionality reduction technique used in different fields of pattern recognition including EEG signal classification. Global modular PCA (GModPCA) is a variation of PCA. In this paper, an effective framework with GModPCA and Support Vector Machine (SVM) is presented for epileptic seizure detection in EEG signals. The feature extraction is performed with GModPCA, whereas SVM trained with radial basis function kernel performed the classification between seizure and nonseizure EEG signals. Seven different experimental cases were conducted on the benchmark epilepsy EEG dataset. The system performance was evaluated using 10-fold cross-validation. In addition, we prove analytically that GModPCA has less time and space complexities as compared to PCA. The experimental results show that EEG signals have strong inter-sub-pattern correlations. GModPCA and SVM have been able to achieve 100% accuracy for the classification between normal and epileptic signals. Along with this, seven different experimental cases were tested. The classification results of the proposed approach were better than were compared the results of some of the existing methods proposed in literature. It is also found that the time and space

  18. Epileptic Seizures Versus Syncope: Pathophysiology and Clinical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios Charalambous

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Generalised epileptic seizures and syncope are two syndromes with similar clinical manifestation and their differentiation can be quite challenging. The aim of this review is to use an evidence-based approach in differentiating these two syndromes through the comprehension of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved and their clinical signs. Both syndromes affect regions of the forebrain and consciousness level, although, different mechanisms are involved. Syncope is a paroxysmal event secondary to a short-term decrease in cerebral perfusion, oxygenation or essential nutrients delivery. Generalised epileptic seizure activity is defined as the clinical manifestation of transient paroxysmal disturbances in brain function secondary to an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. Clinical criteria, including precipitating events, clinical signs preceding, during and following the episodes and event duration, can be used to differentiate the two syndromes. Although these criteria might be useful for the practitioner, definite conclusions should be precluded due to the lack of original research articles and weak evidence on this specific field.Application: The review might be a useful tool for the general practitioner and clinical scientist as it will aid towards the differentiation of two syndromes, i.e. generalised epileptic seizures and syncope, with similar clinical presentation.

  19. Detection and Prediction of Epileptic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas

    % from 16 cm2. The coherences of different frequency bands below 16 Hz all seem to have similar declines as a function of the Euclidean distance between channels. Frequencies between 16 and 30 Hz have a steeper decline and will only show coherent parts to cortical channels within 60 cm2....... There is no coherence for frequencies above 30 Hz at any distance. A lot of patients with epilepsy still struggle with a dreadful fear of suddenly having a seizure. The current PhD study identified topics where an EEG monitor could provide improvement in the patient’s quality of life. By algorithm development...

  20. Aspirin attenuates spontaneous recurrent seizures in the chronically epileptic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kun; Hu, Ming; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Neuroinflammatory processes are pathologic hallmarks of both experimental and human epilepsy, and could be implicated in the neuronal hyperexcitability. Aspirin represents one of the non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with fewer side effects in long-term application. This study was carried out to assess the anti-epileptic effects of aspirin when administered during the chronic stage of temporal lobe epilepsy [TLE] in mice. The alteration of hippocampal neurogenesis was also examined for raising a possible mechanism underlying the protective effect of anti-inflammatory treatment in the TLE. Two months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, the chronically epileptic mice were treated with aspirin (20 mg, 60 mg or 80 mg/kg) once a day for 10 weeks. Spontaneous recurrent seizures were monitored by video camera for 2 weeks. To evaluate the profile of hippocampal neurogenesis, the newly generated cells in the dentate gyrus were labeled by the proliferation marker BrdU. The newborn neurons that extended axons to CA3 area were visualized by cholera toxin B subunit retrograde tracing. Administration of aspirin with a dosage of 60 mg or 80 mg/kg initiated at 2 months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus significantly reduced the frequency and duration of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Aspirin treatment also increased the number of newborn neurons with anatomic integration through improving the survival of the newly generated cells. Aspirin treatment during the chronic stage of TLE could attenuate the spontaneous recurrent seizures in mice. Promotion of hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibition of COX-PGE2 pathway might partly contribute to this anti-epileptic effect. Highlights • Aspirin attenuates spontaneous recurrent seizures of chronically epileptic mice • Aspirin increases neurogenesis of chronically epileptic hippocampus by improving the survival of newly generated cells • Promotion of hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibition

  1. Multiple Sclerosis: Can It Cause Seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... multiple sclerosis and epilepsy? Answers from B Mark Keegan, M.D. Epileptic seizures are more common in ... controlled with anti-seizure medication. With B Mark Keegan, M.D. Lund C, et al. Multiple sclerosis ...

  2. Epileptic Seizure, Postictal Hemiparesis, and Hyperleukocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Olivieri MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute ischemic stroke (AIS is a rare event in infancy. Besides vasculopathy, thrombophilia, or cardiac disorders, cancer and chemotherapy are known predisposing factors for AIS. Leukemia can be associated with different abnormal coagulation parameters, but severe bleeding or thrombosis occurs rarely. Clinical Course: We report the case of a 2-year-old boy who was presented to our emergency ward after a prolonged seizure with right sided postictal hemiparesis. Cranial computed tomography scan revealed a large infarction and edema due to thrombosis of the left carotid artery, the middle cerebral artery, and the anterior cerebral artery. Laboratory workup showed 196 g/L leukocytes with 75% myeloid blast cells. Immediate exchange transfusion, hydration, and chemotherapy with cytarabine were started. During the hospital course intracranial pressure increased and the patient developed a unilateral dilated pupil unresponsive to light. Cranial computed tomography scan revealed a new infarction in the right middle cerebral artery territory. Refractory increased intracranial pressure and brain stem herniation developed, and the child died 3 days after admission to hospital. Conclusion: Seizures with postictal hemiparesis due to cerebral infarction can be a rare manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. Leukocytosis and cancer-induced coagulopathy are main reasons for thrombosis and/or hemorrhage. High leukocyte counts need immediate interventions with hydration, careful chemotherapy, and perhaps exchange transfusion or leukapharesis. In the presence of thrombosis, anticoagulation must be discussed despite the risk of bleeding due to hyperfibrinolysis and low platelet counts. Mortality may be reduced by awareness of this rare presentation of leukemia and prompt institution of leucoreductive treatment.

  3. Do video games evoke specific types of epileptic seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccioli, Marta; Vigevano, Federico; Buttinelli, Carla; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée G A

    2005-11-01

    We determined whether epileptic clinical manifestations evoked by playing video games (VG) differ from those evoked by intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) or striped patterns (P). We exposed nine children who had TV- and VG-evoked seizures in daily life to 12 VG after standardized photic stimulation and pattern stimulation. Their EEGs were recorded continuously, analyzed, and then correlated with a video of their behavior. Similar types of clinical signs were seen during VG, P, and IPS, but the signs we observed were more subtle during the VG. Eight patients showed a clear lateralization. A new observation was the lowering of the eyelids to a state of half-closed. Our study suggests that the type of visual stimulus provoking a photoparoxysmal response or seizure is not particularly relevant. The children belonged to different epilepsy groups, and our findings add to the discussion on the boundaries of the epilepsy types.

  4. Mental development of tuberous sclerosis with regard to epileptic seizures and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katafuchi, Yukihiko; Ishihara, Osamu; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Shiotsuki, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Yoichiro; Imuta, Fusae

    1985-01-01

    The relation of mental development to epileptic seizures and CT findings was examined in 17 patients with tuberous sclerosis. Epileptic seizures occurred in 16 of the 17 patients. The earlier it occurred, the higher the incidence of mental retardation was. There was no constant correlation between mental development and the type of epileptic seizures or the attainment of inhibition of seizures. In two patients in whom calcification spreading to the cerebral cortex and subcortical region was detected on CT, in addition to calcified tubercles around the cerebral ventricle, an intelligence quotient was significantly lower than in the other patients. (Namekawa, K.)

  5. Paradoxical Seizure Response to Phenytoin in an Epileptic Heroin Addict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasagar, Brintha; Verma, Beni R; Dewberry, Robert G; Pula, Thaddeus

    2015-06-01

    Phenytoin has a narrow therapeutic window and seizures can occur at both ends of the spectrum. A 41-year-old man with a history of a seizure disorder and heroin addiction presented with dizziness following 2 generalized tonic-clonic seizures that occurred earlier that day. The patient had received a loading dose of phenytoin for seizures associated with a subtherapeutic level 5 days previously. Initial evaluation revealed an elevated phenytoin level of 32.6 mcg/mL and an opiate-positive toxicology screen. Levetiracetam was started on the day of presentation and phenytoin was held until the level returned to the therapeutic range. The patient's dizziness resolved and he had no additional seizures. Evaluation for reversible causes of seizure activity along with anticonvulsant administration is generally the standard of care for breakthrough seizures. Phenytoin blood levels, if supratherapeutic, may be at least partially responsible for breakthrough seizure activity; in this circumstance, holding phenytoin and temporarily adding another anticonvulsant may be indicated.

  6. [Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukujima, M M; Cardeal, J O; Lima, J G

    1996-06-01

    Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke. Clinical features of 35 patients with ischemic stroke who developed epilepsy (Group 1) were compared with those of 35 patients with ischemic stroke without epilepsy (Group 2). The age of the patients did not differ between the groups. There were more men than women and more white than other races in both groups. Diabetes melitus, hypertension, transient ischemic attack, previous stroke, migraine, Chagas disease, cerebral embolism of cardiac origin and use of oral contraceptive did not differ between the groups. Smokers and alcohol users were more frequent in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Most patients of Group 1 presented with hemiparesis; none presented cerebellar or brainstem involvement. Perhaps strokes in smokers have some different aspects, that let them more epileptogenic than in non smokers.

  7. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and psychoanalytical treatment: results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niraldo de Oliveira Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: the occurrence of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES is estimated to be between 2 to 33 cases in every 100,000 inhabitants. The number of patients with PNES reaches 19% of those treated as epileptics. Patients with PNES are treated as if they had intractable epilepsy, with unsatisfactory results even after medication treatment is used to its maximum. The aim of this study is to present the effects of individual psychoanalytical treatment in patients with PNES, assessing its impact in the evolution of the clinical picture and its association with sex, time of disease, social, psychological and professional harm, as well as going through with treatment. Methods: The case base was composed of 37 patients with PNES. The diagnosis was reached with video-EEG monitoring. Psychoanalytical treatment was carried out through 12 months of weekly sessions timed for around 50-minutes each, in a total of 48 individual sessions. Results: This study found a high rate of success in the treatment of PNES patients. 29.7% (n=11 of patients had cessation or cure of symptoms and 51.4% (n=19 had a decrease in the number of episodes. There is an association between cessation or decrease in the number of episodes and sex (p<0.01, religion (p<0.01 and concluding treatment (p<0.01. Conclusion: Individual psychoanalytical treatment applied to patients with PNES is considered effective and can be an essential form of assistance for the reduction or cessation of episodes.

  8. Patterns of muscle activation during generalized tonic and tonic–clonic epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Wolf, Peter; Sams, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Tonic seizures and the tonic phase of tonic–clonic epileptic seizures are defined as “sustained tonic” muscle contraction lasting a few seconds to minutes. Visual inspection of the surface electromyogram (EMG) during seizures contributed considerably to a better understanding and accurat...

  9. Evaluation of the pentylenetetrazole seizure threshold test in epileptic mice as surrogate model for drug testing against pharmacoresistant seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töllner, Kathrin; Twele, Friederike; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a major problem in epilepsy therapy, so that development of more effective AEDs is an unmet clinical need. Several rat and mouse models of epilepsy with spontaneous difficult-to-treat seizures exist, but because testing of antiseizure drug efficacy is extremely laborious in such models, they are only rarely used in the development of novel AEDs. Recently, the use of acute seizure tests in epileptic rats or mice has been proposed as a novel strategy for evaluating novel AEDs for increased antiseizure efficacy. In the present study, we compared the effects of five AEDs (valproate, phenobarbital, diazepam, lamotrigine, levetiracetam) on the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure threshold in mice that were made epileptic by pilocarpine. Experiments were started 6 weeks after a pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. At this time, control seizure threshold was significantly lower in epileptic than in nonepileptic animals. Unexpectedly, only one AED (valproate) was less effective to increase seizure threshold in epileptic vs. nonepileptic mice, and this difference was restricted to doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg, whereas the difference disappeared at 400mg/kg. All other AEDs exerted similar seizure threshold increases in epileptic and nonepileptic mice. Thus, induction of acute seizures with PTZ in mice pretreated with pilocarpine does not provide an effective and valuable surrogate method to screen drugs for antiseizure efficacy in a model of difficult-to-treat chronic epilepsy as previously suggested from experiments with this approach in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Combined Effects of Feedforward Inhibition and Excitation in Thalamocortical Circuit on the Transitions of Epileptic Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Denggui; Duan, Lixia; Wang, Qian; Luan, Guoming

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying electrophysiologically observed two-way transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures in cerebral cortex remain unknown. The interplay within thalamocortical network is believed to give rise to these epileptic multiple modes of activity and transitions between them. In particular, it is thought that in some areas of cortex there exists feedforward inhibition from specific relay nucleus of thalamus (TC) to inhibitory neuronal population (IN) which has even more stronger functions on cortical activities than the known feedforward excitation from TC to excitatory neuronal population (EX). Inspired by this, we proposed a modified computational model by introducing feedforward inhibitory connectivity within thalamocortical circuit, to systematically investigate the combined effects of feedforward inhibition and excitation on transitions of epileptic seizures. We first found that the feedforward excitation can induce the transition from tonic oscillation to spike and wave discharges (SWD) in cortex, i.e., the epileptic tonic-absence seizures, with the fixed weak feedforward inhibition. Thereinto, the phase of absence seizures corresponding to strong feedforward excitation can be further transformed into the clonic oscillations with the increasing of feedforward inhibition, representing the epileptic absence-clonic seizures. We also observed the other fascinating dynamical states, such as periodic 2/3/4-spike and wave discharges, reversed SWD and clonic oscillations, as well as saturated firings. More importantly, we can identify the stable parameter regions representing the tonic-clonic oscillations and SWD discharges of epileptic seizures on the 2-D plane composed of feedforward inhibition and excitation, where the physiologically plausible transition pathways between tonic-clonic and absence seizures can be figured out. These results indicate the functional role of feedforward pathways in controlling epileptic seizures and

  11. Combined Effects of Feedforward Inhibition and Excitation in Thalamocortical Circuit on the Transitions of Epileptic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denggui Fan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying electrophysiologically observed two-way transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures in cerebral cortex remain unknown. The interplay within thalamocortical network is believed to give rise to these epileptic multiple modes of activity and transitions between them. In particular, it is thought that in some areas of cortex there exists feedforward inhibition from specific relay nucleus of thalamus (TC to inhibitory neuronal population (IN which has even more stronger functions on cortical activities than the known feedforward excitation from TC to excitatory neuronal population (EX. Inspired by this, we proposed a modified computational model by introducing feedforward inhibitory connectivity within thalamocortical circuit, to systematically investigate the combined effects of feedforward inhibition and excitation on transitions of epileptic seizures. We first found that the feedforward excitation can induce the transition from tonic oscillation to spike and wave discharges (SWD in cortex, i.e., the epileptic tonic-absence seizures, with the fixed weak feedforward inhibition. Thereinto, the phase of absence seizures corresponding to strong feedforward excitation can be further transformed into the clonic oscillations with the increasing of feedforward inhibition, representing the epileptic absence-clonic seizures. We also observed the other fascinating dynamical states, such as periodic 2/3/4-spike and wave discharges, reversed SWD and clonic oscillations, as well as saturated firings. More importantly, we can identify the stable parameter regions representing the tonic-clonic oscillations and SWD discharges of epileptic seizures on the 2-D plane composed of feedforward inhibition and excitation, where the physiologically plausible transition pathways between tonic-clonic and absence seizures can be figured out. These results indicate the functional role of feedforward pathways in controlling epileptic

  12. Epileptic seizures and headache/migraine: a review of types of association and terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchetti, Carlo; Pruna, Dario; Ledda, Mariagiuseppina

    2013-11-01

    There are different possible temporal associations between epileptic seizures and headache attacks which have given rise to unclear or controversial terminologies. The classification of the International League Against Epilepsy does not refer to this type of disorder, while the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-2) defines three kinds of association: (1) migraine-triggered seizure ("migralepsy"), (2) hemicrania epileptica, and (3) post-ictal headache. We performed an extensive review of the literature, not including "post-ictal" and "inter-ictal" headaches. On the basis of well-documented reports, the following clinical entities may be identified: (A) "epileptic headache (EH)" or "ictal epileptic headache (IEH)": in this condition headache (with or without migrainous features) is an epileptic manifestation per se, with onset, and cessation if isolated, coinciding with the scalp or deep EEG pattern of an epileptic seizure. EH maybe followed by other epileptic manifestations (motor/sensory/autonomic); this condition should be differentiated from "pure" or "isolated" EH, in which headache/migraine is the sole epileptic manifestation (requiring differential diagnosis from other headache forms). "Hemicrania epileptica" (if confirmed) is a very rare variant of EH, characterized by ipsilateral location of headache and ictal EEG paroxysms. (B) "Pre-ictal migraine" and "pre-ictal headache": when a headache attack is followed during, or shortly after, by a typical epileptic seizure. The migraine attack may be with or without aura, and its seizure-triggering role ("migraine-triggered seizure") is still a subject of debate. A differentiation from occipital epilepsy is mandatory. The term "migralepsy" has not been used uniformly, and may therefore led to misinterpretation. On the basis of this review we suggest definitions and a terminology which may become the basis of a forthcoming classification of headaches associated with epileptic seizures. Copyright

  13. Epileptic seizure, as the first symptom of hypoparathyroidism in children, does not require antiepileptic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Meng-Jia; Li, Jiu-Wei; Shi, Xiu-Yu; Hu, Lin-Yan; Zou, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with hypoparathyroidism exhibit metabolic disorders (hypocalcemia) and brain structural abnormalities (brain calcifications). Currently, studies have determined whether antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is required for epileptic seizures in children with hypoparathyroidism. Method This study aims to evaluate the data of two medical centers in Beijing based on the diagnosis of epileptic seizures as the first symptom of hypoparathyroidism in children. Result A total of 42 pa...

  14. Weather as a risk factor for epileptic seizures: A case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakers, Florian; Walther, Mario; Schiffner, Rene; Rupprecht, Sven; Rasche, Marius; Kockler, Michael; Witte, Otto W; Schlattmann, Peter; Schwab, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    Most epileptic seizures occur unexpectedly and independently of known risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of patients' perception that weather is a risk factor for epileptic seizures. Using a hospital-based, bidirectional case-crossover study, 604 adult patients admitted to a large university hospital in Central Germany for an unprovoked epileptic seizure between 2003 and 2010 were recruited. The effect of atmospheric pressure, relative air humidity, and ambient temperature on the onset of epileptic seizures under temperate climate conditions was estimated. We found a close-to-linear negative correlation between atmospheric pressure and seizure risk. For every 10.7 hPa lower atmospheric pressure, seizure risk increased in the entire study population by 14% (odds ratio [OR] 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.28). In patients with less severe epilepsy treated with one antiepileptic medication, seizure risk increased by 36% (1.36, 1.09-1.67). A high relative air humidity of >80% increased seizure risk in the entire study population by up to 48% (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.11-1.96) 3 days after exposure in a J-shaped association. High ambient temperatures of >20°C decreased seizure risk by 46% in the overall study population (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.32-0.90) and in subgroups, with the greatest effects observed in male patients (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.14-0.74). Low atmospheric pressure and high relative air humidity are associated with an increased risk for epileptic seizures, whereas high ambient temperatures seem to decrease seizure risk. Weather-dependent seizure risk may be accentuated in patients with less severe epilepsy. Our results require further replication across different climate regions and cohorts before reliable clinical recommendations can be made. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Laboratory findings in neurosyphilis patients with epileptic seizures alone as the initial presenting symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Man-Li; Liu, Li-Li; Zeng, Yan-Li; Zhang, Hui-Lin; Liu, Gui-Li; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Dong, Jie; Wu, Jing-Yi; Su, Yuan-Hui; Lin, Li-Rong; Yang, Tian-Ci

    2013-04-01

    A retrospective chart review was performed to characterize the clinical presentation, the characteristic combination of serologic and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) abnormalities, and the neuroimaging findings of neurosyphilis (NS) patients who had epileptic seizures alone as an initial presenting symptom. In a 6.75-year period, 169 inpatients with NS were identified at Zhongshan Hospital (from June 2005 to February 2012). We demonstrated that 13 (7.7%) of the 169 NS patients had epileptic seizures alone as an initial presenting feature. Epileptic seizures occurred in NS patients with syphilitic meningitis (2 cases), meningovascular NS (5 cases), and general paresis (6 cases). The types of epileptic seizures included simple partial, complex partial with secondary generalization (including status epilepticus), and generalized seizures (no focal onset reported). Nine of NS patients with only epileptic seizures as primary symptom were misdiagnosed, and the original misdiagnosis was 69.23% (9/13). Ten (10/13, 76.9%) patients had an abnormal magnetic resonance imaging, and 7 (7/13 53.8%) patients had abnormal electroencephalogram recordings. In addition, the sera rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) from all 13 patients were positive. The overall positive rates of the CSF-RPR and CSF-TPPA were 61.5% and 69.2%, respectively. Three patients demonstrated CSF pleocytosis, and 9 patients exhibited elevated CSF protein levels. Therefore, NS with only epileptic seizures at the initial presentation exhibits a lack of specificity. It is recommended that every patient with clinically evident symptoms of epileptic seizures should have a blood test performed for syphilis. When the serology results are positive, all of the patients should undergo a CSF examination to diagnose NS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Seizure characteristics and the use of anti-epileptic drugs in children and young people with brain tumours and epileptic seizures: Analysis of regional paediatric cancer service population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotto, Chiara; Liu, Jo-Fen; Walker, David A; Whitehouse, William P

    2018-03-21

    Epileptic seizures complicate the management of childhood brain tumours. There are no published standards for clinical practice concerning risk factors, treatment selection or strategies to withdraw treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AED). we undertook a case note review of 120 patients with newly diagnosed brain tumours, referred to a regional paediatric cancer service. data was available on 117/120 (98%) children seizures. A cortical tumour location was associated with the highest risk of seizures (OR: 7.1; CI 95% 2.9-17.3). At a median follow up of 24 months (IQR 25°-75° : 15-48), 22/35 (63%) with seizures, had a single seizure episode, 15/35 (43%) were seizure free (SF) on AEDs, 13/35 (37%) were SF off AEDs, and 7/35 (20%) experienced continuing epileptic seizures. Overall 34/35 (97%) were treated with AEDs after a seizure, of whom 12/35 (35%) withdrew from AED medication, and although 4/35 (12%) had seizure relapse, all were after further acute events. The median duration of AED before withdrawal was 11 months (IQR 25°-75° 5-14 months), and the median follow up after withdrawal was 15 months (IQR 25°-75° 5-34 months). Seizures affect about 1/3rd of children and young people presenting with and being treated for brain tumours particularly when the tumour is in the cerebral cortex. The low risk of recurrent seizures after AED treatment justifies consideration of early withdrawal of AED after seizure control. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Electric Stimulation of Ear Reduces the Effect of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathway on Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Tzu Liao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common clinical syndrome with recurrent neuronal discharges in the temporal lobe, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus. Clinical antiepileptic medicines are often ineffective or of little benefit in 30% of epileptic patients and usually cause severe side effects. Emerging evidence indicates the crucial role of inflammatory mediators in epilepsy. The current study investigates the role of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and its underlying mechanisms in kainic acid- (KA- induced epileptic seizures in rats. Experimental KA injection successfully initiated an epileptic seizure accompanied by increased expression of TLR4 in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and somatosensory cortex. In addition, calcium-sensitive phosphorylated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKIIα increased after the initiation of the epileptic seizure. Furthermore, downstream-phosphorylated signal-regulated kinase (ERK, c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK, and p38 kinase simultaneously increased in these brain areas. Moreover, the transcriptional factor phosphorylated nuclear factor-κB (pNF-κB increased, suggesting that nucleus transcription was affected. Furthermore, the aforementioned molecules decreased by an electric stimulation (ES of either 2 Hz or 15 Hz of the ear in the three brain areas. Accordingly, we suggest that ES of the ear can successfully control epileptic seizures by regulating the TLR4 signaling pathway and has a therapeutic benefit in reducing epileptic seizures.

  18. An epileptic seizures detection algorithm based on the empirical mode decomposition of EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosco, Lorena; Laciar, Eric; Correa, Agustina Garces; Torres, Abel; Graffigna, Juan P

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that affects around 50 million people worldwide. The seizure detection is an important component in the diagnosis of epilepsy. In this study, the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method was proposed on the development of an automatic epileptic seizure detection algorithm. The algorithm first computes the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) of EEG records, then calculates the energy of each IMF and performs the detection based on an energy threshold and a minimum duration decision. The algorithm was tested in 9 invasive EEG records provided and validated by the Epilepsy Center of the University Hospital of Freiburg. In 90 segments analyzed (39 with epileptic seizures) the sensitivity and specificity obtained with the method were of 56.41% and 75.86% respectively. It could be concluded that EMD is a promissory method for epileptic seizure detection in EEG records.

  19. Medical management of epileptic seizures: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma AK

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anand K Sarma,1 Nabil Khandker,1 Lisa Kurczewski,2 Gretchen M Brophy2 1Department of Neurology, 2Departments of Pharmacotherapy & Outcomes Science and Neurosurgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Abstract: Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic illnesses. This condition afflicts 2.9 million adults and children in the US, leading to an economic impact amounting to $15.5 billion. Despite the significant burden epilepsy places on the population, it is not very well understood. As this understanding continues to evolve, it is important for clinicians to stay up to date with the latest advances to provide the best care for patients. In the last 20 years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved 15 new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, with many more currently in development. Other advances have been achieved in terms of diagnostic modalities like electroencephalography technology, treatment devices like vagal nerve and deep-brain stimulators, novel alternate routes of drug administration, and improvement in surgical techniques. Specific patient populations, such as the pregnant, elderly, those with HIV/AIDS, and those with psychiatric illness, present their own unique challenges, with AED side effects, drug interactions, and medical–psychiatric comorbidities adding to the conundrum. The purpose of this article is to review the latest literature guiding the management of acute epileptic seizures, focusing on the current challenges across different practice settings, and it discusses studies in various patient populations, including the pregnant, geriatric, those with HIV/AIDS, comatose, psychiatric, and “pseudoseizure” patients, and offers possible evidence-based solutions or the expert opinion of the authors. Also included is information on newer AEDs, routes of administration, and significant AED-related drug-interaction tables. This review has tried to address only some of these issues that any practitioner who

  20. The lateralizing and localizing value of peri-ictal cough in epileptic seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Korkmaz, Bektaş; Erşen, Gülsün; Delil, Şakir; Özkara, Çiğdem; Yeni, S. Naz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Coughing may be observed as an epiphenomenon during or after epileptic seizures. Aim. In this paper we discuss the lateralization and localization value of cough as an epileptic peri/post ictal semiological phenomenon. Material and Methods. Seven patients presenting cough as a part of their symptomatology are presented. We will discuss cough in the context of these seven patients. Results. Six out of these seven patients were multidrug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy patient...

  1. Prevalence and correlates of epileptic seizure in substance-abusing subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoo, Surendra K; Singh, Shubh M; Bhardwaj, Rahul; Kumar, Suresh; Basu, Debasish; Kulhara, Parmanand

    2009-08-01

    Life-time prevalence of epileptic seizures was assessed in 626 consecutive patients treated for substance abuse. Seizures were reported in 8.63% (9.2% in alcohol abusers, 12.5% in opioid abusers). A total of 64.8% of the seizures were associated with substance use. These occurred during withdrawal in the alcohol cohort and during intoxication with dextropropoxyphene and withdrawal from heroin or poppy husk in the opioid cohort. Results indicate that seizures may be more common in older patients with longer duration of dependence among those abusing alcohol.

  2. Epileptic seizures in patients with glioma: A single centre- based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were used for analysis of seizure incidence differences as per WHO Grades, histology, location ... Keywords: Brain tumour, Epilepsy, Glioma, Seizures, Levetiracetam, .... glioma patients. Characteristics. N (%). Gender. Male. Female. Histology.

  3. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psyche eLoui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG. However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here we describe an algorithm we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determine whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures vs. non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy.

  4. Vulnerability to psychogenic non-epileptic seizures is linked to low neuropeptide Y levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winterdahl, Michael; Miani, Alessandro; Vercoe, Moana

    2017-01-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) is a conversion disorder that reflects underlying psychological distress. Female patients with PNES often present with a history of prolonged stressors, especially sexual abuse. In the current study, we studied the relationship between neuropeptide Y (NPY...

  5. [Epileptic seizures during childbirth in a patient with idiopathic generalised epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Zwarts, M.J.; Renier, W.O.; Bloem, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    During her first pregnancy, a 37-year-old woman with idiopathic generalised epilepsy that was adequately controlled with lamotrigine experienced a series of epileptic seizures following an elective caesarean section. The attacks were terminated with diazepam. The following day, she developed

  6. Epileptic Seizure Prediction Using a New Similarity Index for Chaotic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknazar, Hamid; Nasrabadi, Ali Motie

    Epileptic seizures are generated by abnormal activity of neurons. The prediction of epileptic seizures is an important issue in the field of neurology, since it may improve the quality of life of patients suffering from drug resistant epilepsy. In this study a new similarity index based on symbolic dynamic techniques which can be used for extracting behavior of chaotic time series is presented. Using Freiburg EEG dataset, it is found that the method is able to detect the behavioral changes of the neural activity prior to epileptic seizures, so it can be used for prediction of epileptic seizure. A sensitivity of 63.75% with 0.33 false positive rate (FPR) in all 21 patients and sensitivity of 96.66% with 0.33 FPR in eight patients were achieved using the proposed method. Moreover, the method was evaluated by applying on Logistic and Tent map with different parameters to demonstrate its robustness and ability in determining similarity between two time series with the same chaotic characterization.

  7. Healthcare-seeking behavior of patients with epileptic seizure disorders attending a tertiary care hospital, Kolkata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhik Sinha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Neurological diseases are very important causes of prolonged morbidity and disability, leading to profound financial loss. Epilepsy is one of the most important neurological disorders Healthcare seeking by epilepsy patients is quite diverse and unique. Aims and Objectives: The study was conducted among the epilepsy patients, to assess their healthcare-seeking behavior and its determinants. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and fifteen epilepsy patients, selected by systematic random sampling, in the neuromedicine outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital were interviewed with a predesigned, pretested, semi-structured proforma. Results and Conclusion: More than 90% sought healthcare just after the onset of a seizure. The majority opted for allopathic medicine and the causes for not seeking initial care from allopaths were ignorance, faith in another system, constraint of money, and so on. A significant association existed between rural residence and low social status of the patients with initial care seeking from someone other than allopaths. No association was found among sex, type of seizure, educational status of the patients, and care seeking. The mean treatment gap was 2.98 ± 10.49 months and the chief motivators were mostly the family members. Patients for anti epileptic drugs preferred neurologists in urban areas and general practitioners in rural areas. District care model of epilepsy was proposed in the recommendation.

  8. Childhood masturbation simulating epileptic seizures: A report of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Childhood masturbation is re- garded as one of the paroxysmal, non-epileptic disorders in children, which incorporate several potential diagno- ses. Therefore, if not recognized, it could pose diagnos- tic difficulties, unnecessary investigative spending and considerable parental anxiety.3. There is paucity of ...

  9. The epileptic seizure and the mystery of death in Christian painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Michael W

    2010-02-01

    The epileptic seizure is in many cultures associated with death. Indo-European tradition perceives death not necessarily as the end but as a step, as a point the life cycle is passing through. The epileptic seizure may be seen as a transient form of death, which offers some symmetry with the biblical story of the death and resurrection of Christ. This article, originating from a case report, shows how some Christian painting alludes to renaissance after a seizure and to the parallelism between the patient with epilepsy and the destiny of Christ. Special attention is paid to Raphael's, in this respect particularly complex work, The Transfiguration. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of tonic epileptic seizures based on surface electromyography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sigge N.; Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design an algorithm for detection of tonic seizures based on surface electromyography signals from the deltoids. A successful algorithm has a future prospect of being implemented in a wearable device as part of an alarm system. This has already been done......, median frequency, zero crossing rate and approximate entropy. These features were used as input in the random forest classifier to decide if a data segment was from a seizure or not. The goal was to develop a generic algorithm for all tonic seizures, but better results were achieved when certain...

  11. HMPAO-SPECT during epileptic seizures: Early and late images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overbeck, B.; Gruenwald, F.; Bockisch, A.; Biersack, H.J.; Reinke, U.; Gratz, K.F.

    1990-01-01

    For presurgical evaluation of epilepsy a 44-year old patient with complex-partial seizures underwent HMPAO-SPECT. The morphology of the seizures, the MRI-scan, psychometry and ictal as well as interictal EEGs showed a left temporal origin of the seizures. Early images were obtained 20 min and late images 24 h following injection. On both scans a marked hyperperfusion was observed in the left temporal area. A crossed cerebellar diaschisis was also seen on both SPECTs. It could be shown that during ictal examinations there is no bloodflow-dependent wash-out from brain tissue. (orig.) [de

  12. Control of epileptic seizures in WAG/Rij rats by means of brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Vladimir V.; Maksimenko, Vladimir A.; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Lüttjohann, Annika; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2018-02-01

    The main issue of epileptology is the elimination of epileptic events. This can be achieved by a system that predicts the emergence of seizures in conjunction with a system that interferes with the process that leads to the onset of seizure. The prediction of seizures remains, for the present, unresolved in the absence epilepsy, due to the sudden onset of seizures. We developed an algorithm for predicting seizures in real time, evaluated it and implemented it into an online closed-loop brain stimulation system designed to prevent typical for the absence of epilepsy of spike waves (SWD) in the genetic rat model. The algorithm correctly predicts more than 85% of the seizures and the rest were successfully detected. Unlike the old beliefs that SWDs are unpredictable, current results show that they can be predicted and that the development of systems for predicting and preventing closed-loop capture is a feasible step on the way to intervention to achieve control and freedom from epileptic seizures.

  13. Seizure, Fit or Attack? The Use of Diagnostic Labels by Patients with Epileptic or Non-Epileptic Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plug, Leendert; Sharrack, Basil; Reuber, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the use of diagnostic labels such as "seizure", "attack", "fit", and "blackout" by patients who experience seizures. While previous research on patients' preferences for diagnostic terminology has relied on questionnaires, we assess patients' own preferences and their responses to a doctor's use of different labels…

  14. Gap junctions and epileptic seizures--two sides of the same coin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Volman

    Full Text Available Electrical synapses (gap junctions play a pivotal role in the synchronization of neuronal ensembles which also makes them likely agonists of pathological brain activity. Although large body of experimental data and theoretical considerations indicate that coupling neurons by electrical synapses promotes synchronous activity (and thus is potentially epileptogenic, some recent evidence questions the hypothesis of gap junctions being among purely epileptogenic factors. In particular, an expression of inter-neuronal gap junctions is often found to be higher after the experimentally induced seizures than before. Here we used a computational modeling approach to address the role of neuronal gap junctions in shaping the stability of a network to perturbations that are often associated with the onset of epileptic seizures. We show that under some circumstances, the addition of gap junctions can increase the dynamical stability of a network and thus suppress the collective electrical activity associated with seizures. This implies that the experimentally observed post-seizure additions of gap junctions could serve to prevent further escalations, suggesting furthermore that they are a consequence of an adaptive response of the neuronal network to the pathological activity. However, if the seizures are strong and persistent, our model predicts the existence of a critical tipping point after which additional gap junctions no longer suppress but strongly facilitate the escalation of epileptic seizures. Our results thus reveal a complex role of electrical coupling in relation to epileptiform events. Which dynamic scenario (seizure suppression or seizure escalation is ultimately adopted by the network depends critically on the strength and duration of seizures, in turn emphasizing the importance of temporal and causal aspects when linking gap junctions with epilepsy.

  15. Dynamic imaging of coherent sources reveals different network connectivity underlying the generation and perpetuation of epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Elshoff

    Full Text Available The concept of focal epilepsies includes a seizure origin in brain regions with hyper synchronous activity (epileptogenic zone and seizure onset zone and a complex epileptic network of different brain areas involved in the generation, propagation, and modulation of seizures. The purpose of this work was to study functional and effective connectivity between regions involved in networks of epileptic seizures. The beginning and middle part of focal seizures from ictal surface EEG data were analyzed using dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS, an inverse solution in the frequency domain which describes neuronal networks and coherences of oscillatory brain activities. The information flow (effective connectivity between coherent sources was investigated using the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC method. In 8/11 patients, the first and second source of epileptic activity as found by DICS were concordant with the operative resection site; these patients became seizure free after epilepsy surgery. In the remaining 3 patients, the results of DICS / RPDC calculations and the resection site were discordant; these patients had a poorer post-operative outcome. The first sources as found by DICS were located predominantly in cortical structures; subsequent sources included some subcortical structures: thalamus, Nucl. Subthalamicus and cerebellum. DICS seems to be a powerful tool to define the seizure onset zone and the epileptic networks involved. Seizure generation seems to be related to the propagation of epileptic activity from the primary source in the seizure onset zone, and maintenance of seizures is attributed to the perpetuation of epileptic activity between nodes in the epileptic network. Despite of these promising results, this proof of principle study needs further confirmation prior to the use of the described methods in the clinical praxis.

  16. Degenerate time-dependent network dynamics anticipate seizures in human epileptic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauste Campo, Adrià; Principe, Alessandro; Ley, Miguel; Rocamora, Rodrigo; Deco, Gustavo

    2018-04-01

    Epileptic seizures are known to follow specific changes in brain dynamics. While some algorithms can nowadays robustly detect these changes, a clear understanding of the mechanism by which these alterations occur and generate seizures is still lacking. Here, we provide crossvalidated evidence that such changes are initiated by an alteration of physiological network state dynamics. Specifically, our analysis of long intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) recordings from a group of 10 patients identifies a critical phase of a few hours in which time-dependent network states become less variable ("degenerate"), and this phase is followed by a global functional connectivity reduction before seizure onset. This critical phase is characterized by an abnormal occurrence of highly correlated network instances and is shown to be particularly associated with the activity of the resected regions in patients with validated postsurgical outcome. Our approach characterizes preseizure network dynamics as a cascade of 2 sequential events providing new insights into seizure prediction and control.

  17. Glutamate decarboxylase activity in rat brain during experimental epileptic seizures induced by pilocarpine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netopilova, M; Drsata, J [Department of Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, Charles University, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Haugvicova, R; Kubova, H; Mares, P [Institute of Physiology, Czech Academy of Sciences, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic)

    1998-07-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity was studied rat brain parts in a pilocarpine model of epileptic seizures. An increased enzyme activity was found in hippocampus a cerebellum during the acute phase of seizures, while the cortex and cerebellum showed increased GAD activity in the chronic phase of the process. Systematic administration of pilocarpine to rats induces status epilepticus. The aim of this research was to find out if seizures induced by pilocarpine are connected changes in glutamate decarboxylase activity, the enzyme that catalyzes synthesis of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. GAD was assayed by means of radiometric method using {sup 14}C-carboxyl-labelled glutamate and measurement of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} radioactivity. Obtained results suggest that pilocarpine seizures are connected with changes of GAD activity in individual parts of rat brain. (authors)

  18. Glutamate decarboxylase activity in rat brain during experimental epileptic seizures induced by pilocarpine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netopilova, M.; Drsata, J.; Haugvicova, R.; Kubova, H.; Mares, P.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity was studied rat brain parts in a pilocarpine model of epileptic seizures. An increased enzyme activity was found in hippocampus a cerebellum during the acute phase of seizures, while the cortex and cerebellum showed increased GAD activity in the chronic phase of the process. Systematic administration of pilocarpine to rats induces status epilepticus. The aim of this research was to find out if seizures induced by pilocarpine are connected changes in glutamate decarboxylase activity, the enzyme that catalyzes synthesis of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. GAD was assayed by means of radiometric method using 14 C-carboxyl-labelled glutamate and measurement of 14 CO 2 radioactivity. Obtained results suggest that pilocarpine seizures are connected with changes of GAD activity in individual parts of rat brain. (authors)

  19. SVM-Based System for Prediction of Epileptic Seizures from iEEG Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkassky, Vladimir; Lee, Jieun; Veber, Brandon; Patterson, Edward E.; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Worrell, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This paper describes a data-analytic modeling approach for prediction of epileptic seizures from intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) recording of brain activity. Even though it is widely accepted that statistical characteristics of iEEG signal change prior to seizures, robust seizure prediction remains a challenging problem due to subject-specific nature of data-analytic modeling. Methods Our work emphasizes understanding of clinical considerations important for iEEG-based seizure prediction, and proper translation of these clinical considerations into data-analytic modeling assumptions. Several design choices during pre-processing and post-processing are considered and investigated for their effect on seizure prediction accuracy. Results Our empirical results show that the proposed SVM-based seizure prediction system can achieve robust prediction of preictal and interictal iEEG segments from dogs with epilepsy. The sensitivity is about 90–100%, and the false-positive rate is about 0–0.3 times per day. The results also suggest good prediction is subject-specific (dog or human), in agreement with earlier studies. Conclusion Good prediction performance is possible only if the training data contain sufficiently many seizure episodes, i.e., at least 5–7 seizures. Significance The proposed system uses subject-specific modeling and unbalanced training data. This system also utilizes three different time scales during training and testing stages. PMID:27362758

  20. EPILAB: a software package for studies on the prediction of epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, C A; Direito, B; Feldwisch-Drentrup, H; Valderrama, M; Costa, R P; Alvarado-Rojas, C; Nikolopoulos, S; Le Van Quyen, M; Timmer, J; Schelter, B; Dourado, A

    2011-09-15

    A Matlab®-based software package, EPILAB, was developed for supporting researchers in performing studies on the prediction of epileptic seizures. It provides an intuitive and convenient graphical user interface. Fundamental concepts that are crucial for epileptic seizure prediction studies were implemented. This includes, for example, the development and statistical validation of prediction methodologies in long-term continuous recordings. Seizure prediction is usually based on electroencephalography (EEG) and electrocardiography (ECG) signals. EPILAB is able to process both EEG and ECG data stored in different formats. More than 35 time and frequency domain measures (features) can be extracted based on univariate and multivariate data analysis. These features can be post-processed and used for prediction purposes. The predictions may be conducted based on optimized thresholds or by applying classifications methods such as artificial neural networks, cellular neuronal networks, and support vector machines. EPILAB proved to be an efficient tool for seizure prediction, and aims to be a way to communicate, evaluate, and compare results and data among the seizure prediction community. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimized feature subsets for epileptic seizure prediction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Bruno; Ventura, Francisco; Teixeira, César; Dourado, António

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of the number of EEG features to give as inputs to epilepsy seizure predictors is a needed step towards the development of a transportable device for real-time warning. This paper presents a comparative study of three feature selection methods, based on Support Vector Machines. Minimum-Redundancy Maximum-Relevance, Recursive Feature Elimination, Genetic Algorithms, show that, for three patients of the European Database on Epilepsy, the most important univariate features are related to spectral information and statistical moments.

  2. The Anticonvulsant Effects of Ketogenic Diet on Epileptic Seizures and Potential Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifan; Xu, Jingwei; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Wei; Li, Bingjin

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is a syndrome of brain dysfunction induced by the aberrant excitability of certain neurons. Despite advances in surgical technique and anti-epileptic drug in recent years, recurrent epileptic seizures remain intractable and lead to a serious morbidity in the world. The ketogenic diet refers to a high-fat, low-carbohydrate and adequate-protein diet. Currently, its beneficial effects on epileptic seizure reduction have been well established. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying the anti-epileptic effects of ketogenic diet are still poorly understood. In this article, the possible roles of ketogenic diet on epilepsy were discussed. Data was obtained from the websites including Web of Science, Medline, Pubmed, Scopus, based on these keywords: "Ketogenic diet" and "epilepsy". As shown in both clinical and basic studies, the therapeutic effects of ketogenic diet might involve neuronal metabolism, neurotransmitter function, neuronal membrane potential and neuron protection against ROS. In this review, we systematically reviewed the effects and possible mechanisms of ketogenic diet on epilepsy, which may optimize the therapeutic strategies against epilepsy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Temporal seizure focus and status epilepticus are associated with high-sensitive troponin I elevation after epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-09-01

    Postictal elevation of high-sensitive troponin I (TNI), a highly specific biomarker for myocardial ischemia, has been reported. We aimed at evaluating its association of high-sensitive troponin I (TNI) with seizure type and focus, as well as vascular risk factors. TNI was measured in 247 patients admitted to our clinic via the emergency room with an acute epileptic seizure. TNI control measurements were performed in 61.5% of cases. All patients underwent electroencephalography and cerebral imaging. Seizure focus - when possible - was determined using results from these examinations as well as clinical data. Of 247 patients, 133 (53.8%) were men, the mean age was 59 ± 18 years. 70 (28.3%) patients had focal and 177 (71.7%) generalized seizures. Status epilepticus was present in 38 cases (15.4%). Mean TNI was 0.05 ± 0.17. TNI was elevated in 27 patients (10.9%). Higher age, status epilepticus and temporal seizure focus were significantly associated with TNI elevation in multivariate analysis. In 21 (13.8%) of the patients with TNI control measurement, TNI was continuously elevated. Higher age and temporal seizure focus were significantly associated with continuously high TNI. Coronary heart disease and vascular risk factors were significantly associated with high TNI only in univariate analysis. No patient had a symptomatic myocardial ischemia. Postictal TNI elevation is relatively common in older patients with status epilepticus or temporal seizure focus. These data support the concept of relevant and possibly dangerous ictal effects on cardiac function especially in temporal lobe seizures. Although the risk of manifest postictal myocardial infarction seems to be very low, selected patients could profit from closer monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Consensus clinical practice guidelines of the Andalusian Epilepsy Society: therapeutic recommendations when dealing with a first epileptic seizure and in epileptic status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadé-Cerda, J M; Sánchez-Alvarez, J C; Galán-Barranco, J M; Moreno-Alegre, V; Serrano-Castro, P J; Cañadillas-Hidalgo, F M

    Most epileptic seizures are brief and self-limiting, but sometimes they can last longer than expected and this entails (in the case of generalised seizures) a high risk of morbidity and mortality, which increases as they get longer. This severity justifies the need to draw up a set of consensus-based practice guidelines based on implicit evidence, to use Liberati's nomenclature, concerning aspects related to the recommended therapeutic management of a patient with prolonged seizures who is being attended in an emergency department. A selective search was conducted on PubMed-Medline for scientific information related to the subject using scientific evidence filters. This search was completed in other scientific evidence search engines, such as Tripdatabase, Biblioteca Cochrane Plus or DARE. The selected references were analysed and discussed by the authors, and the available evidence and any recommendations that could be drawn from it were collected. The search revealed the existence of 33 primary documents and six practice guidelines or protocols related with the topic under study. The recommendations were inserted in the text explicitly. The therapeutic protocol must be started when faced with any seizures that last more than five minutes. First, steps must be taken to ensure proper respiratory and cardiocirculatory functioning, and then fast-acting antiepileptic drugs are administered intravenously and in high doses until the cause is identified and controlled. Due to their lower level of morbidity and mortality, prolonged non-convulsive seizures do not generally require therapy that is so vigorous and with such a high risk of complications.

  5. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Revived by Epileptic Seizure Then Disappeared Soon during Treatment with Regional Intravenous Nerve Blockade: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Sumitani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS, in which symptoms, including burning pain and severe allodynia, were alleviated by using a regional intravenous nerve blockade (Bier block combined with physiotherapy, but reappeared following an epileptic seizure. Symptoms disappeared again following control of epileptic discharges, as revealed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and electroencephalography (EEG results. Although systemic toxicity of a local anesthetic applied by Bier block was suspected as a cause of the first seizure, the patient did not present any other toxic symptoms, and seizures repeatedly occurred after Bier block cessation; the patient was then diagnosed as having temporal symptomatic epilepsy. This case suggests that symptoms of CRPS may be sustained by abnormal brain conditions, and our findings contribute to the understanding of how the central nervous system participates in maintaining pain and allodynia associated with CRPS.

  6. Preictal dynamics of EEG complexity in intracranially recorded epileptic seizure: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob, Petr; Roman, Robert; Svetlak, Miroslav; Kukleta, Miloslav; Chladek, Jan; Brazdil, Milan

    2014-11-01

    Recent findings suggest that neural complexity reflecting a number of independent processes in the brain may characterize typical changes during epileptic seizures and may enable to describe preictal dynamics. With respect to previously reported findings suggesting specific changes in neural complexity during preictal period, we have used measure of pointwise correlation dimension (PD2) as a sensitive indicator of nonstationary changes in complexity of the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. Although this measure of complexity in epileptic patients was previously reported by Feucht et al (Applications of correlation dimension and pointwise dimension for non-linear topographical analysis of focal onset seizures. Med Biol Comput. 1999;37:208-217), it was not used to study changes in preictal dynamics. With this aim to study preictal changes of EEG complexity, we have examined signals from 11 multicontact depth (intracerebral) EEG electrodes located in 108 cortical and subcortical brain sites, and from 3 scalp EEG electrodes in a patient with intractable epilepsy, who underwent preoperative evaluation before epilepsy surgery. From those 108 EEG contacts, records related to 44 electrode contacts implanted into lesional structures and white matter were not included into the experimental analysis.The results show that in comparison to interictal period (at about 8-6 minutes before seizure onset), there was a statistically significant decrease in PD2 complexity in the preictal period at about 2 minutes before seizure onset in all 64 intracranial channels localized in various brain sites that were included into the analysis and in 3 scalp EEG channels as well. Presented results suggest that using PD2 in EEG analysis may have significant implications for research of preictal dynamics and prediction of epileptic seizures.

  7. Epileptic seizure prediction based on a bivariate spectral power methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandarabadi, Mojtaba; Teixeira, Cesar A; Direito, Bruno; Dourado, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The spectral power of 5 frequently considered frequency bands (Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Theta and Delta) for 6 EEG channels is computed and then all the possible pairwise combinations among the 30 features set, are used to create a 435 dimensional feature space. Two new feature selection methods are introduced to choose the best candidate features among those and to reduce the dimensionality of this feature space. The selected features are then fed to Support Vector Machines (SVMs) that classify the cerebral state in preictal and non-preictal classes. The outputs of the SVM are regularized using a method that accounts for the classification dynamics of the preictal class, also known as "Firing Power" method. The results obtained using our feature selection approaches are compared with the ones obtained using minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance (mRMR) feature selection method. The results in a group of 12 patients of the EPILEPSIAE database, containing 46 seizures and 787 hours multichannel recording for out-of-sample data, indicate the efficiency of the bivariate approach as well as the two new feature selection methods. The best results presented sensitivity of 76.09% (35 of 46 seizures predicted) and a false prediction rate of 0.15(-1).

  8. How large must an epileptic focus be to cause an electrographic status epilepticus--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauser, Susanne; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2004-10-01

    Based on experimental data from animal studies different theories regarding the size of an epileptic focus have been postulated which range from single pacemaker cells to extended neuronal networks. We report a case which gives further information about the size of a human epileptic focus which can trigger manifest epileptic seizures. We report a 22-year-old man with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. This patient suffered from brief complex partial seizures and frequent epigastric auras. To differentiate a mesiotemporal from a temporolateral seizure origin the patient was implanted with a 10 contact depth electrode from a posterior approach into the right hippocampus, and additional temporobasal/temporolateral subdural strip electrodes. Depth recordings revealed an electrographic status with continuous rhythmic sharp wave activity (1 Hz), the field of which was confined to a diameter of less than 1 cm in the anterior hippocampus, whereas temporobasal subdural strip electrodes did not display this activity. Periodically, spread of this activity occurred to the amygdala, to the posterior part of the hippocampus, and less often to the temporobasal cortex. Most seizure patterns remained subclinical, few of them became symptomatic as partial seizures. This case demonstrates that a hippocampal epileptic focus causing electrographic focal status epilepticus may be limited to a volume of less than 1 cm in diameter. This observation is discussed with regard to implantation strategies and to possible superselective resective or modulatory approaches in the treatment of such limited epileptogenic areas.

  9. Hidden pattern discovery on epileptic EEG with 1-D local binary patterns and epileptic seizures detection by grey relational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Yılmaz

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach to detect epilepsy seizures by using Electroencephalography (EEG), which is one of the most common methods for the diagnosis of epilepsy, based on 1-Dimension Local Binary Pattern (1D-LBP) and grey relational analysis (GRA) methods. The main aim of this paper is to evaluate and validate a novel approach, which is a computer-based quantitative EEG analyzing method and based on grey systems, aimed to help decision-maker. In this study, 1D-LBP, which utilizes all data points, was employed for extracting features in raw EEG signals, Fisher score (FS) was employed to select the representative features, which can also be determined as hidden patterns. Additionally, GRA is performed to classify EEG signals through these Fisher scored features. The experimental results of the proposed approach, which was employed in a public dataset for validation, showed that it has a high accuracy in identifying epileptic EEG signals. For various combinations of epileptic EEG, such as A-E, B-E, C-E, D-E, and A-D clusters, 100, 96, 100, 99.00 and 100% were achieved, respectively. Also, this work presents an attempt to develop a new general-purpose hidden pattern determination scheme, which can be utilized for different categories of time-varying signals.

  10. Large-Scale Modeling of Epileptic Seizures: Scaling Properties of Two Parallel Neuronal Network Simulation Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo L. Pesce

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our limited understanding of the relationship between the behavior of individual neurons and large neuronal networks is an important limitation in current epilepsy research and may be one of the main causes of our inadequate ability to treat it. Addressing this problem directly via experiments is impossibly complex; thus, we have been developing and studying medium-large-scale simulations of detailed neuronal networks to guide us. Flexibility in the connection schemas and a complete description of the cortical tissue seem necessary for this purpose. In this paper we examine some of the basic issues encountered in these multiscale simulations. We have determined the detailed behavior of two such simulators on parallel computer systems. The observed memory and computation-time scaling behavior for a distributed memory implementation were very good over the range studied, both in terms of network sizes (2,000 to 400,000 neurons and processor pool sizes (1 to 256 processors. Our simulations required between a few megabytes and about 150 gigabytes of RAM and lasted between a few minutes and about a week, well within the capability of most multinode clusters. Therefore, simulations of epileptic seizures on networks with millions of cells should be feasible on current supercomputers.

  11. Large-scale modeling of epileptic seizures: scaling properties of two parallel neuronal network simulation algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Lorenzo L; Lee, Hyong C; Hereld, Mark; Visser, Sid; Stevens, Rick L; Wildeman, Albert; van Drongelen, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Our limited understanding of the relationship between the behavior of individual neurons and large neuronal networks is an important limitation in current epilepsy research and may be one of the main causes of our inadequate ability to treat it. Addressing this problem directly via experiments is impossibly complex; thus, we have been developing and studying medium-large-scale simulations of detailed neuronal networks to guide us. Flexibility in the connection schemas and a complete description of the cortical tissue seem necessary for this purpose. In this paper we examine some of the basic issues encountered in these multiscale simulations. We have determined the detailed behavior of two such simulators on parallel computer systems. The observed memory and computation-time scaling behavior for a distributed memory implementation were very good over the range studied, both in terms of network sizes (2,000 to 400,000 neurons) and processor pool sizes (1 to 256 processors). Our simulations required between a few megabytes and about 150 gigabytes of RAM and lasted between a few minutes and about a week, well within the capability of most multinode clusters. Therefore, simulations of epileptic seizures on networks with millions of cells should be feasible on current supercomputers.

  12. Epileptic seizure predictors based on computational intelligence techniques: a comparative study with 278 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre Teixeira, César; Direito, Bruno; Bandarabadi, Mojtaba; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Valderrama, Mario; Schelter, Bjoern; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Navarro, Vincent; Sales, Francisco; Dourado, António

    2014-05-01

    The ability of computational intelligence methods to predict epileptic seizures is evaluated in long-term EEG recordings of 278 patients suffering from pharmaco-resistant partial epilepsy, also known as refractory epilepsy. This extensive study in seizure prediction considers the 278 patients from the European Epilepsy Database, collected in three epilepsy centres: Hôpital Pitié-là-Salpêtrière, Paris, France; Universitätsklinikum Freiburg, Germany; Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Portugal. For a considerable number of patients it was possible to find a patient specific predictor with an acceptable performance, as for example predictors that anticipate at least half of the seizures with a rate of false alarms of no more than 1 in 6 h (0.15 h⁻¹). We observed that the epileptic focus localization, data sampling frequency, testing duration, number of seizures in testing, type of machine learning, and preictal time influence significantly the prediction performance. The results allow to face optimistically the feasibility of a patient specific prospective alarming system, based on machine learning techniques by considering the combination of several univariate (single-channel) electroencephalogram features. We envisage that this work will serve as benchmark data that will be of valuable importance for future studies based on the European Epilepsy Database. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Budget impact analysis of adjunctive therapy with lacosamide for partial-onset epileptic seizures in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to compute the budget impact of lacosamide, a new adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures in epilepsy patients from 16 years of age who are uncontrolled and having previously used at least three anti-epileptic drugs from a Belgian healthcare payer perspective. The budget impact analysis compared the 'world with lacosamide' to the 'world without lacosamide' and calculated how a change in the mix of anti-epileptic drugs used to treat uncontrolled epilepsy would impact drug spending from 2008 to 2013. Data on the number of patients and on the market shares of anti-epileptic drugs were taken from Belgian sources and from the literature. Unit costs of anti-epileptic drugs originated from Belgian sources. The budget impact was calculated from two scenarios about the market uptake of lacosamide. The Belgian target population is expected to increase from 5333 patients in 2008 to 5522 patients in 2013. Assuming that the market share of lacosamide increases linearly over time and is taken evenly from all other anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), the budget impact of adopting adjunctive therapy with lacosamide increases from €5249 (0.1% of reference drug budget) in 2008 to €242,700 (4.7% of reference drug budget) in 2013. Assuming that 10% of patients use standard AED therapy plus lacosamide, the budget impact of adopting adjunctive therapy with lacosamide is around €800,000-900,000 per year (or 16.7% of the reference drug budget). Adjunctive therapy with lacosamide would raise drug spending for this patient population by as much as 16.7% per year. However, this budget impact analysis did not consider the fact that lacosamide reduces costs of seizure management and withdrawal. The literature suggests that, if savings in other healthcare costs are taken into account, adjunctive therapy with lacosamide may be cost saving.

  14. Non-invasive imaging of epileptic seizures in vivo using photoacoustic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Qizhi; Carney, Paul R; Yuan Zhen; Jiang Huabei [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Liu Zhao [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Chen Huanxin; Roper, Steven N [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0265 (United States)], E-mail: hjiang@bme.ufl.edu

    2008-04-07

    Non-invasive laser-induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging imaging modality that has the potential to image the dynamic function of the brain due to its unique ability of imaging biological tissues with high optical contrast and ultrasound resolution. Here we report the first application of our finite-element-based PAT for imaging of epileptic seizures in an animal model. In vivo photoacoustic images were obtained in rats with focal seizures induced by microinjection of bicuculline, a GABA{sub A} antagonist, into the neocortex. The seizure focus was accurately localized by PAT as confirmed with gold-standard electroencephalogram (EEG). Compared to the existing neuroimaging modalities, PAT not only has the unprecedented advantage of high spatial and temporal resolution in a single imaging modality, but also is portable and low in cost, making it possible to bring brain imaging to the bedside.

  15. Automatic identification of epileptic seizures from EEG signals using linear programming boosting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ahnaf Rashik; Subasi, Abdulhamit

    2016-11-01

    Computerized epileptic seizure detection is essential for expediting epilepsy diagnosis and research and for assisting medical professionals. Moreover, the implementation of an epilepsy monitoring device that has low power and is portable requires a reliable and successful seizure detection scheme. In this work, the problem of automated epilepsy seizure detection using singe-channel EEG signals has been addressed. At first, segments of EEG signals are decomposed using a newly proposed signal processing scheme, namely complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition with adaptive noise (CEEMDAN). Six spectral moments are extracted from the CEEMDAN mode functions and train and test matrices are formed afterward. These matrices are fed into the classifier to identify epileptic seizures from EEG signal segments. In this work, we implement an ensemble learning based machine learning algorithm, namely linear programming boosting (LPBoost) to perform classification. The efficacy of spectral features in the CEEMDAN domain is validated by graphical and statistical analyses. The performance of CEEMDAN is compared to those of its predecessors to further inspect its suitability. The effectiveness and the appropriateness of LPBoost are demonstrated as opposed to the commonly used classification models. Resubstitution and 10 fold cross-validation error analyses confirm the superior algorithm performance of the proposed scheme. The algorithmic performance of our epilepsy seizure identification scheme is also evaluated against state-of-the-art works in the literature. Experimental outcomes manifest that the proposed seizure detection scheme performs better than the existing works in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and Cohen's Kappa coefficient. It can be anticipated that owing to its use of only one channel of EEG signal, the proposed method will be suitable for device implementation, eliminate the onus of clinicians for analyzing a large bulk of data manually, and

  16. Long-Term Intake of Uncaria rhynchophylla Reduces S100B and RAGE Protein Levels in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nou-Ying Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic seizures are crucial clinical manifestations of recurrent neuronal discharges in the brain. An imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neuronal discharges causes brain damage and cell loss. Herbal medicines offer alternative treatment options for epilepsy because of their low cost and few side effects. We established a rat epilepsy model by injecting kainic acid (KA, 12 mg/kg, i.p. and subsequently investigated the effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR and its underlying mechanisms. Electroencephalogram and epileptic behaviors revealed that the KA injection induced epileptic seizures. Following KA injection, S100B levels increased in the hippocampus. This phenomenon was attenuated by the oral administration of UR and valproic acid (VA, 250 mg/kg. Both drugs significantly reversed receptor potentiation for advanced glycation end product proteins. Rats with KA-induced epilepsy exhibited no increase in the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 3, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and chemokine receptor type 2, which play a role in inflammation. Our results provide novel and detailed mechanisms, explaining the role of UR in KA-induced epileptic seizures in hippocampal CA1 neurons.

  17. Long-Term Intake of Uncaria rhynchophylla Reduces S100B and RAGE Protein Levels in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Lin, Yi-Wen; Ho, Tin-Yun; Cheng, Chin-Yi; Chen, Chao-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are crucial clinical manifestations of recurrent neuronal discharges in the brain. An imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neuronal discharges causes brain damage and cell loss. Herbal medicines offer alternative treatment options for epilepsy because of their low cost and few side effects. We established a rat epilepsy model by injecting kainic acid (KA, 12 mg/kg, i.p.) and subsequently investigated the effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) and its underlying mechanisms. Electroencephalogram and epileptic behaviors revealed that the KA injection induced epileptic seizures. Following KA injection, S100B levels increased in the hippocampus. This phenomenon was attenuated by the oral administration of UR and valproic acid (VA, 250 mg/kg). Both drugs significantly reversed receptor potentiation for advanced glycation end product proteins. Rats with KA-induced epilepsy exhibited no increase in the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 3, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and chemokine receptor type 2, which play a role in inflammation. Our results provide novel and detailed mechanisms, explaining the role of UR in KA-induced epileptic seizures in hippocampal CA1 neurons.

  18. A model based approach in observing the activity of neuronal populations for the prediction of epileptic seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, M.S.; Nesic, D.; Kuhlmann, L.; Postoyan, R.; Varsavsky, A.; Cook, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Epilepsy is a common neurological disease that affects 0.5-1 % of the world's population. In cases where known treatments cannot achieve complete recovery, seizure prediction is essential so that preventive measures can be undertaken to prevent resultant injury. The elcctroencephalogram (EEG) is a widely used diagnostic tool for epilepsy. However, the EEG does not provide a detailed view of the underlying seizure causing neuronal mechanisms. Knowing the dynamics of the neuronal population is useful because tracking the evolution of the neuronal mechanisms will allow us to track the brain's progression from interictal to ictal state. Wendling and colleagues proposed a parameterised mathematical model that represents the activity of interconnected neuronal populations. By modifying the parameters, this model is able to reproduce signals that are very similar to the real EEG depicting commonly observed patterns during interictal and ictal periods. The transition from non-seizure to seizure activity, as seen in the EEG. is hypothesised to be due to the impairment of inhibition. Using Wendling's model, we designed a deterministic nonlinear estimator to recover the average membrane potential of the neuronal populations from a single channel EEG signal. for any fixed and known parameter values. Our nonlinear estimator is analytically proven to asymptotically converge to the true state of the model and illustrated in simulations. We were able to computationally observe the dynamics of the three neuronal populations described in the model: excitatory, fast and slow inhibitory populations. This forms a first step towards the prediction of epileptic seiwres. (author)

  19. METALS IN THE METABOLISM OF HIPPOCAMPUS AND ROLE OF ZINC IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF EPILEPTIC SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Kuchkovsky

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Physiological mechanisms of convulsions status during epilepsy or episindrom significantly different from the mechanisms, which were describe for other disorders associated with glutamatergic system, such as schizophrenia (a decrease of glutamate in neurons and increased dopaminergic load, drug addiction and alcoholism (the formation of endogenous opioids and dopamine, strengthening the role of GABA-ergic system. With glutamatergic transmission are сconnect not only convulsive state, but also the realization of higher integrative functions. Therefore, the development of epilepsy, particularly  which caused glutamate, implemented by activating Zn-ergic hippocampal neurons, associate with complex changes in human mental functions. Based on a scientific literature about  of the role of chelating zinc in the mechanisms of glutamatergic transmission, we can  suggest it participation in the mechanisms of formation of epilepsy  convulsions. In experience on animals, was show that in the animal organism of stressing correlative changes observe zinc content and secretory material in the hippocampus, Paneth cells  and B cells of pancreas. The nature of the changes depend on the stressor. When this change of zinc content in the hippocampus and hypothalamus (as the main regulator of stress reaction were multidirectional that this can be explained by the release of metal together with secretory material in the hypothalamus into the bloodstream. Research epileptic activity  of hippocampus by administering to the animal chelate 8 BSQ allowed to establish the dependence between convulsant action  and first  stress condition of the animal. Evocation of stress by 8-BSQ and physical activity, immobilization and alcohol abuse found that the convulsive effect of this reagent during intravitreal research increased in the case of prior exposure by specified kinds of stressors. In this pre-convulsive effect on exertion increased by 266% and the zinc content

  20. The influence of hubs in the structure of a neuronal network during an epileptic seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Abner Cardoso; Cerdeira, Hilda A.; Machado, Birajara Soares

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we propose changes in the structure of a neuronal network with the intention to provoke strong synchronization to simulate episodes of epileptic seizure. Starting with a network of Izhikevich neurons we slowly increase the number of connections in selected nodes in a controlled way, to produce (or not) hubs. We study how these structures alter the synchronization on the spike firings interval, on individual neurons as well as on mean values, as a function of the concentration of connections for random and non-random (hubs) distribution. We also analyze how the post-ictal signal varies for the different distributions. We conclude that a network with hubs is more appropriate to represent an epileptic state.

  1. Ecstatic epileptic seizures: a glimpse into the multiple roles of the insula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eGschwind

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecstatic epileptic seizures are a rare but compelling epileptic entity. During the first seconds of these seizures, ecstatic auras provoke feelings of well-being, intense serenity, bliss, and enhanced self-awareness. They are associated with the impression of time dilation, and can be described as a mystic experience by some patients. The functional neuroanatomy of ecstatic seizures is still debated. During recent years several patients presenting with ecstatic auras have been reported by others and us (in total n=49; a few of them in the setting of presurgical evaluation including electrical brain stimulation. According to the recently recognized functions of the insula, and the results of nuclear brain imaging and electrical stimulation, the ecstatic symptoms in these patients seem to localize to a functional network centered around the anterior insular cortex, where we thus propose to locate this rare ictal phenomenon. Here we summarize the role of the multiple sensory, autonomic, affective and cognitive functions of the insular cortex, which are integrated into the creation of self-awareness, and we suggest how this system may become dysfunctional on several levels during ecstatic aura.

  2. Long-Term Intake of Uncaria rhynchophylla Reduces S100B and RAGE Protein Levels in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Lin, Yi-Wen; Ho, Tin-Yun; Cheng, Chin-Yi; Chen, Chao-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are crucial clinical manifestations of recurrent neuronal discharges in the brain. An imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neuronal discharges causes brain damage and cell loss. Herbal medicines offer alternative treatment options for epilepsy because of their low cost and few side effects. We established a rat epilepsy model by injecting kainic acid (KA, 12?mg/kg, i.p.) and subsequently investigated the effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) and its underlying mec...

  3. An Automatic Prediction of Epileptic Seizures Using Cloud Computing and Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, Sanjay; Sood, Sandeep K; Gupta, Sunil Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders which is characterized by the spontaneous and unforeseeable occurrence of seizures. An automatic prediction of seizure can protect the patients from accidents and save their life. In this article, we proposed a mobile-based framework that automatically predict seizures using the information contained in electroencephalography (EEG) signals. The wireless sensor technology is used to capture the EEG signals of patients. The cloud-based services are used to collect and analyze the EEG data from the patient's mobile phone. The features from the EEG signal are extracted using the fast Walsh-Hadamard transform (FWHT). The Higher Order Spectral Analysis (HOSA) is applied to FWHT coefficients in order to select the features set relevant to normal, preictal and ictal states of seizure. We subsequently exploit the selected features as input to a k-means classifier to detect epileptic seizure states in a reasonable time. The performance of the proposed model is tested on Amazon EC2 cloud and compared in terms of execution time and accuracy. The findings show that with selected HOS based features, we were able to achieve a classification accuracy of 94.6 %.

  4. Rare GABRA3 variants are associated with epileptic seizures, encephalopathy and dysmorphic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niturad, Cristina Elena; Lev, Dorit; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Schubert, Julian; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Kroes, Hester Y; Oegema, Renske; Traverso, Monica; Specchio, Nicola; Lassota, Maria; Chelly, Jamel; Bennett-Back, Odeya; Carmi, Nirit; Koffler-Brill, Tal; Iacomino, Michele; Trivisano, Marina; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Striano, Pasquale; Nawara, Magdalena; Rzonca, Sylwia; Fischer, Ute; Bienek, Melanie; Jensen, Corinna; Hu, Hao; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Krause, Roland; May, Patrick; Becker, Felicitas; Balling, Rudi; Biskup, Saskia; Haas, Stefan A; Nürnberg, Peter; van Gassen, Koen L I; Lerche, Holger; Zara, Federico; Maljevic, Snezana; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther

    2017-11-01

    Genetic epilepsies are caused by mutations in a range of different genes, many of them encoding ion channels, receptors or transporters. While the number of detected variants and genes increased dramatically in the recent years, pleiotropic effects have also been recognized, revealing that clinical syndromes with various degrees of severity arise from a single gene, a single mutation, or from different mutations showing similar functional defects. Accordingly, several genes coding for GABAA receptor subunits have been linked to a spectrum of benign to severe epileptic disorders and it was shown that a loss of function presents the major correlated pathomechanism. Here, we identified six variants in GABRA3 encoding the α3-subunit of the GABAA receptor. This gene is located on chromosome Xq28 and has not been previously associated with human disease. Five missense variants and one microduplication were detected in four families and two sporadic cases presenting with a range of epileptic seizure types, a varying degree of intellectual disability and developmental delay, sometimes with dysmorphic features or nystagmus. The variants co-segregated mostly but not completely with the phenotype in the families, indicating in some cases incomplete penetrance, involvement of other genes, or presence of phenocopies. Overall, males were more severely affected and there were three asymptomatic female mutation carriers compared to only one male without a clinical phenotype. X-chromosome inactivation studies could not explain the phenotypic variability in females. Three detected missense variants are localized in the extracellular GABA-binding NH2-terminus, one in the M2-M3 linker and one in the M4 transmembrane segment of the α3-subunit. Functional studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed a variable but significant reduction of GABA-evoked anion currents for all mutants compared to wild-type receptors. The degree of current reduction correlated partially with the phenotype

  5. High expression of cystine-glutamate antiporter xCT (SLC7A11) is an independent biomarker for epileptic seizures at diagnosis in glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mai Froberg; Heimisdóttir, Sólborg Berglind; Sørensen, Mia Dahl

    2018-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are an important cause of morbidity in glioma patients. Substantial lines of evidence support the concept of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate being a crucial mediator of glioma-associated seizures. In gliomas, non-vesicular secretion of glutamate via the cystine...... tumor using tissue microarrays. In addition to histological grading of the tumors, isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) R132H mutational status was determined by immunohistochemistry. 215 consecutive glioma patients were included in the study (7.4% grade II, 7.0% grade III, 85.6% grade IV). High x...

  6. Physics of the Brain. Prevention of the Epileptic Seizures by the Multi-photon Pulsed-operated Fiber Lasers in the Ultraviolet Range of Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander; IAPS Team

    The novel study of the epileptogenesis mechanisms is proposed. It is based on the pulsed-operated (amplitude modulation) multi-photon (frequency modulation) fiber-laser interaction with the brain epilepsy-topion (the epilepsy onset area), so as to prevent the excessive electrical discharge (epileptic seizure) in the brain. The repetition frequency, Ω, matches the low frequency (epileptic) phonon waves in the brain. The laser repetition frequency (5-100 pulses per second) enables the resonance-scanning of the wide range of the phonon (possible epileptic-to-be) activity in the brain. The tunable fiber laser frequencies, Δω (multi photon operation), are in the ultraviolet frequency range, thus enabling monitoring of the electrical charge imbalance (within the 10s of milliseconds), and the DNA-corruption in the epilepsy-topion, as the possible cause of the disease. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., Stefan University.

  7. The role of stress as a trigger for epileptic seizures: a narrative review of evidence from human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Barbora; Harris, Peter R; Ponnusamy, Athi; Reuber, Markus

    2013-11-01

    Stress is one of the most frequently self-identified seizure triggers in patients with epilepsy; however, most previous publications on stress and epilepsy have focused on the role of stress in the initial development of epilepsy. This narrative review explores the causal role of stress in triggering seizures in patients with existing epilepsy. Findings from human studies of psychological stress, as well as of physiologic stress responses in humans and animals, and evidence from nonpharmacologic interventions for epilepsy are considered. The evidence from human studies for stress as a trigger of epileptic seizures is inconclusive. Although retrospective self-report studies show that stress is the most common patient-perceived seizure precipitant, prospective studies have yielded mixed results and studies of life events suggest that stressful experiences only trigger seizures in certain individuals. There is limited evidence suggesting that autonomic arousal can precede seizures. Interventions designed to improve coping with stress reduce seizures in some individuals. Studies of physiologic stress using animal epilepsy models provide more convincing evidence. Exposure to exogenous and endogenous stress mediators has been found to increase epileptic activity in the brain and trigger overt seizures, especially after repeated exposure. In conclusion, stress is likely to exacerbate the susceptibility to epileptic seizures in a subgroup of individuals with epilepsy and may play a role in triggering "spontaneous" seizures. However, there is currently no strong evidence for a close link between stress and seizures in the majority of people with epilepsy, although animal research suggests that such links are likely. Further research is needed into the relationship between stress and seizures and into interventions designed to reduce perceived stress and improve quality of life with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. SozRank: A new approach for localizing the epileptic seizure onset zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murin, Yonathan; Kim, Jeremy; Parvizi, Josef; Goldsmith, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting about 1% of the world population. For patients with focal seizures that cannot be treated with antiepileptic drugs, the common treatment is a surgical procedure for removal of the seizure onset zone (SOZ). In this work we introduce an algorithm for automatic localization of the seizure onset zone (SOZ) in epileptic patients based on electrocorticography (ECoG) recordings. The proposed algorithm builds upon the hypothesis that the abnormal excessive (or synchronous) neuronal activity in the brain leading to seizures starts in the SOZ and then spreads to other areas in the brain. Thus, when this abnormal activity starts, signals recorded at electrodes close to the SOZ should have a relatively large causal influence on the rest of the recorded signals. The SOZ localization is executed in two steps. First, the algorithm represents the set of electrodes using a directed graph in which nodes correspond to recording electrodes and the edges' weights quantify the pair-wise causal influence between the recorded signals. Then, the algorithm infers the SOZ from the estimated graph using a variant of the PageRank algorithm followed by a novel post-processing phase. Inference results for 19 patients show a close match between the SOZ inferred by the proposed approach and the SOZ estimated by expert neurologists (success rate of 17 out of 19).

  9. SozRank: A new approach for localizing the epileptic seizure onset zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonathan Murin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting about 1% of the world population. For patients with focal seizures that cannot be treated with antiepileptic drugs, the common treatment is a surgical procedure for removal of the seizure onset zone (SOZ. In this work we introduce an algorithm for automatic localization of the seizure onset zone (SOZ in epileptic patients based on electrocorticography (ECoG recordings. The proposed algorithm builds upon the hypothesis that the abnormal excessive (or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain leading to seizures starts in the SOZ and then spreads to other areas in the brain. Thus, when this abnormal activity starts, signals recorded at electrodes close to the SOZ should have a relatively large causal influence on the rest of the recorded signals. The SOZ localization is executed in two steps. First, the algorithm represents the set of electrodes using a directed graph in which nodes correspond to recording electrodes and the edges' weights quantify the pair-wise causal influence between the recorded signals. Then, the algorithm infers the SOZ from the estimated graph using a variant of the PageRank algorithm followed by a novel post-processing phase. Inference results for 19 patients show a close match between the SOZ inferred by the proposed approach and the SOZ estimated by expert neurologists (success rate of 17 out of 19.

  10. Epileptic seizures, coma and EEG burst-suppression from suicidal bupropion intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Anna Hiro; Schu, Ulrich; Maier, Tanja; Knake, Susanne; Rosenow, Felix

    2017-03-01

    Bupropion, an amphetamine-like dual mechanism drug, is approved and increasingly used for the treatment of major depression, and its use is associated with a dose-dependent risk of epileptic seizures. Suicide attempts are frequent in major depression and often an overdose of the drugs available is ingested. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the clinical course, including EEG and neurological symptoms, as well as treatment and prognosis of bupropion intoxication. We report on the clinical and EEG course of a women who ingested 27 g of bupropion in a suicide attempt. Myoclonic seizures were followed by generalized tonic-clonic seizures and coma associated with EEG burst-suppression and brief tonic seizures. Active carbon and neuro-intensive care treatment, including respiratory support, were given. Within three days, the patient returned to a stable clinical condition with a mildly encephalopathic EEG. In conclusion, bupropion intoxication requires acute intensive care treatment and usually has a good prognosis, however, misinterpretation of the clinical and EEG presentation may lead to errors in management.

  11. Epileptic Seizure Detection with Log-Euclidean Gaussian Kernel-Based Sparse Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shasha; Zhou, Weidong; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Yanli

    2016-05-01

    Epileptic seizure detection plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy and reducing the massive workload of reviewing electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. In this work, a novel algorithm is developed to detect seizures employing log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based sparse representation (SR) in long-term EEG recordings. Unlike the traditional SR for vector data in Euclidean space, the log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based SR framework is proposed for seizure detection in the space of the symmetric positive definite (SPD) matrices, which form a Riemannian manifold. Since the Riemannian manifold is nonlinear, the log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel function is applied to embed it into a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) for performing SR. The EEG signals of all channels are divided into epochs and the SPD matrices representing EEG epochs are generated by covariance descriptors. Then, the testing samples are sparsely coded over the dictionary composed by training samples utilizing log-Euclidean Gaussian kernel-based SR. The classification of testing samples is achieved by computing the minimal reconstructed residuals. The proposed method is evaluated on the Freiburg EEG dataset of 21 patients and shows its notable performance on both epoch-based and event-based assessments. Moreover, this method handles multiple channels of EEG recordings synchronously which is more speedy and efficient than traditional seizure detection methods.

  12. Historic, clinical, and prognostic features of epileptic encephalopathies caused by CDKL5 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Brian D; Dhamija, Radhika; Wirrell, Elaine C; Nickels, Katherine C

    2012-02-01

    Mutations within the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene are important causes of early-onset epileptic encephalopathies. We sought to determine the historic, clinical, and prognostic features of epilepsy secondary to CDKL5 mutations. We performed retrospective chart reviews of children at our institution with epilepsy and CDKL5 mutations. Six children were identified. One manifested a deletion in exons 10-15 of the CDKL5 gene, another manifested a single base-pair duplication in exon 3, and the rest manifested base-pair exchanges. The mean age of seizure onset was 1.8 months (range, 1-3 months). Although the majority (4/6, 67%) presented with partial-onset seizures, all children developed infantile spasms. All children demonstrated developmental delay and visual impairment. Although such mutations are X-linked, two children were boys. They did not present with more severe phenotypes than their female counterparts. Despite trials of antiepileptic drugs (mean, 5; range, 3-7), steroids/adrenocorticotropic hormone (4/6; 67%), and the ketogenic diet (6/6; 100%), all children manifested refractory seizures at last follow-up. Although no treatment eliminated seizures, topiramate, vigabatrin, and the ketogenic diet were most helpful at reducing seizure frequency. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MICROARRAY PROFILE OF SEIZURE DAMAGE-REFRACTORY HIPPOCAMPAL CA3 IN A MOUSE MODEL OF EPILEPTIC PRECONDITIONING

    OpenAIRE

    HATAZAKI, S.; BELLVER-ESTELLES, C.; JIMENEZ-MATEOS, E. M.; MELLER, R.; BONNER, C.; MURPHY, N.; MATSUSHIMA, S.; TAKI, W.; PREHN, J. H. M.; SIMON, R. P.; HENSHALL, D. C.

    2007-01-01

    A neuroprotected state can be acquired by preconditioning brain with a stimulus that is subthreshold for damage (tolerance). Acquisition of tolerance involves coordinate, bi-directional changes to gene expression levels and the re-programmed phenotype is determined by the preconditioning stimulus. While best studied in ischemic brain there is evidence brief seizures can confer tolerance against prolonged seizures (status epilepticus). Presently, we developed a model of epileptic preconditioni...

  14. Automatic detection of epileptic seizures on the intra-cranial electroencephalogram of rats using reservoir computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buteneers, Pieter; Verstraeten, David; van Mierlo, Pieter; Wyckhuys, Tine; Stroobandt, Dirk; Raedt, Robrecht; Hallez, Hans; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we propose a technique based on reservoir computing (RC) to mark epileptic seizures on the intra-cranial electroencephalogram (EEG) of rats. RC is a recurrent neural networks training technique which has been shown to possess good generalization properties with limited training. The system is evaluated on data containing two different seizure types: absence seizures from genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) and tonic-clonic seizures from kainate-induced temporal-lobe epilepsy rats. The dataset consists of 452hours from 23 GAERS and 982hours from 15 kainate-induced temporal-lobe epilepsy rats. During the preprocessing stage, several features are extracted from the EEG. A feature selection algorithm selects the best features, which are then presented as input to the RC-based classification algorithm. To classify the output of this algorithm a two-threshold technique is used. This technique is compared with other state-of-the-art techniques. A balanced error rate (BER) of 3.7% and 3.5% was achieved on the data from GAERS and kainate rats, respectively. This resulted in a sensitivity of 96% and 94% and a specificity of 96% and 99% respectively. The state-of-the-art technique for GAERS achieved a BER of 4%, whereas the best technique to detect tonic-clonic seizures achieved a BER of 16%. Our method outperforms up-to-date techniques and only a few parameters need to be optimized on a limited training set. It is therefore suited as an automatic aid for epilepsy researchers and is able to eliminate the tedious manual review and annotation of EEG. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Affective disorders and functional (non-epileptic) seizures in persons with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith A; Macfarlane, Matthew D; Looi, Jeffrey Cl

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to describe the prevalence, assessment and management of affective disorders as well as functional (non-epileptic) seizures in people with epilepsy. This paper comprises a selective review of the literature of the common affective manifestations of epilepsy. Affective disorders are the most common psychiatric comorbidity seen in people with epilepsy and assessment and management parallels that of the general population. Additionally, people with epilepsy may experience higher rates of mood instability, irritability and euphoria, classified together as a group, interictal dysphoric disorder and resembling an unstable bipolar Type II disorder. Functional seizures present unique challenges in terms of identification of the disorder and a lack of specific management. Given their high prevalence, it is important to be able to recognise affective disorders in people with epilepsy. Management principles parallel those in the general population with specific caution exercised regarding the potential interactions between antidepressant medications and antiepileptic drugs. Functional seizures are more complex and require a coordinated approach involving neurologists, psychiatrists, general practitioners, nursing and allied health. There is very limited evidence to guide psychological and behavioural interventions for neurotic disorders in epilepsy and much more research is needed. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  16. Epileptic seizure detection from EEG signals with phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupling and support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiang; Cai, Lihui; Chen, Yingyuan; Qin, Yingmei

    2018-03-01

    As a pattern of cross-frequency coupling (CFC), phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) depicts the interaction between the phase and amplitude of distinct frequency bands from the same signal, and has been proved to be closely related to the brain’s cognitive and memory activities. This work utilized PAC and support vector machine (SVM) classifier to identify the epileptic seizures from electroencephalogram (EEG) data. The entropy-based modulation index (MI) matrixes are used to express the strength of PAC, from which we extracted features as the input for classifier. Based on the Bonn database, which contains five datasets of EEG segments obtained from healthy volunteers and epileptic subjects, a 100% classification accuracy is achieved for identifying seizure ictal from healthy data, and an accuracy of 97.67% is reached in the classification of ictal EEG signals from inter-ictal EEGs. Based on the CHB-MIT database which is a group of continuously recorded epileptic EEGs by scalp electrodes, a 97.50% classification accuracy is obtained and a raising sign of MI value is found at 6s before seizure onset. The classification performance in this work is effective, and PAC can be considered as a useful tool for detecting and predicting the epileptic seizures and providing reference for clinical diagnosis.

  17. [Clinical practice guidelines of the Andalusian Epilepsy Society on prophylaxis and treatment of acute symptomatic epileptic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadé-Cerdá, J M; Gascón-Jiménez, F J; Ramos-Lizana, J; Sánchez-Alvarez, J C; Serrano-Castro, P J

    Antiepileptic drugs (AED) have traditionally been used empirically to prevent the presentation of epileptic seizures in patients with acute brain disorders during the early or late phase. However, AED are not free of serious drawbacks, which means that their use should be based on solid scientific foundations. Our aim is to produce a set of practice guidelines based on explicit evidence about when prophylactic treatment with AED is indicated and the length of time it should be continued in acute symptomatic seizures (ASS). A selective search for quality scientific information on the subject was conducted on PubMed-Medline, Tripdatabase and the Biblioteca Cochrane Plus. The authors discussed and analysed the references that were selected and any recommendations that could be drawn from them were collected. A total of 14 primary documents and eight practice guidelines, protocols or experts' recommendations were identified. Our recommendations were explicitly included at the end of the document. The Andalusian Epilepsy Society makes the following recommendations: a) AED must only be used for the primary prevention of ASS in severe traumatic brain injury and as secondary prevention of new ASS due to other causes of acute brain damage; b) duration of treatment of ASS must not exceed the time needed to resolve the cause that gave rise to them; and c) benzodiazepines are the preferred drugs for use in the treatment of ASS due to alcohol withdrawal and magnesium sulphate for the ASS of eclampsia.

  18. Are psychogenic non-epileptic seizures just another symptom of conversion disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaan, Richard A A; Duncan, Roderick; Goldstein, Laura H; Jankovic, Joseph; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2017-05-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are classified with other functional neurological symptoms as 'Conversion Disorder', but there are reasons to wonder whether this symptomatology constitutes a distinct entity. We reviewed the literature comparing PNES with other functional neurological symptoms. We find eight studies that directly examined this question. Though all but one found significant differences-notably in presenting age, trauma history, and dissociation-they were divided on whether these differences represented an important distinction. We argue that the aetiological and mechanistic distinctions they support, particularly when bolstered by additional data, give reason to sustain a separation between these conditions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. The effect of epileptic seizures on proton MRS visible neurochemical concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simister, Robert J; McLean, Mary A; Salmenpera, Tuuli M; Barker, Gareth J; Duncan, John S

    2008-09-01

    To investigate post-ictal changes in cerebral metabolites. We performed a longitudinal quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study in 10 patients with epilepsy and 10 control subjects. The patients were studied on two occasions: immediately following a seizure, and on a second occasion at least 7h after the most recent seizure. Each study measured N-acetyl aspartate plus N-acetyl aspartyl glutamate (NAAt), Creatine plus phosphocreatine (Cr), Choline containing compounds (Cho) and glutamate plus glutamine (GLX) concentrations using a short-echo time sequence (TE=30ms), and NAAt, Cr and lactate using a second sequence with longer echo time (TE=144ms). The control group was studied on two occasions using the same sequences. No inter-scan differences were observed for the control group. NAAt and NAAt/Cr levels were lower in the patient group at both measured TEs but did not change significantly between studies. The ratio of Cr at TE 144ms to TE 30ms (Cr(144)/Cr(30)) and GLX/Cr were higher and Cho lower in the post-ictal scan compared to the inter-ictal study. Change in Cr(144)/Cr(30) and NAAt(144)/Cr(144) correlated with the post-ictal interval. Lactate measurement at longer TE was not informative. Proton MRS is sensitive to metabolite changes following epileptic seizures within the immediate post-ictal period. The ratio Cr(144)/Cr(30) is the most sensitive measure of metabolic disturbance and is highest in the post-ictal period but appears to normalise within 2h of the most recent seizure.

  20. Ngram-derived pattern recognition for the detection and prediction of epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Eftekhar

    Full Text Available This work presents a new method that combines symbol dynamics methodologies with an Ngram algorithm for the detection and prediction of epileptic seizures. The presented approach specifically applies Ngram-based pattern recognition, after data pre-processing, with similarity metrics, including the Hamming distance and Needlman-Wunsch algorithm, for identifying unique patterns within epochs of time. Pattern counts within each epoch are used as measures to determine seizure detection and prediction markers. Using 623 hours of intracranial electrocorticogram recordings from 21 patients containing a total of 87 seizures, the sensitivity and false prediction/detection rates of this method are quantified. Results are quantified using individual seizures within each case for training of thresholds and prediction time windows. The statistical significance of the predictive power is further investigated. We show that the method presented herein, has significant predictive power in up to 100% of temporal lobe cases, with sensitivities of up to 70-100% and low false predictions (dependant on training procedure. The cases of highest false predictions are found in the frontal origin with 0.31-0.61 false predictions per hour and with significance in 18 out of 21 cases. On average, a prediction sensitivity of 93.81% and false prediction rate of approximately 0.06 false predictions per hour are achieved in the best case scenario. This compares to previous work utilising the same data set that has shown sensitivities of up to 40-50% for a false prediction rate of less than 0.15/hour.

  1. Controlled test for predictive power of Lyapunov exponents: their inability to predict epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ying-Cheng; Harrison, Mary Ann F; Frei, Mark G; Osorio, Ivan

    2004-09-01

    Lyapunov exponents are a set of fundamental dynamical invariants characterizing a system's sensitive dependence on initial conditions. For more than a decade, it has been claimed that the exponents computed from electroencephalogram (EEG) or electrocorticogram (ECoG) signals can be used for prediction of epileptic seizures minutes or even tens of minutes in advance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the predictive power of Lyapunov exponents. Three approaches are employed. (1) We present qualitative arguments suggesting that the Lyapunov exponents generally are not useful for seizure prediction. (2) We construct a two-dimensional, nonstationary chaotic map with a parameter slowly varying in a range containing a crisis, and test whether this critical event can be predicted by monitoring the evolution of finite-time Lyapunov exponents. This can thus be regarded as a "control test" for the claimed predictive power of the exponents for seizure. We find that two major obstacles arise in this application: statistical fluctuations of the Lyapunov exponents due to finite time computation and noise from the time series. We show that increasing the amount of data in a moving window will not improve the exponents' detective power for characteristic system changes, and that the presence of small noise can ruin completely the predictive power of the exponents. (3) We report negative results obtained from ECoG signals recorded from patients with epilepsy. All these indicate firmly that, the use of Lyapunov exponents for seizure prediction is practically impossible as the brain dynamical system generating the ECoG signals is more complicated than low-dimensional chaotic systems, and is noisy. Copyright 2004 American Institute of Physics

  2. A Case of Habitual Neck Compression Induced Electroencephalogram Abnormalities: Differentiating from Epileptic Seizures Using a Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hongyoon; Seo, Minseok; Lee, Hoyoung; Kim, Youngsoo; Yun, Changho; Kim, Sangeun; Park, Sungho [Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Self-induced hypoxia has been reported particularly in adolescents, and it can result in neurological injury. Here, we present a case of electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities induced by habitual neck compression differentiated from epileptic seizures by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT. A 19-year-old male was admitted for evaluation of recurrent generalized tonic-clonic seizures. No interictal EEG abnormality was detected; however, abnormal slow delta waves were found immediately after habitual right neck compression. To differentiate EEG abnormalities due to a hemodynamic deficit induced by habitual neck compression from an epileptic seizure, Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT was performed immediately after right carotid artery compression. Abnormal delta waves were triggered, and cerebral hypoperfusion in the right internal carotid artery territory was detected on Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT. The slow delta wave detected on the EEG resulted from the cerebral hypoperfusion because of the habitual neck compression.

  3. An integrative view of mechanisms underlying generalized spike-and-wave epileptic seizures and its implication on optimal therapeutic treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyuan Yan

    Full Text Available Many types of epileptic seizures are characterized by generalized spike-and-wave discharges. In the past, notable effort has been devoted to understanding seizure dynamics and various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the underlying mechanisms. In this paper, by taking an integrative view of the underlying mechanisms, we demonstrate that epileptic seizures can be generated by many different combinations of synaptic strengths and intrinsic membrane properties. This integrative view has important medical implications: the specific state of a patient characterized by a set of biophysical characteristics ultimately determines the optimal therapeutic treatment. Through the same view, we further demonstrate the potentiation effect of rational polypharmacy in the treatment of epilepsy and provide a new angle to resolve the debate on polypharmacy. Our results underscore the need for personalized medicine and demonstrate that computer modeling and simulation may play an important role in assisting the clinicians in selecting the optimal treatment on an individual basis.

  4. A Case of Habitual Neck Compression Induced Electroencephalogram Abnormalities: Differentiating from Epileptic Seizures Using a Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hongyoon; Seo, Minseok; Lee, Hoyoung; Kim, Youngsoo; Yun, Changho; Kim, Sangeun; Park, Sungho

    2014-01-01

    Self-induced hypoxia has been reported particularly in adolescents, and it can result in neurological injury. Here, we present a case of electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities induced by habitual neck compression differentiated from epileptic seizures by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT. A 19-year-old male was admitted for evaluation of recurrent generalized tonic-clonic seizures. No interictal EEG abnormality was detected; however, abnormal slow delta waves were found immediately after habitual right neck compression. To differentiate EEG abnormalities due to a hemodynamic deficit induced by habitual neck compression from an epileptic seizure, Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT was performed immediately after right carotid artery compression. Abnormal delta waves were triggered, and cerebral hypoperfusion in the right internal carotid artery territory was detected on Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT. The slow delta wave detected on the EEG resulted from the cerebral hypoperfusion because of the habitual neck compression

  5. Automatic epileptic seizure detection in EEGs using MF-DFA, SVM based on cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongnan; Wen, Tingxi; Huang, Wei; Wang, Meihong; Li, Chunfeng

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disease with transient brain dysfunction that results from the sudden abnormal discharge of neurons in the brain. Since electroencephalogram (EEG) is a harmless and noninvasive detection method, it plays an important role in the detection of neurological diseases. However, the process of analyzing EEG to detect neurological diseases is often difficult because the brain electrical signals are random, non-stationary and nonlinear. In order to overcome such difficulty, this study aims to develop a new computer-aided scheme for automatic epileptic seizure detection in EEGs based on multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) and support vector machine (SVM). New scheme first extracts features from EEG by MF-DFA during the first stage. Then, the scheme applies a genetic algorithm (GA) to calculate parameters used in SVM and classify the training data according to the selected features using SVM. Finally, the trained SVM classifier is exploited to detect neurological diseases. The algorithm utilizes MLlib from library of SPARK and runs on cloud platform. Applying to a public dataset for experiment, the study results show that the new feature extraction method and scheme can detect signals with less features and the accuracy of the classification reached up to 99%. MF-DFA is a promising approach to extract features for analyzing EEG, because of its simple algorithm procedure and less parameters. The features obtained by MF-DFA can represent samples as well as traditional wavelet transform and Lyapunov exponents. GA can always find useful parameters for SVM with enough execution time. The results illustrate that the classification model can achieve comparable accuracy, which means that it is effective in epileptic seizure detection.

  6. ABC optimized RBF network for classification of EEG signal for epileptic seizure identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Satapathy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The brain signals usually generate certain electrical signals that can be recorded and analyzed for detection in several brain disorder diseases. These small signals are expressly called as Electroencephalogram (EEG signals. This research work analyzes the epileptic disorder in human brain through EEG signal analysis by integrating the best attributes of Artificial Bee Colony (ABC and radial basis function networks (RBFNNs. We have used Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT technique for extraction of potential features from the signal. In our study, for classification of these signals, in this paper, the RBFNNs have been trained by a modified version of ABC algorithm. In the modified ABC, the onlooker bees are selected based on binary tournament unlike roulette wheel selection of ABC. Additionally, kernels such as Gaussian, Multi-quadric, and Inverse-multi-quadric are used for measuring the effectiveness of the method in numerous mixtures of healthy segments, seizure-free segments, and seizure segments. Our experimental outcomes confirm that RBFNN with inverse-multi-quadric kernel trained with modified ABC is significantly better than RBFNNs with other kernels trained by ABC and modified ABC.

  7. Spectral bandwidth of interictal fast epileptic activity characterizes the seizure onset zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Heers

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The foremost aim of presurgical epilepsy evaluation is the delineation of the seizure onset zone (SOZ. There is increasing evidence that fast epileptic activity (FEA, 14–250 Hz occurring interictally, i.e. between seizures, is predominantly localized within the SOZ. Currently it is unknown, which frequency band of FEA performs best in identifying the SOZ, although prior studies suggest highest concordance of spectral changes with the SOZ for high frequency changes. We suspected that FEA reflects dampened oscillations in local cortical excitatory-inhibitory neural networks, and that interictal FEA in the SOZ is a consequence of reduced oscillatory damping. We therefore predict a narrowing of the spectral bandwidth alongside increased amplitudes of spectral peaks during interictal FEA events. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated spectral changes during interictal FEA in invasive EEG (iEEG recordings of 13 patients with focal epilepsy. In relative spectra of beta and gamma band changes (14–250 Hz during FEA, we found that spectral peaks within the SOZ indeed were significantly more narrow-banded and their power changes were significantly higher than outside the SOZ. In contrast, the peak frequency did not differ within and outside the SOZ. Our results show that bandwidth and power changes of spectral modulations during FEA both help localizing the SOZ. We propose the spectral bandwidth as new source of information for the evaluation of EEG data.

  8. Repeat interruptions in spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 expansions are strongly associated with epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Karen N.; Liu, Jilin; Landrian, Ivette; Zeng, Desmond; Raskin, Salmo; Moscovich, Mariana; Gatto, Emilia M.; Ochoa, Adriana; Teive, Hélio A. G.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder, is the result of a non-coding, pentanucleotide repeat expansion within intron 9 of the Ataxin 10 gene. SCA10 patients present with pure cerebellar ataxia; yet, some families also have a high incidence of epilepsy. SCA10 expansions containing penta- and heptanucleotide interruption motifs, termed “ATCCT interruptions,” experience large contractions during germline transmission, particularly in paternal lineages. At the same time, these alleles confer an earlier age at onset which contradicts traditional rules of genetic anticipation in repeat expansions. Previously, ATCCT interruptions have been associated with a higher prevalence of epileptic seizures in one Mexican-American SCA10 family. In a large cohort of SCA10 families, we analyzed whether ATCCT interruptions confers a greater risk for developing seizures in these families. Notably, we find that the presence of repeat interruptions within the SCA10 expansion confers a 6.3-fold increase in the risk of an SCA10 patient developing epilepsy (6.2-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only) and a 13.7-fold increase in having a positive family history of epilepsy (10.5-fold when considering patients of Mexican ancestry only). We conclude that the presence of repeat interruptions in SCA10 repeat expansion indicates a significant risk for the epilepsy phenotype and should be considered during genetic counseling. PMID:24318420

  9. [A modified approach to the diagnosis and therapy of epileptic seizures in the third stage of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavranović, Muhamed; Delilović, Jasminka; Kurtović, Azra; Alibegović, Sakib; Rajić, Zeljka; Ajanović, Zakira

    2003-01-01

    Incidence of seizures in the elderly is nowadays greater than the one characteristic for children up to 10 years of age. Epileptic seizures are the third most common serious neurological disorder in this age group, after stroke and dementia. Optimal care for those patients, regarding to the seizures, demands some modification in diagnostic and treatment approach. Aim of this report was to point out problems in diagnostics, treatment and most common mistakes in practice. Fifty one patients were assessed, aged 65-83 years, (30 female and 21 male), with diagnosis of epilepsy and established antiepileptic treatment. All patients were re-examined, and following procedures were utilised: auto and heteroanamnesis (especially data provided by eyewitnesses), clinical examination, biochemical status, complete cardiological examination, EEG registration, serum concentrations of antiepileptic drugs, CT and MRI scan. Out of 51 patients 11 were misdiagnosed (syncope, provoked seizures, TIA). The most common form of seizures were partial seizures with or without secondary generalization (31 cases). Etiologic factors: stroke (25 cases), arteriosclerosis (7 cases), tumours (3 cases), trauma (2 cases), unknown (3 cases) cardiovascular diseases (29 casec) diabetes mellitus (20 cases), respiratory disturbance (12 cases) renal disturbances (8 cases). Only 30 patients had monotherapy from the beginning, with either carbamazepine or valproate. Rest were treated from the beginning with 2 antiepileptic drugs (phenobarbital + carbamazepine or pheytoin + phenobarbital). Adverse effects were recorded in 21 patients. I. It is crucial to distingiush unprovoked and provoked seizures during diagnostic procedures, as well as epileptic and non-epileptic attacks; 2. Principle of monotherapy is conditio sine qua non, and in treatment attention should be paid to co-morbidity, multitherapy, drug interactions, intoxication, diminished detoxication and elimination of drugs, as well as increased

  10. Causes of mortality in early infantile epileptic encephalopathy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, Graciane; de Souza Santos, Francisco; Borelli, Wyllians Vendramini; Pisani, Leonardo; Nunes, Magda Lahorgue; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; da Costa, Jaderson Costa

    2018-06-12

    Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy syndrome (EIEE), also known as Ohtahara syndrome, is an age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy syndrome defined by clinical features and electroencephalographic findings. Epileptic disorders with refractory seizures beginning in the neonatal period and/or early infancy have a potential risk of premature mortality, including sudden death. We aimed to identify the causes of death in EIEE and conducted a literature survey of fatal outcomes. We performed a literature search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science for data from inception until September 2017. The terms "death sudden," "unexplained death," "SUDEP," "lethal," and "fatal" and the medical subject heading terms "epileptic encephalopathy," "mortality," "death," "sudden infant death syndrome," and "human" were used in the search strategy. The EIEE case report studies reporting mortality were included. The search yielded 1360 articles. After screening for titles and abstracts and removing duplicate entries, full texts of 15 articles were reviewed. After reading full texts, 11 articles met the inclusion criteria (9 articles in English and 2 in Japanese, dated from 1976 to 2015). The review comprised 38 unique cases of EIEE, 17 of which had death as an outcome. In all cases, the suppression-burst pattern on electroencephalographies (EEGs) was common. Most cases (55%) involved male infants. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) age at onset of seizure was 19.6 ± 33 days. The mean (SD) age at death was 12.9 ± 14.1 months. Most infants (58.8%) survived less than one year. The cause of death was described only in eight (47%) patients; the cause was pneumonia/respiratory illness or sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). The results show EIEE as a severe disease associated with a premature mortality, evidenced by a very young age at death. Increasing interest in the detection of new molecular bases of EIEE is leading us to a better understanding of this severe

  11. Two cases of childhood narcolepsy mimicking epileptic seizures in video-EEG/EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagishita, Tomoe; Ito, Susumu; Ohtani, Yui; Eto, Kaoru; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Oguni, Hirokazu; Nagata, Satoru

    2018-06-06

    Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive sleepiness, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis, and can occur with or without cataplexy. Here, we report two children with narcolepsy presenting with cataplexy mimicking epileptic seizures as determined by long-term video-electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) monitoring. Case 1 was a 15-year-old girl presenting with recurrent episodes of "convulsions" and loss of consciousness, who was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of epilepsy showing "convulsions" and "complex partial seizures". The long-term video-polygraph showed a clonic attack lasting for 15 s, which corresponded to 1-2 Hz with interruption of mentalis EMG discharges lasting for 70-300 ms without any EEG changes. Narcolepsy was suspected due to the attack induced by hearty laughs and the presence of sleep attacks, and confirmed by low orexin levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Case 2 was an 11-year-old girl presenting with recurrent episodes of myoclonic attacks simultaneously with dropping objects immediately after hearty laughs, in addition to sleep attacks, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. The long-term video-polygraph showed a subtle attack, characterized by dropping chopsticks from her hand, which corresponded to an interruption of ongoing deltoid EMG discharges lasting 140 ms without any EEG changes. A diagnosis of narcolepsy was confirmed by the low orexin levels in CSF. These cases demonstrate that children with narcolepsy may have attacks of cataplexy that resemble clonic or myoclonic seizures. Copyright © 2018 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wake up between them. Seizures can have many causes, including medicines, high fevers, head injuries and certain diseases. People who have recurring seizures due to a brain disorder have epilepsy. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  13. CDKL5 mutations cause infantile spasms, early onset seizures, and severe mental retardation in female patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, H L; Evans, J; Edwards, S; Colley, J; Newbury‐Ecob, R; O'Callaghan, F; Huyton, M; O'Regan, M; Tolmie, J; Sampson, J; Clarke, A; Osborne, J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency of mutations in CDKL5 in both male and female patients with infantile spasms or early onset epilepsy of unknown cause, and to consider whether the breadth of the reported phenotype would be extended by studying a different patient group. Methods Two groups of patients were investigated for CDKL5 mutations. Group 1 comprised 73 patients (57 female, 16 male) referred to Cardiff for CDKL5 analysis, of whom 49 (42 female, 7 male) had epileptic seizure onset in the first six months of life. Group 2 comprised 26 patients (11 female, 15 male) with infantile spasms previously recruited to a clinical trial, the UK Infantile Spasms Study. Where a likely pathogenic mutation was identified, further clinical data were reviewed. Results Seven likely pathogenic mutations were found among female patients from group 1 with epileptic seizure onset in the first six months of life, accounting for seven of the 42 in this group (17%). No mutations other than the already published mutation were found in female patients from group 2, or in any male patient from either study group. All patients with mutations had early signs of developmental delay and most had made little developmental progress. Further clinical information was available for six patients: autistic features and tactile hypersensitivity were common but only one had suggestive Rett‐like features. All had a severe epileptic seizure disorder, all but one of whom had myoclonic jerks. The EEG showed focal or generalised changes and in those with infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia. Slow frequencies were seen frequently with a frontal or fronto‐temporal predominance and high amplitudes. Conclusions The spectrum of the epileptic seizure disorder, and associated EEG changes, in those with CDKL5 mutations is broader than previously reported. CDKL5 mutations are a significant cause of infantile spasms and early epileptic seizures in female patients, and of a later intractable seizure disorder

  14. Microarray profile of seizure damage-refractory hippocampal CA3 in a mouse model of epileptic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatazaki, S; Bellver-Estelles, C; Jimenez-Mateos, E M; Meller, R; Bonner, C; Murphy, N; Matsushima, S; Taki, W; Prehn, J H M; Simon, R P; Henshall, D C

    2007-12-05

    A neuroprotected state can be acquired by preconditioning brain with a stimulus that is subthreshold for damage (tolerance). Acquisition of tolerance involves coordinate, bi-directional changes to gene expression levels and the re-programmed phenotype is determined by the preconditioning stimulus. While best studied in ischemic brain there is evidence brief seizures can confer tolerance against prolonged seizures (status epilepticus). Presently, we developed a model of epileptic preconditioning in mice and used microarrays to gain insight into the transcriptional phenotype within the target hippocampus at the time tolerance had been acquired. Epileptic tolerance was induced by an episode of non-damaging seizures in adult C57Bl/6 mice using a systemic injection of kainic acid. Neuron and DNA damage-positive cell counts 24 h after status epilepticus induced by intraamygdala microinjection of kainic acid revealed preconditioning given 24 h prior reduced CA3 neuronal death by approximately 45% compared with non-tolerant seizure mice. Microarray analysis of over 39,000 transcripts (Affymetrix 430 2.0 chip) from microdissected CA3 subfields was undertaken at the point at which tolerance was acquired. Results revealed a unique profile of small numbers of equivalently up- and down-regulated genes with biological functions that included transport and localization, ubiquitin metabolism, apoptosis and cell cycle control. Select microarray findings were validated post hoc by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The present study defines a paradigm for inducing epileptic preconditioning in mice and first insight into the global transcriptome of the seizure-damage refractory brain.

  15. The role of driver nodes in managing epileptic seizures: Application of Kuramoto model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Ali; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar; Bakouie, Fatemeh

    2017-04-21

    Synchronization is an important global phenomenon which could be found in a wide range of complex systems such as brain or electronic devices. However, in some circumstances the synchronized states are not desirable for the system and should be suppressed. For example, excessively synchronized activities in the brain network could be the root of neuronal disorders like epileptic seizures. According to the controllability theory of the complex networks, a minimum set of driver nodes has the ability to control the entire system. In this study, we examine the role of driver nodes in suppressing the excessive synchronization in a generalized Kuramoto model, which consists of two types of oscillators: contrarian and regular ones. We used two different structural topologies: Barabási-Albert scale-free (BASF) network and Caenorhabditis elegans (C.elegans) neuronal network. Our results show that contrarian driver nodes have the sufficient ability to break the synchronized level of the systems. In this case, the system coherency level is not fully suppressed that is avoiding dysfunctions of normal brain functions which require the neuronal synchronized activities. Moreover, in this case, the oscillators grouped in two distinct synchronized clusters that could be an indication of chaotic behavior of the system known as resting-state activity of the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical spectrum of psychogenic non epileptic seizures in children; an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaan, Priyanka; Gulati, Sheffali; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Sapra, Savita; Sagar, Rajesh; Mohammad, Akbar; Pandey, R M; Tripathi, Manjari

    2018-07-01

    The current study was designed to analyze the clinical spectrum of Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) in children. Children aged 6-16years with clinically suspected PNES, confirmed by short-term VEEG (STVEEG{video electroencephalogram}) and induction were classified as per Seneviratne classification. Stressors, associated co morbidities, Verbal IQ (Intelligence Quotient) and behavioral abnormalities were assessed using HTP(House tree person) test, DSM IV (Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders) TR criteria, MISIC (Malin intelligence scale for Indian children) and CBCL (Child behaviour checklist). Eighty children with PNES {45 boys; mean age: 10.5 (±1.6) years} were enrolled. Median delay in diagnosis was 5 months {IQR(interquartile range)- 0.5 to 48 months}) and 45% patients were already on AEDs (antiepileptic drugs). Commonest semiology was dialeptic (42.5%), followed by mixed (28.8%), motor (15%) and nonepileptic aura (13.8%). Family stressors were the commonest followed by school related issues. The most common psychiatric comorbidity was adjustment disorder. Somatic complaints were observed in 50% children. Dialeptic PNES is commonest in children. In resource constrained settings, STVEEG along with induction is a reliable method to diagnose PNES. A comprehensive assessment protocol (including assessment of stressors) is needed for holistic management of pediatric PNES. Copyright © 2018 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimal Feature Space Selection in Detecting Epileptic Seizure based on Recurrent Quantification Analysis and Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh LAshkari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Selecting optimal features based on nature of the phenomenon and high discriminant ability is very important in the data classification problems. Since it doesn't require any assumption about stationary condition and size of the signal and the noise in Recurrent Quantification Analysis (RQA, it may be useful for epileptic seizure Detection. In this study, RQA was used to discriminate ictal EEG from the normal EEG where optimal features selected by combination of algorithm genetic and Bayesian Classifier. Recurrence plots of hundred samples in each two categories were obtained with five distance norms in this study: Euclidean, Maximum, Minimum, Normalized and Fixed Norm. In order to choose optimal threshold for each norm, ten threshold of ε was generated and then the best feature space was selected by genetic algorithm in combination with a bayesian classifier. The results shown that proposed method is capable of discriminating the ictal EEG from the normal EEG where for Minimum norm and 0.1˂ε˂1, accuracy was 100%. In addition, the sensitivity of proposed framework to the ε and the distance norm parameters was low. The optimal feature presented in this study is Trans which it was selected in most feature spaces with high accuracy.

  18. Fuzzy topological digital space and digital fuzzy spline of electroencephalography during epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mazlina Muzafar; Wahab, Abdul Fatah

    2017-08-01

    Epilepsy disease occurs because of there is a temporary electrical disturbance in a group of brain cells (nurons). The recording of electrical signals come from the human brain which can be collected from the scalp of the head is called Electroencephalography (EEG). EEG then considered in digital format and in fuzzy form makes it a fuzzy digital space data form. The purpose of research is to identify the area (curve and surface) in fuzzy digital space affected by inside epilepsy seizure in epileptic patient's brain. The main focus for this research is to generalize fuzzy topological digital space, definition and basic operation also the properties by using digital fuzzy set and the operations. By using fuzzy digital space, the theory of digital fuzzy spline can be introduced to replace grid data that has been use previously to get better result. As a result, the flat of EEG can be fuzzy topological digital space and this type of data can be use to interpolate the digital fuzzy spline.

  19. Bio-Signal Complexity Analysis in Epileptic Seizure Monitoring: A Topic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenning Mei

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Complexity science has provided new perspectives and opportunities for understanding a variety of complex natural or social phenomena, including brain dysfunctions like epilepsy. By delving into the complexity in electrophysiological signals and neuroimaging, new insights have emerged. These discoveries have revealed that complexity is a fundamental aspect of physiological processes. The inherent nonlinearity and non-stationarity of physiological processes limits the methods based on simpler underlying assumptions to point out the pathway to a more comprehensive understanding of their behavior and relation with certain diseases. The perspective of complexity may benefit both the research and clinical practice through providing novel data analytics tools devoted for the understanding of and the intervention about epilepsies. This review aims to provide a sketchy overview of the methods derived from different disciplines lucubrating to the complexity of bio-signals in the field of epilepsy monitoring. Although the complexity of bio-signals is still not fully understood, bundles of new insights have been already obtained. Despite the promising results about epileptic seizure detection and prediction through offline analysis, we are still lacking robust, tried-and-true real-time applications. Multidisciplinary collaborations and more high-quality data accessible to the whole community are needed for reproducible research and the development of such applications.

  20. Classification of epileptic seizures using wavelet packet log energy and norm entropies with recurrent Elman neural network classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu, S; Sriraam, N; Kumar, G Pradeep

    2017-02-01

    Electroencephalogram shortly termed as EEG is considered as the fundamental segment for the assessment of the neural activities in the brain. In cognitive neuroscience domain, EEG-based assessment method is found to be superior due to its non-invasive ability to detect deep brain structure while exhibiting superior spatial resolutions. Especially for studying the neurodynamic behavior of epileptic seizures, EEG recordings reflect the neuronal activity of the brain and thus provide required clinical diagnostic information for the neurologist. This specific proposed study makes use of wavelet packet based log and norm entropies with a recurrent Elman neural network (REN) for the automated detection of epileptic seizures. Three conditions, normal, pre-ictal and epileptic EEG recordings were considered for the proposed study. An adaptive Weiner filter was initially applied to remove the power line noise of 50 Hz from raw EEG recordings. Raw EEGs were segmented into 1 s patterns to ensure stationarity of the signal. Then wavelet packet using Haar wavelet with a five level decomposition was introduced and two entropies, log and norm were estimated and were applied to REN classifier to perform binary classification. The non-linear Wilcoxon statistical test was applied to observe the variation in the features under these conditions. The effect of log energy entropy (without wavelets) was also studied. It was found from the simulation results that the wavelet packet log entropy with REN classifier yielded a classification accuracy of 99.70 % for normal-pre-ictal, 99.70 % for normal-epileptic and 99.85 % for pre-ictal-epileptic.

  1. The new ILAE report on terminology and concepts for organization of epileptic seizures: a clinician's critical view and contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2011-12-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) standardized classification and terminology for "epileptic seizures" of 1981 and "epilepsies and epileptic syndromes" of 1989 provide a fundamental framework for organizing and differentiating the epilepsies. However, a revision of these classifications is mandated by recent major technologic and scientific advances. Since 1997, the relevant ILAE Commissions have made significant efforts to achieve better and internationally uniform classifications as reflected in their reports of 2001, 2006, and 2010. Their initial aim to construct a "new scientific classification from application of methods used in biology that determines separate species and natural classes" proved elusive and, therefore, the last Commission in their report of 2010 confined their revisions to "new terminology and concepts" instead of "proposing a new classification (in the sense of organization) of epilepsies." It is unfortunate that most of the proposals in this report are modified interpretations and nomenclature of previous ILAE classifications; new terms are not better than the old ones, and recent advances have not been incorporated. Hence, the new ILAE report met with considerable protest from several expert epileptologists. This critical review refers mainly to the epileptic seizures, the classification of which may be an easier and less controversial task in the ILAE revisions. A revised classification should incorporate advanced knowledge of seizure pathophysiology, and clinical, interictal, and ictal manifestations. Such an attempt was made and detailed in the 2006 report of the ILAE Classification Core Group. However, these changes were largely discarded in the new ILAE report of 2010, without justification. This is inexplicable considering that the scientific advances that were available to the two Commissions were the same or had improved between 2006 and 2010. Of major concern is that "No specific classification is recommended for

  2. A prospective observational longitudinal study of new-onset seizures and newly diagnosed epilepsy in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsø, N; Toft, Nils; Sabers, A.

    2017-01-01

    Seizures are common in dogs and can be caused by non-epileptic conditions or epilepsy. The clinical course of newly diagnosed epilepsy is sparsely documented. The objective of this study was to prospectively investigate causes for seizures (epileptic and non-epileptic) in a cohort of dogs with ne...

  3. A Long Short-Term Memory deep learning network for the prediction of epileptic seizures using EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiouris, Κostas Μ; Pezoulas, Vasileios C; Zervakis, Michalis; Konitsiotis, Spiros; Koutsouris, Dimitrios D; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2018-05-17

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) is the most prominent means to study epilepsy and capture changes in electrical brain activity that could declare an imminent seizure. In this work, Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) networks are introduced in epileptic seizure prediction using EEG signals, expanding the use of deep learning algorithms with convolutional neural networks (CNN). A pre-analysis is initially performed to find the optimal architecture of the LSTM network by testing several modules and layers of memory units. Based on these results, a two-layer LSTM network is selected to evaluate seizure prediction performance using four different lengths of preictal windows, ranging from 15 min to 2 h. The LSTM model exploits a wide range of features extracted prior to classification, including time and frequency domain features, between EEG channels cross-correlation and graph theoretic features. The evaluation is performed using long-term EEG recordings from the open CHB-MIT Scalp EEG database, suggest that the proposed methodology is able to predict all 185 seizures, providing high rates of seizure prediction sensitivity and low false prediction rates (FPR) of 0.11-0.02 false alarms per hour, depending on the duration of the preictal window. The proposed LSTM-based methodology delivers a significant increase in seizure prediction performance compared to both traditional machine learning techniques and convolutional neural networks that have been previously evaluated in the literature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. " Blaming, shaming, humiliation": Stigmatising medical interactions among people with non-epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Catherine; Lian, Olaug S

    2017-01-01

    Background : People with non-epileptic seizures (NES) describe challenging relationships with health professionals, and explain negative interactions as common and expected. Despite these difficulties, little is known about how people with NES experience difficult healthcare encounters. Methods : Using a thematic discourse analysis approach, we analysed the free-text survey responses of 135 people with NES and asked: what kind of challenges do people living with this condition encounter when interacting with health professionals, and how do they experience the consequences of difficult interactions? We explore their experiences by interpreting the latent meaning of participants' texts from a social-constructionist perspective on health and illness. Results : The overarching narrative depicts a fundamental breakdown in patient-provider relationships. According to our data, the negative experiences of study participants emerge from more than practitioners' lack of awareness of NES and access to information about the condition - to the extent that it is available. In examining the challenges people with NES encounter when interacting with health professionals, their main experiences centre on blame and humiliation. When exploring their experiences, theories of stigma serve as a useful theoretical framework. Conclusions : Normative judgements arising from psychogenic understandings of NES are stigmatising and restrict professional displays of respectful (patient-centred) care. Those with the condition depict being negatively stereotyped, illegitimated and held morally culpable by health professionals. Perceived to lack medical, moral and credible status, participants describe practitioners who treat them with disrespect, and some recount conduct that defies all ethical and professional obligations and standards. These encounters can have wide-ranging adverse consequences for patients: emotionally, physically, and for their future healthcare. The quality of healthcare

  5. “ Blaming, shaming, humiliation”: Stigmatising medical interactions among people with non-epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Catherine; Lian, Olaug S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with non-epileptic seizures (NES) describe challenging relationships with health professionals, and explain negative interactions as common and expected. Despite these difficulties, little is known about how people with NES experience difficult healthcare encounters. Methods: Using a thematic discourse analysis approach, we analysed the free-text survey responses of 135 people with NES and asked: what kind of challenges do people living with this condition encounter when interacting with health professionals, and how do they experience the consequences of difficult interactions? We explore their experiences by interpreting the latent meaning of participants’ texts from a social-constructionist perspective on health and illness. Results: The overarching narrative depicts a fundamental breakdown in patient-provider relationships. According to our data, the negative experiences of study participants emerge from more than practitioners’ lack of awareness of NES and access to information about the condition - to the extent that it is available. In examining the challenges people with NES encounter when interacting with health professionals, their main experiences centre on blame and humiliation. When exploring their experiences, theories of stigma serve as a useful theoretical framework. Conclusions: Normative judgements arising from psychogenic understandings of NES are stigmatising and restrict professional displays of respectful (patient-centred) care. Those with the condition depict being negatively stereotyped, illegitimated and held morally culpable by health professionals. Perceived to lack medical, moral and credible status, participants describe practitioners who treat them with disrespect, and some recount conduct that defies all ethical and professional obligations and standards. These encounters can have wide-ranging adverse consequences for patients: emotionally, physically, and for their future healthcare. The quality of healthcare

  6. Classification of Focal and Non Focal Epileptic Seizures Using Multi-Features and SVM Classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraam, N; Raghu, S

    2017-09-02

    Identifying epileptogenic zones prior to surgery is an essential and crucial step in treating patients having pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy. Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a significant measurement benchmark to assess patients suffering from epilepsy. This paper investigates the application of multi-features derived from different domains to recognize the focal and non focal epileptic seizures obtained from pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy patients from Bern Barcelona database. From the dataset, five different classification tasks were formed. Total 26 features were extracted from focal and non focal EEG. Significant features were selected using Wilcoxon rank sum test by setting p-value (p z > 1.96) at 95% significance interval. Hypothesis was made that the effect of removing outliers improves the classification accuracy. Turkey's range test was adopted for pruning outliers from feature set. Finally, 21 features were classified using optimized support vector machine (SVM) classifier with 10-fold cross validation. Bayesian optimization technique was adopted to minimize the cross-validation loss. From the simulation results, it was inferred that the highest sensitivity, specificity, and classification accuracy of 94.56%, 89.74%, and 92.15% achieved respectively and found to be better than the state-of-the-art approaches. Further, it was observed that the classification accuracy improved from 80.2% with outliers to 92.15% without outliers. The classifier performance metrics ensures the suitability of the proposed multi-features with optimized SVM classifier. It can be concluded that the proposed approach can be applied for recognition of focal EEG signals to localize epileptogenic zones.

  7. A prospective observational longitudinal study of new-onset seizures and newly diagnosed epilepsy in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsø, N; Toft, Nils; Sabers, A.

    2017-01-01

    Seizures are common in dogs and can be caused by non-epileptic conditions or epilepsy. The clinical course of newly diagnosed epilepsy is sparsely documented. The objective of this study was to prospectively investigate causes for seizures (epileptic and non-epileptic) in a cohort of dogs with new...... structural epilepsy. A non-epileptic cause for seizures was identified in 13 dogs and suspected in 10 dogs. Four dogs in which no cause for seizures was identified experienced only one seizure during the study. In dogs with idiopathic epilepsy 60% had their second epileptic seizure within three months...... seizures motivated early treatment. In a few dogs with a high seizure frequency owners declined treatment against the investigators advice. Epilepsy is the most likely diagnosis in dogs presenting with new-onset seizures. The course of idiopathic epilepsy is highly individual and might not necessarily...

  8. Seizure Recognition and Observation: A Guide for Allied Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epilepsy Foundation of America, Landover, MD.

    Intended for allied health professionals, this guide provides information on seizure recognition and classification to help them assist the patient, the family, and the treating physician in obtaining control of epileptic seizures. A section on seizure recognition describes epilepsy and seizures, covering seizure classification and the causes of…

  9. ‘Transient epileptic amnesia’ : een caus en loteratuuroverzicht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thissen, S.; Vlooswijk, Marielle; Hendriks, M.P.H.; Majoie, Marian

    ‘Transient epileptic amnesia’ (TEA) wordt gezien als een weinig voorkomende vorm van temporaalkwabepilepsie, gekarakteriseerd door aanvallen van specifieke amnesie door epileptische activiteit (ictaalof postictaal). TEA treft voornamelijk mannen bovende 40 jaar. Aanvallen duren korter dan 60 minuten

  10. The impact of self-efficacy, alexithymia and multiple traumas on posttraumatic stress disorder and psychiatric co-morbidity following epileptic seizures: a moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Man Cheung; Allen, Rachel D; Dennis, Ian

    2013-12-30

    This study investigated the incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychiatric co-morbidity following epileptic seizure, whether alexithymia mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and psychiatric outcomes, and whether the mediational effect was moderated by the severity of PTSD from other traumas. Seventy-one (M=31, F=40) people with a diagnosis of epilepsy recruited from support groups in the United Kingdom completed the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 and the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale. They were compared with 71 people (M=29, F=42) without epilepsy. For people with epilepsy, 51% and 22% met the diagnostic criteria for post-epileptic seizure PTSD and for PTSD following one other traumatic life event respectively. For the control group, 24% met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD following other traumatic life events. The epilepsy group reported significantly more anxiety and depression than the control. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis showed that self-efficacy was significantly correlated with alexithymia, post-epileptic seizure PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Alexithymia was also significantly correlated with post-epileptic seizure PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Mediation analyses confirmed that alexithymia mediated the path between self-efficacy and post-epileptic seizure PTSD and psychiatric co-morbidity. Moderated mediation also confirmed that self-efficacy and PTSD from one other trauma moderated the effect of alexithymia on outcomes. To conclude, people can develop posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and psychiatric co-morbidity following epileptic seizure. These psychiatric outcomes are closely linked with their belief in personal competence to deal with stressful situations and regulate their own functioning, to process rather than defend against distressing emotions, and with the degree of PTSD from other traumas. © 2013 Elsevier

  11. Positron emission tomography in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGonigal A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aileen McGonigal,1–3 Marie Arthuis,3 Jean-Arthur Micoulaud-Franchi,4,5 Fabrice Bartolomei,1–3 Eric Guedj6–8 1Institut de Neurosciences des Systèmes, INSERM UMR 1106, Marseille, France; 2Aix Marseille University, Faculty of Medicine, Marseille, France; 3Clinical Neurophysiology Department, Timone Hospital, Marseille, France; 4Department of Functional Investigation of the Nervous System, Sleep Clinic, Bordeaux University Hospital, Bordeaux, France; 5USR CNRS 3413, University of Bordeaux, France; 6Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine Department, Timone Hospital, Marseille, France; 7Aix-Marseille University, CERIMED, Marseille, France; 8Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, UMR7289, INT, Marseille, FranceWe have read with interest the recent review entitled “Uncovering the etiology of conversion disorder: insights from functional neuroimaging” by Maryam Ejareh dar and Richard AA Kanaan,1 published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. Our paper on resting state brain metabolism measured by positron emission tomography (PET was included and discussed.2 We were most surprised to see that the authors of the review seem to have misunderstood the findings of our study, which concerned patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES. The authors state that the 16 patients included in our study “were later found to have PNES with comorbid epilepsy”. This is incorrect, since our study included only patients with PNES in whom comorbid epilepsy was excluded. This crucial point is indeed detailed in the Methods section of our article and clearly stated in the abstract: “in all patients, the diagnosis was subsequently confirmed to be PNES with no coexisting epilepsy.” It is thus on the basis of incorrect understanding of our results that Drs Ejareh dar and Kanaan discuss the possible significance of hypometabolism in the anterior cingulate region described in our paper, and erroneously suggest that interpretation of PET findings is

  12. Seizure pattern-specific epileptic epoch detection in patients with intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.; Arends, J.B.A.M.; Long, X.; Cluitmans, P.J.M.; van Dijk, J.P.

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) features are crucial for the seizure detection performance. Traditional algorithms are designed for a population with normal brain development. However, for patients with an intellectual disability the seizure detection performance is still largely unknown. In addition,

  13. Adaptive heart rate-based epileptic seizure detection using real-time user feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Cooman, Thomas; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Automated seizure detection in a home environment has been of increased interest the last couple of decades. Heart rate-based seizure detection is a way to detect temporal lobe epilepsy seizures at home, but patient-independent algorithms showed to be insufficiently accurate due to the high patient...... with incorrect user feedback, making it ideal for implementation in a home environment for a seizure warning system....

  14. Epileptic seizure propagation from the second somatic sensory area to the fronto-medial region, by insular redistribution. A case report and a connectome description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balogh Attila

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The seizure propagation phenomenon by inducing remote symptoms brings several difficulties in finding the seizure onset and delineating the epileptic network which should be taken into consideration in epilepsy surgery. By demonstrating a difficult (MRI negative epilepsy surgery case explored with invasive presurgical evaluation we highlight the importance to recognise the secondary sensory area and to explore the the parieto-opercular-insular-medial frontal network in certain cases. A further conclusion is the consideration of the redistributory role of the insula as a special structure in the cerebral connectome, having a role in epileptic network organisation.

  15. Patients with epilepsy and patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: video-EEG, clinical and neuropsychological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Katherine; Piazzini, Ada; Chiesa, Valentina; Barbieri, Valentina; Vignoli, Aglaia; Gardella, Elena; Tisi, Giuseppe; Scarone, Silvio; Canevini, Maria Paola; Gambini, Orsola

    2011-11-01

    The incidence of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) is 4.9/100,000/year and it is estimated that about 20-30% of patients referred to tertiary care epilepsy centers for refractory seizures have both epilepsy and PNES. The purpose of our study is to evaluate psychiatric disorders and neuropsychological functions among patients with PNES, patients with epilepsy associated with PNES and patients with epilepsy. We evaluated 66 consecutive in-patients with video-EEG recordings: 21 patients with epilepsy, 22 patients with PNES and 10 patients with epilepsy associated with PNES; 13 patients were excluded (8 because of mental retardation and 5 because they did not present seizures or PNES during the recording period). All patients with PNES had a psychiatric diagnosis (100%) vs. 52% of patients with epilepsy. Cluster B personality disorders were more common in patients with PNES. We observed fewer mood and anxiety disorders in patients with PNES compared with those with epilepsy. We did not find statistically significant differences in neuropsychological profiles among the 3 patient groups. This study can help to contribute to a better understanding of the impact of PNES manifestations, in addition to the occurrence of seizures, in order to provide patients with more appropriate clinical, psychological and social care. Copyright © 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Phenobarbital administration every eight hours: improvement of seizure management in idiopathic epileptic dogs with decreased phenobarbital elimination half-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabile, F; Barnett, C R; De Risio, L

    2017-02-18

    Estimated prevalence of canine idiopathic epilepsy is 0.6 per cent in the first-opinion canine population in the UK. Phenobarbital monotherapy has been reported to reduce/eradicate seizure activity in 60-93 per cent of idiopathic epileptic dogs (IEDs). The objective of this study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of the administration of phenobarbital orally every eight hours in IEDs with phenobarbital elimination half-life less than 20 hours. Medical records of 10 IEDs in which steady state trough serum phenobarbital levels were within the reference range and phenobarbital elimination half-life had become less than 20 hours following prolonged administration every 12 hours were reviewed. Side effects and seizure frequency when phenobarbital was administered every 12 hours or 8 hours were compared. In all dogs the side effects of the antiepileptic medication treatment improved. When phenobarbital was administered every eight hours, 9/10 dogs experienced improvement in seizure frequency and 8/10 dogs maintained seizure freedom for a period three times longer than the longest interictal interval period previously recorded. Reduction in the severity and number of clusters of seizures was recorded in one of the remaining two dogs. The administration of phenobarbital orally every eight hours in IEDs with decreased phenobarbital elimination half-life appears safe and can improve seizure management. The results of this study were presented in abstract form (poster) for the 28th symposium of the European Society of Veterinary Neurology - European College of Veterinary Neurology (ESVN), September 18-19, 2015, Amsterdam, Netherlands. British Veterinary Association.

  17. Conversation analysis can help to distinguish between epilepsy and non-epileptic seizure disorders: a case comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plug, Leendert; Sharrack, Basil; Reuber, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Factual items in patients' histories are of limited discriminating value in the differential diagnosis of epilepsy and non-epileptic seizures (NES). A number of studies using a transcript-based sociolinguistic research method inspired by Conversation Analysis (CA) suggest that it is helpful to focus on how patients talk. Previous reports communicated these findings by using particularly clear examples of diagnostically relevant interactional, linguistic and topical features from different patients. They did not discuss the sequential display of different features although this is crucially important from a conversation analytic point of view. This case comparison aims to show clinicians how the discriminating features are displayed by individual patients over the course of a clinical encounter. CA-inspired brief sequential analysis of two first 30-min doctor-patient encounters by a linguist blinded to all medical information. A gold standard diagnosis was made by the recording of a typical seizure with video-EEG. The patient with epilepsy volunteered detailed first person accounts of seizures. The NES patient exhibited resistance to focusing on individual seizure episodes and only provided a detailed seizure description after repeated prompting towards the end of the interview. Although both patients also displayed some linguistic features favouring the alternative diagnosis, the linguist's final diagnostic hypothesis matched the diagnosis made by video-EEG in both cases. This study illustrates the importance of the time point at which patients share information with the doctor. It supports the notion that close attention to how patients communicate can help in the differential diagnosis of seizures.

  18. Emotional stimuli-provoked seizures potentially misdiagnosed as psychogenic non-epileptic attacks: A case of temporal lobe epilepsy with amygdala enlargement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetaka Tamune

    Full Text Available The association between emotional stimuli and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is largely unknown. Here, we report the case of a depressed, 50-year-old female complaining of episodes of a “spaced out” experience precipitated by emotional stimuli. Psychogenic non-epileptic attacks were suspected. However, video-EEG coupled with emotional stimuli-provoked procedures and MRI findings of amygdala enlargement, led to the diagnosis of left TLE. Accurate diagnosis and explanation improved her subjective depression and seizure frequency. This case demonstrated that emotional stimuli can provoke seizures in TLE and suggested the involvement of the enlarged amygdala and the modulation of emotion-related neural circuits. Keywords: Video-EEG, Psychogenic non-epileptic attacks, Temporal lobe epilepsy, Amygdala enlargement, Reflex seizure, Provoked seizure

  19. Nonseizure SUDEP: Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy without preceding epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhatoo, Samden D; Nei, Maromi; Raghavan, Manoj; Sperling, Michael; Zonjy, Bilal; Lacuey, Nuria; Devinsky, Orrin

    2016-07-01

    To describe the phenomenology of monitored sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) occurring in the interictal period where death occurs without a seizure preceding it. We report a case series of monitored definite and probable SUDEP where no electroclinical evidence of underlying seizures was found preceding death. Three patients (two definite and one probable) had SUDEP. They had a typical high SUDEP risk profile with longstanding intractable epilepsy and frequent generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). All patients had varying patterns of respiratory and bradyarrhythmic cardiac dysfunction with profound electroencephalography (EEG) suppression. In two patients, patterns of cardiorespiratory failure were similar to those seen in some patients in the Mortality in Epilepsy Monitoring Units Study (MORTEMUS). SUDEP almost always occur postictally, after GTCS and less commonly after a partial seizure. Monitored SUDEP or near-SUDEP cases without a seizure have not yet been reported in literature. When nonmonitored SUDEP occurs in an ambulatory setting without an overt seizure, the absence of EEG information prevents the exclusion of a subtle seizure. These cases confirm the existence of nonseizure SUDEP; such deaths may not be prevented by seizure detection-based devices. SUDEP risk in patients with epilepsy may constitute a spectrum of susceptibility wherein some are relatively immune, death occurs in others with frequent GTCS with one episode of seizure ultimately proving fatal, while in others still, death may occur even in the absence of a seizure. We emphasize the heterogeneity of SUDEP phenomena. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. Tranexamic acid-associated seizures: Causes and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecker, Irene; Wang, Dian-Shi; Whissell, Paul D; Avramescu, Sinziana; Mazer, C David; Orser, Beverley A

    2016-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic drugs are routinely used worldwide to reduce the bleeding that results from a wide range of hemorrhagic conditions. The most commonly used antifibrinolytic drug, tranexamic acid, is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative seizures. The reported increase in the frequency of seizures is alarming, as these events are associated with adverse neurological outcomes, longer hospital stays, and increased in-hospital mortality. However, many clinicians are unaware that tranexamic acid causes seizures. The goal of this review is to summarize the incidence, risk factors, and clinical features of these seizures. This review also highlights several clinical and preclinical studies that offer mechanistic insights into the potential causes of and treatments for tranexamic acid-associated seizures. This review will aid the medical community by increasing awareness about tranexamic acid-associated seizures and by translating scientific findings into therapeutic interventions for patients. © 2015 The Authors Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  1. Tranexamic acid–associated seizures: Causes and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecker, Irene; Wang, Dian‐Shi; Whissell, Paul D.; Avramescu, Sinziana; Mazer, C. David

    2015-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic drugs are routinely used worldwide to reduce the bleeding that results from a wide range of hemorrhagic conditions. The most commonly used antifibrinolytic drug, tranexamic acid, is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative seizures. The reported increase in the frequency of seizures is alarming, as these events are associated with adverse neurological outcomes, longer hospital stays, and increased in‐hospital mortality. However, many clinicians are unaware that tranexamic acid causes seizures. The goal of this review is to summarize the incidence, risk factors, and clinical features of these seizures. This review also highlights several clinical and preclinical studies that offer mechanistic insights into the potential causes of and treatments for tranexamic acid–associated seizures. This review will aid the medical community by increasing awareness about tranexamic acid–associated seizures and by translating scientific findings into therapeutic interventions for patients. ANN NEUROL 2016;79:18–26 PMID:26580862

  2. NeuroKinect: A Novel Low-Cost 3Dvideo-EEG System for Epileptic Seizure Motion Quantification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Silva Cunha

    motion trajectories when compared to a 2D frame by frame tracking procedure. We conclude that this new approach provides a more comfortable (both for patients and clinical professionals, simpler, faster and lower-cost procedure than previous approaches, therefore providing a reliable tool to quantitatively analyze MOI patterns of epileptic seizures in the routine of EMUs around the world. We hope this study encourages other EMUs to adopt similar approaches so that more quantitative information is used to improve epilepsy diagnosis.

  3. NeuroKinect: A Novel Low-Cost 3Dvideo-EEG System for Epileptic Seizure Motion Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, João Paulo Silva; Choupina, Hugo Miguel Pereira; Rocha, Ana Patrícia; Fernandes, José Maria; Achilles, Felix; Loesch, Anna Mira; Vollmar, Christian; Hartl, Elisabeth; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2016-01-01

    motion trajectories when compared to a 2D frame by frame tracking procedure. We conclude that this new approach provides a more comfortable (both for patients and clinical professionals), simpler, faster and lower-cost procedure than previous approaches, therefore providing a reliable tool to quantitatively analyze MOI patterns of epileptic seizures in the routine of EMUs around the world. We hope this study encourages other EMUs to adopt similar approaches so that more quantitative information is used to improve epilepsy diagnosis.

  4. Ictal brain SPET during seizures pharmacologically provoked with pentylenetetrazol: a new diagnostic procedure in drug-resistant epileptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcagni, Maria Lucia; Giordano, Alessandro; Bruno, Isabella; Di Giuda, Daniela; De Rossi, Giuseppe; Troncone, Luigi; Parbonetti, Giovanni; Colicchio, Gabriella

    2002-01-01

    Functional brain imaging plays an important role in seizure focus localisation. However, truly ictal single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies are not routinely performed owing to technical problems associated with the use of tracers and methodological and logistical difficulties. In this study we tried to resolve both of these issues by means of a new procedure: technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) brain SPET performed during seizures pharmacologically provoked with pentylenetetrazol, a well-known central and respiratory stimulant. We studied 33 drug-resistant epileptic patients. All patients underwent anamnestic evaluation, neuropsychological and psychodynamic assessment, magnetic resonance imaging, interictal and ictal video-EEG monitoring, and interictal and ictal SPET with 99m Tc-ECD. In order to obtain truly ictal SPET, 65 mg of pentylenetetrazol was injected every 2 minutes and, immediately the seizure began, 740 MBq of 99m Tc-ECD was injected. The scintigraphic findings were considered abnormal if a single area of hyperperfusion was present and corresponded to the site of a single area of hypoperfusion at interictal SPET: the ''hypo-hyperperfusion'' SPET pattern. In 27 of the 33 patients (82%), interictal-ictal SPET showed the hypo-hyperperfusion SPET pattern. Video-EEG showed a single epileptogenic zone in 21/33 patients (64%), and MRI showed anatomical lesions in 19/33 patients (57%). Twenty-two of the 27 patients with hypo-hyperperfusion SPET pattern underwent ablative or palliative surgery and were seizure-free at 3 years of follow-up. No adverse effects were noted during pharmacologically provoked seizure. It is concluded that ictal brain SPET performed during pharmacologically provoked seizure provides truly ictal images because 99m Tc-ECD is injected immediately upon seizure onset. Using this feasible procedure it is possible to localise the focus, to avoid the limitations due to the unpredictability of seizures, to avoid pitfalls due

  5. A 16-Channel CMOS Chopper-Stabilized Analog Front-End ECoG Acquisition Circuit for a Closed-Loop Epileptic Seizure Control System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chung-Yu; Cheng, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Zhi-Xin

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, a 16-channel analog front-end (AFE) electrocorticography signal acquisition circuit for a closed-loop seizure control system is presented. It is composed of 16 input protection circuits, 16 auto-reset chopper-stabilized capacitive-coupled instrumentation amplifiers (AR-CSCCIA) with bandpass filters, 16 programmable transconductance gain amplifiers, a multiplexer, a transimpedance amplifier, and a 128-kS/s 10-bit delta-modulated successive-approximation-register analog-to-digital converter (SAR ADC). In closed-loop seizure control system applications, the stimulator shares the same electrode with the AFE amplifier for effective suppression of epileptic seizures. To prevent from overstress in MOS devices caused by high stimulation voltage, an input protection circuit with a high-voltage-tolerant switch is proposed for the AFE amplifier. Moreover, low input-referred noise is achieved by using the chopper modulation technique in the AR-CSCCIA. To reduce the undesired effects of chopper modulation, an improved offset reduction loop is proposed to reduce the output offset generated by input chopper mismatches. The digital ripple reduction loop is also used to reduce the chopper ripple. The fabricated AFE amplifier has 49.1-/59.4-/67.9-dB programmable gain and 2.02-μVrms input referred noise in a bandwidth of 0.59-117 Hz. The measured power consumption of the AFE amplifier is 3.26 μW per channel, and the noise efficiency factor is 3.36. The in vivo animal test has been successfully performed to verify the functions. It is shown that the proposed AFE acquisition circuit is suitable for implantable closed-loop seizure control systems.

  6. Focal epileptic seizures with secondary generalization in cortical atrophy and gliosis dysplasia in the left temporal lobe and hemimegalencephaly in the left occipital lobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchev, I.; Mancheva-Ganeva, V.; Manolova, T.; Manchev, L.

    2016-01-01

    It is a case of an eight-year-old patient with cortical dysplasia and gliosis in the left temporal lobe clinically manifested with focal epileptic seizures with secondary generalization. Signs of mental retardation and a number of somatic complications - diabetes, etc., were found. The complex therapy with anticonvulsant medications, immunovenin, plasmaphoresis and anti-diabetic drugs was partially effective

  7. Cardiac troponin I (CTnI level among children with epileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Anwer Attia Khattab

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Cardiac troponin I is a perfect tool for early detection of cases with myocardial dysfunction in epileptic patients – cardiac troponin I is significantly increased in children with epilepsy especially the complicated epilepsy. Cardiac injury in epileptic children is more common in patients with early onset epilepsy, positive prenatal problem, idiopathic epilepsy, abnormal imaging and EEG – elevated TnI levels may be of value in assessing the severity and eventual outcome and mortality risk of the disease in children with epilepsy.

  8. Mouse epileptic seizure detection with multiple EEG features and simple thresholding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieng, Quang M.; Anbazhagan, Ashwin; Chen, Min; Reutens, David C.

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by recurrent, unprovoked seizures. The search for new treatments for seizures and epilepsy relies upon studies in animal models of epilepsy. To capture data on seizures, many applications require prolonged electroencephalography (EEG) with recordings that generate voluminous data. The desire for efficient evaluation of these recordings motivates the development of automated seizure detection algorithms. Approach. A new seizure detection method is proposed, based on multiple features and a simple thresholding technique. The features are derived from chaos theory, information theory and the power spectrum of EEG recordings and optimally exploit both linear and nonlinear characteristics of EEG data. Main result. The proposed method was tested with real EEG data from an experimental mouse model of epilepsy and distinguished seizures from other patterns with high sensitivity and specificity. Significance. The proposed approach introduces two new features: negative logarithm of adaptive correlation integral and power spectral coherence ratio. The combination of these new features with two previously described features, entropy and phase coherence, improved seizure detection accuracy significantly. Negative logarithm of adaptive correlation integral can also be used to compute the duration of automatically detected seizures.

  9. Epileptic Seizure Detection and Prediction Based on Continuous Cerebral Blood Flow Monitoring – a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senay Tewolde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the third most common neurological illness, affecting 1% of the world’s population. Despite advances in medicine, about 25 to 30% of the patients do not respond to or cannot tolerate the severe side effects of medical treatment, and surgery is not an option for the majority of patients with epilepsy. The objective of this article is to review the current state of research on seizure detection based on cerebral blood flow (CBF data acquired by thermal diffusion flowmetry (TDF, and CBF-based seizure prediction. A discussion is provided on the applications, advantages, and disadvantages of TDF in detecting and localizing seizure foci, as well as its role in seizure prediction. Also presented are an overview of the present challenges and possible future research directions (along with methodological guidelines of the CBF-based seizure detection and prediction methods.

  10. Pharmacological analysis of postictal refractoriness after cortical epileptic seizures in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 59, Suppl.1 (2007), s. 12-13 ISSN 1734-1140. [Day of neuropsychopharmacology /16./. 06.09.2007-08.09.2007, Wroclaw] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : postictal refractoriness * epileptic afterdischarges * rat Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  11. DREADDs suppress seizure-like activity in a mouse model of pharmacoresistant epileptic brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avaliani, N.; Andersson, M.; Thomsen, Annika Højrup Runegaard

    2016-01-01

    and closely resemble features of human epileptic tissue. Studies suggest that chemically induced epileptiform activity in rat OHSCs is pharmacoresistant to most of AEDs. However, high-frequency electric stimulus train-induced bursting (STIB) in OHSCs is responsive to carbamazepine and phenytoin. We...

  12. Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secondary seizures; Reactive seizures; Seizure - secondary; Seizure - reactive; Convulsions ... or kidney failure Very high blood pressure ( malignant hypertension ) Venomous bites and stings ( snake bite ) Withdrawal from ...

  13. Metabolic Alkalosis, Acute Renal Failure and Epileptic Seizures as Unusual Manifestations of an Upside-Down Stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Stephani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Upside-down stomach represents a critical and rare manifestation of hiatal hernias. Here we report on a 60-year-old male patient who was admitted to our hospital with epileptic seizures and dehydration. Laboratory tests revealed severe metabolic alkalosis (pH 7.56 with low potassium (2.7 mmol/l, hypochloremia (<60 mmol/l, increased hematocrit (53% and high levels of serum creatinine (651 µmol/l. Based on a history of recurrent vomiting, gastroscopy and computed tomography were performed. Both diagnostics showed an upside-down stomach with signs of incarceration. Upon infusion of sodium chloride 0.9%, acid-base state, electrolyte balance and renal function became improved. Subsequently, the patient was referred to the department of surgery for hiatoplasty with fundoplication. This case report highlights severe metabolic and neurological disorders as unusual and life-threatening complications of an upside-down stomach.

  14. Attachment style, relationship quality, and psychological distress in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures versus epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Becky; Norman, Paul; Reuber, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Psychopathology levels are elevated in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and those with epilepsy. However, patients with PNES report higher rates of trauma and neglect, poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and an increased prevalence of insecure attachment. We examined to what extent attachment style and relationship quality with their main informal carer impact on levels of HRQoL, depression, and anxiety in patients with PNES versus those with epilepsy. Consecutive patients with PNES (N=23) and epilepsy (N=72) completed questionnaires about attachment style, quality of their relationship with their main informal carer, seizure severity, HRQoL, depression, and anxiety. Patients with PNES reported higher levels of anxiety and depression and lower HRQoL than those with epilepsy. PNES: No significant correlations were found with HRQoL but depression correlated positively with attachment avoidance, attachment anxiety, and relationship conflict. Anxiety correlated positively with attachment avoidance, attachment anxiety, and relationship conflict, and negatively with relationship depth and support. Epilepsy: HRQoL correlated negatively with seizure severity, depression, anxiety, attachment avoidance, and attachment anxiety. Depression correlated positively with attachment avoidance, attachment anxiety, and relationship conflict. Anxiety correlated positively with seizure severity, attachment avoidance, and attachment anxiety. Correlations between measures of relationship quality and anxiety were stronger in patients with PNES versus those with epilepsy (zs=2.66 to 2.97, ps<0.004). Attachment style and relationship quality explained larger amounts of variance in depression (45%) and anxiety (60%) in the patients with PNES than those with epilepsy (16% and 13%). Levels of anxiety and depression were higher in patients with PNES than those with epilepsy. Interpersonal problems were much more closely associated with anxiety and depression in

  15. Clinical and neuropsychological changes after the disappearance of seizures in a case of transient epileptic amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Sekimoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We encountered a female patient with late-onset temporal lobe epilepsy who presented with transient amnesia as the sole ictal manifestation, an accelerated rate of forgetting daily life events, and a retrograde memory deficit. We describe the memory function of the patient both before and after the administration of antiseizure medication. After the patient's seizures were controlled with antiseizure drugs, her neuropsychological memory performance scores showed improvement. We presumed that the disappearance of seizures was associated with a decrease in the accelerated rate of forgetting medication. However, her lost memories were not recovered after the seizures were controlled by antiseizure medication.

  16. Sporadic infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations in PCDH19 resembles Dravet syndrome but mainly affects females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Depienne

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Dravet syndrome (DS is a genetically determined epileptic encephalopathy mainly caused by de novo mutations in the SCN1A gene. Since 2003, we have performed molecular analyses in a large series of patients with DS, 27% of whom were negative for mutations or rearrangements in SCN1A. In order to identify new genes responsible for the disorder in the SCN1A-negative patients, 41 probands were screened for micro-rearrangements with Illumina high-density SNP microarrays. A hemizygous deletion on chromosome Xq22.1, encompassing the PCDH19 gene, was found in one male patient. To confirm that PCDH19 is responsible for a Dravet-like syndrome, we sequenced its coding region in 73 additional SCN1A-negative patients. Nine different point mutations (four missense and five truncating mutations were identified in 11 unrelated female patients. In addition, we demonstrated that the fibroblasts of our male patient were mosaic for the PCDH19 deletion. Patients with PCDH19 and SCN1A mutations had very similar clinical features including the association of early febrile and afebrile seizures, seizures occurring in clusters, developmental and language delays, behavioural disturbances, and cognitive regression. There were, however, slight but constant differences in the evolution of the patients, including fewer polymorphic seizures (in particular rare myoclonic jerks and atypical absences in those with PCDH19 mutations. These results suggest that PCDH19 plays a major role in epileptic encephalopathies, with a clinical spectrum overlapping that of DS. This disorder mainly affects females. The identification of an affected mosaic male strongly supports the hypothesis that cellular interference is the pathogenic mechanism.

  17. Detecting epileptic seizure with different feature extracting strategies using robust machine learning classification techniques by applying advance parameter optimization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Lal

    2018-06-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder produced due to abnormal excitability of neurons in the brain. The research reveals that brain activity is monitored through electroencephalogram (EEG) of patients suffered from seizure to detect the epileptic seizure. The performance of EEG detection based epilepsy require feature extracting strategies. In this research, we have extracted varying features extracting strategies based on time and frequency domain characteristics, nonlinear, wavelet based entropy and few statistical features. A deeper study was undertaken using novel machine learning classifiers by considering multiple factors. The support vector machine kernels are evaluated based on multiclass kernel and box constraint level. Likewise, for K-nearest neighbors (KNN), we computed the different distance metrics, Neighbor weights and Neighbors. Similarly, the decision trees we tuned the paramours based on maximum splits and split criteria and ensemble classifiers are evaluated based on different ensemble methods and learning rate. For training/testing tenfold Cross validation was employed and performance was evaluated in form of TPR, NPR, PPV, accuracy and AUC. In this research, a deeper analysis approach was performed using diverse features extracting strategies using robust machine learning classifiers with more advanced optimal options. Support Vector Machine linear kernel and KNN with City block distance metric give the overall highest accuracy of 99.5% which was higher than using the default parameters for these classifiers. Moreover, highest separation (AUC = 0.9991, 0.9990) were obtained at different kernel scales using SVM. Additionally, the K-nearest neighbors with inverse squared distance weight give higher performance at different Neighbors. Moreover, to distinguish the postictal heart rate oscillations from epileptic ictal subjects, and highest performance of 100% was obtained using different machine learning classifiers.

  18. Effects of single-dose neuropeptide Y on levels of hippocampal BDNF, MDA, GSH, and NO in a rat model of pentylenetetrazole-induced epileptic seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Maral Kir

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, characterized by recurrent seizures, which may increase the content of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Th e objective of this study was to investigate the eff ects of Neuropeptide Y on oxidative and nitrosative balance and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels induced by pentylenetetrazole (a standard convulsant drug in the hippocampus of Wistar rats. Th ree groups of seven rats were treated intraperitoneally as follows: group  (saline + saline  ml saline, group  (salin + Pentylenetetrazole  ml saline  min before Pentylenetetrazole; and group  (Neuropeptide Y + Pentylenetetrazole  μg/kg Neuropeptide Y  min before  mg/kg Pentylenetetrazole. After  h, the animals were euthanized by decapitation. Hippocampus were isolated to evaluate the malondialdehyde, glutathione, nitric oxide, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in three rat groups. Th e results of this study demonstrated that while intraperitoneally administered neuropeptide Y did not result in a statistically signifi cant diff erence in BDNF levels, its administration caused a statistically signifi cant decrease in malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels and an increase in glutathione levels in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced epileptic seizure. Neuropeptide Y were able to reduce nitroxidative damage induced by pentylenetetrazole in the hippocampus of Wistar rats.

  19. Proposal for best practice in the use of video-EEG when psychogenic non-epileptic seizures are a possible diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley Whitehead

    Full Text Available The gold-standard for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES is capturing an attack with typical semiology and lack of epileptic ictal discharges on video-EEG. Despite the importance of this diagnostic test, lack of standardisation has resulted in a wide variety of protocols and reporting practices. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of research findings on the diagnostic video-EEG procedure, in both the adult and paediatric literature. We discuss how uncertainties about the ethical use of suggestion can be resolved, and consider what constitutes best clinical practice. We stress the importance of ictal observation and assessment and consider how diagnostically useful information is best obtained. We also discuss the optimal format of video-EEG reports; and of highlighting features with high sensitivity and specificity to reduce the risk of miscommunication. We suggest that over-interpretation of the interictal EEG, and the failure to recognise differences between typical epileptic and nonepileptic seizure manifestations are the greatest pitfalls in neurophysiological assessment of patients with PNES. Meanwhile, under-recognition of semiological pointers towards frontal lobe seizures and of the absence of epileptiform ictal EEG patterns during some epileptic seizure types (especially some seizures not associated with loss of awareness, may lead to erroneous PNES diagnoses. We propose that a standardised approach to the video-EEG examination and the subsequent written report will facilitate a clear communication of its import, improving diagnostic certainty and thereby promoting appropriate patient management. Keywords: Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, Nonepileptic attack disorder, Suggestion, EEG

  20. Oxidative Stress Induced by Epileptic Seizure and Its Attenuation by Melatonin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, J.; Stopka, Pavel; Nohejlová, K.; Rokyta, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, Suppl.1 (2013), S67-S74 ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : free radicals * seizure * melatonin * EPR Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  1. Automated Epileptic Seizure Detection Based on Wearable ECG and PPG in a Hospital Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecasteele, Kaat; De Cooman, Thomas; Gu, Ying; Cleeren, Evy; Claes, Kasper; Paesschen, Wim Van; Huffel, Sabine Van; Hunyadi, Borbála

    2017-10-13

    Electrocardiography has added value to automatically detect seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients. The wired hospital system is not suited for a long-term seizure detection system at home. To address this need, the performance of two wearable devices, based on electrocardiography (ECG) and photoplethysmography (PPG), are compared with hospital ECG using an existing seizure detection algorithm. This algorithm classifies the seizures on the basis of heart rate features, extracted from the heart rate increase. The algorithm was applied to recordings of 11 patients in a hospital setting with 701 h capturing 47 (fronto-)temporal lobe seizures. The sensitivities of the hospital system, the wearable ECG device and the wearable PPG device were respectively 57%, 70% and 32%, with corresponding false alarms per hour of 1.92, 2.11 and 1.80. Whereas seizure detection performance using the wrist-worn PPG device was considerably lower, the performance using the wearable ECG is proven to be similar to that of the hospital ECG.

  2. Automated Epileptic Seizure Detection Based on Wearable ECG and PPG in a Hospital Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaat Vandecasteele

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrocardiography has added value to automatically detect seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE patients. The wired hospital system is not suited for a long-term seizure detection system at home. To address this need, the performance of two wearable devices, based on electrocardiography (ECG and photoplethysmography (PPG, are compared with hospital ECG using an existing seizure detection algorithm. This algorithm classifies the seizures on the basis of heart rate features, extracted from the heart rate increase. The algorithm was applied to recordings of 11 patients in a hospital setting with 701 h capturing 47 (fronto-temporal lobe seizures. The sensitivities of the hospital system, the wearable ECG device and the wearable PPG device were respectively 57%, 70% and 32%, with corresponding false alarms per hour of 1.92, 2.11 and 1.80. Whereas seizure detection performance using the wrist-worn PPG device was considerably lower, the performance using the wearable ECG is proven to be similar to that of the hospital ECG.

  3. De novo mutations in synaptic transmission genes including DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    in five individuals and de novo mutations in GABBR2, FASN, and RYR3 in two individuals each. Unlike previous studies, this cohort is sufficiently large to show a significant excess of de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy probands compared to the general population using a likelihood analysis (p...... = 8.2 × 10(-4)), supporting a prominent role for de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies. We bring statistical evidence that mutations in DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathy, find suggestive evidence for a role of three additional genes, and show that at least 12% of analyzed individuals have...... analyzed exome-sequencing data of 356 trios with the "classical" epileptic encephalopathies, infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome, including 264 trios previously analyzed by the Epi4K/EPGP consortium. In this expanded cohort, we find 429 de novo mutations, including de novo mutations in DNM1...

  4. Treatment of Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent the most severe epilepsies, with onset in infancy and childhood and seizures continuing in adulthood in most cases. New genetic causes are being identified at a rapid rate. Treatment is challenging and the overall outcome remains poor. Available targeted treatments, based on the precision medicine approach, are currently few. To provide an overview of the treatment of epileptic encephalopathies with known genetic determinants, including established treatment, anecdotal reports of specific treatment, and potential tailored precision medicine strategies. Genes known to be associated to epileptic encephalopathy were selected. Genes where the association was uncertain or with no reports of details on treatment, were not included. Although some of the genes included are associated with multiple epilepsy phenotypes or other organ involvement, we have mainly focused on the epileptic encephalopathies and their antiepileptic treatments. Most epileptic encephalopathies show genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. The treatment of seizures is difficult in most cases. The available evidence may provide some guidance for treatment: for example, ACTH seems to be effective in controlling infantile spams in a number of genetic epileptic encephalopathies. There are potentially effective tailored precision medicine strategies available for some of the encephalopathies, and therapies with currently unexplained effectiveness in others. Understanding the effect of the mutation is crucial for targeted treatment. There is a broad range of disease mechanisms underlying epileptic encephalopathies, and this makes the application of targeted treatments challenging. However, there is evidence that tailored treatment could significantly improve epilepsy treatment and prognosis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Oral Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) reduces kainic acid-induced epileptic seizures and neuronal death accompanied by attenuating glial cell proliferation and S100B proteins in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2011-05-17

    Epilepsy is a common clinical syndrome with recurrent neuronal discharges in cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Here we aim to determine the protective role of Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR), an herbal drug belong to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), on epileptic rats. To address this issue, we tested the effect of UR on kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptic seizures and further investigate the underlying mechanisms. Oral UR successfully decreased neuronal death and discharges in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. The population spikes (PSs) were decreased from 4.1 ± 0.4 mV to 2.1 ± 0.3 mV in KA-induced epileptic seizures and UR-treated groups, respectively. Oral UR protected animals from neuronal death induced by KA treatment (from 34 ± 4.6 to 191.7 ± 48.6 neurons/field) through attenuating glial cell proliferation and S100B protein expression but not GABAA and TRPV1 receptors. The above results provide detail mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective action of UR on KA-induced epileptic seizure in hippocampal CA1 neurons. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The incidence of unprovoked seizures and occurrence of neurodevelopmental comorbidities in children at the time of their first epileptic seizure and during the subsequent six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åndell, Eva; Tomson, Torbjörn; Carlsson, Sofia; Hellebro, Eva; Andersson, Tomas; Adelöw, Cecilia; Åmark, Per

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unprovoked seizures in children and the prevalence of related neurodevelopmental comorbidities at the time of the presumed first seizure and six months thereafter. The medical records of all children (0-18 years of age) seeking medical attention as the result of a first unprovoked seizure between September 1, 2001 and December 31, 2006, and registered in the population-based Stockholm Incidence Registry of Epilepsy (SIRE) were reviewed. Neurodevelopmental comorbidities were evaluated on the basis of the medical records from this first visit and from other healthcare during the following six months. The incidence of unprovoked seizures was between 30 and 204/100,000 person years (n=766) in the different age groups. It was highest among the youngest children and lowest among the 18-year-olds with small gender differences. The most common neurodevelopment comorbidities were developmental delay (22%, CI: 19-25%), speech/language and learning difficulties (23%, CI: 20-26%) and intellectual disability (16%, CI: 13-18%). The types of neurodevelopmental comorbidity varied by age at the time of seizure onset, with cerebral palsy being more common among the 0-5-year-olds, attention deficits among the 6-16-year-olds, and autism and psychiatric diagnosis among the older children. An associated neurodevelopmental comorbidity was more common among those experiencing recurrent than single seizures during follow-up six months from the index seizure (42% versus 66%). In 68% (CI: 64-71%) of the children there was no known or suspected neurodevelopmental comorbidity. The incidence of unprovoked, non-febrile seizures among 0-18-year-olds included in the SIRE was 67/100,000 person-years. Neurodevelopmental comorbidities were common already at the time of onset of the seizure disorder, indicating that neither seizure treatment nor seizures were the underlying cause of other neurodevelopmental symptoms in these patients during the period studied. Copyright

  7. Hypoparathyroidism Causing Seizures: When Epilepsy Does Not Fit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faheem Seedat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old man presented to the Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital emergency department with recurrent seizures having previously been diagnosed with epilepsy from age 14. The biochemical investigations and brain imaging were suggestive of seizures secondary to hypocalcemia, and a diagnosis of idiopathic hypoparathyroidism was confirmed. After calcium and vitamin D replacement, the patient recovered well and is seizure free, and off antiepileptic therapy. This case highlights the occurrence of brain calcinosis in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism; the occurrence of acute symptomatic seizures due to provoking factors other than epilepsy; and the importance, in the correct clinical setting, of considering alternative, and sometimes treatable, causes of seizures other than epilepsy.

  8. The appropriacy of fluency tests in assessing epileptic seizure lateralization in children with partial epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuksanović Jasmina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluency tests are frequently used in clinical practice to asses executive functions. The literature data are not unequivocal although in a great number of papers is pointed out the importance of the left hemisphere, specially of the left frontal lobes in the mediation of phonological fluency and the right hemisphere in the mediation of nonverbal fluency. This paper considers the suitability of fluency tests for the detection of left versus right seizure laterality. The sample consisted of thirty-two epilepsy patients divided into two groups: LHF-participants with the seizure focus in the left hemisphere (n=16, and DHF-participants with the seizure focus in the right hemisphere (n=16, and K-the control group of t age-matched healthy children (n=50 aged 7-11 years. The qualitative and quantitative comparison of the phonological and nonverbal fluency performance was carried out in consideration of the seizure laterality as well as compared to the healthy controls. The results of phonological fluency performance revealed that the performance of the LHF group was significantly reduced as compared to both DHF and K group. The analysis of nonverbal fluency performance revealed that the performance of the DHF group was significantly reduced as compared to both LHF and K group The qualitative analysis obtained valuable data, which could additionally contribute to the neuropsychological evaluation of the left versus right seizure laterality.

  9. Epileptic Seizure Prediction Using Big Data and Deep Learning: Toward a Mobile System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiral-Kornek, Isabell; Roy, Subhrajit; Nurse, Ewan; Mashford, Benjamin; Karoly, Philippa; Carroll, Thomas; Payne, Daniel; Saha, Susmita; Baldassano, Steven; O'Brien, Terence; Grayden, David; Cook, Mark; Freestone, Dean; Harrer, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Seizure prediction can increase independence and allow preventative treatment for patients with epilepsy. We present a proof-of-concept for a seizure prediction system that is accurate, fully automated, patient-specific, and tunable to an individual's needs. Intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) data of ten patients obtained from a seizure advisory system were analyzed as part of a pseudoprospective seizure prediction study. First, a deep learning classifier was trained to distinguish between preictal and interictal signals. Second, classifier performance was tested on held-out iEEG data from all patients and benchmarked against the performance of a random predictor. Third, the prediction system was tuned so sensitivity or time in warning could be prioritized by the patient. Finally, a demonstration of the feasibility of deployment of the prediction system onto an ultra-low power neuromorphic chip for autonomous operation on a wearable device is provided. The prediction system achieved mean sensitivity of 69% and mean time in warning of 27%, significantly surpassing an equivalent random predictor for all patients by 42%. This study demonstrates that deep learning in combination with neuromorphic hardware can provide the basis for a wearable, real-time, always-on, patient-specific seizure warning system with low power consumption and reliable long-term performance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Low-Power Implantable Device for Onset Detection and Subsequent Treatment of Epileptic Seizures: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tariqus Salam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years, there has been growing interest in neuro-responsive intracerebral local treatments of seizures, such as focal drug delivery, focal cooling, or electrical stimulation. This mode of treatment requires an effective intracerebral electroencephalographic acquisition system, seizure detector, brain stimulator, and wireless system that consume ultra-low power. This review focuses on alternative brain stimulation treatments for medically intractable epilepsy patients. We mainly discuss clinical studies of long-term responsive stimulation and suggest safer optimized therapeutic options for epilepsy. Finally, we conclude our study with the proposed low-power, implantable fully integrated device that automatically detects low-voltage fast activity ictal onsets and triggers focal treatment to disrupt seizure progression. The detection performance was verified using intracerebral electroencephalographic recordings from two patients with epilepsy. Further experimental validation of this prototype is underway.

  11. Quantitative analysis of surface electromyography during epileptic and nonepileptic convulsive seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, S.; Conradsen, I.; Moldovan, M.

    2014-01-01

    , median frequency (MF), coherence, and duration of the seizures, of the clonic EMG discharges, and of the silent periods between the cloni. Based on wavelet analysis, we distinguished between a low-frequency component (LF 2-8 Hz) and a high-frequency component (HF 64-256 Hz). Results: Duration...... without rhythmic clonic movements....

  12. Automatic epileptic seizure detection using scalp EEG and advanced artificial intelligence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergus, Paul; Hignett, David; Hussain, Abir; Al-Jumeily, Dhiya; Abdel-Aziz, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    The epilepsies are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders and syndromes characterised by recurrent, involuntary, paroxysmal seizure activity, which is often associated with a clinicoelectrical correlate on the electroencephalogram. The diagnosis of epilepsy is usually made by a neurologist but can be difficult to be made in the early stages. Supporting paraclinical evidence obtained from magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography may enable clinicians to make a diagnosis of epilepsy and investigate treatment earlier. However, electroencephalogram capture and interpretation are time consuming and can be expensive due to the need for trained specialists to perform the interpretation. Automated detection of correlates of seizure activity may be a solution. In this paper, we present a supervised machine learning approach that classifies seizure and nonseizure records using an open dataset containing 342 records. Our results show an improvement on existing studies by as much as 10% in most cases with a sensitivity of 93%, specificity of 94%, and area under the curve of 98% with a 6% global error using a k-class nearest neighbour classifier. We propose that such an approach could have clinical applications in the investigation of patients with suspected seizure disorders.

  13. Epileptic Seizure Prediction Using Big Data and Deep Learning: Toward a Mobile System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell Kiral-Kornek

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrates that deep learning in combination with neuromorphic hardware can provide the basis for a wearable, real-time, always-on, patient-specific seizure warning system with low power consumption and reliable long-term performance.

  14. Examinations with computerized cranial axial tomography carried out on patients with epileptic seizures, taking into consideration the EEG and the clinical picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiser, R.

    1982-01-01

    204 patients suffering from epileptic seizures were examined with the help of computerized cranial X-ray tomography; the results were compared with anamnestic, clinical, and EEC-findings. In good agreement with results published in literature, in 54% of the patients pathologic CT's such as tumours, attack scars, changes in ventricles and arachnoid spaces etc. were found. A pathological CT is very likely to appear in male patients who are 30 or even 50 years of age, having partial attacks with elementary symptoms, focal diagnosis in the EEG and a neurological unilateral finding. Especially noteworthy is the tumour detecting rate achieved by CT and the fact that in nearly 5% of the cases CT detected a cerebral lesion which has not been suspected, neither clinically nor in the EEG (4 tumours). This shows clearly that CT represents a heighly valuable diagnostic help, especially for patients with epileptic seizures. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Ictal technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission tomographic findings and propagation of epileptic seizure activity in patients with extratemporal epilepsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noachtar, S.; Arnold, S.; Werhahn, K.J.; Yousry, T.A.; Tatsch, K.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the propagation of extratemporal epileptic seizure activity on the regional increase in cerebral blood flow, which is usually associated with epileptic seizure activity. Forty-two consecutive patients with extratemporal epilepsies were prospectively evaluated. All patients underwent ictal SPET studies with simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and video recordings of habitual seizures and imaging studies including cranial magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography with 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2 deoxy-d-glucose. Propagation of epilptic seizure activity (PESA) was defined as the absence of hyperperfusion on ictal ECD SPET in the lobe of seizure onset, but its presence in another ipsilateral or contralateral lobe. Observers analysing the SPET images were not informed of the other results. PESA was observed in 8 of the 42 patients (19%) and was ipsilateral to the seizure onset in five (63%) of these eight patients. The time between clinical seizure onset and injection of the ECD tracer ranged from 14 to 61 s (mean 34 s). Seven patients (88%) with PESA had parieto-occipital epilepsy and one patient had a frontal epilepsy. PESA was statistically more frequent in patients with parieto-occipital lobe epilepsies (58%) than in the remaining extratemporal epilepsy syndromes (3%) (P<0.0002). These findings indicate that ictal SPET studies require simultaneous EEG-video recordings in patients with extratemporal epilepsies. PESA should be considered when interpreting ictal SPET studies in these patients. Patients with PESA are more likely to have parieto-occipital lobe epilepsy than seizure onset in other extratemporal regions. (orig./MG) (orig.)

  16. Clinical and neuropsychological changes after the disappearance of seizures in a case of transient epileptic amnesia

    OpenAIRE

    Sekimoto, Masanori; Muramatsu, Reimi; Kato, Masaaki; Onuma, Teiichi

    2017-01-01

    We encountered a female patient with late-onset temporal lobe epilepsy who presented with transient amnesia as the sole ictal manifestation, an accelerated rate of forgetting daily life events, and a retrograde memory deficit. We describe the memory function of the patient both before and after the administration of antiseizure medication. After the patient's seizures were controlled with antiseizure drugs, her neuropsychological memory performance scores showed improvement. We presumed that ...

  17. Update on the mechanisms and roles of high-frequency oscillations in seizures and epileptic disorders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiruška, Přemysl; Alvarado-Rojas, C.; Schevon, C.A.; Staba, R.; Stacey, W.; Wendling, F.; Avoli, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 8 (2017), s. 1330-1339 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29835A; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02634S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : high-frequency oscillations * epilepsy * ripples * fast ripples * ictogenesis * epileptogenesis * seizures * interneurons * computer models Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 5.295, year: 2016

  18. Dynamics of large-scale brain activity in normal arousal states and epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Rennie, C. J.; Rowe, D. L.

    2002-04-01

    Links between electroencephalograms (EEGs) and underlying aspects of neurophysiology and anatomy are poorly understood. Here a nonlinear continuum model of large-scale brain electrical activity is used to analyze arousal states and their stability and nonlinear dynamics for physiologically realistic parameters. A simple ordered arousal sequence in a reduced parameter space is inferred and found to be consistent with experimentally determined parameters of waking states. Instabilities arise at spectral peaks of the major clinically observed EEG rhythms-mainly slow wave, delta, theta, alpha, and sleep spindle-with each instability zone lying near its most common experimental precursor arousal states in the reduced space. Theta, alpha, and spindle instabilities evolve toward low-dimensional nonlinear limit cycles that correspond closely to EEGs of petit mal seizures for theta instability, and grand mal seizures for the other types. Nonlinear stimulus-induced entrainment and seizures are also seen, EEG spectra and potentials evoked by stimuli are reproduced, and numerous other points of experimental agreement are found. Inverse modeling enables physiological parameters underlying observed EEGs to be determined by a new, noninvasive route. This model thus provides a single, powerful framework for quantitative understanding of a wide variety of brain phenomena.

  19. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Chung-Hsiang Liu; Yi-Wen Lin; Nou-Ying Tang; Hsu-Jan Liu; Ching-Liang Hsieh

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR), which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA-) induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treat...

  20. MDR-1 and MRP2 gene polymorphisms in Mexican epileptic pediatric patients with complex partial seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eEscalante-Santiago

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the Pgp efflux transport protein is overexpressed in resected tissue of patients with epilepsy, the presence of polymorphisms in MDR1 / ABCB1 and MRP2 / ABCC2 in patients with antiepileptic-drugs resistant epilepsy is controversial. The aim of this study was to perform an exploratory study to identify nucleotide changes and search new and reported mutations in patients with antiepileptic-drugs resistant epilepsy (ADR and patients with good response to anti-epileptic drugs (CTR in a rigorously selected population. We analyzed 22 samples from drug-resistant patients with epilepsy and 7 samples from patients with good response to anti-epileptic drugs. Genomic DNA was obtained from leukocytes. Eleven exons in both genes were genotyped. The concentration of drugs in saliva and plasma was determined. The concentration of valproic acid in saliva was lower in ADR than in CRT. In ABCB1, five reported SNPs and five unreported nucleotide changes were identified; rs2229109 (GA and rs2032582 (AT and AG were found only in the ADR. Of six SNPs associated with the ABCC2 that were found in the study population, rs3740066 (TT and 66744T>A (TG were found only in the ADR. The strongest risk factor in the ABCB1 gene was identified as the TA genotype of rs2032582, whereas for the ABCC2 gene the strongest risk factor was the T allele of rs3740066. The screening of SNPs in ACBC1 and ABCC2 indicates that the Mexican patients with epilepsy in this study display frequently reported ABCC1 polymorphisms; however, in the study subjects with a higher risk factor for drug resistance, new nucleotide changes were found in the ABCC2 gene. Thus, the population of Mexican patients with AED-resistant epilepsy used in this study exhibits genetic variability with respect to those reported in other study populations; however, it is necessary to explore this polymorphism in a larger population of patients with AED-resistant epilepsy.

  1. Online Epileptic Seizure Prediction Using Wavelet-Based Bi-Phase Correlation of Electrical Signals Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabi, Zahra; Amirfattahi, Rasoul; Shayegh, Farzaneh; Ghassemi, Fahimeh

    2015-09-01

    Considerable efforts have been made in order to predict seizures. Among these methods, the ones that quantify synchronization between brain areas, are the most important methods. However, to date, a practically acceptable result has not been reported. In this paper, we use a synchronization measurement method that is derived according to the ability of bi-spectrum in determining the nonlinear properties of a system. In this method, first, temporal variation of the bi-spectrum of different channels of electro cardiography (ECoG) signals are obtained via an extended wavelet-based time-frequency analysis method; then, to compare different channels, the bi-phase correlation measure is introduced. Since, in this way, the temporal variation of the amount of nonlinear coupling between brain regions, which have not been considered yet, are taken into account, results are more reliable than the conventional phase-synchronization measures. It is shown that, for 21 patients of FSPEEG database, bi-phase correlation can discriminate the pre-ictal and ictal states, with very low false positive rates (FPRs) (average: 0.078/h) and high sensitivity (100%). However, the proposed seizure predictor still cannot significantly overcome the random predictor for all patients.

  2. Measuring the level and content of consciousness during epileptic seizures: the Ictal Consciousness Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanna, A E; Mula, M; Servo, S; Strigaro, G; Tota, G; Barbagli, D; Collimedaglia, L; Viana, M; Cantello, R; Monaco, F

    2008-07-01

    Ictal alterations of the level of general awareness and subjective content of consciousness play a pivotal role in the clinical phenomenology of epilepsy, and reflect the pathological involvement of different neurobiological substrates. However, no self-reported measures have been proposed for patients experiencing altered conscious states during seizures. This study describes the development and validation of a new scale for the quantitative assessment of the level and content of ictal consciousness, the Ictal Consciousness Inventory (ICI). The ICI is a 20-item questionnaire generated on the basis of interviews with patients, literature review, and consultation with experts. It was tested on a sample of 110 patients attending three different epilepsy clinics in Northern Italy, who also completed standardized clinical scales. Standard psychometric methods were used to demonstrate that this scale satisfies criteria for acceptability, reliability, and validity. The ICI is proposed as a user-friendly and clinically sound instrument for the measurement of ictal alterations of consciousness in patients with epilepsy.

  3. Escitalopram causes fewer seizures in human overdose than citalopram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Zeynep; Ceschi, Alessandro; Rauber-Lüthy, Christine; Sauer, Oliver; Stedtler, Uwe; Prasa, Dagmar; Seidel, Carola; Hackl, Elisabeth; Hoffmann-Walbeck, Petra; Gerber-Zupan, Gabriela; Bauer, Kathrin; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd-Achim; Wilks, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Seizures are a recognized complication of acute overdose with the racemic (1:1 ratio of R- and S-enantiomers) selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant citalopram. We tested the hypothesis that escitalopram (the therapeutically active S-enantiomer of citalopram) causes fewer seizures in overdose than citalopram at comparable doses of the S-enantiomer. Multicenter retrospective review of cases with citalopram and escitalopram overdose reported to German, Austrian, and Swiss Poisons Centers between 1997 and 2006. 316 citalopram and 63 escitalopram cases were analyzed. Somnolence, nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, QT prolongation, and tremor occurred with similar frequency in both groups. There was a striking difference in the frequency of single and multiple seizures: 43 cases (13.5%) in the citalopram group and 1 case (1.6%) with a single seizure in the escitalopram group (p=0.0065). At comparable ingested doses of the S-enantiomer, the symptom profile for citalopram and escitalopram intoxications is similar except for seizures that occur more frequently in citalopram than in escitalopram poisoning.

  4. Feasibility of imaging epileptic seizure onset with EIT and depth electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowska-Wrobel, Anna; Aristovich, Kirill; Faulkner, Mayo; Avery, James; Holder, David

    2018-06-01

    Imaging ictal and interictal activity with Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) using intracranial electrode mats has been demonstrated in animal models of epilepsy. In human epilepsy subjects undergoing presurgical evaluation, depth electrodes are often preferred. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of using EIT to localise epileptogenic areas with intracranial electrodes in humans. The accuracy of localisation of the ictal onset zone was evaluated in computer simulations using 9M element FEM models derived from three subjects. 5 mm radius perturbations imitating a single seizure onset event were placed in several locations forming two groups: under depth electrode coverage and in the contralateral hemisphere. Simulations were made for impedance changes of 1% expected for neuronal depolarisation over milliseconds and 10% for cell swelling over seconds. Reconstructions were compared with EEG source modelling for a radially orientated dipole with respect to the closest EEG recording contact. The best accuracy of EIT was obtained using all depth and 32 scalp electrodes, greater than the equivalent accuracy with EEG inverse source modelling. The localisation error was 5.2 ± 1.8, 4.3 ± 0 and 46.2 ± 25.8 mm for perturbations within the volume enclosed by depth electrodes and 29.6 ± 38.7, 26.1 ± 36.2, 54.0 ± 26.2 mm for those without (EIT 1%, 10% change, EEG source modelling, n = 15 in 3 subjects, p EIT was insensitive to source dipole orientation, all 15 perturbations within the volume enclosed by depth electrodes were localised, whereas the standard clinical method of visual inspection of EEG voltages, only localised 8 out of 15 cases. This suggests that adding EIT to SEEG measurements could be beneficial in localising the onset of seizures. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Wen; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsu-Jan; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR), which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA-) induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A)) receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus.

  6. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsiang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR, which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA- induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus

  7. Rare GABRA3 variants are associated with epileptic seizures, encephalopathy and dysmorphic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niturad, Cristina Elena; Lev, Dorit; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Charzewska, Agnieszka; Schubert, Julian; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Kroes, Hester Y.; Oegema, Renske; Traverso, Monica; Specchio, Nicola; Lassota, Maria; Chelly, Jamel; Bennett-Back, Odeya; Carmi, Nirit; Koffler-Brill, Tal; Iacomino, Michele; Trivisano, Marina; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Striano, Pasquale; Nawara, Magdalena; Rzoca, Sylwia; Fischer, Ute; Bienek, Melanie; Jensen, Corinna; Hu, Hao; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Krause, Roland; May, Patrick; Becker, Felicitas; Balling, Rudi; Biskup, Saskia; Haas, Stefan A.; Nürnberg, Peter; Van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Lerche, Holger; Zara, Federico; Maljevic, Snezana; Leshinsky-Silver, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Genetic epilepsies are caused by mutations in a range of different genes, many of them encoding ion channels, receptors or transporters. While the number of detected variants and genes increased dramatically in the recent years, pleiotropic effects have also been recognized, revealing that clinical

  8. GC-MS-Based metabolomics discovers a shared serum metabolic characteristic among three types of epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dian; Wang, Xingxing; Kong, Jing; Wu, Jiayan; Lai, Minchao

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the overall and common metabolic changes of seizures can provide novel clues for their control and prevention. Here, we aim to investigate the global metabolic feature of serum for three types of seizures. We recruited 27 patients who had experienced a seizure within 48h (including 11 who had a generalized seizure, nine who had a generalized seizure secondary to partial seizure and seven who had a partial seizure) and 23 healthy controls. We analyzed the global metabolic changes of serum after seizures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Based on differential metabolites, the metabolic pathways and their potential to diagnose seizures were analyzed, and metabolic differences among three types of seizures were compared. The metabolic profiles of serum were distinctive between the seizure group and the controls but were not different among the three types of seizures. Compared to the controls, patients with seizures had higher levels of lactate, butanoic acid, proline and glutamate and lower levels of palmitic acid, linoleic acid, elaidic acid, trans-13-octadecenoic acid, stearic acid, citrate, cysteine, glutamine, asparagine, and glyceraldehyde in the serum. Furthermore, these differential metabolites had common change trends among the three types of seizures. Related pathophysiological processes reflected by these metabolites are energy deficit, inflammation, nervous excitation and neurotoxicity. Importantly, transamination inhibition is suspected to occur in seizures. Lactate, glyceraldehyde and trans-13-octadecenoic acid in serum jointly enabled a precision of 92.9% for diagnosing seizures. There is a common metabolic feature in three types of seizures. Lactate, glyceraldehyde and trans-13-octadecenoic acid levels jointly enable high-precision seizure diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparisons of childhood trauma, alexithymia, and defensive styles in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures vs. epilepsy: Implications for the etiology of conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Marcia J; Dwivedi, Alok K; Privitera, Michael D; Isaacs, Kelly; Hughes, Cynthia; Bowman, Michelle

    2013-08-01

    It has been theorized that conversion disorder is the result of emotion that cannot be experienced consciously as feeling states or put into words (i.e., alexithymia), but there is little confirming empirical evidence. We sought to characterize subjects with conversion disorder compared to subjects with a distinct medical illness, using the model of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) vs. epilepsy (ES), on measures of childhood traumatic experience, alexithymia and maturity of psychological defensive strategies. All subjects admitted to the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center were offered self-report questionnaires (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 and Response Evaluation Measure-71) at the outset of evaluation. Diagnosis of each subject was confirmed by video-EEG and we compared subjects with PNES to those with ES on these measures. 82 subjects had ES AND 96 had PNES. Those with PNES were significantly more likely to have experienced childhood trauma in all domains (p=.005 to p=.05), and were significantly more likely to have alexithymia (p=.0267). There was a significant difference in the capacity to identify feelings, and a trend towards significance in capacity to describe feelings. There were no differences in defensive styles between the two groups. PNES diagnosis was associated with female sex, higher alexithymia scores and higher rates of childhood trauma, but not with differences in defensive styles compared to ES. These findings add empirical evidence for theories regarding the cause of conversion disorder and may aid in the design of prospective treatment trials in patients with conversion disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. COgnitive behavioural therapy versus standardised medical care for adults with Dissociative non-Epileptic Seizures (CODES): statistical and economic analysis plan for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Emily J; Goldstein, Laura H; McCrone, Paul; Perdue, Iain; Chalder, Trudie; Mellers, John D C; Richardson, Mark P; Murray, Joanna; Reuber, Markus; Medford, Nick; Stone, Jon; Carson, Alan; Landau, Sabine

    2017-06-06

    Dissociative seizures (DSs), also called psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, are a distressing and disabling problem for many patients in neurological settings with high and often unnecessary economic costs. The COgnitive behavioural therapy versus standardised medical care for adults with Dissociative non-Epileptic Seizures (CODES) trial is an evaluation of a specifically tailored psychological intervention with the aims of reducing seizure frequency and severity and improving psychological well-being in adults with DS. The aim of this paper is to report in detail the quantitative and economic analysis plan for the CODES trial, as agreed by the trial steering committee. The CODES trial is a multicentre, pragmatic, parallel group, randomised controlled trial performed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 13 sessions of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) plus standardised medical care (SMC) compared with SMC alone for adult outpatients with DS. The objectives and design of the trial are summarised, and the aims and procedures of the planned analyses are illustrated. The proposed analysis plan addresses statistical considerations such as maintaining blinding, monitoring adherence with the protocol, describing aspects of treatment and dealing with missing data. The formal analysis approach for the primary and secondary outcomes is described, as are the descriptive statistics that will be reported. This paper provides transparency to the planned inferential analyses for the CODES trial prior to the extraction of outcome data. It also provides an update to the previously published trial protocol and guidance to those conducting similar trials. ISRCTN registry ISRCTN05681227 (registered on 5 March 2014); ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02325544 (registered on 15 December 2014).

  11. Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be diagnosed with epilepsy , also known as seizure disorder. Seizure Basics Usually, electrical activity in the brain involves ... times. Fortunately, fainting rarely is a sign of epilepsy. Most kids recover very quickly (seconds to minutes) ...

  12. Towards prognostic biomarkers from BOLD fluctuations to differentiate a first epileptic seizure from new-onset epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Lalit; Janssens, Rick; Vlooswijk, Mariëlle C.G.; Rouhl, Rob P.W.; de Louw, Anton; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Ulman, Shrutin; Besseling, René M.H.; Hofman, Paul A.M.; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, Vivianne H.; Hilkman, Danny M.; Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Backes, Walter H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The diagnosis of epilepsy cannot be reliably made prior to a patient's second seizure in most cases. Therefore, adequate diagnostic tools are needed to differentiate subjects with a first seizure from those with a seizure preceding the onset of epilepsy. The objective was to explore

  13. Uncaria rhynchophylla and rhynchophylline improved kainic acid-induced epileptic seizures via IL-1β and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tin-Yun; Tang, Nou-Ying; Hsiang, Chien-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2014-05-15

    Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) has been used for the treatment of convulsions and epilepsy in traditional Chinese medicine. This study reported the major anti-convulsive signaling pathways and effective targets of UR and rhynchophylline (RP) using genomic and immunohistochemical studies. Epileptic seizure model was established by intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA) in rats. Electroencephalogram and electromyogram recordings indicated that UR and RP improved KA-induced epileptic seizures. Toll-like receptor (TLR) and neurotrophin signaling pathways were regulated by UR in both cortex and hippocampus of KA-treated rats. KA upregulated the expression levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF), which were involved in TLR and neurotrophin signaling pathways, respectively. However, UR and RP downregulated the KA-induced IL-1β and BDNF gene expressions. Our findings suggested that UR and RP exhibited anti-convulsive effects in KA-induced rats via the regulation of TLR and neurotrophin signaling pathways, and the subsequent inhibition of IL-1β and BDNF gene expressions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Diurnal patterns and relationships between physiological and self-reported stress in patients with epilepsy and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Barbora; Harris, Peter R; Reuber, Markus

    2017-05-01

    Patients with epilepsy and those with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) experience high levels of stress and stress is one of the most frequently self-identified seizure precipitants. Although stress is a multifaceted phenomenon, few studies have systematically examined its different components in patients with seizures. The aim of this study was therefore to describe diurnal patterns of psychological and physiological measures of stress in patients with epilepsy and patients with PNES, and explore their relationships to each other in order to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying stress and seizure occurrence in these patients. A range of stress markers including self-reported stress, salivary cortisol, and heart rate variability (HRV) were explored in adult patients with refractory epilepsy (N=22) and those with PNES (N=23) undergoing three- to five-day video-telemetry. A diurnal pattern was observed in the physiological measures, characterized by higher levels of physiological arousal in the mornings and lower levels at night in both patients with epilepsy and PNES. The physiological measures (cortisol and HRV) were associated with each other in patients with epilepsy; no close relationship was found with self-reported stress in either of the two patient groups. The findings contribute to and expand on previous studies of the patterns of stress in patients with seizures. The results also indicate a discrepancy between patients' physiological responses and their subjective stress perceptions, suggesting that simple self-reports cannot be used as a proxy of physiological arousal in patients with seizures and stress. Stress in these patient groups should be studied using a combination of complementary measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of patients diagnosed with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Lorna; Vaidya-Mathur, Urmi; Lancman, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are treated with psychotherapy, the effectiveness of most psychotherapeutic modalities remains understudied. In this treatment series of 16 patients dually diagnosed with PNES and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we evaluated the effect of prolonged exposure therapy (PE) on reduction of PNES. Secondary measures included Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Post-Traumatic Disorder Diagnostic Scale (PDS). Subjects diagnosed with video EEG-confirmed PNES and PTSD confirmed through neuropsychological testing and clinical interview were treated with traditional PE psychotherapy with certain modifications for the PNES. Treatment was conducted over the course of 12-15 weekly sessions. Seizure frequency was noted in each session by examining the patients' seizure logs, and mood and PTSD symptomatology was assessed at baseline and on the final session. Eighteen subjects enrolled, and 16 (88.8%) completed the course of treatment. Thirteen of the 16 (81.25%) therapy completers reported no seizures by their final PE session, and the other three reported a decline in seizure frequency (Z=-3.233, p=0.001). Mean scores on scales of depression (M=-13.56, SD=12.27; t (15)=-4.420, pPTSD symptoms (M=-17.1875, SD=13.01; t (15)=-5.281, pPTSD reduced the number of PNES and improved mood and post traumatic symptomatology. Follow-up revealed that gains made in seizure control on the last day of treatment were maintained over time. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of PTZ-induced epileptic seizures on hippocampal expression of PSA-NCAM in offspring born to kindled rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajabzadeh Aliakbar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal epileptic seizures during pregnancy can affect the hippocampal neurons in the offspring. The polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM, which is expressed in the developing central nervous system, may play important roles in neuronal migration, synaptogenesis, and axonal outgrowth. This study was designed to assess the effects of kindling either with or without maternal seizures on hippocampal PSA-NCAM expression in rat offspring. Methods Forty timed-pregnant Wistar rats were divided into four groups: A Kind+/Seiz+, pregnant kindled (induced two weeks prior to pregnancy rats that received repeated intraperitoneal (i.p. pentylenetetrazol, PTZ injections on gestational days (GD 14-19; B Kind-/Seiz+, pregnant non-kindled rats that received PTZ injections on GD14-GD19; C Kind+/Seiz-, pregnant kindled rats that did not receive any PTZ injections; and D Kind-/Seiz-, the sham controls. Following birth, the pups were sacrificed on PD1 and PD14, and PSA-NCAM expression and localization in neonates’ hippocampi were analyzed by Western blots and immunohistochemistry. Results Our data show a significant down regulation of hippocampal PSA-NCAM expression in the offspring of Kind+/Seiz+ (p = 0.001 and Kind-/Seiz+ (p = 0.001 groups compared to the sham control group. The PSA-NCAM immunoreactivity was markedly decreased in all parts of the hippocampus, especially in the CA3 region, in Kind+/Seiz+ (p = 0.007 and Kind-/Seiz+ (p = 0.007 group’s newborns on both PD1 and 14. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that maternal seizures but not kindling influence the expression of PSA-NCAM in the offspring’s hippocampi, which may be considered as a factor for learning/memory and cognitive impairments reported in children born to epileptic mothers.

  17. Pyridox(am)ine-5-Phosphate Oxidase Deficiency Treatable Cause of Neonatal Epileptic Encephalopathy With Burst Suppression: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Andrea; Aziz, Aly S; Mutch, Carly; Lewis, Jillian; Go, Cristina Y; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet

    2015-08-01

    Pyridox(am)ine-5-phosphate oxidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of pyridoxine metabolism. Intractable neonatal epileptic encephalopathy is the classical presentation. Pyridoxal-5-phosphate or pyridoxine supplementation improves symptoms. We report a patient with myoclonic and tonic seizures at the age of 1 hour. Pyridoxal-5-phosphate was started on the first day of life and seizures stopped at the age of 3 days, but encephalopathy persisted for 4 weeks. She had normal neurodevelopmental outcome at the age of 12 months on pyridoxal-5-phosphate monotherapy. She had novel homozygous pathogenic frameshift mutation (c.448_451del;p.Pro150Argfs*27) in the PNPO gene. Long-lasting encephalopathy despite well-controlled clinical seizures does neither confirm nor exclude pyridox(am)ine-5-phosphate oxidase deficiency. Normal neurodevelopmental outcome of our patient emphasizes the importance of pyridoxal-5-phosphate treatment. Pyridox(am)ine-5-phosphate oxidase deficiency should be included in the differential diagnosis of Ohtahara syndrome and neonatal myoclonic encephalopathy as a treatable underlying cause. In addition, we reviewed the literature for pyridox(am)ine-5-phosphate oxidase deficiency and summarized herein all confirmed cases. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Mild overexpression of Mecp2 in mice causes a higher susceptibility toward seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodda, Chiranjeevi; Tantra, Martesa; Mollajew, Rustam; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga P; Laccone, Franco A; Can, Karolina; Rosenberger, Albert; Mironov, Sergej L; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Mannan, Ashraf U

    2013-07-01

    An intriguing finding about the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is that the loss-of-function mutations cause Rett syndrome and duplication (gain-of-function) of MECP2 leads to another neurological disorder termed MECP2 duplication syndrome. To ensure proper neurodevelopment, a precise regulation of MeCP2 expression is critical, and any gain or loss of MeCP2 over a narrow threshold level may lead to postnatal neurological impairment. To evaluate MeCP2 dosage effects, we generated Mecp2(WT_EGFP) transgenic (TG) mouse in which MeCP2 (endogenous plus TG) is mildly overexpressed (approximately 1.5×). The TG MeCP2(WT_EGFP) fusion protein is functionally active, as cross breeding of these mice with Mecp2 knockout mice led to alleviation of major phenotypes in the null mutant mice, including premature lethality. To characterize the Mecp2(WT_EGFP) mouse model, we performed an extensive battery of behavioral tests, which revealed that these mice manifest increased aggressiveness and higher pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure propensity. Evaluation of neuronal parameters revealed a reduction in the number of tertiary branching sites and increased spine density in Mecp2(WT_EGFP) transgenic (TG) neurons. Treatment of TG neurons with epileptogenic compound-PTZ led to a marked increase in amplitude and frequency of calcium spikes. Based on our ex vivo and in vivo data, we conclude that epileptic seizures are manifested as the first symptom when MeCP2 is mildly overexpressed in mice. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of intra-cerebroventricular administered rocuronium on the central nervous system of rats and determination of its epileptic seizure-inducing dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Mehmet; Gökmen, Necati; Doğan, Alper; Erbayraktar, Serhat; Yılmaz, Osman; Ocmen, Elvan; Erdost, Hale Aksu; Arkan, Atalay

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricularly administered rocuronium bromide on the central nervous system, determine the seizure threshold dose of rocuronium bromide in rats, and investigate the effects of rocuronium on the central nervous system at 1/5, 1/10, and 1/100 dilutions of the determined seizure threshold dose. A permanent cannula was placed in the lateral cerebral ventricle of the animals. The study was designed in two phases. In the first phase, the seizure threshold dose of rocuronium bromide was determined. In the second phase, Group R 1/5 (n=6), Group 1/10 (n=6), and Group 1/100 (n=6) were formed using doses of 1/5, 1/10, and 1/100, respectively, of the obtained rocuronium bromide seizure threshold dose. The rocuronium bromide seizure threshold value was found to be 0.056±0.009μmoL. The seizure threshold, as a function of the body weight of rats, was calculated as 0.286μmoL/kg -1 . A dose of 1/5 of the seizure threshold dose primarily caused splayed limbs, posturing, and tremors of the entire body, whereas the dose of 1/10 of the seizure threshold dose caused agitation and shivering. A dose of 1/100 of the seizure threshold dose was associated with decreased locomotor activity. This study showed that rocuronium bromide has dose-related deleterious effects on the central nervous system and can produce dose-dependent excitatory effects and seizures. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  20. [The effects of intra-cerebroventricular administered rocuronium on the central nervous system of rats and determination of its epileptic seizure-inducing dose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Mehmet; Gökmen, Necati; Doğan, Alper; Erbayraktar, Serhat; Yılmaz, Osman; Ocmen, Elvan; Erdost, Hale Aksu; Arkan, Atalay

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricularly administered rocuronium bromide on the central nervous system, determine the seizure threshold dose of rocuronium bromide in rats, and investigate the effects of rocuronium on the central nervous system at 1/5, 1/10, and 1/100 dilutions of the determined seizure threshold dose. A permanent cannula was placed in the lateral cerebral ventricle of the animals. The study was designed in two phases. In the first phase, the seizure threshold dose of rocuronium bromide was determined. In the second phase, Group R 1/5 (n=6), Group 1/10 (n=6), and Group 1/100 (n=6) were formed using doses of 1/5, 1/10, and 1/100, respectively, of the obtained rocuronium bromide seizure threshold dose. The rocuronium bromide seizure threshold value was found to be 0.056±0.009μmoL. The seizure threshold, as a function of the body weight of rats, was calculated as 0.286μmoL/kg -1 . A dose of 1/5 of the seizure threshold dose primarily caused splayed limbs, posturing, and tremors of the entire body, whereas the dose of 1/10 of the seizure threshold dose caused agitation and shivering. A dose of 1/100 of the seizure threshold dose was associated with decreased locomotor activity. This study showed that rocuronium bromide has dose-related deleterious effects on the central nervous system and can produce dose-dependent excitatory effects and seizures. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  1. Epilepsy in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures Epilepsia em pacientes com crises não epilépticas psicogênicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Luiz Marchetti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of epilepsy in patients who presented psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES. The evaluation was carried out during intensive VEEG monitoring in a diagnostic center for epilepsy in a university hospital. The difficulties involved in reaching this diagnosis are discussed. Ninety-eight patients underwent intensive and prolonged video-electroencephalographic (VEEG monitoring; out of these, a total of 28 patients presented PNES during monitoring. Epilepsy was defined as present when the patient presented epileptic seizures during VEEG monitoring or when, although not presenting epileptic seizures during monitoring, the patient presented unequivocal interictal epileptiform discharges. The frequency of epilepsy in patients with PNES was 50% (14 patients. Our findings suggest that the frequency of epilepsy in patients with PNES is much higher than that of previous studies, and point out the need, at least in some cases, for prolonging the evaluation of patients with PNES who have clinical histories indicating epilepsy.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a frequência de epilepsia em pacientes que apresentaram crises não epilépticas psicogênicas (CNEP. Isto foi realizado durante monitoração intensiva por video-EEG num centro diagnóstico de epilepsia em um hospital universitário. As dificuldades envolvidas para se chegar a este diagnóstico são discutidas. Noventa e oito pacientes foram submetidos a monitoração intensiva por video-EEG; 28 destes pacientes apresentaram CNEP durante a monitoração. Epilepsia foi considerada presente quando o paciente apresentou crises epilépticas durante a avaliação pelo video-EEG ou quando, apesar da não ocorrência de crises epilépticas durante a avaliação, descargas epilépticas interictais inequívocas estavam presentes. A frequência de epilepsia em pacientes com CNEP foi 50% (14 pacientes. Nossos achados sugerem que a frequência de epilepsia em

  2. Towards prognostic biomarkers from BOLD fluctuations to differentiate a first epileptic seizure from new-onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lalit; Janssens, Rick; Vlooswijk, Mariëlle C G; Rouhl, Rob P W; de Louw, Anton; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Ulman, Shrutin; Besseling, René M H; Hofman, Paul A M; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, Vivianne H; Hilkman, Danny M; Jansen, Jacobus F A; Backes, Walter H

    2017-03-01

    The diagnosis of epilepsy cannot be reliably made prior to a patient's second seizure in most cases. Therefore, adequate diagnostic tools are needed to differentiate subjects with a first seizure from those with a seizure preceding the onset of epilepsy. The objective was to explore spontaneous blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fluctuations in subjects with a first-ever seizure and patients with new-onset epilepsy (NOE), and to find characteristic biomarkers for seizure recurrence after the first seizure. We examined 17 first-seizure subjects, 19 patients with new-onset epilepsy (NOE), and 18 healthy controls. All subjects underwent clinical investigation and received electroencephalography and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The BOLD time series were analyzed in terms of regional homogeneity (ReHo) and fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFFs). We found significantly stronger amplitudes (higher fALFFs) in patients with NOE relative to first-seizure subjects and healthy controls. The frequency range of 73-198 mHz (slow-3 subband) appeared most useful for discriminating patients with NOE from first-seizure subjects. The ReHo measure did not show any significant differences. The fALFF appears to be a noninvasive measure that characterizes spontaneous BOLD fluctuations and shows stronger amplitudes in the slow-3 subband of patients with NOE relative first-seizure subjects and healthy controls. A larger study population with follow-up is required to determine whether fALFF holds promise as a potential biomarker for identifying subjects at increased risk to develop epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. De novo mutations in HCN1 cause early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Caroline; Dalle, Carine; Rastetter, Agnès; Striano, Pasquale; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Nabbout, Rima; Cancès, Claude; Ville, Dorothée; Brilstra, Eva H; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Raffo, Emmanuel; Bouteiller, Delphine; Marie, Yannick; Trouillard, Oriane; Robbiano, Angela; Keren, Boris; Agher, Dahbia; Roze, Emmanuel; Lesage, Suzanne; Nicolas, Aude; Brice, Alexis; Baulac, Michel; Vogt, Cornelia; El Hajj, Nady; Schneider, Eberhard; Suls, Arvid; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Gormley, Padhraig; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Baulac, Stéphanie; Zara, Federico; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Haaf, Thomas; LeGuern, Eric; Depienne, Christel

    2014-06-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels contribute to cationic Ih current in neurons and regulate the excitability of neuronal networks. Studies in rat models have shown that the Hcn1 gene has a key role in epilepsy, but clinical evidence implicating HCN1 mutations in human epilepsy is lacking. We carried out exome sequencing for parent-offspring trios with fever-sensitive, intractable epileptic encephalopathy, leading to the discovery of two de novo missense HCN1 mutations. Screening of follow-up cohorts comprising 157 cases in total identified 4 additional amino acid substitutions. Patch-clamp recordings of Ih currents in cells expressing wild-type or mutant human HCN1 channels showed that the mutations had striking but divergent effects on homomeric channels. Individuals with mutations had clinical features resembling those of Dravet syndrome with progression toward atypical absences, intellectual disability and autistic traits. These findings provide clear evidence that de novo HCN1 point mutations cause a recognizable early-onset epileptic encephalopathy in humans.

  4. Increased odds and predictive rates of MMPI-2-RF scale elevations in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and observed sex differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bene, Victor A; Arce Rentería, Miguel; Maiman, Moshe; Slugh, Mitch; Gazzola, Deana M; Nadkarni, Siddhartha S; Barr, William B

    2017-07-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) is a self-report instrument, previously shown to differentiate patients with epileptic seizures (ES) and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES). At present, the odds of MMPI-2-RF scale elevations in PNES patients, as well as the diagnostic predictive value of such scale elevations, remain largely unexplored. This can be of clinical utility, particularly when a diagnosis is uncertain. After looking at mean group differences, we applied contingency table derived odds ratios to a sample of ES (n=92) and PNES (n=77) patients from a video EEG (vEEG) monitoring unit. We also looked at the positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV), as well as the false discovery rate (FDR) and false omission rate (FOR) for scales found to have increased odds of elevation in PNES patients. This was completed for the overall sample, as well as the sample stratified by sex. The odds of elevations related to somatic concerns, negative mood, and suicidal ideation in the PNES sample ranged from 2 to 5 times more likely. Female PNES patients had 3-6 times greater odds of such scale elevations, while male PNES patients had odds of 5-15 times more likely. PPV rates ranged from 53.66% to 84.62%, while NPV rates ranged from 47.52% to 90.91%. FDR across scales ranged from 15.38% to 50%, while the FOR ranged from 9.09% to 52.47%. Consistent with prior research, PNES patients have greater odds of MMPI-2-RF scale elevations, particularly related to somatic concerns and mood disturbance. Female PNES patients endorsed greater emotional distress, including endorsement of suicide related items. Elevations of these scales could aid in differentiating PNES from ES patients, although caution is warranted due to the possibility of both false positives and the incorrect omissions of PNES cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mutations in KPTN Cause Macrocephaly, Neurodevelopmental Delay, and Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baple, Emma L.; Maroofian, Reza; Chioza, Barry A.; Izadi, Maryam; Cross, Harold E.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Barwick, Katy; Skrzypiec, Anna; Pawlak, Robert; Wagner, Karin; Coblentz, Roselyn; Zainy, Tala; Patton, Michael A.; Mansour, Sahar; Rich, Phillip; Qualmann, Britta; Hurles, Matt E.; Kessels, Michael M.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    The proper development of neuronal circuits during neuromorphogenesis and neuronal-network formation is critically dependent on a coordinated and intricate series of molecular and cellular cues and responses. Although the cortical actin cytoskeleton is known to play a key role in neuromorphogenesis, relatively little is known about the specific molecules important for this process. Using linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing on samples from families from the Amish community of Ohio, we have demonstrated that mutations in KPTN, encoding kaptin, cause a syndrome typified by macrocephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, and seizures. Our immunofluorescence analyses in primary neuronal cell cultures showed that endogenous and GFP-tagged kaptin associates with dynamic actin cytoskeletal structures and that this association is lost upon introduction of the identified mutations. Taken together, our studies have identified kaptin alterations responsible for macrocephaly and neurodevelopmental delay and define kaptin as a molecule crucial for normal human neuromorphogenesis. PMID:24239382

  6. Cognitive Dysfunctions in Epileptic Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semih Ayta

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Some children with epilepsy display a low level of intelligence, learning disabilities, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, mood disorders and anxiety. Besides specific learning disabilities like reading, writing, arithmetics, learning problems may involve other major areas of intellectual functions such as speech and language, attention, memory, fine motor coordination. Even in the presence of common pathology that leads to epilepsy and mental dysfunctions, seizures cause additional cognitive problems. Age at seizure onset, type of seizures and epileptic syndromes are some variables that determine the effect of epilepsy on cognition. As recurrent seizures may have some negative impact on the developing brain, the use of antiepileptic drugs should be considered not only to aim reducing seizures but also to prevent possible seizure-induced cortical dysfunctions. Epilepsy is a disorder requiring a complicated psychological adjustment for the patients and indeed is a disease that affects the whole family. Thus, the management of epilepsy must include educational, psychotherapeutic and behavioral interventions as well as drug treatment.

  7. BAD-dependent regulation of fuel metabolism and K(ATP) channel activity confers resistance to epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Cassina, Alfredo; Martínez-François, Juan Ramón; Fisher, Jill K; Szlyk, Benjamin; Polak, Klaudia; Wiwczar, Jessica; Tanner, Geoffrey R; Lutas, Andrew; Yellen, Gary; Danial, Nika N

    2012-05-24

    Neuronal excitation can be substantially modulated by alterations in metabolism, as evident from the anticonvulsant effect of diets that reduce glucose utilization and promote ketone body metabolism. We provide genetic evidence that BAD, a protein with dual functions in apoptosis and glucose metabolism, imparts reciprocal effects on metabolism of glucose and ketone bodies in brain cells. These effects involve phosphoregulation of BAD and are independent of its apoptotic function. BAD modifications that reduce glucose metabolism produce a marked increase in the activity of metabolically sensitive K(ATP) channels in neurons, as well as resistance to behavioral and electrographic seizures in vivo. Seizure resistance is reversed by genetic ablation of the K(ATP) channel, implicating the BAD-K(ATP) axis in metabolic control of neuronal excitation and seizure responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Validity of the clinical and content scales of the Multiphasic Personality Inventory Minnesota 2 for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barrio, A; Jiménez-Huete, A; Toledano, R; García-Morales, I; Gil-Nagel, A

    2016-03-01

    The use of the Multiphasic Personality Inventory Minnesota 2 (MMPI-2) for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) is controversial. This study examines the validity of the clinical scales and, unlike previous works, the content scales. Cross-sectional study of 209 patients treated in the epilepsy unit. We performed a logistic regression analysis, taking video-electroencephalography as the reference test, and as predictor variables age, sex, IQ and clinical (model A) or content scales (model B) of the MMPI-2. The models were selected according to the Aikake index and compared using the DeLong test. We analyzed 37 patients with PNES alone, or combined with seizures, and 172 patients with seizures only. The model consisting of sex, Hs (hypochondriasis) and Pa (paranoia) showed a sensitivity of 77.1%, a specificity of 76.8%, a percentage of correct classification of 76.8%, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.836 for diagnosing CNEP. Model B, consisting of sex, HEA (health concerns) and FRS (fears), showed a sensitivity of 65.7%, a specificity of 78.0%, a percentage of correct classification of 75.9% and an AUC of 0.840. DeLong's test did not detect significant differences. The MMPI-2 has a moderate validity for the diagnosis of PNES in patients referred to an epilepsy unit. Using content scales does not significantly improve results from the clinical scales. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. The cost effectiveness of licensed oromucosal midazolam (Buccolam(®)) for the treatment of children experiencing acute epileptic seizures: an approach when trial evidence is limited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dawn; Gladwell, Daniel; Batty, Anthony J; Brereton, Nic; Tate, Elaine

    2013-04-01

    In the UK, two treatment options are used for acute epileptic seizures in the community-rectal diazepam and unlicensed buccal midazolam. In practice, the former is rarely used, with unlicensed buccal midazolam being widely recommended and prescribed by physicians. In September 2011, Buccolam(®) (licensed midazolam oromucosal solution) became the first medicine to receive a Paediatric-Use Marketing Authorization (PUMA) and it is indicated for the treatment of prolonged, acute, convulsive seizures by caregivers in the community for children (aged 6 months to marketing authorization processes and may be based upon small population subsets and may not, in some cases, require new safety or efficacy data to be generated; a similar situation to that seen for orphan drugs. This can lead to challenges when conducting economic evaluations. The aim of this study was to assess the cost effectiveness of Buccolam(®) for children with a diagnosis of epilepsy suffering prolonged, acute, convulsive seizures occurring in the UK community setting. DESIGN AND PERSPECTIVE: A hybrid model was developed according to a UK payer perspective. The model included a time-to-event simulation for the frequency and location of occurrence of seizures, along with a decision-tree model that assessed the treatment pathway when a seizure occured. The model compared treatment with Buccolam(®) with standard care in the community (95 % unlicensed buccal midazolam and 5 % rectal diazepam) or either treatment alone. The model was informed by data from a variety of sources, including clinical effectiveness estimates, and costs based on published UK data, using 2012-13 prices, where possible. To determine current practice and real-world effectiveness, a Delphi panel and a survey of parents of children with epilepsy were conducted. Buccolam(®) showed a reduction in costs of £2,939 compared with standard care, £14,269 compared with rectal diazepam alone and £886 compared with unlicensed buccal midazolam

  10. COgnitive behavioural therapy vs standardised medical care for adults with Dissociative non-Epileptic Seizures (CODES): a multicentre randomised controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Laura H; Mellers, John D C; Landau, Sabine; Stone, Jon; Carson, Alan; Medford, Nick; Reuber, Markus; Richardson, Mark; McCrone, Paul; Murray, Joanna; Chalder, Trudie

    2015-06-27

    The evidence base for the effectiveness of psychological interventions for patients with dissociative non-epileptic seizures (DS) is currently extremely limited, although data from two small pilot randomised controlled trials (RCTs), including from our group, suggest that Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) may be effective in reducing DS occurrence and may improve aspects of psychological status and psychosocial functioning. The study is a multicentre, pragmatic parallel group RCT to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of specifically-tailored CBT plus standardised medical care (SMC) vs SMC alone in reducing DS frequency and improving psychological and health-related outcomes. In the initial screening phase, patients with DS will receive their diagnosis from a neurologist/epilepsy specialist. If patients are eligible and interested following the provision of study information and a booklet about DS, they will consent to provide demographic information and fortnightly data about their seizures, and agree to see a psychiatrist three months later. We aim to recruit ~500 patients to this screening stage. After a review three months later by a psychiatrist, those patients who have continued to have DS in the previous eight weeks and who meet further eligibility criteria will be told about the trial comparing CBT + SMC vs SMC alone. If they are interested in participating, they will be given a further booklet on DS and study information. A research worker will see them to obtain their informed consent to take part in the RCT. We aim to randomise 298 people (149 to each arm). In addition to a baseline assessment, data will be collected at 6 and 12 months post randomisation. Our primary outcome is monthly seizure frequency in the preceding month. Secondary outcomes include seizure severity, measures of seizure freedom and reduction, psychological distress and psychosocial functioning, quality of life, health service use, cost effectiveness and adverse

  11. TNF-Overexpression in Borna Disease Virus-Infected Mouse Brains Triggers Inflammatory Reaction and Epileptic Seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Katharina; Schaudien, Dirk; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.; Herzog, Sibylle; Richt, Juergen A.; Baumgaertner, Wolfgang; Herden, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Proinflammatory state of the brain increases the risk for seizure development. Neonatal Borna disease virus (BDV)-infection of mice with neuronal overexpression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) was used to investigate the complex relationship between enhanced cytokine levels, neurotropic virus

  12. Metabolic and toxic causes of canine seizure disorders: A retrospective study of 96 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Christina; Jambroszyk, Melanie; Tipold, Andrea

    2011-02-01

    A wide variety of intoxications and abnormal metabolic conditions can lead to reactive seizures in dogs. Patient records of dogs suffering from seizure disorders (n=877) were reviewed, and 96 cases were associated with an underlying metabolic or toxic aetiology. These included intoxications by various agents, hypoglycaemia, electrolyte disorders, hepatic encephalopathy, hypothyroidism, uraemic encephalopathy, hypoxia and hyperglycaemia. The incidence of the underlying diseases was determined. The most common causes of reactive seizures were intoxications (39%, 37 dogs) and hypoglycaemia (32%, 31 dogs). Hypocalcaemia was the most frequent electrolyte disorder causing reactive seizures (5%) and all five of these dogs had ionised calcium concentrations ≤0.69 mmol/L. Eleven per cent of dogs with seizures had metabolic or toxic disorders and this relatively high frequency emphasises the importance of a careful clinical work-up of cases presented with seizures in order to reach a correct diagnosis and select appropriate treatment options. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel GABRG2 mutations cause familial febrile seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boillot, Morgane; Morin-Brureau, Mélanie; Picard, Fabienne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Lambrecq, Virginie; Minetti, Carlo; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Iacomino, Michele; Ishida, Saeko; An-Gourfinkel, Isabelle; Daniau, Mailys; Hardies, Katia; Baulac, Michel; Dulac, Olivier; Leguern, Eric; Nabbout, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause in a large family with febrile seizures (FS) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and subsequently search for additional mutations in a cohort of 107 families with FS, with or without epilepsy. Methods: The cohort consisted of 1 large family with FS and TLE, 64 smaller French families recruited through a national French campaign, and 43 Italian families. Molecular analyses consisted of whole-exome sequencing and mutational screening. Results: Exome sequencing revealed a p.Glu402fs*3 mutation in the γ2 subunit of the GABAA receptor gene (GABRG2) in the large family with FS and TLE. Three additional nonsense and frameshift GABRG2 mutations (p.Arg136*, p.Val462fs*33, and p.Pro59fs*12), 1 missense mutation (p.Met199Val), and 1 exonic deletion were subsequently identified in 5 families of the follow-up cohort. Conclusions: We report GABRG2 mutations in 5.6% (6/108) of families with FS, with or without associated epilepsy. This study provides evidence that GABRG2 mutations are linked to the FS phenotype, rather than epilepsy, and that loss-of-function of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit is the probable underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:27066572

  14. Oxidant-Antioxidant Balance In Epileptic Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moawad, A.T.; Mohammed, A.A.; El-Maghraby, D.M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders which are characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. It is usually controlled, but cannot be cured with medications, although surgery may be considered in difficult cases. Over 30% of people with epilepsy don't have seizure control even with the best available medications. In epileptic children, oxidant-antioxidant balance is disturbed. Glutathione homeostasis may be altered as a consequence of reactive metabolites and/or reactive oxygen species produced during treatment with antiepileptic drugs. Per-oxidation of membrane lipid caused by an increase in generation of free radical or decrease in the activities of antioxidant defense systems have been suggested to be critically involved in seizure control. The effect of antiepileptic monotherapy as valproic acid (VPA) or carbamazepine (CBZ) or both on level of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) as an index of antioxidant and the plasma of malondialdehyde (MDA) as an index of oxidative stress were studied in this study. Forty children (18 males and 22 females) with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, diagnosed in the Pediatric Neurology Unit, Children Hospital, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt, were selected to represent group (1) with mean age of 5.13 ± 4.36 years. Thirty healthy children (14 males and 16 females) matched in age, sex and social life status served as normal control group (2). The results revealed that there was high significant increase in the plasma level of MDA in patients with idiopathic epilepsy as compared to the control while the serum level of GST was significantly decreased in epileptic children as compared to the control group. Non-significant difference in plasma level of MDA and serum level of GST among the epileptic subgroups was observed. In uncontrolled epileptic patients (seizures more than 4/month), the plasma level of MDA displayed higher significant increase than in controlled epileptic patients. On the other hand, serum GST

  15. Absence-like and tonic seizures in aspartoacylase/attractin double-mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohma, Hiroshi; Kuramoto, Takashi; Matalon, Reuben; Surendran, Sankar; Tyring, Stephen; Kitada, Kazuhiro; Sasa, Masashi; Serikawa, Tadao

    2007-04-01

    The Spontaneously Epileptic Rat (SER), a double-mutant for tremor and zitter mutations, shows spontaneous occurrences of absence-like and tonic seizures. Several lines of evidence suggest that the combined effect of Aspa and Atrn mutations is the most likely cause of the epileptic phenotype of the SER. To address this issue, we produced a new double-mutant mouse line carrying both homozygous Aspa-knockout and Atrn(mg-3J) mutant alleles. The Aspa/Atrn double-mutant mice exhibited absence-like and tonic seizures that were characterized by the appearance of 5-7 Hz spike-wave-like complexes and low voltage fast waves on EEGs. These results demonstrate directly that the simultaneous loss of the Aspa and Atrn gene functions causes epileptic seizures in the mouse and suggest that both Aspa and Atrn deficiencies might be responsible for epileptic seizures in the SER.

  16. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (pFibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described.

  17. Epileptic seizure detection using DWT-based approximate entropy, Shannon entropy and support vector machine: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmila, A; Aman Raj, Suman; Shashank, Pandey; Mahalakshmi, P

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we have used a time-frequency domain analysis method called discrete wavelet transform (DWT) technique. This method stand out compared to other proposed methods because of its algorithmic elegance and accuracy. A wavelet is a mathematical function based on time-frequency analysis in signal processing. It is useful particularly because it allows a weak signal to be recovered from a noisy signal without much distortion. A wavelet analysis works by analysing the image and converting it to mathematical function which is decoded by the receiver. Furthermore, we have used Shannon entropy and approximate entropy (ApEn) for extracting the complexities associated with electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. The ApEn is a suitable feature to characterise the EEGs because its value drops suddenly due to excessive synchronous discharge of neurons in the brain during epileptic activity in this study. EEG signals are decomposed into six EEG sub-bands namely D1-D5 and A5 using DWT technique. Non-linear features such as ApEn and Shannon entropy are calculated from these sub-bands and support vector machine classifiers are used for classification purpose. This scheme is tested using EEG data recorded from five healthy subjects and five epileptic patients during the inter-ictal and ictal periods. The data are acquired from University of Bonn, Germany. The proposed method is evaluated through 15 classification problems, and obtained high classification accuracy of 100% for two cases and it indicates the good classifying performance of the proposed method.

  18. Danish epileptics given Thorotrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, J.H.; Anderson, M.; Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Cancer incidence among 8004 patients hospitalized for epilepsy between 1933 and 1962 was compared to that of the general population. Among 140 epileptics given Thorotrast during cerebral angiography, a significant excess of cancer was observed. Thorotrast exposure was linked to significant excesses of liver cancer, leukaemia and lung cancer. An excess of brain cancer occurred shortly after hospital admission, suggesting brain tumours were the cause of the seizure disorder and are not due to Thorotrast. Haemangiosarcomas of the liver appeared uniquely related to Thorotrast, as did the rare subtypes of leukaemia observed. Cholangiocarcinomas also occurred in excess. The preponderance of anaplastic lung cancer is provocative and suggests the possibility that thoron exposure from the decay of Thorotrast might be involved. The cumulative risk of developing cancer at 40 years, excluding the brain cancer risk, was 60±6%. (author)

  19. Impaired action potential initiation in GABAergic interneurons causes hyperexcitable networks in an epileptic mouse model carrying a human Na(V)1.1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrich, Ulrike B S; Liautard, Camille; Kirschenbaum, Daniel; Pofahl, Martin; Lavigne, Jennifer; Liu, Yuanyuan; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Escayg, Andrew; Dihné, Marcel; Beck, Heinz; Mantegazza, Massimo; Lerche, Holger

    2014-11-05

    Mutations in SCN1A and other ion channel genes can cause different epileptic phenotypes, but the precise mechanisms underlying the development of hyperexcitable networks are largely unknown. Here, we present a multisystem analysis of an SCN1A mouse model carrying the NaV1.1-R1648H mutation, which causes febrile seizures and epilepsy in humans. We found a ubiquitous hypoexcitability of interneurons in thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus, without detectable changes in excitatory neurons. Interestingly, somatic Na(+) channels in interneurons and persistent Na(+) currents were not significantly changed. Instead, the key mechanism of interneuron dysfunction was a deficit of action potential initiation at the axon initial segment that was identified by analyzing action potential firing. This deficit increased with the duration of firing periods, suggesting that increased slow inactivation, as recorded for recombinant mutated channels, could play an important role. The deficit in interneuron firing caused reduced action potential-driven inhibition of excitatory neurons as revealed by less frequent spontaneous but not miniature IPSCs. Multiple approaches indicated increased spontaneous thalamocortical and hippocampal network activity in mutant mice, as follows: (1) more synchronous and higher-frequency firing was recorded in primary neuronal cultures plated on multielectrode arrays; (2) thalamocortical slices examined by field potential recordings revealed spontaneous activities and pathological high-frequency oscillations; and (3) multineuron Ca(2+) imaging in hippocampal slices showed increased spontaneous neuronal activity. Thus, an interneuron-specific generalized defect in action potential initiation causes multisystem disinhibition and network hyperexcitability, which can well explain the occurrence of seizures in the studied mouse model and in patients carrying this mutation. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414874-16$15.00/0.

  20. Resuscitation of sudden cardiac death caused by acute epileptic seizures: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana-Oliviana Geavlete

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic long QT syndrome in pediatric patients is a life-threatening condition. Sometimes, this pathology can be misdiagnosed and erroneously managed as generalized epilepsy due to similar clinical manifestations. The presented case discusses a 13-year-old female patient with generalized epilepsy since the age of 4, admitted for two episodes of resuscitated cardiac arrest due to torsades de pointes and ventricular fibrillation. The final diagnosis of congenital long QT was established and due to the patient's high-risk profile for future cardiac events, implantable cardiac defibrillator was subsequently indicated. Early recognition of congenital long QT and timing of cardiac therapy were crucial and potentially lower the incidence of fatal dysrhythmias commonly associated this condition. In high-risk patients, both medical and interventional therapy can be life-saving.

  1. Seizure-induced muscle force can caused lumbar spine fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlhorn, A T; Strohm, P C; Hausschildt, O

    2007-01-01

    of the mid-thoracic spine. We report a patient who had suffered from a tonic-clonic seizure during early morning hours. After a cracking sound the patient woke up in a state of post-ictal disorientation, loss of urine and tongue bite. He was admitted to our facilities with the suspected vertebral fracture...

  2. Tuberous sclerosis: A rare cause of seizure in Nigeria. | Altraide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was associated learning disabilities and poor school performance, with sudden outburst of mood swings ranging from laughter to anger. Speech was delayed. He has been on Carbamazepine for the past two years and is seizure free. There was no history of similar illness in the family. Physical examination showed ...

  3. The association between seizures and deposition of collagen in the brain in porcine Taenia solium neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Nina M; Trevisan, Chiara; Leifsson, Páll S; Johansen, Maria V

    2016-09-15

    Neurocysticercosis caused by infection with Taenia solium is a significant cause of epilepsy and seizures in humans. The aim of this study was to assess the association between seizures and the deposition of collagen in brain tissue in pigs with T. solium neurocysticercosis. In total 78 brain tissue sections from seven pigs were examined histopathologically i.e. two pigs with epileptic seizures and T. solium cysts, four pigs without seizures but with cysts, and one non-infected control pig. Pigs with epileptic seizures had a larger amount of collagen in their brain tissue, showing as large fibrotic scars and moderate amount of collagen deposited around cysts, compared to pigs without seizures and the negative control pig. Our results indicate that collagen is likely to play a considerable part in the pathogenesis of seizures in T. solium neurocysticercosis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Epilepsy from a metaphysical perspective: an interpretation of the biblical story of the epileptic boy and Raphael's Transfiguration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, D

    1994-01-01

    Raphael's last painting reveals, in the upper half of the picture, Christ's transfiguration on Mount Tabor and, in the lower half, the young boy's epileptic seizure at the foot of the mountain in the presence of the other disciples. Raphael depicts both events, which are told in succession in the Gospels, as if they took place at the same time. By synchronizing both scenes, Raphael demonstrated a significant correspondence between Christ and the epileptic boy which reveals the epileptic seizure as a symbolic representation of a transcendental event. This metaphysical aspect of epilepsy depicted by Raphael can also be found in the corresponding biblical passages. In the Gospels, the metamorphosis caused by the epileptic seizure is used as a simile for Christ's transfiguration through suffering, death and resurrection.

  5. Assessing quantitative EEG spectrograms to identify non-epileptic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenka, Ajay; Boro, Alexis; Yozawitz, Elissa

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of quantitative EEG (QEEG) spectrograms in order to distinguish epileptic from non-epileptic events. Seventeen patients with paroxysmal non-epileptic events, captured during EEG monitoring, were retrospectively assessed using QEEG spectrograms. These patients were compared to a control group of 13 consecutive patients (ages 25-60 years) with epileptic seizures of similar semiology. Assessment of raw EEG was employed as the gold standard against which epileptic and non-epileptic events were validated. QEEG spectrograms, available using Persyst 12 EEG system integration software, were each assessed with respect to their usefulness to distinguish epileptic from non-epileptic seizures. The given spectrogram was interpreted as indicating a seizure if, at the time of the clinically identified event, it showed a visually significant change from baseline. Eighty-two clinically identified paroxysmal events were analysed (46 non-epileptic and 36 epileptic). The "seizure detector trend analysis" spectrogram correctly classified 33/46 (71%) non-epileptic events (no seizure indicated during a clinically identified event) vs. 29/36 (81%) epileptic seizures (seizure indicated during a clinically identified event) (p=0.013). Similarly, "rhythmicity spectrogram", FFT spectrogram, "asymmetry relative spectrogram", and integrated-amplitude EEG spectrogram detected 28/46 (61%), 30/46 (65%), 22/46 (48%) and 27/46 (59%) non-epileptic events vs. 27/36 (75%), 25/36 (69%), 25/36 (69%) and 27/36 (75%) epileptic events, respectively. High sensitivities and specificities for QEEG seizure detection analyses suggest that QEEG may have a role at the bedside to facilitate early differentiation between epileptic seizures and non-epileptic events in order to avoid unnecessary administration of antiepileptic drugs and possible iatrogenic consequences.

  6. Early-onset epileptic encephalopathy caused by a reduced sensitivity of Kv7.2 potassium channels to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Ambrosino, Paolo; Mosca, Ilaria; De Maria, Michela; Moretto, Edoardo; Miceli, Francesco; Alaimo, Alessandro; Iraci, Nunzio; Manocchio, Laura; Medoro, Alessandro; Passafaro, Maria; Taglialatela, Maurizio

    2016-12-01

    Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 subunits underlie the M-current, a neuronal K + current characterized by an absolute functional requirement for phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ). Kv7.2 gene mutations cause early-onset neonatal seizures with heterogeneous clinical outcomes, ranging from self-limiting benign familial neonatal seizures to severe early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (Kv7.2-EE). In this study, the biochemical and functional consequences prompted by a recurrent variant (R325G) found independently in four individuals with severe forms of neonatal-onset EE have been investigated. Upon heterologous expression, homomeric Kv7.2 R325G channels were non-functional, despite biotin-capture in Western blots revealed normal plasma membrane subunit expression. Mutant subunits exerted dominant-negative effects when incorporated into heteromeric channels with Kv7.2 and/or Kv7.3 subunits. Increasing cellular PIP 2 levels by co-expression of type 1γ PI(4)P5-kinase (PIP5K) partially recovered homomeric Kv7.2 R325G channel function. Currents carried by heteromeric channels incorporating Kv7.2 R325G subunits were more readily inhibited than wild-type channels upon activation of a voltage-sensitive phosphatase (VSP), and recovered more slowly upon VSP switch-off. These results reveal for the first time that a mutation-induced decrease in current sensitivity to PIP 2 is the primary molecular defect responsible for Kv7.2-EE in individuals carrying the R325G variant, further expanding the range of pathogenetic mechanisms exploitable for personalized treatment of Kv7.2-related epilepsies.

  7. “Blaming, shaming, humiliation”: Stigmatising medical interactions among people with non-epileptic seizures [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Robson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: People with non-epileptic seizures (NES describe challenging relationships with health professionals, and explain negative interactions as common and expected. Despite these difficulties, little is known about how people with NES experience difficult healthcare encounters. Methods: Using a thematic discourse analysis approach, we analysed the free-text survey responses of 135 people with NES and asked: what kind of challenges do people living with this condition encounter when interacting with health professionals, and how do they experience the consequences of difficult interactions? We explore their experiences by interpreting the latent meaning of participants’ texts from a social-constructionist perspective on health and illness. Results: The overarching narrative depicts a fundamental breakdown in patient-provider relationships. According to our data, the negative experiences of study participants emerge from more than practitioners’ lack of awareness of NES and access to information about the condition - to the extent that it is available. In examining the challenges people with NES encounter when interacting with health professionals, their main experiences centre on blame and humiliation. When exploring their experiences, theories of stigma serve as a useful theoretical framework. Conclusions: Normative judgements arising from psychogenic understandings of NES are stigmatising and restrict professional displays of respectful (patient-centred care. Those with the condition depict being negatively stereotyped, illegitimated and held morally culpable by health professionals. Perceived to lack medical, moral and credible status, participants describe practitioners who treat them with disrespect, and some recount conduct that defies all ethical and professional obligations and standards. These encounters can have wide-ranging adverse consequences for patients: emotionally, physically, and for their future healthcare. The

  8. Self-esteem and psychiatric features of Turkish adolescents with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: a comparative study with epilepsy and healthy control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Say, Gokçe N; Tasdemir, Haydar A; Akbas, Seher; Yüce, Murat; Karabekiroglu, Koray

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and epilepsy are known to have psychosocial problems. The aim of the present study was to compare the psychosocial difficulties, history of stressful life events/abuse, psychiatric diagnosis, and self-esteem of adolescents with PNES to the ones with epilepsy and healthy controls at a tertiary care center in Turkey. Thirty-four adolescents with PNES diagnosed by video-EEG were compared with 23 adolescents that have epilepsy and 35 healthy volunteers. Comorbid psychiatric diagnoses of participants were examined by semi-structured interviews using Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version (KSADS-PL). Self-esteem of adolescents was evaluated by Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES). No differences in sociodemographic features were observed between the groups. The PNES group showed significantly higher rates of parental conflicts, difficulties in relationship with siblings/peers, school under-achievement, and history of stressful events/abuse. The rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders were 64.7% in PNES and 47.8% in epilepsy group. The most common disorders in both groups were attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depressive disorder. The rate of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was significantly increased in the PNES group. Additionally, adolescents with PNES displayed significantly lower levels of self-esteem than the other groups. It could be concluded that both disorders involved a high risk for developing psychiatric disorders; additionally, adolescents with PNES have higher rates of stressors and lower levels of self-esteem. Findings from this investigation point to the importance of psychiatric interventions in pediatric PNES and also epilepsy.

  9. Heterozygous truncation mutations of the SMC1A gene cause a severe early onset epilepsy with cluster seizures in females: Detailed phenotyping of 10 new cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, Joseph D; Joss, Shelagh; Metcalfe, Kay A; Somarathi, Suresh; Cruden, Jamie; Devlin, Anita M; Donaldson, Alan; DiDonato, Nataliya; Fitzpatrick, David; Kaiser, Frank J; Lampe, Anne K; Lees, Melissa M; McLellan, Ailsa; Montgomery, Tara; Mundada, Vivek; Nairn, Lesley; Sarkar, Ajoy; Schallner, Jens; Pozojevic, Jelena; Parenti, Ilaria; Tan, Jeen; Turnpenny, Peter; Whitehouse, William P; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2017-04-01

    The phenotype of seizure clustering with febrile illnesses in infancy/early childhood is well recognized. To date the only genetic epilepsy consistently associated with this phenotype is PCDH19, an X-linked disorder restricted to females, and males with mosaicism. The SMC1A gene, which encodes a structural component of the cohesin complex is also located on the X chromosome. Missense variants and small in-frame deletions of SMC1A cause approximately 5% of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS). Recently, protein truncating mutations in SMC1A have been reported in five females, all of whom have been affected by a drug-resistant epilepsy, and severe developmental impairment. Our objective was to further delineate the phenotype of SMC1A truncation. Female cases with de novo truncation mutations in SMC1A were identified from the Deciphering Developmental Disorders (DDD) study (n = 8), from postmortem testing of an affected twin (n = 1), and from clinical testing with an epilepsy gene panel (n = 1). Detailed information on the phenotype in each case was obtained. Ten cases with heterozygous de novo mutations in the SMC1A gene are presented. All 10 mutations identified are predicted to result in premature truncation of the SMC1A protein. All cases are female, and none had a clinical diagnosis of CdLS. They presented with onset of epileptic seizures between <4 weeks and 28 months of age. In the majority of cases, a marked preponderance for seizures to occur in clusters was noted. Seizure clusters were associated with developmental regression. Moderate or severe developmental impairment was apparent in all cases. Truncation mutations in SMC1A cause a severe epilepsy phenotype with cluster seizures in females. These mutations are likely to be nonviable in males. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Mutations in the GABA Transporter SLC6A1 Cause Epilepsy with Myoclonic-Atonic Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvill, Gemma L.; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Schneider, Amy; Zemel, Matthew; Myers, Candace T.; Saykally, Julia; Nguyen, John; Robbiano, Angela; Zara, Federico; Specchio, Nicola; Mecarelli, Oriano; Smith, Robert L.; Leventer, Richard J.; Møller, Rikke S.; Nikanorova, Marina; Dimova, Petia; Jordanova, Albena; Petrou, Steven; Helbig, Ingo; Striano, Pasquale; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Mefford, Heather C.

    2015-01-01

    GAT-1, encoded by SLC6A1, is one of the major gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters in the brain and is responsible for re-uptake of GABA from the synapse. In this study, targeted resequencing of 644 individuals with epileptic encephalopathies led to the identification of six SLC6A1 mutations in seven individuals, all of whom have epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures (MAE). We describe two truncations and four missense alterations, all of which most likely lead to loss of function of GAT-1 and thus reduced GABA re-uptake from the synapse. These individuals share many of the electrophysiological properties of Gat1-deficient mice, including spontaneous spike-wave discharges. Overall, pathogenic mutations occurred in 6/160 individuals with MAE, accounting for ∼4% of unsolved MAE cases. PMID:25865495

  11. [Tropical causes of epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carod-Artal, F J

    Eighty-five percent of all epileptics live in tropical regions. Prenatal risk factors, traumatic brain injuries and different parasitic infestations of the central nervous system (CNS) are the reasons behind the high prevalence of epilepsy. This work reviews the main parasitic infestations causing epilepsy in the tropics. Neurocysticercosis is the main cause of focal epilepsy in early adulthood in endemic areas (30-50%). All the phases of cysticerci (viable, transitional and calcified) are associated with epileptic seizures. Anti-cysticercus treatment helps get rid of cysticerci faster and reduces the risk of recurrence of seizures in patients with viable cysts. Symptomatic epilepsy can be the first manifestation of neuroschistosomiasis in patients without any systemic symptoms. The pseudotumoral form can trigger seizures secondary to the presence of granulomas and oedemas in the cerebral cortex. The eggs of Schistosoma japonicum are smaller, reach the CNS more easily and trigger epileptic seizures more frequently. Toxocariasis and sparganosis are other parasitic infestations that can give rise to symptomatic seizures. The risk factors for suffering chronic epilepsy after cerebral malaria are a positive familial history of epilepsy and a history of episodes of fever and cerebral malaria that began with coma or which progressed with multiple, prolonged epileptic seizures. About 20% of patients with cerebral infarction secondary to Chagas disease present late vascular epilepsy as a complication. Very few studies have been conducted to examine the prognosis, risk of recurrence and modification of the natural course of seizures associated with tropical parasitic infestations, except for the case of neurocysticercosis.

  12. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Ramsdell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  13. Clinical intrafamilial variability in lethal familial neonatal seizure disorder caused by TBC1D24 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Reymundo; Herman, Kristin; Rothfuss, Melanie; Rieger, Hillary; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Aprile, Davide; Fruscione, Floriana; Zara, Federico; Fassio, Anna

    2016-12-01

    TBC1D24-related disorders include a wide phenotypic ranging from mild to lethal seizure disorders, non-syndromic deafness, and composite syndromes such as DOORS (deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures). The TBC1D24 gene has a role in cerebral cortex development and in presynaptic neurotransmission. Here, we present a familial case of a lethal early-onset epileptic encephalopathy, associated with two novel compound heterozygous missense variants on the TBC1D24 gene, which were detected by exome sequencing. The detailed clinical data of the three siblings is summarized in order to support the variability of the phenotype, severity, and progression of this disorder among these family members. Functional studies demonstrated that the identified novel missense mutations result in a loss of expression of the protein, suggesting a correlation between residual expression, and the disease severity. This indicates that protein expression analysis is important for interpreting genetic results when novel variants are found, as well as for complementing clinical assessment by predicting the functional impact. Further analysis is necessary to delineate the clinical presentation of individuals with TBC1D24 pathogenic variants, as well as to develop markers for diagnosis, prognosis, and potential targeted treatments. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Neonatal epileptic encephalopathy caused by mutations in the PNPO gene encoding pyridox(am)ine 5'-phosphate oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Philippa B; Surtees, Robert A H; Champion, Michael P; Beesley, Clare E; Dalton, Neil; Scambler, Peter J; Heales, Simon J R; Briddon, Anthony; Scheimberg, Irene; Hoffmann, Georg F; Zschocke, Johannes; Clayton, Peter T

    2005-04-15

    In the mouse, neurotransmitter metabolism can be regulated by modulation of the synthesis of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and failure to maintain pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) levels results in epilepsy. This study of five patients with neonatal epileptic encephalopathy suggests that the same is true in man. Cerebrospinal fluid and urine analyses indicated reduced activity of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase and other PLP-dependent enzymes. Seizures ceased with the administration of PLP, having been resistant to treatment with pyridoxine, suggesting a defect of pyridox(am)ine 5'-phosphate oxidase (PNPO). Sequencing of the PNPO gene identified homozygous missense, splice site and stop codon mutations. Expression studies in Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that the splice site (IVS3-1g>a) and stop codon (X262Q) mutations were null activity mutations and that the missense mutation (R229W) markedly reduced pyridox(am)ine phosphate oxidase activity. Maintenance of optimal PLP levels in the brain may be important in many neurological disorders in which neurotransmitter metabolism is disturbed (either as a primary or as a secondary phenomenon).

  15. De novo loss- or gain-of-function mutations in KCNA2 cause epileptic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syrbe, Steffen; Hedrich, Ulrike B S; Riesch, Erik

    2015-01-01

    disability, delayed speech development and sometimes ataxia. Functional studies of the two mutations associated with this phenotype showed almost complete loss of function with a dominant-negative effect. Two further individuals presented with a different and more severe epileptic encephalopathy phenotype....... They carried mutations inducing a drastic gain-of-function effect leading to permanently open channels. These results establish KCNA2 as a new gene involved in human neurodevelopmental disorders through two different mechanisms, predicting either hyperexcitability or electrical silencing of KV1.2-expressing...

  16. Mutation of Elfn1 in mice causes seizures and hyperactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie Dolan

    Full Text Available A growing number of proteins with extracellular leucine-rich repeats (eLRRs have been implicated in directing neuronal connectivity. We previously identified a novel family of eLRR proteins in mammals: the Elfns are transmembrane proteins with 6 LRRs, a fibronectin type-3 domain and a long cytoplasmic tail. The recent discovery that Elfn1 protein, expressed postsynaptically, can direct the elaboration of specific electrochemical properties of synapses between particular cell types in the hippocampus strongly reinforces this hypothesis. Here, we present analyses of an Elfn1 mutant mouse line and demonstrate a functional requirement for this gene in vivo. We first carried out detailed expression analysis of Elfn1 using a β-galactosidase reporter gene in the knockout line. Elfn1 is expressed in distinct subsets of interneurons of the hippocampus and cortex, and also in discrete subsets of cells in the habenula, septum, globus pallidus, dorsal subiculum, amygdala and several other regions. Elfn1 is expressed in diverse cell types, including local GABAergic interneurons as well as long-range projecting GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. Elfn1 protein localises to axons of excitatory neurons in the habenula, and long-range GABAergic neurons of the globus pallidus, suggesting the possibility of additional roles for Elfn1 in axons or presynaptically. While gross anatomical analyses did not reveal any obvious neuroanatomical abnormalities, behavioural analyses clearly illustrate functional effects of Elfn1 mutation. Elfn1 mutant mice exhibit seizures, subtle motor abnormalities, reduced thigmotaxis and hyperactivity. The hyperactivity is paradoxically reversible by treatment with the stimulant amphetamine, consistent with phenotypes observed in animals with habenular lesions. These analyses reveal a requirement for Elfn1 in brain function and are suggestive of possible relevance to the etiology and pathophysiology of epilepsy and attention

  17. Genetics Home Reference: early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 1 (EIEE1) is a seizure disorder characterized by a type of seizure known as ... 2 links) Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  18. Illusory shadow person causing paradoxical gaze deviations during temporal lobe seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, M.; van Eijsden, P.; Ferrier, C. H.; Kho, K. H.; van Rijen, P. C.; Leijten, F. S. S.

    Generally, activation of the frontal eye field during seizures can cause versive (forced) gaze deviation, while non-versive head deviation is hypothesised to result from ictal neglect after inactivation of the ipsilateral temporoparietal area. Almost all non-versive head deviations occurring during

  19. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Suvasini; Tripathi, Manjari

    2013-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  20. [Neuroprotective effect of naloxone in brain damage caused by repeated febrile seizure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ying; Qin, Jiong; Chang, Xing-zhi; Yang, Zhi-xian

    2004-04-01

    The brain damage caused by repeated febrile seizure (FS) during developing age is harmful to the intellectual development of children. So how to decrease the related damage is a very important issue. The main purpose of the present study was to find out whether the non-specific opiate antagonist naloxone at low dose has the neuroprotective effect on seizure-induced brain damage. Warm water induced rat FS model was developed in this study. Forty-seven rats were randomly divided into two groups: normal control group (n = 10) and hyperthermic seizure groups (n = 37). The latter was further divided into FS control group (n = 13) and naloxone-treated group (n = 24). The dose of naloxone is different in two naloxone-treated groups (12/each group), in one group the dose was 1 mg/kg, in the other one 2 mg/kg. Seven febrile seizures were induced in each rat of hyperthermic seizure groups with the interval of 2 days. The rats were weighed and injected intraperitoneally with naloxone once the FS occurred in naloxone-treated group, while the rats of the other groups were injected with 0.9% sodium chloride. Latency, duration and grade of FS in different groups were observed and compared. HE-staining and the electron microscopy (EM) were used to detect the morphologic and ultrastructural changes of hippocampal neurons. In naloxone-treated group, the rats' FS duration and FS grade (5.02 +/- 0.63, 2.63 +/- 0.72) were significantly lower (t = 5.508, P seizure, it could lighten the brain damage resulted from repeated FS to some extent.

  1. Abnormal cerebrospinal fluid biochemistry in biotinidase deficiency causing diagnostic conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Deepa; Maw, Anna; Brown, Richard; Hogg, Sarah; Calvin, Jackie; Parker, Alasdair P J

    2014-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is a treatable cause of infantile epilepsy and the presentation can be nonspecific. The seizures are difficult to differentiate from other causes of epileptic encephalopathy, which generally have a poor prognosis. We report 2 infants who presented with seizures, and whose low cerebrospinal fluid glucose and high cerebrospinal lactate caused a diagnostic dilemma. Subsequent urine organic acids pointed to the correct diagnosis and avoided invasive investigation. The children had a good clinical outcome with resolution of their seizures on biotin treatment.

  2. Seizures in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Polman, Susan; De Keyser, Jacques

    Seizures have long been recognized to be part of the disease spectrum of multiple sclerosis (MS). While they occur in only a minority of patients with MS, epileptic seizures can have serious consequences. The treatment of MS can be epileptogenic, and antiepileptic treatment can conversely worsen the

  3. Seizures and epilepsy in elderly patients of an urban area of Iran: clinical manifestation, differential diagnosis, etiology, and epilepsy subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Sayed Shahaboddin; Delbari, Ahmad; Salman-Roghani, Reza; Shahgholi, Leili; Fadayevatan, Reza; Mokhber, Naghmeh; Lokk, Johan

    2013-08-01

    The incidences of seizures and epilepsy in the population show a peak after 60 years of age. Due to the lack of reported clinical aspects of seizure and epilepsy in the older patients in our region in Iran, this study was conducted to describe the clinical manifestation, etiology, differential diagnosis, and epilepsy subtypes of epilepsy and seizure. A cross-sectional retrospective study was performed on all consecutively elderly seizure and epilepsy patients, referred to the Epilepsy Association in the city of Qom, Iran over a 10-year period. A total of 466 patients aged >60 years were admitted. 31 % of the patients had epilepsy or seizure and 69 % of them had non-epileptic events. The most prevalent differential diagnoses in the beginning were syncope and cardiovascular disorders. The most frequent clinical symptom of epilepsy was generalized tonic-clonic seizures (75 %). The most common cause of seizure was systemic metabolic disorder (27 %). In epileptic elderly patients, no cause was ascertained for 38 % and the most frequently observed pathological factors were cerebrovascular diseases, which accounted for 24 %. The most common type of epileptic seizure was generalized epileptic seizures (75 %). 10 % of elderly epileptic patients suffered from status epilepticus, which was primarily caused by anoxia. Despite the rising rate and potentially profound physical and psychosocial effects of seizures and epilepsy, these disorders have received surprisingly little research focus and attention in Iran. Referring older patients to a specialist or a specialist epilepsy center allows speedy assessment, appropriate investigation and treatment, and less likely to miss the diagnosis.

  4. Early Seizure Detection Based on Cardiac Autonomic Regulation Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatas Pavei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a neurological disorder that causes changes in the autonomic nervous system. Heart rate variability (HRV reflects the regulation of cardiac activity and autonomic nervous system tone. The early detection of epileptic seizures could foster the use of new treatment approaches. This study presents a new methodology for the prediction of epileptic seizures using HRV signals. Eigendecomposition of HRV parameter covariance matrices was used to create an input for a support vector machine (SVM-based classifier. We analyzed clinical data from 12 patients (9 female; 3 male; age 34.5 ± 7.5 years, involving 34 seizures and a total of 55.2 h of interictal electrocardiogram (ECG recordings. Data from 123.6 h of ECG recordings from healthy subjects were used to test false positive rate per hour (FP/h in a completely independent data set. Our methodological approach allowed the detection of impending seizures from 5 min to just before the onset of a clinical/electrical seizure with a sensitivity of 94.1%. The FP rate was 0.49 h−1 in the recordings from patients with epilepsy and 0.19 h−1 in the recordings from healthy subjects. Our results suggest that it is feasible to use the dynamics of HRV parameters for the early detection and, potentially, the prediction of epileptic seizures.

  5. Diagnostic value of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram for epileptic seizures in pediatric intensive care unit%振幅整合脑电图在儿童重症监护室癫痫发作中的诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新华; 沈金梅; 姚佩丽; 周渊峰; 高萱; 马健; 陆国平; 周水珍; 王艺

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the value of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram(aEEG) in diagnose of epileptic seizure and status epilepticus in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).Methods Thirty-five children admitted to Children's Hospital of Fudan University from January to December 2014 with severe neurologia situation in PICU were investigated,and bedside video-EEG(VEEG) findings were recorded for more than 4 hours.VEEG signals were transformed into aEEG signals by Galileo NT PMS software:one-channel aEEG (C3-C4),mutichannel aEEG (F3-F4;C3-C4;P3-P4;T3-T4) plus original EEG.Electrical seizure activity on VEEG was signed out with respect to its occurrence,duration and localization of seizure onset;while aEEG seizure was recorded only during its occurrence.The relationship between aEEG and VEEG was analyzed by Spearman analysis.Results A total of 61 traces in 35 cases were suitable for analysis.(1) gender:24 male and 11 female;years of age:12 cases of 2 months-1 year old,13 cases > 1-6 years old,10 cases > 6-12 years old;etiological factors:15 cases associated with severe viral encephalitis,6 cases associated with epilepsy,6 cases associated with intracranial hemorrhage,5 cases associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE),3 cases with other factors.(2) The results were divided into 2 groups:status epilepticus (SE) group and epileptic seizures group.There were 37 traces in SE group,19 traces of them were convulsive SE,and severe viral encephalitis and epilepsy were the most common causes.The other 18 traces were non-convulsive SE,the most common causes were severe viral encephalitis,HIE and intracranial hemorrhage.There were 24 traces in non-SE group,and 118 frequencies of epileptic seizures were monitored.(3)The diagnostic value of aEEG for SE and epileptic seizures:37 traces with status epilepticus on VEEG were all diagnosed as SE on aEEG.For non-SE electrical seizures,the sensitivity of aEEG for detection of electrical seizures was as follows:79.66

  6. l-Carnitine Modulates Epileptic Seizures in Pentylenetetrazole-Kindled Rats via Suppression of Apoptosis and Autophagy and Upregulation of Hsp70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Abdelaziz M; Adel, Mohamed; El-Mesery, Mohamed; Abbas, Khaled M; Ali, Amr N; Abulseoud, Osama A

    2018-03-14

    l-Carnitine is a unique nutritional supplement for athletes that has been recently studied as a potential treatment for certain neuropsychiatric disorders. However, its efficacy in seizure control has not been investigated. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive either saline (Sal) (negative control) or pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) 40 mg/kg i.p. × 3 times/week × 3 weeks. The PTZ group was further subdivided into two groups, the first received oral l-carnitine (l-Car) (100 mg/kg/day × 4 weeks) (PTZ + l-Car), while the second group received saline (PTZ + Sal). Daily identification and quantification of seizure scores, time to the first seizure and the duration of seizures were performed in each animal. Molecular oxidative markers were examined in the animal brains. l-Car treatment was associated with marked reduction in seizure score ( p = 0.0002) that was indicated as early as Day 2 of treatment and continued throughout treatment duration. Furthermore, l-Car significantly prolonged the time to the first seizure ( p l-Car administration for four weeks attenuated PTZ-induced increase in the level of oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde (MDA) ( p l-Car significantly reduced PTZ-induced elevation in protein expression of caspase-3 ( p l-Car in seizure control and call for testing these preclinical results in a proof of concept pilot clinical study.

  7. l-Carnitine Modulates Epileptic Seizures in Pentylenetetrazole-Kindled Rats via Suppression of Apoptosis and Autophagy and Upregulation of Hsp70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz M. Hussein

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available l-Carnitine is a unique nutritional supplement for athletes that has been recently studied as a potential treatment for certain neuropsychiatric disorders. However, its efficacy in seizure control has not been investigated. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive either saline (Sal (negative control or pentylenetetrazole (PTZ 40 mg/kg i.p. × 3 times/week × 3 weeks. The PTZ group was further subdivided into two groups, the first received oral l-carnitine (l-Car (100 mg/kg/day × 4 weeks (PTZ + l-Car, while the second group received saline (PTZ + Sal. Daily identification and quantification of seizure scores, time to the first seizure and the duration of seizures were performed in each animal. Molecular oxidative markers were examined in the animal brains. l-Car treatment was associated with marked reduction in seizure score (p = 0.0002 that was indicated as early as Day 2 of treatment and continued throughout treatment duration. Furthermore, l-Car significantly prolonged the time to the first seizure (p < 0.0001 and shortened seizure duration (p = 0.028. In addition, l-Car administration for four weeks attenuated PTZ-induced increase in the level of oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde (MDA (p < 0.0001 and reduced the activity of catalase enzyme (p = 0.0006 and increased antioxidant GSH activity (p < 0.0001. Moreover, l-Car significantly reduced PTZ-induced elevation in protein expression of caspase-3 (p < 0.0001 and β-catenin (p < 0.0001. Overall, our results suggest a potential therapeutic role of l-Car in seizure control and call for testing these preclinical results in a proof of concept pilot clinical study.

  8. Benign infantile seizures and paroxysmal dyskinesia caused by an SCN8A mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardella, Elena; Becker, Felicitas; Møller, Rikke S

    2016-01-01

    by stretching, motor initiation or by emotional stimuli. In one case, we recorded typical PKD spells by video-EEG-polygraphy, documenting a cortical involvement. INTERPRETATION: Our study establishes SCN8A as a novel gene in which a recurrent mutation causes BFIS/ICCA, expanding the clinical-genetic spectrum...... patient had seizures only at school age. All patients stayed otherwise seizure-free, most without medication. Interictal EEG was normal in all cases but two. Five/16 patients developed additional brief paroxysmal episodes in puberty, either dystonic/dyskinetic or "shivering" attacks, triggered...... identified as the major gene in all three conditions, found to be mutated in 80-90% of familial and 30-35% of sporadic cases. METHODS: We searched for the genetic defect in PRRT2-negative, unrelated families with BFIS or ICCA using whole exome or targeted gene panel sequencing, and performed a detailed...

  9. Prevalence, causes, and behavioral and emotional comorbidities of acute symptomatic seizures in Africa: A critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kariuki, Symon M.; Abubakar Ali, A.; Stein, A.; Marsh, K.; Newton, C.R.

    2017-01-01

    Seizures with fever includes both febrile seizures (due to nonneurological febrile infections) and acute symptomatic seizures (due to neurological febrile infections). The cumulative incidence (lifetime prevalence) of febrile seizures in children aged ≤6 years is 2–5% in American and European

  10. Anti-Neuronal Autoantibodies in Both Drug Responsive and Resistant Focal Seizures with Unknown Cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozubatik-Celik, Gokcen; Ozkara, Cigdem; Ulusoy, Canan; Gunduz, Aysegul; Delil, Sakir; Yeni, Naz; Tuzun, Erdem

    2017-09-01

    and Objective Autoimmunity is an emerging field of research in the etiology of different neurological disorders including epilepsy. We aimed to investigate the presence of neuronal autoantibodies in focal epilepsy with unknown cause and their clinical correlates in both drug-responsive and resistant patients. Between 2009 and 2010 94 patients were prospectively enrolled, had their antibodies tested and clinically followed." An additional 50 age- and gender-matched controls were also tested for antibodies. Age at examination, gender, age at onset, seizure frequency, risk factors, seizure precipitants, and type of seizures were noted. Plasma obtained from patients was frozen at -80°C and analysed for autoantibodies against VGKC-complex, VGCC, GAD, LGI1, CASPR2, NMDA, AMPA and GABAB receptors with immunocytochemistry and radioimmunoassay as required. Thirteen (13.8%) patients, but none of the controls, had antibodies (p=0.003). Antibodies were directed against the uncharacterized components of VGKC-complex in 5 patients (5.3%), GAD in 4 patients (4.2%), NMDA-R in 1 patient (1%), AMPA-R in 1 patient (1%) and both GAD and VGKC-complex in 2 patients (2.1%). Prognosis of epilepsy, in subsequent follow-up, did not correlate to general presence of anti-neuronal antibodies with slightly more patients with antibodies epilepsy control than without (76.9% vs. 69.1%, not-statistically significant. Three patients with suspected active autoimmunity and epilepsy who were treated, showed a response to treatment with a reduction in the seizure frequency. Although most clinical features were identical between seropositive and seronegative patient groups, seropositive patients were more likely to have inflammatory/autoimmune disorders in their medical history. In keeping with previous studies, we have shown anti-neuronal antibodies in a proportion of focal epilepsy patients. Although autoimmunity might merely occur as a bystander effect in many chronic neurological disorders

  11. Computed Tomography Findings in Patients with Seizure Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumnima Acharya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Seizure occurs in up to 10% of the population, whereas epilepsy is a chronic disease characterized by recurrent seizures that may affect up to 2% of the population. Modern neuroimaging is useful in diagnosis of  abnormalities underlying the epilepsies, but the information provided by imaging techniques can also contribute to proper classification of certain epileptic disorders and can delineate the genetics of some underlying syndromes. Neuroimaging is even more important for those patients who have medically intractable seizures. This study was carried out to establish different etiologies of seizures, to correlate the clinical data and radiological findings in cases of seizure, and to identify the common etiologies in different types of seizures. Methods: This was a retrospective hospital-based study conducted in the Department of Radiodiagnosis of Lumbini Medical College Teaching Hospital. Records of patients of past two years, admitted in any department of the hospital with history of seizure disorder and underwent a Computed Tomography  (CT of brain were included. The CT patterns were assessed and the data were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: There were a total of 480 cases out of which 263 (55% were male and 217 (45% were female with M:F ratio of 1.2:1. Generalized seizure was more frequent than partial seizure in both gender. In 274 cases of generalized seizures, CT scan findings were abnormal in 151 cases and normal finding observed in 123 cases. In 206 cases of partial seizures, 125 cases were abnormal and 81 having normal CT scan findings. Age wise distribution showed highest number (n=218 of cases in young group (60 yr. The most common cause of seizure  was  calcified granuloma (n=79, 16.5% followed by neurocysticercosis (NCC, n=64, 13%. Diffuse cerebral edema, sub-arachnoid hemorrhage, and hydrocephalus was seen only in lower age group particularly among 1-20 years. Infarct and diffuse cortical

  12. Epilepsy research methods update: Understanding the causes of epileptic seizures and identifying new treatments using non-mammalian model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunliffe, Vincent T; Baines, Richard A; Giachello, Carlo N G; Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Morgan, Alan; Reuber, Markus; Russell, Claire; Walker, Matthew C; Williams, Robin S B

    2015-01-01

    This narrative review is intended to introduce clinicians treating epilepsy and researchers familiar with mammalian models of epilepsy to experimentally tractable, non-mammalian research models used in epilepsy research, ranging from unicellular eukaryotes to more complex multicellular organisms. The review focuses on four model organisms: the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and the zebrafish Danio rerio. We consider recent discoveries made with each model organism and discuss the importance of these advances for the understanding and treatment of epilepsy in humans. The relative ease with which mutations in genes of interest can be produced and studied quickly and cheaply in these organisms, together with their anatomical and physiological simplicity in comparison to mammalian species, are major advantages when researchers are trying to unravel complex disease mechanisms. The short generation times of most of these model organisms also mean that they lend themselves particularly conveniently to the investigation of drug effects or epileptogenic processes across the lifecourse. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Epileptic Seizure Detection based on Wavelet Transform Statistics Map and EMD Method for Hilbert-Huang Spectral Analyzing in Gamma Frequency Band of EEG Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Behnam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Seizure detection using brain signal (EEG analysis is the important clinical methods in drug therapy and the decisions before brain surgery. In this paper, after signal conditioning using suitable filtering, the Gamma frequency band has been extracted and the other brain rhythms, ambient noises and the other bio-signal are canceled. Then, the wavelet transform of brain signal and the map of wavelet transform in multi levels are computed. By dividing the color map to different epochs, the histogram of each sub-image is obtained and the statistics of it based on statistical momentums and Negentropy values are calculated. Statistical feature vector using Principle Component Analysis (PCA is reduced to one dimension. By EMD algorithm and sifting procedure for analyzing the data by Intrinsic Mode Function (IMF and computing the residues of brain signal using spectrum of Hilbert transform and Hilbert – Huang spectrum forming, one spatial feature based on the Euclidian distance for signal classification is obtained. By K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN classifier and by considering the optimal neighbor parameter, EEG signals are classified in two classes, seizure and non-seizure signal, with the rate of accuracy 76.54% and with variance of error 0.3685 in the different tests.

  14. CDKL5 gene-related epileptic encephalopathy: electroclinical findings in the first year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melani, Federico; Mei, Davide; Pisano, Tiziana; Savasta, Salvatore; Franzoni, Emilio; Ferrari, Anna Rita; Marini, Carla; Guerrini, Renzo

    2011-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene abnormalities cause an early-onset epileptic encephalopathy. We performed video-electroencephalography (video-EEG) monitoring early in the course of CDKL5-related epileptic encephalopathy in order to examine the early electroclinical characteristics of the condition. We used video-EEG to monitor six infants (five females, one male) with CDKL5-related epileptic encephalopathy (five mutations; one deletion), at ages 45 days to 12 months and followed them up to the ages of 14 months to 5 years (mean age 23 mo). We focused our analysis on the first year of life. The results were evaluated against those of a comparison group of nine infants (aged below 1y) with epileptic encephalography who had tested negative for CDKL5 mutations and deletions. One infant exhibited normal background activity, three exhibited moderate slowing, and two exhibited a suppression burst pattern. Two participants had epileptic spasms and four had a stereotyped complex seizure pattern, which we defined as a 'prolonged' generalized tonic-clonic event consisting of a tonic-tonic/vibratory contraction, followed by a clonic phase with series of spasms, gradually translating into repetitive distal myoclonic jerks. Seizure duration ranged from 2 to 4 minutes. The EEG correlate of each clinical phase included an initial electrodecremental event (tonic vibratory phase), irregular series of sharp waves and spike slow waves (clonic phase with series of spasms), and bilateral rhythmic sharp waves (time locked with myoclonus). Infants with CDKL5-related early epileptic encephalopathy can present in the first year of life with an unusual electroclinical pattern of 'prolonged' generalized tonic-clonic seizures. © The Authors. Journal compilation © Mac Keith Press 2011.

  15. Methodological standards for in vitro models of epilepsy and epileptic seizures. A TASK1-WG4 report of the AES/ILAE Translational Task Force of the ILAE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raimondo, J. V.; Heinemann, U.; de Curtis, M.; Goodkin, H. P.; Dulla, Ch. G.; Janigro, D.; Ikeda, A.; Lin, Ch.-Ch. K.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Galanopoulou, A. S.; Bernard, Ch.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, Suppl.4 (2017), s. 40-52 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29835A; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-33115A; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02634S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08565S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : brain slice preparation * electrophysiological recording methods * recording solution composition * in vitro models of seizures * animal selection and killing Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 5.295, year: 2016

  16. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Research of the serum level of neuron-specific enolase in children with various types of seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Chun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the relevance between the level changes of serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE and neuronal damage in various seizure types of children with epilepsy. Methods According to the classification criteria of seizure types formulated by International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE in 1981, 190 children with epilepsy were enrolled including tonic-clonic seizure group (41 cases, tonic seizure group (34 cases, clonic seizure group (22 cases, myoclonic seizure group (12 cases, atonic seizure group (17 cases, absence seizure group (22 cases, simple partial seizure group (21 cases and complex partial seizure group (21 cases, and 64 healthy children were enrolled as control group. The long-range vedio-electroencephalogram (VEEG was operated and the blood samples were collected from these cases within 72 h after their seizures. Results The serum NSE levels of epileptic children were significantly higher than control group (P = 0.000. Among these seizure groups, serum NSE in myoclonic seizure group [(32.42 ± 6.62 ng/ml] was significantly higher than the other types, except for tonic-clonic seizure group (P = 0.062. There was no significant difference among the other types (P > 0.05, for all. According to rank correlation analysis, there was positive corrlation between serum NSE levels and VEEG abnormal intensity (rs = 0.613, P = 0.000. Conclusion The serum NSE were markedly increased in children with epilepsy after seizures, suggesting that a certain degree of neuronal damage may result from seizures; the higher NSE levels were, the more serious neuronal damage caused by epileptiform discharges was. The serum NSE levels in myoclonic seizure group and tonic-clonic seizure group were significantly higher than other seizure types, indicating the two kinds of seizures may result in greater neuronal damage.

  18. Seizure Disorders in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If I have a seizure disorder, can it cause problems during pregnancy? • What risks are associated with having a seizure ... If I have a seizure disorder, can it cause problems during pregnancy? Seizure disorders can affect pregnancy in several ways: • ...

  19. Menstrual cycle worsening of epileptic seizures in women with symptomatic focal epilepsy Piora de crises epilépticas durante o período menstrual em mulheres com epilepsia focal sintomática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Belini Bazán

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hormonal fluctuation is responsible for worsening of epileptic seizures during the menstrual cycle. OBJETIVE: To identify irregularities in the menstrual cycles of women with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE and extratemporal focal epilepsy (ETFE and correlate the frequency of seizures during the menstrual cycles. METHOD: We evaluated prospectively women in the menacme with MTLE and ETFE. Calendars were provided for these patients, and they were asked to mark their seizure frequency according to the menses. Calendars were reviewed in each routine medical appointment. RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients with MTLE and 14 with ETFE were evaluated. We registered 211 cycles in the patients with MTLE and 49 in those with ETFE. Irregular menstrual cycles were found in 28 (28/39, 71.7% patients with MTLE and 6 (6/14, 42.8% with ETFE (p=0.052. Premenstrual seizure worsening was observed in 46 (21.8% patients with MTLE and 9 (18.3% with ETFE (p=0.596. Menstrual worsening was observed in 47 (22.2% patients with MTLE and 15 (30.6% with ETFE (p=0. 217. Ovulatory worsening was observed in 36 (17% patients with MTLE and 13 (26.5% with ETFE (p=0,126. Catamenial worsening was observed in 58 (27.4% of the patients with MTLE and in 17 (34.7% of the patients with ETFE (p=0.315. CONCLUSION: There was no difference between the group of patients with MTLE and ETFE regarding the frequency of irregular cycles and seizure worsening during the premenstrual, menstrual, catamenial or ovulatory periods.INTRODUÇÃO: Admite-se que a flutuação hormonal seja a responsável para a piora de crises epilépticas no período catamenial. OBJETIVO: Identificar irregularidades nos ciclos menstruais de mulheres com epilepsia de lobo temporal mesial (ELTM e epilepsia focal extratemporal (EFET; e relacionar a frequencia de crises durante o ciclo menstrual. MÉTODO: Avaliamos mulheres na menacme, que apresentem quadro clínico laboratorial compatível com ELTM e EFET. Foram

  20. Punctate white matter lesions in full-term infants with neonatal seizures associated with SLC13A5 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeke, Lauren C.; Brilstra, Eva; Braun, Kees P.; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; Salomons, Gajja S.; Koeleman, Bobby P; van Gassen, Koen L. I.; van Straaten, Henrica L.; Craiu, Dana; de Vries, Linda S.

    Introduction: Early-onset epileptic encephalopathy caused by biallelic SLC13A5 mutations is characterized by seizure onset in the first days of life, refractory epilepsy and develop mental delay. Little detailed information about the brain MRI features is available in these patients. Methods:

  1. Punctate white matter lesions in full-term infants with neonatal seizures associated with SLC13A5 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeke, Lauren C; Brilstra, Eva; Braun, Kees P; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; Salomons, Gajja S; Koeleman, BPC; van Gassen, Koen L; van Straaten, Henrica L; Craiu, Dana; de Vries, Linda S

    INTRODUCTION: Early-onset epileptic encephalopathy caused by biallelic SLC13A5 mutations is characterized by seizure onset in the first days of life, refractory epilepsy and developmental delay. Little detailed information about the brain MRI features is available in these patients. METHODS:

  2. Mutations in the GABA Transporter SLC6A1 Cause Epilepsy with Myoclonic-Atonic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvill, Gemma L; McMahon, Jacinta M; Schneider, Amy

    2015-01-01

    GAT-1, encoded by SLC6A1, is one of the major gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters in the brain and is responsible for re-uptake of GABA from the synapse. In this study, targeted resequencing of 644 individuals with epileptic encephalopathies led to the identification of six SLC6A1 mutatio...

  3. HMPAO-SPECT in cerebral seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenwald, F.; Bockisch, A.; Reichmann, K.; Ammari, B.; Hotze, A.; Biersack, H.J.; Durwen, H.; Buelau, P.; Elger, C.E.; Rohde, A.; Penin, H.

    1988-01-01

    In nine patients with suspected psychogenic seizures and in three patients with proven epileptic seizures HMPAO-SPECT was performed prior to and during seizure. In the patients with lateron-proven psychogenic seizures no, or only slight, changes of regional cerebral blood flow were found. Patients with proven epilepsy revealed partly normal findings interictally but during seizure a markedly increased circumscript blood flow was found in all patients. Even though PET is superior to SPECT with respect to spatial resolution, in the diagnosis of seizures HMPAO-SPECT has the advantage of enabling injection of the tracer during the seizure and the performance of the SPECT study subsequently. (orig.) [de

  4. CDKL5 Gene-Related Epileptic Encephalopathy in Estonia: Four Cases, One Novel Mutation Causing Severe Phenotype in a Boy, and Overview of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilles, Stella; Talvik, Inga; Noormets, Klari; Vaher, Ulvi; Õunap, Katrin; Reimand, Tiia; Sander, Valentin; Ilves, Pilvi; Talvik, Tiina

    2016-12-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 ( CDKL5 ) gene mutations have mainly been found in females with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE), severe intellectual disability, and Rett-like features. To date, only 22 boys have been reported, presenting with far more severe phenotypic features. We report the first cases of CDKL5 gene-related EIEE in Estonia diagnosed using panels of epilepsy-associated genes and describe the phenotype-genotype correlations in three male and one female patient. One of the mutations, identified in a male patient, was a novel de novo hemizygous frameshift mutation (NM_003159.2:c.2225_2228del (p.Glu742Afs*41)) in exon 15 of CDKL5. All boys have a more severe phenotype than the female patient. In boys with early onset of seizures and poor development with absent or poor eye contact, CDKL5 gene-related EIEE can be suspected and epilepsy-associated genes should be analyzed for early etiological diagnosis. Early genetic diagnosis would be the cornerstone in personalized treatment in the future. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Early age conductive hearing loss causes audiogenic seizure and hyperacusis behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Jayaram, Aditi; Kumaraguru, Anand; Fu, Qiang; Li, Ji; Allman, Brian

    2011-12-01

    Recent clinical reports found a high incidence of recurrent otitis media in children suffering hyperacusis, a marked intolerance to an otherwise ordinary environmental sound. However, it is unclear whether the conductive hearing loss caused by otitis media in early age will affect sound tolerance later in life. Thus, we have tested the effects of tympanic membrane (TM) damage at an early age on sound perception development in rats. Two weeks after the TM perforation, more than 80% of the rats showed audiogenic seizure (AGS) when exposed to loud sound (120 dB SPL white noise, hearing loss recovered. The TM damaged rats also showed significantly enhanced acoustic startle responses compared to the rats without TM damage. These results suggest that early age conductive hearing loss may cause an impaired sound tolerance during development. In addition, the AGS can be suppressed by the treatment of vigabatrin, acute injections (250 mg/kg) or oral intakes (60 mg/kg/day for 7 days), an antiepileptic drug that inhibits the catabolism of GABA. c-Fos staining showed a strong staining in the inferior colliculus (IC) in the TM damaged rats, not in the control rats, after exposed to loud sound, indicating a hyper-excitability in the IC during AGS. These results indicate that early age conductive hearing loss can impair sound tolerance by reducing GABA inhibition in the IC, which may be related to hyperacusis seen in children with otitis media. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Seizure detection using dynamic warping for patients with intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.; Arends, J.B.A.M.; Long, X.; Wu, Y.; Cluitmans, P.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is paramount for both retrospective analysis and real-time monitoring of epileptic seizures. Studies have shown that EEG-based seizure detection is very difficult for a specific epileptic population with intellectual disability due to the cerebral development disorders.

  7. Estudo de fatores clínicos preditivos para crises epilépticas após acidente vascular cerebral isquêmico Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Maiumi Fukujima

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos aspectos clínicos de 35 pacientes com acidente vascular cerebral isquêmico que evoluíram com crises epilépticas (Grupo 1, comparando-os a 35 pacientes com AVCI sem crises epilépticas (Grupo 2. A comparação das idades entre os grupos não mostrou diferença significante. O sexo masculino e a raça branca predominaram em ambos os grupos. Diabetes melito, hipertensão arterial, ataque isquêmico transitório, acidente vascular cerebral pregresso, enxaqueca, doença de Chagas, embolia cerebral cardiogênica e uso de anticoncepcional oral não diferiram significantemente entre os grupos. Tabagismo e etilismo foram significantemente mais freqüentes no Grupo 1 (pPreditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke. Clinical features of 35 patients with ischemic stroke who developed epilepsy (Group 1 were compared with those of 35 patients with ischemic stroke without epilepsy (Group 2. The age of the patients did not differ between the groups. There were more men than women and more white than other races in both groups. Diabetes melitus, hypertension, transient ischemic attack, previous stroke, migraine, Chagas disease, cerebral embolism of cardiac origin and use of oral contraceptive did not differ between the groups. Smokers and alcohol users were more frequent in Group 1 (p<0,05. Most patients of Group 1 presented with hemiparesis; none presented cerebellar or brainstem involvement. Perhaps strokes in smokers have some different aspects, that let them more epileptogenic than in non smokers.

  8. A KCNQ channel opener for experimental neonatal seizures and status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raol, YogendraSinh H.; Lapides, David A.; Keating, Jeffery; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R.; Cooper, Edward C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Neonatal seizures occur frequently, are often refractory to anticonvulsants, and are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Genetic and electrophysiological evidence indicates that KCNQ voltage-gated potassium channels are critical regulators of neonatal brain excitability. This study tests the hypothesis that selective openers of KCNQ channels may be effective for treatment of neonatal seizures. Methods We induced seizures in postnatal day 10 rats with either kainic acid or flurothyl. We measured seizure activity using quantified behavioral rating and electrocorticography. We compared the efficacy of flupirtine, a selective KCNQ channel opener, with phenobarbital and diazepam, two drugs in current use for neonatal seizures. Results Unlike phenobarbital or diazepam, flupirtine prevented animals from developing status epilepticus (SE) when administered prior to kainate. In the flurothyl model, phenobarbital and diazepam increased latency to seizure onset, but flupirtine completely prevented seizures throughout the experiment. Flupirtine was also effective in arresting electrographic and behavioral seizures when administered after animals had developed continuous kainate-induced SE. Flupirtine caused dose-related sedation and suppressed EEG activity, but did not result in respiratory suppression or result in any mortality. Interpretation Flupirtine appears more effective than either of two commonly used anti-epileptic drugs, phenobarbital and diazepam, in preventing and suppressing seizures in both the kainic acid and flurothyl models of symptomatic neonatal seizures. KCNQ channel openers merit further study as potential treatments for seizures in infants and children. PMID:19334075

  9. Orthosiphon stamineus Leaf Extract Affects TNF-α and Seizures in a Zebrafish Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Kar Meng Choo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic seizures result from abnormal brain activity and can affect motor, autonomic and sensory function; as well as, memory, cognition, behavior, or emotional state. Effective anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs are available but have tolerability issues due to their side effects. The Malaysian herb Orthosiphon stamineus, is a traditional epilepsy remedy and possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and free-radical scavenging abilities, all of which are known to protect against seizures. This experiment thus aimed to explore if an ethanolic leaf extract of O. stamineus has the potential to be a novel symptomatic treatment for epileptic seizures in a zebrafish model; and the effects of the extract on the expression levels of several genes in the zebrafish brain which are associated with seizures. The results of this study indicate that O. stamineus has the potential to be a novel symptomatic treatment for epileptic seizures as it is pharmacologically active against seizures in a zebrafish model. The anti-convulsive effect of this extract is also comparable to that of diazepam at higher doses and can surpass diazepam in certain cases. Treatment with the extract also counteracts the upregulation of NF-κB, NPY and TNF-α as a result of a Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ treated seizure. The anti-convulsive action for this extract could be at least partially due to its downregulation of TNF-α. Future work could include the discovery of the active anti-convulsive compound, as well as determine if the extract does not cause cognitive impairment in zebrafish.

  10. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  11. Posttraumatic stress disorder caused by the misattribution of seizure-related experiential responses

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Matthew L.; Rozensky, Ronald H.; Zlatar, Zvinka Z.; Averbuch, Robert N.; Cibula, Jean E.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with temporal lobe seizures sometimes experience what John Hughlings Jackson described as “dreamy states” during seizure onset. These phenomena may be characterized by a re-experiencing of past events, feelings of familiarity (déjà vu), and hallucinations. In previous reports, patients have been aware of the illusory nature of their experiences. Here, however, the case of a patient with a documented 37-year history of temporal lobe epilepsy who is not aware is described. Fifteen year...

  12. The persistence of erroneous familiarity in an epileptic male : Challenging perceptual theories of déjà vu activation

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, Akira Robert; Moulin, Christopher J. A.

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 39-year-old, temporal lobe epileptic male, MH. Prior to complex partial seizure, experienced up to three times a day, MH often experiences an aura experienced as a persistent sensation of deja vu. Data-driven theories of deja vu formation suggest that partial familiarity for the perceived stimulus is responsible for the sensation. Consequently, diverting attention away from this stimulus should cause the sensation to dissipate. MH, whose sensations of deja vu persist l...

  13. Transient epileptic amnesia: clinical report of a cohort of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Brunetti, Valerio; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Quaranta, Davide; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-07-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia is a seizure disorder, usually with onset in the middle-elderly and good response to low dosages of antiepileptic drugs. We describe the clinical, electroencephalography (EEG), and neuroimaging features of 11 patients with a temporal lobe epilepsy characterized by amnesic seizures as the sole or the main symptom. We outline the relevance of a detailed clinical history to recognize amnesic seizures and to avoid the more frequent misdiagnoses. Moreover, the response to monotherapy was usually good, although the epileptic disorder was symptomatic of acquired lesions in the majority of patients.

  14. CT findings in epileptic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Nobuo; Kimura, Shigeru; Watanabe, Jun; Haneda, Satoshi; Takebe, Yukinao

    1981-01-01

    CT findings in 43 children with generalized seizures (grand mal seizures) (GM group) and in 50 children with partial seizures (P group), classified according to clinical seizure type, were studied. 1) CT abnormalities were demonstrated in 19% (8/43) in GM group and in 40% (20/50) in P group, including localized CT abnormalities in 9.3% (4/43) and in 34% (17/50) respectively. CT abnormalities were found more frequently in cases with abnormal past histories and/or mental defects (MD) than in those without them. 2) In P group, localized CT abnormalities and generalized brain atrophy were observed in 13 and 7 cases respectively. In 40 cases with focal epileptic discharges (FED) in EEG, localized CT abnormalities were demonstrated in 23% (9/40). The sites of localized CT abnormalities corresponded in 73% (11/15) to the sites of focal suppression in EEG (i.e., slowing, low amplitude and lazy pattern) regardless of FED. 3) The bicaudate cerebro-ventricular index (B-CVI) in 19 cases in the normal control group over 2 years of age was 10.0 +- 1.2 (mean +- SD). Ventricular narrowing (VN), with B-CVI less than 8.2 (mean - 1.5 SD), was observed in 5, 17 and 27% in control, GM and P groups respectively, indicating more frequently in epileptic children than in normal controls. Seizures were well controlled in 85% (11/13) in VN group and in 70% (26/36) in normal ventricular group. Brain atrophy in CT findings to inspection was ascertained in all cases by measuring B-CVI. (author)

  15. Envenomation Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharal, Ghulam Abbas; Darby, Richard Ryan; Cohen, Adam B

    2018-01-01

    Insect sting-related envenomation rarely produces seizures. We present a patient with confusion and seizures that began 24 hours after a yellow jacket (wasp) sting. Given the rapid onset and resolution of symptoms, as well as accompanying dermatological and orbital features, and the lack of any infectious or structural abnormalities identified, the toxic effect of the wasp venom (and related anaphylaxis reaction) was believed to be the cause of his presentation.

  16. CDKL5 mutations as a cause of severe epilepsy in infancy: clinical and electroencephalographic long-term course in 4 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähn, Johanna; Caliebe, Almuth; von Spiczak, Sarah; Boor, Rainer; Stefanova, Irina; Stephani, Ulrich; Helbig, Ingo; Muhle, Hiltrud

    2013-07-01

    CDKL5 mutations cause severe epilepsy in infancy with subsequent epileptic encephalopathy. As yet, few studies report on long-term observations in patients with CDKL5-related epileptic encephalopathy. In this study, we describe the evolution of the epilepsy phenotype and the electroencephalographic (EEG) features in 4 patients during a maximum observation period of 22 years. All 4 patients had epilepsy starting with focal seizures in the first 3 months of life, evolving to epileptic spasms between the ages of 2 and 6 years and later on to tonic seizures. In 3 patients, epilepsy was resistant to antiepileptic therapy. Although there was no common EEG pattern in all patients, late hypsarrhythmia until the age of 9 years was observed in 2 patients. CDKL5-related epileptic encephalopathies are a group of refractory seizure disorders starting in early infancy. The phenomenon of late hypsarrhythmia may help define a subgroup of patients with severe and adverse outcomes.

  17. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  18. Occipital lobe seizures and epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcock, Jane E; Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2012-10-01

    Occipital lobe epilepsies (OLEs) manifest with occipital seizures from an epileptic focus within the occipital lobes. Ictal clinical symptoms are mainly visual and oculomotor. Elementary visual hallucinations are common and characteristic. Postictal headache occurs in more than half of patients (epilepsy-migraine sequence). Electroencephalography (EEG) is of significant diagnostic value, but certain limitations should be recognized. Occipital spikes and/or occipital paroxysms either spontaneous or photically induced are the main interictal EEG abnormalities in idiopathic OLE. However, occipital epileptiform abnormalities may also occur without clinical relationship to seizures particularly in children. In cryptogenic/symptomatic OLE, unilateral posterior EEG slowing is more common than occipital spikes. In neurosurgical series of symptomatic OLE, interictal EEG abnormalities are rarely strictly occipital. The most common localization is in the posterior temporal regions and less than one-fifth show occipital spikes. In photosensitive OLE, intermittent photic stimulation elicits (1) spikes/polyspikes confined in the occipital regions or (2) generalized spikes/polyspikes with posterior emphasis. In ictal EEG, a well-localized unifocal rhythmic ictal discharge during occipital seizures is infrequent. A bioccipital field spread to the temporal regions is common. Frequency, severity, and response to treatment vary considerably from good to intractable and progressive mainly depending on underlying causes.

  19. [Epileptic encephalopathy associated with forced normalization after administration of levetiracetam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Takahiro; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Nobuya; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2013-09-01

    Here we report a case of a 10-year-old female with unclassified epileptic encephalopathy who showed forced normalization after administration of levetiracetam (LEV). She initially presented with intractable tonic and myoclonic seizures that were observed about 10 times a day along with frequent multifocal sharp and slow wave complexes on electroencephalography (EEG). We were forced to decrease the topiramate dose because of the appearance of nystagmus, and her myoclonic seizures became worse. We added LEV (250 mg/day) and her tonic and myoclonic seizures disappeared one day after initiation of LEV administration. However, she showed hyporesponsiveness and akinesia. The disappearance of paroxysmal discharges on EEG confirmed the diagnosis of forced normalization. Despite continuous administration of LEV, tonic and myoclonic seizures relapsed within a month but her psychotic symptoms resolved simultaneously. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of forced normalization after LEV administration. It should be noted that LEV may cause forced normalization although it can be started at an adequate dosage.

  20. Cerebellar atrophy in epileptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taneva, N.

    1991-01-01

    52 patients with epileptic seizures of different form, frequency and duration who had received long term treatment with anticonvulsive drugs were examined on Siretom 2000, a brain scanner of II generation. 6 standard incisions were made in all patients in the area of cerebellum, side ventricules and high convexity. Additional scanning with an incision width of 5 mm was made when pathological changes were detected. There were found 3 cases of cerebellar atrophy, 3 - cerebral atrophy, 1 - combined atrophy and 4 - with other changes. It was difficult to establish any relation between the rerebellar atrophy and the type of anticonvulsant used because treatment had usually been complex. 1 fig., 1 tab., 4 refs

  1. Inferences from a community study about non-epileptic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes Marleide da Mota

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the epidemiological importance of the different types of non-epileptic events (NEE in a low-income urban community. METHOD: The patients suspected of having epilepsy, who were detected in the first phase (screening one of this prevalence study, were interviewed by a neurologist in a non-structured neurological interview. These NEE were classified as physiological and psychogenic, subdivided by various types. The psychogenic NEE were classified according to the DSM-IV criteria. RESULTS: We compared the cases suspected of having epilepsy (n=176 with those not suspected (n=806 and discovered that those cases suspected of having epilepsy had a greater median age (<0.01 and female predominance (p<0.01. Among the cases suspected of having epilepsy there were different diagnosis: epileptic events without identifiable cause (n=20 or with identifiable causes (e.g., febrile convulsions and eclampsia. The most prevalent diagnosis for those suspected of having epilepsy was syncope (n=63; 35.8%. In terms of physiological events, the most frequent were: epileptic seizures, paroxysmal toxic phenomena (including alcoholism and brain trauma, besides syncope; in terms of psychogenic events the most frequent were: dissociative and anxiety disorders. Regarding gender differences, paroxysmal toxic problems were significantly more prevalent in men (p= 0.02, and dissociative disorders (p=0.01 in women. CONCLUSION: This survey confirms the epidemiological importance of syncope in a populational sample with NEE. However, among the psychogenic disorders of this NEE sample, the most frequent were dissociative and anxiety phenomena. This finding contrasts with the literature based on samples from tertiary epileptic centers with video-EEG resources, which found somatoform disorders to be more prevalent than dissociative and anxiety phenomena.

  2. Absence seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seizure - petit mal; Seizure - absence; Petit mal seizure; Epilepsy - absence seizure ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM. Seizures (paroxysmal disorders). In: Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM, eds. Nelson Essentials ...

  3. Seizure Prediction and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasemidis, Leon D.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by intermittent, paroxysmal, hypersynchronous electrical activity, that may remain localized and/or spread and severely disrupt the brain’s normal multi-task and multi-processing function. Epileptic seizures are the hallmarks of such activity and had been considered unpredictable. It is only recently that research on the dynamics of seizure generation by analysis of the brain’s electrographic activity (EEG) has shed ample light on the predictability of seizures, and illuminated the way to automatic, prospective, long-term prediction of seizures. The ability to issue warnings in real time of impending seizures (e.g., tens of minutes prior to seizure occurrence in the case of focal epilepsy), may lead to novel diagnostic tools and treatments for epilepsy. Applications may range from a simple warning to the patient, in order to avert seizure-associated injuries, to intervention by automatic timely administration of an appropriate stimulus, for example of a chemical nature like an anti-epileptic drug (AED), electromagnetic nature like vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), deep brain stimulation (DBS), transcranial direct current (TDC) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and/or of another nature (e.g., ultrasonic, cryogenic, biofeedback operant conditioning). It is thus expected that seizure prediction could readily become an integral part of the treatment of epilepsy through neuromodulation, especially in the new generation of closed-loop seizure control systems. PMID:21939848

  4. Porencephaly and cortical dysplasia as cause of seizures in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Gisele Fabrino

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seizures are a common problem in small animal neurology and it may be related to underlying diseases. Porencephaly is an extremely rare disorder, and in Veterinary Medicine it affects more often ruminants, with only few reports in dogs. Case presentation A one-year-old intact male Shih-Tzu dog was referred to Veterinary University Hospital with history of abnormal gait and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Signs included hypermetria, abnormal nystagmus and increased myotatic reflexes. At necropsy, during the brain analysis, a cleft was observed in the left parietal and occipital lobes, creating a communication between the subarachnoid space and the left lateral ventricle, consistent with porencephaly; and also a focal atrophy of the caudal paravermal and vermal portions of the cerebellum. Furthermore, the histological examination showed cortical and cerebellar neuronal dysplasia. Conclusions Reports of seizures due to porencephaly are rare in dogs. In this case, the dog presented a group of brain abnormalities which per se or in assemblage could result in seizure manifestation.

  5. Recurrent abdominal pain: when an epileptic seizure should be suspected? Dor abdominal recorrente: quando suspeitar de crise epiléptica?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata C. Franzon

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent episodes of abdominal pain are common in childhood. Among the diagnostic possibilities are migraine and abdominal epilepsy (AE. AE is an infrequent syndrome with paroxystic episodes of abdominal pain, awareness disturbance, EEG abnormalities and positive results with the introduction of antiepileptic drugs. We present one 6 year-old girl who had short episodes of abdominal pain since the age of 4. The pain was followed by cry, fear and occasionally secondary generalization. MRI showed tumor in the left temporal region. As a differential diagnosis, we report a 10 year-old boy who had long episodes of abdominal pain accompanied by blurring of vision, vertigo, gait ataxia, dysarthria, acroparesthesias and vomiting. He received the diagnosis of basilar migraine. In our opinion, AE is part of a large group (partial epilepsies and does not require a special classification. Pediatric neurologists must be aware of these two entities that may cause abdominal pain.Episódios recorrentes de dor abdominal são freqüentes na infância e entre as causas neurológicas há migrânea e epilepsia abdominal (EA. EA é uma síndrome que consiste de episódios paroxísticos de dor abdominal associada à alteração de consciência, anormalidades eletrencefalográficas e boa resposta à terapia anticonvulsivante. Apresentamos uma menina de 6 anos que tinha desde os 4 anos episódios de curta duração de dor abdominal, seguidos por choro, medo e ocasional generalização secundária. A RM mostrou a presença de um tumor em região temporal esquerda. Como diagnóstico diferencial, apresentamos um menino de 10 anos que há 12 meses referia episódios de dor abdominal de longa duração acompanhados por turvação visual, vertigem, marcha atáxica, disartria, acroparestesia e vômito, recebendo posteriormente o diagnóstico de migrânia basilar. Em nossa opinião, EA faz parte de um grande grupo (epilepsias parciais e não requer uma classificação especial

  6. Frontal Lobe Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause of frontal lobe epilepsy remains unknown. Complications Status epilepticus. Frontal lobe seizures tend to occur in clusters and may provoke a dangerous condition called status epilepticus — in which seizure activity lasts much longer than ...

  7. Pharmacoepidemiology and prevalence of epileptic seizures in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to establish an estimated number of people living with epilepsy in southeastern Nigeria, to determine the prevalence and the utilization pattern of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). A cross sectional, observational survey was used in the study. Multi-stage random sampling technique was used to select ...

  8. Seizure characteristics of epilepsy in childhood after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuji; Natsume, Jun; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Naoko; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Tsuji, Takeshi; Okumura, Akihisa; Kubota, Tetsuo; Ando, Naoki; Saitoh, Shinji; Miura, Kiyokuni; Negoro, Tamiko; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify characteristics of post-encephalopathic epilepsy (PEE) in children after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), paying particular attention to precise diagnosis of seizure types. Among 262 children with acute encephalopathy/encephalitis registered in a database of the Tokai Pediatric Neurology Society between 2005 and 2012, 44 were diagnosed with AESD according to the clinical course and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and were included in this study. Medical records were reviewed to investigate clinical data, MRI findings, neurologic outcomes, and presence or absence of PEE. Seizure types of PEE were determined by both clinical observation by pediatric neurologists and ictal video-electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. Of the 44 patients after AESD, 10 (23%) had PEE. The period between the onset of encephalopathy and PEE ranged from 2 to 39 months (median 8.5 months). Cognitive impairment was more severe in patients with PEE than in those without. Biphasic seizures and status epilepticus during the acute phase of encephalopathy did not influence the risk of PEE. The most common seizure type of PEE on clinical observation was focal seizures (n = 5), followed by epileptic spasms (n = 4), myoclonic seizures (n = 3), and tonic seizures (n = 2). In six patients with PEE, seizures were induced by sudden unexpected sounds. Seizure types confirmed by ictal video-EEG recordings were epileptic spasms and focal seizures with frontal onset, and all focal seizures were startle seizures induced by sudden acoustic stimulation. Intractable daily seizures remain in six patients with PEE. We demonstrate seizure characteristics of PEE in children after AESD. Epileptic spasms and startle focal seizures are common seizure types. The specific seizure types may be determined by the pattern of diffuse subcortical white matter injury in AESD and age-dependent reorganization of the brain

  9. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  10. Complex partial seizure, disruptive behaviours and the Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Complex partial seizure is an epileptic seizure which results in impairment of responsiveness or awareness such as altered level of consciousness. Complex partial seizures are often preceded by an aura such as depersonalization, feelings of de javu, jamais vu and fear. The ictal phase of complex partial ...

  11. Febrile Seizure Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Cisneros

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This simulation session is appropriate for medical students, community physicians, or residents in emergency medicine, neurology, pediatrics, or family medicine. Introduction: Febrile seizures are the most common form of seizures in childhood; they are thought to occur in 2-5% of all children.1-3 Febrile seizures are defined as a seizure in association with a febrile illness in children without a central nervous system infection, previous afebrile seizure, known brain disorder, or electrolyte abnormalities. 1,2 They typically occur between 6 months and 18 months of age though they can occur up to 5 years of age.3 Febrile seizures are categorized as: simple (generalized seizure lasting less than 15 minutes in a child aged 6 months to 5 years, and less than 1 in a 24 hour period or complex (a focal seizure or generalized seizure lasting greater than 15 minutes, or multiple seizures in a 24 hour period. 1,3 Treatment for febrile seizures is based on treating the underlying cause of the fever and giving reassurance and education to the parents.2 Mortality is extremely rare, and there is no difference in the patient’s cognitive abilities after a febrile seizure, even when the seizure is prolonged.1 Objectives: At the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 discuss the management of febrile seizures 2 discuss when placement of an advanced airway is indicated in the management of a febrile seizure 3 list the risk factors for febrile seizures 4 prepare a differential diagnosis for the causes of febrile seizures 5 educate family members on febrile seizures. Methods: This educational session is a high-fidelity simulation.

  12. Rare Cause of Seizures, Renal Failure, and Gangrene in an 83-Year-Old Diabetic Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalin Viswanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an 83-year-old diabetic male who presented with acute-onset renal failure, seizures, psychosis, pneumonia, and right foot gangrene. Investigations revealed thrombocytopenia, CSF lymphocytosis, ANA and dsDNA positivity, hypocomplementemia, and pneumonitis following which he was treated with pulse methylprednisolone. He was treated for Pseudomonas-related ventilator-associated pneumonia, candiduria, and E. coli-related bedsore infection prior to discharge. He was discharged at request and died 17 days later due to a respiratory infection.

  13. GABAergic Neuron-Specific Loss of Ube3a Causes Angelman Syndrome-Like EEG Abnormalities and Enhances Seizure Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Matthew C; Wallace, Michael L; Sidorov, Michael S; Burette, Alain C; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M; King, Ian F; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2016-04-06

    Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs)-all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reflex epileptic mechanisms in humans: Lessons about natural ictogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter

    2017-06-01

    The definition of reflex epileptic seizures is that specific seizure types can be triggered by certain sensory or cognitive stimuli. Simple triggers are sensory (most often visual, more rarely tactile or proprioceptive; simple audiogenic triggers in humans are practically nonexistent) and act within seconds, whereas complex triggers like praxis, reading and talking, and music are mostly cognitive and work within minutes. The constant relation between a qualitatively, often even quantitatively, well-defined stimulus and a specific epileptic response provides unique possibilities to investigate seizure generation in natural human epilepsies. For several reflex epileptic mechanisms (REMs), this has been done. Reflex epileptic mechanisms have been reported less often in focal lesional epilepsies than in idiopathic "generalized" epilepsies (IGEs) which are primarily genetically determined. The key syndrome of IGE is juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), where more than half of the patients present reflex epileptic traits (photosensitivity, eye closure sensitivity, praxis induction, and language-induced orofacial reflex myocloni). Findings with multimodal investigations of cerebral function concur to indicate that ictogenic mechanisms in IGEs largely (ab)use preexisting functional anatomic networks (CNS subsystems) normally serving highly complex physiological functions (e.g., deliberate complex actions and linguistic communication) which supports the concept of system epilepsy. Whereas REMs in IGEs, thus, are primarily function-related, in focal epilepsies, they are primarily localization-related. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Genetic and Reflex Epilepsies, Audiogenic Seizures and Strains: From Experimental Models to the Clinic". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic epileptic encephalopathies: is all written into the DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; de Jonghe, Peter; Zara, Federico

    2013-11-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy is a condition in which epileptic activity, clinical or subclinical, is thought to be responsible for any disturbance of cognition, behavior, or motor control. However, experimental evidence supporting this clinical observation are still poor and the causal relationship between pharmacoresistant seizures and cognitive outcome is controversial. In the past two decades, genetic studies shed new light onto complex mechanisms underlying different severe epileptic conditions associated with intellectual disability and behavioral abnormalities, thereby providing important clues on the relationship between seizures and cognitive outcome. Dravet syndrome is a childhood disorder associated with loss-of-function mutations in SCN1A and is characterized by frequent seizures and severe cognitive impairment, thus well illustrating the concept of epileptic encephalopathy. However, it is difficult to determine the causative role of the underlying sodium channel dysfunction and that of the consequent seizures in influencing cognitive outcome in these children. It is also difficult to demonstrate whether a recognizable profile of cognitive impairment or a definite behavioral phenotype exists. Data from the laboratory and the clinics may provide greater insight into the degree to which epileptic activity may contribute to cognitive impairment in individual syndromes. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. Towards an Online Seizure Advisory System—An Adaptive Seizure Prediction Framework Using Active Learning Heuristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karuppiah Ramachandran, Vignesh Raja; Alblas, Huibert J.; Le Viet Duc, Duc Viet; Meratnia, Nirvana

    2018-01-01

    In the last decade, seizure prediction systems have gained a lot of attention because of their enormous potential to largely improve the quality-of-life of the epileptic patients. The accuracy of the prediction algorithms to detect seizure in real-world applications is largely limited because the

  17. EEG analysis of seizure patterns using visibility graphs for detection of generalized seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Lei; Long, Xi; Arends, J.B.A.M.; Aarts, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The traditional EEG features in the time and frequency domain show limited seizure detection performance in the epileptic population with intellectual disability (ID). In addition, the influence of EEG seizure patterns on detection performance was less studied. New method A single-channel

  18. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppert, M.M.J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Viergever, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This

  19. Prevalence of Autism among Epileptic Children Referring to Imam Reza Clinic and Comparing to Control Group (non Epileptic Children During2013-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LS mohammadijahromi

    2017-06-01

    Discussion: According to this study, the prevalence of autism among epileptic children is higher than non epileptic ones. As the age of the onset of seizure is lower the prevalence of autism will be higher. Also, the prevalence of autism among epileptic children will be higher as abnormal findings of imaging and known etiologies of seizureincrease. Loss of significant correlations among prevalence of autism and some variables of seizure can be due to few numbers of autistic cases, which were diagnosed in this study comparing with previous studies.

  20. Autonomic headache with autonomic seizures: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozge, Aynur; Kaleagasi, Hakan; Yalçin Tasmertek, Fazilet

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the report is to present a case of an autonomic headache associated with autonomic seizures. A 19-year-old male who had had complex partial seizures for 15 years was admitted with autonomic complaints and left hemicranial headache, independent from seizures, that he had had for 2 years and were provoked by watching television. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed right hippocampal sclerosis and electroencephalography revealed epileptic activity in right hemispheric areas. Treatment with valproic acid decreased the complaints. The headache did not fulfil the criteria for the diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, and was different from epileptic headache, which was defined as a pressing type pain felt over the forehead for several minutes to a few hours. Although epileptic headache responds to anti-epileptics and the complaints of the present case decreased with antiepileptics, it has been suggested that the headache could be a non-trigeminal autonomic headache instead of an epileptic headache.

  1. Diagnosis and Prognosis of Seizures and Epilepsy in Childhood: Dutch study of epilepsy in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Stroink (Hans)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMany people suffer from one or more epileptic seizures during life, but not all these people have epilepsy. Moreover, epilepsy is not one disease or syndrome, but a collection of different disorders, which have in common the repeated occurrence of unprovoked epileptic seizures during

  2. Epileptic Negative Myoclonus as the First and Only Symptom in a Challenging Diagnosis of Benign Epilepsy With Centrotemporal Spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen MD

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of epileptic negative myoclonus as the first and only ictal symptom of benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes. Methods: Electrophysiological evaluations included polygraphic recordings with simultaneous video electroencephalogram monitoring and tests performed with patient’s upper limb outstretched in standing posture. Epileptic negative myoclonus manifestations, electrophysiological features, and responses to antiepileptic drugs were analyzed. Results: The authors report 2 patients with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, who had epileptic negative myoclonus as the first and only seizure type. Video electroencephalogram monitoring results showed that their negative myoclonus seizures were emanating from the contralateral central and the parietal regions. Epileptic negative myoclonus was controlled by administration of valproate and levetiracetam. Conclusion: Epileptic negative myoclonus can be the first and only seizure type of benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, and long-term follow-up monitoring should be the care for the recurrence and/or presence of other types of seizures.

  3. Experimental febrile seizures are precipitated by a hyperthermia-induced respiratory alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rivera, Claudio; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Salmen, Benedikt; Mackie, Ken; Sipilä, Sampsa T; Voipio, Juha; Kaila, Kai

    2006-07-01

    Febrile seizures are frequent during early childhood, and prolonged (complex) febrile seizures are associated with an increased susceptibility to temporal lobe epilepsy. The pathophysiological consequences of febrile seizures have been extensively studied in rat pups exposed to hyperthermia. The mechanisms that trigger these seizures are unknown, however. A rise in brain pH is known to enhance neuronal excitability. Here we show that hyperthermia causes respiratory alkalosis in the immature brain, with a threshold of 0.2-0.3 pH units for seizure induction. Suppressing alkalosis with 5% ambient CO2 abolished seizures within 20 s. CO2 also prevented two long-term effects of hyperthermic seizures in the hippocampus: the upregulation of the I(h) current and the upregulation of CB1 receptor expression. The effects of hyperthermia were closely mimicked by intraperitoneal injection of bicarbonate. Our work indicates a mechanism for triggering hyperthermic seizures and suggests new strategies in the research and therapy of fever-related epileptic syndromes.

  4. Benign focal epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS: clinical characteristics of seizures according to age at first seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miziara Carmen Silvia M.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available BECTS is characterized by the presence of simple partial motor seizures in the face and/or oropharynx, with or without sensory symptoms and often with secondary generalization. These seizures tend to occur more often during sleep or drowsiness. According to some authors, generalized seizures prevail over other types particularly among children aged five or less. The purpose of this study is to determine the characteristics of the first epileptic episode among children with BECTS, grouped by age as of their first epileptic seizure, as well as to analyze how such seizures change over the course of clinical evolution. A total of 61 children were examined, 16 of whom below the age of 5 and 45 above. With regard to the first and recurrent epileptic episodes, our final assessment showed that partial seizures occurred more frequently than generalized tonic-clonic seizures in both groups. Although no conclusive relation could be established between the type of partial seizure (i.e. simple versus complex and the children's age as of their first epileptic episode, it was possible to correlate the type of epileptic seizure with their clinical evolution, in which case simple partial seizures proved to be more frequent than complex partial seizures. It should be noted that the number of children under the age of five was relatively small, which evinces the need for further studies. It should also be borne in mind that the reported frequency of generalized seizures in these children's first epileptic episode may be due to their parents' lack of attention and familiarity with this pathology and their attendant difficulty in characterizing its clinical symptoms.

  5. Disruption of Fgf13 causes synaptic excitatory-inhibitory imbalance and genetic epilepsy and febrile seizures plus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranam, Ram S; He, Xiao Ping; Yao, Lijun; Le, Tri; Jang, Wonjo; Rehder, Catherine W; Lewis, Darrell V; McNamara, James O

    2015-06-10

    We identified a family in which a translocation between chromosomes X and 14 was associated with cognitive impairment and a complex genetic disorder termed "Genetic Epilepsy and Febrile Seizures Plus" (GEFS(+)). We demonstrate that the breakpoint on the X chromosome disrupted a gene that encodes an auxiliary protein of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, fibroblast growth factor 13 (Fgf13). Female mice in which one Fgf13 allele was deleted exhibited hyperthermia-induced seizures and epilepsy. Anatomic studies revealed expression of Fgf13 mRNA in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons of hippocampus. Electrophysiological recordings revealed decreased inhibitory and increased excitatory synaptic inputs in hippocampal neurons of Fgf13 mutants. We speculate that reduced expression of Fgf13 impairs excitability of inhibitory interneurons, resulting in enhanced excitability within local circuits of hippocampus and the clinical phenotype of epilepsy. These findings reveal a novel cause of this syndrome and underscore the powerful role of FGF13 in control of neuronal excitability. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/358866-16$15.00/0.

  6. USE OF STRUCTURAL MRI IN PATIENTS WITH MEDICALLY REFRACTORY SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ara G. Kaprelyan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Refractory epilepsy is common in patients with structural brain lesions including acquired disorders and genetic abnormalities. Recently, MRI is a precise diagnostic tool for recognition of different structural causes underlying medically intractable seizures.Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of MRI for detection of brain lesions associated with refractory epilepsy.Material and methods: 49 patients (20M and 29F; aged 48.6±24.7 years with refractory epilepsy were included in the study. They presented with partial (46.0%, secondary (31.0% or primary (23.0% generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Clinical diagnosis was based on the revised criteria of ILAE. Structural neuroimaging (MRI, EEG recording, and neurological examination were performed.Results: MRI detected different structural brain abnormalities totally in 36 (73.5% patients, including cerebral tumors (21p, cerebrovascular accidents (5p, hyppocampal sclerosis (3p, developmental malformations (2p, postencephalitic lesions (2p, arachnoid cysts (2p, and tuberous sclerosis (1p. Neuroimaging revealed normal findings in 13 (27.5% cases. EEG recordings showed focal epileptic activity in 38 (77.6% patients, including 33 cases with and 5 without structural brain abnormalities.Conclusion: This study revealed that structural brain lesions are commonly associated with refractory epilepsy. We suggested that MRI is a useful diagnostic method for assessment of patients with uncontrolled seizures or altered epileptic pattern.

  7. Gene therapy decreases seizures in a model of Incontinentia pigmenti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogbevia, Godwin K; Töllner, Kathrin; Körbelin, Jakob; Bröer, Sonja; Ridder, Dirk A; Grasshoff, Hanna; Brandt, Claudia; Wenzel, Jan; Straub, Beate K; Trepel, Martin; Löscher, Wolfgang; Schwaninger, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Incontinentia pigmenti (IP) is a genetic disease leading to severe neurological symptoms, such as epileptic seizures, but no specific treatment is available. IP is caused by pathogenic variants that inactivate the Nemo gene. Replacing Nemo through gene therapy might provide therapeutic benefits. In a mouse model of IP, we administered a single intravenous dose of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, AAV-BR1-CAG-NEMO, delivering the Nemo gene to the brain endothelium. Spontaneous epileptic seizures and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were monitored. The endothelium-targeted gene therapy improved the integrity of the BBB. In parallel, it reduced the incidence of seizures and delayed their occurrence. Neonate mice intravenously injected with the AAV-BR1-CAG-NEMO vector developed no hepatocellular carcinoma or other major adverse effects 11 months after vector injection, demonstrating that the vector has a favorable safety profile. The data show that the BBB is a target of antiepileptic treatment and, more specifically, provide evidence for the therapeutic benefit of a brain endothelial-targeted gene therapy in IP. Ann Neurol 2017;82:93-104. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  8. Deep Recurrent Neural Networks for seizure detection and early seizure detection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talathi, S. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Epilepsy is common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.6-0.8 % of world population. Epileptic patients suffer from chronic unprovoked seizures, which can result in broad spectrum of debilitating medical and social consequences. Since seizures, in general, occur infrequently and are unpredictable, automated seizure detection systems are recommended to screen for seizures during long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. In addition, systems for early seizure detection can lead to the development of new types of intervention systems that are designed to control or shorten the duration of seizure events. In this article, we investigate the utility of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) in designing seizure detection and early seizure detection systems. We propose a deep learning framework via the use of Gated Recurrent Unit (GRU) RNNs for seizure detection. We use publicly available data in order to evaluate our method and demonstrate very promising evaluation results with overall accuracy close to 100 %. We also systematically investigate the application of our method for early seizure warning systems. Our method can detect about 98% of seizure events within the first 5 seconds of the overall epileptic seizure duration.

  9. Patients' and neurologists' perception of epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Kimberley; Kandler, Rosalind; Reuber, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Although differences in illness perceptions between neurologists and patients with epilepsy or psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are likely to be clinically relevant, this is the first study to attempt a direct comparison. In addition, this study compares the illness perceptions of patients with epilepsy with those of patients with PNES. Thirty-four patients with epilepsy, 40 patients with PNES, and 45 neurologists were recruited. All patient participants completed versions of the illness perception questionnaire revised (IPQ-R) adapted for epileptic or nonepileptic seizure disorders, single-item symptom attribution question (SAQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 (QOLIE-31), and Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS). Participating neurologists completed two versions of the IPQ-R and two SAQs for epileptic and nonepileptic seizure disorders. Differences in illness perceptions between patients with epilepsy and patients with PNES were minor compared to those between patients with either seizure disorder and neurologists. Neurologists considered both seizure disorders more treatable and more amenable to personal control than did the patients themselves. Neurologists had much more polarized views of the etiology of both conditions; whereas patients mostly considered the causes of their seizure disorders as partially "physical" and partially "psychological," neurologists perceived epilepsy as an essentially "physical" and PNES as a clearly "psychological" problem. There are considerable differences between the illness perceptions of patients with seizure disorders and their doctors, which could represent barriers to successful clinical management. In particular, a discrepancy between neurologists' and patients' beliefs about the personal control that patients may be able to exert over PNES could contribute to the confusion or anger some patients report after the diagnosis has been explained to them. Furthermore

  10. A new potential AED, carisbamate, substantially reduces spontaneous motor seizures in rats with kainate-induced epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabenstatter, Heidi L.; Dudek, F. Edward

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Animal models with spontaneous epileptic seizures may be useful in the discovery of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of carisbamate on spontaneous motor seizures in rats with kainate-induced epilepsy. Methods Repeated, low-dose (5 mg/kg), intraperitoneal injections of kainate were administered every hour until each male Sprague-Dawley rat had experienced convulsive status epilepticus for at least 3 h. Five 1-month trials (n= 8–10 rats) assessed the effects of 0.3, 1, 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg carisbamate on spontaneous seizures. Each trial involved six AED-versus-vehicle tests comprised of carisbamate or 10% solutol-HS-15 treatments administered as intraperitoneal injections on alternate days with a recovery day between each treatment day. Results Carisbamate significantly reduced motor seizure frequency at doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg, and caused complete seizure cessation during the 6-h post-drug epoch in 7 of 8 animals at 30 mg/kg. The effects of carisbamate (0.3–30 mg/kg) on spontaneous motor seizures appeared dose dependent. Conclusions These data support the hypothesis that a repeated-measures, cross-over protocol in animal models with spontaneous seizures is an effective method for testing AEDs. Carisbamate reduced the frequency of spontaneous motor seizures in a dose-dependent manner, and was more effective than topiramate at reducing seizures in rats with kainate-induced epilepsy. PMID:18494790

  11. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis as a cause of new onset of seizures in a patient with non-small cell lung carcinoma: a case report

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    Voutsas Vasileios

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The etiology of seizure disorders in lung cancer patients is broad and includes some rather rare causes of seizures which can sometimes be overlooked by physicians. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rather rare cause of seizures in lung cancer patients and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of seizure disorders in this population. Case presentation This case report describes the new onset of seizures in a 64-year-old male patient receiving chemotherapy for a diagnosed stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma. After three cycles of therapy, he was re-evaluated with a chest computed tomography which showed a 50% reduction in the tumor mass and in the size of the hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Twenty days after the fourth cycle of chemotherapy, the patient was admitted to a neurological clinic because of the onset of self-limiting complex partial seizures, with motionless stare and facial twitching, but with no signs of secondary generalization. The patient had also recently developed neurological symptoms of short-term memory loss and temporary confusion, and behavioral changes. Laboratory evaluation included brain magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain, serum examination for 'anti-Hu' antibodies and stereotactic brain biopsy. Based on the clinical picture, the patient's history of lung cancer, the brain magnetic resonance imaging findings and the results of the brain biopsy, we concluded that our patient had a 'definite' diagnosis of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis and he was subsequently treated with a combination of chemotherapy and oral steroids, resulting in stabilization of his neurological status. Despite the neurological stabilization, a chest computed tomography which was performed after the 6th cycle showed relapse of the disease in the chest. Conclusion Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rather rare cause of new onset of seizures in patients with

  12. Charles Bonnet Syndrome in a Patient With Right Medial Occipital Lobe Infarction: Epileptic or Deafferentation Phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumral, Emre; Uluakay, Arzu; Dönmez, İlknur

    2015-07-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is an uncommon disorder characterized by complex and recurrent visual hallucinations in patients with visual pathway pathologic defects. To describe a patient who experienced complex visual hallucinations following infarction in the right occipital lobe and epileptic seizure who was diagnosed as having CBS. A 65-year-old man presented acute ischemic stroke caused by artery to artery embolism involving the right occipital lobe. Following ischemic stroke, complex visual hallucinations in the left visual field not associated with loss of consciousness or delusion developed in the patient. Hallucinations persisted for >1 month and during hallucination, no electrographic seizures were recorded through 24 hours of videoelectroencephalographic monitoring. CBS may develop in a patient with occipital lobe infarction following an embolic event. CBS associated with medial occipital lobe infarction and epilepsy may coexist and reflects the abnormal functioning of an integrated neuronal network.

  13. Imaging DC MEG Fields Associated with Epileptic Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, B. J.; Bowyer, S. M.; Moran, J. E.; Jenrow, K.; Tepley, N.

    2004-10-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a non-invasive brain imaging modality, with high spatial and temporal resolution, used to evaluate and quantify the magnetic fields associated with neuronal activity. Complex partial epileptic seizures are characterized by hypersynchronous neuronal activity believed to arise from a zone of epileptogenesis. This study investigated the characteristics of direct current (DC) MEG shifts arising at epileptic onset. MEG data were acquired with rats using a six-channel first order gradiometer system. Limbic status epilepticus was induced by IA (femoral) administration of kainic acid. DC-MEG shifts were observed at the onset of epileptic spike train activity and status epilepticus. Epilepsy is also being studied in patients undergoing presurgical mapping from the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Henry Ford Hospital using a whole head Neuromagnetometer. Preliminary data analysis shows that DC-MEG waveforms, qualitatively similar to those seen in the animal model, are evident prior to seizure activity in human subjects.

  14. CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF NEW - ONSET EPILETIC SEIZURES IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Chalapathi Rao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epilepsy is one of the most familiar neurological disorders which can cause bodily injury and death from inadequately treated or untreated cases. The imaging and EEG of new onset seizures is done with different indications, to identify an acute illness as the underline course for the seizure and possible neurological deficit. To this purpose we have evaluated new onset seizures in adult patients in correlation with their clinical profile, Electroencephalography (EEG and Computerized tomography (CT imaging of brain. METHODS: This cro ss sectional study was studied in 100 adult patients, presenting with seizures attending the Emergency department, General Medicine and Neurology wards and OPD of Tertiary care teaching hospital during the period of March 2006 to March 2008. All the patien ts were examined clinically and subjected to CT imaging of brain and EEG. Other necessary blood investigations were also done. Correlation between various seizures and CT scan brain and EEG were studied. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data . RESULTS: 63% of patients were in the age group of 20 - 39 years, 63% were males and 37% were females. 65% presented with GTCS, 35% with partial seizures. CT scan was found abnormal in 49.2% patients in GTCS, 71.4% in partial seizures. EEG showed abnormal p attern in 39% patients. 40% of the patients with partial seizures had epileptic form discharges. 33% patients had focal lesions on CT brain with normal EEG. CONCLUSION: Generalized Tonic clonic seizures were the commonest type of seizures was present, seen mostly in male patients. CT scan brain was abnormal in 57% of the patients. Neurocysticercosis and calcified granuloma were the commonest causes for seizures up to 3 rd decade of life. Majority of the patients with focal lesions on CT scan brain had epileptic form discharges on EEG which indicate a strong correlation of EEG with CT findings. Initiating the treatment with antiepileptic drugs was

  15. Consciousness in non-epileptic attack disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, Markus; Kurthen, M

    2011-01-01

    Non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD) is one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. Impairment of consciousness is the key feature of non-epileptic attacks (NEAs). The first half of this review summarises the clinical research literature featuring observations relating to consciousness in NEAD. The second half places this evidence in the wider context of the recent discourse on consciousness in neuroscience and the philosophy of mind. We argue that studies of consciousness should not only distinguish between the 'level' and `content' of consciousness but also between 'phenomenal consciousness' (consciousness of states it somehow "feels to be like") and 'access consciousness' (having certain 'higher' cognitive processes at one's disposal). The existing evidence shows that there is a great intra- and interindividual variability of NEA experience. However, in most NEAs phenomenal experience - and, as a precondition for that experience, vigilance or wakefulness - is reduced to a lesser degree than in those epileptic seizures involving impairment of consciousness. In fact, complete loss of "consciousness" is the exception rather than the rule in NEAs. Patients, as well as external observers, may have a tendency to overestimate impairments of consciousness during the seizures.

  16. Knowledge about epilepsy among teachers and epileptic patients

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    Maria F. Valls Tosetti

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available 223 epileptics patients and their families and 136 teachers from public and private schools were submitted to similar questionnaires related to inheritance, transmission, cure, complilcation rates, care during seizures, need for information on the disease, habits, comparison with other diseases and to the educational and social performances of epileptics. Cure and complication nates accounted for the main differences between those populations. Epileptics could recognize a bigger number of complications but still expected to be cured from the disease. The majority of teachers and patients have never been informed about epilepsy and this finding was related to the big number of equivocal answers obtained from them. Put together, the data showed that social and educational performance of epileptic patients could be disturbed by medical and social parameters. Some, of them could be improved by an educational program towards these aspects of epilepsy.

  17. EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH CONTINUOUS SPIKES-WAVES ACTIVITY DURING SLEEP

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    E. D. Belousova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author represents the review and discussion of current scientific literature devoted to epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-waves activity during sleep — the special form of partly reversible age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy, characterized by triad of symptoms: continuous prolonged epileptiform (spike-wave activity on EEG in sleep, epileptic seizures and cognitive disorders. The author describes the aspects of classification, pathogenesis and etiology, prevalence, clinical picture and diagnostics of this disorder, including the peculiar anomalies on EEG. The especial attention is given to approaches to the treatment of epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikeswaves activity during sleep. Efficacy of valproates, corticosteroid hormones and antiepileptic drugs of other groups is considered. The author represents own experience of treatment this disorder with corticosteroids, scheme of therapy and assessment of efficacy.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in epileptic adult patients: experience in Ramathibodi Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solosrungruang, Anusorn; Laothamatas, Jiraporn; Chinwarun, Yotin

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to classify the imaging structural abnormalities of epileptic adult patients referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) of the brain at Ramathibodi Hospital and to correlate with the clinical data and EEG. MR imaging of 91 adult epileptic patients (age ranging from 15-85 years old with an average of 36.90 years old) were retrospectively reviewed and classified into eight groups according to etiologies. Then clinical data and EEG correlations were analyzed using the Kappa analysis. All of the MR imaging of the brain were performed at Ramathibodi Hospital from January 2001 to December 2002. Secondary generalized tonic clonic seizure was the most common clinical presenting seizure type. Extra temporal lobe epilepsy was the most common clinical diagnosis. Of the thirty-three patients who underwent EEG before performing MR imaging, 17 had normal EEG From MR imaging, temporal lobe lesion was the main affected location and mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was the most common cause of the epilepsy in patients. For age group classification, young adult (15-34 years old) and adult (35-64 years old) age groups, MTS was the most common etiology of epilepsy with cortical dysplasia being the second most common cause for the first group and vascular disease for the latter group. For the older age group (> 64 years old), vascular disease and idiopathic cause were equally common etiologies. MRI, EEG findings, and clinical data were all concordant with statistical significance. MRI is the non-invasive modality of choice for evaluation of the epileptic patients. The result is concordant with the clinical and EEG findings. It can detect and localize the structural abnormality accurately and is useful in the treatment planning.

  19. Studies on glucose metabolism and blood perfusion in childhood partial seizure by positron emission CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michihiro, Narumi

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the glucose metabolism and blood perfusion of the interictal epileptic focus, 15 positron emission tomography (PET) measurements were performed in 14 children with partial seizures (2 with simple partial seizures, 2 with complex partial seizures, and 10 with partial seizures evolving to secondary generalized seizures), comprising 7 males and 7 females aged 1 to 12 years old at the onset of the epileptic seizures. The intervals between the seizure onset and PET examinations were 1 month to 7 years (mean 3 1/4 years). Radiopharmaceuticals such as 11 C-glucose, 11 CO 2 and 11 CO were used as indicators of local cerebral glucose metabolism, blood perfusion and blood flow, respectively. Apart from 2 cases, none of the patients showed abnormal x-ray computed tomographic scans (X-CT). The abnormal X-CT findings included cortical atrophy of the cerebrum apart from the epiletic focus in one case and cavum vergae in the other. Hypometabolism and hypoperfusion at the epileptic focus were observed in 10 patients undergoing single examinations who had suffered from epileptic seizures for more than 1 year. Out of 4 patients who had suffered from epileptic seizures for 1 year or less, one revealed a zone of hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in the epileptic focus and expanded region larger than that of the epileptic focus on the electroencephalogram. Two other patients revealed a zone of hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in an area contralateral to the epileptic focus. In the remaining one patient, PET examinations were performed twice. The initial PET pictures one year after seizure onset revealed a zone of hypermetabolism and hyperperfusion in the cerebellum ipsilateral to the epileptic focus, and the second PET at 6 months after the initial examination revealed hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in the focus, similarly to the 10 cases mentioned above. (J.P.N.)

  20. Continuous EEG-fMRI in Pre-Surgical Evaluation of a Patient with Symptomatic Seizures: Bold Activation Linked to Interictal Epileptic Discharges Caused by Cavernoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avesani, M; Formaggio, E; Milanese, F; Baraldo, A; Gasparini, A; Cerini, R; Bongiovanni, L G; Pozzi Mucelli, R; Fiaschi, A; Manganotti, P

    2008-04-07

    We used continuous electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) to identify the linkage between the "epileptogenic" and the "irritative" area in a patient with symptomatic epilepsy (cavernoma, previously diagnosed and surgically treated), i.e. a patient with a well known "epileptogenic area", and to increase the possibility of a non invasive pre-surgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsies. A compatible MRI system was used (EEG with 29 scalp electrodes and two electrodes for ECG and EMG) and signals were recorded with a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. After the recording session and MRI artifact removal, EEG data were analyzed offline and used as paradigms in fMRI study. Activation (EEG sequences with interictal slow-spiked-wave activity) and rest (sequences of normal EEG) conditions were compared to identify the potential resulting focal increase in BOLD signal and to consider if this is spatially linked to the interictal focus used as a paradigm and to the lesion. We noted an increase in the BOLD signal in the left neocortical temporal region, laterally and posteriorly to the poro-encephalic cavity (residual of cavernoma previously removed), that is around the "epileptogenic area". In our study "epileptogenic" and "irritative" areas were connected with each other. Combined EEG-fMRI may become routine in clinical practice for a better identification of an irritative and lesional focus in patients with symptomatic drug-resistant epilepsy.

  1. Absent CNKSR2 causes seizures and intellectual, attention, and language deficits

    OpenAIRE

    Vaags, A.; Bowdin, S.; Smith, M.; Gilbert-Dussardier, B.; Brocke-Holmefjord, K.; Sinopoli, K.; Gilles, C.; Haaland, T.; Vincent-Delorme, C.; Lagrue, E.; Harbuz, R.; Walker, S.; Marshall, C.; Houge, G.; Kalscheuer, V.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic function is central to brain function. Understanding the synapse is aided by studies of patients lacking individual synaptic proteins. Common neurological diseases are genetically complex. Their understanding is likewise simplified by studies of less common monogenic forms. We detail the disease caused by absence of the synaptic protein CNKSR2 in 8 patients ranging from 6 to 62 years old. The disease is characterized by intellectual disability, attention problems, and abrupt lifelong...

  2. Neonatal seizures: the overlap between diagnosis of metabolic disorders and structural abnormalities. Case report

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    Freitas Alessandra

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Inborn metabolic errors (IME and cortical developmental malformations are uncommon etiologies of neonatal seizures, however they may represent treatable causes of refractory epilepsy and for this reason must be considered as possible etiological factors. This case report aims to demonstrate the importance of neuroimaging studies in one patient with neonatal seizures, even when there are clues pointing to a metabolic disorder. CASE REPORT: A previously healthy 14 day-old child started presenting reiterated focal motor seizures (FMS which evolved to status epilepticus. Exams showed high serum levels of ammonia and no other abnormalities. A metabolic investigation was conducted with normal results. During follow-up, the patient presented developmental delay and left side hemiparesia. Seizures remained controlled with anti-epileptic drugs for four months, followed by relapse with repetitive FMS on the left side. Temporary improvement was obtained with anti-epileptic drug adjustment. At the age of 6 months, during a new episode of status epilepticus, high ammonia levels were detected. Other metabolic exams remained normal. The child was referred to a video-electroencephalographic monitoring and continuous epileptiform discharges were recorded over the right parasagittal and midline regions, with predominance over the posterior quadrant. A new neuroimaging study was performed and displayed a malformation of cortical development. Our case illustrates that because newborns are prone to present metabolic disarrangement, an unbalance such as hyperammonemia may be a consequence of acute events and conduct to a misdiagnosis of IME.

  3. Pattern of seizure cases in tertiary care hospitals in Karnataka state of India

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    Nitin Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence and incidence of epilepsy is higher in developing countries than in developed countries. Understanding pattern and risk factors of seizure cases will help in suggesting appropriate preventive measures. Objectives: This study was carried out to assess the pattern of seizure, its management and compliance with treatment. Materials and Methods: Data from medical records of seizure cases in three tertiary care hospitals of Mangalore city in south India admitted from January 2006 to December 2011 were collected and analyzed. Results: Nearly half (44.4% of the 196 cases belonged to productive age group (15-45 years and 2/3 rd (60.7% were males. Majority (>80% cases were unskilled workers and of low socio-economic status groups. Family history of seizures was present in 8.4% cases. Mean age of onset of seizure was found to be 19.9 years. Proportion of generalized tonic clonic seizure cases was 78.1%. Secondary seizures were seen in 66 (33.7% cases with the most common cause being trauma to the head (24.2%. Refractory seizures were present in 2.7% cases. Monotherapy was the most commonly followed treatment regimen and phenytoin was the most popular anti-epileptic drug (AED used. Non-compliance with AEDs was seen in 18.1% cases and was more among patients on polytherapy (P = 0.032. Conclusion: Seizure manifestations and treatment compliance vary widely in the studied population. In depth analysis of each seizure type will give more information about the factors associated with it.

  4. Absent CNKSR2 causes seizures and intellectual, attention, and language deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaags, Andrea K; Bowdin, Sarah; Smith, Mary-Lou; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Brocke-Holmefjord, Katja S; Sinopoli, Katia; Gilles, Cindy; Haaland, Tove B; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Lagrue, Emmanuelle; Harbuz, Radu; Walker, Susan; Marshall, Christian R; Houge, Gunnar; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Scherer, Stephen W; Minassian, Berge A

    2014-11-01

    Synaptic function is central to brain function. Understanding the synapse is aided by studies of patients lacking individual synaptic proteins. Common neurological diseases are genetically complex. Their understanding is likewise simplified by studies of less common monogenic forms. We detail the disease caused by absence of the synaptic protein CNKSR2 in 8 patients ranging from 6 to 62 years old. The disease is characterized by intellectual disability, attention problems, and abrupt lifelong language loss following a brief early childhood epilepsy with continuous spike-waves in sleep. This study describes the phenotype of CNKSR2 deficiency and its involvement in systems underlying common neurological disorders. © 2014 American Neurological Association.

  5. PICK1 uncoupling from mGluR7a causes absence-like seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Bertaso, Federica; Zhang, Chuansheng; Scheschonka, Astrid; de Bock, Frédéric; Fontanaud, Pierre; Marin, Philippe; Huganir, Richard L; Betz, Heinrich; Bockaert, Joël; Fagni, Laurent; Lerner-Natoli, Mireille

    2008-01-01

    Absence epilepsy is a neurological disorder that causes a recurrent loss of consciousness and generalized spike-and-wave discharges on an electroencephalogram (EEG). The role of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and associated scaffolding proteins in absence epilepsy has been unclear to date. We investigated a possible role for these proteins in absence epilepsy, focusing on the mGluR7a receptor and its PDZ-interacting protein, protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1), in rats and ...

  6. Mental Development of Children with Non-epileptic Paroxysmal States in Medical History

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    Turovskaya N.G.,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The author studied mental functions disorders in children with a history of paroxysmal states of various etiologies and compared mental development disorder patterns in patients with epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysms. Study sample were 107 children, aged 6 to 10 years. The study used experimental psychological and neuropsychological techniques. According to the empirical study results, non-epileptic paroxysms unlike epileptic much less combined with a number of mental functions disorders and intelligence in general. However, non-epileptic paroxysmal states as well as epileptic seizure associated with increasing activity exhaustion and abnormal function of the motor analyzer (dynamic and kinesthetic dyspraxia. Visual memory disorders and modal-nonspecific memory disorders have more pronounced importance in the mental ontogenesis structure in children with convulsive paroxysms compared to children with cerebral pathology without paroxysms history

  7. A girl with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy associated with microdeletion involving CDKL5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitsu, Hirotomo; Osaka, Hitoshi; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that aberrations of CDKL5 in female patients cause early-onset intractable seizures, severe developmental delay or regression, and Rett syndrome-like features. We report on a Japanese girl with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy, hypotonia, developmental regression, and Rett syndrome-like features. The patient showed generalized tonic seizures, and later, massive myoclonus induced by phone and light stimuli. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed no structural brain anomalies but cerebral atrophy. Electroencephalogram showed frontal dominant diffuse poly spikes and waves. Through copy number analysis by genomic microarray, we found a microdeletion at Xp22.13. A de novo 137-kb deletion, involving exons 5-21 of CDKL5, RS1, and part of PPEF1 gene, was confirmed by quantitative PCR and breakpoint specific PCR analyses. Our report suggests that the clinical features associated with CDKL5 deletions could be implicated in Japanese patients, and that genetic testing of CDKL5, including both sequencing and deletion analyses, should be considered in girls with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy and RTT-like features. Copyright © 2011 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Recurrent epileptic Wernicke aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahaya, Kinshuk; Dhand, Upinder K; Goyal, Munish K; Soni, Chetan R; Sahota, Pradeep K

    2010-04-15

    We report a patient with recurrent epileptic Wernicke aphasia who prior to this presentation, had been misdiagnosed as transient ischemic attacks for several years. This case report emphasizes the consideration of epileptic nature of aphasia when a clear alternate etiology is unavailable, even when EEG fails to show a clear ictal pattern. We also present a brief discussion of previously reported ictal aphasias. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Seizure-induced brain lesions: A wide spectrum of variably reversible MRI abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cianfoni, A.; Caulo, M.; Cerase, A.; Della Marca, G.; Falcone, C.; Di Lella, G.M.; Gaudino, S.; Edwards, J.; Colosimo, C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction MRI abnormalities in the postictal period might represent the effect of the seizure activity, rather than its structural cause. Material and Methods Retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging charts of 26 patients diagnosed with seizure-related MR-signal changes. All patients underwent brain-MRI (1.5-Tesla, standard pre- and post-contrast brain imaging, including DWI-ADC in 19/26) within 7 days from a seizure and at least one follow-up MRI, showing partial or complete reversibility of the MR-signal changes. Extensive clinical work-up and follow-up, ranging from 3 months to 5 years, ruled out infection or other possible causes of brain damage. Seizure-induced brain-MRI abnormalities remained a diagnosis of exclusion. Site, characteristics and reversibility of MRI changes, and association with characteristics of seizures were determined. Results MRI showed unilateral (13/26) and bilateral abnormalities, with high (24/26) and low (2/26) T2-signal, leptomeningeal contrast-enhancement (2/26), restricted diffusion (9/19). Location of abnormality was cortical/subcortical, basal ganglia, white matter, corpus callosum, cerebellum. Hippocampus was involved in 10/26 patients. Reversibility of MRI changes was complete in 15, and with residual gliosis or focal atrophy in 11 patients. Reversibility was noted between 15 and 150 days (average, 62 days). Partial simple and complex seizures were associated with hippocampal involvement (p = 0.015), status epilepticus with incomplete reversibility of MRI abnormalities (p = 0.041). Conclusions Seizure or epileptic status can induce transient, variably reversible MRI brain abnormalities. Partial seizures are frequently associated with hippocampal involvement and status epilepticus with incompletely reversible lesions. These seizure-induced MRI abnormalities pose a broad differential diagnosis; increased awareness may reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention

  10. Seizure-induced brain lesions: A wide spectrum of variably reversible MRI abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cianfoni, A., E-mail: acianfoni@hotmail.com [Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of Italian Switzerland–Ospedale regionale Lugano, Via Tesserete 46, Lugano, 6900, CH (Switzerland); Caulo, M., E-mail: caulo@unich.it [Department of Neuroscience and Imaging, University of Chieti, Via dei Vestini 33, 6610 Chieti. Italy (Italy); Cerase, A., E-mail: alfonsocerase@gmail.com [Unit of Neuroimaging and Neurointervention NINT, Department of Neurological and Sensorineural Sciences, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Policlinico “Santa Maria alle Scotte”, V.le Bracci 16, Siena (Italy); Della Marca, G., E-mail: dellamarca@rm.unicatt.it [Neurology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Falcone, C., E-mail: carlo_falc@libero.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Di Lella, G.M., E-mail: gdilella@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Gaudino, S., E-mail: sgaudino@sirm.org [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Edwards, J., E-mail: edwardjc@musc.edu [Neuroscience Dept., Medical University of South Carolina, 96J Lucas st, 29425, Charleston, SC (United States); Colosimo, C., E-mail: colosimo@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Introduction MRI abnormalities in the postictal period might represent the effect of the seizure activity, rather than its structural cause. Material and Methods Retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging charts of 26 patients diagnosed with seizure-related MR-signal changes. All patients underwent brain-MRI (1.5-Tesla, standard pre- and post-contrast brain imaging, including DWI-ADC in 19/26) within 7 days from a seizure and at least one follow-up MRI, showing partial or complete reversibility of the MR-signal changes. Extensive clinical work-up and follow-up, ranging from 3 months to 5 years, ruled out infection or other possible causes of brain damage. Seizure-induced brain-MRI abnormalities remained a diagnosis of exclusion. Site, characteristics and reversibility of MRI changes, and association with characteristics of seizures were determined. Results MRI showed unilateral (13/26) and bilateral abnormalities, with high (24/26) and low (2/26) T2-signal, leptomeningeal contrast-enhancement (2/26), restricted diffusion (9/19). Location of abnormality was cortical/subcortical, basal ganglia, white matter, corpus callosum, cerebellum. Hippocampus was involved in 10/26 patients. Reversibility of MRI changes was complete in 15, and with residual gliosis or focal atrophy in 11 patients. Reversibility was noted between 15 and 150 days (average, 62 days). Partial simple and complex seizures were associated with hippocampal involvement (p = 0.015), status epilepticus with incomplete reversibility of MRI abnormalities (p = 0.041). Conclusions Seizure or epileptic status can induce transient, variably reversible MRI brain abnormalities. Partial seizures are frequently associated with hippocampal involvement and status epilepticus with incompletely reversible lesions. These seizure-induced MRI abnormalities pose a broad differential diagnosis; increased awareness may reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention.

  11. Channel selection for automatic seizure detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjaer, Troels Wesenberg; Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the performance of epileptic seizure detection using only a few of the recorded EEG channels and the ability of software to select these channels compared with a neurophysiologist. Methods: Fifty-nine seizures and 1419 h of interictal EEG are used for training and testing...... of an automatic channel selection method. The characteristics of the seizures are extracted by the use of a wavelet analysis and classified by a support vector machine. The best channel selection method is based upon maximum variance during the seizure. Results: Using only three channels, a seizure detection...... sensitivity of 96% and a false detection rate of 0.14/h were obtained. This corresponds to the performance obtained when channels are selected through visual inspection by a clinical neurophysiologist, and constitutes a 4% improvement in sensitivity compared to seizure detection using channels recorded...

  12. Mortality after primary intracerebral hemorrhage in relation to post-stroke seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, D.; Bekelaar, K.; Schreuder, F.H.B.M.; Greef, B.T.A. de; Vlooswijk, M.C.G.; Staals, J.; Oostenbrugge, R.J. van; Rouhl, R.P.W.

    2017-01-01

    Seizures after intracerebral hemorrhage are repeatedly seen. Whether the development of seizures after intracerebral hemorrhage affects survival in the long term is unknown. This study aims to determine the relation between seizures (i.e., with and without anti-epileptic therapy) and long-term

  13. A STUDY OF THE VARIED AETIOLOGY AND CLINICAL PRESENTATION OF NEW ONSET SEIZURES IN POSTPARTUM PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Kumar Sudarsi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Seizures in the postpartum period are the major cause of mortality and morbidity. A variety of neurological disorders causing seizures may be encountered during pregnancy and puerperium. These disorders may be unrelated to pregnancy (e.g. Meningitis or peculiar to pregnancy (e.g. Eclampsia or. Pregnancy may affect the course of the pre-existing neurological disorders such as epilepsy. So, keeping in mind the varied aetiology of postpartum seizures and its response to appropriate treatment, our study has been conducted to find out the most common causes in our setup to guide the optimal therapy. AIM OF THE STUDY To study the varied aetiology and clinical presentation of new onset seizures in the postpartum period over a period of two years. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients who developed first episode of seizures in postpartum period (that is after delivery to 6 weeks admitted to Osmania General Hospital on random selection. All women complaining of new onset seizure with in postpartum period up to 6 weeks. All those women who are known epileptics and who had seizures in the antenatal period were excluded from the study. The selected patients were studied in detail with history and physical examination. RESULTS Different causes for first episode of seizures in postpartum period are enlisted here. Cavernous sinus thrombosis in 17 patients, late postpartum eclampsia accounted for 13 patients, intracranial haemorrhage in 6 patients, ischaemic stroke in 5 patients, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in 4 patients, CNS infections in 6 patients, glioma in 1 patient, viral hepatitis in one patient, idiopathic in 3 patients. CONCLUSIONS Cavernous sinus thrombosis and late postpartum eclampsia constitute the major aetiology of first onset of seizes occurring in the postpartum period.

  14. Application of magnetic source imaging in localizing the epileptic foci in patients with grey matter heterotopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jilin; Wu Jie; Jia Xiuchuan; Li Sumin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of magnetic source imaging (MSI) in localizing the epileptic foci of patients with histologically proved grey matter heterotopia (GMH) and seizure. Methods: MSI examinations were performed on 8 patients with GMH and seizure. The location of the epileptic foci defined by MSI was compared with the results of the ECoG. After imaging examinations, all patients received operation with 13-48 months follow up to observe the effectiveness of the operation. Results: Among the 8 patients, 1 had hippocampal sclerosis, 2 had focal cortical dysplasia of type Ⅰ B and 1 had focal cortical dysplasia of type Ⅱ B. MRI showed normal findings in 2 cases, subcortical heterotopia in 4 cases, and nodular heterotopia in 2 cases with one having schizencephaly. The epileptic foci defined by MSI were at right temporal lobe in 2 cases, left frontal lobe in 2 cases, biparietal lobe in 1 case, left parietal lobe in 1 case, left temporal lobe in 1 case, and left frontal-parietal lobe in 1 case. The epileptic foci defined by MSI were completely overlaid with area of GMH in 4 cases, closely behind the area of GMH in case, and partly overlaid with area of CMH in 1 cases with size larger than that of the latter. One patient showed two epileptic foci with one located within the area of GMH and the other one 2 centimeters anterior to the area of GMH. One case's epileptic focus located 2 centimeters posteolateral to the area of GMH. The locations of the epileptic foci defined by MSI showed no difference with those defined by ECoG in all patients. According to Engel classification of treatment effect of epilepsy, 6 patients achieved Engle class Ⅰ ( seizure free after operation), and 2 patients Engel class Ⅳ (no changes in the frequency of occurrence of seizures before and after operation). Conclusion: MSI can noninvasively and precisely localize the epileptic foci before operation in patients with GMH and seizure. (authors)

  15. The offspring of epileptic mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamer, S K; Misra, S; Jaiswal, S

    1996-01-01

    The offspring of an epileptic mother is an issue-currently getting attention because of its several implications. A complex interaction between epilepsy during pregnancy and its adverse impact on foetus, labor, neonate, congenital malformation, psychosocial and medico-social concern and treatment challenges of such cases is increasingly being realised. Some of the significant observations has been reviewed extensively in this article. Maternal epilepsy is likely to adversely affect the off-spring at its various stages of development amounting to increased morbidity and mortality. Increased seizure frequency during pregnancy with resultant increased risk is well documented but its mechanism is poorly understood. Low apgar score, increased still birth rates (1.3 to 14%) in offspring of epileptic mother (OEM) is reported. So also, the neonatal and perinatal deaths are twice more common in OEMS than normal control. Small for dates, and prematurity in OEM is reported to be 7 to 10% and 4-11% respectively. Adverse impact on labor and delivery like preclampsia, abruptio placentae, polyhydramnios, assisted delivery, cesarean section and IUGR poses particular challenges to the obstetrician. Pediatrician's alertness is needed to anticipate and deal with the bleeding manifestation due to deficiency of Vit-K dependent clotting factors and various anticonvulsant drug (AED) withdrawal symptoms. Significant risk of developing congenital malformation is the result of epilepsy perse and the AED used during pregnancy. AED exposure leads to other distinct clinical syndromes, the orofacial clefts and cardiac anomalies being the commonest manifestation. Epilepsy in mother but not in father has significant adverse impact. Management strategies in the context of available observation has been discussed.

  16. Psychogenic seizures and frontal disconnection: EEG synchronisation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazeva, Maria G; Jalili, Mahdi; Frackowiak, Richard S; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2011-05-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are paroxysmal events that, in contrast to epileptic seizures, are related to psychological causes without the presence of epileptiform EEG changes. Recent models suggest a multifactorial basis for PNES. A potentially paramount, but currently poorly understood factor is the interplay between psychiatric features and a specific vulnerability of the brain leading to a clinical picture that resembles epilepsy. Hypothesising that functional cerebral network abnormalities may predispose to the clinical phenotype, the authors undertook a characterisation of the functional connectivity in PNES patients. The authors analysed the whole-head surface topography of multivariate phase synchronisation (MPS) in interictal high-density EEG of 13 PNES patients as compared with 13 age- and sex-matched controls. MPS mapping reduces the wealth of dynamic data obtained from high-density EEG to easily readable synchronisation maps, which provide an unbiased overview of any changes in functional connectivity associated with distributed cortical abnormalities. The authors computed MPS maps for both Laplacian and common-average-reference EEGs. In a between-group comparison, only patchy, non-uniform changes in MPS survived conservative statistical testing. However, against the background of these unimpressive group results, the authors found widespread inverse correlations between individual PNES frequency and MPS within the prefrontal and parietal cortices. PNES appears to be associated with decreased prefrontal and parietal synchronisation, possibly reflecting dysfunction of networks within these regions.

  17. Cortical GABAergic excitation contributes to epileptic activities around human glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, Johan; Varlet, Pascale; Cresto, Noemie; Baulac, Michel; Duyckaerts, Charles; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chazal, Geneviève; Devaux, Bertrand; Rivera, Claudio; Miles, Richard; Capelle, Laurent; Huberfeld, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Diffuse brain gliomas induce seizures in a majority of patients. As in most epileptic disorders, excitatory glutamatergic mechanisms are involved in the generation of epileptic activities in the neocortex surrounding gliomas. However, chloride homeostasis is known to be perturbed in glial tumor cells. Thus the contribution of GABAergic mechanisms which depend on intracellular chloride and which are defective or pro-epileptic in other structural epilepsies merits closer study. Objective We studied in neocortical slices from the peritumoral security margin resected around human brain gliomas, the occurrence, networks, cells and signaling basis of epileptic activities. Results Postoperative glioma tissue from 69% of patients spontaneously generated interictal-like discharges. These events were synchronized, with a high frequency oscillation signature, in superficial layers of neocortex around glioma areas with tumor infiltration. Interictal-like events depended on both glutamatergic transmission and on depolarizing GABAergic signaling. About 65% of pyramidal cells were depolarized by GABA released by interneurons. This effect was related to perturbations in Chloride homeostasis, due to changes in expression of chloride co-transporters: KCC2 was reduced and expression of NKCC1 increased. Ictal-like activities were initiated by convulsant stimuli exclusively in these epileptogenic areas. Conclusions Epileptic activities are sustained by excitatory effects of GABA in the peritumoral human neocortex, as in temporal lobe epilepsies. Glutamate and GABA signaling are involved in oncogenesis and chloride homeostasis is perturbed. These same factors, induce an imbalance between synaptic excitatory and inhibition underly epileptic discharges in tumor patients. PMID:25009229

  18. Anesthesia-induced epilepsy: causes and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xuefeng

    2014-09-01

    Epilepsy is a type of chronic brain disease that results from an abnormally high synchronization of neuronal discharge. The typical clinical features of epilepsy are paroxysms and transient and stereotyped brain dysfunction. Many cases of epileptic seizures occurring during anesthesia have been reportedx. Recently, risk assessment of epileptic seizures during surgery and anesthesia has gained increasing attention. In this review, we systematically summarize the influence of anesthesia on epileptic seizures; the types, durations and frequencies of seizures related to anesthesia; and the epidemiology, prevention, treatment and prognosis of epilepsy. We also explore the possible mechanism of epilepsy and provide guidance for anesthesia during surgeries.

  19. De novo loss-of-function mutations in CHD2 cause a fever-sensitive myoclonic epileptic encephalopathy sharing features with Dravet syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suls, Arvid; Jaehn, Johanna A; Kecskés, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is a severe epilepsy syndrome characterized by infantile onset of therapy-resistant, fever-sensitive seizures followed by cognitive decline. Mutations in SCN1A explain about 75% of cases with Dravet syndrome; 90% of these mutations arise de novo. We studied a cohort of nine Dravet...

  20. Prevalence of epilepsy and seizure disorders as causes of apparent life- threatening event (ALTE) in children admitted to a tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Alessandra Marques dos; Nunes, Magda Lahorgue

    2009-09-01

    To determine the prevalence and describe clinical characteristics of seizure disorders and epilepsy as causes of apparent life- threatening event (ALTE) in children admitted at the emergency and followed in a tertiary hospital. Cross-sectional study with prospective data collection using specific guidelines to determine the etiology of ALTE. During the study, 30 (4.2%) children admitted to the hospital had a diagnosis of ALTE. There was a predominance of males (73%) and term infants (70%). Neonatal neurological disorders and neuropsychomotor development delay were found respectively in 13.4% and 10% of the cases. Etiological investigation revealed that 50% of the cases were idiopathic, and 13.4% were caused by epilepsy or seizure disorders. Although all patients had recurrent ALTE events, epilepsy had not been previously suspected. Epilepsy should be included in the differential diagnosis of ALTE, particularly when events are recurrent.

  1. Febrile seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... proper care. Occasionally, a provider will prescribe a medicine called diazepam to prevent or treat febrile seizures that occur more than once. However, no drug is completely effective in preventing febrile seizures. Alternative Names Seizure - fever induced; Febrile convulsions Patient Instructions ...

  2. Dose-Dependent Effect of Curcumin on Learning and Memory Deficit in Kainate-Epileptic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Kiasalari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives : Epileptic seizures accompany disturbances in learning, memory, and cognitive skills. With regard to antiepileptic potential of curcumin and its beneficial effect on memory, the effect of its administration on learning and memory in kainate-epileptic rats was investigated.   Methods: Forty male rats were divided into sham, positive control ( valproate-treated epileptic, epileptic, and two curcumin-treated epileptic groups. Rat model of epilepsy was induced by unilateral intrahippocampal administration of 4 μg of kainate per rat. Rats received intraperitoneal injection of curcumin (50 and 100 mg/kg daily for 1 week before surgery. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial (IL and step-through latencies (STL were determined using passive avoidance test and alternation behavior percentage was obtained according to Y maze test.   Results: Regarding IL, there was no significant difference between the groups. In contrast, STL significantly decreased in curcumin-50-treated epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 263.1 to 184.5 s. However, this parameter significantly increased in curcumin-100-treated epileptic group as compared to epileptic group (p<0.01 (a change from 263.1 to 220.3 s. In addition, STL was also significantly higher in valproic acid-treated epileptic group versus epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 145.7 to 210.3 s. Alternation percentage was also significantly higher in curcumin-50- and curcumin-100-treated epileptic groups relative to epileptic group (p<0.05 (a change from 60.5 to 77.6 and 80.3%.   Conclusion: Curcumin could dose-dependently enhance the consolidation and recall in epileptic animals and could improve spatial memory in such animals.

  3. Fragility in dynamic networks: application to neural networks in the epileptic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritharan, Duluxan; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a network phenomenon characterized by atypical activity at the neuronal and population levels during seizures, including tonic spiking, increased heterogeneity in spiking rates, and synchronization. The etiology of epilepsy is unclear, but a common theme among proposed mechanisms is that structural connectivity between neurons is altered. It is hypothesized that epilepsy arises not from random changes in connectivity, but from specific structural changes to the most fragile nodes or neurons in the network. In this letter, the minimum energy perturbation on functional connectivity required to destabilize linear networks is derived. Perturbation results are then applied to a probabilistic nonlinear neural network model that operates at a stable fixed point. That is, if a small stimulus is applied to the network, the activation probabilities of each neuron respond transiently but eventually recover to their baseline values. When the perturbed network is destabilized, the activation probabilities shift to larger or smaller values or oscillate when a small stimulus is applied. Finally, the structural modifications to the neural network that achieve the functional perturbation are derived. Simulations of the unperturbed and perturbed networks qualitatively reflect neuronal activity observed in epilepsy patients, suggesting that the changes in network dynamics due to destabilizing perturbations, including the emergence of an unstable manifold or a stable limit cycle, may be indicative of neuronal or population dynamics during seizure. That is, the epileptic cortex is always on the brink of instability and minute changes in the synaptic weights associated with the most fragile node can suddenly destabilize the network to cause seizures. Finally, the theory developed here and its interpretation of epileptic networks enables the design of a straightforward feedback controller that first detects when the network has destabilized and then applies linear state

  4. [Unusual dreams in epileptics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldyrev, A I

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses bizarre dreams characteristic of epileptics and never occurring in normal subjects which have an important practical implication especially for early detection of epilepsy and the prevention of severe forms of the disease. This group of dreams includes vivid nightmares with vital fear, dreams not infrequently transforming into pro-dream states; persistently repeated stereotyped dreams and dreams with invariably the same unpleasant sensations representing an isolated aura of subsequent epileptic attacks. Diagnostically important may also be dreams with the symptoms of derealization and depersonalization, vague dream images and the deja vu phenomenon.

  5. Predictability of uncontrollable multifocal seizures - towards new treatment options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnertz, Klaus; Dickten, Henning; Porz, Stephan; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Elger, Christian E.

    2016-04-01

    Drug-resistant, multifocal, non-resectable epilepsies are among the most difficult epileptic disorders to manage. An approach to control previously uncontrollable seizures in epilepsy patients would consist of identifying seizure precursors in critical brain areas combined with delivering a counteracting influence to prevent seizure generation. Predictability of seizures with acceptable levels of sensitivity and specificity, even in an ambulatory setting, has been repeatedly shown, however, in patients with a single seizure focus only. We did a study to assess feasibility of state-of-the-art, electroencephalogram-based seizure-prediction techniques in patients with uncontrollable multifocal seizures. We obtained significant predictive information about upcoming seizures in more than two thirds of patients. Unexpectedly, the emergence of seizure precursors was confined to non-affected brain areas. Our findings clearly indicate that epileptic networks, spanning lobes and hemispheres, underlie generation of seizures. Our proof-of-concept study is an important milestone towards new therapeutic strategies based on seizure-prediction techniques for clinical practice.

  6. Neonatal Seizure Models to Study Epileptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Kasahara

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Current therapeutic strategies for epilepsy include anti-epileptic drugs and surgical treatments that are mainly focused on the suppression of existing seizures rather than the occurrence of the first spontaneous seizure. These symptomatic treatments help a certain proportion of patients, but these strategies are not intended to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the primary process of epilepsy development, i.e., epileptogenesis. Epileptogenic changes include reorganization of neural and glial circuits, resulting in the formation of an epileptogenic focus. To achieve the goal of developing “anti-epileptogenic” drugs, we need to clarify the step-by-step mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis for patients whose seizures are not controllable with existing “anti-epileptic” drugs. Epileptogenesis has been studied using animal models of neonatal seizures because such models are useful for studying the latent period before the occurrence of spontaneous seizures and the lowering of the seizure threshold. Further, neonatal seizure models are generally easy to handle and can be applied for in vitro studies because cells in the neonatal brain are suitable for culture. Here, we review two animal models of neonatal seizures for studying epileptogenesis and discuss their features, specifically focusing on hypoxia-ischemia (HI-induced seizures and febrile seizures (FSs. Studying these models will contribute to identifying the potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers of epileptogenesis.

  7. Risk factor for febrile seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odalović Dragica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Febrile seizures are the most frequent neurological disorder in the childhood. According to American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP, they have been defined as seizures provoked by high temperature in children aged between 6 months and 5 years, without previous history of afebrile seizures, intracranial infections and other possible causes of seizures. Seizures can be typical and atypical, according to the characteristics. Pathogenesis of this disorder has not been clarified yet, and it is believed to be a combination of genetic factors, high body temperature and brain maturation. The risk factors for recurrence of febrile seizures are: age in which seizures appeared for the first time, epilepsy in the first degree relative, febrile seizures in the first degree relative, frequent diseases with fever and low body temperature on the beginning of seizures. The frequency of recurrent seizures The risk for occurrence of epilepsy in children with simple seizures is about 1-1.5%, which is slightly higher compared to general population, while it increases to 4-15% in patients with complex seizures. However, there is no evidence that therapy prevents occurrence of epilepsy. When the prevention of recurrent seizures is considered, it is necessary to separate simple from complex seizures. The aim of this paper was to analyze the most important risk factors for febrile seizures, and to evaluate their impact on occurrence of recurrent seizures. Our study included 125 children with febrile seizures, aged from 6 months to 5 years. The presence of febrile seizures and epilepsy in the first degree relative has been noted in 22% of children. Typical febrile seizures were observed in 76% of cases, and atypical in 24%. Most patients had only one seizure (73.6%. Children, who had seizure earlier in life, had more frequent recurrences. Both risk factors were present in 25% of patients, while 68% of patients had only one risk factor. For the children with febrile disease

  8. Complete remission of epileptic psychosis after temporal lobectomy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Renato Luiz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a female patient with refractory complex partial seizures since 15 years of age, recurrent postictal psychotic episodes since 35 which evolved to a chronic refractory interictal psychosis and MRI with right mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS. After a comprehensive investigation (video-EEG intensive monitoring, interictal and ictal SPECT, and a neuropsychological evaluation including WADA test she was submitted to a right temporal lobectomy. Since then, she has been seizure-free with remission of psychosis, although with some persistence of personality traits (hiperreligiosity, viscosity which had been present before surgery. This case supports the idea that temporal lobectomy can be a safe and effective therapeutic measure for patients with MTS, refractory epilepsy and recurrent postictal epileptic psychosis or interictal epileptic psychosis with postictal exacerbation.

  9. Immune-mediated steroid-responsive epileptic spasms and epileptic encephalopathy associated with VGKC-complex antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Jehan; Brenner, Tanja; Gill, Deepak; Troedson, Christopher; Sinclair, Adriane J; Brilot, Fabienne; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Dale, Russell C

    2011-11-01

    Autoantibodies that bind to voltage-gated potassium-channel complex proteins (VGKC-complex antibodies) occur frequently in adults with limbic encephalitis presenting with cognitive impairment and seizures. Recently, VGKC-complex antibodies have been described in a few children with limbic encephalitis, and children with unexplained encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus. We report a case of infantile-onset epileptic spasms and developmental delay compatible with epileptic encephalopathy. Our patient was a female infant, aged 4 months at presentation. She had evidence of immune activation in the central nervous system with elevated cerebrospinal fluid neopterin and mirrored oligoclonal bands, which prompted testing for autoantibodies. VGKC-complex antibodies were elevated (201 pmol/L, normalVGKC-complex antibodies might represent a marker of immune therapy responsiveness in a subgroup of patients with infantile epileptic encephalopathy. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  10. [Brain lateralization and seizure semiology: ictal clinical lateralizing signs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Réka; Kalmár, Zsuzsanna; Fehér, Nóra; Fogarasi, András; Gyimesi, Csilla; Janszky, József

    2008-07-30

    Clinical lateralizing signs are the phenomena which can unequivocally refer to the hemispheric onset of epileptic seizures. They can improve the localization of epileptogenic zone during presurgical evaluation, moreover, their presence can predict a success of surgical treatment. Primary sensory phenomena such as visual aura in one half of the field of vision or unilateral ictal somatosensory sensation always appear on the contralateral to the focus. Periictal unilateral headache, although it is an infrequent symptom, is usually an ipsilateral sign. Primary motor phenomena like epileptic clonic, tonic movements, the version of head ubiquitously appear contralateral to the epileptogenic zone. Very useful lateralization sign is the ictal hand-dystonia which lateralizes to the contralateral hemisphere in nearly 100%. The last clonus of the secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizure lateralizes to the ipsilateral hemisphere in 85%. The fast component of ictal nystagmus appears in nearly 100% on the contralateral side of the epileptic focus. Vegetative symptoms during seizures arising from temporal lobe such as spitting, nausea, vomiting, urinary urge are typical for seizures originating from non-dominant (right) hemisphere. Ictal pallor and cold shivers are dominant hemispheric lateralization signs. Postictal unilateral nose wiping refers to the ipsilateral hemispheric focus compared to the wiping hand. Ictal or postictal aphasia refers to seizure arising from dominant hemisphere. Intelligable speech during complex partial seizures appears in non-dominant seizures. Automatism with preserved consciousness refers to the seizures of non-dominant temporal lobe.

  11. EEG analysis of seizure patterns using visibility graphs for detection of generalized seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Long, Xi; Arends, Johan B A M; Aarts, Ronald M

    2017-10-01

    The traditional EEG features in the time and frequency domain show limited seizure detection performance in the epileptic population with intellectual disability (ID). In addition, the influence of EEG seizure patterns on detection performance was less studied. A single-channel EEG signal can be mapped into visibility graphs (VGS), including basic visibility graph (VG), horizontal VG (HVG), and difference VG (DVG). These graphs were used to characterize different EEG seizure patterns. To demonstrate its effectiveness in identifying EEG seizure patterns and detecting generalized seizures, EEG recordings of 615h on one EEG channel from 29 epileptic patients with ID were analyzed. A novel feature set with discriminative power for seizure detection was obtained by using the VGS method. The degree distributions (DDs) of DVG can clearly distinguish EEG of each seizure pattern. The degree entropy and power-law degree power in DVG were proposed here for the first time, and they show significant difference between seizure and non-seizure EEG. The connecting structure measured by HVG can better distinguish seizure EEG from background than those by VG and DVG. A traditional EEG feature set based on frequency analysis was used here as a benchmark feature set. With a support vector machine (SVM) classifier, the seizure detection performance of the benchmark feature set (sensitivity of 24%, FD t /h of 1.8s) can be improved by combining our proposed VGS features extracted from one EEG channel (sensitivity of 38%, FD t /h of 1.4s). The proposed VGS-based features can help improve seizure detection for ID patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential DNA methylation patterns define status epilepticus and epileptic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F C; Das, Sudipto; Sano, Takanori; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Bryan, Kenneth; Buckley, Patrick G; Stallings, Raymond L; Henshall, David C

    2012-02-01

    Prolonged seizures (status epilepticus) produce pathophysiological changes in the hippocampus that are associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression. Epileptic tolerance is an endogenous program of cell protection that can be activated in the brain by previous exposure to a non-harmful seizure episode before status epilepticus. A major transcriptional feature of tolerance is gene downregulation. Here, through methylation analysis of 34,143 discrete loci representing all annotated CpG islands and promoter regions in the mouse genome, we report the genome-wide DNA methylation changes in the hippocampus after status epilepticus and epileptic tolerance in adult mice. A total of 321 genes showed altered DNA methylation after status epilepticus alone or status epilepticus that followed seizure preconditioning, with >90% of the promoters of these genes undergoing hypomethylation. These profiles included genes not previously associated with epilepsy, such as the polycomb gene Phc2. Differential methylation events generally occurred throughout the genome without bias for a particular chromosomal region, with the exception of a small region of chromosome 4, which was significantly overrepresented with genes hypomethylated after status epilepticus. Surprisingly, only few genes displayed differential hypermethylation in epileptic tolerance. Nevertheless, gene ontology analysis emphasized the majority of differential methylation events between the groups occurred in genes associated with nuclear functions, such as DNA binding and transcriptional regulation. The present study reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes after status epilepticus and in epileptic tolerance, which may contribute to regulating the gene expression environment of the seizure-damaged hippocampus.

  13. Generalized seizures in the right hippocampus sclerosis combined with hypoplasia of the right vertebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchev, L.; Toneva, J.; Manolova, T.; Manchev, I.; Valcheva, V.

    2016-01-01

    We present a clinical case of generalized epileptic seizures, occurring suddenly. The common finding from MRI of the brain is sclerosis of the right hippocampus, while MR angiography shows hypoplasia of the right vertebral artery. There are EEG signs for single foci of abnormal activity more on the right side. An anticonvulsant and symptomatic treatment demonstrate a favorable result. Under discussion is the question of surgery treatment. Key words: Hippocampal Sclerosis. MRI. Epileptic Seizures

  14. Serum cardiac troponin I in canine syncope and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, E; Dukes-McEwan, J; Cripps, P J

    2017-02-01

    To determine if serum cardiac troponin I (cTnI) concentration distinguishes between cardiogenic syncope and collapsing dogs presenting with either generalized epileptic seizures (both with and without cardiac disease) or vasovagal syncope. Seventy-nine prospectively recruited dogs, grouped according to aetiology of collapse: generalized epileptic seizures (group E), cardiogenic syncope (group C), dogs with both epileptic seizures and cardiac disease (group B), vasovagal syncope (group V) or unclassified (group U). Most patients had ECG (n = 78), echocardiography (n = 78) and BP measurement (n = 74) performed. Dogs with a history of intoxications, trauma, evidence of metabolic disorders or renal insufficiency (based on serum creatinine concentrations >150 μmol/L and urine specific gravity disease) or vasovagal syncope. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Stimulus driver for epilepsy seizure suppression with adaptive loading impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ker, Ming-Dou; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chen, Wei-Ling

    2011-10-01

    A stimulus driver circuit for a micro-stimulator used in an implantable device is presented in this paper. For epileptic seizure control, the target of the driver was to output 30 µA stimulus currents when the electrode impedance varied between 20 and 200 kΩ. The driver, which consisted of the output stage, control block and adaptor, was integrated in a single chip. The averaged power consumption of the stimulus driver was 0.24-0.56 mW at 800 Hz stimulation rate. Fabricated in a 0.35 µm 3.3 V/24 V CMOS process and applied to a closed-loop epileptic seizure monitoring and controlling system, the proposed design has been successfully verified in the experimental results of Long-Evans rats with epileptic seizures.

  16. CDKL5 alterations lead to early epileptic encephalopathy in both genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jao-Shwann; Shimojima, Keiko; Takayama, Rumiko; Natsume, Jun; Shichiji, Minobu; Hirasawa, Kyoko; Imai, Kaoru; Okanishi, Tohru; Mizuno, Seiji; Okumura, Akihisa; Sugawara, Midori; Ito, Tomoshiro; Ikeda, Hiroko; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Oguni, Hirokazu; Imai, Katsumi; Osawa, Makiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    Genetic mutations of the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been reported in patients with epileptic encephalopathy, which is characterized by intractable seizures and severe-to-profound developmental delay. We investigated the clinical relevance of CDKL5 alterations in both genders. A total of 125 patients with epileptic encephalopathy were examined for genomic copy number aberrations, and 119 patients with no such aberrations were further examined for CDKL5 mutations. Five patients with Rett syndrome, who did not show methyl CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) mutations, were also examined for CDKL5 mutations. One male and three female patients showed submicroscopic deletions including CDKL5, and two male and six female patients showed CDKL5 nucleotide alterations. Development of early onset seizure was a characteristic clinical feature for the patients with CDKL5 alterations in both genders despite polymorphous seizure types, including myoclonic seizures, tonic seizures, and spasms. Severe developmental delays and mild frontal lobe atrophies revealed by brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were observed in almost all patients, and there was no gender difference in phenotypic features. We observed that 5% of the male patients and 14% of the female patients with epileptic encephalopathy had CDKL5 alterations. These findings indicate that alterations in CDKL5 are associated with early epileptic encephalopathy in both female and male patients. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. FOCAL EPILEPTIC MYOCLONUS IN KOZHEVNIKOV–RASMUSSEN SYNDROME

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    N. E. Kvaskova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the clinical, electroencephalographic (EEG and neuroimaging features, as well as the results of treatment of patients with focal epileptic myoclonus (FEM with the Kozhevnikov–Rasmussen syndrome (KRS. FEM in KRS-patients was identified in 11 cases, accounting for 0.9 % of all the cases of epilepsy with the onset of seizures up to 18 years (n = 1261. The age at onset of KRS ranged from 3 to 21 years (average – 9.2 ± 5.7 years. In the active period of the disease of all patients in the clinical picture the active FEM appeared and increasing frequency of the secondary generalized seizures (SGS. In addition SGS and FEM, the clinical picture of the disease in most patients (91 % the focal motor (clonic and the somatosensory focal seizures were observed. As the disease progressed, the FEM became more pronounced in frequency and intensity, seized more muscle groups, localizing mainly in the muscles of the trunk and limbs. The typical EEG pattern of FEM patients with KRS was regional epileptiform activity that occurs in the structure of the continued regional slowing localizing maximum of the fronto-central-temporal region. During the magnetic resonance tomography of the brain in dynamics all the patients observed the increase in total cortical hemiatrophy. In all the cases, the appointment of antiepileptic therapy resulted in a slowing of the FEM, however, a complete remission was reached at none of the patients. Two patients were made surgical treatment of epilepsy. In one case remission of epileptic seizures was observed after right-side hemispherotomy. Our study showed that FEM is very resistant type of epileptic seizures. This fact calls for the identification of the FEM at the early stages of the disease with the purpose to improve the prognosis, as well as for an earlier surgical treatment.

  18. Epileptic negative drop attacks in atypical benign partial epilepsy: a neurophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshiko; Oguni, Hirokazu; Osawa, Makiko

    2009-03-01

    We conducted a computer-assisted polygraphic analysis of drop attacks in a child with atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE) to investigate neurophysiological characteristics. The patient was a six-year two-month-old girl, who had started to have focal motor seizures, later combined with daily epileptic negative myoclonus (ENM) and drop attacks, causing multiple injuries. We studied episodes of ENM and drop attacks using video-polygraphic and computer-assisted back-averaging analysis. A total of 12 ENM episodes, seven involving the left arm (ENMlt) and five involving both arms (ENMbil), and five drop attacks were captured for analysis. All episodes were time-locked to spike-and-wave complexes (SWC) arising from both centro-temporo-parietal (CTP) areas. The latency between the onset of SWC and ENMlt, ENMbil, and drop attacks reached 68 ms, 42 ms, and 8 ms, respectively. The height of the spike as well as the slow-wave component of SWC for drop attacks were significantly larger than that for both ENMlt and ENMbil (p negative myoclonus involving not only upper proximal but also axial muscles, causing the body to fall. Thus, drop attacks in ABPE are considered to be epileptic negative drop attacks arising from bilateral CTP foci and differ from drop attacks of a generalized origin seen in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and myoclonic-astatic epilepsy.

  19. Ketogenic diet efficacy in the treatment of intractable epileptic spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayyali, Husam R; Gustafson, Megan; Myers, Tara; Thompson, Lindsey; Williams, Michelle; Abdelmoity, Ahmad

    2014-03-01

    To determine the efficacy of the ketogenic diet in controlling epileptic spasms after failing traditional antiepileptic medication therapy. This is a prospective, case-based study of all infants with epileptic spasms who were referred for treatment with the ketogenic diet at our hospital between 2009 and 2012. All subjects continued to have epileptic spasms with evidence of hypsarrhythmia or severe epileptic encephalopathy on electroencephalography despite appropriate medication treatments. The diet efficacy was assessed through clinic visits, phone communications, and electroencephalography. Quality of life improvement was charted based on the caregiver's perspective. Twenty infants (15 males) were included in the study. The mean age at seizure onset was 4.5 months. Age at ketogenic diet initiation was 0.3 to 2.9 years (mean 1.20, standard deviation 0.78). Fifteen patients had epileptic spasms of unknown etiology; three had perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, one had lissencephaly, and one had STXBP1 mutation. Fifteen infants failed to respond to adrenocorticotropin hormone and/or vigabatrin before going on the ketogenic diet. Three months after starting the diet, >50% seizure reduction was achieved in 70% of patients (95% CI 48-86). These results were maintained at 6- and 12-month intervals. All eight of the patients followed for 24 months had >50% seizure reduction (95% CI 63-100). At least 90% seizure reduction was reported in 20% of patients at 3 months (95% CI 7-42), 22% (95% CI 8-46) at 6 months, and 35% (95% CI 17-59) at 12 months. The majority of patients (63%) achieved improvement of their spasms within 1 month after starting the diet. Sixty percent of patients had electroencephalographic improvement. All caregivers reported improvement of the quality of life at the 3-month visit (95% confidence interval 81-100). This ratio was 94% at 6 months (95% CI 72-99) and 82% at 12 months (95% CI 58-95). The ketogenic diet is a safe and potentially

  20. Atypical presentation in Rasmussen encephalitis: delayed late-onset periodic epileptic spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Taíssa P F; Hamad, Ana P A; Caboclo, Luís Otávio S F; Centeno, Ricardo S; Zaninotto, Ana Luiza; Scattolin, Monica; Carrete Junior, Henrique; Lancellotti, Carmem L P; Yacubian, Elza Márcia T

    2011-09-01

    A five-and-a-half-year-old girl started experiencing progressive left hemiparesis at age two and a half years. At age five years and four months she started presenting clusters of asymmetric periodic epileptic spasms with no hypsarrhythmia. The ictal EEG showed periodic, constant and stereotyped complexes. Serial brain imaging revealed progressive atrophy of the right hemisphere with increased T2 signal on MRI. She underwent a right hemispherotomy, and histological examination showed signs of inflammation and features of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). She has been seizure-free for 16 months. This case is unique in the following aspects: the presence of typical Rasmussen encephalitis features of progressive unilateral brain involvement without seizures, a delay of almost three years prior to seizure onset; an atypical seizure type presentation with periodic epileptic spasms and the presence of FCD associated with inflammatory changes. [Published with video sequences].

  1. Evaluation of the Effect of Jobelyn® on Chemoconvulsants- Induced Seizure in Mice

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    Solomon Umukoro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Epilepsy is a common central nervous system (CNS disorder characterized by seizures resulting from episodic neuronal discharges. The incidence of toxicity and refractoriness has compromised the clinical efficacy of the drugs currently used for the treatment of convulsions. Thus, there is a need to search for new medicines from plant origin that are readily available and safer for the control of seizures. Jobelyn® (JB is a unique African polyherbal preparation used by the natives to treat seizures in children. This investigation was carried out to evaluate whether JB has anti-seizure property in mice. Methods: The animals received JB (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, p.o 30 min before induction of convulsions with intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of picrotoxin (6 mg/kg, strychnine (2 mg/ kg and pentylenetetrazole (85 mg/kg respectively. Diazepam (2 mg/kg, p.o. was used as the reference drug. Anti-seizure activities were assessed based on the ability of test drugs to prevent convulsions, death or to delay the onset of seizures in mice. Results: JB (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, p.o could only delay the onset of seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole (85 mg/kg, i.p. in mice. However, it did not offer any protection against seizure episodes, as it failed to prevent the animals, from exhibiting tonic-clonic convulsions caused by pentylenetetrazole (85 mg/kg, i.p., strychnine (2 mg/kg or picrotoxin (6 mg/kg, i.p.. On the other hand, diazepam (2 mg/kg, p.o., offered 100% protection against convulsive seizures, induced by pentylenetetrazole (85 mg/kg, i.p.. However, it failed to prevent seizures produced by strychnine (2 mg/kg, i.p. or picrotoxin (6 mg/kg, i.p.. Discussion: Our results suggest that JB could not prevent the examined chemoconvulsants-induced convulsions. However, its ability to delay the latency to seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole suggests that JB might be effective in the control of the seizure spread in epileptic brains.

  2. A Recurrent De Novo PACS2 Heterozygous Missense Variant Causes Neonatal-Onset Developmental Epileptic Encephalopathy, Facial Dysmorphism, and Cerebellar Dysgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Heather E; Jean-Marçais, Nolwenn; Yang, Edward; Heron, Delphine; Tatton-Brown, Katrina; van der Zwaag, Paul A; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Krock, Bryan L; Backer, E; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Sinnema, Margje; Reijnders, Margot R F; Bearden, David; Begtrup, Amber; Telegrafi, Aida; Lunsing, Roelineke J; Burglen, Lydie; Lesca, Gaetan; Cho, Megan T; Smith, Lacey A; Sheidley, Beth R; Moufawad El Achkar, Christelle; Pearl, Phillip L; Poduri, Annapurna; Skraban, Cara M; Tarpinian, Jennifer; Nesbitt, Addie I; Fransen van de Putte, Dietje E; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Rump, Patrick; Chatron, Nicolas; Sabatier, Isabelle; De Bellescize, Julitta; Guibaud, Laurent; Sweetser, David A; Waxler, Jessica L; Wierenga, Klaas J; Donadieu, Jean; Narayanan, Vinodh; Ramsey, Keri M; Nava, Caroline; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Vitobello, Antonio; Tran Mau-Them, Frédéric; Philippe, Christophe; Bruel, Ange-Line; Duffourd, Yannis; Thomas, Laurel; Lelieveld, Stefan H; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke; Brunner, Han G; Keren, Boris; Thevenon, Julien; Faivre, Laurence; Thomas, Gary; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel

    2018-05-03

    Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEEs) represent a large clinical and genetic heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental diseases. The identification of pathogenic genetic variants in DEEs remains crucial for deciphering this complex group and for accurately caring for affected individuals (clinical diagnosis, genetic counseling, impacting medical, precision therapy, clinical trials, etc.). Whole-exome sequencing and intensive data sharing identified a recurrent de novo PACS2 heterozygous missense variant in 14 unrelated individuals. Their phenotype was characterized by epilepsy, global developmental delay with or without autism, common cerebellar dysgenesis, and facial dysmorphism. Mixed focal and generalized epilepsy occurred in the neonatal period, controlled with difficulty in the first year, but many improved in early childhood. PACS2 is an important PACS1 paralog and encodes a multifunctional sorting protein involved in nuclear gene expression and pathway traffic regulation. Both proteins harbor cargo(furin)-binding regions (FBRs) that bind cargo proteins, sorting adaptors, and cellular kinase. Compared to the defined PACS1 recurrent variant series, individuals with PACS2 variant have more consistently neonatal/early-infantile-onset epilepsy that can be challenging to control. Cerebellar abnormalities may be similar but PACS2 individuals exhibit a pattern of clear dysgenesis ranging from mild to severe. Functional studies demonstrated that the PACS2 recurrent variant reduces the ability of the predicted autoregulatory domain to modulate the interaction between the PACS2 FBR and client proteins, which may disturb cellular function. These findings support the causality of this recurrent de novo PACS2 heterozygous missense in DEEs with facial dysmorphim and cerebellar dysgenesis. Copyright © 2018 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  3. Endogenous sulfur dioxide regulates hippocampal neuron apoptosis in developing epileptic rats and is associated with the PERK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Manman; Han, Ying; Li, Qinrui; Zhang, Jing

    2018-02-05

    Epilepsy is among the most common neurological diseases in children. Recurrent seizures can result in hippocampal damage and seriously impair learning and memory functions in children. However, the mechanisms underlying epilepsy-related brain injury are unclear. Neuronal apoptosis is among the most common neuropathological manifestations of brain injury. Endogenous sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) has been shown to be involved in seizures and related neuron apoptosis. However, the role of endogenous SO 2 in epilepsy remains unclear. This study assessed whether endogenous SO 2 is involved in epilepsy and its underlying mechanisms. Using a rat epilepsy model induced by an intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA), we found that hippocampal neuron apoptosis was induced in epileptic rats, and the SO 2 content and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) activity in the plasma were increased compared to those in the control group. However, the inhibition of SO 2 production by l-aspartate-β-hydroxamate (HDX) can subvert this response 72h after an epileptic seizure. No difference in apoptosis was observed 7 d after the epileptic seizure in the KA and KA+HDX groups. The protein expression levels of AAT2, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), pancreatic eIF2 kinase-like ER kinase (PERK) and phospho-PERK (p-PERK) were remarkably elevated in the hippocampi of the epileptic rats, while the HDX treatment was capable of reversing this process 7 d after the epileptic seizure. These results indicate that the inhibition of endogenous SO 2 production can alleviate neuronal apoptosis and is associated with the PERK signaling pathway during the initial stages after epileptic seizure, but inhibiting SO 2 production only delayed the occurrence of apoptosis and did not prevent neuronal apoptosis in the epileptic rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Epileptic consciousness: concept and meaning of aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Silva, Sergio; Alvarez-Silva, Iria; Alvarez-Rodriguez, Javier; Perez-Echeverria, M J; Campayo-Martinez, Antonio; Rodriguez-Fernandez, F L

    2006-05-01

    This research is based on previous publications that have analyzed certain neuropsychological phenomena that always have the same characteristic clinical features: a vivid experience of sudden onset and automatic development, accompanied by an intense sensation of strangeness. When these automatisms are accompanied by only mental symptoms, the designation paroxysmal psychic automatisms (PPAs) is proposed, and they should be interpreted as partial seizures (PSs) with a psychic content whenever they clearly exhibit the four features of suddenness, passivity, intensity, and strangeness. This interpretation is based on the existence of a wealth of scientific literature indicating an overlap between PPAs and PSs; moreover, bibliographic reviews indicate that the clinical signs just defined as characterizing PPAs are precisely those defining the epileptic consciousness.

  5. High-Definition transcranial direct current stimulation in early onset epileptic encephalopathy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiron, Oded; Gale, Rena; Namestnic, Julia; Bennet-Back, Odeya; David, Jonathan; Gebodh, Nigel; Adair, Devin; Esmaeilpour, Zeinab; Bikson, Marom

    2018-01-01

    Early onset epileptic encephalopathy is characterized by high daily seizure-frequency, multifocal epileptic discharges, severe psychomotor retardation, and death at infancy. Currently, there are no effective treatments to alleviate seizure frequency and high-voltage epileptic discharges in these catastrophic epilepsy cases. The current study examined the safety and feasibility of High-Definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) in reducing epileptiform activity in a 30-month-old child suffering from early onset epileptic encephalopathy. HD-tDCS was administered over 10 intervention days spanning two weeks including pre- and post-intervention video-EEG monitoring. There were no serious adverse events or side effects related to the HD-tDCS intervention. Frequency of clinical seizures was not significantly reduced. However, interictal sharp wave amplitudes were significantly lower during the post-intervention period versus baseline. Vital signs and blood biochemistry remained stable throughout the entire study. These exploratory findings support the safety and feasibility of 4 × 1 HD-tDCS in early onset epileptic encephalopathy and provide the first evidence of HD-tDCS effects on paroxysmal EEG features in electroclinical cases under the age of 36 months. Extending HD-tDCS treatment may enhance electrographic findings and clinical effects.

  6. Dramatic effect of levetiracetam in early-onset epileptic encephalopathy due to STXBP1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilena, Robertino; Striano, Pasquale; Traverso, Monica; Viri, Maurizio; Cristofori, Gloria; Tadini, Laura; Barbieri, Sergio; Romeo, Antonino; Zara, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Syntaxin Binding Protein 1 (STXBP1) mutations determine a central neurotransmission dysfunction through impairment of the synaptic vesicle release, thus causing a spectrum of phenotypes varying from syndromic and non-syndromic epilepsy to intellectual disability of variable degree. Among the antiepileptic drugs, levetiracetam has a unique mechanism of action binding SV2A, a glycoprotein of the synaptic vesicle release machinery. We report a 1-month-old boy manifesting an epileptic encephalopathy with clonic seizures refractory to phenobarbital, pyridoxine and phenytoin that presented a dramatic response to levetiracetam with full epilepsy control and EEG normalization. Genetic analysis identified a novel de novo heterozygous mutation (c.[922A>T]p.[Lys308(∗)]) in the STXBP1 gene that severely affects the protein. The observation of a dramatic efficacy of levetiracetam in a case of STXBP1 epileptic encephalopathy refractory to other antiepileptic drugs and considerations regarding the specific mechanism of action of levetiracetam modulating the same system affected by STXBP1 mutations support the hypothesis that this drug may be able to reverse specifically the disease epileptogenic abnormalities. Further clinical observations and laboratory studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis and eventually lead to consider levetiracetam as the first choice treatment of patients with suspected or confirmed STXBP1-related epilepsies. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Insomnia in epilepsy is associated with continuing seizures and worse quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigg, Mark; Gharai, Sean; Ruland, Jeff; Schroeder, Catherine; Hodges, Matthew; Ingersoll, Karen S; Thorndike, Frances P; Yan, Guofen; Ritterband, Lee M

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate how insomnia is associated with seizure control and quality of life in patients with epilepsy. Consecutive patients with epilepsy attending clinical visits were surveyed with the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Patients had to be treated with at least one anticonvulsant and could not have had documented psychogenic pseudoseizure. The presence or absence of seizures and quality of life (QOLIE-P-10) within the past 4 weeks was recorded. Other variables included demographic and clinical data, sleep-wake timing, the Hörne-Östberg Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ), sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and mood (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, CES-D). 207 patients completed surveys. 43% had clinically significant insomnia, and 51% had at least mild insomnia. 58% were seizure free. Mean ISI scores were significantly worse for those with continuing seizures, and more severe ISI scores correlated strongly with worse QOL. Younger age, shorter duration of epilepsy, use of sedative/hypnotics, medical and sleep comorbidities, delayed sleep timing and chronotype, excessive sleepiness, and depression were all associated with more severe insomnia. Those with unexpected health care visits over the most recent 4 weeks had worse insomnia. After adjustment for these covariates, more severe insomnia remained significantly associated with lack of seizure freedom and with worse QOL. Insomnia is common in epilepsy, and is associated with short term poor seizure control and worse QOL. Future studies must evaluate cause-and-effect relationships. Assessment of insomnia may be important in the comprehensive care of epilepsy and may influence control of epileptic seizures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Uric acid is released in the brain during seizure activity and increases severity of seizures in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thyrion, L.; Raedt, R.; Portelli, J.; van Loo, P.; Wadman, W.J.; Glorieux, G.; Lambrecht, B.N.; Janssens, S.; Vonck, K.; Boon, P.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence points at an important role of endogenous cell-damage induced pro-inflammatory molecules in the generation of epileptic seizures. Uric acid, under the form of monosodium urate crystals, has shown to have pro-inflammatory properties in the body, but less is known about its role in

  9. Seizure Following Topical Gammabenzene Hexachloride Therapy

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    Biswas Animesh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of short-lived, self-limiting major epileptic seizures following an improper application of gammabenzene hexachloride (GBHC lotion in a 15 month old boy suffering from scabies with secondary bacterial infection is reported here due to its rarity in clinical practice and, more particularly, to stress the need of correct instructions on the use of GBHC application for the prevention of iatrogenic neurotoxicity.

  10. Management Of Post Stroke Seizures

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    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of seizures in relation to stroke is 8.9%, with a frequency of 10.6 and 8.6% in haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, respectively. In subarachnoid haemorrhage the incidence is 8.5%. Due to the fact that infarcts are significantly more frequent than haemorrhages, seizures are mainly related to occlusive vascular disease of the brain. The general view is to consider stroke-related seizures as harmless complications in the course of a prolonged vascular disease involving the heart and brain. Seizures can be classified as those of early and those of late onset in a paradigm comparable to post-traumatic epilepsy, with an arbitrary dividing point of two weeks after the event. Most early-onset seizures occur during the first day after the stroke. Late-onset seizures occur three times more often than early-onset ones. A first late-onset epileptic event is most likely to take place between six months and two years after the stroke. However, up to 28% of patients develop their first seizure several years later. Simple partial seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, account for about 50% of total seizures, while complex partial spells, with or without secondary generalisation, and primary generalised tonic–clonic insults account for approximately 25% each. Status epilepticus occurs in 12% of stroke patients, but the recurrence rate after an initial status epilepticus is not higher than after a single seizure. Inhibitory seizures, mimicking transient ischaemic attacks, are observed in 7.1% of cases. The only clinical predictor of late-onset seizures is the initial presentation of partial anterior circulation syndrome due to a territorial infarct. Patients with total anterior circulation syndrome have less chance of developing epileptic spells, not only due to their shorter life expectancy but also due to the fact that the large infarcts are sharply demarcated in these patients. The optimal timing and type of antiepileptic drug

  11. Cerebrovascular Diseases and Early Seizure

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    Ayşegül Gündüz

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cerebrovascular disease is one of the important causes of seizures and epilepsy among the advanced age group. Seziures are found to be associated with lesion localization and size in previous studies. METHODS: Here, we aimed to detect prevelance of seizure, relation of seizure and lesion localization, and observed seizure types. RESULTS: Three hundred seventy eight patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease or intraparenchymal hemorrhage who were followed in Cerrahpasa IVIedical School clinic were studied retrospectively and probability of seizure occurence within 1 month after stroke was evaluated. CONCLUSION: Among 378 patients hospitalized by acute stroke, 339 were diagnosed as ischemic cerebrovascular disease and 39 (10.3% had primary intraparenchymal hematoma. Seizures were observed in 16 patients (4.2%, 2 (%5.1 in intraparenchymal hematoma group and 14 (%4.1 in ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Early seizures were detected in 33% of patients with anterior cerebral artery, in 6.8% of posterior cerebral artery and in 3.3% of middle cerebral artery infarcts and in three patients out of 12 who were known to have epilepsy. Seizure types were secondarily generalised tonic-clonic seizure in nine cases (57%. Among whole group status epilepticus was observed in four patients (1.1%. Conclusion: Early seizure rates are found to be high among patients with anterior cerebral artery infarct and known epilepsy

  12. The delta between postoperative seizure freedom and persistence: Automatically detected focal slow waves after epilepsy surgery

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    Margit Schönherr

    2017-01-01

    Significance: The quantity of delta activity could be used as a diagnostic marker for recurrent seizures. The close relation to epileptic spike localizations and the resection volume of patients with successful second surgery imply involvement in seizure recurrence. This initial evidence suggests a potential application in the planning of second epilepsy surgery.

  13. Psychosocial Functioning of Adult Epileptic and MS Patients and Adult Normal Controls on the WPSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Siang-Yang

    1986-01-01

    Psychosocial functioning of adult epileptic outpatients as assessed by the Washington Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (WPSI) was compared to that of adult multiple sclerosis (MS) outpatients and normal subjects. When only valid WPSI profiles were considered, the only significant finding was that the epilepsy group and the MS group had more…

  14. Cortical epileptic afterdischarges in immature rats are differently influenced by NMDA receptor antagonists

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlamberová, Romana; Mareš, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 516, č. 1 (2005), s. 10-17 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00B122 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : epileptic seizure * cerebral cortex * NMDA receptor antagonist Subject RIV: FH - Neuro logy Impact factor: 2.477, year: 2005

  15. Application of rare variant transmission disequilibrium tests to epileptic encephalopathy trio sequence data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bridgers, Joshua; Cossette, Patrick; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P.; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B.; Heinzen, Erin L.; Jiang, Yu; Johnson, Michael R.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Marson, Anthony G.; Mefford, Heather C.; O'Brien, Terence J.; Ottman, Ruth; Petrou, Steven; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ren, Zhong; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sherr, Elliott; Wang, Quanli; Balling, Rudi; Barisic, Nina; Baulac, Stéphanie; Caglayan, Hande; Craiu, Dana; De Jonghe, Peter; Depienne, Christel; Guerrini, Renzo; Helbig, Ingo; Hjalgrim, Helle; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Jähn, Johanna A.; Klein, Karl Martin; Koeleman, Bobby; Komarek, Vladimir; Krause, Roland; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes R.; Lerche, Holger; Linnankivi, Tarja; Marini, Carla; May, Patrick; Møller, Rikke S.; Muhle, Hiltrud; Pal, Deb; Palotie, Aarno; Rosenow, Felix; Selmer, Kaja; Serratosa, Jose M.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Stephani, Ulrich; Sterbova, Katalin; Striano, Pasquale; Suls, Arvid; Talvik, Tiina; von Spiczak, Sarah; Weber, Yvonne G.; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Zara, Federico; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K.; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Bautista, Jocelyn F.; Bluvstein, Judith; Cascino, Gregory D.; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Fiol, Miguel E.; Fountain, Nathan B.; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Haas, Kevin; Haut, Sheryl R.; Hayward, Jean; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Kossoff, Eric H.; Kuperman, Rachel; McGuire, Shannon M.; Motika, Paul V.; Novotny, Edward J.; Paolicchi, Juliann M.; Parent, Jack; Park, Kristen; Shellhaas, Renée A; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C.; Sullivan, Joseph; Thio, Liu Lin; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P. G.; Von Allmen, Gretchen K.; Weisenberg, Judith L.; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R.

    2017-01-01

    The classic epileptic encephalopathies, including infantile spasms (IS) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), are severe seizure disorders that usually arise sporadically. De novo variants in genes mainly encoding ion channel and synaptic proteins have been found to account for over 15% of patients

  16. The Persistence of Erroneous Familiarity in an Epileptic Male: Challenging Perceptual Theories of Deja Vu Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Akira R.; Moulin, Christopher J. A.

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 39-year-old, temporal lobe epileptic male, MH. Prior to complex partial seizure, experienced up to three times a day, MH often experiences an aura experienced as a persistent sensation of deja vu. Data-driven theories of deja vu formation suggest that partial familiarity for the perceived stimulus is responsible for the…

  17. Is there anything distinctive about epileptic deja vu?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Zeman, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Déjà vu can occur as an aura of temporal lobe epilepsy and in some psychiatric conditions but is also common in the general population. It is unclear whether any clinical features distinguish pathological and physiological forms of déjà vu. 50 epileptic patients with ictal déjà vu, 50 non-epileptic patients attending general neurology clinics and 50 medical students at Edinburgh University were recruited. Data were collected on demographic factors, the experience of déjà vu using a questionnaire based on Sno's Inventory for Déjà Vu Experiences Assessment, symptoms of anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale as well as seizure characteristics, anti-epileptic medications, handedness, EEG and neuroimaging findings for epileptic patients. 73.5% of neurology patients, 88% of students and (by definition) all epilepsy patients had experienced déjà vu. The experience of déjà vu itself was similar in the three groups. Epileptic déjà vu occurred more frequently and lasted somewhat longer than physiological déjà vu. Epilepsy patients were more likely to report prior fatigue and concentrated activity, associated derealisation, olfactory and gustatory hallucinations, physical symptoms such as headaches, abdominal sensations and fear. After controlling for study group, anxiety and depression scores were not associated with déjà vu frequency. Déjà vu is common and qualitatively similar whether it occurs as an epileptic aura or normal phenomenon. However ictal déjà vu occurs more frequently and is accompanied by several distinctive features. It is distinguished primarily by 'the company it keeps'.

  18. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce eGreyson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. 55% of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients’ reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time.

  19. Dopey's seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Copyright 1999 BEA Trading Ltd.

  20. Neurodevelopmental comorbidities and seizure control 24 months after a first unprovoked seizure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Eva Åndell; Tomson, Torbjörn; Carlsson, Sofia; Tedroff, Kristina; Åmark, Per

    2018-07-01

    To follow children with newly diagnosed unprovoked seizures to determine (1) whether the prevalence of neurodevelopmental comorbidities and cerebral palsy (CP) changed after the initial seizure, and (2) the association between studied comorbidities and seizures 13-24 months after seizure onset or initiation of treatment. Analyses were based on 750 children (28 days-18 years) with a first unprovoked seizure (index) included in a population-based Incidence Registry in Stockholm between 2001 and 2006. The children were followed for two years and their medical records were examined for a priori defined neurodevelopmental/psychiatric comorbidities and CP and seizure frequency. Baseline information was collected from medical records from before, and up to six months after, the index seizure. Odds ratios (OR) of repeated seizures 13-24 months after the first seizure or after initiation of anti-epileptic drug treatment was calculated by logistic regression and adjusted for age and sex. At baseline, 32% of the children had neurodevelopmental/psychiatric comorbidities or CP compared to 35%, 24 months later. Children with such comorbidities more often experienced seizures 13-24 months after the index seizure (OR 2.87, CI 2.07-3.99) with the highest OR in those with CP or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Children diagnosed at age neurodevelopmental comorbidities and CP in children with epilepsy tend to be present already at seizure onset and that such comorbidities are strong indicators of poor outcome regarding seizure control with or without treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Computed tomography of epileptic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Mana; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Miyake, Shota; Yamada, Michiko; Iwamoto, Hiroko

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the changes seen on cranial computed tomography (CT) of epileptic children, especially in the area of the temporal horn. The subjects were 242 epileptic children excluding those with encephalitis, brain tumor, neurocutaneous syndromes, degenerative disease, hydrocephalus etc. The control subjects were 195 children without any neurological disease and symptoms. CT scan were taken with a TCT-60A whole body scanner, and 14 check points were evaluated excluding the temporal horn. 195 epileptic children (N-group) and all control children were normal at 14 check points. Next, the areas of the temporal horns and adjoining hemispheres of the epileptic children (N-group) and control children were examined with Muto-Tablet-Desitizer. The temporal horn ratio ((area of temporal horn/area of ipsilateral hemisphere) x 100) was greater in younger children of the control group, and it was higher in epileptic than in control children. Enlargement of the temporal horn was seen in 1 % of the controls and in 35 % of the 125 epileptic children with normal measurements at 14 points on CT scans (p < 0.01). The frequency of enlargement of temporal horns was not variable among different epileptic types. In the epileptic children with normal CT scans except for enlargement of temporal horns behavioral disturbances were 6 boys and 5 had enlarged temporal horns (bilateral 1 case, left side 1 case, right side 3 cases). (author)

  2. Glial overexpression of Dube3a causes seizures and synaptic impairments in Drosophila concomitant with down regulation of the Na+/K+ pump ATPα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Kevin A; LeDoux, Mark S; Reiter, Lawrence T

    2017-12-01

    Duplication 15q syndrome (Dup15q) is an autism-associated disorder co-incident with high rates of pediatric epilepsy. Additional copies of the E3 ubiquitin ligase UBE3A are thought to cause Dup15q phenotypes, yet models overexpressing UBE3A in neurons have not recapitulated the epilepsy phenotype. We show that Drosophila endogenously expresses Dube3a (fly UBE3A homolog) in glial cells and neurons, prompting an investigation into the consequences of glial Dube3a overexpression. Here we expand on previous work showing that the Na + /K + pump ATPα is a direct ubiquitin ligase substrate of Dube3a. A robust seizure-like phenotype was observed in flies overexpressing Dube3a in glial cells, but not neurons. Glial-specific knockdown of ATPα also produced seizure-like behavior, and this phenotype was rescued by simultaneously overexpressing ATPα and Dube3a in glia. Our data provides the basis of a paradigm shift in Dup15q research given that clinical phenotypes have long been assumed to be due to neuronal UBE3A overexpression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neuroimaging observations in a cohort of elderly manifesting with new onset seizures: Experience from a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Sinha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The occurrence of epilepsy is higher among elderly patients. The clinical manifestations of seizures, causes of epilepsy, and choice of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs are different in elderly people with epilepsy compared to the young. Aim: To evaluate the imaging (CT/MRI observations in elderly patients manifesting with new-onset seizures. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and one elderly patients with new onset seizures, >60 years (age: 68.0 ± 7.5 years; M:F = 1.8:1 from Jan′ 07 to Jan′ 09, were prospectively recruited. Observations of cranial CT scan (n = 201 and MR imaging (n = 43 were analyzed. Results: The type of seizures included: Simple partial (42%, generalized tonic-clonic (30.3%, and complex partial (27.4%. The pattern of epilepsy syndromes were acute symptomatic (42.3%, remote symptomatic (18.4%, cryptogenic (37.8%, and idiopathic (1.5%. Seizures were controlled with monotherapy in 85%. The CT scan (n = 201 revealed cerebral atrophy (139, mild (79, moderate (43, and severe (18; focal lesions (98, infarcts (45, hemorrhages (18, granuloma (16, tumor (15 and gliosis (4, and hemispheric atrophy (1, white matter changes (75 and diffuse edema (21. An MRI (n = 43 showed variable degree of cerebral atrophy (31; white matter changes (20; focal cerebral lesions (24; - infarct (7; intracranial hemorrhage (6; granuloma (5; tumor (6; gliosis (1; hemispheric atrophy (1; and prominent Virchow-Robin spaces (7; and UBOs (12. Patients with focal lesions in neuroimaging more often had partial seizures, symptomatic epilepsy, past stroke, focal deficit, absence of diffuse atrophy, focal EEG slowing, abnormal CSF, seizure recurrence at follow-up (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Brain imaging observations in elderly patients with new-onset seizures revealed underlying symptomatic nature, hence the etiology and thereby assisted in deciding the specific therapy.

  4. Dextromethorphan in the treatment of early myoclonic encephalopathy evolving into migrating partial seizures in infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Hsuan Chien

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathy with suppression-burst in electroencephalography (EEG can evolve into a few types of epileptic syndromes. We present here an unusual case of early myoclonic encephalopathy that evolved into migrating partial seizures in infancy. A female neonate initially had erratic myoclonus movements, hiccups, and a suppression-burst pattern in EEG that was compatible with early myoclonic encephalopathy. The seizures were controlled with dextromethorphan (20 mg/kg, and a suppression-burst pattern in EEG was reverted to relatively normal background activity. However, at 72 days of age, alternating focal tonic seizures, compatible with migrating partial seizures in infancy, were demonstrated by the 24-hour EEG recording. The seizures responded poorly to dextromethorphan. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of early myoclonic encephalopathy evolving into migrating partial seizure in infancy. Whether it represents another age-dependent epilepsy evolution needs more clinical observation.

  5. Anticonvulsant action of topiramate against motor seizures in developing rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haugvicová, Renata; Kubová, Hana; Škutová, Markéta; Mareš, Pavel

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2000), s. 1235-1240 ISSN 0013-9580 R&D Projects: GA MZd NL5745 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : topiramate * pentylenetetrazol * epileptic seizures Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.787, year: 2000

  6. The ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ville, Dorothée; Chiron, Catherine; Laschet, Jacques; Dulac, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Hormonal therapy or ketogenic diet often permits overcoming the challenging periods of many epileptic encephalopathies (West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes and encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep), but relapse affects over 20% of patients. We report here a monocenter pilot series of 42 consecutive patients in whom we combined oral steroids with the ketogenic diet for corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent epileptic encephalopathy. We retrospectively evaluated the effect on seizure frequency, interictal spike activity, neuropsychological course, and steroid treatment course. Twenty-three patients had West syndrome (WS), 13 had encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep (CSWS), and six others had miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. All patients succeeded to reach 0.8 to 1.6g/l ketone bodies in the urine following the usual KD regimen. For at least 6 months, 14/42 responded to the addition of the ketogenic diet: 4/23 with WS, 8/13 with CSWS, and 2/6 with miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. The addition of the KD allowed withdrawing steroids in all responders. Among them, 10/15 had been patients with steroid-dependent epileptic encephalopathy and 4/27 patients with steroid-resistant epileptic encephalopathy. Therefore, the ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies. Patients presenting with steroid-dependent CSWS seem to be the best candidates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Seizure disorders in 43 cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, A; Bellino, C; Bertone, I; Cagnotti, G; Iulini, B; Miniscalco, B; Casalone, C; Gianella, P; Cagnasso, A

    2015-01-01

    Large animals have a relatively high seizure threshold, and in most cases seizures are acquired. No published case series have described this syndrome in cattle. To describe clinical findings and outcomes in cattle referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the University of Turin (Italy) because of seizures. Client-owned cattle with documented evidence of seizures. Medical records of cattle with episodes of seizures reported between January 2002 and February 2014 were reviewed. Evidence of seizures was identified based on the evaluation of seizure episodes by the referring veterinarian or 1 of the authors. Animals were recruited if physical and neurologic examinations were performed and if diagnostic laboratory test results were available. Forty-three of 49 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 8 months. Thirty-one animals were male and 12 were female. Piedmontese breed accounted for 39/43 (91%) animals. Seizures were etiologically classified as reactive in 30 patients (70%) and secondary or structural in 13 (30%). Thirty-six animals survived, 2 died naturally, and 5 were euthanized for reasons of animal welfare. The definitive cause of reactive seizures was diagnosed as hypomagnesemia (n = 2), hypocalcemia (n = 12), and hypomagnesemia-hypocalcemia (n = 16). The cause of structural seizures was diagnosed as cerebrocortical necrosis (n = 8), inflammatory diseases (n = 4), and lead (Pb) intoxication (n = 1). The study results indicate that seizures largely are reported in beef cattle and that the cause can be identified and successfully treated in most cases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Multicenter clinical assessment of improved wearable multimodal convulsive seizure detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorati, Francesco; Regalia, Giulia; Caborni, Chiara; Migliorini, Matteo; Bender, Daniel; Poh, Ming-Zher; Frazier, Cherise; Kovitch Thropp, Eliana; Mynatt, Elizabeth D; Bidwell, Jonathan; Mai, Roberto; LaFrance, W Curt; Blum, Andrew S; Friedman, Daniel; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Mohammadpour-Touserkani, Fatemeh; Reinsberger, Claus; Tognetti, Simone; Picard, Rosalind W

    2017-11-01

    New devices are needed for monitoring seizures, especially those associated with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). They must be unobtrusive and automated, and provide false alarm rates (FARs) bearable in everyday life. This study quantifies the performance of new multimodal wrist-worn convulsive seizure detectors. Hand-annotated video-electroencephalographic seizure events were collected from 69 patients at six clinical sites. Three different wristbands were used to record electrodermal activity (EDA) and accelerometer (ACM) signals, obtaining 5,928 h of data, including 55 convulsive epileptic seizures (six focal tonic-clonic seizures and 49 focal to bilateral tonic-clonic seizures) from 22 patients. Recordings were analyzed offline to train and test two new machine learning classifiers and a published classifier based on EDA and ACM. Moreover, wristband data were analyzed to estimate seizure-motion duration and autonomic responses. The two novel classifiers consistently outperformed the previous detector. The most efficient (Classifier III) yielded sensitivity of 94.55%, and an FAR of 0.2 events/day. No nocturnal seizures were missed. Most patients had seizure frequency. When increasing the sensitivity to 100% (no missed seizures), the FAR is up to 13 times lower than with the previous detector. Furthermore, all detections occurred before the seizure ended, providing reasonable latency (median = 29.3 s, range = 14.8-151 s). Automatically estimated seizure durations were correlated with true durations, enabling reliable annotations. Finally, EDA measurements confirmed the presence of postictal autonomic dysfunction, exhibiting a significant rise in 73% of the convulsive seizures. The proposed multimodal wrist-worn convulsive seizure detectors provide seizure counts that are more accurate than previous automated detectors and typical patient self-reports, while maintaining a tolerable FAR for ambulatory monitoring. Furthermore, the multimodal system

  9. Endogenous opioid systems: physiological role in the self-limitation of seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella, F C; Long, J B; Holaday, J W

    1985-04-15

    Immediately following a seizure, the severity of subsequent seizures is significantly reduced. The involvement of endogenous opioid systems as a physiological regulator of this postseizure inhibition was studied in rats using repeated maximal electroshock (MES) seizures. Both the opiate antagonist (-)-naloxone and morphine tolerance abolished the progressive seizure protection associated with repeated MES. We propose that endogenous opioids, activated by a prior seizure, provide a central homeostatic inhibitory mechanism which may be responsible for the initiation of a postictal refractory state in the epileptic.

  10. Seizures beget seizures in temporal lobe epilepsies: the boomerang effects of newly formed aberrant kainatergic synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Crepel, Valérie; Represa, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Do temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) seizures in adults promote further seizures? Clinical and experimental data suggest that new synapses are formed after an initial episode of status epilepticus, however their contribution to the transformation of a naive network to an epileptogenic one has been debated. Recent experimental data show that newly formed aberrant excitatory synapses on the granule cells of the fascia dentate operate by means of kainate receptor-operated signals that are not present on naive granule cells. Therefore, genuine epileptic networks rely on signaling cascades that differentiate them from naive networks. Recurrent limbic seizures generated by the activation of kainate receptors and synapses in naive animals lead to the formation of novel synapses that facilitate the emergence of further seizures. This negative, vicious cycle illustrates the central role of reactive plasticity in neurological disorders.

  11. Urinary urge seizure semiology localization by intracranial monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Ronak; Shamim, Sadat

    2018-01-01

    Seizures may present with many different symptom complexes. Seizure semiologies have localization value when contemplating surgical therapies. Epilepsy presenting as a desire to micturate is exceedingly rare, with only a handful of published cases. We present a patient who had initially unexplained childhood urinary urge that progressed into lapses of memory and confusion that was eventually diagnosed as epilepsy in adulthood. Due to refractoriness to medical management, our patient's epileptic focus was localized through both noninvasive and invasive subdural electrode arrays to the nondominant medial temporal lobe and successfully treated with an amygdalohippocampectomy. Only one other case of ictal urinary urgency seizures has been recorded with intracranial electroencephalogram monitoring in the literature.

  12. Analysis of mutations in 7 genes associated with neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission in a cohort of children with non-syndromic infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ka-Yee Kwong

    Full Text Available Epileptic Encephalopathy (EE is a heterogeneous condition in which cognitive, sensory and/or motor functions deteriorate as a consequence of epileptic activity, which consists of frequent seizures and/or major interictal paroxysmal activity. There are various causes of EE and they may occur at any age in early childhood. Genetic mutations have been identified to contribute to an increasing number of children with early onset EE which had been previously considered as cryptogenic. We identified 26 patients with Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy (IEE of unknown etiology despite extensive workup and without any specific epilepsy syndromic phenotypes. We performed genetic analysis on a panel of 7 genes (ARX, CDKL5, KCNQ2, PCDH19, SCN1A, SCN2A, STXBP1 and identified 10 point mutations [ARX (1, CDKL5 (3, KCNQ2 (2, PCDH19 (1, SCN1A (1, STXBP1 (2] as well as one microdeletion involving both SCN1A and SCN2A. The high rate (42% of mutations suggested that genetic testing of this IEE panel of genes is recommended for cryptogenic IEE with no etiology identified. These 7 genes are associated with channelopathies or synaptic transmission and we recommend early genetic testing if possible to guide the treatment strategy.

  13. The Significance of Epileptic Seizures in Infancy and Childhood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-13

    Apr 13, 1974 ... glycaemia, cerebral ischaemia, changes in carbon dioxide tension and cellular ... we are facing a dramatic event in the life of a family. It may come like .... as in toxoplasmosis, and vascular malformations in Sturge-. Weber's ...

  14. Epileptic seizures in patients with glioma: A single centrebased ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To elucidate the outcomes of treatment and epidemiology of epilepsy related to glioma in a single center in Chinese patients. Methods: Prescription medicines usage and clinical data were collected from medical records of 119 patients with gliomas between August 2009 and September 2015. Fisher's exact and ...

  15. FUNCTIONAL ELECTRICAL STIMULATION FOR CONTROL OF EPILEPTIC SEIZURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiao, Jianhang

    Nearly 50 million people worldwide have epilepsy and one-third of them do not respond well to any antiepileptic drugs. Given the large population of patients experiencing drug resistant epilepsy, increased attention has been paid over the last two decades to the development of electrical stimulat...

  16. Aliocha Dostoevski’s death during an epileptic seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson José Amâncio

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Mortality due to epilepsy is of great concern worldwide. Individuals with epilepsy have a two- or three-fold risk of death when compared to the general population. Based on biographical data and Anna Grigoriévna Dostoevskaia’s memories, the authors concluded that a prolonged episode of status epilepticus was the culprit in the death of young Aliocha, youngest son of Fyodor Mikhailovich and Anna Dostoevski. At the time of Aliocha’s death, very limited knowledge about epilepsy or therapeutic resources was available. Despite all the progress, epilepsies remain potentially fatal conditions. The suffering generated by Aliocha’s death and other similar cases remains as a challenge for epileptologists who assemble efforts to fight against such conditions.

  17. Effect of carbamazepine (Tegretol) on seizure and EEG patterns in monkeys with alumina-induced focal motor and hippocampal foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, J; Grewal, R S

    1976-12-01

    Qualitative and quantitative aspects of chronic carbamazepine (Tegretol) medication on focal seizures and associated interictal EEG abnormalities in Rhesus monkeys with alumina-induced foci in either the sensorimotor cortex or the hipocampus was investigated. In both groups of animals, carbamazepine produced qualitative control of visible seizures and reduced intracortical spike propagation, but did not cause complete normalization of the background EEG; quantitative indices, such as spike density and amount of paroxysmal discharge representative of abnormal EEG activity, were significantly reduced with respect to predrug values during medication and after cessation as well. Threshold to pentylenetetrazol was elevated by carbamazepine in both groups of epileptic monkeys. Aggressivity and other clinical manifestations in monekys with hippocampal foci were markedly reduced by carbamazepine.

  18. Targeted resequencing in epileptic encephalopathies identifies de novo mutations in CHD2 and SYNGAP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvill, Gemma L; Heavin, Sinéad B; Yendle, Simone C

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of epilepsies with poor prognosis, of which the majority are of unknown etiology. We perform targeted massively parallel resequencing of 19 known and 46 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in 500 affected individuals (cases) to identify...... CHD2 and SYNGAP1 mutations are new causes of epileptic encephalopathies, accounting for 1.2% and 1% of cases, respectively. We also expand the phenotypic spectra explained by SCN1A, SCN2A and SCN8A mutations. To our knowledge, this is the largest cohort of cases with epileptic encephalopathies...

  19. Modeling epileptic brain states using EEG spectral analysis and topographic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Bruno; Teixeira, César; Ribeiro, Bernardete; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Sales, Francisco; Dourado, António

    2012-09-30

    Changes in the spatio-temporal behavior of the brain electrical activity are believed to be associated to epileptic brain states. We propose a novel methodology to identify the different states of the epileptic brain, based on the topographic mapping of the time varying relative power of delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequency sub-bands, estimated from EEG. Using normalized-cuts segmentation algorithm, points of interest are identified in the topographic mappings and their trajectories over time are used for finding out relations with epileptogenic propagations in the brain. These trajectories are used to train a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), which models the different epileptic brain states and the transition among them. Applied to 10 patients suffering from focal seizures, with a total of 30 seizures over 497.3h of data, the methodology shows good results (an average point-by-point accuracy of 89.31%) for the identification of the four brain states--interictal, preictal, ictal and postictal. The results suggest that the spatio-temporal dynamics captured by the proposed methodology are related to the epileptic brain states and transitions involved in focal seizures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies as a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Tomoko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Recently, some reports have indicated that limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (VGKC-Ab) is a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report a 53-year-old woman who had her first epileptic seizure at the age of 50 years old. Examination by 3-Tesla brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and swelling on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging at 2 months after her first seizure. The patient received intravenous methylprednisolone and carbamazepine 300 mg/day. One month later, MRI revealed improvement of her left hippocampal abnormalities. Thereafter, she had no seizures, however, three years after her first seizure, EEG revealed a seizure pattern in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed hypermetabolism. Her serum VGKC-Ab levels were 118 pM(normal VGKC-Ab levels decreased to 4.4 pM. Remission of the epileptic seizures was also observed. This MTLE in the middle age was considered as limbic encephalitis associated with anti- VGKC-Ab. In cases of unexplained adult-onset MTLE, limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC-Ab, which responds well to immunotherapy, should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  1. EEG-confirmed epileptic activity in a cat with VGKC-complex/LGI1 antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakozdy, Akos; Glantschnigg, Ursula; Leschnik, Michael; Hechinger, Harald; Moloney, Teresa; Lang, Bethan; Halasz, Peter; Vincent, Angela

    2014-03-01

    A 5-year-old, female client-owned cat presented with acute onset of focal epileptic seizures with orofacial twitching and behavioural changes. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral temporal lobe hyperintensities and the EEG was consistent with ictal epileptic seizure activity. After antiepileptic and additional corticosteroid treatment, the cat recovered and by 10 months of follow-up was seizure-free without any problem. Retrospectively, antibodies to LGI1, a component of the voltage-gated potassium channel-complex, were identified. Feline focal seizures with orofacial involvement have been increasingly recognised in client-owned cats, and autoimmune limbic encephalitis was recently suggested as a possible aetiology. This is the first report of EEG, MRI and long-term follow-up of this condition in cats which is similar to human limbic encephalitis.

  2. MANAGEMENT OF A REEVE'S MUNTJAC ( MUNTIACUS REEVESI) WITH SEIZURES USING LEVETIRACETAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Emily R; Seeley, Kathryn E; Lovett, Mathew C; Junge, Randall E

    2017-12-01

    This report describes the diagnosis and management of idiopathic epilepsy in a 4-yr-old intact female Reeve's muntjac ( Muntiacus reevesi). The patient was initially witnessed to have isolated paroxysmal events consistent with epileptic seizures (altered consciousness, lateral recumbency, tonic/clonic movement of limbs) lasting less than 3 min with an immediate return to normal consciousness. The seizure frequency increased to >3 seizures within 24 hr and phenobarbital 3 mg/kg orally every 12 hr was started. Because of continued epileptic seizures and low serum phenobarbital levels, the dose was increased until significant elevations of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were detected. Levetiracetam 40 mg/kg orally every 12 hr was initiated and the phenobarbital was weaned and discontinued. One breakthrough seizure has been witnessed in the 10 mo since starting levetiracetam.

  3. Molecular and neurochemical substrates of the audiogenic seizure strains: The GASH:Sal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Martín, Ana I; Aroca-Aguilar, J Daniel; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Muñoz, Luis J; López, Dolores E; Escribano, Julio; de Cabo, Carlos

    2017-06-01

    Animal models of audiogenic epilepsy are useful tools to understand the mechanisms underlying human reflex epilepsies. There is accumulating evidence regarding behavioral, anatomical, electrophysiological, and genetic substrates of audiogenic seizure strains, but there are still aspects concerning their neurochemical basis that remain to be elucidated. Previous studies have shown the involved of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) in audiogenic seizures. The aim of our research was to clarify the role of the GABAergic system in the generation of epileptic seizures in the genetic audiogenic seizure-prone hamster (GASH:Sal) strain. We studied the K + /Cl - cotransporter KCC2 and β2-GABAA-type receptor (GABAAR) and β3-GABAAR subunit expressions in the GASH:Sal both at rest and after repeated sound-induced seizures in different brain regions using the Western blot technique. We also sequenced the coding region for the KCC2 gene both in wild- type and GASH:Sal hamsters. Lower expression of KCC2 protein was found in GASH:Sal when compared with controls at rest in several brain areas: hippocampus, cortex, cerebellum, hypothalamus, pons-medulla, and mesencephalon. Repeated induction of seizures caused a decrease in KCC2 protein content in the inferior colliculus and hippocampus and an increase in the pons-medulla. When compared to controls, the basal β 2 -GABA A R subunit in the GASH:Sal was overexpressed in the inferior colliculus, rest of the mesencephalon, and cerebellum, whereas basal β 3 subunit levels were lower in the inferior colliculus and rest of the mesencephalon. Repeated seizures increased β2 both in the inferior colliculus and in the hypothalamus and β 3 in the hypothalamus. No differences in the KCC2 gene-coding region were found between GASH:Sal and wild-type hamsters. These data indicate that GABAergic system functioning is impaired in the GASH:Sal strain, and repeated seizures seem to aggravate this dysfunction. These results have potential clinical

  4. Role of biomarkers in differentiating new-onset seizures from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Javali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Review of literature revealed very limited studies considering a combination of serum prolactin (PRL and serum creatine kinase (CK as markers for differentiating epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES. Therefore, in the present study, we analyzed the role of serum PRL and serum CK, individually and in combination. Methodology: This prospective study was conducted in a tertiary care medical teaching hospital over a period of 18 months. Patients aged over 15 years suspected to have new-onset seizures presenting within 5 h of ictus were included in this study. CK, serum PRL was measured at 0–1, 1–3, and 3–5 h after seizures. Results: Hundred subjects were studied for the role of serum PRL and serum CK in differentiating epileptic and PNES. The mean age was 42.24 years with a male:female ratio of 1.27:1. All patients of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTCS, who presented within 1 h, had elevated PRL, whereas 75% of patients with partial seizures had elevated PRL within 1 h of presentation. Nearly 91.66% of patients with GTCS who presented within 1 h had elevated CPK, whereas 70% of patients with partial seizures had elevated CPK. None of the patients diagnosed with PNES showed rise in either of the markers. Conclusion: In the present study, none of the patients with PNES showed raise in either serum PRL or CK. However, there was no correlation between the types of seizure and PRL or serum CK levels.

  5. Automatic multi-modal intelligent seizure acquisition (MISA) system for detection of motor seizures from electromyographic data and motion data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Wolf, Peter

    2012-01-01

    measures of reconstructed sub-bands from the discrete wavelet transformation (DWT) and the wavelet packet transformation (WPT). Based on the extracted features all data segments were classified using a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm as simulated seizure or normal activity. A case study...... of the seizure from the patient showed that the simulated seizures were visually similar to the epileptic one. The multi-modal intelligent seizure acquisition (MISA) system showed high sensitivity, short detection latency and low false detection rate. The results showed superiority of the multi- modal detection...... system compared to the uni-modal one. The presented system has a promising potential for seizure detection based on multi-modal data....

  6. Multi-modal Intelligent Seizure Acquisition (MISA) system - A new approach towards seizure detection based on full body motion measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Wolf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Many epilepsy patients cannot call for help during a seizure, because they are unconscious or because of the affection of their motor system or speech function. This can lead to injuries, medical complications and at worst death. An alarm system setting off at seizure onset could help to avoid...... hazards. Today no reliable alarm systems are available. A Multi-modal Intelligent Seizure Acquisition (MISA) system based on full body motion data seems as a good approach towards detection of epileptic seizures. The system is the first to provide a full body description for epilepsy applications. Three...... test subjects were used for this pilot project. Each subject simulated 15 seizures and in addition performed some predefined normal activities, during a 4-hour monitoring with electromyography (EMG), accelerometer, magnetometer and gyroscope (AMG), electrocardiography (ECG), electroencephalography (EEG...

  7. Monitoring of regional cerebral blood flow by single photon emission tomography of I123-N-isopropyl-iodoamphetamine in epileptics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magistretti, P.L.; Uren, R.F.; Parker, J.A.; Royal, H.D.; Front, D.; Kolodny, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    In some patients with epileptic disorders it is difficult to accurately localize the seizure focus especially in the case of deep lesions. In an attempt to provide better localization of such foci we have used single photon emission tomography (SPECT) of a new radiopharmaceutical I 123 -N-isopropyl-iodoamphetamine (IMP) to measure regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF) in the ictal and interictal phases. Eight patients were studied. The location of the seizure focus was determined by intraoperative corticography operative findings and pathology in 5 patients and by neuropsychological testing and long-term EEG monitoring in the other three. The SPECT scan accurately localized the seizure focus in all patients. This modality also allowed the functional state of the seizure focus to be assessed. In five of the thirteen studies there was increased RCBF at the seizure focus. On four of these occasions the patients reported symptoms typical of their seizures. In the asymptomatic patient the focally increased RCBF corresponded with a very active superficial epileptic focus on EEG. These preliminary results suggest that SPECT scans of RCBF, will have considerable utility in the management of epileptics. This is particularly the case as the necessary instrumentation is already available in many hospitals, thus minimizing the cost of widespread application

  8. A brief history of typical absence seizures - Petit mal revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen; Lattanzi, Simona; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Nardone, Raffaele; Martini, Mariano

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we have traced back the history of typical absence seizures, from their initial clinical description to the more recent nosological position. The first description of absence seizures was made by Poupart in 1705 and Tissot in 1770. In 1824, Calmeil introduced the term "absences", and in 1838, Esquirol for the first time used the term petit mal. Reynolds instead used the term "epilepsia mitior" (milder epilepsy) and provided a comprehensive description of absence seizures (1861). In 1854, Delasiauve ranked absences as the seizure type with lower severity and introduced the concept of idiopathic epilepsy. Otto Binswanger (1899) discussed the role of cortex in the pathophysiology of "abortive seizures", whereas William Gowers (1901) emphasized the importance of a detailed clinical history to identify nonmotor seizures or very mild motor phenomena which otherwise may go unnoticed or considered not epileptic. At the beginning of the 20th Century, the term pyknolepsy was introduced, but initially was not universally considered as a type of epilepsy; it was definitely recognized as an epileptic entity only in 1945, based on electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. Hans Berger, the inventor of the EEG, made also the first EEG recording of an atypical absence (his results were published only in 1933), whereas the characteristic EEG pattern was reported by neurophysiologists of the Harvard Medical School in 1935. The discovery of EEG made it also possible to differentiate absence seizures from so called "psychomotor" seizures occurring in temporal lobe epilepsy. Penfield and Jasper (1938) considered absences as expression of "centrencephalic epilepsy". Typical absences seizures are now classified by the International League Against Epilepsy among generalized nonmotor (absence) seizures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Massively multiplayer online role-playing game-induced seizures: a neglected health problem in Internet addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2006-08-01

    As the Internet has become rapidly and widely integrated into society, Internet addiction has become a growing psychosocial problem. However, epileptic seizure, another out-of-the-ordinary health problem, is often neglected in this regard. Ten patients who experienced epileptic seizures while playing the newest genre of electronic games -- Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) -- were investigated. Patients were predominantly male young adults, and most of the events were generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonic seizures, and absences. These patients should be categorized into idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Even though photosensitivity was an important factor, behavioral and higher mental activities also seemed to be significant seizure precipitants. Results demonstrated that MMORPG-induced seizures were not analogous to the ordinary video game-induced seizures. Significantly, an epileptic seizure warning did not always appear on the websites of MMORPGs and instructions for the software. While the prevalence of MMORPG-induced seizures remains unknown, it may exceed our expectations and impact our society. Not only for clinical neurologists but also for the primary physicians, educators, sociologists, and global online game publishers, there should be an awareness of this special form of reflex seizures in order to provide an appropriate health warning to MMORPG players.

  10. The effects of glycemic control on seizures and seizure-induced excitotoxic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schauwecker Paula

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder after stroke, affecting more than 50 million persons worldwide. Metabolic disturbances are often associated with epileptic seizures, but the pathogenesis of this relationship is poorly understood. It is known that seizures result in altered glucose metabolism, the reduction of intracellular energy metabolites such as ATP, ADP and phosphocreatine and the accumulation of metabolic intermediates, such as lactate and adenosine. In particular, it has been suggested that the duration and extent of glucose dysregulation may be a predictor of the pathological outcome of status. However, little is known about neither the effects of glycemic control on brain metabolism nor the effects of managing systemic glucose concentrations in epilepsy. Results In this study, we examined glycemic modulation of kainate-induced seizure sensitivity and its neuropathological consequences. To investigate the relationship between glycemic modulation, seizure susceptibility and its neuropathological consequences, C57BL/6 mice (excitotoxin cell death resistant were subjected to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, followed by systemic administration of kainic acid to induce seizures. Glycemic modulation resulted in minimal consequences with regard to seizure severity but increased hippocampal pathology, irrespective of whether mice were hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic prior to kainate administration. Moreover, we found that exogenous administration of glucose following kainic acid seizures significantly reduced the extent of hippocampal pathology in FVB/N mice (excitotoxin cell death susceptible following systemic administration of kainic acid. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that modulation of the glycemic index can modify the outcome of brain injury in the kainate model of seizure induction. Moreover, modulation of the glycemic index through glucose rescue greatly diminishes the extent of seizure

  11. The prevalence of thyrotoxicosis-related seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tae-Jin; Kim, Sun-Jung; Kim, Gyu Sik; Choi, Young-Chul; Kim, Won-Joo

    2010-09-01

    Central nervous system dysfunction, such as hyperexcitation, irritability, and disturbance of consciousness, may occur in patients with thyrotoxicosis. There are also a few case reports of seizures attributed to thyrotoxicosis. The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of seizures that appeared to be related to the thyrotoxic state in patients with thyrotoxicosis. We retrospectively determined the prevalence and clinical features of seizures in 3382 patients with hyperthyroidism. Among patients with seizures, we excluded those with other causes of seizures or a history of epilepsy. We did not exclude two patients in whom later work-up showed an abnormal magnetic resonance imaging, as their seizures resolved after they became euthyroid. Among the 3382 patients with hyperthyroidism, there were seven patients (0.2%) with seizures who met our criteria. Primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in four patients (57%), complex partial seizures with secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in two patients (29%), and one patient had a focal seizure (14%). The initial electroencephalography (EEG) was normal in two patients (29%), had generalized slow activity in four patients (57%), and had diffuse generalized beta activity in one patient (14%). On magnetic resonance imaging, one patient had diffuse brain atrophy, and one had an old basal ganglia infarct. After the patients became euthyroid, the EEG was repeated and was normal in all patients. During follow-up periods ranging from 18 to 24 months, none of the patients had seizures. Hyperthyroidism is the precipitating cause of seizures in a small percentage of these patients. In these patients, the prognosis is good if they become euthyroid. The prevalence of thyrotoxicosis-related seizures reported here can be used in conjunction with the prevalence of thyrotoxicosis in the population to estimate the prevalence of thyrotoxicosis-related seizures in populations.

  12. [What the patient's history tells us about their nonepileptic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, M; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Gülich, E; Bartolomei, F; McGonigal, A

    2014-10-01

    The aetiology of "psychogenic" non-epileptic seizures (NES) remains poorly understood and the differentiation of NES from epilepsy can be a difficult. In the first part of this review article we focus on recent insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of NES. We summarise a number of studies demonstrating the importance of abnormalities of emotion regulation in patients with NES. Evidence for abnormal emotion regulation comes from both self-report and experimental studies of pre-conscious cognitive processes. These studies show that NES are not the only manifestation of abnormal mental processing in these patients and that excessive social threat avoidance and emotional dysregulation are also evident between seizures and may therefore contribute to disability beyond the seizures themselves. In the second part of this review, we describe the findings of a number of studies, which have examined differences between the communication behaviour of patients with NES and those with epilepsy. We argue, that, whilst these studies initially aimed to help clinicians with the differential diagnosis of NES and epilepsy, close sociolinguistic analysis of patient's talk can also provide clues about the aetiology of NES. We conclude that the interaction of patient with NES with the doctor can be interpreted as a manifestation of avoidance and a demonstration of helplessness perhaps intended to secure active support from the doctor. In the third part of this review, we suggest that a close reading of a transcript of the interaction between a patient with NES and her doctor (and perhaps attentive listening to how patients' talk about themselves and their disorder) can yield clues to the causes of NES in individual cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Seizure characteristics in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate seizure characteristic among multiple sclerosis patients with coexistent seizure activity compared to control group. Materials and Methods : This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted by reviewing the clinical records of patients with definite diagnosis of MS according to McDonald′s criteria from March 2007 to June 2011, who referred to the MS clinic of the university. Results : A total of 920 patients with a diagnosis of MS were identified, among whom 29 patients (3.15% with seizure activity (case due to MS with the mean age of 32.6 ± 6.23 years were analyzed. Also, fifty MS patients without any seizure occurrence with the mean age of 33.7 ± 7.4 years were used as our control group. In case group, seizure was general tonic clonic in 23 patients (79.3%, complex partial in four (13.8%, and simple partial in two (5.9%. The 26 available interictal EEGs in MS patients showed abnormal EEG pattern in 22 (84.6% of them, including focal epileptic form discharge or focal slowing in 10 (38.5%, generalized discharge (spike-wave, polyspike, or general paroxysmal fast activity in 10 (38.5%, and general slowing activity in 10 record (38.5%. MRI reviews of the 26 available brain MRIs showed subcortical white mater lesions in 22 (84.6% of patients with seizure. All MRIs were performed within one month after the first seizure episode. Amongst 48 available MRIs in our control group, 91.7% (44 cases showed periventricular lesions and in 8.3% (4 cases subcortical white matter lesions were reported. Conclusion : The result of this study demonstrated the higher rate of subcortical whit matter lesion in MS patients with seizure occurrence compared to control group.

  14. Intraoperative seizures and seizures outcome in patients underwent awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Peizhi, Zhou; Xiang, Wang; Yanhui, Liu; Ruofei, Liang; Shu, Jiang; Qing, Mao

    2016-11-25

    Awake craniotomies (AC) could reduce neurological deficits compared with patients under general anesthesia, however, intraoperative seizure is a major reason causing awake surgery failure. The purpose of the study was to give a comprehensive overview the published articles focused on seizure incidence in awake craniotomy. Bibliographic searches of the EMBASE, MEDLINE,were performed to identify articles and conference abstracts that investigated the intraoperative seizure frequency of patients underwent AC. Twenty-five studies were included in this meta-analysis. Among the 25 included studies, one was randomized controlled trials and 5 of them were comparable studies. The pooled data suggested the general intraoperative seizure(IOS) rate for patients with AC was 8%(fixed effect model), sub-group analysis identified IOS rate for glioma patients was 8% and low grade patients was 10%. The pooled data showed early seizure rates of AC patients was 11% and late seizure rates was 35%. This systematic review and meta-analysis shows that awake craniotomy is a safe technique with relatively low intraoperative seizure occurrence. However, few RCTs were available, and the acquisition of further evidence through high-quality RCTs is highly recommended.

  15. Treating acute seizures with benzodiazepines: does seizure duration matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, David E

    2014-10-01

    Several clinical trials have shown improved seizure control and outcome by early initiation of treatment with benzodiazepines, before arrival in the emergency department and before intravenous access can be established. Here, evidence is provided and reviewed for rapid treatment of acute seizures in order to avoid the development of benzodiazepine pharmacoresistance and the emergence of self-sustaining status epilepticus. Alterations in the physiology, pharmacology, and postsynaptic level of GABA-A receptors can develop within minutes to an hour and hinder the ability of synaptic inhibition to stop seizures while also impairing the efficacy of GABAergic agents, such as benzodiazepines, to boost impaired inhibition. In addition, heightened excitatory transmission further exacerbates the inhibitory/excitatory balance and makes seizure control even more resistant to treatment. The acute increase in the surface expression of NMDA receptors during prolonged seizures also may cause excitotoxic injury, cell death, and other pathological expressions and re-arrangements of receptor subunits that all contribute to long-term sequelae such as cognitive impairment and chronic epilepsy. In conclusion, a short window of opportunity exists when seizures are maximally controlled by first-line benzodiazepine treatment. After that, multiple pathological mechanisms quickly become engaged that make seizures increasingly more difficult to control with high risk for long-term harm.

  16. Recognition and management of seizures in children in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Edward; Dey, Indranil; Scammell, Andrea; Burnage, Katy; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-09-01

    Seizure is defined as 'a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain, which usually affects how a person appears or acts for a short time'. Children who have experienced seizures commonly present to emergency departments (EDs), and detailed history taking will usually help differentiate between epileptic and non-epileptic events. ED nurses are often the first health professionals to manage children with seizures, and this is best done by following the ABCDE approach. Treatment involves termination of seizures with anticonvulsants, and children may need other symptomatic management. Seizures in children can be an extremely distressing experience for parents, who should be supported and kept informed by experienced ED nurses. Nurses also play a vital role in educating parents on correct administration of anticonvulsants and safety advice. This article discusses the aetiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of children with seizures, with particular emphasis on epilepsy. It includes two reflective case studies to highlight the challenges faced by healthcare professionals managing children who present with convulsions.

  17. International veterinary epilepsy task force recommendations for systematic sampling and processing of brains from epileptic dogs and cats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matiasek, Kaspar; Pumarola I Batlle, Martí; Rosati, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, histological investigations of the epileptic brain are required to identify epileptogenic brain lesions, to evaluate the impact of seizure activity, to search for mechanisms of drug-resistance and to look for comorbidities. For many instances, however, neuropathological studies fai...

  18. Localisation of epileptic foci using novel imaging modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciantis, Alessio; Lemieux, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review This review examines recent reports on the use of advanced techniques to map the regions and networks involved during focal epileptic seizure generation in humans. Recent findings A number of imaging techniques are capable of providing new localizing information on the ictal processes and epileptogenic zone. Evaluating the clinical utility of these findings has been mainly performed through post-hoc comparison with the findings of invasive EEG and ictal single-photon emission computed tomography, using postsurgical seizure reduction as the main outcome measure. Added value has been demonstrated in MRI-negative cases. Improved understanding of the human ictiogenic processes and the focus vs. network hypothesis is likely to result from the application of multimodal techniques that combine electrophysiological, semiological, and whole-brain coverage of brain activity changes. Summary On the basis of recent research in the field of neuroimaging, several novel imaging modalities have been improved and developed to provide information about the localization of epileptic foci. PMID:23823464

  19. Uric acid is released in the brain during seizure activity and increases severity of seizures in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyrion, Lisa; Raedt, Robrecht; Portelli, Jeanelle; Van Loo, Pieter; Wadman, Wytse J; Glorieux, Griet; Lambrecht, Bart N; Janssens, Sophie; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Recent evidence points at an important role of endogenous cell-damage induced pro-inflammatory molecules in the generation of epileptic seizures. Uric acid, under the form of monosodium urate crystals, has shown to have pro-inflammatory properties in the body, but less is known about its role in seizure generation. This study aimed to unravel the contribution of uric acid to seizure generation in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures. We measured extracellular levels of uric acid in the brain and modulated them using complementary pharmacological and genetic tools. Local extracellular uric acid levels increased three to four times during acute limbic seizures and peaked between 50 and 100 min after kainic acid infusion. Manipulating uric acid levels through administration of allopurinol or knock-out of urate oxidase significantly altered the number of generalized seizures, decreasing and increasing them by a twofold respectively. Taken together, our results consistently show that uric acid is released during limbic seizures and suggest that uric acid facilitates seizure generalization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of rare variant transmission disequilibrium tests to epileptic encephalopathy trio sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The classic epileptic encephalopathies, including infantile spasms (IS) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), are severe seizure disorders that usually arise sporadically. De novo variants in genes mainly encoding ion channel and synaptic proteins have been found to account for over 15% of patients...... with IS or LGS. The contribution of autosomal recessive genetic variation, however, is less well understood. We implemented a rare variant transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) to search for autosomal recessive epileptic encephalopathy genes in a cohort of 320 outbred patient-parent trios that were generally...... not find evidence of a role for individual autosomal recessive genes, our current sample is insufficiently powered to assess the overall role of autosomal recessive genotypes in an outbred epileptic encephalopathy population....

  1. CDKL5 variant in a boy with infantile epileptic encephalopathy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Virginia Chun-Nei; Kwong, Anna Ka-Yee

    2015-04-01

    A Chinese boy presented at 18 months with intractable epilepsy, developmental delay and autistic features. He had multiple seizure types, including absence, myoclonic seizures, limb spasm and tonic seizures. His seizures were finally controlled at 3 years of age with clonazepam and a short course of chloral hydrate incidentally given for his insomnia. Subsequently, he had improvement in his communication skills. A novel hemizygous missense variant (c.1649G>A; p.R550Q) in exon 12 of CDKL5 gene was detected for him, his asymptomatic mother and elder sister. His phenotype is less severe than other male cases. We recommend screening CDKL5 for boys with pharmarco-resistant epilepsy and a trial of benzodiazepines for Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy (IEE). Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Space time frequency (STF) code tensor for the characterization of the epileptic preictal stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Bruno; Teixeira, César; Ribeiro, Bernardete; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Dourado, António

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the ability of multiway models to characterize the epileptic preictal period. The understanding of the characteristics of the period prior to the seizure onset is a decisive step towards the development of seizure prediction frameworks. Multiway models of EEG segments already demonstrated that hidden structures may be unveiled using tensor decomposition techniques. We propose a novel approach using a multiway model, Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC), to identify spatial, temporal and spectral signatures of the preictal period. The results obtained, from a dataset of 4 patients, with a total of 30 seizures, suggest that a common structure may be involved in seizure generation. Furthermore, the spatial signature may be related to the ictal onset region and that determined frequency sub-bands may be more relevant in preictal stages.

  3. Using bivariate signal analysis to characterize the epileptic focus: the benefit of surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejak, R G; Chicharro, D; Lehnertz, K; Mormann, F

    2011-04-01

    The disease epilepsy is related to hypersynchronous activity of networks of neurons. While acute epileptic seizures are the most extreme manifestation of this hypersynchronous activity, an elevated level of interdependence of neuronal dynamics is thought to persist also during the seizure-free interval. In multichannel recordings from brain areas involved in the epileptic process, this interdependence can be reflected in an increased linear cross correlation but also in signal properties of higher order. Bivariate time series analysis comprises a variety of approaches, each with different degrees of sensitivity and specificity for interdependencies reflected in lower- or higher-order properties of pairs of simultaneously recorded signals. Here we investigate which approach is best suited to detect putatively elevated interdependence levels in signals recorded from brain areas involved in the epileptic process. For this purpose, we use the linear cross correlation that is sensitive to lower-order signatures of interdependence, a nonlinear interdependence measure that integrates both lower- and higher-order properties, and a surrogate-corrected nonlinear interdependence measure that aims to specifically characterize higher-order properties. We analyze intracranial electroencephalographic recordings of the seizure-free interval from 29 patients with an epileptic focus located in the medial temporal lobe. Our results show that all three approaches detect higher levels of interdependence for signals recorded from the brain hemisphere containing the epileptic focus as compared to signals recorded from the opposite hemisphere. For the linear cross correlation, however, these differences are not significant. For the nonlinear interdependence measure, results are significant but only of moderate accuracy with regard to the discriminative power for the focal and nonfocal hemispheres. The highest significance and accuracy is obtained for the surrogate-corrected nonlinear

  4. Limited efficacy of the ketogenic diet in the treatment of highly refractory epileptic spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shaun A; Shin, Ji Hyun; Shih, Evan J; Murata, Kristina K; Sewak, Sarika; Kezele, Michele E; Sankar, Raman; Matsumoto, Joyce H

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that the ketogenic diet is effective in the treatment of epileptic spasms, even in refractory cases. However, there has been very limited demonstration of prompt and complete (video-EEG confirmed) response. We set out to describe our center's experience with the ketogenic diet in the treatment of children with highly refractory epileptic spasms, with rigorous seizure outcome assessment. Children treated with the ketogenic diet for epileptic spasms between April, 2010 and June, 2014 were retrospectively identified. Seizure burden was tabulated at baseline and after 1, 3, 6, and 12-months of ketogenic diet exposure. Adverse events were similarly ascertained. We identified a cohort of 22 consecutive patients who received ketogenic diet therapy, with median age of onset of epileptic spasms of 5.2 (IQR 2.0-9.0) months, with diet initiation beginning a median of 26.4 (12.5-38.7) months after onset, and following a median of 7 (IQR 5-7) treatment failures. Only 2 patients exhibited a complete response during ketogenic diet exposure, and response was more reasonably attributed to alternative therapies in both cases. A modest early reduction in seizure frequency was not sustained beyond 1 month of diet exposure. The diet was well tolerated, and continued in 6 patients with subjective and/or partial response. In contrast to prior studies reporting substantial efficacy of the ketogenic diet, our findings suggest limited efficacy, albeit in a highly refractory cohort. Prospective studies in both refractory and new-onset populations, with both video-EEG confirmation of response and rigorous cognitive outcome assessment, would be of great value to more clearly define the utility of the ketogenic diet in the treatment of epileptic spasms. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Analysis of gene mutation of early onset epileptic spasm with unknown reason].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Pan, G; Li, W H; Zhang, L M; Wu, B B; Wang, H J; Zhang, P; Zhou, S Z

    2017-11-02

    Objective: To summarize the gene mutation of early onset epileptic spasm with unknown reason. Method: In this prospective study, data of patients with early onset epileptic spasm with unknown reason were collected from neurological department of Children's Hospital of Fudan University between March 2016 and December 2016. Patients with known disorders such as infection, metabolic, structural, immunological problems and known genetic mutations were excluded. Patients with genetic disease that can be diagnosed by clinical manifestations and phenotypic characteristics were also excluded. Genetic research methods included nervous system panel containing 1 427 epilepsy genes, whole exome sequencing (WES), analysis of copy number variation (CNV) and karyotype analysis of chromosome. The basic information, phenotypes, genetic results and the antiepileptic treatment of patients were analyzed. Result: Nine of the 17 cases with early onset epileptic spasm were boys and eight were girls. Patients' age at first seizure onset ranged from 1 day after birth to 8 months (median age of 3 months). The first hospital visit age ranged from 1 month to 2 years (median age of 4.5 months). The time of following-up ranged from 8 months to 3 years and 10 months. All the 17 patients had early onset epileptic spasm. Video electroencephalogram was used to monitor the spasm seizure. Five patients had Ohtahara syndrome, 10 had West syndrome, two had unclear classification. In 17 cases, 10 of them had detected pathogenic genes. Nine cases had point mutations, involving SCN2A, ARX, UNC80, KCNQ2, and GABRB3. Except one case of mutations in GABRB3 gene have been reported, all the other cases had new mutations. One patient had deletion mutation in CDKL5 gene. One CNV case had 6q 22.31 5.5MB repeats. Ten cases out of 17 were using 2-3 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and the drugs had no effect. Seven cases used adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and prednisone besides AEDs (a total course for 8 weeks

  6. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    testing of the brain revealed no structural abnormality. His blood examination findings were ... A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports ... seizures cause great personal distress and significantly affect marital relationships. Though ...

  7. Abnormal binding and disruption in large scale networks involved in human partial seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolomei Fabrice

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a marked increase in the amount of electrophysiological and neuroimaging works dealing with the study of large scale brain connectivity in the epileptic brain. Our view of the epileptogenic process in the brain has largely evolved over the last twenty years from the historical concept of “epileptic focus” to a more complex description of “Epileptogenic networks” involved in the genesis and “propagation” of epileptic activities. In particular, a large number of studies have been dedicated to the analysis of intracerebral EEG signals to characterize the dynamic of interactions between brain areas during temporal lobe seizures. These studies have reported that large scale functional connectivity is dramatically altered during seizures, particularly during temporal lobe seizure genesis and development. Dramatic changes in neural synchrony provoked by epileptic rhythms are also responsible for the production of ictal symptoms or changes in patient’s behaviour such as automatisms, emotional changes or consciousness alteration. Beside these studies dedicated to seizures, large-scale network connectivity during the interictal state has also been investigated not only to define biomarkers of epileptogenicity but also to better understand the cognitive impairments observed between seizures.

  8. Large-scale structural alteration of brain in epileptic children with SCN1A mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yun-Jeong; Yum, Mi-Sun; Kim, Min-Jee; Shim, Woo-Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Yoo, Il Han; Lee, Jiwon; Lim, Byung Chan; Kim, Ki Joong; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Mutations in SCN1A gene encoding the alpha 1 subunit of the voltage gated sodium channel are associated with several epilepsy syndromes including genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) and severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI). However, in most patients with SCN1A mutation, brain imaging has reported normal or non-specific findings including cerebral or cerebellar atrophy. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in brain morphometry in epileptic chil...

  9. Multimodality localization of epileptic foci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desco, Manuel; Pascau, Javier; Pozo, M. A.; Santos, Andres; Reig, Santiago; Gispert, Juan D.; Garcia-Barreno, Pedro

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents a multimodality approach for the localization of epileptic foci using PET, MRI and EEG combined without the need of external markers. Mutual Information algorithm is used for MRI-PET registration. Dipole coordinates (provided by BESA software) are projected onto the MRI using a specifically developed algorithm. The four anatomical references used for electrode positioning (nasion, inion and two preauricular points) are located on the MRI using a triplanar viewer combined with a surface-rendering tool. Geometric transformation using deformation of the ideal sphere used for dipole calculations is then applied to match the patient's brain size and shape. Eight treatment-refractory epileptic patients have been studied. The combination of the anatomical information from the MRI, hipoperfusion areas in PET and dipole position and orientation helped the physician in the diagnosis of epileptic focus location. Neurosurgery was not indicated for patients where PET and dipole results were inconsistent; in two cases it was clinically indicated despite the mismatch, showing a negative follow up. The multimodality approach presented does not require external markers for dipole projection onto the MRI, this being the main difference with previous methods. The proposed method may play an important role in the indication of surgery for treatment- refractory epileptic patients.

  10. Epileptic manifestations induced by midazolam in the neonatal period Manifestações epilépticas induzidas por midazolam no período neonatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Augusta Montenegro

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiepileptic drugs may cause worsening of epilepsy by aggravating pre-existing seizures or by triggering new seizure types. There are several reports of adverse effects related to midazolam, but only a few authors reported epileptic manifestations. We report four newborns seen at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of our University Hospital, who developed seizures a few seconds after the administration of midazolam. It is difficult to identify the patients at risk, but it is important to be aware and recognize this situation.Drogas antiepilépticas podem piorar o controle da epilepsia por agravar crises epilépticas pre-existentes ou por desencadear novos tipos de crises. Existem vários relatos de eventos adversos relacionados ao midazolam; entretanto, poucos autores referem manifestações epilépticas. Neste estudo relatamos a ocorrência de crises epilépticas poucos segundos após a administração de midazolam, em quatro neonatos atendidos na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva do nosso hospital universitário. É difícil determinar quais pacientes estão em risco, mas é importante estar atento e reconhecer esta situação.

  11. Efficacy of sodium channel blockers in SCN2A early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilena, Robertino; Striano, Pasquale; Gennaro, Elena; Bassi, Laura; Olivotto, Sara; Tadini, Laura; Mosca, Fabio; Barbieri, Sergio; Zara, Federico; Fumagalli, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Recent clinical evidence supports a targeted therapeutic approach for genetic epileptic encephalopathies based on the molecular dysfunction. A 2-day-old male infant presented with epileptic encephalopathy characterized by burst-suppression EEG background and tonic-clonic migrating partial seizures. The condition was refractory to phenobarbital, pyridoxine, pyridoxal phosphate and levetiracetam, but a dramatic response to an intravenous loading dose of phenytoin was documented by video-EEG monitoring. Over weeks phenytoin was successfully switched to carbamazepine to prevent seizure relapses associated with difficulty in maintaining proper blood levels of phenytoin. Genetic analysis identified a novel de novo heterozygous mutation (c.[4633A>G]p.[Met1545Val]) in SCN2A. At two years and three months of age the patient is still seizure-free on carbamazepine, although a developmental delay is evident. Sodium channel blockers represent the first-line treatment for confirmed or suspected SCN2A-related epileptic encephalopathies. In severe cases with compatible electro-clinical features we propose a treatment algorithm based on a test trial with high dose intravenous phenytoin followed in case of a positive response by carbamazepine, more suitable for long-term maintenance treatment. Because of their rarity, collaborative studies are needed to delineate shared therapeutic protocols for EIEE based on the electro-clinical features and the presumed underlying genetic substrate. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Seizure following the Use of the COX-2 Inhibitor Etoricoxib

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    Valentina Arnao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of epileptic seizures occurring after the use of a COX-2 inhibitor. A 61-year-old man was admitted to our department because of a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. EEG showed generalized slowdown of the activity. Neuroimaging and blood samples studies did not evidence alterations, but a careful pharmacological history revealed that the patient had taken the COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib to treat lumbago few days before the onset of clinical symptoms. No seizures were reported after etoricoxib discontinuation and an EEG resulted to be normal two months after this. Conclusion. Knowing the pharmacological history of a patient is important for understanding the clinical presentation and selecting appropriate treatment. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of generalized seizures associated with the use of COX-2 inhibitors.

  13. Predictors and incidence of posttraumatic seizures in children and adolescents after brain injury

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    Athanasios K. Petridis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the incidence of early and late seizures after head injury in patients under 18 years old. Factors correlating with a high risk of developing posttraumatic seizures were identified. Such risk factors were the severity of the head trauma and a Glasgow Coma Scale of 3-8. In contrast to many studies, we observed that the incidence of posttraumatic seizures was significantly higher in patients older than 12 years old (12-16 and 12-18. Most of the late seizures were paroxysmal electroencephalography (EEG discharges diagnosed on a snapshot-EEG during the follow-up examination of the patients without clinical symptoms. We suppose that EEG-examination in head injured children is important to identify patients with epileptic potentials without clinical symptoms. Epileptic patterns of the EEG could worsen the diagnosis and clinical outcome of the children in accordance to studies performed in the adult population.

  14. Brain imaging during seizure: ictal brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottamasu, Sambasiva Rao

    1997-01-01

    The role of single photon computed tomography (SPECT) in presurgical localization of medically intractable complex partial epilepsy (CPE) in children is reviewed. 99m Technetium neurolite, a newer lipophylic agent with a high first pass brain extraction and little or no redistribution is injected during a seizure, while the child is monitored with a video recording and continuous EEG and SPECT imaging is performed in the next 1-3 hours with the images representing regional cerebral profusion at the time of injection. On SPECT studies performed with radiopharmaceutical injected during a seizure, ictal focus is generally hypervascular. Other findings on ictal brain SPECT include hypoperfusion of adjacent cerebral cortex and white matter, hyperperfusion of contralateral motor cortex, hyperperfusion of ipsilateral basal ganglia and thalamus, brain stem and contralateral cerebellum. Ictal brain SPECT is non-invasive, cost effective and highly sensitive for localization of epileptic focus in patients with intractable CPE. (author)

  15. Computed tomography and childhood seizure disorder in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computed tomography and childhood seizure disorder in Ibadan. ... neuroimaging, it offers an opportunity to investigate structural lesions as a cause of seizures ... The presence of neurologic deficit increased the yield of abnormal CT features.

  16. Antiepileptic Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla and Rhynchophylline Involved in the Initiation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Phosphorylation of MAPK Signal Pathways in Acute Seizures of Kainic Acid-Treated Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Cheng Hsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures cause inflammation of the central nervous system. The extent of the inflammation is related to the severity and recurrence of the seizures. Cell surface receptors are stimulated by stimulators such as kainic acid (KA, which causes intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signal pathway transmission to coordinate a response. It is known that Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR and rhynchophylline (RP have anticonvulsive effects, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop a novel strategy for treating epilepsy by investigating how UR and RP initiate their anticonvulsive mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered KA (12 mg/kg, i.p. to induce seizure before being sacrificed. The brain was removed 3 h after KA administration. The results indicate that pretreatment with UR (1.0 g/kg, RP (0.25 mg/kg, and valproic acid (VA, 250 mg/kg for 3 d could reduce epileptic seizures and could also reduce the expression of c-Jun aminoterminal kinase phosphorylation (JNKp of MAPK signal pathways in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus brain tissues. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α remain unchanged, indicating that the anticonvulsive effect of UR and RP is initially involved in the JNKp MAPK signal pathway during the KA-induced acute seizure period.

  17. Antiepileptic Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla and Rhynchophylline Involved in the Initiation of c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Phosphorylation of MAPK Signal Pathways in Acute Seizures of Kainic Acid-Treated Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Chung-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Seizures cause inflammation of the central nervous system. The extent of the inflammation is related to the severity and recurrence of the seizures. Cell surface receptors are stimulated by stimulators such as kainic acid (KA), which causes intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal pathway transmission to coordinate a response. It is known that Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR) and rhynchophylline (RP) have anticonvulsive effects, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop a novel strategy for treating epilepsy by investigating how UR and RP initiate their anticonvulsive mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered KA (12 mg/kg, i.p.) to induce seizure before being sacrificed. The brain was removed 3 h after KA administration. The results indicate that pretreatment with UR (1.0 g/kg), RP (0.25 mg/kg), and valproic acid (VA, 250 mg/kg) for 3 d could reduce epileptic seizures and could also reduce the expression of c-Jun aminoterminal kinase phosphorylation (JNKp) of MAPK signal pathways in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus brain tissues. Proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 β , IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor- α remain unchanged, indicating that the anticonvulsive effect of UR and RP is initially involved in the JNKp MAPK signal pathway during the KA-induced acute seizure period.

  18. "Are You Saying She's Mentally Ill Then?" Explaining Medically Unexplained Seizures in Clinical Encounters

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Catherine M.; Lian, Olaug S.

    2015-01-01

    Bodily phenomena that are difficult to identify, localize, explain and cure with the aid of modern biomedical knowledge and technology leave ample room for cultural influence. That makes them a perfect case for studying the cultural dimension of medical knowledge and practice. Building on this assumption we qualitatively explore the communication between neurologists and women with seizure disorders of uncertain etiology, often labeled psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES), in a specialis...

  19. Characteristics of seizure-induced signal changes on MRI in patients with first seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si Eun; Lee, Byung In; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Park, Kang Min; Kim, Hyung Chan; Lee, Joonwon; Bae, Soo-Young; Lee, Dongah; Kim, Sung Eun

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive factors and identify the characteristics of the seizure-induced signal changes on MRI (SCM) in patients with first seizures. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with first seizures from March 2010 to August 2014. The inclusion criteria for this study were patients with 1) first seizures, and 2) MRI and EEG performed within 24h of the first seizures. The definition of SCM was hyper-intensities in the brain not applying to cerebral arterial territories. Multivariate logistic regression was performed with or without SCM as a dependent variable. Of 431 patients with seizures visiting the ER, 69 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of 69 patients, 11 patients (15.9%) had SCM. Epileptiform discharge on EEG (OR 29.7, 95% CI 1.79-493.37, p=0.018) was an independently significant variable predicting the presence of SCM in patients with first seizures. In addition, the topography of SCM was as follows; i) ipsilateral hippocampus, thalamus and cerebral cortex (5/11), ii) unilateral cortex (4/11), iii) ipsilateral thalamus and cerebral cortex (1/11), iv) bilateral hippocampus (1/11). Moreover, 6 out of 7 patients who underwent both perfusion CT and MRI exhibited unilateral cortical hyperperfusion with ipsilateral thalamic involvement reflecting unrestricted vascular territories. There is an association between epileptiform discharges and SCM. Additionally, the involvement of the unilateral cortex and ipsilateral thalamus in SCM and its hyperperfusion state could be helpful in differentiating the consequences of epileptic seizures from other pathologies. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Agmatine for combined treatment of epilepsy, depression and cognitive impairment in chronic epileptic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tanveer; Bagga, Neetu; Kaur, Anureet; Kaur, Navjot; Gawande, Dinesh Yugraj; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Epilepsy is fourth most common neurological disorders associated with depression and cognitive deficits. As per present scenario, none of the antiseizure drugs have been reported successful to have ameliorative effect on epilepsy associated depression and cognitive deficits. Thus, the study was envisioned to assess an ameliorative potential of agmatine on epilepsy and its efficacy and safety for management of associated depression and cognitive deficits. The animals were made epileptic employing pentylenetetrazole (35mg/kg i.p. every 48±2h) kindling model of epilepsy and subsequently were treated with vehicle, valproic acid (300mg/kg/day i.p.) and agmatine (2.5, 5, and 10mg/kg)/day/i.p. for 15days. Except naïve, all the groups were challenged with same pentylenetetrazole dose as employed during kindling on days 5, 10, and 15 to evaluate seizure severity. Two hours after seizure severity test, tail suspension test and passive shock avoidance paradigm was employed to evaluate depression and cognitive behavior respectively. Results suggested that epileptic animals were significantly associated with depression and cognitive impairment. Chronic valproate treatment significantly reduced seizure severity, but was found unable to mitigate depression and cognitive deficits. However, agmatine treatment dose dependently ameliorated seizure severity as well as associated depression and cognitive deficits. On 15th day, animals were euthanized and pertinent neurochemical estimations were carried out in cortical and hippocampal areas of the mice brain. Thus, study concluded that agmatine ameliorated seizure severity, depression and cognitive impairment in epileptic animals, possibly via restoring glutamate-GABA neurotransmission and serotonin synthesis with decreased nitrosative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of cranial imaging in epileptic status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Pradeep P.; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: There is paucity of studies evaluating the role of cranial imaging in the management of status epilepticus (SE); therefore this study evaluates the role of imaging in predicting the outcome of SE. Methods: Consecutive patients with SE were prospectively evaluated. Clinical evaluation, blood counts, serum chemistry and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were carried out. Cranial CT scan was performed on a spiral CT and MRI on a 1.5 T scanner. Patients were treated with IV sodium valproate, phenytoin and benzodiazepines as per fixed protocol. Outcome was defined as seizure control at 1 h and mortality. Various clinical and radiological parameters were correlated. Results: There were 99 patients with SE whose mean age was 35 (1-78) years, 40 females and 17 were below 12 years of age. Fifty six patients had central nervous system (CNS) infections, 15 strokes, 13 metabolic encephalopathy, 5 drug default and in the remaining 10 patients various acute symptomatic causes were present. Cranial imaging was abnormal in 59% patients. CT was abnormal in 21 (47.7%) out of 44 patients whereas MRI was abnormal in 26 (63.4%) out of 41 patients. Both MRI and CT were carried out in 14 patients and 12 revealed abnormalities; 2 had abnormality only on MRI. Imaging revealed cortical lesions in 10, subcortical in 19 and both cortical as well as subcortical in 30 patients. One hour seizure control was achieved in 60, seizures recurred within 24 h in 38 and 27 patients died during hospital stay. Seizure type, duration of SE, seizure control at 1 h and mortality did not correlate with radiological abnormalities. Conclusion: Cranial imaging reveals structural abnormality in 59% patients with SE and was not related to SE control and mortality.

  2. Role of cranial imaging in epileptic status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Pradeep P; Kalita, Jayantee [Department of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India); Misra, Usha K. [Department of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014 (India)], E-mail: drukmisra@rediffmail.com

    2009-06-15

    Introduction: There is paucity of studies evaluating the role of cranial imaging in the management of status epilepticus (SE); therefore this study evaluates the role of imaging in predicting the outcome of SE. Methods: Consecutive patients with SE were prospectively evaluated. Clinical evaluation, blood counts, serum chemistry and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were carried out. Cranial CT scan was performed on a spiral CT and MRI on a 1.5 T scanner. Patients were treated with IV sodium valproate, phenytoin and benzodiazepines as per fixed protocol. Outcome was defined as seizure control at 1 h and mortality. Various clinical and radiological parameters were correlated. Results: There were 99 patients with SE whose mean age was 35 (1-78) years, 40 females and 17 were below 12 years of age. Fifty six patients had central nervous system (CNS) infections, 15 strokes, 13 metabolic encephalopathy, 5 drug default and in the remaining 10 patients various acute symptomatic causes were present. Cranial imaging was abnormal in 59% patients. CT was abnormal in 21 (47.7%) out of 44 patients whereas MRI was abnormal in 26 (63.4%) out of 41 patients. Both MRI and CT were carried out in 14 patients and 12 revealed abnormalities; 2 had abnormality only on MRI. Imaging revealed cortical lesions in 10, subcortical in 19 and both cortical as well as subcortical in 30 patients. One hour seizure control was achieved in 60, seizures recurred within 24 h in 38 and 27 patients died during hospital stay. Seizure type, duration of SE, seizure control at 1 h and mortality did not correlate with radiological abnormalities. Conclusion: Cranial imaging reveals structural abnormality in 59% patients with SE and was not related to SE control and mortality.

  3. Oxcabazepine (®Trileptal in Anti-Epileptic Polytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peder Klosterskov Jensen

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-epileptic activity of oxcarbazepine (OXC was compared with that of carbamazepine (CBZ and the primary active metabolite of OXC, a monohydroxy derivative (MHD. Altogether 255 patients receiving either OXC or MHD (192 and 63 patients respectively were included in the analysis of efficacy. Out of these 255 patients a total of 40 were children. The duration of treatment varied between 8 and 24weeks. The daily dose of OXC or MHD varied between 600 and 5400 mg (in children 600–2400 mg. Out of five studies two were double-blind controlled studies (including a total of 105 patients whereas the remaining three were open studies. The results of these studies indicate that, in adults with epilepsy, there is no statistically significant difference in overall seizure frequency between CBZ and OXC. In one double-blind study the number of generalized tonic-clonic seizures was significantly less frequent during treatment with OXC than with CBZ. No statistically significant difference with regard to side-effects was observed between OXC and CBZ. The results in children with epilepsy show a statistically significant difference in seizure frequency in favour of OXC, in comparison with CBZ. Overall, the polytherapy studies in adults and children support the effectiveness and safety of oxcarbazepine.

  4. Decrement of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents in dentate granule cells in epileptic hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isokawa, M

    1996-05-01

    1. Inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were studied in hippocampal dentate granule cells (DGCs) in the pilocarpine model and human temporal lobe epilepsy, with the use of the whole cell patch-clamp recording technique in slice preparations. 2. In the pilocarpine model, hippocampal slices were prepared from rats that were allowed to experience spontaneous seizures for 2 mo. Human hippocampal specimens were obtained from epileptic patients who underwent surgical treatment for medically intractable seizures. 3. IPSCs were generated by single perforant path stimulation and recorded at a membrane potential (Vm) of 0 mV near the reversal potential of glutamate excitatory postsynaptic currents in the voltage-clamp recording. IPSCs were pharmacologically identified as gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) IPSCs by 10 microM bicuculline methiodide. 4. During low-frequency stimulation, IPSCs were not different in amplitude among non-seizure-experienced rat hippocampi, human nonsclerotic hippocampi, seizure-experienced rat hippocampi, and human sclerotic hippocampi. In the last two groups of DGCs, current-clamp recordings indicated the presence of prolonged excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) mediated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. 5. High-frequency stimulation, administered at Vm = -30 mV to activate NMDA currents, reduced GABAA IPSC amplitude specifically in seizure-experienced rat hippocampi (t = 2.5, P < 0.03) and human sclerotic hippocampi (t = 7.7, P < 0.01). This reduction was blocked by an NMDA receptor antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) (50 microM). The time for GABAA IPSCs to recover to their original amplitude was also shortened by the application of APV. 6. I conclude that, when intensively activated, NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory transmission may interact with GABAergic synaptic inhibition in DGCs in seizure-experienced hippocampus to transiently reduce GABA(A) receptor-channel function. Such interactions may contribute to

  5. A mouse model of DEPDC5-related epilepsy: Neuronal loss of Depdc5 causes dysplastic and ectopic neurons, increased mTOR signaling, and seizure susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuskaitis, Christopher J; Jones, Brandon M; Wolfson, Rachel L; Super, Chloe E; Dhamne, Sameer C; Rotenberg, Alexander; Sabatini, David M; Sahin, Mustafa; Poduri, Annapurna

    2018-03-01

    DEPDC5 is a newly identified epilepsy-related gene implicated in focal epilepsy, brain malformations, and Sudden Unexplained Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). In vitro, DEPDC5 negatively regulates amino acid sensing by the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, but the role of DEPDC5 in neurodevelopment and epilepsy has not been described. No animal model of DEPDC5-related epilepsy has recapitulated the neurological phenotypes seen in patients, and germline knockout rodent models are embryonic lethal. Here, we establish a neuron-specific Depdc5 conditional knockout mouse by cre-recombination under the Synapsin1 promotor. Depdc5 flox/flox -Syn1 Cre (Depdc5cc+) mice survive to adulthood with a progressive neurologic phenotype that includes motor abnormalities (i.e., hind limb clasping) and reduced survival compared to littermate control mice. Depdc5cc+ mice have larger brains with increased cortical neuron size and dysplastic neurons throughout the cortex, comparable to the abnormal neurons seen in human focal cortical dysplasia specimens. Depdc5 results in constitutive mTORC1 hyperactivation exclusively in neurons as measured by the increased phosphorylation of the downstream ribosomal protein S6. Despite a lack of increased mTORC1 signaling within astrocytes, Depdc5cc+ brains show reactive astrogliosis. We observed two Depdc5cc+ mice to have spontaneous seizures, including a terminal seizure. We demonstrate that as a group Depdc5cc+ mice have lowered seizure thresholds, as evidenced by decreased latency to seizures after chemoconvulsant injection and increased mortality from pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures. In summary, our neuron-specific Depdc5 knockout mouse model recapitulates clinical, pathological, and biochemical features of human DEPDC5-related epilepsy and brain malformations. We thereby present an important model in which to study targeted therapeutic strategies for DEPDC5-related conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Wavelet analysis of epileptic spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latka, Miroslaw; Was, Ziemowit; Kozik, Andrzej; West, Bruce J.

    2003-05-01

    Interictal spikes and sharp waves in human EEG are characteristic signatures of epilepsy. These potentials originate as a result of synchronous pathological discharge of many neurons. The reliable detection of such potentials has been the long standing problem in EEG analysis, especially after long-term monitoring became common in investigation of epileptic patients. The traditional definition of a spike is based on its amplitude, duration, sharpness, and emergence from its background. However, spike detection systems built solely around this definition are not reliable due to the presence of numerous transients and artifacts. We use wavelet transform to analyze the properties of EEG manifestations of epilepsy. We demonstrate that the behavior of wavelet transform of epileptic spikes across scales can constitute the foundation of a relatively simple yet effective detection algorithm.

  7. Wavelet analysis of epileptic spikes

    CERN Document Server

    Latka, M; Kozik, A; West, B J; Latka, Miroslaw; Was, Ziemowit; Kozik, Andrzej; West, Bruce J.

    2003-01-01

    Interictal spikes and sharp waves in human EEG are characteristic signatures of epilepsy. These potentials originate as a result of synchronous, pathological discharge of many neurons. The reliable detection of such potentials has been the long standing problem in EEG analysis, especially after long-term monitoring became common in investigation of epileptic patients. The traditional definition of a spike is based on its amplitude, duration, sharpness, and emergence from its background. However, spike detection systems built solely around this definition are not reliable due to the presence of numerous transients and artifacts. We use wavelet transform to analyze the properties of EEG manifestations of epilepsy. We demonstrate that the behavior of wavelet transform of epileptic spikes across scales can constitute the foundation of a relatively simple yet effective detection algorithm.

  8. GRIN1 mutations cause encephalopathy with infantile-onset epilepsy, and hyperkinetic and stereotyped movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Chihiro; Shiina, Masaaki; Tohyama, Jun; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Blumkin, Lubov; Lev, Dorit; Mukaida, Souichi; Nozaki, Fumihito; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Onuma, Akira; Kodera, Hirofumi; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-06-01

    Recently, de novo mutations in GRIN1 have been identified in patients with nonsyndromic intellectual disability and epileptic encephalopathy. Whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis of patients with genetically unsolved epileptic encephalopathies identified four patients with GRIN1 mutations, allowing us to investigate the phenotypic spectrum of GRIN1 mutations. Eighty-eight patients with unclassified early onset epileptic encephalopathies (EOEEs) with an age of onset stereotypic hand movements were observed in two and three patients, respectively. All the four patients exhibited only nonspecific focal and diffuse epileptiform abnormality, and never showed suppression-burst or hypsarrhythmia during infancy. A de novo mosaic mutation (c.1923G>A) with a mutant allele frequency of 16% (in DNA of blood leukocytes) was detected in one patient. Three mutations were located in the transmembrane domain (3/4, 75%), and one in the extracellular loop near transmembrane helix 1. All the mutations were predicted to impair the function of the NMDA receptor. Clinical features of de novo GRIN1 mutations include infantile involuntary movements, seizures, and hand stereotypies, suggesting that GRIN1 mutations cause encephalopathy resulting in seizures and movement disorders. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  9. Dissociation in patients with dissociative seizures: relationships with trauma and seizure symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, S; Mellers, J D C; Goldstein, L H

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to extend the current understanding of dissociative symptoms experienced by patients with dissociative (psychogenic, non-epileptic) seizures (DS), including psychological and somatoform types of symptomatology. An additional aim was to assess possible relationships between dissociation, traumatic experiences, post-traumatic symptoms and seizure manifestations in this group. A total of 40 patients with DS were compared with a healthy control group (n = 43), matched on relevant demographic characteristics. Participants completed several self-report questionnaires, including the Multiscale Dissociation Inventory (MDI), Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire-20, Traumatic Experiences Checklist and the Post-Traumatic Diagnostic Scale. Measures of seizure symptoms and current emotional distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were also administered. The clinical group reported significantly more psychological and somatoform dissociative symptoms, trauma, perceived impact of trauma, and post-traumatic symptoms than controls. Some dissociative symptoms (i.e. MDI disengagement, MDI depersonalization, MDI derealization, MDI memory disturbance, and somatoform dissociation scores) were elevated even after controlling for emotional distress; MDI depersonalization scores correlated positively with trauma scores while seizure symptoms correlated with MDI depersonalization, derealization and identity dissociation scores. Exploratory analyses indicated that somatoform dissociation specifically mediated the relationship between reported sexual abuse and DS diagnosis, along with depressive symptoms. A range of psychological and somatoform dissociative symptoms, traumatic experiences and post-traumatic symptoms are elevated in patients with DS relative to healthy controls, and seem related to seizure manifestations. Further studies are needed to explore peri-ictal dissociative experiences in more detail.

  10. Physics of the Brain: Interaction of the Optical-Fiber-Guided Multi-Ultraviolet-Photon Beams with the Epilepsy Topion, (the Seizure Onset Area)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    A novel method for the possible prevention of epileptic seizures is proposed, based on the multi-ultraviolet-photon beam interaction with the epilepsy topion, (nonlinear coupling of an ultra high frequency mode to the brain beta phonons). It is hypothesized that epilepsy is a chaotic-dynamics phenomenon: small electrical changes in the epilepsy-topion lead, (within the 10s of milliseconds), to the onset of chaos, (seizure--excessive electrical discharge), and subsequent cascading into adjacent areas. The ultraviolet photons may control the imbalance of sodium and potassium ions and, consequently, may prove to be efficient in the prevention of epileptic seizures. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  11. Epileptic palatal myoclonus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatum, W.O.; Sperling, M.R.; Jacobstein, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is usually caused by lesions of the brainstem. The authors report a case of PM of focal cortical origin in a patient with epilepsia partialis continua. The PM sometimes occurred in isolation, and at other times was accompanied by unilateral face, neck, and arm twitching. This was documented by both EEG and SPECT

  12. Epileptic palatal myoclonus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatum, W.O.; Sperling, M.R.; Jacobstein, J.G. (Graduate Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is usually caused by lesions of the brainstem. The authors report a case of PM of focal cortical origin in a patient with epilepsia partialis continua. The PM sometimes occurred in isolation, and at other times was accompanied by unilateral face, neck, and arm twitching. This was documented by both EEG and SPECT.

  13. Widespread EEG changes precede focal seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Perucca

    Full Text Available The process by which the brain transitions into an epileptic seizure is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the transition to seizure is associated with changes in brain dynamics detectable in the wideband EEG, and whether differences exist across underlying pathologies. Depth electrode ictal EEG recordings from 40 consecutive patients with pharmacoresistant lesional focal epilepsy were low-pass filtered at 500 Hz and sampled at 2,000 Hz. Predefined EEG sections were selected immediately before (immediate preictal, and 30 seconds before the earliest EEG sign suggestive of seizure activity (baseline. Spectral analysis, visual inspection and discrete wavelet transform were used to detect standard (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma and high-frequency bands (ripples and fast ripples. At the group level, each EEG frequency band activity increased significantly from baseline to the immediate preictal section, mostly in a progressive manner and independently of any modification in the state of vigilance. Preictal increases in each frequency band activity were widespread, being observed in the seizure-onset zone and lesional tissue, as well as in remote regions. These changes occurred in all the investigated pathologies (mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis, local/regional cortical atrophy, and malformations of cortical development, but were more pronounced in mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis. Our findings indicate that a brain state change with distinctive features, in the form of unidirectional changes across the entire EEG bandwidth, occurs immediately prior to seizure onset. We postulate that these changes might reflect a facilitating state of the brain which enables a susceptible region to generate seizures.

  14. A Neonate with persistent hypoglycemia and seizures.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBY

    disorder was diagnosed and managed with limited success as the episodes hydroglycemic seizures persisted. ... the presence of hyperinsulinemia as the cause of the hypoglycemic dependent seizures. Case Presentation. A three day old girl was admitted to the neonatal .... the Prader-Willi syndrome, has been reported.

  15. Optimizing the molecular diagnosis of CDKL5 gene-related epileptic encephalopathy in boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Davide; Darra, Francesca; Barba, Carmen; Marini, Carla; Fontana, Elena; Chiti, Laura; Parrini, Elena; Dalla Bernardina, Bernardo; Guerrini, Renzo

    2014-11-01

    Mutations involving the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene cause an early onset epileptic encephalopathy (EE) with severe neurologic impairment and a skewed 12:1 female-to-male ratio. To date, 18 mutations have been described in boys. We analyzed our cohort of boys with early onset EE to assess the diagnostic yield of our molecular approach. We studied 74 boys who presented early onset severe seizures, including infantile spasms and developmental delay, in the setting of EE, using Sanger sequencing, next-generation sequencing (NGS) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). We identified alterations involving CDKL5 in four boys (5.4%) using NGS in one and MLPA in three. Three of four mutations were indicative of somatic mosaicism. CDKL5 gene mutations accounted for 5.4% of boys with early onset EE. Somatic mosaic mutations might be even more represented than germline mutations, probably because their less deleterious effect enhances viability of the male embryo. The molecular approach used for CDKL5 screening remarkably influences the diagnostic yield in boys. Diagnosis is optimized by Sanger sequencing combined with array-based methods or MLPA; alternatively, NGS targeted resequencing designed to also detect copy number alterations, may be performed. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. Predicting seizure by modeling synaptic plasticity based on EEG signals - a case study of inherited epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghui; Su, Jianzhong; Wang, Qingyun; Liu, Yueming; Good, Levi; Pascual, Juan M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper explores the internal dynamical mechanisms of epileptic seizures through quantitative modeling based on full brain electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. Our goal is to provide seizure prediction and facilitate treatment for epileptic patients. Motivated by an earlier mathematical model with incorporated synaptic plasticity, we studied the nonlinear dynamics of inherited seizures through a differential equation model. First, driven by a set of clinical inherited electroencephalogram data recorded from a patient with diagnosed Glucose Transporter Deficiency, we developed a dynamic seizure model on a system of ordinary differential equations. The model was reduced in complexity after considering and removing redundancy of each EEG channel. Then we verified that the proposed model produces qualitatively relevant behavior which matches the basic experimental observations of inherited seizure, including synchronization index and frequency. Meanwhile, the rationality of the connectivity structure hypothesis in the modeling process was verified. Further, through varying the threshold condition and excitation strength of synaptic plasticity, we elucidated the effect of synaptic plasticity to our seizure model. Results suggest that synaptic plasticity has great effect on the duration of seizure activities, which support the plausibility of therapeutic interventions for seizure control.

  17. Dynamic Network Drivers of Seizure Generation, Propagation and Termination in Human Neocortical Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambhati, Ankit N.; Davis, Kathryn A.; Oommen, Brian S.; Chen, Stephanie H.; Lucas, Timothy H.; Litt, Brian; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2015-01-01

    The epileptic network is characterized by pathologic, seizure-generating ‘foci’ embedded in a web of structural and functional connections. Clinically, seizure foci are considered optimal targets for surgery. However, poor surgical outcome suggests a complex relationship between foci and the surrounding network that drives seizure dynamics. We developed a novel technique to objectively track seizure states from dynamic functional networks constructed from intracranial recordings. Each dynamical state captures unique patterns of network connections that indicate synchronized and desynchronized hubs of neural populations. Our approach suggests that seizures are generated when synchronous relationships near foci work in tandem with rapidly changing desynchronous relationships from the surrounding epileptic network. As seizures progress, topographical and geometrical changes in network connectivity strengthen and tighten synchronous connectivity near foci—a mechanism that may aid seizure termination. Collectively, our observations implicate distributed cortical structures in seizure generation, propagation and termination, and may have practical significance in determining which circuits to modulate with implantable devices. PMID:26680762

  18. Interleukin-6 deficiency reduces the brain inflammatory response and increases oxidative stress and neurodegeneration after kainic acid-induced seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Molinero, A; Carrasco, J

    2001-01-01

    and were killed six days later. Morphological damage to the hippocampal field CA1-CA3 was seen after kainic acid treatment. Reactive astrogliosis and microgliosis were prominent in kainic acid-injected normal mice hippocampus, and clear signs of increased oxidative stress were evident. Thus......The role of interleukin-6 in hippocampal tissue damage after injection with kainic acid, a rigid glutamate analogue inducing epileptic seizures, has been studied by means of interleukin-6 null mice. At 35mg/kg, kainic acid induced convulsions in both control (75%) and interleukin-6 null (100%) mice......, and caused a significant mortality (62%) only in the latter mice, indicating that interleukin-6 deficiency increased the susceptibility to kainic acid-induced brain damage. To compare the histopathological damage caused to the brain, control and interleukin-6 null mice were administered 8.75mg/kg kainic acid...

  19. The effect of leptin, ghrelin, and neuropeptide-Y on serum Tnf-Α, Il-1β, Il-6, Fgf-2, galanin levels and oxidative stress in an experimental generalized convulsive seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztas, Berrin; Sahin, Deniz; Kir, Hale; Eraldemir, Fatma Ceyla; Musul, Mert; Kuskay, Sevinç; Ates, Nurbay

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effects of the endogenous ligands leptin, ghrelin, and neuropeptide Y (NPY) on seizure generation, the oxidant/antioxidant balance, and cytokine levels, which are a result of immune response in a convulsive seizure model. With this goal, Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups-Group 1: Saline, Group 2: Saline+PTZ (65mg/kg), Group 3: leptin (4mg/kg)+PTZ, Group 4: ghrelin (80μg/kg)+PTZ, and Group 5: NPY (60μg/kg)+PTZ. All injections were delivered intraperitoneally, and simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) records were obtained. Seizure activity was scored by observing seizure behavior, and the onset time, latency, and seizure duration were determined according to the EEG records. At the end of the experiments, blood samples were obtained in all groups to assess the serum TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, FGF-2, galanin, nitric oxide (NOֹ), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) levels. The electrophysiological and biochemical findings (p<0.05) of this study show that all three peptides have anticonvulsant effects in the pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced generalized tonic-clonic convulsive seizure model. The reduction of the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 caused by leptin, ghrelin, and NPY shows that these peptides may have anti-inflammatory effects in epileptic seizures. Also, leptin significantly increases the serum levels of the endogenous anticonvulsive agent galanin. The fact that each one of these endogenous peptides reduces the levels of MDA and increases the serum levels of GSH leads to the belief that they may have protective effects against oxidative damage that is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Our study contributes to the clarification of the role of these peptides in the brain in seizure-induced oxidative stress and immune system physiology and also presents new approaches to the etiology and treatment of tendency to epileptic seizures. Copyright

  20. Dynamic modulation of epileptic high frequency oscillations by the phase of slower cortical rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, George M; Wong, Simeon M; Anderson, Ryan A; Singh-Cadieux, Gabrielle; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Ochi, Ayako; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Okanishi, Tohru; Valiante, Taufik A; Donner, Elizabeth; Rutka, James T; Snead, O Carter; Doesburg, Sam M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological high frequency oscillations (pHFOs) have been proposed to be robust markers of epileptic cortex. Oscillatory activity below this frequency range has been shown to be modulated by phase of lower frequency oscillations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dynamic cross-frequency interactions involving pHFOs are concentrated within the epileptogenic cortex. Intracranial electroencephalographic recordings from 17 children with medically-intractable epilepsy secondary to focal cortical dysplasia were obtained. A time-resolved analysis was performed to determine topographic concentrations and dynamic changes in cross-frequency amplitude-to-phase coupling (CFC). CFC between pHFOs and the phase of theta and alpha rhythms was found to be significantly elevated in the seizure-onset zone compared to non-epileptic regions (pfrequency oscillations at which pHFO amplitudes were maximal was inconsistent at seizure initiation, yet consistently at the trough of the low frequency rhythm at seizure termination. Amplitudes of pHFOs were most significantly modulated by the phase of alpha-band oscillations (p<0.01). These results suggest that increased CFC between pHFO amplitude and alpha phase may constitute a marker of epileptogenic brain areas and may be relevant for understanding seizure dynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bipolar electrocoagulation on cortex after AVMs lesionectomy for seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yong; Wang, Rong; Yang, Lijun; Bai, Qin; Wang, Shuo; Zhao, Jizong

    2011-01-01

    The findings of previous studies remain controversial on the optimal management required for effective seizure control after surgical excision of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We evaluated the efficacy of additional bipolar electrocoagulation on the electrically positive cortex guided by intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) for controlling cerebral AVMs-related epilepsy. Sixty consecutive patients with seizure due to cerebral AVMs, who underwent surgical excision of cerebral AVMs and intraoperative ECoG, were assessed. The AVMs and surrounding hemosiderin stained tissue were completely removed, and bipolar electrocoagulation was applied on the surrounding cerebral cortex where epileptic discharges were monitored via intraoperative ECoG. Patients were followed up at three to six months after the surgery and then annually. We evaluated seizure outcome by using Engel's classification and postoperative complications. Forty-nine patients (81.6%) were detected of epileptic discharges before and after AVMs excision. These patients underwent the removal of AVMs plus bipolar electrocoagulation on spike-positive site cortex. After electrocoagulation, 45 patients' epileptic discharges disappeared, while four obviously diminished. Fifty-five of 60 patients (91.7%) had follow-up lasting at least 22 months (mean 51.1 months; range 22-93 months). Determined by the Engel Seizure Outcome Scale, 39 patients (70.9%) were Class I, seven (12.7%) Class II, five (9.0%) Class III, and four (7.2%) Class IV. Even after the complete removal of AVM and surrounding gliotic and hemosiderin stained tissue, a high-frequency residual spike remained on the surrounding cerebral cortex. Effective surgical seizure control can be achieved by carrying out additional bipolar electrocoagulation on the cortex guided by the intraoperative ECoG.