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Sample records for epidural intracranial pressure

  1. Rebound intracranial hypertension: a complication of epidural blood patching for intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, P G; Amrhein, T J; Gray, L

    2014-06-01

    Rebound intracranial hypertension is a complication of epidural blood patching for treatment of intracranial hypotension characterized by increased intracranial pressure, resulting in potentially severe headache, nausea, and vomiting. Because the symptoms of rebound intracranial hypertension may bear some similarity to those of intracranial hypotension and literature reports of rebound intracranial hypertension are limited, it may be mistaken for refractory intracranial hypotension, leading to inappropriate management. This clinical report of 9 patients with confirmed rebound intracranial hypertension reviews the clinical characteristics of patients with this condition, emphasizing factors that can be helpful in discriminating rebound intracranial hypertension from refractory spontaneous intracranial hypotension, and discusses treatment. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  2. Simultaneous measurements of intracranial pressure parameters in the epidural space and in brain parenchyma in patients with hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Sorteberg, Wilhelm

    2010-12-01

    In this study, the authors compare simultaneous measurements of static and pulsatile pressure parameters in the epidural space and brain parenchyma of hydrocephalic patients. Simultaneous intracranial pressure (ICP) signals from the epidural space (ICPEPI) and the brain parenchyma (ICPPAR) were compared in 12 patients undergoing continuous ICP monitoring as part of their diagnostic workup for hydrocephalus. The static ICP was characterized by mean ICP and the frequency of B waves quantified in the time domain, while the pulsatile ICP was determined from the cardiac beat-induced single ICP waves and expressed by the ICP pulse pressure amplitude (dP) and latency (dT; that is, rise time). The 12 patients underwent a median of 22.5 hours (range 5.9-24.8 hours) of ICP monitoring. Considering the total recording period of each patient, the mean ICP (static ICP) differed between the 2 compartments by ≥5 mm Hg in 8 patients (67%) and by ≥10 mm Hg in 4 patients (33%). In contrast, for every patient the ICP pulse pressure readings from the 2 compartments showed near-identical results. Consequently, when sorting patients to shunt/no shunt treatment according to pulsatile ICP values, selection was independent of sensor placement. The frequency of B waves also compared well between the 2 compartments. The pulsatile ICP is measured with equal confidence from the ICPEPI and ICPPAR signals. When using the pulsatile ICP for evaluation of hydrocephalic patients, valid measurements may thus be obtained from pressure monitoring in the epidural space. Recorded differences in the mean ICP between the epidural space and the brain parenchyma are best explained by differences in the zero setting of different sensors.

  3. Analysis of epidural pressure pulse wave (EDP-PW) and common carotid blood velocity (CBFV) in acute intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemori, M; Tokutomi, T; Kawaba, T; Nakashima, H; Kuramoto, S

    1986-06-01

    The changes in the two consistent components of epidural pressure pulse wave (EDP-PW), P1 and P2 waves, and mean velocity of common carotid blood flow (CBFV) were studied in 21 patients with acute intracranial hypertension to investigate the origin of th the amplitude change in these components. The amplitudes of P2 wave increased progressively with the rise of EDP, but those of P1 wave remained nearly invariable at EDP of more than 20-30 mmHg which is incompatible with the changes in CBFV. Jugular vein compression caused in rapid rise of EDP and a proportionate increase in the magnitudes of both waves. Hyperventilation and mannitol administration caused a disproportionate reduction in the amplitudes of P2 wave with a fall of EDP. But mannitol at high EDP (more than 40 mmHg) caused a mild fall of EDP and some increase in the amplitudes of P2 wave. These results indicate that the variations in the amplitudes of P1 wave reflect the changes in vascular resistance of the large intracranial conductive arteries, while those of P2 wave result from the changes in the volume of the cerebral bulk. The increase in the amplitudes of P2 wave induced by mannitol at high EDP may suggest a defective autoregulation of the cerebral vessels.

  4. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma during rivaroxaban treatment

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    Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Rego, Felipe Marques Monteiro do; Milano, Jeronimo Buzetti; Jung, Gustavo Simiano; Silva Junior, Luis Fernando; Ramina, Ricardo, E-mail: leonardoruschel@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Neurologia de Curitiba (INC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    According to our research, this is the first case described in the literature of spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma secondary to the use of Xarelto®. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematomas are rarely described in the literature. They are associated with infectious diseases of the skull, coagulation disorders, vascular malformations of the dura mater and metastasis to the skull. Long-term post-marketing monitoring and independent reports will probably detect the full spectrum of hemorrhagic complications of the use of rivaroxaban. (author)

  5. Invasive and Ultrasound Based Monitoring of the Intracranial Pressure in an Experimental Model of Epidural Hematoma Progressing towards Brain Tamponade on Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kasapas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. An experimental epidural hematoma model was used to study the relation of ultrasound indices, namely, transcranial color-coded-Doppler (TCCD derived pulsatility index (PI, optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD, and pupil constriction velocity (V which was derived from a consensual sonographic pupillary light reflex (PLR test with invasive intracranial pressure (ICP measurements. Material and Methods. Twenty rabbits participated in the study. An intraparenchymal ICP catheter and a 5F Swan-Ganz catheter (SG for the hematoma reproduction were used. We successively introduced 0.1 mL increments of autologous blood into the SG until the Cushing reaction occurred. Synchronous ICP and ultrasound measurements were performed accordingly. Results. A constant increase of PI and ONSD and a decrease of V values were observed with increased ICP values. The relationship between the ultrasound variables and ICP was exponential; thus curved prediction equations of ICP were used. PI, ONSD, and V were significantly correlated with ICP (r2=0.84±0.076, r2=0.62±0.119, and r2=0.78±0.09, resp. (all P<0.001. Conclusion. Although statistically significant prediction models of ICP were derived from ultrasound indices, the exponential relationship between the parameters underpins that results should be interpreted with caution and in the current experimental context.

  6. Increased intracranial pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by pressing on important structures and by restricting blood flow into the brain. Many conditions can increase intracranial pressure. Common causes include: Aneurysm rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage Brain tumor Encephalitis Head ...

  7. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raboel, P H; Bartek, J; Andresen, M

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) has been used for decades in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology. There are multiple techniques: invasive as well as noninvasive. This paper aims to provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the most common and well-known methods...

  8. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure During Intracranial Endoscopy

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    Rajeev Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intracranial endoscopy is a minimum invasive procedure, which reduces trauma to the brain, is cost-effective, and carries a shortened hospital stay with an improved postoperative outcome. Objective: To monitor intracranial pressure changes during intracranial endoscopy among children and adults under general anesthesia/sedation, and to compare the intracranial pressure changes between children and adults receiving general anesthesia and among adults receiving general anesthesia and sedation. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted in one of the tertiary care hospitals of Lucknow. This was carried out in the department of neurosurgery from January 2008 to December 2008. Patients who were not fit for general anesthesia received local anesthesia under sedation. Patients participating in the study were divided into three groups. Intracranial pressure was recorded at specific intervals. Parametric data were subjected to statistical analysis using a student\\s t test. Result: A total of 70 patients were undergoing intracranial endoscopy under general anesthesia during the study period. In both groups A and B, intracranial pressure increases the maximum during inflation of the balloon. In group C, all the variations in ICP were found to be statistically significant. In the comparison of intracranial pressure changes between groups A and B, no significant difference was found. All correlations in the comparison of groups B and C were found to be statistically significant (p< 0.001. Conclusion: There is a need for continuous intraoperative monitoring of ICP intracranial endoscopy, because ICP increases in various stages of the procedure, which can be detrimental to the perfusion of the brain. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(4.000: 240-245

  9. INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Widiyanthi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Intracranial pressure is total of pressure that is produced by brain, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid/CSF in the tight cranial space. As a respon to intracranial pressure increasing, compensation begin by movement of CSF from ventricle to cerebral subarachnoidal space, and increase the absorption of CSF. Increasing of ICP usually caused by increasing of brain volume (cerebral oedem, blood (intracranial bleeding, space occupying lesion, or CSF (hidrocephalus. Indication in ICP monitoring can be seen from : neurological criteria, abnormal CT-scan result when admission, normal CT-scan result, but had more two risk factors. According to the procedure that must be done, there are two methods in ICP monitoring: invasive ICP monitoring methodes and non-invasive measuring method. Increasing of ICP will decrease the compliance of brain, pulsation of artery more clearly, and the component of vein is lost. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  10. Two cases of medically-refractory spontaneous orthostatic headaches with normal cerebrospinal fluid pressures responding to epidural blood patching: Intracranial hypotension versus hypovolemia and the need for clinical awareness

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    Kaukab M Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF hypovolemia syndrome requires a high index of suspicion and meticulous history taking, demonstration of low CSF pressure and/or neuroimaging features. A 31-year-old male, presented with subacute onset moderate occipital and sub-occipital headaches precipitated by upright posture and relieved on recumbency and neck pain for 2 years. There was no trauma, cranial/spinal surgery. Clinical examination was normal and CSF opening pressure and laboratory study were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI brain showed thin subdural hygroma. Another patient, 41-year-old male presented with 1 month of subacute onset severe bifrontal throbbing orthostatic headaches (OHs. CSF opening pressure was normal. Contrast MRI brain showed the presence of bilateral subdural hygromas, diffuse meningeal enhancement, venous distension, sagging of the brain, and tonsillar herniation. We report two cases of "spontaneous OHs" with normal CSF pressures who were successfully treated with epidural blood patching after poor response to conservative management.

  11. Intracranial subdural hematoma coexisting with improvement in spontaneous intracranial hypotension after an epidural blood patch

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    Cheng-Hsi Chang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year-old male had spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH presenting with refractory headache for 4 months. Multiple epidural blood patches (EBPs yielded relief of symptoms, but the course was complicated, with asymptomatic intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH. Except for SDH, other radiological diagnostic signs of SIH were resolved and the patient’s headaches improved after EBP. Owing to a mass effect and persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage, surgical repair of the spinal leakage was performed, but no cranial procedures were carried out. Postoperatively, the SDH completely resolved, but there was still CSF leakage at the level where surgery was performed. The patient has remained free of headache or other events for 3 years. It was reduction rather than elimination of the spinal CSF leak that yielded remission of SIH. In summary, intracranial SDH can be a complication of inadequately treated SIH (i.e. persistent minor CSF leakage. Management of SDH should focus on correction of the underlying SIH rather than craniotomy for hematoma evacuation.

  12. Organic electronics based pressure sensor towards intracranial pressure monitoring

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    Rai, Pratyush; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2010-04-01

    The intra-cranial space, which houses the brain, contains cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that acts as a fluid suspension medium for the brain. The CSF is always in circulation, is secreted in the cranium and is drained out through ducts called epidural veins. The venous drainage system has inherent resistance to the flow. Pressure is developed inside the cranium, which is similar to a rigid compartment. Normally a pressure of 5-15 mm Hg, in excess of atmospheric pressure, is observed at different locations inside the cranium. Increase in Intra-Cranial Pressure (ICP) can be caused by change in CSF volume caused by cerebral tumors, meningitis, by edema of a head injury or diseases related to cerebral atrophy. Hence, efficient ways of monitoring ICP need to be developed. A sensor system and monitoring scheme has been discussed here. The system architecture consists of a membrane less piezoelectric pressure sensitive element, organic thin film transistor (OTFT) based signal transduction, and signal telemetry. The components were fabricated on flexible substrate and have been assembled using flip-chip packaging technology. Material science and fabrication processes, subjective to the device performance, have been discussed. Capability of the device in detecting pressure variation, within the ICP pressure range, is investigated and applicability of measurement scheme to medical conditions has been argued for. Also, applications of such a sensor-OTFT assembly for logic sensor switching and patient specific-secure monitoring system have been discussed.

  13. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis presenting with an intracranial epidural hematoma

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    Lee, K.-W. [Department of Pediatrics, Loma Linda Children' s Hospital and University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States); McLeary, M.S. [Div. of Pediatric Radiology, Loma Linda Children' s Hospital and University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Zuppan, C.W. [Dept. of Pathology, Loma Linda Children' s Hospital and University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Won, D.J. [Div. of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Loma Linda University Children' s Hospital, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    An 8-year-old boy developed vomiting and severe headache following minor head trauma. A CT scan of the head demonstrated a lytic lesion of the skull and adjacent epidural hematoma. Surgical evacuation and removal of the skull lesion and hematoma were carried out, and pathologic evaluation resulted in a diagnosis of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH). Epidural involvement of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis is very rare, and we report the first case of LCH presenting as an intracranial epidural hematoma. (orig.)

  14. Raised intracranial pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the cranium to compensate for the added volume. Once this compensatory reserve is exhausted, pressure increases and brain shifts may occur and result in herniation (Fig. 2). e compliance curve is expressed by plotting the ICP against an expanding volume. Once the compensatory reserve is exceeded the increase in ...

  15. Observational study of changes in epidural pressure and elastance during epidural blood patch in obstetric patients.

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    Pratt, S D; Kaczka, D W; Hess, P E

    2014-05-01

    During an epidural blood patch, we inject blood until the patient describes mild back pressure, often leading to injection of more than 20 mL of blood. We undertook this study to measure the epidural pressures generated during an epidural blood patch and to identify the impact of volume on epidural elastance in obstetric patients. This study was performed in postpartum patients who presented for an epidural blood patch with symptoms consistent with a postdural puncture headache. After identification of the epidural space using loss of resistance to air or saline, we measured static epidural pressure after each 5-mL injection of blood. Models were then fitted to the data and the epidural elastance and compliance calculated. Eighteen blood patches were performed on 17 patients. The mean final volume injected was 18.9±7.8 mL [range 6-38 mL]. The mean final pressure generated was 13.1±13.4 mmHg [range 2-56 mmHg]. A curvilinear relationship existed between volume injected and pressure, which was described by two models: (1) pressure=0.0254×(mL injected)(2)+0.0297 mL, or (2) pressure=0.0679×mL(1.742). The value for r2 was approximately 0.57 for both models. We found no correlation between the final pressure generated and the success of the epidural blood patch. We found a curvilinear relationship between the volume of blood injected during an epidural blood patch and the pressure generated in the epidural space. However, there was a large variation in both the volume of blood and the epidural pressure generated. The clinical importance of this finding is not known. A larger study would be required to demonstrate whether pressure is a predictor of success. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Intracranial epidural hematoma in a newborn with DIC secondary to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urgent cranial ultrasound showed epidural hematoma with mass effect on the underlying parietal lobe and the right lateral ventricle with mid-line shift (A). It also revealed hydropcephaly sequelae of prenatal intraventricular hemorrhage; with periventricular cysts and thalamic arteritis, signs of fetopathy (B). Congenital rubella ...

  17. Paraplegia and intracranial hypertension following epidural anesthesia: report of four cases

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    Frederico A. D. Kliemann

    1975-09-01

    Full Text Available Four patients who received epidural anesthesia presented sustained myelopathy; three of them had complete paraplegia and one a lumbo-sacral myelopathy with urinary retention. All four patients complained of very intense radicular pains immediately after the analgesic effect of Lidocaine was over. Two patients in whom lumbar puncture was done in the first 24 hours presented an aseptic meningitic reaction in CSF. Paraplegia completed in two to ten months in three patients and in two of them severe intracranial hypertension developped at this time. It is proposed that the disease runs a two-stages course, at least in some cases, characterized by an aseptic meningitis, followed, after a silent period of some months, by signs of adhesive spinal and intracranial arachnoiditis. Intracranial hypertension was controlled by ventriculo-peritoneal shunt; in two patients a transitory effect of intrathecal injections of methyl-prednisolone acetate was observed. Two patients recovered almost completely from paraplegia.

  18. Intracranial pressure in patients with the empty sella syndrome without benign intracranial hypertension.

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    Kaye, A H; Tress, B M; Brownbill, D; King, J

    1982-01-01

    The intracranial pressure was monitored continuously for at least 48 hours in five patients with empty sella syndrome, who did not have clinical benign intracranial hypertension (BIH). It has been suggested that the empty sella syndrome is a result of chronically elevated intracranial pressure in the presence of a congenitally deficient diaphragma sellae. However, whilst the intracranial pressure in two of the five patients was abnormally high, in three patients in whom it was monitored, the ...

  19. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Once believed an exceedingly rare disorder, recent evidence suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure headache has to be considered an important cause of new daily persistent headaches, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Treatment of low CSF pressure headache consists...... of non-invasive/conservative measures and invasive measures with epidural blood patch providing the cornerstone of the invasive measures. In the present pilot study we therefore aimed to evaluate the treatment efficacy of epidural blood patch (EBP) in treatment-refractory low-pressure headache. Our...

  20. Micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement

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    Xiong, Liu; Yan, Yao; Jiahao, Ma; Yanhang, Zhang; Qian, Wang; Zhaohua, Zhang; Tianling, Ren

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a micro packaged MEMS pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement which belongs to BioMEMS. It can be used in lumbar puncture surgery to measure intracranial pressure. Miniaturization is key for lumbar puncture surgery because the sensor must be small enough to allow it be placed in the reagent chamber of the lumbar puncture needle. The size of the sensor is decided by the size of the sensor chip and package. Our sensor chip is based on silicon piezoresistive effect and the size is 400 × 400 μm2. It is much smaller than the reported polymer intracranial pressure sensors such as liquid crystal polymer sensors. In terms of package, the traditional dual in-line package obviously could not match the size need, the minimal size of recently reported MEMS-based intracranial pressure sensors after packaging is 10 × 10 mm2. In this work, we are the first to introduce a quad flat no-lead package as the package form of piezoresistive intracranial pressure sensors, the whole size of the sensor is minimized to only 3 × 3 mm2. Considering the liquid measurement environment, the sensor is gummed and waterproof performance is tested; the sensitivity of the sensor is 0.9 × 10-2 mV/kPa. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61025021, 61434001), and the ‘Thousands Talents’ Program for Pioneer Researchers and Its Innovation Team, China.

  1. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Treated with a Targeted CT-Guided Epidural Blood Patch

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    Inês Correia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH is an important cause of new daily persistent headache. It is thought to be due to spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leaks, which probably have a multifactorial etiology. The classic manifestation of SIH is an orthostatic headache, but other neurological symptoms may be present. An epidural blood patch is thought to be the most effective treatment, but a blind infusion may be ineffective. We describe the case of a young man who developed an acute severe headache, with pain worsening when assuming an upright posture and relief gained with recumbency. No history of previous headache, recent cranial or cervical trauma, or invasive procedures was reported. Magnetic resonance imaging showed pachymeningeal enhancement and other features consistent with SIH and pointed towards a cervical CSF leak site. After failure of conservative treatment, a targeted computer tomography-guided EBP was performed, with complete recovery.

  2. A novel method for long-term monitoring of intracranial pressure in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, Maria; Juhler, Marianne; Skjolding, Anders Daehli

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In preclinical neurological studies, monitoring intracranial pressure (ICP) in animal models especially in rodents is challenging. Further, the lack of methods for long-term ICP monitoring has limited the possibilities to conduct prolonged studies on ICP fluctuations in parallel...... and in the epidural space. The two pressures were recorded twice a week for 59 days and the correlation was studied. RESULTS: The two pressure recordings correlated exceptionally well and the R(2) values on each recording day ranged between 0.99 and 1.00. However, the ventricular probes caused a number...... are far less invasive and induce no apparent mechanical tissue damage and highly decrease the infection risk associated with ICP recordings. CONCLUSION: Epidural ICP recorded with this new method is identical to the ventricular ICP for at least 59 days but is far less complicated and safer for the animals...

  3. Novel method for dynamic control of intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Mark G; Dombrowski, Stephen M; Qvarlander, Sara; El-Khoury, Serge; Yang, Jun; Thyagaraj, Suraj; Loth, Francis

    2017-05-01

    OBJECT Intracranial pressure (ICP) pulsations are generally considered a passive result of the pulsatility of blood flow. Active experimental modification of ICP pulsations would allow investigation of potential active effects on blood and CSF flow and potentially create a new platform for the treatment of acute and chronic low blood flow states as well as a method of CSF substance clearance and delivery. This study presents a novel method and device for altering the ICP waveform via cardiac-gated volume changes. METHODS The novel device used in this experiment (named Cadence) consists of a small air-filled inelastic balloon (approximately 1.0 ml) implanted into the intracranial space and connected to an external programmable pump, triggered by an R-wave detector. Balloons were implanted into the epidural space above 1 of the hemispheres of 19 canines for up to 10 hours. When activated, the balloons were programed to cyclically inflate with the cardiac cycle with variable delay, phase, and volume. The ICP response was measured in both hemispheres. Additionally, cerebral blood flow (heat diffusion and laser Doppler) was studied in 16 canines. RESULTS This system, depending on the inflation pattern of the balloon, allowed a flattening of the ICP waveform, increase in the ICP waveform amplitude, or phase shift of the wave. This occurred with small mean ICP changes, typically around ± 2 mm Hg (15%). Bilateral ICP effects were observed with activation of the device: balloon inflation at each systole increased the systolic ICP pulse (up to 16 mm Hg, 1200%) and deflation at systole decreased or even inverted the systolic ICP pulse (-0.5 to -19 mm Hg, -5% to -1600%) in a dose-(balloon volume) dependent fashion. No aphysiological or deleterious effects on systemic pressure (≤ ±10 mm Hg; 13% change in mean pressure) or cardiac rate (≤ ± 17 beats per minute; 16% change) were observed during up to 4 hours of balloon activity. CONCLUSIONS The results of these initial

  4. Continuous positive airway pressure breathing increases the spread of sensory blockade after low-thoracic epidural injection of lidocaine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, W.A.; Gielen, M.J.M.; Giele, J.L.P.

    2006-01-01

    Factors affecting the distribution of sensory blockade after epidural injection of local anesthetics remain incompletely clarified. To evaluate if increasing intrathoracic pressure affects the spread of thoracic epidural anesthesia, we randomized 20 patients who received an epidural catheter at the

  5. 21 CFR 882.1620 - Intracranial pressure monitoring device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intracranial pressure monitoring device. 882.1620 Section 882.1620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... for short-term monitoring and recording of intracranial pressures and pressure trends. The device...

  6. Changes in intracranial pressure associated with chest physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, DaiWai M; Thoyre, Suzanne M; Turner, Dennis A; Bennett, Stacey; Graffagnino, Carmelo

    2007-01-01

    Management of intracranial hypertension is pivotal in the care of brain-injured patients. We report the case of a patient with both a closed head injury and anoxic encephalopathy, who subsequently experienced episodes of refractory intracranial hypertension. The patient's care was complicated by the development of a pneumonia, which required frequent turning of the patient and chest physiotherapy. Conventional wisdom suggests that these interventions may stimulate the patient and worsen intracranial pressure, and therefore should be avoided. Our observations on this patient, however, contradict this belief. This single-subject study presents data to support the use of chest physiotherapy in patients at risk for intracranial hypertension. Further, the evidence is compelling that a randomized-controlled trial is indicated to test the hypothesis that chest physiotherapy may actually result in short-term resolution of high intracranial pressure, and thus provide one more clinical tool in the management of elevated intracranial pressure.

  7. Intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure in near-drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnaik, A P; Preston, G; Lieh-Lai, M; Eisenbrey, A B

    1985-04-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were strictly controlled in 11 pediatric victims of near-drowning. Three outcome groups were defined: complete recovery, persistent vegetative state, and death. In the early postimmersion phase (first 72 h), CPP was consistently above 50 mm Hg in all patients. There were occasional, nonrepetitive, and easily controllable ICP spikes above 15 mm Hg in three patients from each group. Repeated ICP spikes above 15 mm Hg were observed in some patients with adverse outcome only after 72 h. Successful control of ICP and CPP did not ensure intact survival, and sustained late intracranial hypertension is more likely a sign of profound neurologic insult rather than its cause.

  8. Complications of invasive intracranial pressure monitoring devices in neurocritical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Samon; Peitz, Geoffrey; Ares, William; Hafeez, Shaheryar; Grandhi, Ramesh

    2017-11-01

    Intracranial pressure monitoring devices have become the standard of care for the management of patients with pathologies associated with intracranial hypertension. Given the importance of invasive intracranial monitoring devices in the modern neurointensive care setting, gaining a thorough understanding of the potential complications related to device placement-and misplacement-is crucial. The increased prevalence of intracranial pressure monitoring as a management tool for neurosurgical patients has led to the publication of a plethora of papers regarding their indications and complications. The authors aim to provide a concise review of key contemporary articles in the literature concerning important complications with the hope of elucidating practices that improve outcomes for neurocritically ill patients.

  9. Diagnostic value of optical coherence tomography for intracranial pressure in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Maren; Yri, Hanne; Sander, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) in the absence of space-occupying lesions or other known etiology. It primarily affects young obese females, and potentially causes permanent visual loss due to papilledema and secondary op...

  10. Measuring elevated intracranial pressure through noninvasive methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Helena; Nissborg, Emelie; Bartek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    techniques available. Several methods for noninvasive measuring of elevated ICP have been proposed: radiologic methods including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, transcranial Doppler, electroencephalography power spectrum analysis, and the audiological and ophthalmological techniques......Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is an important cause of secondary brain injury, and a measurement of ICP is often of crucial value in neurosurgical and neurological patients. The gold standard for ICP monitoring is through an intraventricular catheter, but this invasive technique...... is associated with certain risks. Intraparenchymal ICP monitoring methods are considered to be a safer alternative but can, in certain conditions, be imprecise due to zero drift and still require an invasive procedure. An accurate noninvasive method to measure elevated ICP would therefore be desirable...

  11. [Non-invasive monitoring of intracranial pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachev, V I; Likholetova, N V

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript presents an analysis of different intracranial pressure (ICP) non-invasive monitoring devices. External ventricular drainage still remains a "gold standard" оf neuromonitoring, but this manipulation can be not always feasible, because of contra-indications or absence of neurosurgery in this hospital. Also there is a risk of development infections or hemorrhage. In these conditions the great value is got by development of ways of non-invasive definition of VChD which would allow to carry out safe and, if necessary, numerous measurement of this parameter. Now, the leading place is occupied by various ultrasonic and telemetric methods. The question of accuracy of received data at non-invasive methods remains open and demands further specification.

  12. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Durham, T.; Otto, C.; Grounds, D.; Davis, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006 there have been 6 reported cases of altered visual acuity and intracranial pressure (ICP) in long duration astronauts. In order to document this risk and develop an integrated approach to its mitigation, the NASA Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) and Human Research Program (HRP) have chosen to use the Human System Risk Board (HSRB) and the risk management analysis tool (RMAT). The HSRB is the venue in which the stakeholders and customers discuss and vet the evidence and the RMAT is the tool that facilitates documentation and comparison of the evidence across mission profiles as well as identification of risk factors, and documentation of mitigation strategies. This process allows for information to be brought forward and dispositioned so that it may be properly incorporated into the RMAT and contribute to the design of the research and mitigation plans. The evidence thus far has resulted in the identification of a visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) project team, updating of both short and long duration medical requirements designed to assess visual acuity, and a research plan to characterize this issue further. In order to understand this issue more completely, a plan to develop an Accelerated Research Collaboration (ARC) has been approved by the HSRB. The ARC is a novel research model pioneered by the Myelin Repair Foundation. It is a patient centered research model that brings together researchers and clinicians, under the guidance of a scientific advisory panel, to collaborate and produce results much quickly than accomplished through traditional research models. The data and evidence from the updated medical requirements and the VIIP ARC will be reviewed at the HSRB on a regular basis. Each review package presented to the HSRB will include an assessment and recommendation with respect to continuation of research, countermeasure development, occupational surveillance modalities, selection criteria, etc. This process will determine the

  13. Model-Based, Noninvasive Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Identification, and Model Reduction in Biomedicine. Invited keynote lecture. IV Congress of Applied, Computational and Industrial Mathematics, Society for...Verghese. Model-based estimation of intracranial pressure and cere- brovascular autoregulation. Computers in Cardiology 35:369-371, 2008. [3] FM Kashif...of arterial blood pressure pulses. Computers in Cardiology 30:259-262, 2003. [7] IT Hwang. Frequency-domain model-based intracranial pressure

  14. Probabilistic Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Effects on Optic Nerve Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Altered intracranial pressure (ICP) is involved/implicated in several ocular conditions: papilledema, glaucoma and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The biomechanical effects of altered ICP on optic nerve head (ONH) tissues in these conditions are uncertain but likely important. We have quantified ICP-induced deformations of ONH tissues, using finite element (FE) and probabilistic modeling (Latin Hypercube Simulations (LHS)) to consider a range of tissue properties and relevant pressures.

  15. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depreitere, Bart; Bruyninckx, Dominike; Güiza, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The literature on intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in meningitis is limited to case reports and a handful of descriptive series. The aim of this study is to investigate relationships among ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and outcome in meningitis and to identify whether ICP affected clinical decisions. Between 1999 and 2011, a total of 17 patients with meningitis underwent ICP monitoring at the University Hospitals Leuven. Charts were reviewed for clinical history, ICP/CPP data, imaging findings, and Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Univariate correlations were computed for outcome and ICP/CPP variables, computed tomography characteristics, and Corticosteroid Randomization After Significant Head Injury outcome model variables. Treatment decisions were assessed regarding whether or not they were based on ICP. At drain placement, Glasgow Coma Scale scores showed a median of 8 (range 3-12). Six of 17 patients had either one or two nonreactive pupils. Significant correlations with outcome were found for the highest documented ICP value (r = -0.70), the number of episodes when CPP meningitis high ICP and low CPP represent secondary insults. The poor condition of the patients illustrates that the level of suspicion for increased ICP in meningitis may not be high enough.

  16. Epidural abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms: Bowel or bladder incontinence Difficulty urinating (urinary retention) Fever and back pain Intracranial epidural abscess may ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  17. Management of raised intracranial pressure and hyperosmolar therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropper, Allan H

    2014-06-01

    The management of raised intracranial pressure is undergoing rapid change. The choice of medical treatments to reduce intracranial pressure varies between institutions and regions of the world. The mainstay of therapy, however, continues to be the infusion of a hyperosmolar solution to achieve an osmotic gradient to force the exit of water from the brain. This review introduces the basic concepts of raised intracranial pressure, summarises several recent studies that have challenged dogma in the field, and provides practical advice on hyperosmolar treatment, based on personal experience and a critical reading of the literature.

  18. Paraplegia and intracranial hypertension following epidural anesthesia: report of four cases Paraplegia e hipertensão craniana após anestesia epidural: relato de 4 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico A. D. Kliemann

    1975-09-01

    Full Text Available Four patients who received epidural anesthesia presented sustained myelopathy; three of them had complete paraplegia and one a lumbo-sacral myelopathy with urinary retention. All four patients complained of very intense radicular pains immediately after the analgesic effect of Lidocaine was over. Two patients in whom lumbar puncture was done in the first 24 hours presented an aseptic meningitic reaction in CSF. Paraplegia completed in two to ten months in three patients and in two of them severe intracranial hypertension developped at this time. It is proposed that the disease runs a two-stages course, at least in some cases, characterized by an aseptic meningitis, followed, after a silent period of some months, by signs of adhesive spinal and intracranial arachnoiditis. Intracranial hypertension was controlled by ventriculo-peritoneal shunt; in two patients a transitory effect of intrathecal injections of methyl-prednisolone acetate was observed. Two patients recovered almost completely from paraplegia.Quatro pacientes que receberam anestesia epidural apresentaram mielopatia de longa evolução; em três ocorreu paraplegia completa e um apresentou uma síndrome medular lombo-sacra com retenção urinária. Todos os pacientes se queixaram de intensas dores radiculares imediatamente após a cessação do efeito analgésico da lidocaína. Dois pacientes apresentaram uma reação meningítica asséptica no líquido cefalorraqueano nas primeiras 24 horas. A paraplegia tornou-se completa em 2 a 10 meses após a anestesia; dois pacientes tiveram hipertensão craniana severa. Em alguns casos, senão em todos, esta afecção apresenta uma evolução em duas etapas, caracterizadas por meningite asséptica imediata, seguida, depois de um período silencioso de poucos meses, de sinais de aracnoidite adesiva espinal e intracraniana. A hipertensão intracraniana foi controlada por derivação ventriculo-peritoneal; em 2 pacientes houve melhora transit

  19. Prediction of intracranial hypertension through noninvasive intracranial pressure waveform analysis in pediatric hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestero, Matheus Fernando Manzolli; Frigieri, Gustavo; Cabella, Brenno Caetano Troca; de Oliveira, Sergio Mascarenhas; de Oliveira, Ricardo Santos

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a noninvasive device to assess intracranial pressure wave form in children with hydrocephalus. A prospective and non-experimental descriptive-analytic study was performed. Fifty-six patients were enrolled in this study. They were divided in four groups: group A, children with clinically compensated hydrocephalus; B, surgically treated hydrocephalus; C, patients with acute intracranial hypertension due to hydrocephalus; and D, children without neurological disease (control). Data were collected through the installation of an extracranial deformation sensor, coupled to the children's scalp, which allowed registration of noninvasive intracranial pressure curves. Parameters obtained were analyzed: P2/P1 ratio, "classification P1 and P2 and P1 slope. P2/P1 index and "classification of P1 and P2" had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100% for predicting intracranial hypertension. "P1 slope" presented no statistical difference. This study showed a useful and noninvasive method for monitoring intracranial pressure, which was able to indicate the intracranial hypertension in children with hydrocephalus and, thus, should be further investigated for clinical applications.

  20. Routine intracranial pressure monitoring in acute coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Rob J; Raper, Joseph; Todhunter, Emma

    2015-11-02

    We know that the brain damage resulting from traumatic and other insults is not due solely to the direct consequences of the primary injury. A significant and potentially preventable contribution to the overall morbidity arises from secondary hypoxic-ischaemic damage. Brain swelling accompanied by raised intracranial pressure (ICP) prevents adequate cerebral perfusion with well-oxygenated blood.Detection of raised ICP could be useful in alerting clinicians to the need to improve cerebral perfusion, with consequent reductions in brain injury. To determine whether routine ICP monitoring in severe coma of any cause reduces the risk of all-cause mortality or severe disability at final follow-up. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), CINAHL Plus, ISI Web of Science (SCI-EXPANDED & CPCI-S), clinical trials registries and reference lists. We ran the most recent search on 22 May 2015. All randomised controlled studies of real-time ICP monitoring by invasive or semi-invasive means in acute coma (traumatic or non-traumatic aetiology) versus clinical care without ICP monitoring (that is, guided only by clinical or radiological inference of the presence of raised ICP). Two authors (ET and RF) worked independently to identify the one study that met inclusion criteria. JR and RF independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We contacted study authors for additional information, including details of methods and outcome data. One randomized controlled trial (RCT) meeting the selection criteria has been identified to date.The included study had 324 participants. We judged risk of bias to be low for all categories except blinding of participants and personnel, which is not feasible for this intervention. There were few missing data, and we analysed all on an intention-to-treat basis.Participants could be 13 years of age or older (mean age of sample 29

  1. [Increase in intracranial pressure in monitoring brain stem auditory evoked potentials using headphones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, G; Pfurtscheller, G; Tritthart, H; List, W F

    1988-11-01

    Ten measurements of intracranial pressure (ICP) (ventricular n = 5, epidural n = 3) in 8 patients (3 after aneurysm surgery, 5 with head trauma) were performed before and after application of conventional headphones for stimulating brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP). The effects of miniature earphones and sound tubes on ICP were also studied. In 7 of 10 measurements after application of headphones a reversible increase of ICP (mean 26 +/- 19% in patients with ICP greater than 10 mmHg was recorded; in 3 patients (ICP less than or equal to 10 mgHg) no changes of ICP were seen. Using miniature earphones and sound tubes no increase of ICP was noted in any patient, and hence these can be recommended for stimulating BAEP in case of increased ICP.

  2. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in Monozygotic Female Twins: Intracranial Pressure Dynamics and Treatment Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polemikos, Manolis; Heissler, Hans E; Hermann, Elvis J; Krauss, Joachim K

    2017-05-01

    Familial cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are exceedingly rare, and its occurrence in monozygotic twins has not been reported previously. We report monozygotic female twins who developed IIH, one at age 25 years and the other at age 28 years. Continuous intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring confirmed elevated ICP as measured initially by lumbar puncture. In both cases, successful treatment with resolution of papilledema and symptoms relief was achieved after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. This report documents the first case of IIH in monozygotic twins and the associated changes in ICP dynamics. Interestingly, almost equivalent alterations in ICP dynamics were found in the 2 patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Methicillin-Resistant Staphyloccocus aureus intracranial Epidural Abscess with Osteomyelitis During Pregnancy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanamai, Vaya W; Seagle, Brandon-Luke L; Luo, Guoyang

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is increasing, and 0.5-4% of pregnant women are colonized. A 30-year-old pregnant woman at term presented with intractable headache 1 week after incision and drainage of a MRSA-positive axillary abscess. Imaging demonstrated a right-sided epidural abscess with midline shift and myositis of the overlying temporalis muscle. She underwent cesarean delivery followed by craniectomy of osteomyelitic bone and evacuation of the epidural abscess. Central nervous system abscess is rare but should be considered in patients with a history of MRSA infection and new neurologic signs or symptoms. Surgical evacuation and antibiotic therapy in combination with obstetrical care considering delivery timing based upon maternal stability and gestational age may produce excellent outcomes.

  4. Utility of intracranial pressure monitoring for diagnosis of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in the absence of papilledema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Kelly J; Raslan, Ahmed M

    2017-12-16

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is characterized by headaches, visual obscurations, and papilledema, while diagnosis involves lumbar puncture (LP) with an elevated opening pressure (OP) ≥ 20cm H20. When papilledema is absent, diagnosis becomes less clear. Some physicians have argued that absence of papilledema rules out IIH, while others maintain that elevated OP is sufficient for diagnosis. The authors performed a single institution 4-year retrospective analysis of patients who underwent invasive intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring for presumed IIH. A total of 22 patients were reviewed and 13 had classic symptoms of IIH, documented elevated OP and absence of papilledema, 5/13 (38%) patients had proven intracranial hypertension using invasive ICP monitoring, while 8/13 (62%) had normal ICP. Using current diagnostic algorithms of clinical presentation and elevated OP, over half of patients without papilledema in our series would be falsely diagnosed with IIH, which could result in unnecessary medical and surgical intervention. Thus, elevated OP as determined by LP is insufficient to diagnosis IIH. On the other hand, the absence of papilledema does not rule out intracranial hypertension. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pseudoarachnoiditis in Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Alkan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an important cause of new daily persistent headaches in young and middle-aged individuals. The diagnosis is made based on low cerebrospinal fluid pressure with characteristic findings upon brain and spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We present the case of a 15-year-old boy with spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Although his brain MRI was normal, his lumbar spinal MRI showed clustering of the nerve roots characteristic of arachnoiditis. Radionuclide cisternography revealed an epidural leak, which was treated with an epidural blood patch. The patient reached a near-full recovery within 24 h, and the lumbar spinal MRI findings mimicking arachnoiditis disappeared.

  6. Deformation of skull bone as intracranial pressure changing | Yue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Raised intracranial pressure (ICP), a serious and often fatal condition, is often not preventable. In the present study, the relationship was determined between cranial deformation and ICP change. To record the deformation of skull bone, strain foil was placed on the exterior surface of parietal skull. Prior to construction of ...

  7. Intracranial Pressure Is a Determinant of Sympathetic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Eric A. Schmidt; Eric A. Schmidt; Fabien Despas; Fabien Despas; Anne Pavy-Le Traon; Anne Pavy-Le Traon; Zofia Czosnyka; John D. Pickard; Kamal Rahmouni; Atul Pathak; Atul Pathak; Jean M. Senard; Jean M. Senard

    2018-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure within the cranium. ICP rise compresses brain vessels and reduces cerebral blood delivery. Massive ICP rise leads to cerebral ischemia, but it is also known to produce hypertension, bradycardia and respiratory irregularities due to a sympatho-adrenal mechanism termed Cushing response. One still unresolved question is whether the Cushing response is a non-synaptic acute brainstem ischemic mechanism or part of a larger physiological reflex for arteria...

  8. Increased intraoperative epidural pressure in lumbar spinal stenosis patients with a positive nerve root sedimentation sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Thomas; Melloh, Markus; Staub, Lukas P; Lord, Sarah J; Lange, Jörn; Merk, Harry R

    2014-05-01

    The sedimentation sign (SedSign) has been shown to discriminate well between selected patients with and without lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). The purpose of this study was to compare the pressure values associated with LSS versus non-LSS and discuss whether a positive SedSign may be related to increased epidural pressure at the level of the stenosis. We measured the intraoperative epidural pressure in five patients without LSS and a negative SedSign, and in five patients with LSS and a positive SedSign using a Codman(™) catheter in prone position under radioscopy. Patients with a negative SedSign had a median epidural pressure of 9 mmHg independent of the measurement location. Breath and pulse-synchronous waves accounted for 1-3 mmHg. In patients with monosegmental LSS and a positive SedSign, the epidural pressure above and below the stenosis was similar (median 8-9 mmHg). At the level of the stenosis the median epidural pressure was 22 mmHg. A breath and pulse-synchronous wave was present cranial to the stenosis, but absent below. These findings were independent of the cross-sectional area of the spinal canal at the level of the stenosis. Patients with LSS have an increased epidural pressure at the level of the stenosis and altered pressure wave characteristics below. We argue that the absence of sedimentation of lumbar nerve roots to the dorsal part of the dural sac in supine position may be due to tethering of affected nerve roots at the level of the stenosis.

  9. Chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Different manifestations of the same disorder of intracranial pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J Nicholas P; Pickard, John D; Lever, Andrew M L

    2017-08-01

    Though not discussed in the medical literature or considered in clinical practice, there are similarities between chronic fatigue syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) which ought to encourage exploration of a link between them. The cardinal symptoms of each - fatigue and headache - are common in the other and their multiple other symptoms are frequently seen in both. The single discriminating factor is raised intracranial pressure, evidenced in IIH usually by the sign of papilloedema, regarded as responsible for the visual symptoms which can lead to blindness. Some patients with IIH, however, do not have papilloedema and these patients may be clinically indistinguishable from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Yet IIH is rare, IIH without papilloedema (IIHWOP) seems rarer still, while chronic fatigue syndrome is common. So are the clinical parallels spurious or is there a way to reconcile these conflicting observations? We suggest that it is a quirk of clinical measurement that has created this discrepancy. Specifically, that the criteria put in place to define IIH have led to a failure to appreciate the existence, clinical significance or numerical importance of patients with lower level disturbances of intracranial pressure. We argue that this has led to a grossly implausible distortion of the epidemiology of IIH such that the milder form of the illness (IIHWOP) is seen as less common than the more severe and that this would be resolved by recognising a connection with chronic fatigue syndrome. We hypothesise, therefore, that IIH, IIHWOP, lesser forms of IIH and an undetermined proportion of chronic fatigue cases are all manifestations of the same disorder of intracranial pressure across a spectrum of disease severity, in which this subset of chronic fatigue syndrome would represent the most common and least severe and IIH the least common and most extreme. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Modeling Cyclic Variation of Intracranial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    demonstrates a cyclic low-frequency variation in the baseline corresponding to the ventilation . As a result, the ICP recording is not similar to the...dilation must be determined. The cyclic variation of intrathoracic pressure during positive pressure ventilation is considered a major causal... mechanism (s) that controls the dynamic characteristics of the ICP recording over the ventilation cycle are up-stream from the pial veins at vascular

  11. Bedside Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Assessment in the Identification of Increased Intracranial Pressure in Suspected Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazuzta, Jose E; Brown, Martha E; Akhtar, Javed

    2016-01-01

    We determined whether the bedside assessment of the optic nerve sheath diameter could identify elevated intracranial pressure in individuals with suspected idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This was a single-center, prospective, rater-blinded study performed in a freestanding pediatric teaching hospital. Patients aged 12 to 18 years scheduled for an elective lumbar puncture with the suspicion of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were eligible to participate. Optic nerve sheath diameter was measured via ultrasonography before performing a sedated lumbar puncture for measuring cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure. Abnormal measurements were predefined as optic nerve sheath diameter ≥4.5 mm and a cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure greater than 20 cmH2O. Thirteen patients participated in the study, 10 of whom had elevated intracranial pressure. Optic nerve sheath diameter was able to predict or rule out elevated intracranial pressure in all patients. Noninvasive assessment of the optic nerve sheath diameter could help to identify patients with elevated intracranial pressure when idiopathic intracranial hypertension is suspected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamic Cerebrovascular and Intracranial Pressure Reactivity Assessment of Impaired Cerebrovascular Autoregulation in Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, Denis E; Statom, Gloria; Nemoto, Edwin M

    2016-01-01

    We previously suggested that the discrepancy between a critical cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) of 30 mmHg, obtained by increasing intracranial pressure (ICP), and 60 mmHg, obtained by decreasing arterial pressure, was due to pathological microvascular shunting at high ICP [1], and that the determination of the critical CPP by the static cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation curve is not valid with intracranial hypertension. Here, we demonstrated that induced dynamic ICP reactivity (iPRx), and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVRx) tests accurately identify the critical CPP in the hypertensive rat brain, which differs from that obtained by the static autoregulation curve. Step changes in CPP from 70 to 50 and 30 mmHg were made by increasing ICP using an artificial cerebrospinal fluid reservoir connected to the cisterna magna. At each CPP, a transient 10-mmHg increase in arterial pressure was induced by bolus intravenous dopamine. iPRx and iCVRx were calculated as ΔICP/Δ mean arterial pressure (MAP) and as ΔCBF/ΔMAP, respectively. The critical CPP at high ICP, obtained by iPRx and iCVRx, is 50 mmHg, where compromised capillary flow, transition of blood flow to nonnutritive microvascular shunts, tissue hypoxia, and brain-blood barrier leakage begin to occur, which is higher than the 30 mmHg determined by static autoregulation.

  13. Use of intracranial pressure monitoring in bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lykke; Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Nielsen, Troels H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with severe bacterial meningitis where intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring has been performed. METHODS: A retrospective observational study including patients admitted 1st(.) January 2005 to 31st(.) December 2014...... CT scans with signs of elevated ICP. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with severe meningitis should be admitted to intensive care units and evaluated for ICP monitoring regardless of head CT findings....

  14. Biomechanics of Retinal Venous Pulsations as Indicators of Intracranial Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Charles F Babbs

    2016-01-01

    The origin of retinal venous pulsations remains an open problem in physiology and medicine; so too, their exact relationship to intracranial pressure. This study takes a mathematical modeling approach to explore details of blood flow through the eye to reveal the mechanism of pulsations. The intravaginal, intraneural, and intraocular segments of the retinal arteries and veins are modeled as connected resistive-capacitive segments. The analysis incorporates two critical mechanical properties o...

  15. The major influence of the atmosphere on intracranial pressure: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbowski, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    The impact of the atmosphere on human physiology has been studied widely within the last years. In practice, intracranial pressure is a pressure difference between intracranial compartments and the surrounding atmosphere. This means that gauge intracranial pressure uses atmospheric pressure as its zero point, and therefore, this method of pressure measurement excludes the effects of barometric pressure's fluctuation. The comparison of these two physical quantities can only take place through their absolute value relationship. The aim of this study is to investigate the direct effect of barometric pressure on the absolute intracranial pressure homeostasis. A prospective observational cross-sectional open study was conducted in Szczecin, Poland. In 28 neurosurgical patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus, intracranial intraventricular pressure was monitored in a sitting position. A total of 168 intracranial pressure and atmospheric pressure measurements were performed. Absolute atmospheric pressure was recorded directly. All values of intracranial gauge pressure were converted to absolute pressure (the sum of gauge intracranial pressure and local absolute atmospheric pressure). The average absolute mean intracranial pressure in the patients is 1006.6 hPa (95 % CI 1004.5 to 1008.8 hPa, SEM 1.1), and the mean absolute atmospheric pressure is 1007.9 hPa (95 % CI 1006.3 to 1009.6 hPa, SEM 0.8). The observed association between atmospheric and intracranial pressure is strongly significant (Spearman correlation r = 0.87, p pressure are related to seasonal variation. Absolute intracranial pressure is shown to be impacted positively by atmospheric pressure.

  16. Biomarkers Prognostic for Elevated Intracranial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE March 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 1 Dec 2010 - 31...opening pressure was 25. Overnight, patient became bradycardic and hypotensive to the 60’s diastolic requiring epi and initiation of vasopressin and...place through 6/18. The bolt removed by neurosurgery on 6/18/12. On 6/21/12, the patient had an episode of bradycardia and hypotension to which his care

  17. Increased Intracranial Pressure in the Setting of Enterovirus and Other Viral Meningitides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jules C. Beal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased intracranial pressure due to viral meningitis has not been widely discussed in the literature, although associations with Varicella and rarely Enterovirus have been described. Patients with increased intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid analysis suggestive of a viral process are sometimes classified as having atypical idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH. However, a diagnosis of IIH requires normal cerebrospinal fluid, and therefore in these cases an infection with secondary intracranial hypertension may be a more likely diagnosis. Here seven patients are presented with elevated intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid suggestive of viral or aseptic meningitis. Of these, 1 had Enterovirus and the remainder were diagnosed with nonspecific viral meningitis. These data suggest that viral meningitis may be associated with elevated intracranial pressure more often than is commonly recognized. Enterovirus has previously been associated with increased intracranial pressure only in rare case reports.

  18. Phantom model of physiologic intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottan, Simone; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2012-06-01

    We describe herein a novel life-size phantom model of the intracranial cavity and its validation. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) domains including ventricular, cysternal, and subarachnoid spaces were derived via magnetic resonance imaging. Brain mechanical properties and cranio-spinal compliance were set based on published data. Both bulk and pulsatile physiologic CSF flow were modeled. Model validation was carried out by comparisons of flow and pressure measurements in the phantom with published in vivo data of healthy subjects. Physiologic intracranial pressure with 10 mmHg mean and 0.4 mmHg peak pulse amplitude was recorded in the ventricles. Peak CSF flow rates of 0.2 and 2 ml/s were measured in the cerebral aqueduct and subarachnoid space, respectively. The phantom constitutes a first-of-its-kind approach to modeling physiologic intracranial dynamics in vitro. Herein, we describe the phantom design and manufacturing, definition and implementation of its operating parameters, as well as the validation of the modeled dynamics.

  19. Effect of gravity and microgravity on intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Justin S; Petersen, Lonnie G; Howden, Erin J; Sarma, Satyam; Cornwell, William K; Zhang, Rong; Whitworth, Louis A; Williams, Michael A; Levine, Benjamin D

    2017-03-15

    Astronauts have recently been discovered to have impaired vision, with a presentation that resembles syndromes of elevated intracranial pressure on Earth. Gravity has a profound effect on fluid distribution and pressure within the human circulation. In contrast to prevailing theory, we observed that microgravity reduces central venous and intracranial pressure. This being said, intracranial pressure is not reduced to the levels observed in the 90 deg seated upright posture on Earth. Thus, over 24 h in zero gravity, pressure in the brain is slightly above that observed on Earth, which may explain remodelling of the eye in astronauts. Astronauts have recently been discovered to have impaired vision, with a presentation that resembles syndromes of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). This syndrome is considered the most mission-critical medical problem identified in the past decade of manned spaceflight. We recruited five men and three women who had an Ommaya reservoir inserted for the delivery of prophylactic CNS chemotherapy, but were free of their malignant disease for at least 1 year. ICP was assessed by placing a fluid-filled 25 gauge butterfly needle into the Ommaya reservoir. Subjects were studied in the upright and supine position, during acute zero gravity (parabolic flight) and prolonged simulated microgravity (6 deg head-down tilt bedrest). ICP was lower when seated in the 90 deg upright posture compared to lying supine (seated, 4 ± 1 vs. supine, 15 ± 2 mmHg). Whilst lying in the supine posture, central venous pressure (supine, 7 ± 3 vs. microgravity, 4 ± 2 mmHg) and ICP (supine, 17 ± 2 vs. microgravity, 13 ± 2 mmHg) were reduced in acute zero gravity, although not to the levels observed in the 90 deg seated upright posture on Earth. Prolonged periods of simulated microgravity did not cause progressive elevations in ICP (supine, 15 ± 2 vs. 24 h head-down tilt, 15 ± 4 mmHg). Complete removal of gravity does not

  20. Relationship between intracranial pressure and phase contrast cine MRI derived measures of intracranial pulsations in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Matthias; Khoo, Angela K; Conforti, David A; Cuganesan, Ramesh

    2016-11-01

    Phase contrast cine MRI with determination of pulsatile aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stroke volume and flow velocity has been suggested to assess intracranial pulsations in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH). We aimed to compare this non-invasive measure of pulsations to intracranial pressure (ICP) pulse wave amplitude from continuous ICP monitoring. We hypothesised that a significant correlation between these two markers of intracranial pulsations exists. Fifteen patients with suspected iNPH had continuous computerised ICP monitoring with calculation of mean ICP pulse wave amplitude (MWA) from time-domain analysis. MRI measured CSF aqueductal stroke volume and peak flow velocity. Mean MWA was 5.4mmHg (range 2.3-12.4mmHg). Mean CSF stroke volume and peak flow velocity were 65μl (range 3-195μl) and 9.31cm/s (range 1.68-15.0cm/s), respectively. No significant correlation between the invasive and non-invasive measures of pulsations existed (Spearman r=-0.30 and r=-0.27, respectively; p>0.05). We observed marked intra-individual fluctuation of MWA during continuous ICP monitoring of an average of 6.0mmHg (range 2.8-12.2mmHg). The results suggest a complex interplay between measures of pulsations derived from snapshot MRI measurements and continuous computerised ICP measurements, as no significant relationship existed in our data. Further study is needed to better understand the temporal profile of CSF MRI flow studies, as substantial variation in MWA over the course of several hours of ICP monitoring is common, suggesting that these physiologic fluctuations might obscure MRI snapshot measures of intracranial pulsations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamics of inner ear pressure change caused by intracranial pressure manipulation in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thalen, EO; Wit, HP; Segenhout, JM; Albers, FWJ

    Previous studies have shown that pressure changes in the cerebrospinal fluid compartment are transmitted to the inner ear. The main route for pressure transfer is the cochlear aqueduct, about which little is known with regard to its dynamic properties. In the present study, sudden intracranial

  2. Visual Impairment/Increased Intracranial Pressure (VIIP): Layman's Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    To date NASA has documented that seven long duration astronauts have experienced in-flight and post-flight changes in vision and eye anatomy including degraded distant vision, swelling of the back of the eye, and changes in the shape of the globe. We have also documented in a few of these astronauts post-flight, increases in the pressure of the fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. This is referred to as increased intracranial pressure (ICP). The functional and anatomical changes have varied in severity and duration. In the post-flight time period, some individuals have experienced a return to a pre-flight level of visual function while others have experienced changes that remain significantly altered compared to pre-flight. In addition, the increased ICP also persists in the post-flight time period. Currently, the underlying cause or causes of these changes is/are unknown but the spaceflight community at NASA suspects that the shift of blood toward the head and the changes in physiology that accompany it, such as increased intracranial pressure, play a significant role.

  3. Middle-ear influence on otoacoustic emissions. II : Contributions of posture and intracranial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buki, B; Chomicki, A; Dordain, M; Lemaire, JJ; Wit, HP; Chazal, J; Avan, P

    Although it seems likely that body till or surgically provoked variations in intracranial pressure (ICP) can result in variations of intralabyrinthine pressure, the channels for pressure transmission remain controversial and the reasons why evoked otoacoustic emissions (EOAEs) exhibit attendant

  4. Raised intracranial pressure (ICP): management in emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh Kumar R; Singhi, Sunit C; Singhi, Pratibha

    2012-04-01

    Raised intracranial pressure is a life threatening condition; unless recognized and treated early, it may progress into herniation syndrome and death. Symptoms and signs are neither sufficiently sensitive nor specific, hence a high index of suspicion and vigilance are needed for early recognition. Immediate goal of management is to prevent / reverse herniation and to maintain good cerebral perfusion pressure. The therapeutic measures include stabilization of airway, breathing and circulation, along with neutral neck position, head end elevation by 30°, adequate sedation and analgesia, minimal stimulation, and hyperosmolar therapy (mannitol or 3% saline). Short-term hyperventilation (to achieve PCO(2) ≈ 30 mm Hg) using bag ventilation can be resorted to if signs of impending herniation are present.

  5. The interaction between intracranial pressure, intraocular pressure and lamina cribrosal compression in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMonnies, Charles W

    2016-05-01

    This review examines some of the biomechanical consequences associated with the opposing intraocular and intracranial forces. These forces compress the lamina cribrosa and are a potential source of glaucomatous pathology. A difference between them creates a displacement force on the lamina cribrosa. Increasing intraocular pressure and/or decreasing intracranial pressure will increase the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference and the risk of its posterior displacement, canal expansion and the formation of pathological cupping. Both intraocular pressure and intracranial pressure can be elevated during a Valsalva manoeuvre with associated increases in both anterior and posterior lamina cribrosa loading as well as its compression. Any resulting thinning of or damage to the lamina cribrosa and/or retinal ganglion cell axons and/or astrocyte and glial cells attached to the matrix of the lamina cribrosa and/or reduction in blood flow to the lamina cribrosa may contribute to glaucomatous neuropathy. Thinning of the lamina cribrosa reduces its stiffness and increases the risk of its posterior displacement. Optic nerve head posterior displacement warrants medical or surgical lowering of intraocular pressure; however, compared to intraocular pressure, the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference may be more important in pressure-related pathology of the optic nerve head region. Similarly important could be increased compression loading of the lamina cribrosa. Reducing participation in activities which elevate intraocular and intracranial pressure will decrease lamina cribrosa compression exposure and may contribute to glaucoma management and may have prognostic significance for glaucoma suspects. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  6. Plateau Waves of Intracranial Pressure and Multimodal Brain Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Celeste; Maia, Isabel; Cerejo, Antonio; Smielewski, Peter; Paiva, José-Artur; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe multimodal brain monitoring characteristics during plateau waves of intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with head injury, using ICM+ software for continuous recording. Plateau waves consist of an abrupt elevation of ICP above 40 mmHg for 5-20 min. This is a prospective observational study of patients with head injury who were admitted to a neurocritical care unit and who developed plateau waves. We analyzed 59 plateau waves that occurred in 8 of 18 patients (44 %). At the top of plateau waves arterial blood pressure remained almost constant, but cerebral perfusion pressure, cerebral blood flow, brain tissue oxygenation, and cerebral oximetry decreased. After plateau waves, patients with a previously better autoregulation status developed hyperemia, demonstrated by an increase in cerebral blood flow and brain oxygenation. Pressure and oxygen cerebrovascular reactivity indexes (pressure reactivity index and ORxshort) increased significantly during the plateau wave as a sign of disruption of autoregulation. Bedside multimodal brain monitoring is important to characterize increases in ICP and give differential diagnoses of plateau waves, as management of this phenomenon differs from that of regular ICP.

  7. An in vitro evaluation of the pressure generated during programmed intermittent epidural bolus injection at varying infusion delivery speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpner, Thomas T; Lange, Elizabeth M S; Ahmed, Heena S; Fitzgerald, Paul C; Wong, Cynthia A; Toledo, Paloma

    2016-11-01

    Programmed intermittent bolus injection of epidural anesthetic solution results in decreased anesthetic consumption and better patient satisfaction compared with continuous infusion, presumably by better spread of the anesthetic solution in the epidural space. It is not known whether the delivery speed of the bolus injection influences analgesia outcomes. The objective of this in vitro study was to determine the pressure generated by a programmed intermittent bolus pump at 4 infusion delivery speeds through open-ended, single-orifice and closed-end, multiorifice epidural catheters. In vitro observational study. Not applicable. Not applicable. A CADD-Solis Pain Management System v3.0 with Programmed Intermittent Bolus Model 2110 was connected via a 3-way adapter to an epidural catheter and a digital pressure transducer. Pressures generated by delivery speeds of 100, 175, 300, and 400 mL/h of saline solution were tested with 4 epidural catheters (2 single orifice and 2 multiorifice). These runs were replicated on 5 pumps. Analysis of variance was used to compare the mean peak pressures of each delivery speed within each catheter group (single orifice and multiorifice). Thirty runs at each delivery speed were performed with each type of catheter for a total of 240 experimental runs. Peak pressure increased with increasing delivery speeds in both catheter groups (Pintermittent infusion boluses, the delivery speed of saline solution through epidural catheters was directly related to the peak pressures. Future work should evaluate whether differences in the delivery speed of anesthetic solution into the epidural space correlate with differences in the duration and quality of analgesia during programmed intermittent epidural bolus delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intracranial Pressure during HighVolume Hemofiltration in Severe Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Berdnikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the prognostic value of intracranial pressure (ICP changes in highvolume hemofiltration (HVHF in patients with severe sepsis and normal preperfusion ICP.Subjects and methods. A retrospective study was conducted in 50 patients (a total of 134 sessions with severe sepsis and normal baseline ICP who received ther apy using HVHF for extrarenal indications. Based on ICP changes before and after HVHF, the investigators identified 2 groups: 1 no ICP changes (n=81; 2 elevated ICP (n=53.Conclusion. HVHF is ineffective when the normal preperfusion ICP is increased in patients with severe sepsis who have a concurrence of an arteriovenous carbon dioxide difference of more than 8 mm Hg and a Glasgow coma score of less than 10.

  9. Biotelemetric Wireless Intracranial Pressure Monitoring: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H. Behfar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of intracranial pressure (ICP is of great importance in management of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs. The existing clinically established ICP measurement methods require catheter insertion in the cranial cavity. This increases the risk of infection and hemorrhage. Thus, noninvasive but accurate techniques are attractive. In this paper, we present two wireless, batteryless, and minimally invasive implantable sensors for continuous ICP monitoring. The implants comprise ultrathin (50 μm flexible spiral coils connected in parallel to a capacitive microelectromechanical systems (MEMS pressure sensor. The implantable sensors are inductively coupled to an external on-body reader antenna. The ICP variation can be detected wirelessly through measuring the reader antenna’s input impedance. This paper also proposes novel implant placement to improve the efficiency of the inductive link. In this study, the performance of the proposed telemetry system was evaluated in a hydrostatic pressure measurement setup. The impact of the human tissues on the inductive link was simulated using a 5 mm layer of pig skin. The results from the in vitro measurement proved the capability of our developed sensors to detect ICP variations ranging from 0 to 70 mmHg at 2.5 mmHg intervals.

  10. Brain herniation in a patient with apparently normal intracranial pressure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlqvist Mats B

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Intracranial pressure monitoring is commonly implemented in patients with neurologic injury and at high risk of developing intracranial hypertension, to detect changes in intracranial pressure in a timely manner. This enables early and potentially life-saving treatment of intracranial hypertension. Case presentation An intraparenchymal pressure probe was placed in the hemisphere contralateral to a large basal ganglia hemorrhage in a 75-year-old Caucasian man who was mechanically ventilated and sedated because of depressed consciousness. Intracranial pressures were continuously recorded and never exceeded 17 mmHg. After sedation had been stopped, our patient showed clinical signs of transtentorial brain herniation, despite apparently normal intracranial pressures (less than 10 mmHg. Computed tomography revealed that the size of the intracerebral hematoma had increased together with significant unilateral brain edema and transtentorial herniation. The contralateral hemisphere where the intraparenchymal pressure probe was placed appeared normal. Our patient underwent emergency decompressive craniotomy and was tracheotomized early, but did not completely recover. Conclusions Intraparenchymal pressure probes placed in the hemisphere contralateral to an intracerebral hematoma may dramatically underestimate intracranial pressure despite apparently normal values, even in the case of transtentorial brain herniation.

  11. Intracranial pressure monitoring and outcomes after traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Peter L.; Skoretz, Terry G.; Doig, Gordon; Girotti, Murray J.

    2000-01-01

    Objective Uncontrolled intracranial hypertension after traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes significantly to the death rate and to poor functional outcome. There is no evidence that intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring alters the outcome of TBI. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that insertion of ICP monitors in patients who have TBI is not associated with a decrease in the death rate. Design Study of case records. Methods The data files from the Ontario Trauma Registry from 1989 to 1995 were examined. Included were all cases with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 12 from the 14 trauma centres in Ontario. Cases identifying a Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale score in the head region (MAIS head) greater than 3 were selected for further analysis. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate the relationship between ICP and death. Results Of 9001 registered cases of TBI, an MAIS head greater than 3 was recorded in 5507. Of these patients, 541 (66.8% male, mean age 34.1 years) had an ICP monitor inserted. Their average ISS was 33.4 and 71.7% survived. There was wide variation among the institutions in the rate of insertion of ICP monitors in these patients (ranging from 0.4% to over 20%). Univariate logistic regression indicated that increased MAIS head, ISS, penetrating trauma and the insertion of an ICP monitor were each associated with an increased death rate. However, multivariate analyses controlling for MAIS head, ISS and injury mechanism indicated that ICP monitoring was associated with significantly improved survival (p < 0.015). Conclusions ICP monitor insertion rates vary widely in Ontario’s trauma hospitals. The insertion of an ICP monitor is associated with a statistically significant decrease in death rate among patients with severe TBI. This finding strongly supports the need for a prospective randomized trial of management protocols, including ICP monitoring, in patients with severe TBI. PMID:11129833

  12. Transcranial Doppler Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure Plateau Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardim, Danilo; Schmidt, Bernhard; Robba, Chiara; Donnelly, Joseph; Puppo, Corina; Czosnyka, Marek; Smielewski, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) has been used to estimate ICP noninvasively (nICP); however, its accuracy varies depending on different types of intracranial hypertension. Given the high specificity of TCD to detect cerebrovascular events, this study aimed to compare four TCD-based nICP methods during plateau waves of ICP. A total of 36 plateau waves were identified in 27 patients (traumatic brain injury) with TCD, ICP, and ABP simultaneous recordings. The nICP methods were based on: (1) interaction between flow velocity (FV) and ABP using a "black-box" mathematical model (nICP_BB); (2) diastolic FV (nICP_FV d ); (3) critical closing pressure (nICP_CrCP), and (4) pulsatility index (nICP_PI). Analyses focused on relative changes in time domain between ICP and noninvasive estimators during plateau waves and the magnitude of changes (∆ between baseline and plateau) in real ICP and its estimators. A ROC analysis for an ICP threshold of 35 mmHg was performed. In time domain, nICP_PI, nICP_BB, and nICP_CrCP presented similar correlations: 0.80 ± 0.24, 0.78 ± 0.15, and 0.78 ± 0.30, respectively. nICP_FV d presented a weaker correlation (R = 0.62 ± 0.46). Correlations between ∆ICP and ∆nICP were better represented by nICP_CrCP and BB, R = 0.48, 0.44 (p waves were replicated by nICP methods with strong correlations. In addition, the methods presented high performance for detection of intracranial hypertension. However, absolute accuracy for noninvasive ICP assessment using TCD is still low and requires further improvement.

  13. Lack of relationship between resistance to cerebrospinal fluid outflow and intracranial pressure in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, P K; Fremming, A D; Sorteberg, A

    2003-12-01

    To explore whether calculation of resistance to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow (Rout) by the lumbar constant rate infusion test in a reliable way predicts the intracranial pressure (ICP) profile in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). A prospective study was undertaken including 16 cases with clinical signs of normal pressure hydrocephalus that were investigated with both continuous ICP monitoring and the lumbar constant rate infusion test. Intracranial pressure monitoring was performed for about 24 h, and supplied with a simultaneous lumbar constant rate infusion test at the end of the monitoring period. The pressure recordings were analysed using the Sensometrics Pressure Analyser. Various characteristics of the pressure curves were compared. The continuous ICP recordings were considered as normal (mean ICP or =12.0 mmHg/ml/min) in 12 of 16 cases. There was no relationship between lumbar Rout and mean ICP during sleep. We could not find any relationship between lumbar Rout and number of nightly ICP elevations of 1525 mmHg lasting 0.5 or 1 min. Neither resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) nor mean ICP during sleep was related to the ventricular size. The results of this prospective study revealed no significant relationship between resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) and the ICP profile in NPH cases. The results also suggest that caution should be made when predicting the ICP profile on the basis of measuring the lumbar CSF pressure for a few minutes duration.

  14. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    reduction in frequency. An increase in days with use of medication was found. Increased awareness of low CSF pressure headache is emphasized and a controlled larger randomized study is needed to confirm the results. However the present results, allows us to conclude that EBP in treatment-refractory low CSF...

  15. Assessment of continuous intracranial pressure recordings in childhood craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Helseth, Eirik; Due-Tønnessen, Bernt; Lundar, Tryggve

    2002-12-01

    In this study, we explored two strategies of assessing continuous intracranial pressure (ICP) recordings in children with craniosynostosis, namely either by computation of the mean ICP or by computation of the accurate numbers of ICP elevations of different durations. The ICP recordings of 121 consecutive patients with a tentative diagnosis of craniosynostosis who underwent continuous ICP monitoring were examined. The relationship between mean ICP and numbers of ICP elevations was defined. The distribution of numbers of ICP elevations between patients either undergoing surgery or conservative treatment was also compared, since the choice of treatment was heavily dependent on the results of ICP monitoring. At the time of ICP monitoring, calculation of mean ICP was the main parameter for assessment of ICP curves. After a median observation period of 16 months, the ICP curves were reexamined by means of the software Sensometrics Pressure Analyser, which presents the ICP curve as a matrix of numbers of ICP elevations of different levels (20-40 mm Hg) and durations (0.5- 20 min). Since the recording period differed between the cases, the numbers were standardized to a given recording time of 10 h, to allow for comparisons between patients. Cases with a borderline mean ICP during sleep (mean ICP 10-15 mm Hg) constituted 40.5% of the 121 patients. In this group, a rather weak relationship between mean ICP and the number of ICP elevations above 20 mm Hg was found, as well as a relatively high number of ICP elevations above 20 mm Hg of various durations. As compared to the patients undergoing surgery, a rather high number of ICP elevations above 20 mm Hg of various durations was found in patients undergoing conservative treatment. The study confirmed our hypothesis that in children with craniosynostosis, calculation of mean ICP does not describe the ICP curve in a reliable way. Decision-making should also include the computation of the distribution of numbers of ICP

  16. Blood pressure and heart rate during orthostatic stress and walking with continuous postoperative thoracic epidural bupivacaine/morphine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Hjortsø, N C; Blemmer, T

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-one patients scheduled for elective cholecystectomy performed through a mini-laparotomy, were randomized to received either combined thoracic epidural anaesthesia/light general anaesthesia and postoperative balanced analgesia with continuous epidural bupivacaine 10 mg.h-1 and morphine 0.2 mg.......h-1 for 38 h after surgery plus systemic ibuprofen 600 mg x 8 h-1 (N = 15) or general anaesthesia and postoperative analgesia with systemic morphine and ibuprofen 600 mg x 8 h-1 (N = 16). During postoperative epidural infusion sensory blockade to pinprick was Th4 to L1, and analgesia at rest...... lower heart rate (approximately 10 bpm) 48 h after surgery at rest and during orthostatic stress in the epidural group. There was no significant difference between groups in number of patients with a reduction > 20 mmHg (2.7 kPa) in systolic blood pressure during orthostatic stress (two in each group...

  17. Noise reduction in intracranial pressure signal using causal shape manifolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Abhejit; Hamilton, Robert B; Scalzo, Fabien

    2016-07-01

    We present the Iterative/Causal Subspace Tracking framework (I/CST) for reducing noise in continuously monitored quasi-periodic biosignals. Signal reconstruction of the basic segments of the noisy signal (e.g. beats) is achieved by projection to a reduced space on which probabilistic tracking is performed. The attractiveness of the presented method lies in the fact that the subspace, or manifold, is learned by incorporating temporal, morphological, and signal elevation constraints, so that segment samples with similar shapes, and that are close in time and elevation, are also close in the subspace representation. Evaluation of the algorithm's effectiveness on the intracranial pressure (ICP) signal serves as a practical illustration of how it can operate in clinical conditions on routinely acquired biosignals. The reconstruction accuracy of the system is evaluated on an idealized 20-min ICP recording established from the average ICP of patients monitored for various ICP related conditions. The reconstruction accuracy of the ground truth signal is tested in presence of varying levels of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) and Poisson noise processes, and measures significant increases of 758% and 396% in the average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  18. Regional cooling for reducing brain temperature and intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Luis Vicente; Peluso, Cássio Morano; Prandini, Mirto Nelso; Godoy, Roberto; Rojas, Salomon Soriano Ordinola

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of regional cooling for reducing brain temperature (BrTe) and intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients where conventional clinical treatment has failed. Regional cooling was carried out using ice bags covering the area of the craniectomy (regional method) in 23 patients. The BrTe and ICP were determined using a fiber optic sensor. Thirteen patients (56.52%) were female. The ages ranged from 16 to 83 years (mean of 48.9). The mean APACHE II score was 25 points (11-35). The patients were submitted, on mean, to 61.7 hours (20-96) of regional cooling. There was a significant reduction in mean BrTe (p<0.0001--from 37.1 degrees C to 35.2 degrees C) and mean ICP (p=0.0001--from 28 mmHg to 13 mmHg). Our results suggest that mild brain hypothermia induced by regional cooling was effective in the control of ICP in patients who had previously undergone decompressive craniectomy.

  19. Moving the patient in bed: effects on intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, P H; Ozuna, J; Lipe, H P

    1981-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) was measured in 20 patients before and after each of eight nursing care activities: turning the body to four positions, passive range of motion (arm extension and hip flexion), and rotation of the head to the right and to the left. Technically usable data was available for 18 patients. Mean ICP increased for at least five minutes in all patients after one of the four turns and in 88 percent after half the turns. Change in mean ICP with one of a pair of lateral or supine turns was strongly predictive of the direction of change (increase or decrease) of the other turn of the pair. Large increases in ICP occurred in the five patients for whom head rotation was done, while there was minimal change in ICP with both passive range of motion procedures. A cumulative increase in ICP occurred with activities spaced 15 minutes apart, regardless of the nature of the activity. No cumulative increase in ICP was found with procedures spaced at least one hour apart.

  20. Blood Pressure Management in Intracranial Hemorrhage: Current Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcel, Cheryl; Sato, Shoichiro; Anderson, Craig S

    2016-04-01

    Non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (i.e. intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH] and subarachnoid hemorrhage [SAH]) are more life threatening and least treatable despite being less common than ischemic stroke. Elevated blood pressure (BP) is a strong predictor of poor outcome in both ICH and SAH. Data from a landmark clinical trial INTERACT 2, wherein 2839 participants enrolled with spontaneous ICH were randomly assigned to receive intensive (target systolic BP <140 mmHg) or guideline recommended BP lowering therapy (target systolic BP <180 mmHg), showed that intensive BP lowering was safe, and more favorable functional outcome and better overall health-related quality of life were seen in survivors in the intensive treatment group. These results contributed to the shift in European and American guidelines towards more aggressive early management of elevated BP in ICH. In contrast, the treatment of BP in SAH is less well defined and more complex. Although there is consensus that hypertension needs to be controlled to prevent rebleeding in the acute setting, induced hypertension in the later stages of SAH has questionable benefits.

  1. Update in intracranial pressure evaluation methods and translaminar pressure gradient role in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaudvytyte, Lina; Januleviciene, Ingrida; Ragauskas, Arminas; Bartusis, Laimonas; Siesky, Brent; Harris, Alon

    2015-02-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Historically, it has been considered an ocular disease primary caused by pathological intraocular pressure (IOP). Recently, researchers have emphasized intracranial pressure (ICP), as translaminar counter pressure against IOP may play a role in glaucoma development and progression. It remains controversial what is the best way to measure ICP in glaucoma. Currently, the 'gold standard' for ICP measurement is invasive measurement of the pressure in the cerebrospinal fluid via lumbar puncture or via implantation of the pressure sensor into the brains ventricle. However, the direct measurements of ICP are not without risk due to its invasiveness and potential risk of intracranial haemorrhage and infection. Therefore, invasive ICP measurements are prohibitive due to safety needs, especially in glaucoma patients. Several approaches have been proposed to estimate ICP non-invasively, including transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, tympanic membrane displacement, ophthalmodynamometry, measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter and two-depth transcranial Doppler technology. Special emphasis is put on the two-depth transcranial Doppler technology, which uses an ophthalmic artery as a natural ICP sensor. It is the only method which accurately and precisely measures absolute ICP values and may provide valuable information in glaucoma. © 2014 The Authors Acta Ophthalmologica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  2. Effects of respiratory physiotherapy on intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure in severe traumatic brain injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Cassia; Garrido, Cinthia; Troncoso, Eliane; Lobo, Suzana Margareth

    2008-12-01

    After brain injury intracranial hypertension is the major cause of mortality, in addition to the possibility of functional, behavioral and cognitive sequels. Scarcity of studies on the effects of respiratory physiotherapy on these patients may lead to contradictory performances. This study aimed to assess the effects of customary respiratory physiotherapy maneuvers on intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures in patients with severe brain injury. Clinical, prospective trial with patients with severe traumatic brain injury, mechanically ventilated and with a continued measurement of intracranial pressure. The effects of manual vibrocompression maneuvers and intratracheal aspiration with or without saline infusion on the measurements of intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures, between the first and third day after cerebral injury were evaluated. Data were collected from 11 patients, 41 years of age (median) and APACHE II of 19.5 ± 5. The manual vibrocompression maneuver did not cause an increase of intracranial pressure on any of the days assessed. Intracranial pressure significantly increased after intratracheal aspiration maneuvers in relation to the basal measurement (day1, 9.5 ± 0.9 mm Hg vs 18.0 ± 3.2 mm Hg; day 2, 10.6 ± 1.7 mm Hg vs 21.4 ± 3.8 mm Hg; day 3, 14.4 ± 1.0 vs 24.9 ± 2.7 mm Hg; pmanual vibrocompression maneuver did not increase intracranial pressure or cerebral perfusion pressure in patients with severe brain injury. Intratracheal aspiration induced a significant and transient increase of the intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures.

  3. Changes in intracranial pressure after calvarial expansion surgery in children with slit ventricle syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, P K; Helseth, E; Due-Tønnessen, B; Lundar, T

    2001-10-01

    The effect of calvarial expansion on symptom relief and intracranial pressure (ICP) in three children with slit ventricle syndrome (SVS) and intracranial hypertension despite a functioning ventricular shunt is reported. These children presented with a clinical picture of SVS, accompanied by slit-like ventricles on cranial computer tomography scan and intracranial hypertension. Calvarial expansion was performed by mans of an anterior approach in one case and a posterior approach (modified tiara plastic) in the other two cases. After calvarial expansion, symptoms of intracranial hypertension were abolished in one case and markedly reduced in two cases (observation period 25-36 months). Comparison of ICP before and after surgery was performed by means of new software (Sensometrics Pressure Analyser, version 1.2) that revealed a significant reduction in the number of abnormal ICP elevations after surgery. The results were not accompanied by changes in the size of the cerebral ventricles. This study demonstrates that in children with SVS and intracranial hypertension despite a functioning shunt, calvarial expansion may reduce ICP and produce long-lasting symptom relief. In these cases, we suggest that intracranial hypertension was caused by compromised intracranial volume. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. [Intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressure in neurosurgical patients during anaesthesia with xenon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylova, A V; Gavrilov, A G; Lubnin, A Iu; Potapov, A A

    2014-01-01

    Despite difficulties in providing xenon anaesthesia, xenon still seems to be attractive for neurosurgical procedures. But data upon its effect on intracranial (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) remains controversial. We monitored ICP and CPP in patients with or without intracranial hypertension during xenon inhalation in different concentrations. Our results suggest that caution should be used while inhaling xenon in high anaesthetic concentration in patients wiith known intracranial hypertension. We also address new possibilities of xenon use, e.g., for sedation in neurosurgery. The study was supported by Russian Fund for Fundamental Research, grant number 13-04-01640.

  5. The tympanic membrane displacement analyser for monitoring intracranial pressure in children

    OpenAIRE

    Gwer, Samson; Sheward, Victoria; Birch, Anthony; Marchbanks, Robert; Idro, Richard; Newton, Charles R.; Kirkham, Fenella J.; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Lim, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Raised intracranial pressure (ICP) is a potentially treatable cause of morbidity and mortality but tools for monitoring are invasive. We sought to investigate the utility of the tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) analyser for non-invasive measurement of ICP in children. Methods We made TMD observations on normal and acutely comatose children presenting to Kilifi District Hospital (KDH) at the rural coast of Kenya and on children on follow-up for idiopathic intracranial hypertension ...

  6. Comparative observational study on the clinical presentation, intracranial volume measurements, and intracranial pressure scores in patients with either Chiari malformation Type I or idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frič, Radek; Eide, Per Kristian

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Several lines of evidence suggest common pathophysiological mechanisms in Chiari malformation Type I (CMI) and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). It has been hypothesized that tonsillar ectopy, a typical finding in CMI, is the result of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) combined with a developmentally small posterior cranial fossa (PCF). To explore this hypothesis, the authors specifically investigated whether ICP is comparable in CMI and IIH and whether intracranial volumes (ICVs) are different in patients with CMI and IIH, which could explain the tonsillar ectopy in CMI. The authors also examined whether the symptom profile is comparable in these 2 patient groups. METHODS The authors identified all CMI and IIH patients who had undergone overnight diagnostic ICP monitoring during the period from 2002 to 2014 and reviewed their clinical records and radiological examinations. Ventricular CSF volume (VV), PCF volume (PCFV), and total ICV were calculated from initial MRI studies by using volumetric software. The static and pulsatile ICP scores during overnight monitoring were analyzed. Furthermore, the authors included a reference (REF) group consisting of patients who had undergone ICP monitoring due to suspected idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus or chronic daily headache and showed normal pressure values. RESULTS Sixty-six patients with CMI and 41 with IIH were identified, with comparable demographics noted in both groups. The occurrence of some symptoms (headache, nausea, and/or vomiting) was comparable between the cohorts. Dizziness and gait ataxia were significantly more common in patients with CMI, whereas visual symptoms, diplopia, and tinnitus were significantly more frequent in patients with IIH. The cranial volume measurements (VV, PCFV, and ICV) of the CMI and IIH patients were similar. Notably, 7.3% of the IIH patients had tonsillar descent qualifying for diagnosis of CMI (that is, > 5 mm). The extent of tonsillar ectopy was

  7. Raised intracranial pressure in Crouzon syndrome: incidence, causes, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Sittah, Ghassan S; Jeelani, Owase; Dunaway, David; Hayward, Richard

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Patients with Crouzon syndrome (CS) are at risk for developing raised intracranial pressure (ICP), which has the potential to impair both vision and neurocognitive development. For this reason, some experts recommend early prophylactic cranial vault expansion on the basis that if ICP is not currently raised, it is likely to become so. The aim of this study was to examine the justification for such a policy. This was done by analyzing the incidence, causes, and subsequent risk of recurrence in a series of patients with CS, in whom raised ICP was treated only after it had been diagnosed. METHODS This study was a retrospective review of the medical records and imaging data of patients with a clinical diagnosis of CS. RESULTS There were 49 patients in the study, of whom 30 (61.2%) developed at least 1 episode of raised ICP. First episodes occurred at an average age of 1.42 years and were attributable to craniocerebral disproportion/venous hypertension (19 patients), hydrocephalus (8 patients), and airway obstruction (3 patients). They were managed, respectively, by vault expansion, ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion, and airway improvement. Fourteen of the 30 patients developed a second episode of raised ICP an average of 1.42 years after treatment for their initial episode, and 3 patients developed a third episode an average of 3.15 years after that. Causes of subsequent episodes of raised ICP often differed from previous episodes and required different management. Patients who were < 1 year old when the first episode was diagnosed were at increased risk of recurrence. CONCLUSIONS Although the incidence of raised ICP in CS is high, it did not occur in nearly 40% of children during the course of this study. The several possible causes of CS require different management and may vary from episode to episode. The authors recommend an expectant policy toward these children with careful clinical, ophthalmological, respiratory, and radiological monitoring for raised

  8. Management of Raised Intracranial Pressure in Head Injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The skull is a rigid container which holds a fixed volume of brain matter, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and circulating blood. Neurones and glia make up 1200 to 1600 ml of the volume of intracranial content, with CSF and circulating blood each accounting for about 100 to 150 ml; there is a small amount, about 50 ml, ...

  9. Intracranial hypotension and hypertension in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozge, Aynur; Bolay, Hayrunnisa

    2014-07-01

    The specific aim of this review is to report the features of intracranial pressure changes [spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH)] in children and adolescents, with emphasis on the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment modalities. Headache associated with intracranial pressure changes are relatively rare and less known in children and adolescents. SIH is a specific syndrome involving reduced intracranial pressure with orthostatic headache, frequently encountered connective tissue disorders, and a good prognosis with medical management, initial epidural blood patching, and sometimes further interventions may be required. IIH is an uncommon condition in children and different from the disease in adults, not only with respect to clinical features (likely to present with strabismus and stiff neck rather than headache or pulsatile tinnitus) but also different in outcome. Consequently, specific ICP changes of pediatric ages required specific attention both of exact diagnosis and entire management.

  10. The effects of indomethacin on intracranial pressure and cerebral haemodynamics in patients undergoing craniotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mads; Tankisi, A; Cold, G E

    2004-01-01

    was given before induction of anaesthesia and the infusion was terminated after opening of the dura. Subdural intracranial pressure was measured through the first burr hole and before opening the dura. Cerebral blood flow velocity, cerebral perfusion pressure, jugular bulb oxygen saturation, arterio...

  11. Visual evoked potentials show strong positive association with intracranial pressure in patients with cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Adriano da Cunha Silva Vieira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To verify the relationship between intracranial pressure and flash visual evoked potentials (F-VEP in patients with cryptococcal meningitis. Method The sample included adults diagnosed with cryptococcal meningitis admitted at a reference hospital for infectious diseases. The patients were subjected to F-VEP tests shortly before lumbar puncture. The Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient was calculated and the linear regression analysis was performed. Results : Eighteen individuals were subjected to a total of 69 lumbar punctures preceded by F-VEP tests. At the first lumbar puncture performed in each patient, N2 latency exhibited a strong positive correlation with intracranial pressure (r = 0.83; CI = 0.60 - 0.94; p < 0.0001. The direction of this relationship was maintained in subsequent punctures. Conclusion : The intracranial pressure measured by spinal tap manometry showed strong positive association with the N2 latency F-VEP in patients with cryptococcal meningitis.

  12. Complications associated with prolonged hypertonic saline therapy in children with elevated intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, David D; Meltzer, Hal S; Crawford, John R; Hilfiker, Mary L; Shellington, David K; Peterson, Bradley M; Levy, Michael L

    2013-07-01

    Safe upper limits for therapeutic hypernatremia in the treatment of intracranial hypertension have not been well established. We investigated complications associated with hypernatremia in children who were treated with prolonged infusions of hypertonic saline. Retrospective chart analysis. PICU in university-affiliated children's hospital. All children from 2004 to 2009 requiring intracranial pressure monitoring (external ventricular drain or fiberoptic intraparenchymal monitor) for at least 4 days who were treated with hypertonic saline infusion for elevated intracranial pressure and did not meet exclusion criteria. Continuous hypertonic saline infusion on a sliding scale was used to achieve target sodium levels that would keep intracranial pressure less than 20 mm Hg once the conventional therapies failed. Eighty-eight children met inclusion criteria. Etiologies of elevated intracranial pressure included trauma (n = 48), ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke (n = 20), infection (n = 8), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (n = 5), neoplasm (n = 2), and others (n = 5). The mean peak serum sodium was 171.3 mEq/L (range, 150-202). The mean Glasgow Outcome Score was 2.8 (± 1.1) at time of discharge from the hospital. Overall mortality was 15.9%. Children with sustained (> 72 hr) serum sodium levels above 170 mEq/L had a significantly higher occurrence of thrombocytopenia (p syndrome (p = 0.029) after controlling for variables of age, gender, Pediatric Risk of Mortality score, duration of barbiturate-induced coma, duration of intracranial pressure monitoring, vasopressor requirements, and underlying pathology. Children with sustained serum sodium levels greater than 165 mEq/L had a significantly higher prevalence of anemia (p syndrome than those whose sodium level was maintained below these thresholds.

  13. Intracranial pressure, its components and cerebrospinal fluid pressure-volume compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprowicz, M; Lalou, D A; Czosnyka, M; Garnett, M; Czosnyka, Z

    2016-09-01

    Clinical measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) is often performed to aid diagnosis of hydrocephalus. This review discusses analysis of ICP and its components' for the investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. The role of pulse, slow and respiratory waveforms of ICP in diagnosis, prognostication and management of hydrocephalus is presented. Two methods related to ICP measurement are listed: an overnight monitoring of ICP and a constant-rate infusion study. Due to the dynamic nature of ICP, a 'snapshot' manometric measurement of ICP is of limited use as it might lead to unreliable results. Therefore, monitoring of ICP over longer time combined with analysis of its waveforms provides more detailed information on the state of pressure-volume compensation. The infusion study implements ICP signal processing and CSF circulation model analysis in order to assess the cerebrospinal dynamics variables, such as CSF outflow resistance, compliance of CSF space, pressure amplitude, reference pressure, and CSF formation. These parameters act as an aid tool in diagnosis and prognostication of hydrocephalus and can be helpful in the assessment of a shunt malfunction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Correlation of the intraocular pressure with increased intracranial pressure in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskandari H

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Although measurement of intracranial pressure by noninvasive methods has been suggested, but mainly invasive methods are used for this purpose-Increase in episcleral venous pressure can be expected to result in a linear increase in intraocular pressure. Congested oculat veins with capillary leakage and hemorrhage are seen when the ICP is increased, thus theoretically measurement of intraocular pressure can be a procedure for estimation of the ICP. This study was performed to find whether there is andy relationship between intraocular pressure and ICP, so we used 12 albino rabbits in two divided groups. Our study was not designed to elucidate the mechanism of change but merely to record any changes observed. All measures except an increase in ICP were applied on the test group as well as on the control group. After general anesthesia with the combination of ketamin, rampune, and pentobarbital a burr hole was made in the lambda region of the skull and a cannula was placed in the subdural space. The ICP in the test group increased up to 15 mmHg and was constant throughout the experiment. Intraocular pressure was measured by Schiotz tonometers afte general anesthesia, after cannulation of the skull, and immediately after increasing the ICP which was repated in 15 minutes interval for 4 hours. There was no statistical difference between the two groups (P:0.997 . results show that neither cannulation nor general anesthesia for 4 hours produce alteration in IOP in the control group nor increasing of the ICP to level of 15 mmHg produces any alteration in IOP on the test group.

  15. Chapter 5 cerebral perfusion pressure and intracranial pressure in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Pamela H; Kirkness, Catherine; Blissitt, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 300,000 children and adults are hospitalized annually with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and monitored for many vital signs, including intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). Nurses use these monitored values to infer the risk of secondary brain injury. The purpose of this chapter is to review nursing research on the monitoring of ICP and CPP in TBI. In this context, nursing research is defined as the research conducted by nurse investigators or research about the variables ICP and CPP that pertains to the nursing care of the TBI patient, adult or child. A modified systematic review of the literature indicated that, except for sharp head rotation and prone positioning, there are no body positions or nursing activities that uniformly or nearly uniformly result in clinically relevant ICP increase or decrease. In the smaller number of studies in which CPP is also measured, there are few changes in CPP since arterial blood pressure generally increases along with ICP. Considerable individual variation occurs in controlled studies, suggesting that clinicians need to pay close attention to the cerebrodynamic responses of each patient to any care maneuver. We recommend that future research regarding nursing care and ICP/CPP in TBI patients needs to have a more integrated approach, examining comprehensive care in relation to short- and long-term outcomes and incorporating multimodality monitoring. Intervention trials of care aspects within nursing control, such as the reduction of environmental noise, early mobilization, and reduction of complications of immobility, are all sorely needed.

  16. Detection of intracochlear and intracranial pressure changes with otoacoustic emissions : a gerbil model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buki, B; de Kleine, E; Wit, HP; Avan, P

    Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is known to affect the phases and levels of lower-frequency distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) in a characteristic: manner suggestive of an increase in the stiffness of the stapes system. likely in relation to an attendant increased intracochlear

  17. Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure Research Clinical Advisory Panel (RCAP) Meeting. [Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) Research and Clinical Advisory Panel convened on December 1, 2014 at the ISS Conference Facility in Houston. The panel members were provided updates to the current clinical cases and treatment plans along with the latest research activities (http://humanresearchroadmap.nasa.gov/Risks/?i=105) and preliminary study results. The following is a summary of this meeting.

  18. The Course of Intracranial Pressure in Traumatic Brain Injury : Relation with Outcome and CT-characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, Rosette; de Jong, Bauke M.; Wagemakers, Michiel; Regtien, Joost G.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    One of the predictive factors of outcome in traumatic brain injury is high intracranial pressure (ICP). Recently, the time course of ICP has been described but few data are available on the relation of these ICP profiles and outcome. The aim of this study is to investigate the relation of the time

  19. Refractory High Intracranial Pressure following Intraventricular Hemorrhage due to Moyamoya Disease in a Pregnant Caucasian Woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Montiel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Intraventricular hemorrhage during pregnancy is usually followed by a poor recovery. When caused by moyamoya disease, ischemic or hemorrhagic episodes may complicate the management of high intracranial pressure. A 26-year-old Caucasian woman presented with generalized seizures and a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS of 3 during the 36th week of pregnancy. The fetus was delivered by caesarean section. The brain CT in the mother revealed bilateral intraventricular hemorrhage, a callosal hematoma, hydrocephalus and right frontal ischemia. Refractory high intracranial pressure developed and required bilateral ventricular drainage and intensive care treatment with barbiturates and hypothermia. Magnetic resonance imaging and cerebral angiography revealed a moyamoya syndrome with rupture of the abnormal collateral vascular network as the cause of the hemorrhage. Intracranial pressure could only be controlled after the surgical removal of the clots after a large opening of the right ventricle. Despite an initially low GCS, this patient made a good functional recovery at one year follow-up. Management of refractory high intracranial pressure following moyamoya related intraventricular bleeding should require optimal removal of ventricular clots and appropriate control of cerebral hemodynamics to avoid ischemic or hemorrhagic complications.

  20. Measuring Blast-Related Intracranial Pressure Within the Human Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    4 Pressure sensors Commercially available sensors from Endevco (models 8515C and 8530C), FISO Technologies (FOP-MIV model) and PCB...monitoring of the ambient overpressure at the target was provided by a pressure probe that contained two Endevco sensors placed frontally and sideon with...pressure sensor measuring the static component of the shock wave in air along the tube; (B) pressure sensor using Endevco sensor to measure static and

  1. Pressures, flow, and brain oxygenation during plateau waves of intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Celeste; Maia, Isabel; Cerejo, António; Varsos, Georgios; Smielewski, Peter; Paiva, José-Artur; Czosnyka, Marek

    2014-08-01

    Plateau waves are common in traumatic brain injury. They constitute abrupt increases of intracranial pressure (ICP) above 40 mmHg associated with a decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). The aim of this study was to describe plateau waves characteristics with multimodal brain monitoring in head injured patients admitted in neurocritical care. Prospective observational study in 18 multiple trauma patients with head injury admitted to Neurocritical Care Unit of Hospital Sao Joao in Porto. Multimodal systemic and brain monitoring of primary variables [heart rate, arterial blood pressure, ICP, CPP, pulse amplitude, end tidal CO₂, brain temperature, brain tissue oxygenation pressure, cerebral oximetry (CO) with transcutaneous near-infrared spectroscopy and cerebral blood flow (CBF)] and secondary variables related to cerebral compensatory reserve and cerebrovascular reactivity were supported by dedicated software ICM+ ( www.neurosurg.cam.ac.uk/icmplus) . The compiled data were analyzed in patients who developed plateau waves. In this study we identified 59 plateau waves that occurred in 44% of the patients (8/18). During plateau waves CBF, cerebrovascular resistance, CO, and brain tissue oxygenation decreased. The duration and magnitude of plateau waves were greater in patients with working cerebrovascular reactivity. After the end of plateau wave, a hyperemic response was recorded in 64% of cases with increase in CBF and brain oxygenation. The magnitude of hyperemia was associated with better autoregulation status and low oxygenation levels at baseline. Multimodal brain monitoring facilitates identification and understanding of intrinsic vascular brain phenomenon, such as plateau waves, and may help the adequate management of acute head injury at bed side.

  2. Clinical experience with telemetric intracranial pressure monitoring in a Danish neurosurgical center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, Alexander; Andresen, Morten; Hadi, Amer

    2014-01-01

    for late wound infection at the surgical site in two patients. CONCLUSION: Telemetric ICP monitoring is useful in patients with complicated CSF dynamic disturbances who would otherwise require repeated invasive pressure monitoring. It seems to be a feasible method to guide adjustment of programmable valve......BACKGROUND: Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is important in the optimal treatment of various neurological and neurosurgical diseases. Telemetric ICP monitoring allows long-term measurements in the patient's everyday life and the possibility to perform additional measurements without...... kinds of hydrocephalus, seven patients had idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and three patients had normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Fifteen patients had a shunt prior to implantation. Median duration of implantation was 248 (49-666) days and median duration from implantation to last...

  3. Changes in Cerebral Partial Oxygen Pressure and Cerebrovascular Reactivity During Intracranial Pressure Plateau Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Erhard W; Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Smielewski, Peter; Pickard, John; Czosnyka, Marek

    2015-08-01

    Plateau waves in intracranial pressure (ICP) are frequently recorded in neuro intensive care and are not yet fully understood. To further investigate this phenomenon, we analyzed partial pressure of cerebral oxygen (pbtO2) and a moving correlation coefficient between ICP and mean arterial blood pressure (ABP), called PRx, along with the cerebral oxygen reactivity index (ORx), which is a moving correlation coefficient between cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and pbtO2 in an observational study. We analyzed 55 plateau waves in 20 patients after severe traumatic brain injury. We calculated ABP, ABP pulse amplitude (ampABP), ICP, CPP, pbtO2, heart rate (HR), ICP pulse amplitude (ampICP), PRx, and ORx, before, during, and after each plateau wave. The analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc test was used to compare the differences in the variables before, during, and after the plateau wave. We considered all plateau waves, even in the same patient, independent because they are separated by long intervals. We found increases for ICP and ampICP according to our operational definitions for plateau waves. PRx increased significantly (p = 0.00026), CPP (p waves. ABP, ampABP, and HR remained unchanged. PRx during the plateau was higher than before the onset of wave in 40 cases (73 %) with no differences in baseline parameters for those with negative and positive ΔPRx (difference during and after). ORx showed an increase during and a decrease after the plateau waves, however, not statistically significant. PbtO2 overshoot after the wave occurred in 35 times (64 %), the mean difference was 4.9 ± 4.6 Hg (mean ± SD), and we found no difference in baseline parameters between those who overshoot and those who did not overshoot. Arterial blood pressure remains stable in ICP plateau waves, while cerebral autoregulatory indices show distinct changes, which indicate cerebrovascular reactivity impairment at the top of the wave. PbtO2 decreases during the waves and may

  4. Update on intracranial hypertension and hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jan; Goadsby, Peter J

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this article is to review recent findings on the pathophysiology of idiopathic changes in intracranial pressure. The review will focus on idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). Substantial evidence indicates that IIH is associated with delayed absorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Stenoses of the transverse sinus are common in IIH, but their clinical significance has not been entirely clarified. Despite the observed efficacy of endovascular treatment in some IIH patients, a correlation between the extent of observed stenoses and the clinical course of the disease could not be demonstrated. The underlying cause of SIH is a spontaneous CSF leakage into the epidural space. Conservative treatment and the epidural blood patch remain the treatment of choice for this rare syndrome. Recent clinical evidence indicates that IIH is probably a result of CSF outflow abnormality rather than of CSF production. Further research is needed to elucidate the causes of elevated intracranial pressure and the mechanism leading to visual loss. Prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to clarify a possible therapeutic potential of endovascular treatment. Research efforts on SIH should focus further on associated connective tissue disorders predisposing to CSF leaks.

  5. Adult Neuroblastoma Complicated by Increased Intracranial Pressure: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick L. Stevens

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is the third most commonly occurring malignancy of the pediatric population, although it is extremely rare in the adult population. In adults, neuroblastoma is often metastatic and portends an extremely poor overall survival. Our case report documents metastatic neuroblastoma occurring in a healthy 29-year-old woman whose course was complicated by an unusual presentation of elevated intracranial pressures. The patient was treated with systemic chemotherapy, I131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG radiotherapy, and autologous stem cell transplant (SCT. Unfortunately the patient’s response to therapy was limited and she subsequently died. We aim to review neuroblastoma in the context of increased intracranial pressure and the limited data of neuroblastoma occurring in the adult population, along with proposed treatment options.

  6. Adult Neuroblastoma Complicated by Increased Intracranial Pressure: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Patrick L.; Johnson, Douglas B.; Thompson, Mary Ann; Keedy, Vicki L.; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Snyder, Kristen M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the third most commonly occurring malignancy of the pediatric population, although it is extremely rare in the adult population. In adults, neuroblastoma is often metastatic and portends an extremely poor overall survival. Our case report documents metastatic neuroblastoma occurring in a healthy 29-year-old woman whose course was complicated by an unusual presentation of elevated intracranial pressures. The patient was treated with systemic chemotherapy, I131 metaiodobenzylgu...

  7. Discriminant Analysis of Intracranial Volumetric Variables in Patients with Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus and Brain Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwosz, Leszek; Szczepek, Ewa; Nowiński, Krzysztof; Sokołowska, Beata; Jurkiewicz, Jerzy; Czernicki, Zbigniew; Koszewski, Waldemar

    2018-01-01

    A method was developed for the computerized volumetric assessment of the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) distribution. The study involved 62 patients differentiated into two groups: with CSF resorption disorders (normal pressure hydrocephalus - 30 patients) and without CSF resorption disorders (various types of brain atrophy - 32 patients). The goal of the study was to ascertain whether the assessment, depending on the linear discriminant analysis of volumetric brain features, could be an effective tool differentiating the two groups. Volumetric measurements were performed using VisNow software. For each patient, five features were determined and subjected to discriminant analysis: CSF volume in the subarachnoid space and basal cisterns (SV), CSF volume in the intracranial ventricular system (VV), brain volume (BV), total intracranial CSF volume (FV), and total intracranial volume (TV). Discriminant analysis enables the achievement of a high percentage of correct classification of patients to the appropriate group determined on the result of a lumbar infusion test. The discriminator, based on three features: BV, SV, and VV, showed a complete separation of the groups; irrespective of age. The squared Mahalanobis distance was 70.8. The results confirmed the applicability of the volumetric method. Discriminant analysis seems a useful tool leading to the acquisition of a computer-aided method for the differential diagnosis of CSF resorption disorders.

  8. The Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure Syndrome in Long Duration NASA Astronauts: An Integrated Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, C. A.; Norsk, P.; Shelhamer, M. J.; Davis, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    The Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is currently NASA's number one human space flight risk. The syndrome, which is related to microgravity exposure, manifests with changes in visual acuity (hyperopic shifts, scotomas), changes in eye structure (optic disc edema, choroidal folds, cotton wool spots, globe flattening, and distended optic nerve sheaths). In some cases, elevated cerebrospinal fluid pressure has been documented postflight reflecting increased intracranial pressure (ICP). While the eye appears to be the main affected end organ of this syndrome, the ocular affects are thought to be related to the effect of cephalad fluid shift on the vascular system and the central nervous system. The leading hypotheses for the development of VIIP involve microgravity induced head-ward fluid shifts along with a loss of gravity-assisted drainage of venous blood from the brain, both leading to cephalic congestion and increased ICP. Although not all crewmembers have manifested clinical signs or symptoms of the VIIP syndrome, it is assumed that all astronauts exposed to microgravity have some degree of ICP elevation in-flight. Prolonged elevations of ICP can cause long-term reduced visual acuity and loss of peripheral visual fields, and has been reported to cause mild cognitive impairment in the analog terrestrial population of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH). These potentially irreversible health consequences underscore the importance of identifying the factors that lead to this syndrome and mitigating them.

  9. Space obstructive syndrome: intracranial hypertension, intraocular pressure, and papilledema in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Thomas C

    2012-01-01

    Humans undergo several consistent and measurable changes of fluid distribution and regulation in the course of adapting to microgravity. Recently, a syndrome of objective findings has been described by Mader et al. associated with long-duration missions, including hyperopic shifts, mildly elevated intracranial pressure, papilledema, globe flattening, choroidal folds, and other anatomic findings. Experience with venous obstructive lesions leads the author to propose a primary obstructive process, unique to or exacerbated by microgravity, acting at the level of the proximal internal jugular veins, termed Space Obstructive Syndrome (SOS). Literature, anatomy, and ultrasound observations revealed four major potential compression zones of the internal jugular vein, with Zone I between the sternocleidomastoid muscle and the carotid artery as the primary area of compression, both in 1 G in an upright position and in microgravity. Internal jugular vein compression, along with loss of gravitationally induced cranial outflow of blood in the vertebral veins and collaterals, may lead to intracranial venous hypertension with resultant facial/head and upper airway swelling, increased intraocular pressure, intracranial hypertension, and papilledema. Further study and proof of concept will necessitate ultrasound, Doppler flow study, and internal jugular vein pressure measurements on orbit in the International Space Station. If proven, SOS will give researchers opportunity for study and development of mitigation strategies such as artificial gravity systems.

  10. Bernoulli's Principle Applied to Brain Fluids: Intracranial Pressure Does Not Drive Cerebral Perfusion or CSF Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eric; Ros, Maxime; Moyse, Emmanuel; Lorthois, Sylvie; Swider, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    In line with the first law of thermodynamics, Bernoulli's principle states that the total energy in a fluid is the same at all points. We applied Bernoulli's principle to understand the relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) and intracranial fluids. We analyzed simple fluid physics along a tube to describe the interplay between pressure and velocity. Bernoulli's equation demonstrates that a fluid does not flow along a gradient of pressure or velocity; a fluid flows along a gradient of energy from a high-energy region to a low-energy region. A fluid can even flow against a pressure gradient or a velocity gradient. Pressure and velocity represent part of the total energy. Cerebral blood perfusion is not driven by pressure but by energy: the blood flows from high-energy to lower-energy regions. Hydrocephalus is related to increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resistance (i.e., energy transfer) at various points. Identification of the energy transfer within the CSF circuit is important in understanding and treating CSF-related disorders. Bernoulli's principle is not an abstract concept far from clinical practice. We should be aware that pressure is easy to measure, but it does not induce resumption of fluid flow. Even at the bedside, energy is the key to understanding ICP and fluid dynamics.

  11. Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions and Intracranial Pressure During CSF Infusion Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael A; Malm, Jan; Eklund, Anders; Horton, Nicholas J; Voss, Susan E

    A noninvasive method to monitor changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) is required for astronauts on long-duration spaceflight who are at risk of developing the Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure syndrome that has some, but not all of the features of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. We assessed the validity of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to detect changes in ICP. Subjects were eight patients undergoing medically necessary diagnostic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) infusion testing for hydrocephalus. DPOAE measurements were obtained with an FDA-approved system at baseline and six controlled ICP levels in ∼3 mmHg increments in random order, with a range from 10.8 ± 2.9 mmHg (SD) at baseline to 32.3 ± 4.1 mmHg (SD) at level 6. For f2 frequencies between 800 and 1700 Hz, when ICP was ≥ 12 mmHg above baseline ICP, DPOAE angles increased significantly and DPOAE magnitudes decreased significantly, but less robustly. Significant changes in DPOAE angle and magnitude are seen when ICP is ≥ 12 mmHg above a subject's supine baseline ICP during CSF infusion testing. These results suggest that the changes in DPOAE angle and magnitude seen with change in ICP are physiologically based, and suggest that it should be possible to detect pathological ICP elevation using DPOAE measurements. To use DPOAE for noninvasive estimation of ICP during spaceflight will require baseline measurements in the head-up, supine, and head-down positions to obtain baseline DPOAE values at different ICP ranges. Williams MA, Malm J, Eklund A, Horton NJ, Voss SE. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions and intracranial pressure during CSF infusion testing. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(10):844-851.

  12. MRI evidence for preserved regulation of intracranial pressure in patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinel, Felix G.; Fischer, Judith; Pomschar, Andreas; Wöhrle, Natalie; Koerte, Inga K.; Steffinger, Denise [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Laubender, Rüdiger P. [Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Muacevic, Alexander [European Cyberknife Center Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Alperin, Noam [Department of Radiology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Ertl-Wagner, Birgit, E-mail: birgit.ertl-wagner@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate intracranial pressure and associated hemo- and hydrodynamic parameters in patients with cerebral arteriovenous malformations AVMs. Methods: Thirty consecutive patients with arteriovenous malformations (median age 38.7 years, 27/30 previously treated with radiosurgery) and 30 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were investigated on a 3.0 T MR scanner. Nidus volume was quantified on dynamic MR angiography. Total arterial cerebral blood flow (tCBF), venous outflow as well as aqueductal and craniospinal stroke volumes were obtained using velocity-encoded cine-phase contrast MRI. Intracranial volume change during the cardiac cycle was calculated and intracranial pressure (ICP) was derived from systolic intracranial volume change (ICVC) and pulse pressure gradient. Results: TCBF was significantly higher in AVM patients as compared to healthy controls (median 799 vs. 692 mL/min, p = 0.007). There was a trend for venous flow to be increased in both the ipsilateral internal jugular vein (IJV, 282 vs. 225 mL/min, p = 0.16), and in the contralateral IJV (322 vs. 285 mL/min, p = 0.09), but not in secondary veins. There was no significant difference in median ICP between AVM patients and control subjects (6.9 vs. 8.6 mmHg, p = 0.30) and ICP did not correlate with nidus volume in AVM patients (ρ = −0.06, p = 0.74). There was a significant positive correlation between tCBF and craniospinal CSF stroke volume (ρ = 0.69, p = 0.02). Conclusions: The elevated cerebral blood flow in patients with AVMs is drained through an increased flow in IJVs but not secondary veins. ICP is maintained within ranges of normal and does not correlate with nidus volume.

  13. Intracranial hypotension and intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, Esther L; Dillon, William P

    2010-11-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure within the intracranial space. Intracranial hypotension is a clinical syndrome in which low cerebrospinal fluid volume (CSF) results in orthostatic headache. Severe cases can result in nausea, vomiting, photophobia, and, rarely, decreased level of consciousness and coma. CSF opening pressure can be within the normal range in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Imaging tests therefore play a key and decisive role in the diagnosis, as well as treatment, of intracranial hypotension. Intracranial hypertension occurs in a chronic form known as idiopathic intracranial hypertension, as well as in a large variety of neurologic and systemic disorders. Symptoms include headache, nausea and vomiting, blurred vision, and in severe cases, altered level of consciousness that can progress to coma and death. Direct measurements of CSF pressure through lumbar puncture (in idiopathic intracranial hypotension) or invasive ICP monitoring (in acute intracranial hypertension) are the key diagnostic tests. Imaging is used primarily to determine treatable causes of increased ICP, to assess for impending brain herniation, and to evaluate ventricular size. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of Cerebrospinal Fluid Opening Pressure in Children With Demyelinating Disease to Children With Primary Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Followell, Bethanie; Aylward, Shawn C

    2017-03-01

    The authors aimed to compare the opening pressures of children with demyelinating disease to children with primary intracranial hypertension. Medical records were reviewed for a primary diagnosis of demyelinating disease, or primary intracranial hypertension. Diagnosis of demyelinating disease was made according to either the 2007 or 2012 International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group criteria. Primary intracranial hypertension diagnosis was confirmed by presence of elevated opening pressure, normal cerebrospinal fluid composition and neuroimaging. The authors compared 14 children with demyelinating disease to children with primary intracranial hypertension in 1:1 and 1:2 fashions. There was a statistically significant higher BMI in the primary intracranial hypertension group compared to the demyelinating group ( P = .0203). The mean cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count was higher in the demyelinating disease group compared to primary intracranial hypertension ( P = .0002). Among both comparisons, the cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure, glucose, protein and red blood cell counts in children with demyelinating disease were comparable to age- and sex-matched controls with primary intracranial hypertension.

  15. Blood pressure and heart rate during orthostatic stress and walking with continuous postoperative thoracic epidural bupivacaine/morphine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Hjortsø, N C; Blemmer, T

    1993-01-01

    and during mobilisation was superior compared to systemic morphine and NSAID. There were no significant differences between groups in haemodynamic responses (BP and heart rate) during rest, orthostatic stress and after walking assessed before, 24 and 48 h after operation except for a clinically unimportant...... lower heart rate (approximately 10 bpm) 48 h after surgery at rest and during orthostatic stress in the epidural group. There was no significant difference between groups in number of patients with a reduction > 20 mmHg (2.7 kPa) in systolic blood pressure during orthostatic stress (two in each group...

  16. Acute Vision Loss Secondary to Epidural Blood Patch: Terson Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani-Estévez, Gabriel L; Chen, John J; Watson, James C; Leavitt, Jacqueline A

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural blood patch (EBP) is a commonly used procedure to treat postdural puncture headache. We present a case of vision loss immediately following an EBP. A 49-year-old woman with idiopathic intracranial hypertension received an EBP for postdural puncture headache at an outside facility without fluoroscopic guidance and in the seated position. The patient experienced syncope during the procedure as 25 mL of autologous blood was rapidly injected. The patient regained consciousness and described bilateral vision loss. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was negative for hemorrhage. Dilated fundus examination revealed significant, bilateral retinal and vitreous hemorrhage consistent with Terson syndrome. This patient developed Terson syndrome as an immediate EBP complication. Iatrogenic Terson syndrome has been previously described with epidural space saline and anesthetic injections, but not EBP. Of 11 reported cases, 10 were female, and 9 had complete vision recovery. Previous studies have demonstrated that epidural space injection increases subarachnoid pressure in a volume- and rate-dependent fashion. An abrupt increase in subarachnoid space pressure likely led to retinal hemorrhage by compromising retinal venous drainage. This is the first known case of Terson syndrome caused by EBP. Injectate volume should be minimized, and a slow rate of injection pursued. The anesthesiologist, pain interventionist, and ophthalmologist should be aware of this rare but disabling complication and consider taking extra precautions when consenting patients for EBP with vision compromise or comorbidities concerning for elevated intracranial pressure.

  17. A Quad-Cantilevered Plate micro-sensor for intracranial pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalkov, Vasko; Qasaimeh, Mohammad A

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a new design for pressure-sensing micro-plate platform to bring higher sensitivity to a pressure sensor based on piezoresistive MEMS sensing mechanism. The proposed design is composed of a suspended plate having four stepped cantilever beams connected to its corners, and thus defined as Quad-Cantilevered Plate (QCP). Finite element analysis was performed to determine the optimal design for sensitivity and structural stability under a range of applied forces. Furthermore, a piezoresistive analysis was performed to calculate sensor sensitivity. Both the maximum stress and the change in resistance of the piezoresistor associated with the QCP were found to be higher compared to previously published designs, and linearly related to the applied pressure as desired. Therefore, the QCP demonstrates greater sensitivity, and could be potentially used as an efficient pressure sensor for intracranial pressure measurement.

  18. Pharmacologic Treatment Reduces Pressure Times Time Dose and Relative Duration of Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Katharine; Yang, S; Hu, P F; Chen, H H; Bonds, B; Stansbury, L G; Scalea, T M; Stein, D M

    2016-05-01

    Past work has shown the importance of the "pressure times time dose" (PTD) of intracranial hypertension (intracranial pressure [ICP] > 19 mm Hg) in predicting outcome after severe traumatic brain injury. We used automated data collection to measure the effect of common medications on the duration and dose of intracranial hypertension. Patients >17 years old, admitted and requiring ICP monitoring between 2008 and 2010 at a single, large urban tertiary care facility, were retrospectively enrolled. Timing and dose of ICP-directed therapy were recorded from paper and electronic medical records. The ICP data were collected automatically at 6-second intervals and averaged over 5 minutes. The percentage of time of intracranial hypertension (PTI) and PTD (mm Hg h) were calculated. A total of 98 patients with 664 treatment instances were identified. Baseline PTD ranged from 27 (before administration of propofol and fentanyl) to 150 mm Hg h (before mannitol). A "small" dose of hypertonic saline (HTS; ≤250 mL 3%) reduced PTD by 38% in the first hour and 37% in the second hour and reduced the time with ICP >19 by 38% and 39% after 1 and 2 hours, respectively. A "large" dose of HTS reduced PTD by 40% in the first hour and 63% in the second (PTI reduction of 36% and 50%, respectively). An increased dose of propofol or fentanyl infusion failed to decrease PTD but reduced PTI between 14% (propofol alone) and 30% (combined increase in propofol and fentanyl, after 2 hours). Barbiturates failed to decrease PTD but decreased PTI by 30% up to 2 hours after administration. All reductions reported are significantly changed from baseline, P < .05. Baseline PTD values before drug administration reflects varied patient criticality, with much higher values seen before the use of mannitol or barbiturates. Treatment with HTS reduced PTD and PTI burden significantly more than escalation of sedation or pain management, and this effect remained significant at 2 hours after administration.

  19. The evaluation of the wave-form analysis capability of a new strain-gauge intracranial pressure MicroSensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, I R; Miller, J D

    1995-06-01

    Both laboratory and clinical trials have indicated the reliability of a new catheter-tip, strain-gauge intracranial pressure transducer. We report on the results of bench tests comparing the wave-form analysis capabilities of the new Codman intracranial pressure MicroSensor and a similar strain-gauge transducer. Good agreement was found between the two sensors with no significant nonlinearity or hysteresis over a measured pressure range from 0 to 100 mg Hg. Under "fluid-filled" conditions, the MicroSensor showed good reproduction of an arterial pressure wave form; when spectral analysis was used to analyze the two sensor types and break them down into harmonic components, no significant differences could be found for any of the first 10 amplitude and phase harmonics. If proven to stay robust after long-term clinical use, this sensor may be a useful alternative to the existing transducer systems for routinely monitoring the intracranial pressure and its wave form.

  20. Bedside sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter as a predictor of increased intracranial pressure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Audrey; Hoehn, Mary Ellen; Smith, Mary E; Spentzas, Thomas; Schlappy, David; Pershad, Jay

    2009-06-01

    We investigate the test performance of emergency physician-performed sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter for diagnosis of increased intracranial pressure. Children between the ages of 0 and 18 years with suspected increased intracranial pressure were prospectively recruited from the emergency department and ICU of an urban, tertiary-level, freestanding pediatric facility. Pediatric emergency physicians with goal-directed training in ophthalmic sonography measured optic nerve sheath diameter. Images were recorded and subsequently reviewed by a pediatric ophthalmologist and an ophthalmic sonographer, both of whom were blind to the patient's clinical condition. Measurements obtained by the ophthalmic sonographer were considered the criterion standard. An optic nerve sheath diameter greater than 4.0 mm in subjects younger than 1 year and greater than 4.5 mm in older children was considered abnormal. The diagnosis of increased intracranial pressure was based on results of cranial imaging or direct measurement of intracranial pressure. Sixty-four patients were recruited, of whom 24 (37%) had a confirmed diagnosis of increased intracranial pressure. The sensitivity of optic nerve sheath diameter as a screening test for increased intracranial pressure was 83% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60 to 0.94); specificity was 38% (95% CI 0.23 to 0.54); positive likelihood ratio was 1.32 (95% CI 0.97 to 1.79) and negative likelihood ratio was 0.46 (95% CI 0.18 to 1.23). There was fair to good interobserver agreement between the pediatric emergency physician and ophthalmic sonographer (kappa 0.52) and pediatric ophthalmologist (kappa 0.64). The sensitivity and specificity of bedside sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter is inadequate to aid medical decisionmaking in children with suspected increased intracranial pressure. Pediatric emergency physicians with focused training by a pediatric ophthalmologist familiar with ophthalmic sonography can

  1. Increased Intracranial Pressure during Hemodialysis in a Patient with Anoxic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damholt, Mette B.; Strange, Ditte G.; Kelsen, Jesper; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS) is a serious neurological complication of hemodialysis, and patients with acute brain injury are at increased risk. We report a case of DDS leading to intracranial hypertension in a patient with anoxic brain injury and discuss the subsequent dialysis strategy. A 13-year-old girl was admitted after prolonged resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an inferior vena cava aneurysm and multiple pulmonary emboli as the likely cause. An intracranial pressure (ICP) monitor was inserted, and, on day 3, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) was initiated due to acute kidney injury, during which the patient developed severe intracranial hypertension. CT of the brain showed diffuse cerebral edema. CRRT was discontinued, sedation was increased, and hypertonic saline was administered, upon which ICP normalized. Due to persistent hyperkalemia and overhydration, ultrafiltration and intermittent hemodialysis were performed separately on day 4 with a small dialyzer, low blood and dialysate flow, and high dialysate sodium content. During subsequent treatments, isolated ultrafiltration was well tolerated, whereas hemodialysis was associated with increased ICP necessitating frequent pauses or early cessation of dialysis. In patients at risk of DDS, hemodialysis should be performed with utmost care and continuous monitoring of ICP should be considered. PMID:28409034

  2. Increased Intracranial Pressure during Hemodialysis in a Patient with Anoxic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Anton; Damholt, Mette B; Strange, Ditte G; Kelsen, Jesper; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Møller, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS) is a serious neurological complication of hemodialysis, and patients with acute brain injury are at increased risk. We report a case of DDS leading to intracranial hypertension in a patient with anoxic brain injury and discuss the subsequent dialysis strategy. A 13-year-old girl was admitted after prolonged resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an inferior vena cava aneurysm and multiple pulmonary emboli as the likely cause. An intracranial pressure (ICP) monitor was inserted, and, on day 3, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) was initiated due to acute kidney injury, during which the patient developed severe intracranial hypertension. CT of the brain showed diffuse cerebral edema. CRRT was discontinued, sedation was increased, and hypertonic saline was administered, upon which ICP normalized. Due to persistent hyperkalemia and overhydration, ultrafiltration and intermittent hemodialysis were performed separately on day 4 with a small dialyzer, low blood and dialysate flow, and high dialysate sodium content. During subsequent treatments, isolated ultrafiltration was well tolerated, whereas hemodialysis was associated with increased ICP necessitating frequent pauses or early cessation of dialysis. In patients at risk of DDS, hemodialysis should be performed with utmost care and continuous monitoring of ICP should be considered.

  3. Increased Intracranial Pressure during Hemodialysis in a Patient with Anoxic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Lund

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS is a serious neurological complication of hemodialysis, and patients with acute brain injury are at increased risk. We report a case of DDS leading to intracranial hypertension in a patient with anoxic brain injury and discuss the subsequent dialysis strategy. A 13-year-old girl was admitted after prolonged resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Computed tomography (CT revealed an inferior vena cava aneurysm and multiple pulmonary emboli as the likely cause. An intracranial pressure (ICP monitor was inserted, and, on day 3, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT was initiated due to acute kidney injury, during which the patient developed severe intracranial hypertension. CT of the brain showed diffuse cerebral edema. CRRT was discontinued, sedation was increased, and hypertonic saline was administered, upon which ICP normalized. Due to persistent hyperkalemia and overhydration, ultrafiltration and intermittent hemodialysis were performed separately on day 4 with a small dialyzer, low blood and dialysate flow, and high dialysate sodium content. During subsequent treatments, isolated ultrafiltration was well tolerated, whereas hemodialysis was associated with increased ICP necessitating frequent pauses or early cessation of dialysis. In patients at risk of DDS, hemodialysis should be performed with utmost care and continuous monitoring of ICP should be considered.

  4. Assessment of the usability of a digital learning technology prototype for monitoring intracranial pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Regina de Carvalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the usability of a digital learning technology prototype as a new method for minimally invasive monitoring of intracranial pressure. Method: descriptive study using a quantitative approach on assessing the usability of a prototype based on Nielsen's ten heuristics. Four experts in the area of Human-Computer interaction participated in the study. Results: the evaluation delivered eight violated heuristics and 31 usability problems in the 32 screens of the prototype. Conclusion: the suggestions of the evaluators were critical for developing an intuitive, user-friendly interface and will be included in the final version of the digital learning technology.

  5. Effect of Body Mass Index on Venous Sinus Pressures in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Patients Before and After Endovascular Stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raper, Daniel M S; Ding, Dale; Buell, Thomas J; Crowley, R Webster; Starke, Robert M; Liu, Kenneth C

    2017-04-20

    Elevated body mass index (BMI) has been correlated with worse outcomes after treatment for idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Venous sinus stenting (VSS) has emerged as a safe and effective treatment for a subset of patients with IIH and evidence of venous sinus stenosis. However, the association between BMI and the efficacy of VSS remains poorly characterized. To determine, in a retrospective cohort study, the effect of BMI on preoperative mean intracranial venous pressure (MVP) and post-VSS outcomes. We performed a retrospective evaluation of a prospectively collected database of patients with IIH and intracranial venous sinus stenosis who underwent VSS. Patient demographics and treatment factors, including pre- and postprocedural trans-stenosis pressure gradients, were analyzed to identify the relationship between BMI and outcomes after VSS. Increasing BMI was significantly correlated with higher maximum MVP ( P = .013) and higher trans-stenosis pressure gradient ( P = .043) prior to treatment. The degrees of improvement in maximum MVP and pressure gradient after VSS were greatest for obese and morbidly obese patients (BMI > 30 kg/m 2 ). Maximum poststent MVP, clinical outcomes, and stent-adjacent stenosis requiring retreatment after VSS were not significantly associated with BMI. We provide direct evidence for a positive correlation between BMI and intracranial venous pressure in patients with IIH. VSS affords a significantly greater amelioration of intracranial venous hypertension and stenosis for IIH patients with higher BMIs. As such, obesity should not be a deterrent for the use of VSS in the management of IIH.

  6. Electrostatic discharges and their effect on the validity of registered values in intracranial pressure monitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Morten; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius; Juhler, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    , the authors have tried to determine if the ICP monitors from major manufacturers were affected by electrostatic discharges (ESDs), if the changes were permanent or transient in nature, and if the changes were modified by the addition of different electrical appliances normally used in the neurointensive care......Object Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is used extensively in clinical practice, and as such, the accuracy of registered ICP values is paramount. Clinical observations of nonphysiological changes in ICP have called into question the accuracy of registered ICP values. Subsequently....... Results Five pressure monitors from 4 manufacturers were evaluated. Three monitors containing electrical circuitry at the tip of the transducer were all affected by ESDs. Clinically significant permanent changes in the reported ICP values for 1 pressure monitor were observed, as well as temporary...

  7. Finite element model of size, shape and blood pressure on rupture of intracranial saccular aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rica Nabong, Jennica; David, Guido

    2017-10-01

    Rupture of intracranial saccular aneurysms is a primary concern for neurologists and patients because it leads to stroke and permanent disability. This paper examines the role of blood pressure, in connection with size of and wall thickness, in the rupture of saccular aneurysms. A bulb-shaped geometry of a saccular aneurysm is obtained from angiographic images of a patient and modeled using Finite Elements based on the principle of virtual work under the Fung stress-strain relationship. The numerical model is subjected to varying levels of systolic blood pressure. Rupture is assumed to occur when the wall stress exceeded its mechanical strength. The results show which sizes of this class of aneurysms are at high risk of rupture for varying levels of blood pressure.

  8. Effect of mannitol on cerebrovascular pressure reactivity in patients with intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sung-Chun; Lin, Ru-Jen; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Wu, An-Yeu; Lai, Dar-Ming; Huang, Sheng-Jean; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-09-01

    Mannitol is commonly used in patients with increased intracranial pressure (ICP), but its effect on cerebrovascular pressure reactivity (CVPR) is uncertain. We analyzed the changes of pressure reactivity index (PRx) during the course of mannitol treatment. Twenty-one patients who received mannitol treatment for increased ICP were recruited prospectively. Continuous waveforms of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and ICP were collected simultaneously for 60 minutes (10 minutes at baseline and 50 minutes since mannitol administration) during 37 events of mannitol treatment. The correlation coefficients between the mean ABP and ICP were averaged every 10 minutes and labeled as the PRx. The linear correlation of six time points of PRx in each event was calculated to represent the trend of CVPR changes. The negative slope of correlation was defined as improvement in CVPR under mannitol treatment and vice versa. At baseline, the average of ICP was 26.0 ± 9.1 mmHg and the values of PRx were significantly correlated with ICP (p = 0.0044, r = 0.46). After mannitol administration, the average of ICP decreased significantly to 21.2 ± 11.1 mmHg (p = 0.036), and CVPR improved in 59.4 % of all events. Further analysis showed that low baseline cerebral perfusion pressure was the only hemodynamic parameter significant association with the improvement of CVPR after mannitol treatment (p = 0.039). Despite lowering ICP, mannitol may have diverse effects on CVPR in patients with intracranial hypertension. Our study suggests that mannitol infusion may have a beneficial effect on CVPR, particularly in those with a low cerebral perfusion pressure at baseline. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Hypotension during epidural analgesia for Caesarean section. Arterial and central venous pressure changes after acute intravenous loading with two litres of Hartmann's solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, M; Thomas, P; Wilkes, R G

    1983-03-01

    The incidence of hypotension occurring in women undergoing Caesarean section with epidural analgesia was investigated in 60 patients receiving an intravenous preload of two litres Hartmann's solution. Hypotension occurred in only 6.7% of patients. Central venous pressure measurements in 20 patients confirmed the safety of the technique. A comparison is made with other preloading techniques.

  10. Measurements of intracranial pressure and compliance index using 1.5-T clinical MRI machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsumi, Hideki; Matsumae, Mitsunori; Hirayama, Akihiro; Kuroda, Kagayaki

    2014-03-20

    To assess a newly proposed noninvasive technique for evaluating intracranial pressure (ICP) index and brain compliance (BC) index based on an inverse analysis of a brain-circulation-equivalent electrical circuit (EC) model, in which cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow and arterial flow rates measured by using the phase contrast method are used as currents. Quantitative phase contrast flow measurements were performed by using a 1.5-T scanner for 25 volunteers and 23 patients with chronic increased ICP state. Bilateral carotid and verrtebral arteries and CSF flows were modeled by a pair of electrical circuits inductively coupled by a transformer. The ICP index was defined as the voltage of the second order circuit, while the BC index was calculated as the ratio between the mutual indeuctance of the transformer and the reactance in the second order circuit. The ICP index obtained by the EC correlated well with the pressure gradient obtained by the Navier-Stokes Technique (NS-PG). The combination of NS-PG and BC index by the EC appeared to be appropriate for characterizing the brain circulation status of the volunteers. This noninvasive ICP and BC index measurement technique is more useful for asessment of intracranial condition.

  11. Frank-ter Haar syndrome associated with sagittal craniosynostosis and raised intracranial pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendon Charlotte L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frank-ter Haar syndrome is a rare disorder associated with skeletal, cardiac, ocular and craniofacial features including hypertelorism and brachycephaly. The most common underlying genetic defect in Frank-ter Haar syndrome appears to be a mutation in the SH3PXD2B gene on chromosome 5q35.1. Craniosynostosis, or premature fusion of the calvarial sutures, has not previously been described in Frank-ter Haar syndrome. Case presentation We present a family of three affected siblings born to consanguineous parents with clinical features in keeping with a diagnosis of Frank-ter Haar syndrome. All three siblings have a novel mutation caused by the deletion of exon 13 of the SH3PXD2B gene. Two of the three siblings also have non-scaphocephalic sagittal synostosis associated with raised intracranial pressure. Conclusion The clinical features of craniosynostosis and raised intracranial pressure in this family with a confirmed diagnosis of Frank-ter Haar syndrome expand the clinical spectrum of the disease. The abnormal cranial proportions in a mouse model of the disease suggests that the association is not coincidental. The possibility of craniosynostosis should be considered in individuals with a suspected diagnosis of Frank-ter Haar syndrome.

  12. Hypertonic saline for the management of raised intracranial pressure after severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangat, Halinder S; Härtl, Roger

    2015-05-01

    Hyperosmolar agents are commonly used as an initial treatment for the management of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). They have an excellent adverse-effect profile compared to other therapies, such as hyperventilation and barbiturates, which carry the risk of reducing cerebral perfusion. The hyperosmolar agent mannitol has been used for several decades to reduce raised ICP, and there is accumulating evidence from pilot studies suggesting beneficial effects of hypertonic saline (HTS) for similar purposes. An ideal therapeutic agent for ICP reduction should reduce ICP while maintaining cerebral perfusion (pressure). While mannitol can cause dehydration over time, HTS helps maintain normovolemia and cerebral perfusion, a finding that has led to a large amount of pilot data being published on the benefits of HTS, albeit in small cohorts. Prophylactic therapy is not recommended with mannitol, although it may be beneficial with HTS. To date, no large clinical trial has been performed to directly compare the two agents. The best current evidence suggests that mannitol is effective in reducing ICP in the management of traumatic intracranial hypertension and carries mortality benefit compared to barbiturates. Current evidence regarding the use of HTS in severe TBI is limited to smaller studies, which illustrate a benefit in ICP reduction and perhaps mortality. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. Controlled lumbar drainage in medically refractory increased intracranial pressure. A safe and effective treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Ali; Ghostine, Samer; Colohan, Austin R T

    2008-01-01

    A prospective study of lumbar CSF drainage in the setting of raised intra-cranial pressure refractory to medical management and ventriculostomy placement is presented. There have been no controlled trials of its use reported in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. An IRB approved prospective study was conducted. 8 patients with increased intracranial pressure secondary to traumatic brain injury or aneurysm rupture were initially managed with sedation, ventriculostomy placement, mild hyperventilation (pCO2 = 30-35), and hyperosmolar therapy (Na = 150-155). A lumbar drain was placed if ICP continued to be above 20 mmHg despite optimization of medical therapy. After lumbar drain placement, ICP was reduced from a mean of 27 +/- 7.8 to 9 +/- 6.3, an average decrease of 18 mm H2O (p < 0.05). Requirements for hypertonic saline and/or mannitol boluses and sedation to control ICP were also decreased. There were no complications noted. We have shown that controlled lumbar drainage is a safe, efficacious and minimally invasive method for treatment of elevated ICP refractory to medical management. Ventriculostomies are always placed before utilizing lumbar drains to minimize the risk of cerebral herniation. We would advocate making controlled lumbar drainage a standard part of ICP control protocols.

  14. [Sleep polygraphy with recording of intracranial pressure and measure of cerebral blood volume in hydrocephalic infants (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mises, J; Gabersek, V; Lacombe, J; Hirsch, J F; Pierre-Kahn, A; Zouaoui, A; Barritault, L; Rimbert, J; N'Geh, R

    1979-01-01

    This study was carried with the intention of explaining the causes of modifications in intracranial pressure (ICP) during paradoxical sleep (PS) in normal and hydrocephalic infants, and establishing relationships between these modifications and cerebral blood volume (CBV). All tests (conventional sleep polygraphy, ICP measured by a transducer on the fontanel, CBV measured by isotopic labelling of red blood cells in vivo) were carried out without use of surgical procedures. During paradoxical sleep there was a sustained wave of increased intracranial pressure lasting from 10 to 20 minutes, as well as phase-type variations lasting no longer than 1 minute. Increased ICP was also observed in the normal subjects. Recordings show that there is well-defined correlation between the sustained wave of high intracranial pressure and an increase in CBV.

  15. Chest physiotherapy on intracranial pressure of critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lucas Lima; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the outcomes of increased or decreased intracranial pressure and/or the decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure resulting from respiratory physiotherapy on critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Through a systematic review of the literature, clinical trials published between 2002 and 2012 were selected. The search involved the LILACS, SciELO, MedLine and PEDro databases using the keywords "physical therapy", "physiotherapy", "respiratory therapy" and "randomized controlled trials" combined with the keyword "intracranial pressure". In total, five studies, including a total of 164 patients between 25 and 65 years of age, reporting that respiratory physiotherapy maneuvers significantly increased intracranial pressure without changing the cerebral perfusion pressure were included. The articles addressed several techniques including vibration, vibrocompression, tapping, postural drainage, and the endotracheal aspiration maneuver. All patients required invasive mechanical ventilation. Respiratory physiotherapy leads to increased intracranial pressure. Studies suggest that there are no short-term hemodynamic or respiratory repercussions or changes in the cerebral perfusion pressure. However, none of the studies evaluated the clinical outcomes or ensured the safety of the maneuvers.

  16. Use of antihypertension agents for the suppression of arterial pulse pressure waveforms in patients with intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Carole L; Wilkinson, Ian B; Kirkpatrick, Peter J

    2006-04-01

    Patients with intracranial aneurysms tend toward raised blood pressure and abnormal pulse pressure profiles. The authors have investigated the influence of three antihypertension agents on blood pressure and pulse pressure waveforms in patients with known intracranial aneurysms, with a view to assessing the potential benefits of longterm antihypertension therapy on the progression of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Nineteen patients with a mean age of 56 years (range 38-76 years) were recruited for this study. All patients had confirmed intracranial aneurysms. A double-blind, randomized, crossover study was performed using perindopril, irbesartan, isosorbide mononitrate, and a placebo. Blood pressure and pulse pressure waveforms were assessed at the end of each 4-week treatment period. Perindopril and irbesartan were well tolerated. For all measured parameters except heart rate (p = 0.03), no significant difference between baseline and placebo was identified. Each drug when compared with placebo reduced peripheral arterial blood pressure. Perindopril significantly decreased mean blood pressure by 10 mm Hg (p = 0.004), irbesartan by 9 mm Hg (p = 0.004), and isosorbide mononitrate by 13 mm Hg (p = 0.005). The administration of each drug effected a significant reduction in the carotid artery augmentation index (AIX) compared with baseline values (perindopril p = 0.01, irbesartan p = 0.0002, and isosorbide mononitrate p = 0.03). There was also a significant difference in the AIX between irbesartan and the placebo (p = 0.05). Compared with the placebo, there was a significant difference in AIX (adjusted for heart rate) following the administration of irbesartan (p = 0.003) and isosorbide mononitrate (p = 0.01), but not with perindopril (p = 0.17). Irbesartan appears to be the most effective treatment for the combined suppression of blood pressure and AIX in patients with intracranial aneurysms and has a high degree of patient tolerance.

  17. Intracranial pressure and outcome in critically ill patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Giulia; Messerer, Mahmoud; Stocchetti, Nino; Levivier, Marc; Daniel, Roy T; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-06-01

    Evidences supporting the use of intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) are limited. The aim of our paper was to examine whether elevated intracranial pressure and ICP-derived variables predict mortality and functional outcomes after aSAH. A systematic review of the literature was performed through PubMed and Cochrane databases up to June 2015. Population was restricted to aSAH patients requiring admission to the intensive care unit. ICP was included in the analysis as absolute value as well as variables derived from ICP monitoring (pressure reactivity index, ICP pulse wave amplitude, ICP-arterial blood pressure wave amplitude correlation and ICP variability). Outcomes included mortality, neurological recovery and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Quality of evidence was rated using the GRADE system. Twenty-six studies were examined. Due to heterogeneity in qualifying studies, a meta-analysis could not be generated. We found a correlation between elevated ICP and mortality. However, ICP absolute values were not independent predictors of long-term functional outcomes (low quality of evidence). A variable relationship between elevated ICP and DCI was found (very low quality of evidence). ICP-derived variables had higher accuracy than ICP absolute values in predicting functional outcomes (moderate quality of evidence). Elevated ICP was associated with higher mortality however absolute ICP values per se were not independent predictors of functional recovery. Variables derived from ICP monitoring are more accurate than ICP absolute values in predicting outcome. Given the absence of good quality data, additional large studies may help to better define the prognostic value of ICP after aSAH.

  18. A preliminary study for investigating idiopatic normal pressure hydrocephalus by means of statistical parameters classification of intracranial pressure recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisto, A; Bramanti, A; Galeano, M; Angileri, F; Campobello, G; Serrano, S; Azzerboni, B

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate Id-iopatic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (INPH) through a multidimensional and multiparameter analysis of statistical data obtained from accurate analysis of Intracranial Pressure (ICP) recordings. Such a study could permit to detect new factors, correlated with therapeutic response, which are able to validate a predicting significance for infusion test. The algorithm developed by the authors computes 13 ICP parameter trends on each of the recording, afterward 9 statistical information from each trend is determined. All data are transferred to the datamining software WEKA. According to the exploited feature-selection techniques, the WEKA has revealed that the most significant statistical parameter is the maximum of Single-Wave-Amplitude: setting a 27 mmHg threshold leads to over 90% of correct classification.

  19. Brain CT to Assess Intracranial Pressure in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, Suguna; Lerma, Jesus; Khraishi, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Morphologic features of computed tomography (CT) scans of the brain can be used to estimate intracranial pressure (ICP) via an image-processing algorithm. Clinically, such estimations can be used to prognosticate outcomes and avoid placement of invasive intracranial monitors in certain patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Features on a CT scan that may correlate with measurements of low ICP are sought. A measure is proposed that is a function of the distribution of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in and around the brain. In our method, we present an algorithm that semiautomatically segments brain parenchyma from CSF, and apply standard image processing calculations. The ratio of CSF volume to the size of the intracranial vault (ICV) or volume inside the skull, csf(v) /icv(v) is calculated and then plotted against the actual recorded ICP, yielding a relationship between the image features and ICP. We analyzed a total of 45 scans from 20 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). We showed that a ratio csf(v)/icv(v) > .034 correlates with an ICP < 20 mmHg (P = .0046). For csf(v)/icv(v) ≤ .034, a distinction between low and high ICP cannot be effectively estimated by this univariate measure. This method permits a noninvasive means of identifying patients who are low risk for having elevated ICP; by following Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines strictly such a patient may be subjected to an unnecessary, invasive procedure. This work is a promising pilot study that will need to be analyzed for a larger population. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  20. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring as a Part of Multimodal Monitoring Management of Patients with Critical Polytrauma: Correlation between Optimised Intensive Therapy According to Intracranial Pressure Parameters and Clinical Picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Loredana; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Carmen Alina; Papurica, Marius; Gruneantu, Anelore; Patrut, Raluca; Vernic, Corina; Dumbuleu, Corina Maria; Sandesc, Dorel

    2015-12-01

    Trauma patient requires a complex therapeutic management because of multiple severe injuries or secondary complications. The most significant injury found in patients with trauma is head injury, which has the greatest impact on mortality. Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is required in severe traumatic head injury because it optimises treatment based on ICP values and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). From a total of 64 patients admitted in the intensive care unit (ICU) 'Casa Austria', from the Polytraumatology Clinic of the Emergency County Hospital "Pius Brinzeu" Timisoara, Romania, between January 2014 and December 2014; only patients who underwent ICP monitoring (n=10) were analysed. The study population was divided into several categories depending on the time passed since trauma to the time of installation of ICP monitoring (24 h). Comparisons were made in terms of the number of days admitted in the ICU and mortality between patients with head injury who benefited and those who did not benefit from ICP monitoring. The results show the positive influence of ICP monitoring on the number of admission days in ICU because of the possibility that the number of admission days to augment therapeutic effects in patients who benefited from ICP monitoring reduces by 1.93 days compared with those who did not undergo ICP monitoring. ICP monitoring and optimizing therapy according to the ICP and CPP has significant influence on the rate of survival. ICP monitoring is necessary in all patients with head trauma injury according to recent guidelines. The main therapeutic goal in the management of the trauma patient with head injury is to minimize the destructive effects of the associated side effects.

  1. Brain energy metabolism and intracranial pressure in idiopathic adult hydrocephalus syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agren-Wilsson, A; Eklund, A; Koskinen, L; Bergenheim, A; Malm, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: The symptoms in idiopathic adult hydrocephalus syndrome (IAHS) are consistent with pathology involving the periventricular white matter, presumably reflecting ischaemia and CSF hydrodynamic disturbance. Objective: To investigate whether a change in intracranial pressure (ICP) can affect energy metabolism in deep white matter. Methods: A microdialysis catheter, a brain tissue oxygen tension probe, and an ICP transducer were inserted into the periventricular white matter 0–7 mm from the right frontal horn in 10 patients with IAHS. ICP and intracerebral PtiO2 were recorded continuously during lumbar CSF constant pressure infusion test. ICP was raised to pressure levels of 35 and 45 mm Hg for 10 minutes each, after which CSF drainage was undertaken. Microdialysis samples were collected every three minutes and analysed for glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glutamate. Results: When raising the ICP, a reversible drop in the extracellular concentrations of glucose, lactate, and pyruvate was found. Comparing the values during baseline to values at the highest pressure level, the fall in glucose, lactate, and pyruvate was significant (pintracranial pressure induces an immediate and reversible change in energy metabolism in periventricular white matter, without any sign of ischaemia. Theoretically, frequent ICP peaks (B waves) over a long period could eventually cause persisting axonal disturbance and subsequently the symptoms noted in IAHS. PMID:16024885

  2. Clinical comparison of tympanic membrane displacement with invasive intracranial pressure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimbles, S; Dodd, C; Banister, K; Mendelow, A D; Chambers, I R

    2005-12-01

    A non-invasive method of assessing intracranial pressure (ICP) would be of benefit to patients with abnormal cerebral pathology that could give rise to changes in ICP. In particular, it would assist the regular monitoring of hydrocephalus patients. This study evaluated a technique using tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) measurements, which has been reported to provide a reliable, non-invasive measure of ICP. A group of 135 hydrocephalus patients was studied, as well as 13 patients with benign intracranial hypertension and a control group of 77 volunteers. TMD measurements were carried out using the Marchbanks measurement system analyser and compared between the groups. In 36 patients, invasive measurements of ICP carried out at the same time were compared with the TMD values. A highly significant relationship was found between TMD and ICP but intersubject variability was high and the predictive value of the technique low. Taking the normal range of ICP to be 10-15 mmHg, the predictive limits of the regression are an order of magnitude wider than this and therefore Vm cannot be used as a surrogate for ICP. In conclusion, TMD measurements do not provide a reliable non-invasive measure of ICP in patients with shunted hydrocephalus.

  3. Intracranial hemorrhage in normotensive and hypertensive patients receiving streptokinase after decreasing elevated blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Shemirani

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction (AMI and eligible for thrombolytic therapy may not be treated because of association between hemorrhagic complications especially intracranial hemorrhage (ICH, and severe hypertension (HTN at presentation. Unfortunately, this leads to under use or delay in thrombolytic therapy. We assessed effect of decreasing elevated blood pressure before thrombolytic therapy in order to reduce the incidence of ICH without increasing mortality rate. Methods: This observational and analytical cohort study enrolled 293 patients (215males and 78 female with STsegment elevation (AMI that were hospitalized in emergency department of Noor hospital, Isfahan, Iran. Severe hypertension (blood pressure ≥180/110mmHg was diagnosed in 132 patients. All of them received 1.5 million units streptokinase within one hour intravenously. In the hypertensive group, elevated blood pressure was lowered to less than180/110mmhg before thrombolysis and they were observed to detect development of symptomatic ICH and they underwent Brain CT scan, if required. Results: The incidence of total stroke, ICH and death were 1.4%, 0.7% and 4.8%, respectively. The incidence of death and ICH in patients with severe hypertension was less than control group (P value=0.13 and 0.59, respectively Conclusion: Although we did not find any increase in ICH incidence in severe hypertensive patients treated be streptokinase due to AMI, but we recommend a multi-centric study with more cases and varied thrombolytic protocols. Key words: Acute myocardial infarction, Intracranial hemorrhage, Thrombolytic therapy

  4. A computer-based method for comparisons of continuous intracranial pressure recordings within individual cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, P K; Fremming, A D

    2003-05-01

    This study assessed two strategies of comparing continuous intracranial pressure (ICP) recordings within individual cases, namely either by calculation of differences in mean ICP or by calculation of differences in numbers of ICP elevations. Continuous ICP recordings before and after cranial surgery were both presented as mean ICP and as numbers of ICP elevations of different levels (20 and 25 mmHg lasting either 0.5 or 1 minute). Since the length of pressure recordings differed somewhat between individuals, the numbers of ICP elevations were standardised by computing the numbers of elevations during a 10 hours period. The ICP recordings were analysed by the Sensometrics Pressure Analyser software. The ICP curves included here were selected from a group of 15 children undergoing calvarial expansion surgery for craniosynostosis, in whom continuous ICP monitoring was performed both before and after surgery as part of the diagnostic workout to rule out lasting intracranial hypertension. After surgery, mean ICP during sleep was reduced by 5 mmHg or more in 5 cases, minimally changed (i.e. 2 mmHg or less) in 6 cases, and variably increased in the other 4 cases. In one of these 4 latter cases, numbers of ICP elevations were increased after surgery, but in all other 14 cases the numbers of ICP elevations were significantly reduced. Reduction of mean ICP by more than 2 mmHg associated with good outcome was observed in 3 of 15 cases (20%), whereas marked and significant reductions in numbers of ICP elevations during sleep combined with good outcome was observed in 12 of 15 cases (80%). Outcome after the 2nd ICP monitoring was more reliably predicted by computing differences in numbers of ICP elevations than by calculation of mean ICP.

  5. A new method and software for quantitative analysis of continuous intracranial pressure recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, P K; Fremming, A D

    2001-12-01

    A computer software utilising a new method for quantitative analysis of intracranial pressure (ICP), was developed to provide a more accurate analysis of continuously recorded ICP. Intracranial pressure curves were analysed by the software to explore the relationship between mean ICP and the presence of ICP elevations. The Sensometrics Pressure Analyser (version 1.2) software provides a quantitative analysis of the ICP curve, presenting the ICP recordings as a matrix of numbers of ICP elevations of different levels (e.g. 20 or 30 or 40 mmHg) and durations (e.g. 0.5, 5 or 10 minutes). The number of ICP elevations may be standardised by calculating the number of elevations during for instance a 10 hour period. The computer software was used to retrospectively analyse the ICP curves in our first consecutive 127 patients undergoing continuous 24 hours ICP monitoring during the two-year period from February 1997 to December 1998. The indications for ICP monitoring were suspected hydrocephalus, craniosynostosis or shunt failure. Analysis of the ICP curves revealed a rather weak relationship between mean ICP and the number of apparently abnormal ICP elevations (that is elevations of 20 mmHg or above). Abnormal ICP elevations were present in a relatively high proportion of cases with a normal mean ICP below 10 mmHg, or a borderline mean ICP between 10 and 15 mmHg. In addition, the ICP data of two cases are presented suggesting that mean ICP may be an inaccurate measure of ICP. The results of analysing ICP curves by means of this method and software reveal that calculation of ICP elevations of different levels and durations may represent a more accurate description of the ICP curve than calculation of mean ICP. The method may enhance the clinical application of ICP monitoring.

  6. Central Hemodynamics and Intracranial and Cerebral Perfusion Pressures in Acute Cerebral Circulatory Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Lukashev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the central hemodynamics (CH and intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures (ICP and CPP in acute cerebral circulatory disorders (ACCD and their possible relationships for further development of intensive differential therapy for the detected disorders. Material and methods. Hemodynamic studies using the transpulmonary thermodilu-tion technique, measurements of ICP, calculations of CPP, and currently available X-ray studies were conducted in 18 patients on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 of ACCD. All the patients were found to have essential hypertension and coronary heart disease. Results. In the first 5 days of ACCD, there was a normodynamic type of circulation in hemorrhagic stroke (HS and a hypodynamic type in ischemic stroke (IS. ICP remained at the baseline elevated level in the IS group and increased over time in the HS group. CPP was significantly unchanged. Myocardial dysfunction was detected when there was a significant preload caused by a high postload. In IS, an inverse correlation was found between ICP and global ejection fraction (GEF, cardiac performance index (CPI and on day 7, the correlation was direct. In HS, ICP had a direct correlation with CPI and an inverse correlation with GEF. These changes during treatment failed to progress and were revealed in the presence of brain dislocation, as evidenced by spiral computed tomography. Conclusion. Thus, the pattern of CH disorders depends on the type of ACCD. In the first 5 days of ACCD, a hypokinetic circulatory type is registered in IS and a normokinetic type is in HS. Evolving dislocation of the brain with impaired function of its stem structures due to ICP elevation is one of the causes of central hemodynamic changes. The value of ICP in ACCD is a crucial indicator in the diagnosis of secondary brain damages and determines treatment policy. Key words: acute ischemic attack, intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, central hemodynamics, myocardial depression.

  7. Mapping in-vivo optic nerve head strains caused by intraocular and intracranial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, H.; Grimm, J.; Wang, B.; Smith, M. A.; Gogola, A.; Nelson, S.; Tyler-Kabara, E.; Schuman, J.; Wollstein, G.; Sigal, I. A.

    2017-02-01

    Although it is well documented that abnormal levels of either intraocular (IOP) or intracranial pressure (ICP) can lead to potentially blinding conditions, such as glaucoma and papilledema, little is known about how the pressures actually affect the eye. Even less is known about potential interplay between their effects, namely how the level of one pressure might alter the effects of the other. Our goal was to measure in-vivo the pressure-induced stretch and compression of the lamina cribrosa due to acute changes of IOP and ICP. The lamina cribrosa is a structure within the optic nerve head, in the back of the eye. It is important because it is in the lamina cribrosa that the pressure-induced deformations are believed to initiate damage to neural tissues leading to blindness. An eye of a rhesus macaque monkey was imaged in-vivo with optical coherence tomography while IOP and ICP were controlled through cannulas in the anterior chamber and lateral ventricle, respectively. The image volumes were analyzed with a newly developed digital image correlation technique. The effects of both pressures were highly localized, nonlinear and non-monotonic, with strong interactions. Pressure variations from the baseline normal levels caused substantial stretch and compression of the neural tissues in the posterior pole, sometimes exceeding 20%. Chronic exposure to such high levels of biomechanical insult would likely lead to neural tissue damage and loss of vision. Our results demonstrate the power of digital image correlation technique based on non-invasive imaging technologies to help understand how pressures induce biomechanical insults and lead to vision problems.

  8. Low pressure traumatic epidural hematoma in a child with a prior hemispherectomy: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fassil B Mesfin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2½-year-old male child with a prior history of a left anatomic hemispherectomy to treat refractory epilepsy fell down two steps, striking his head on the ipsilateral side of the hemispherectomy. He presented with non-consolable crying and emesis. CT scan of the head demonstrated a left frontal epidural hematoma beneath the site of his prior craniectomy. The patient was initially treated by close observation. However, due to an increase in the hematoma from 29.5 to 49.3 ml over a 12-hour period along with the patient′s lack of clinical improvement, surgical evacuation was performed. Intraoperatively, the source of the hemorrhage was found to be the skull fracture. Postoperatively, he returned to his neurologic baseline and was discharged home on postoperative day 3.

  9. [Intracranial pressure plateau waves in patients with severe traumatic brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshorov, A V; Savin, I A; Goriachev, A S; Popugaev, K A; Polupan, A A; Sychev, A A; Gavrilov, A G; Kravchuk, A D; Zakharova, N E; Danilov, G V; Potapov, A A

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study was to assess frequency of plato waves, their influence on outcomes and define factors leading to plato waves. Ninety eight patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) were included. Blood pressure (BP), intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and pressure reactivity index (Prx) were registered. Age was 34 +/- 13.6. There were 73 male and 25 female. Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 6 +/- 1.4. Plato waves developed in 24 patients (group 1), 74 patients (group 2) did not have plato waves. Median of plato waves in the 1st group was 7[3.5; 7]. They developed on 3rd [2;4.5] day. Maximum level of ICP during plato waves was 47.5 [40;53] mmHg, its duration was 8.5 [7;27] minutes. In the group 1 Prx was significantly lower during first day, than in the group 2. Duration of ICP monitoring was longer in the group I due to presence of plato waves in these patients. CPP did not differ in groups, because CPP was strictly controlled. Patients of the group I had preserved autoregulation and less severe trauma (predominance of closed trauma and Marshall I, II type of brain damage). Plato waves did not predict bad outcomes.

  10. The Relationship Between Intracranial Pressure and Age-Chasing Age-Related Reference Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sarah Hornshøj; Lilja-Cyron, Alexander; Andresen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No true reference values for intracranial pressure (ICP) in humans exist; current values are estimated from measurements in adults who undergo treatment in order to correct ICP. We report ICP values in a "pseudonormal" group of children and adults to examine if age affects ICP. METHODS...... patients, 32 had higher nighttime ICP. The difference between daytime and nighttime ICP was similar in children (ΔICP = 5.8 mmHg ± 4.0, P age, with an ICP decrement of 0.69 mmHg per decade (P = 0.......015). CONCLUSIONS: We found similar differences in daytime and nighttime ICP between children and adults with no ICP-related disease. ICP seems to decrease with age across all ages. This has implications for therapeutic interventions (e.g., shunt valve selection or resistance in external ventricular drainage)....

  11. Increased intracranial pressure in myelomeningocele (MMC) patients never shunted: results of a prospective preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iborra, J; Pagès, E; Cuxart, A; Poca, A; Sahuquillo, J

    2000-08-01

    In some young adults non-shunted myelomeningocele (MMC) patients without symptoms or with unspecific clinical findings, moderate or severe stabilised ventriculomegaly are observed in control CT scans. Physicians are then faced with the so-called 'Arrested Hydrocephalus' (AH) syndrome. The present study is part of a prospective protocol in which patients with hydrocephalus associated with MMC and long-term clinical diagnosis of AH were included. To evaluate myelomeningocele patients never shunted with clinical and/or CT scan criteria compatible with AH. Multidisciplinary Spina Bifida Unit in a tertiary university hospital in Barcelona, Spain. Fourteen MMC patients were selected, in all of them, continuous intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring was performed. Analysis of the ICP records was done using the method described by Borgesen in mmHg. All patients were also studied by intelligence quotient (IQ) testing before and after shunting. The CT in all the study cases showed an Evans ratio Seguridad Social (FISS).

  12. Giant cerebral cavernous malformation causing raised intracranial pressure in an adult: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cerebral cavernous malformations (GCCMs are very rare malformations in adults, and they rarely present with raised intracranial pressure due to obstructive hydrocephalus. Around 20 cases of GCCMs have been reported in available literature. We report such a case, discuss and review the available literature regarding this eminently treatable group of vascular malformations.

  13. Pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension - Is the fixed threshold value of elevated LP opening pressure set too high?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstl, Lucia; Schoppe, Nikola; Albers, Lucia; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Alperin, Noam; Ehrt, Oliver; Pomschar, Andreas; Landgraf, Mirjam N; Heinen, Florian

    2017-11-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) in children is a rare condition of unknown etiology and various clinical presentations. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate if our pediatric IIH study group fulfilled the revised diagnostic criteria for IIH published in 2013, particularly with regard to clinical presentation and threshold value of an elevated lumbar puncture opening pressure. Additionally we investigated the potential utilization of MR-based and fundoscopic methods of estimating intracranial pressure for improved diagnosis. Clinical data were collected retrospectively from twelve pediatric patients diagnosed with IIH between 2008 and 2012 and revised diagnostic criteria were applied. Comparison with non-invasive methods for measuring intracranial pressure, MRI-based measurement (MR-ICP) and venous ophthalmodynamometry was performed. Only four of the twelve children (33%) fulfilled the revised diagnostic criteria for a definite diagnosis of IIH. Regarding noninvasive methods, MR-ICP (n = 6) showed a significantly higher mean of intracranial pressure compared to a healthy age- and sex-matched control group (p = 0.0043). Venous ophthalmodynamometry (n = 4) showed comparable results to invasive lumbar puncture. The revised diagnostic criteria for IIH may be too strict especially in children without papilledema. MR-ICP and venous ophthalmodynamometry are promising complementary procedures for monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anaesthetic management of emergency caesarean section in a patient with seizures and likely raised intracranial pressure due to tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidya, D K; Trikha, A; Menon, S; Garg, R

    2011-09-01

    We report the anaesthetic management of a term pregnant woman with active tuberculous meningitis, who had experienced seizures, had signs of raised intracranial pressure and required emergency caesarean section. Peripartum anaesthetic management of a patient with tuberculous meningitis is a rare event.

  15. Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, Alan; Dulchavsky, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Future human space travel will primarily consist of long duration missions onboard the International Space Station or exploration class missions to Mars, its moons, or nearby asteroids. Current evidence suggests that long duration missions might increase risk of permanent ocular structural and functional changes, possibly due to increased intracranial pressure resulting from a spaceflight-induced cephalad (headward) fluid shift.

  16. Research on simulation and experiment of noninvasive intracranial pressure monitoring based on acoustoelasticity effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu J

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Jun Wu1, Wei He2, Wei-min Chen1, Lian Zhu21Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and Systems, 2State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: The real-time monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP is very important for craniocerebrally critically ill patients, but it is very difficult to realize long-time monitoring for the traditional invasive method, which very easily infects patients. Many noninvasive methods have emerged, but these have not been able to monitor ICP for long periods in real time, and they are not ready for clinical application. In order to realize long-time, online, real-time, noninvasive monitoring for ICP, a new method based on acoustoelasticity of ultrasound is herein proposed. Experimental models were devised to research the new method for experiment and simulation. Polymethyl methacrylate and hydrogel were adopted for the experiment, and their mechanical properties were very close to the real brain. A numerical solution for acoustoelasticity theory was acquired by simulating calculation based on a finite-element method. This was compared to the experimental value. The results showed a consistent match between theoretical solution and experimental value, with maximum error at most 5%. Thus, the effectiveness of the new method was verified. Theoretical and practical foundation is provided for this new method, and it could be used for animal experimentation or clinical testing in further research.Keywords: medical instruments, noninvasive, intracranial pressure, ultrasonic, acoustoelasticity, biomechanics

  17. Fast circulation of cerebrospinal fluid: an alternative perspective on the protective role of high intracranial pressure in ocular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wostyn, Peter; De Groot, Veva; Van Dam, Debby; Audenaert, Kurt; Killer, Hanspeter Esriel; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2016-05-01

    As ocular hypertension refers to a condition in which the intraocular pressure is consistently elevated but without development of glaucoma, study of it may provide important clues to factors that may play a protective role in glaucoma. β-amyloid, one of the key histopathological findings in Alzheimer's disease, has been reported to increase by chronic elevation of intraocular pressure in animals with experimentally induced ocular hypertension and to cause retinal ganglion cell death, pointing to similarities in molecular cell death mechanisms between glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, recent studies have reported that intracranial pressure is higher in patients with ocular hypertension compared with controls, giving rise to the idea that elevated intracranial pressure may provide a protective effect for the optic nerve by decreasing the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference. The speculation that the higher intracranial pressure reported in ocular hypertension patients may protect against glaucoma mainly through a lower trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference remains at least questionable. Here, we present an alternative viewpoint, according to which the protective effect of higher intracranial pressure could be due, at least in part, to a pressure-independent mechanism, namely faster cerebrospinal fluid production leading to increased cerebrospinal fluid turnover with enhanced removal of potentially neurotoxic waste products that accumulate in the optic nerve. This suggests a new hypothesis for glaucoma, which, just like Alzheimer's disease, may be considered then as an imbalance between production and clearance of neurotoxins, including β-amyloid. If confirmed, then strategies to improve cerebrospinal fluid flow are reasonable and could provide a new therapeutic approach for stopping the neurotoxic β-amyloid pathway in glaucoma. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  18. Invasive intracranial pressure monitoring is a useful adjunct in the management of severe hepatic encephalopathy associated with pediatric acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pradip; Kunde, Sachin; Vos, Miriam; Vats, Atul; Gupta, Nitika; Heffron, Thomas; Romero, Rene; Fortenberry, James D

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric acute liver failure is often accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy, cerebral edema, and raised intracranial pressure. Elevated intracranial pressure can be managed more effectively with intracranial monitoring, but acute-liver-failure-associated coagulopathy is often considered a contraindication for invasive monitoring due to risk for intracranial bleeding. We reviewed our experience with use of early intracranial pressure monitoring in acute liver failure in children listed for liver transplantation. Retrospective review of all intubated pediatric acute liver failure patients with grade III and grade IV encephalopathy requiring intracranial pressure monitoring and evaluated for potential liver transplant who were identified from an institutional liver transplant patient database from 1999 to 2009. None. A total of 14 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria. Their ages ranged from 7 months to 20 yrs. Diagnoses of acute liver failure were infectious (three), drug-induced (seven), autoimmune hepatitis (two), and indeterminate (two). Grade III and IV encephalopathy was seen in ten (71%) and four (29%) patients, respectively. Computed tomography scans before intracranial pressure monitor placement showed cerebral edema in five (35.7%) patients. Before intracranial pressure monitor placement, fresh frozen plasma, vitamin K, and activated recombinant factor VIIa were given to all 14 patients, with significant improvement in coagulopathy (p liver transplant, with 100% surviving neurologically intact. Four of 14 (28%) patients had spontaneous recovery without liver transplant. Two of 14 (14%) patients died due to multiple organ failure before transplant. One patient had a small 9-mm intracranial hemorrhage but survived after receiving a liver transplant. No patient developed intracranial infection. In our series of patients, intracranial pressure monitoring had a low complication rate and was associated with a high survival rate despite severe

  19. Online correlation of spontaneous arterial and intracranial pressure fluctuations in patients with diffuse severe head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Michael; Andres, Robert H; Fuhrer, Martin; Müller, Alexander; Schaller, Benoit; Widmer, HansRuedi

    2007-07-01

    Determination of relevant clinical monitoring parameters for helping guide the intensive care therapy in patients with severe head injury, is one of the most demanding issues in neurotrauma research. New insights into cerebral autoregulation and metabolism have revealed that a rigid cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) regimen might not be suitable for all severe head injured patients. We thus developed an online analysis technique to monitor the correlation (AI rho) between the spontaneous fluctuations of the mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and the intracranial pressure (ICP). In addition, brain tissue oxygen (PtiO2) and metabolic microdialysate measures including glucose and lactate were registered. We found that in patients with good outcome, the AI rho values were significantly lower as compared with patients with poor outcome. Accordingly, microdialysate glucose and lactate were significantly higher in the good outcome group. We conclude that online determination of AI rho offers a valuable additional and technically easily performable tool for guidance of therapy in patients with severe head injury.

  20. Noninvasive and quantitative intracranial pressure estimation using ultrasonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Juan; Yao, Yan; Feng, Liang-Shu; Wang, Yu-Zhi; Zheng, Nan-Nan; Feng, Jia-Chun; Xing, Ying-Qi

    2017-02-07

    We aimed to quantitatively assess intracranial pressure (ICP) using optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurements. We recruited 316 neurology patients in whom ultrasonographic ONSD was measured before lumbar puncture. They were randomly divided into a modeling and a test group at a ratio of 7:3. In the modeling group, we conducted univariate and multivariate analyses to assess associations between ICP and ONSD, age, sex, BMI, mean arterial blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure. We derived the mathematical function "Xing &Wang" from the modelling group to predict ICP and evaluated the function in the test group. In the modeling group, ICP was strongly correlated with ONSD (r = 0.758, p Durbin-Watson value = 1.94). In the test group, a significant correlation was found between the observed and predicted ICP (r = 0.76, p < 0.001). Bland-Altman analysis yielded a mean difference between measurements of -0.07 ± 41.55 mmH2O. The intraclass correlation coefficient and its 95%CIs for noninvasive ICP assessments using our prediction model was 0.86 (0.79-0.90). Ultrasonographic ONSD measurements provide a potential noninvasive method to quantify ICP that can be conducted at the bedside.

  1. Risk of Microgravity-Induced Visual Impairment and Elevated Intracranial Pressure (VIIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Eight cases identified, represent 23.5% of the 34 crewmembers flown on the ISS, with inflight visual changes and pre-to-postflight refractive changes. In some cases, the changes were transient while in others they are persistent with varying degrees of visual impairment. (1) Decreased intraocular pressure (IOP) postflight was observed in 3 cases. (2) Fundoscopic exams revealed postflight findings of choroidal folds in 4 cases, optic disc edema in 5 cases and presence of cotton wool spots in 3 cases. (3) Optical coherence tomography (OCT) confirmed findings of choroidal folds and disc edema and documented retinal nerve fiber layer thickening (4 cases). (4) Findings from MRI examinations showed posterior globe flattening (5 cases) and optic nerve sheath distension (6 cases). (5) Opening cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure was elevated in 4 cases postflight reflecting raised intracranial pressure. While the etiology remains unknown, hypotheses speculate that venous insufficiency or hypertension in the brain caused by cephalad fluid shifts during spaceflight are possible mechanisms for ocular changes in astronauts.

  2. Increased Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment Associated with Long-Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Bowman, Karina

    2011-01-01

    Although humans have been flying in space since the 1960s, more recent missions have revealed a new suite of physiological adaptations and consequences of space flight. Notably, 60% of long-duration crewmembers (ISS/MIR) and >25% of short-duration (Shuttle) crewmembers have reported subjective degradation in vision (based on debrief comments) (Gibson 2011). Decreased near-visual acuity was demonstrated in 46% of ISS/Mir and 21% of Shuttle crewmembers, resulting in a shift of up to 1-2 diopters in their refractive correction. It is likely that the recently revealed ophthalmic changes have been present since the first days of human space flight, but have been overlooked or attributed to other causations. The reported changes in vision have occurred at various time points throughout missions, with ranging degrees of visual degradation. Although some cases resolved upon return to Earth, several astronauts have not regained preflight visual acuity, indicating that the damage may be permanent. While observing these changes over the years, without other overt symptomology and with the given age range of the flying population, this has largely been attributed to an expected hyperopic shift due to aging. However, the availability of onboard analysis techniques, including visual acuity assessments, retinal imagery, and ultrasounds of the eye and optic nerve tracts, along with more detailed post-flight techniques, has led to the recent recognition of a wider syndrome. Along with vision changes, findings include flattening of the globe, swelling of the optic disc (papilledema), choroidal folds in the retina, swelling of the optic nerve sheath, and visual field defects. It is widely hypothesized that this constellation of findings may be explained by an elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). Out of the 60% of long-duration astronauts that have reported a subjective degradation in vision, a subset (currently 10 astronauts) have developed this syndrome. The National

  3. The tympanic membrane displacement analyser for monitoring intracranial pressure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwer, Samson; Sheward, Victoria; Birch, Anthony; Marchbanks, Robert; Idro, Richard; Newton, Charles R; Kirkham, Fenella J; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Lim, Ming

    2013-06-01

    Raised intracranial pressure (ICP) is a potentially treatable cause of morbidity and mortality but tools for monitoring are invasive. We sought to investigate the utility of the tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) analyser for non-invasive measurement of ICP in children. We made TMD observations on normal and acutely comatose children presenting to Kilifi District Hospital (KDH) at the rural coast of Kenya and on children on follow-up for idiopathic intracranial hypertension at Evelina Children's Hospital (ECH), in London, UK. We recruited 63 patients (median age 3.3 (inter-quartile range (IQR) 2.0-4.3) years) at KDH and 14 children (median age 10 (IQR 5-11) years) at ECH. We observed significantly higher (more negative) TMD measurements in KDH children presenting with coma compared to normal children seen at the hospital's outpatient department, in both semi-recumbent [mean -61.3 (95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) -93.5 to 29.1) nl versus mean -7.1 (95 % CI -54.0 to 68.3) nl, respectively; P = 0.03] and recumbent postures [mean -61.4 (95 % CI -93.4 to -29.3) nl, n = 59) versus mean -25.9 (95 % CI -71.4 to 123.2) nl, respectively; P = 0.03]. We also observed higher TMD measurements in ECH children with raised ICP measurements, as indicated by lumbar puncture manometry, compared to those with normal ICP, in both semi-recumbent [mean -259.3 (95 % CI -363.8 to -154.8) nl versus mean 26.7 (95 % CI -52.3 to 105.7) nl, respectively; P analyser has a potential utility in monitoring ICP in a variety of clinical circumstances.

  4. The effect of nursing interventions on the intracranial pressure in paediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tume, Lyvonne N; Baines, Paul B; Lisboa, Paulo J G

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of five selected intensive care nursing interventions on the intracranial pressure (ICP) of moderate to severe traumatic brain-injured children in intensive care. The physiological effects of many nursing interventions in paediatric intensive care (PIC) are not known. This results in the lack of an evidence base for many PIC nursing practices. Prospective observational cohort study conducted over 3 years in a single tertiary referral paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in the North West of England. Five selected commonly performed nursing interventions were studied: endotracheal suctioning and manual ventilation (ETSMV), turning via a log-rolling (LR) approach, eye care, oral care and washing. These were studied in the first 72 h after injury. A total of 25 children with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury and intraparenchymal ICP monitoring in intensive care (aged 2-17 years) were enrolled. Both ETSMV and LR were associated with clinically and statistically significant changes in ICP from baseline to maximal ICP (p = 0·001 ETSMV; p = washing did not cause any clinically significant change in ICP from baseline. After decompressive craniectomy, none of the interventions caused significant changes in ICP. Only two of the five nursing interventions, endotracheal suctioning and LR, caused intracranial hypertension in moderate to severe traumatic brain-injured children, and after craniectomy, no care interventions caused any significant change in ICP. Knowledge about the physiological effects of many intensive care nursing interventions is lacking and this is magnified in paediatrics. This study provides a significant addition to the evidence base in this area and allows intensive care nurses to plan, implement and evaluate more effectively their nursing care for brain-injured children. © 2011 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2011 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  5. Differences in quantitative characteristics of intracranial pressure in hydrocephalic children treated surgically or conservatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Due-Tønnessen, Bernt; Helseth, Eirik; Lundar, Tryggve

    2002-06-01

    This study reports the results of quantitative analysis of continuous intracranial pressure (ICP) recordings in 33 hydrocephalic children. The aim of the study was to compare the exact numbers of increases in ICP during sleep or the awake state in hydrocephalic children who were treated either surgically or conservatively. At the time of ICP monitoring, the ICP curves were assessed by the calculation of mean ICP and visual inspection for the detection of plateau waves. Quantitative analysis was performed with the software Sensometrics Pressure Analyser, which presented the ICP curve as a matrix of numbers of ICP elevations of different levels (20-40 mm Hg) and durations (0.5-20 min). In each case, the numbers of ICP elevations were standardized to 10 h of recording time, providing the opportunity for comparisons of ICP curves between individuals. Compared to the surgery group, there was a rather high number of ICP elevations of 20 mm Hg of various durations in the nonsurgery group, e.g. ICP elevations of 20 mm Hg lasting 10 min occurred in 13 of 19 children (68%) in the nonsurgery group. There was no apparent relationship between ICP and age or between the size of the cerebral ventricles and ICP. In children with hydrocephalus, the presentation of the ICP data as a matrix of ICP elevations of different levels and durations may enhance the informative value of continuous ICP monitoring, as compared to the calculation of mean ICP and visual detection of plateau waves. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  6. Beyond intracranial pressure: optimization of cerebral blood flow, oxygen, and substrate delivery after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzat, Pierre; Sala, Nathalie; Payen, Jean-François; Oddo, Mauro

    2013-07-10

    Monitoring and management of intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) is a standard of care after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the pathophysiology of so-called secondary brain injury, i.e., the cascade of potentially deleterious events that occur in the early phase following initial cerebral insult-after TBI, is complex, involving a subtle interplay between cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen delivery and utilization, and supply of main cerebral energy substrates (glucose) to the injured brain. Regulation of this interplay depends on the type of injury and may vary individually and over time. In this setting, patient management can be a challenging task, where standard ICP/CPP monitoring may become insufficient to prevent secondary brain injury. Growing clinical evidence demonstrates that so-called multimodal brain monitoring, including brain tissue oxygen (PbtO2), cerebral microdialysis and transcranial Doppler among others, might help to optimize CBF and the delivery of oxygen/energy substrate at the bedside, thereby improving the management of secondary brain injury. Looking beyond ICP and CPP, and applying a multimodal therapeutic approach for the optimization of CBF, oxygen delivery, and brain energy supply may eventually improve overall care of patients with head injury. This review summarizes some of the important pathophysiological determinants of secondary cerebral damage after TBI and discusses novel approaches to optimize CBF and provide adequate oxygen and energy supply to the injured brain using multimodal brain monitoring.

  7. Miniature Coplanar Implantable Antenna on Thin and Flexible Platform for Fully Wireless Intracranial Pressure Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Waqas A. Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive approach to intracranial pressure monitoring is desired for long-term diagnostics. The monitored pressure is transmitted outside the skull through an implant antenna. We present a new miniature (6 mm × 5 mm coplanar implant antenna and its integration on a sensor platform to establish a far-field data link for the sensor readout at distances of 0.5 to 1 meter. The implant antenna was developed using full-wave electromagnetic simulator and measured in a liquid phantom mimicking the dielectric properties of the human head. It achieved impedance reflection coefficient better than −10 dB from 2.38 GHz to 2.54 GHz which covers the targeted industrial, scientific, and medical band. Experiments resulted in an acceptable peak gain of approximately −23 dBi. The implant antenna was submerged in the liquid phantom and interfaced to a 0.5 mW voltage controlled oscillator. To verify the implant antenna performance as a part of the ICP monitoring system, we recorded the radiated signal strength using a spectrum analyzer. Using a half-wavelength dipole as the receiving antenna, we captured approximately −58.7 dBm signal at a distance of 1 m from the implant antenna which is well above for the reader with sensitivity of −80 dBm.

  8. Posture-independent piston valve: a novel valve mechanism that actuates based on intracranial pressure alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medow, Joshua E; Luzzio, Christopher C

    2012-01-01

    Shunt valves are intended to maintain physiological intracranial pressure (ICP). A variety of mechanisms have been designed to accomplish this goal but have had limited success. Siphoning, in particular, has been a problem not effectively solved by proposed or manufactured valves. Poor control of ICP results in headache, neurological disturbances, decreased cognition, shunt malfunction, slit ventricles, subdural hematomas, decreased cranial volume, and maldevelopment. The authors of this study describe a prototype valve that was machined and tested ex vivo and that actuates based on ICP alone regardless of the presence of a siphon. Their object was to determine if a novel shunt mechanism that actuates perpendicular to the flow of fluid would eliminate the effect of siphoning in a valve for the treatment of hydrocephalus. A posture-independent piston valve (PIPV) was anchored to a graduated reservoir. Opening pressure was measured by noting the fluid level in the reservoir when the piston moved. Measurements were made using a 90-cm and a 120-cm water-filled siphon tube (1.3-mm standard distal catheter) to simulate an upright posture. A recumbent posture was simulated by the absence of a siphon. Opening pressure of the valve did not change regardless of the presence or absence of a water-filled siphon. The PIPV was triggered only by the pressure head at the inlet and did not actuate in the presence of a siphon, demonstrating proof of principle of the perpendicular actuating mechanism. The PIPV is a purely mechanical device that has practical application in the treatment of hydrocephalus.

  9. Intracranial pressure in hydrocephalus: impact of shunt adjustments and body positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Dan; Qvarlander, Sara; Malm, Jan; Wikkelsö, Carsten; Eklund, Anders; Tisell, Magnus

    2015-02-01

    The association between intracranial pressure (ICP) and different shunt valve opening pressures in relation to body positions is fundamental for understanding the physiological function of the shunt. To analyse the ICP and ICP wave amplitude (AMP) at different shunt settings and body positions in patients with hydrocephalus. In this prospective study 15 patients with communicating hydrocephalus were implanted with a ligated adjustable ventriculoperitoneal shunt. They also received a portable intraparenchymatous ICP-monitoring device. Postoperative ICP and AMP were recorded with the patients in three different body positions (supine, sitting and walking) and with the shunt ligated and open at high, medium and low valve settings. In each patient 12 10 min segments were coded, blinded and analysed for mean ICP and mean AMP using an automated computer algorithm. Mean ICP and mean AMP were lower at all three valve settings compared with the ligated shunt state (p<0.001). Overall, when compared with the supine position, mean ICP was 11.5±1.1 (mean±SD) mm Hg lower when sitting and 10.5±1.1 mm Hg lower when walking (p<0.001). Mean ICP was overall 1.1 mm Hg higher (p=0.042) when walking compared with sitting. The maximal adjustability difference (highest vs lowest valve setting) was 4.4 mm Hg. Changing from a supine to an upright position reduced ICP while AMP only increased at trend level. Lowering of the shunt valve opening pressure decreased ICP and AMP but the difference in mean ICP in vivo between the highest and lowest opening pressures was less than half that previously observed in vitro. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Computerised tomographic detection of intracranial complications of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These include cerebral, subdural and epidural abscesses, frontal bone osteomyelitis. The maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses were mostly involved and can be implicated as the sinogenic causes of intracranial infections. Sphenoidal sinus was not involved in any of the patients. Key Words: Intracranial Complications, Sinusitis, ...

  11. Epidural hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... belts). Follow safety precautions at work and in sports and recreation. For example, do not dive into water if the water depth is unknown or if rocks may be present. Alternative Names Extradural hematoma; Extradural hemorrhage; Epidural hemorrhage; EDH ...

  12. NASA's Current Evidence and Hypothesis for the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Christian A.; Norsk, Peter; Oubre, Cherie M.; Pass, Anastas F.; Tarver, William

    2012-01-01

    While 40 years of human spaceflight exploration has reported visual decrement to a certain extent in a subgroup of astronauts, recent data suggests that there is indeed a subset of crewmembers that experience refraction changes (hyperoptic shift), cotton wool spot formation, choroidal fold development, papilledema, optic nerve sheath distention and/or posterior globe flattening with varying degrees of severity and permanence. Pre and postflight ocular measures have identified a potential risk of permanent visual changes as a result of microgravity exposure, which has been defined as the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure risk (VIIP). The combination of symptoms are referred to as the VIIP syndrome. It is thought that the ocular structural and optic nerve changes are caused by events precipitated by the cephalad fluid shift crewmembers experience during long-duration spaceflight. Three important systems, ocular, cardiovascular, and central nervous, seem to be involved in the development of symptoms, but the etiology is still under speculation. It is believed that some crewmembers are more susceptible to these changes due to genetic/anatomical predisposition or lifestyle (fitness) related factors. Future research will focus on determining the etiology of the VIIP syndrome and development of mechanisms to mitigate the spaceflight risk.

  13. Advances in Intracranial Pressure Monitoring and Its Significance in Managing Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usmah Kawoos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial pressure (ICP measurements are essential in evaluation and treatment of neurological disorders such as subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, hydrocephalus, meningitis/encephalitis, and traumatic brain injury (TBI. The techniques of ICP monitoring have evolved from invasive to non-invasive—with both limitations and advantages. Some limitations of the invasive methods include short-term monitoring, risk of infection, restricted mobility of the subject, etc. The invasiveness of a method limits the frequency of ICP evaluation in neurological conditions like hydrocephalus, thus hampering the long-term care of patients with compromised ICP. Thus, there has been substantial interest in developing noninvasive techniques for assessment of ICP. Several approaches were reported, although none seem to provide a complete solution due to inaccuracy. ICP measurements are fundamental for immediate care of TBI patients in the acute stages of severe TBI injury. In severe TBI, elevated ICP is associated with mortality or poor clinical outcome. ICP monitoring in conjunction with other neurological monitoring can aid in understanding the pathophysiology of brain damage. This review article presents: (a the significance of ICP monitoring; (b ICP monitoring methods (invasive and non-invasive; and (c the role of ICP monitoring in the management of brain damage, especially TBI.

  14. Elevated intracranial pressure and reversible eye-tracking changes detected while viewing a film clip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolecki, Radek; Dammavalam, Vikalpa; Bin Zahid, Abdullah; Hubbard, Molly; Choudhry, Osamah; Reyes, Marleen; Han, ByoungJun; Wang, Tom; Papas, Paraskevi Vivian; Adem, Aylin; North, Emily; Gilbertson, David T; Kondziolka, Douglas; Huang, Jason H; Huang, Paul P; Samadani, Uzma

    2017-06-02

    OBJECTIVE The precise threshold differentiating normal and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is variable among individuals. In the context of several pathophysiological conditions, elevated ICP leads to abnormalities in global cerebral functioning and impacts the function of cranial nerves (CNs), either or both of which may contribute to ocular dysmotility. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of elevated ICP on eye-tracking performed while patients were watching a short film clip. METHODS Awake patients requiring placement of an ICP monitor for clinical purposes underwent eye tracking while watching a 220-second continuously playing video moving around the perimeter of a viewing monitor. Pupil position was recorded at 500 Hz and metrics associated with each eye individually and both eyes together were calculated. Linear regression with generalized estimating equations was performed to test the association of eye-tracking metrics with changes in ICP. RESULTS Eye tracking was performed at ICP levels ranging from -3 to 30 mm Hg in 23 patients (12 women, 11 men, mean age 46.8 years) on 55 separate occasions. Eye-tracking measures correlating with CN function linearly decreased with increasing ICP (p film clip. These results suggest that eye tracking may be used as a noninvasive, automatable means to quantitate the physiological impact of elevated ICP, which has clinical application for assessment of shunt malfunction, pseudotumor cerebri, concussion, and prevention of second-impact syndrome.

  15. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of Intracranial Pressure Predicts Outcome Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkness, Catherine J.; Mitchell, Pamela H.

    2009-01-01

    Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) is a recently developed technique suitable for describing scaling behavior of variability in physiological signals. The purpose of this study is to explore applicability of DFA methods to intracranial pressure (ICP) signals recorded in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). In addition to establishing the degree of fit of the power-law scaling model of detrended fluctuations of ICP in TBI patients, we also examined the relationship of DFA coefficients (scaling exponent and intercept) to: 1) measures of initial neurological functioning; 2) measures of functional outcome at six month follow-up; and 3) measures of outcome, controlling for patient characteristics, and initial neurological status. In a sample of 147 moderate-to-severely injured TBI patients, we found that a higher DFA scaling exponent is significantly associated with poorer initial neurological functioning, and that lower DFA intercept and higher DFA scaling exponent jointly predict poorer functional outcome at six month follow-up, even after statistical control for covariates reflecting initial neurological condition. DFA describes properties of ICP signal in TBI patients that are associated with both initial neurological condition and outcome at six months postinjury. PMID:18990620

  16. Rapid intracranial pressure drop as a cause for posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Ryoko; Oya, Soichi; Nakamura, Takumi; Hana, Taijun; Matsui, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by reversible edematous lesions on radiological examinations as well as symptoms of altered consciousness and seizures. To date, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Case 1 is a 72-year-old man with a history of hypertension presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Fourteen days after the successful clipping of a ruptured aneurysm; he experienced inadvertent overdrainage via the intraventricular drain. Nine hours later, he started to have seizures followed by disturbances in consciousness. An emergency magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple high-intensity lesions in the frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes, basal ganglia, brainstem, and cerebellar hemispheres bilaterally, which are compatible with typical magnetic resonance findings in PRES patients. He was treated conservatively and recovered well. Case 2 is a 68-year-old woman with a mild history of hypertension and a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt for obstructive hydrocephalus, who underwent a cysto-peritoneal shunt placement because of an enlarging symptomatic arachnoid cyst. Immediately following surgery, she experienced disturbances in consciousness and developed status epilepticus. Radiological examinations revealed remarkable shrinkage of the arachnoid cyst and multiple edematous lesions, which led us to strongly suspect PRES. With conservative treatment, her symptoms and the radiological abnormalities disappeared. Based on the previous literature and our cases, we believe that the association between rapid reduction of intracranial pressure (ICP) and the development of PRES should be recognized because most neurosurgical procedures such as craniotomy or cerebrospinal fluid diversion present a potential risk of rapid reduction of ICP.

  17. The effect of head-down tilt and water immersion on intracranial pressure in nonhuman primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Lanny C.; Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Hines, John; Severs, Walter B.

    1992-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is investigated in primates during and after -6-deg head-down tilt (HDT) and immersion in water to examine the effects of the headward fluid shift related to spaceflight. Following the HDT the primates are subjected to head-out thermoneutral water immersion, and the ICP is subsequently measured. ICP is found to increase from 3.8 +/- 1.1 to 5.3 +/- 1.3 mm Hg during the horizontal control period. ICP stabilizes at -6.3 +/- 1.3 mm Hg and then increases to -2.2 +/- 1.9 mm Hg during partial immersion, and ICP subsequently returns to preimmersion levels after immersion. These data indicate that exposure to HDT or water immersion lead to an early sharp increase in ICP, and water immersion alone leads to higher ICP levels. A significant conclusion of the work is that the ICP did not approach pathological levels, and this finding is relevant to human spaceflight research.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging signs of presumed elevated intracranial pressure in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittermann, S; Lang, J; Henke, D; Howard, J; Gorgas, D

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings associated with presumed elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in dogs and to evaluate whether MRI could be used to discriminate between dogs with and without elevated ICP. Of 91 dogs that underwent cranial MRI examination, 18 (19.8%) were diagnosed with elevated ICP based on neurological examination, fundoscopy and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. The MRI findings that showed the strongest association with elevated ICP were mass effect (odds ratio [OR], 78.5), caudal transtentorial herniation (OR, 72.0), subfalcine herniation (OR, 45.6), perilesional oedema (OR, 34.0), displacement of the lamina quadrigemina (OR, 27.7) and effacement of the cerebral sulci (OR, 27.1). The presence of any two or more of the following MRI findings identified elevated ICP with a sensitivity of 72% and a specificity of 96%: compression of the suprapineal recess, compression of the third ventricle, compression of the fourth ventricle, effacement of the cerebral sulci and caudal transposition of the lamina quadrigemina. In conclusion, there is an association between MRI findings and elevated ICP in dogs; therefore, MRI might be useful to discriminate between dogs with and without elevated ICP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Automated midline shift and intracranial pressure estimation based on brain CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenan; Belle, Ashwin; Cockrell, Charles; Ward, Kevin R; Najarian, Kayvan

    2013-04-13

    In this paper we present an automated system based mainly on the computed tomography (CT) images consisting of two main components: the midline shift estimation and intracranial pressure (ICP) pre-screening system. To estimate the midline shift, first an estimation of the ideal midline is performed based on the symmetry of the skull and anatomical features in the brain CT scan. Then, segmentation of the ventricles from the CT scan is performed and used as a guide for the identification of the actual midline through shape matching. These processes mimic the measuring process by physicians and have shown promising results in the evaluation. In the second component, more features are extracted related to ICP, such as the texture information, blood amount from CT scans and other recorded features, such as age, injury severity score to estimate the ICP are also incorporated. Machine learning techniques including feature selection and classification, such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs), are employed to build the prediction model using RapidMiner. The evaluation of the prediction shows potential usefulness of the model. The estimated ideal midline shift and predicted ICP levels may be used as a fast pre-screening step for physicians to make decisions, so as to recommend for or against invasive ICP monitoring.

  20. Delayed Presentation of Isolated Sagittal Synostosis With Raised Intracranial Pressure and Secondary Chiari Malformation With Cervical Syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofos, Stratos S; Robertson, Ben; Duncan, Christian; Sinha, Ajay

    2017-07-01

    Sagittal craniosynostosis (SC) is the most common type of premature suture fusion presenting in approximately 1 in every 5000 births with a 3:1 male:female ratio. The most common indication for surgery is the improvement of the cosmetic appearance of the skull, since a cranial deformation may have a significant psychosocial impact on affected patients. Relief from raised intracranial pressure is a further indication for surgery, although an increased intracranial pressure (ICP) can be demonstrated only in a minority of affected children at diagnosis. It is even more rare to have Chiari malformations (CMs) secondary to ICP in an isolated SC, as shown in a study by Strahle et al (Neurosurg Focus 2011;31:E2), demonstrating only 5 (3%) of the 183 with isolated sagittal synostosis having a CM. The authors present the rare case of a 4-year-old boy presenting late with raised intracranial pressure (40 mm Hg) and his management with 1 stage vault expansion and decompression of CM.

  1. Ocular findings in raised intracranial pressure: a case of Terson syndrome in a 7-month-old infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Othon J; Paul, Ian; Reichard, R Ross

    2011-03-01

    We present the case of a 7-month-old female infant who was found crying and limp. She was transported to a hospital where a possible subarachnoid hemorrhage was diagnosed radiologically. Before further studies could be pursued, her condition worsened and she died. The autopsy demonstrated diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage of the brain and along the spinal cord. The brain, spinal cord, and eyes were retained and examined postfixation. An aneurysm of the middle cerebral artery was identified. Examination of the eyes demonstrated bilateral optic nerve sheath hemorrhage and extensive retinal hemorrhages extending to the ora serrata. A rapid increase in intracranial pressure secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage following rupture of an aneurysm can result in sequelae similar to those found in inflicted traumatic brain injury. In this case, the rise in intracranial pressure resulted in marked hemorrhage within the optic nerve sheaths as well as intra- and preretinal hemorrhages. Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, or other causes of rapidly increased intracranial pressure, may develop ocular hemorrhage (Terson syndrome). This case illustrates the importance of ruling out natural disease before attributing the autopsy findings to trauma, as well as the importance of postmortem fixation of pediatric brains and eyes prior to examination.

  2. The relationship between intracranial pressure and size of cerebral ventricles assessed by computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, P K

    2003-03-01

    This study explored whether assessment of the cerebral ventricular size (or changes in size) by cranial computed tomography (CT) is a reliable way to predict the intracranial pressure (ICP). A total of 224 cranial CT scans and continuous 24 hours ICP recordings in 184 patients were examined and compared. In these cases examinations were undertaken on the basis of suspected craniosynostosis, hydrocephalus or extracranial shunt failure. Simultaneous CT scanning and ICP monitoring was performed twice in 31 cases. Various measures of cerebral ventricular size were computed on the basis of CT, including Evan's index, third ventricular index, cella media index and ventricular score. Various measures of ICP were computed by means of the software Sensometrics Pressure Analyser, including computation of mean ICP, numbers of ICP elevations (20-30 mmHg lasting either 0.5, 1, 5 or 10 minutes), and numbers of ICP depressions (-5 or -10 mmHg lasting either 0.5, 1, 5 or 10 minutes) during a standardized recording time of 10 hours. The relationships between the various measures of ventricular size and the various measures of ICP were explored. There was a weak and non-significant relationship between the various measures of ventricular size and the measures of ICP in the 184 cases. There was a weak relationship between changes in size of cerebral ventricles and changes in ICP in the 31 cases examined twice. The present results suggest that actual size or changes in size of the cerebral ventricles were no reliable predictors of ICP or changes in ICP, suggesting that great caution should be exercised when predicting ICP on the basis of the size of the cerebral ventricles on cranial CT scanning.

  3. Quantitative analysis of continuous intracranial pressure recordings in symptomatic patients with extracranial shunts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, P K

    2003-02-01

    To explore the outcome of management of possible shunt related symptoms using intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring, and to identify potential methodological limitations with the current strategies of ICP assessment. The distribution of persistent symptoms related to extracranial shunt treatment was compared before and after management of shunt failure in 69 consecutive hydrocephalic cases. Management was heavily based on ICP monitoring (calculation of mean ICP and visual determination of plateau waves). After the end of patient management, all ICP curves were re-evaluated using a quantitative method and software (Sensometrics pressure analyser). The ICP curves were presented as a matrix of numbers of ICP elevations (20 to 35 mm Hg) or depressions (-10 to -5 mm Hg) of different durations (0.5, 1, or 5 minutes). The numbers of ICP elevations/depressions standardised to 10 hours recording time were calculated to allow comparisons of ICP between individuals. After ICP monitoring and management of the putative shunt related symptoms, the symptoms remained unchanged in as many as 58% of the cases, with the highest percentages in those patients with ICP considered normal or too low at the time of ICP monitoring. The quantitative analysis revealed a high frequency of ICP elevations (20 to 35 mm Hg lasting 0.5 to 1 minute) and ICP depressions (-10 to -5 mm Hg lasting 0.5, 1, or 5 minutes), particularly in patients with ICP considered normal. The value of continuous ICP monitoring with ICP analysis using current criteria appears doubtful in the management of possible shunt related symptoms. This may reflect limitations in the strategies of ICP analysis. Calculation of the exact numbers of ICP elevations and depressions may provide a more accurate description of the ICP profile.

  4. System for Rapid, Precise Modulation of Intraocular Pressure, toward Minimally-Invasive In Vivo Measurement of Intracranial Pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max A Stockslager

    Full Text Available Pathologic changes in intracranial pressure (ICP are commonly observed in a variety of medical conditions, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, brain tumors, and glaucoma. However, current ICP measurement techniques are invasive, requiring a lumbar puncture or surgical insertion of a cannula into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-filled ventricles of the brain. A potential alternative approach to ICP measurement leverages the unique anatomy of the central retinal vein, which is exposed to both intraocular pressure (IOP and ICP as it travels inside the eye and through the optic nerve; manipulating IOP while observing changes in the natural pulsations of the central retinal vein could potentially provide an accurate, indirect measure of ICP. As a step toward implementing this technique, we describe the design, fabrication, and characterization of a system that is capable of manipulating IOP in vivo with <0.1 mmHg resolution and settling times less than 2 seconds. In vitro tests were carried out to characterize system performance. Then, as a proof of concept, we used the system to manipulate IOP in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri while video of the retinal vessels was recorded and the caliber of a selected vein was quantified. Modulating IOP using our system elicited a rapid change in the appearance of the retinal vein of interest: IOP was lowered from 10 to 3 mmHg, and retinal vein caliber sharply increased as IOP decreased from 7 to 5 mmHg. Another important feature of this technology is its capability to measure ocular compliance and outflow facility in vivo, as demonstrated in tree shrews. Collectively, these proof-of-concept demonstrations support the utility of this system to manipulate IOP for a variety of useful applications in ocular biomechanics, and provide a framework for further study of the mechanisms of retinal venous pulsation.

  5. The effect of hypertonic sodium chloride on intracranial pressure in patients with acute liver failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, Nicholas; Auzinger, Georg; Bernel, William; Wendon, Julia

    2004-01-01

    .... Cerebral edema occurs in up to 80% of patients with Grade IV encephalopathy. In the current prospective randomized controlled clinical trial, we examined the effect of induced hypernatremia on the incidence of intracranial hypertension (IH...

  6. Brain hypoxanthine concentration correlates to lactate/pyruvate ratio but not intracranial pressure in patients with acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Hauerberg, John; Jørgensen, Linda

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cerebral edema in acute liver failure is suggested, in in vitro and animal studies, to involve a compromised oxidative metabolism with a decrease in cerebral ATP levels and an increase in purine concentrations. In this study we hypothesize that the cerebral concentrations...... of hypoxanthine, inosine, and lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio are increased and correlated in patients with acute liver failure. Furthermore, we expect the purines and L/P ratio to correlate with intracranial pressure (ICP) (positively), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) (negatively)....

  7. The effects of intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with traumatic brain injury.

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    Shao-Hua Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although international guideline recommended routine intracranial pressure (ICP monitoring for patients with severe traumatic brain injury(TBI, there were conflicting outcomes attributable to ICP monitoring according to the published studies. Hence, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ICP monitoring in patients with TBI. METHODS: Based on previous reviews, PubMed and two Chinese databases (Wangfang and VIP were further searched to identify eligible studies. The primary outcome was mortality. Secondary outcomes included unfavourable outcome, adverse events, length of ICU stay and length of hospital stay. Weighted mean difference (WMD, odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated and pooled using fixed-effects or random-effects model. RESULTS: two randomized controlled trials (RCTs and seven cohort studies involving 11,038 patients met the inclusion criteria. ICP monitoring was not associated with a significant reduction in mortality (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.87-1.54, with substantial heterogeneity (I(2 = 80%, P<0.00001, which was verified by the sensitivity analyses. No significant difference was found in the occurrence of unfavourable outcome (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.99-1.98; I(2 = 4%, P = 0.35 and adverse events (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.64-1.70; I(2 = 78%, P = 0.03. However, we should be cautious to the result of adverse events because of the substantial heterogeneity in the comparison. Furthermore, longer ICU and hospital stay were the consistent tendency according to the pooled studies. CONCLUSIONS: No benefit was found in patients with TBI who underwent ICP monitoring. Considering substantial clinical heterogeneity, further large sample size RCTs are needed to confirm the current findings.

  8. Noninvasive intracranial pressure monitoring via optic nerve sheath diameter for robotic surgery in steep Trendelenburg position

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    Shagun Bhatia Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent reports of increased intracranial pressure (ICP due to steep Trendelenburg (ST position causing neurological deterioration, decreased regional cerebral oxygen saturation and postoperative visual loss after robotic urological and gynecological surgeries led us to consider a simple technique of ICP monitoring. Ours is one of the first instances reported of quantitative noninvasive measurement of increase in ICP with ST position by serial measurement of binocular optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD in patients undergoing robot assisted urological and gynecological oncosurgery. We tested whether ONSD values rose to above the upper limits of normal and for what length of time they remained elevated. Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized, interventional, parallel group, active control study conducted on 252 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients. ONSD was measured using 7.5 MHz linear ultrasound probe in supine and Trendelenburg positions. Statistics: Student′s t-test to compare the inter-group mean ONSD and the repetitive t-test for intra-group analysis. Result: Comparison of the mean ONSD values of both groups yielded a 2-tailed significance P <0.01 at all compared time points intra- and post-operatively. In Group-O (open surgery; supine position, the baseline mean bilateral ONSD was 4.36 mm, which did not show any statistically significant change throughout open surgery and postoperative period. On de-docking the robot, 6.2 mm was the mean ONSD value in Group-R (robotic group while 4.3 mm was the corresponding value in control Group-O. Conclusion: ONSD evaluation is a simple, quick, safe, readily available, reliable, cost effective, noninvasive, potential standard of care for screening and monitoring of patients undergoing robotic surgery in ST position.

  9. How accurate is ultrasound of the optic nerve sheath diameter performed by inexperienced operators to exclude raised intracranial pressure?

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    G. J. du Toit

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been well documented that ultrasound measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter performed by an experienced operator shows good correlation with raised intracranial pressure, irrespective of the cause. Objective: To establish the accuracy of this technique performed by inexperienced operators.Method: A prospective analytical cross-sectional study was conducted. All patients ≥18 years of age who presented at our medical casualty and emergency departments with suspected meningitis were enrolled in the study. All patients were evaluated with the use of optic nerve sheath diameter ultrasound with or without computed tomography brain scan prior to lumbar puncture. Lumbar puncture opening pressure measurements were compared with the ultrasound measurements.Results: A total of 73 patients were enrolled in the study, of whom 14 had raised intracranial pressure. The study had a sensitivity of 50% (95% confidence interval (CI 26.8%–73.2% and specificity of 89.8% (95% CI 79.5%–95.3% with a positive predictive value of 54.8% (95% CI 29.1%–76.8% and negative predictive value of 88.3% (95% CI 77.8%–94.2%. The likelihood ratio of a positive test was 4.92 (95% CI 1.95–11.89 and that of a negative test 0.56 (95% CI 0.29–0.83. Cohen’s kappa value was 0.41 which indicates a moderate agreement. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve had an area under the curve (AUC of 0.73 (95% CI 0.51–0.95. Conclusion: Ultrasound measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter can be used to exclude raised intracranial pressure, even in the hands of inexperienced operators.

  10. Incidence and predictors of dural venous sinus pressure gradient in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and non-idiopathic intracranial hypertension headache patients: results from 164 cerebral venograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Michael R; Hlubek, Randall J; Moon, Karam; Kalani, M Yashar S; Nakaji, Peter; Smith, Kris A; Little, Andrew S; Knievel, Kerry; Chan, Jane W; McDougall, Cameron G; Albuquerque, Felipe C

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Cerebral venous pressure gradient (CVPG) from dural venous sinus stenosis is implicated in headache syndromes such as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The incidence of CVPG in headache patients has not been reported. METHODS The authors reviewed all cerebral venograms with manometry performed for headache between January 2008 and May 2015. Patient demographics, headache etiology, intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements, and radiographic and manometric results were recorded. CVPG was defined as a difference ≥ 8 mm Hg by venographic manometry. RESULTS One hundred sixty-four venograms were performed in 155 patients. There were no procedural complications. Ninety-six procedures (58.5%) were for patients with IIH. The overall incidence of CVPG was 25.6% (42 of 164 procedures): 35.4% (34 of 96 procedures) in IIH patients and 11.8% (8 of 68 procedures) in non-IIH patients. Sixty procedures (36.6%) were performed in patients with preexisting shunts. Seventy-seven patients (49.7%) had procedures preceded by an ICP measurement within 4 weeks of venography, and in 66 (85.7%) of these patients, the ICP had been found to be elevated. CVPG was seen in 8.3% (n = 5) of the procedures in the 60 patients with a preexisting shunt and in 0% (n = 0) of the 11 procedures in the 77 patients with normal ICP (p < 0.001 for both). Noninvasive imaging (MR venography, CT venography) was assessed prior to venography in 112 (68.3%) of 164 cases, and dural venous sinus abnormalities were demonstrated in 73 (65.2%) of these cases; there was a trend toward CVPG (p = 0.07). Multivariate analysis demonstrated an increased likelihood of CVPG in patients with IIH (OR 4.97, 95% CI 1.71-14.47) and a decreased likelihood in patients with a preexisting shunt (OR 0.09, 95% CI 0.02-0.44). CONCLUSIONS CVPG is uncommon in IIH patients, rare in those with preexisting shunts, and absent in those with normal ICP.

  11. Assessment of the usability of a digital learning technology prototype for monitoring intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Lilian Regina de; Évora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; Zem-Mascarenhas, Silvia Helena

    2016-08-29

    to assess the usability of a digital learning technology prototype as a new method for minimally invasive monitoring of intracranial pressure. descriptive study using a quantitative approach on assessing the usability of a prototype based on Nielsen's ten heuristics. Four experts in the area of Human-Computer interaction participated in the study. the evaluation delivered eight violated heuristics and 31 usability problems in the 32 screens of the prototype. the suggestions of the evaluators were critical for developing an intuitive, user-friendly interface and will be included in the final version of the digital learning technology. avaliar a usabilidade de um protótipo educacional digital sobre um novo método para monitoração da pressão intracraniana de forma minimamente invasivo para enfermeiros e médicos. estudo descritivo com abordagem quantitativa sobre a avaliação de usabilidade de um protótipo com base nas dez Heurísticas de Nielsen. Participaram quatro especialistas da área de Interação Humano Computador. a avaliação resultou em oito heurísticas violadas e 31 problemas de usabilidade nas 32 telas do protótipo. as sugestões dos avaliadores foram cruciais para o desenvolvimento de uma interface amigável e intuitiva e serão consideradas na versão final da tecnologia educacional digital. evaluar la usabilidad de un prototipo educacional digital sobre un nuevo método para monitorización de la presión intracraneal, de manera mínimamente invasiva. estudio descriptivo con abordaje cuantitativo sobre la evaluación de usabilidad de un prototipo con base en las diez reglas Heurísticas de Nielsen. Participaron cuatro especialistas del área de Interacción Humana Computador. la evaluación resultó en ocho reglas heurísticas violadas y 31 problemas de usabilidad en las 32 pantallas del prototipo. las sugestiones de los evaluadores fueron cruciales para el desarrollo de una interfaz amigable e intuitiva y éstas serán consideradas en la

  12. Increased Intracranial Pressure during Hemodialysis in a Patient with Anoxic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anton; Damholt, Mette B; Strange, Ditte G

    2017-01-01

    Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS) is a serious neurological complication of hemodialysis, and patients with acute brain injury are at increased risk. We report a case of DDS leading to intracranial hypertension in a patient with anoxic brain injury and discuss the subsequent dialysis strateg...

  13. Predictability of intracranial pressure level in traumatic brain injury: features extraction, statistical analysis and machine learning-based evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenan; Cockrell, Charles H; Ward, Kevin; Najarian, Kayvan

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to predict Intracranial Pressure (ICP) based on features extracted from non-invasively collected patient data. These features include midline shift measurement and textural features extracted from Computed axial Tomography (CT) images. A statistical analysis is performed to examine the relationship between ICP and midline shift. Machine learning is also applied to estimate ICP levels with a two-stage feature selection scheme. To avoid overfitting, all feature selections and parameter selections are performed using a nested 10-fold cross validation within the training data. The classification results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in ICP prediction.

  14. Intraparenchymal intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with acute liver failure Monitoreo intraparenquimatoso de presión intracraneana en pacientes con falla hepática aguda

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    Alejandra T. Rabadán

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP is a common cause of death in acute liver failure (ALF and is determinant for decision-making regarding the timing of liver transplantation. The recommended type ICP monitoring device is controversial in ALF patients. Epidural devices had less risk of hemorrhagic complications, but they are less reliable than intraparenchymal ones. METHOD: Twenty-three patients with ALF were treated, and 19 of them received a liver transplant. Seventeen patients had ICP monitoring because of grade III-IV encephalopathy. All patients received fresh plasma (2-3 units before and during placing the intraparenchymal device. RESULTS: Eleven cases (64.7% had elevated ICP, and 6 patients (35.2% had normal values. One patient (5.9% had an asymptomatic small intraparenchymal haemorrhage ANTECEDENTES: La presión intracraneana elevada (PIC es una causa frecuente de muerte en la falla hepática aguda (FHA y es determinante para la toma de decisiones respecto del momento del transplante hepático. El tipo de dispositivo para el monitoreo de OIC es controversial em los pacientes em FHA. Los dispositivos epidurales tienen menos riesgo de complicaciones hemorrágicas, pero son menos confiables que los intraparenquimatosos. MÉTODO: Veintitrés pacientes con FHA fueron tratados, y 19 de ellos recibieron un transplante hepático. diecisiete pacientes tuvieron monitoreo de PIC debido a encefalopatía grado III-IV. Todos los pacientes recibieron plasma fresco (2-3 unidades antes y durante la colocación de la fibra intraparenquimatosa. RESULTADOS: Once casos (64.7% tuvieron PIC elevada, y 6 pacientes (35.2% tuvieron valores normales. Un paciente (5.9% tuvo una pequeña hemorragia intraparenquimatosa asintomática <1cm³ en TAC, la cual no impidió el transplante hepático. CONCLUSIÓN: En nuestra experiencia, el monitoreo intraparenquimatoso de presión intracraneana en pacientes con FHA parece ser un método preciso y con bajo riesgo

  15. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: case report

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    Iacob G.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension - IIH (synonymous old terms: benign intracranial hypertension - BIH, pseudotumor-cerebri - PTC it’s a syndrome, related to elevated intracranial pressure, of unknown cause, sometimes cerebral emergency, occuring in all age groups, especially in children and young obese womans, in the absence of an underlying expansive intracranial lesion, despite extensive investigations. Although initial symptoms can resolve, IIH displays a high risk of recurrence several months or years later, even if initial symptoms resolved. Results: A 20-year-old male, obese since two years (body mass index 30, 9, was admitted for three months intense headache, vomiting, diplopia, progressive visual acuity loss. Neurologic examination confirmed diplopia by left abducens nerve palsy, papilledema right > left. At admission, cerebral CT scan and cerebral MRI with angio MRI 3DTOF and 2D venous TOF was normal. Despite treatment with acetazolamide (Diamox, corticosteroid, antidepressants (Amitriptyline, anticonvulsivants (Topiramate three weeks later headache, diplopia persist and vision become worse, confirmed by visual field assessment, visual evoked potential (VEP. A cerebral arteriography demonstrate filling defect of the superior sagittal sinus in the 1/3 proximal part and very week filling of the transverse right sinus on venous time. Trombophylic profile has revealed a heterozygote V factor Leyden mutation, a homozygote MTHFR and PAI mutation justifying an anticoagulant treatment initiated to the patient. The MRI showed a superior sagittal sinus, right transverse and sigmoid sinus thrombosis, dilatation and buckling of the optic nerve sheaths with increased perineural fluid especially retrobulbar, discrete flattening of the posterior segment of the eyeballs, spinal MRI showed posterior epidural space with dilated venous branches, with mass effect on the spinal cord, that occurs pushed anterior on sagittal T1/T2 sequences cervical and

  16. Subdural intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, and degree of cerebral swelling in supra- and infratentorial space-occupying lesions in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stilling, M; Karatasi, E; Rasmussen, Mads

    2005-01-01

    UNLABELLED: To our knowledge comparative studies of intracranial pressure (ICP) and degree of cerebral swelling during craniotomy for supratentorial or infratentorial space occupying lesion in children are not available. In this prospective study subdural ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP......), dural tension, and the degree of cerebral swelling were analysed in supine and prone positioned children subjected to craniotomy for space occupying lesions. MATERIAL AND METHOD: 48 children with space occupying tumours were subjected to either isoflurane/nitrous oxide 50%/fentanyl (n = 22) or propofol....../fentanyl/air/oxygen (n = 26). 25 children were operated supratentorially in supine position, while 23 patients were operated infratentorially in the prone position. Subdural ICP, mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), and CPP were measured just before opening of the dura. Dural tension was estimated before opening of dura...

  17. Short-term elevation of intracranial pressure does neither influence duodenal motility nor frequency of bolus transport events: a porcine model

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    Kochs Bjoern

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with traumatic brain injuries and raised intracranial pressure (ICP display biphasic response with faster gastric emptying during the early stage followed by a prolonged gastric transit time later. While duodenal contractile activity plays a pivotal role in transpyloric transit we investigated the effects of raised intracranial pressure on duodenal motility during the early phase. In order to exclude significant deterioration of mucosal blood supply which might also influence duodenal motility, luminal microdialysis was used in conjunction. Methods During general anaesthesia, 11 pigs (32–37 kg, German Landrace were instrumented with both a luminal catheter for impedancometry and a luminal catheter for microdialysis into the proximal duodenum. Additionally, a catheter was inserted into the left ventricle to increase the intracranial pressure from baseline up to 50 mmHg in steps of 10 mmHg each hour by injection of artificial cerebrospinal fluid. At the same time, duodenal motility was recorded continuously. Duodenal luminal lactate, pyruvate, and glucose concentrations were measured during physiological state and during elevated intracranial pressure of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mmHg in six pigs. Five pigs served as controls. Results Although there was a trend towards shortened migrating motor cycle (MMC length in pigs with raised ICP, the interdigestive phase I–III and the MMC cycle length were comparable in the groups. Spontaneous MMC cycles were not disrupted during intracranial hypertension. The mean concentration of lactate and glucose was comparable in the groups, while the concentration of pyruvate was partially higher in the study group than in the controls (p Conclusion The present study suggests that a stepwise and hourly increase of the intracranial pressure of up to 50 mmHg, does not influence duodenal motility activity in a significant manner. A considerable deterioration of the duodenal mucosal blood

  18. The Cushing Reflex: Oliguria as a Reflection of an Elevated Intracranial Pressure

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    K. Leyssens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oliguria is one of the clinical hallmarks of renal failure. The broad differential diagnosis is well known, but a rare cause of oliguria is intracranial hypertension (ICH. The actual knowledge to explain this relationship is scarce. Almost all literature is about animals where authors describe the Cushing reflex in response to ICH. We hypothesize that the Cushing reflex is translated towards the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with a subsequent reduction in medullary blood flow and oliguria. Recently, we were confronted with a patient who had complicated pituitary surgery and displayed multiple times an oliguria while he developed ICH.

  19. Time Course of Changes in Extravascular Lung Water Index, Intracranial and Cerebral Perfusion Pressures in Acute Cerebral Circulatory Disorders

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    Yu. A. Churlyaev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the time course of changes in extravascular lung water index (ELWI and intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures (ICP and CPP and to determine their possible relationships in acute cerebral circulatory disorders (ACCD. Subject and methods. ELWI, pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI, ICP, CPP, and central hemodynamics were studied by transpulmonary thermodilution and current X-ray studies were conducted in 18 patients on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 of ACCD. Results. Examinations revealed a supratentorial dislocation of the brain in 6 persons; its subtento-rial dislocation was found in 1 case; supra- and subtentorial dislocations were seen in 6. In patients, ELWI and PVPI increased from days 1 and 5, respectively. The high baseline ICP increased over time. CPP remained unchanged. Preserved left ventricular contractility, enhanced myocardial one, a significant direct correlation between ELWI and PVPI, as well as their increase confirmed that the noncardiogenic genesis was responsible for increased ELWI. A direct significant correlation was found between ICP and ELWI, ICP and PVPI. Against this background, acute respiratory distress syndrome developed in 14 patients with pneumonia evolving in its presence in 7 patients. Conclusion. In ACCD, ELWI increases in the first 24 hours of the acute period. One of its causes is, along with others, primary and/or secondary damage to the brainstem structures with elevated ICP and progressive brain dislocation. The determination of ICP, unlike CPP, is crucial in the diagnosis and treatment of primary/secondary brain injuries and in prognosis. Key words: acute cerebral circulatory disorder, extravascular lung fluid, pulmonary vascular permeability, intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  20. [Noninvasive determination of pressure relations of intracranial and intracochlear fluid spaces during the glycerol test in normal probands and patients with Menière's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosepath, K; Maurer, J; Thews, O; Mann, W

    1996-07-01

    The cochlear aqueduct is a route for direct pressure transfer between intracranial and intracochlear fluids. In patients with Menière's disease, intracochlear pressure is presumably disturbed. The "Tympanic Membrane Displacement Analyser (TDA)" is a new system which provides a useful noninvasive method of detecting intracranial and intracochlear pressure changes. In this study TDA measurements in combination with a glycerol test were performed in nine patients with Menière's disease and in seven normal persons. Before ingestion of glycerol, no significant difference in pressure was found between the two groups. After ingestion of glycerol a temporary decrease in intracochlear pressure was detected in both groups without any significant difference between the two groups. These results show that the combination of glycerol testing and TDA measurements does not seem to be helpful for the differential diagnosis of Menière's disease.

  1. Post Traumatic Cerebral Oedema in Severe Head Injury is Related to Intracranial Pressure and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure but not to Cerebral Compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Nujaimin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This was a prospective cohort study, carried out in the Neuro Intensive Care Unit, Department of Neurosciences, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian Kelantan. The study was approved by the local ethics committee and was conducted between November 2005 and September 2007 with a total of 30 patients included in the study. In our study, univariate analysis showed a statistically significant relationship between mean intracranial pressure (ICP as well as cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP with both states of basal cistern and the degree of diffuse injury and oedema based on the Marshall classification system. The ICP was higher while CPP and compliance were lower whenever the basal cisterns were effaced in cases of cerebral oedema with Marshall III and IV. In comparison, the study revealed lower ICP, higher mean CPP and better mean cerebral compliance if the basal cisterns were opened or the post operative CT brain scan showed Marshall I and II. These findings suggested the surgical evacuation of clots to reduce the mass volume and restoration of brain anatomy may reduce vascular engorgement and cerebral oedema, therefore preventing intracranial hypertension, and improving cerebral perfusion pressure and cerebral compliance. Nevertheless the study did not find any significant relationship between midline shifts and mean ICP, CPP or cerebral compliance even though lower ICP, higher CPP and compliance were frequently observed when the midline shift was less than 0.5 cm. As the majority of our patients had multiple and diffuse brain injuries, the absence of midline shift did not necessarily mean lower ICP as the pathology was bilateral and even when after excluding the multiple lesions, the result remained insignificant. We assumed that the CT brain scan obtained after evacuation of the mass lesion to assess the state basal cistern and classify the diffuse oedema may prognosticate the intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure

  2. Delayed epidural hematoma after mild head injury

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    Radulović Danilo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Traumatic delayed epidural hematoma (DEH can be defined as insignificant or not seen on the initial CT scan performed after a trauma but seen on the subsequent CT scan as a “massive” epidural bleeding. Case report. We presented two cases of traumatic DEH after mild head injury. Both patients were conscious and without neurological deficit on the admission. Initial CT scan did not reveal intracranial hematoma. Repeated CT scan, that was performed after neurological deterioration, revealed epidural hematoma in both cases. The patients were operated with a favorable surgical outcome. Conclusion. Traumatic DEH could occur in the patients with head injuries who were conscious on the admission with a normal initial CT scan finding. Early detection of DEH and an urgent surgical evacuation were essential for a good outcome.

  3. Equal contribution of increased intracranial pressure and subarachnoid blood to cerebral blood flow reduction and receptor upregulation after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Laboratory investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    . The effects in all parameters were more pronounced for SAH than for saline injection. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed that both the elevation of intracranial pressure and subarachnoid blood per se contribute approximately equally to the late CBF reductions and receptor upregulation following SAH....

  4. Low-pressure balloon angioplasty with adjuvant pharmacological therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by intracranial arterial occlusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Raul G. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Endovascular Neurosurgery/Interventional Neuroradiology Section, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery, Endovascular Neurosurgery/Interventional Neuroradiology Section, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Neurology, Neurocritical Care and Vascular Neurology Section, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Schwamm, Lee H.; Buonanno, Ferdinando S.; Koroshetz, Walter J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Neurology, Neurocritical Care and Vascular Neurology Section, Boston, MA (United States); Yoo, Albert J.; Rabinov, James D.; Pryor, Johnny C.; Hirsch, Joshua A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Endovascular Neurosurgery/Interventional Neuroradiology Section, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery, Endovascular Neurosurgery/Interventional Neuroradiology Section, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-04-15

    The use of coronary balloons in the cerebral vasculature is limited due to their poor trackability and increased risk of vessel injury. We report our experience using more compliant elastomer balloons for thrombus resistant to intraarterial (IA) pharmacological and mechanical thrombolysis in acute stroke. We retrospectively analyzed 12 consecutive patients with an occluded intracranial artery treated with angioplasty using a low-pressure elastomer balloon. Angiograms were graded according to the Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) and Qureshi grading systems. Outcomes were categorized as independent (modified Rankin scale, mRS, score {<=}2), dependent (mRS score 3-5), or dead (mRS score 6). Included in the study were 12 patients (mean age 66{+-}17 years, range 31-88 years; mean baseline National Institutes of Health stroke scale score 17{+-}3, range 12-23). The occlusion sites were: internal carotid artery (ICA) terminus (five patients, including two concomitant cervical ICA occlusions), M1 segment (two patients), and basilar artery (two patients). Pharmacological treatment included intravenous (IV) t-PA only (two patients), IA urokinase only (nine patients), both IV t-PA and IA urokinase (one patient), and IV and/or IA eptifibatide (eight patients). Mean time to treatment was 5.9{+-}3.9 h (anterior circulation) and 11.0{+-}7.2 h (posterior circulation). Overall recanalization rate (TICI grade 2/3) was 91.6%. Procedure-related morbidity occurred in one patient (distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery embolus). There were no symptomatic hemorrhages. Outcomes at 90 days were independent (five patients), dependent (three patients) and dead (four patients, all due to progression of stroke with withdrawal of care). Angioplasty of acutely occluded intracranial arteries with low-pressure elastomer balloons results in high recanalization rates with an acceptable degree of safety. Prior use of thrombolytics may increase the chances of recanalization, and

  5. Ventriculoperitoneal shunts for treating increased intracranial pressure in cryptococcal meningitis with or without ventriculomegaly

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    Marcelo Corti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cryptococcosis is an opportunistic mycosis, especially in patients that are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive, and frequently involves the central nervous system. Methods We assessed the potential of ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VPS in preventing mortality due to uncontrollable intracranial hypertension (ICH in 15 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis. Results After 2 weeks of antifungal therapy consisting of amphotericin B deoxycholate with or without fluconazole, patients with persistent ICH underwent VPS, despite having persistent Cryptococcus neoformans infection. In 12 patients, the uncontrollable ICH was resolved by VPS. Conclusions Patients with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis who have ICH must be considered for VPS even with positive cerebrospinal fluid cultures.

  6. Manifestations of Pediatric Intracranial Hypertension From the Intracranial Hypertension Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Shawn C; Waslo, Carin S; Au, Johnathan N; Tanne, Emanuel

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the presenting symptoms, demographics, and interventions in pediatric patients enrolled in the Intracranial Hypertension Registry. We analyzed confirmed intracranial hypertension patients ≤18 years at the time of initial diagnosis who were enrolled in the registry. A total of 203 patients met the criteria for inclusion; 142 (70%) were considered primary intracranial hypertension. Females made up 72.5% (103 of 142) and 75.8% (47 of 61) in the primary intracranial hypertension and secondary intracranial hypertension groups, respectively. There were no clinically significant differences in age, body mass index, or opening pressure between the primary intracranial hypertension and secondary intracranial hypertension groups. Symptoms most often reported were headache and blurred vision. Bilateral optic disc edema occurred in 89.3% of primary intracranial hypertension and 78.7% of secondary intracranial hypertension patients. When divided into pre- and postpubertal status, 32.5% of patients were classified prepubertal; 77.3% of these had primary intracranial hypertension. This resulted in a female to male ratio of 1:1.04 for prepubertal and 6:1 for postpubertal primary intracranial hypertension patients. The body mass index was significantly higher in the postpubertal primary intracranial hypertension group (P = 0.0014). There was no significant difference in opening pressure. The common symptoms of intracranial hypertension, including headache, optic disc edema, and vision changes, occurred with similar frequencies in our cohort to those reported in the literature. In separate subanalyses, we found significantly higher rates of obesity in postpubertal females with primary intracranial hypertension. The female-to-male ratios in the postpubertal primary intracranial hypertension and secondary intracranial hypertension groups were higher than reported in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Increases of intracranial pressure and changes of blood flow velocity due to acupressure, needle and laser needle acupuncture?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litscher, Gerhard; Wang, Lu; Schwarz, Gerhard; Schikora, Detlef

    2005-08-01

    Pressure on the acupoints St.7 and SJ.22 can lead to significant, reversible increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with elevated ICP. In this study, we investigated whether changes in cerebral parameters in healthy volunteers can also be registered, when the mentioned acupoints associated with ICP, are stimulated. We investigated a total of 34 volunteers (24 females, 10 males) and a 15-year-old intensive care patient after severe head injury. The mean age of volunteers was 25.2 +/- 3.4 years (range 20-35). Stimulation was performed using acupressure techniques, manual needle and laser needle methods. We evaluated the main parameter of mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (left and right) as well as the pulsatility index. In addition, near infrared spectroscopy and blood pressure parameters were registered. Acupressure, manual needle acupuncture and laser needle acupuncture partially led to significant changes in the main goal values. Acupressure as well as acupuncture (needle and laser needle) can evoke reproducible functional changes in the brain. These accompanying effects are not to be ignored, in particular in patients with increased ICP.

  8. Differential effects of isotonic and hypotonic 4% albumin solution on intracranial pressure and renal perfusion and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Naoya; Kosaka, Junko; Bertolini, Joseph; May, Clive N; Lankadeva, Yugeesh R; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2018-03-01

    Albumin is used to resuscitate trauma patients but may increase intracranial pressure (ICP). Its effects on renal blood flow and function are unknown. Our aim was to examine the effects of hypertonic albumin on ICP and renal function, and if any effects are due to the hypotonicity of the solution containing albumin or to albumin itself. Cross-over, randomised controlled experimental study of six adult Merino ewes in the animal facility of a research institute. Sheep were implanted with flow probes around the pulmonary and renal arteries and an ICP monitoring catheter in a lateral cerebral ventricle. Conscious sheep received normal saline, commercially available hypotonic 4% albumin solution (4% Albumex [278 mOsm/kg]) or a novel isotonic 4% albumin solution (288 mOsm/kg), with at least 48 hours between each intervention. Commercial hypotonic albumin solution increased ICP (by 8.5 mmHg [SEM, 2.1 mmHg]; P hypotonic albumin solution was associated with an increase in central venous pressure (CVP) (by 5.4 mmHg [SEM, 0.6 mmHg]; P hypotonic albumin solution increased ICP and CVP, but did not alter arterial pressure, cardiac output renal blood flow or renal function. Our findings support the view that the tonicity of the albumin solution, rather than the albumin itself, is responsible for increasing ICP.

  9. Pseudotumour cerebri Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and vascular intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iencean St. M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available From the first to use of “pseudotumor cerebri” by Nonne in 1904, the historic evolution of the knowledge on pseudotumor cerebri has been marked by several periods (the otologic stage, the neurosurgical stage, the neuro-ophthalmologic stage; today there are clear diagnosis criteria for the idiopathic intracranial hypertension, there is a clear differentiation between idiopathic intracranial hypertension and vascular intracranial hypertension, also the comprehension of the illness pathogeny is based on the dynamics of the intracranial fluids, which allows the auto-regulation of the cerebral circulation within quasi-normal limits, despite the very high intracranial pressure.

  10. Monitoring intracranial pressure utilizing a novel pattern of brain multiparameters in the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hong-tao Sun,1,* Maohua Zheng,2,* Yanmin Wang,1 Yunfeng Diao,1 Wanyong Zhao,1 Zhengjun Wei1 1Sixth Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Logistics University of People’s Armed Police Force, Tianjin, 2Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical value of multiple brain parameters on monitoring intracranial pressure (ICP procedures in the therapy of severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI utilizing mild hypothermia treatment (MHT alone or a combination strategy with other therapeutic techniques. A total of 62 patients with sTBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score <8 were treated using mild hypothermia alone or mild hypothermia combined with conventional ICP procedures such as dehydration using mannitol, hyperventilation, and decompressive craniectomy. The multiple brain parameters, which included ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure, transcranial Doppler, brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen, and jugular venous oxygen saturation, were detected and analyzed. All of these measures can control the ICP of sTBI patients to a certain extent, but multiparameters associated with brain environment and functions have to be critically monitored simultaneously because some procedures of reducing ICP can cause side effects for long-term recovery in sTBI patients. The result suggested that multimodality monitoring must be performed during the process of mild hypothermia combined with conventional ICP procedures in order to safely target different clinical methods to specific patients who may benefit from an individual therapy. Keywords: mild hypothermia treatment, cerebral perfusion pressure, brain tissue partial pressure of oxygen

  11. [Cervical epidural anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylot, D; Mahul, P; Navez, M L; Hajjar, J; Prades, J M; Auboyer, C

    1993-01-01

    Cervical epidural anaesthesia (CEA) results in an effective sensory blockade of the superficial cervical (C1/C4) and brachial plexus (C5/T1-T2). It is used both intraoperatively and in the treatment of postoperative or chronic pain. The approach to the epidural space at the C7-T1 interspace is not technically difficult. Patients are placed in the sitting position, increasing the negative pressure in the epidural space, with the head flexed on the thorax, in order to open the lowest cervical interspace. A 18-gauge Tuohy needle is inserted by a midline approach into the C6-C7 or C7-T1 interspace. A catheter may be inserted and left in place for postoperative analgesia. Local anaesthetics are administered either alone, or in combination with opiates. The CEA blocks the cardiac sympathetic fibers and consequently decreases heart rate, cardiac output and contractility. The mean blood pressure is unchanged or decreased, depending on peripheral systemic vascular resistance changes. The baroreflex activity is also partly impaired. Sympathetic blockade also decreases myocardial ischaemia. The cardiovascular changes induced by CEA are also partly due to the systemic effect of the local anaesthetic. The respiratory effects are minimal and depend on the extent of the blockade and the concentration of the local anaesthetic. A moderate restrictive syndrome occurs. Since the phrenic nerves originate from C3 to C5, ventilation may be impaired by CEA. Extension of the block may also impair intercostal muscle function, with a risk of respiratory failure when a CEA is used in patients with compromised respiratory function. The potential specific complications, mainly cardiovascular and respiratory, are the exacerbation of the effects of CEA. Side effects such as bradycardia, hypotension and acute ventilatory failure in relation to respiratory muscle paralysis, may be observed. Close monitoring of haemodynamics, respiratory rate and level blockade is required. Cervical epidural

  12. Epidural Steroid Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Epidural Steroid Injections Ray Baker MD Ray Baker MD Updated ... out of the spine. Why Get an Epidural Steroid Injection? Narrowing of the spinal passages can occur ...

  13. Combined Spinal-Epidural Analgesia for Laboring Parturient with Arnold-Chiari Type I Malformation: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark K. Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetic management of laboring parturients with Arnold-Chiari type I malformation poses a difficult challenge for the anesthesiologist. The increase in intracranial pressure during uterine contractions, coughing, valsalva maneuvers, and expulsion of the fetus can be detrimental to the mother during the process of labor and delivery. No concrete evidence has implicated high cerebral spinal fluid pressure on maternal and fetal complications. The literature on the use of neuraxial techniques for managing parturients with Arnold-Chiari is extremely scarce. While most anesthesiologists advocate epidural analgesia for management of labor pain and spinal anesthesia for cesarean section, we are the first to report the use of combined spinal-epidural analgesia for managing labor pain in a pregnant woman with Arnold-Chiari type I malformation. Also, we have reviewed the literature and presented information from case reports and case series to support the safe usage of neuraxial techniques in these patients.

  14. Continuous Monitoring of Cerebrovascular Reactivity Using Pulse Waveform of Intracranial Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aries, M.J.H.; Czosnyka, Marek; Budohoski, Karol P.; Kolias, Angelos G.; Radolovich, Danila K.; Lavinio, Andrea; Pickard, John D.; Smielewski, Peter

    Guidelines for the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) call for the development of accurate methods for assessment of the relationship between cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and cerebral autoregulation and to determine the influence of quantitative indices of pressure autoregulation on

  15. Effects of increased positive end-expiratory pressure on intracranial pressure in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a protocol of a prospective physiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Han; Xu, Ming; Yang, Yan-Lin; Chen, Kai; Xu, Jing-Qing; Zhang, Ying-Rui; Yu, Rong-Guo; Zhou, Jian-Xin

    2016-11-15

    There are concerns that the use of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in patients with brain injury may potentially elevate intracranial pressure (ICP). However, the transmission of PEEP into the thoracic cavity depends on the properties of the lungs and the chest wall. When chest wall elastance is high, PEEP can significantly increase pleural pressure. In the present study, we investigate the different effects of PEEP on the pleural pressure and ICP in different respiratory mechanics. This study is a prospective, single-centre, physiological study in patients with severe brain injury. Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome with ventricular drainage will be enrolled. An oesophageal balloon catheter will be inserted to measure oesophageal pressure. Patients will be sedated and paralysed; airway pressure and oesophageal pressure will be measured during end-inspiratory occlusion and end-expiratory occlusion. Elastance of the chest wall, the lungs and the respiratory system will be calculated at PEEP levels of 5, 10 and 15 cm H2O. We will classify each patient based on the maximal ΔICP/ΔPEEP being above or below the median for the study population. 2 groups will thus be compared. The study protocol and consent forms were approved by the Institutional Review Board of Fujian Provincial Hospital. Study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. NCT02670733; pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Increase in intracranial pressure by application of a rigid cervical collar: a pilot study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maissan, Iscander M; Ketelaars, Rein; Vlottes, Boris; Hoeks, Sanne E; den Hartog, Dennis; Stolker, Robert J

    2017-07-19

    Rigid cervical collars are known to increase intracranial pressure (ICP) in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Cerebral blood flow might decrease according to the Kellie Monroe doctrine. For this reason, the use of the collar in patients with severe TBI has been abandoned from several trauma protocols in the Netherlands. There is no evidence on the effect of a rigid collar on ICP in patients with mild or moderate TBI or indeed patients with no TBI. As a first step we tested the effect in healthy volunteers with normal ICPs and intact autoregulation of the brain. In this prospective blinded cross-over study, we evaluated the effect of application of a rigid cervical collar in 45 healthy volunteers by measuring their optical nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) by transocular sonography. Sonographic measurement of the ONSD behind the eye is an indirect noninvasive method to estimate ICP and pressure changes. We included 22 male and 23 female volunteers. In total 360 ONSD measurements were performed in these 45 volunteers. Application of a collar resulted in a significant increase in ONSD in both the left (β=0.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.05-0.07, Pvolunteers with intact cerebral autoregulation. This suggests that ICP may increase after application of a collar. In healthy volunteers, this seems to be of minor importance. On the basis of our findings the effect of a collar on ONSD and ICP in patients with mild and moderate TBI needs to be determined.

  17. Increased intracranial pressure in a case of spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme: analysis of these two rare conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. de Castro-Costa

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a rare case of increased intracranial hypertension consequent to a spinal cervical glioblastoma multiforme in a young patient. They analyse the physiopathology of intracranial hypertension in spinal tumors and the rarity of such kind of tumor in this location, and its clinico-pathological aspects.

  18. Equal contribution of increased intracranial pressure and subarachnoid blood to cerebral blood flow reduction and receptor upregulation after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Laboratory investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    . The effects in all parameters were more pronounced for SAH than for saline injection. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed that both the elevation of intracranial pressure and subarachnoid blood per se contribute approximately equally to the late CBF reductions and receptor upregulation following SAH.......OBJECT: Cerebral ischemia remains the key cause of disability and death in the late phase after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and its pathogenesis is still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the change in intracranial pressure or the extravasated blood causes...... the late cerebral ischemia and the upregulation of receptors or the cerebral vasoconstriction observed following SAH. METHODS: Rats were allocated to 1 of 3 experimental conditions: 1) cisternal injection of 250 microl blood (SAH Group), 2) cisternal injection of 250 microl NaCl (Saline Group), or 3...

  19. Recurrent Attacks of Raised Intracranial Pressure in Case of Tuberculous Arachnoiditis

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    N. O. Ameli

    1960-01-01

    Full Text Available A ase of recurre'nt raised interacranial pressure is described. At operation posterio-rcfossa arachnoiditis was found. Histological examination suggested a Tuberculous etiology. Four months after the operation she died from an apparently acute tuberculoua meningiti

  20. Measuring Intracranial Pressure and Correlation with Severity of Blast Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    al. General Anesthesia, Sleep , and Coma. New England Jounral of Medicine 2010; 363:2638-2650 15. Sofroniew, M.V., Molecular dissection of reactive... inertia of the sensor may affect the reading of in vivo pressure. Experimental set-up In order to obtain the most accurate ICP measurements, we

  1. A case for further investigating the use of controlled lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage for the control of intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Ali; Ghostine, Samer; Colohan, Austin R T

    2012-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) that is refractory to medical measures and ventriculostomy placement after severe traumatic brain injury or aneurysmal rupture is associated with high mortality. In some recent reports, authors have described the use of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage in these patients. We report the results of a prospective study involving the use of lumbar drainage in 15 patients with elevated ICP that was refractory to medical management and ventriculostomy placement. A prospective study was designed to enroll patients at Loma Linda University Medical Center. Ten patients with traumatic brain injury and five patients with ruptured aneurysms were enrolled. Medical management included maintaining serum Na >150 mEq/L, mild hyperventilation, deep sedation, and maintenance of normothermia. A lumbar drain was placed when ICP was >20 mm Hg for an average of 3 hours despite the optimization of the aforementioned parameters. After lumbar drain placement, ICP was reduced from a mean of 28.2 ± 6.5 mm Hg to 10.1 ± 7.1 mm Hg (P drain placement. One patient had unilateral papillary changes four hours after lumbar drain placement. The pupil returned to its normal state after decompressive craniectomy. There was no incidence of CSF infection. Three of the 15 patients died during the study period. This study shows the beneficial role of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage as an effective and safe treatment modality for elevated ICP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Therapeutic hypothermia with the use of intracranial pressure monitoring for acute disseminated encephalomyelitis with brainstem lesion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kenji; Kozu, Seiki; Arakawa, Akiko; Tsuboi, Tatsuo; Hirao, Jun-Ichi; Ono, Kazuyuki; Arisaka, Osamu

    2014-09-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis confined to the brainstem is associated with poor prognosis. We describe a case of a 10-year-old boy with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in the brainstem that developed after influenza A infection. A 10-year-old boy presented with fever and prolonged disturbance of consciousness and was admitted to our hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the midbrain, with T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images, suggested acute disseminated encephalomyelitis accompanied by a brainstem lesion. Lumbar puncture showed pleocytosis and increased protein content, including myelin basic protein, interleukin-6, and immunoglobulin G, all suggestive of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Treatments such as methylprednisolone pulse therapy, intravenous immunoglobulin, and therapeutic hypothermia were performed. Although the patient presented with anisocoria with increased intracranial pressure monitoring during hypothermia, prompt therapy with d-mannitol and dopamine was effective. Our case results suggest that hypothermia could be included in the choice of therapy for acute disseminated encephalomyelitis with brainstem lesions. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Protective Effect of N-Acetylcysteine Amide on Blast-Induced Increase in Intracranial Pressure in Rats

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    Usmah Kawoos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Blast-induced traumatic brain injury is associated with acute and possibly chronic elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP. The outcome after TBI is dependent on the progression of complex processes which are mediated by oxidative stress. So far, no effective pharmacological protection against TBI exists. In this study, rats were exposed to a single or repetitive blast overpressure (BOP at moderate intensities of 72 or 110 kPa in a compressed air-driven shock tube. The degree and duration of the increase in ICP were proportional to the intensity and frequency of the blast exposure(s. In most cases, a single dose of antioxidant N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA (500 mg/kg administered intravenously 2 h after exposure to BOP significantly attenuated blast-induced increase in ICP. A single dose of NACA was not effective in improving the outcome in the group of animals that were subjected to repetitive blast exposures at 110 kPa on the same day. In this group, two treatments with NACA at 2 and 4 h post-BOP exposure resulted in significant attenuation of elevated ICP. Treatment with NACA prior to BOP exposure completely prevented the elevation of ICP. The findings indicate that oxidative stress plays an important role in blast-induced elevated ICP as treatment with NACA-ameliorated ICP increase, which is frequently related to poor functional recovery after TBI.

  4. [Acute intracranial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilo Arrojo, F; Herrera Muñoz, A; Anciones, B

    2010-10-01

    Acute intracranial hypertension is a syndrome with multiple etiologies. Diagnosis and treatment must be performed urgently to save the patient's life and prevent the development of significant disabilities. The appearance of this syndrome is due to intracraincreased volumes and -in turn- the pressure of the intracranial contents, either through an increase in the physiological components (blood, cerebrospinal fluid and brain parenchyma), or through the appearance of a volume in the form of added mass. The underlying brain edema in this condition may be of several types: cytotoxic, vasogenic, interstitial, or hydrostatic. Increased intracranial pressure decreases cerebral perfusion pressure, creating a vicious cycle because of the resulting cerebral ischemia, which progressively increases cerebral blood volume by decreasing resistance and further increases intracranial pressure. Treatment depends on the etiology and will generally require medical and surgical care. Patient management is usually carried out in neurocritical units and involves intracranial pressure monitoring to guide treatment. Correction of all hemostasis disorders is also crucial to patient survival. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Postural influence on intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressure in ambulatory neurosurgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lonnie Grove; Petersen, Johan Casper Grove; Andresen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    "as normal as possible" i.e. without indication for neurosurgical intervention (e.g. focal lesions, global edema, abnormalities in ICP-profile or cerebrospinal fluid dynamics). ICP (tip-transducer probe, Raumedic) in the brain parenchyma (N=7) or in the lateral ventricles (N=2) and cardiovascular...... indifference point. When upright, the decrease in ICP was attenuated, corresponding to formation of a separate hydrostatic gradient with reference to the base of the skull, likely reflecting the site of venous collapse. ICP therefore seems to be governed by pressure in the draining veins and collapse of neck...... veins may protect the brain from being exposed to a large negative pressure when upright. Despite positional changes in ICP, MAP keeps CPP tightly regulated....

  6. Electrostatic discharges and their effect on the validity of registered values in intracranial pressure monitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Morten; Juhler, Marianne; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    , the authors have tried to determine if the ICP monitors from major manufacturers were affected by electrostatic discharges (ESDs), if the changes were permanent or transient in nature, and if the changes were modified by the addition of different electrical appliances normally used in the neurointensive care....... Results Five pressure monitors from 4 manufacturers were evaluated. Three monitors containing electrical circuitry at the tip of the transducer were all affected by ESDs. Clinically significant permanent changes in the reported ICP values for 1 pressure monitor were observed, as well as temporary...... deflections for 2 other monitors. The monitors had different levels of sensitivity to discharges at low voltages. Conclusions These results explain some of the sudden shifts in ICP noted in the clinical setting. However, a clear deflection pattern related to the addition of electrical appliances was not found...

  7. Understanding idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Mollan, Susan P; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by raised intracranial pressure that predominantly affects young, obese women. Pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but several causal factors have been proposed. Symptoms can include headaches, visual loss, pulsatile tinnitus...... of the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) reported beneficial effects of acetazolamide in patients with mild visual loss. Studies have also established weight loss as an effective disease-modifying treatment, and further clinical trials to investigate new treatments are underway....... The incidence of idiopathic intracranial hypertension is expected to increase as rates of obesity increase; efforts to reduce diagnostic delays and identify new, effective approaches to treatment will be key to meeting the needs of a growing number of patients....

  8. Postural-induced changes in intracranial pressure evaluated non-invasively using the MMS-10 tympanic displacement analyser in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, N; Walsted, A

    2000-01-01

    Inner ear pressure reflects intracranial pressure (ICP) primarily because of the direct communication of perilymph and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through the cochlear aqueduct (CA). The MMS-10 tympanic displacement analyser (TDA) is a relatively new device for measuring perilymphatic pressure non-invasively, and thereby also indirectly measuring intracranial pressure. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of the TDA in a daily clinical setting. Other aims were to investigate changes in perilymphatic pressure from sitting to lying position in healthy volunteers in two age groups (mean age: 33 years and 50 years) and to compare the patency of the CA in these groups using the MMS-10 TDA. Tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) analyses were performed in the test subjects initially twice in sitting position (test-retest) and then in sitting and supine positions. We found that the MMS-10 TDA is easy to use, and that it gives reproducible values in repeated tests, but with large inter-subject differences. The TMD test showed curves, which, in the whole test group, were more negative in supine position, in accordance with an increasing intracranial and inner ear pressure when lying down. The change from sitting to lying position was larger in the younger group than in the older group. In 11% of the younger group (males) and in 30% of the older group (females), the CA was considered to be non-patent, although the difference was not statistically significant. However, the finding is in keeping with the hypothesis of a greater proportion of patent CA in younger than in older individuals.

  9. In-house development of a dedicated data acquisition and monitoring system for intracranial pressure, patient posture and patient symptoms in a regional neurosciences centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, S P; Boddy, I J S; Strachan, R D; Chambers, I R

    2016-02-01

    Management of traumatic brain injury and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow disorders can be aided by measurement and monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP). In addition to pressure measurement, knowledge of patient symptoms and posture during monitoring are also valuable, particularly in the management of CSF flow disorders. ICP monitoring systems have been developed in this centre to meet clinical needs in the absence of commercially available solutions. An early system (mark I) was developed and the technical challenges in its design are described, along with limitations to this system that motivated the development of a new mark II system. The mark II system is then described.

  10. Cerebral haemodynamics during experimental intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Joseph; Czosnyka, Marek; Harland, Spencer; Varsos, Georgios V; Cardim, Danilo; Robba, Chiara; Liu, Xiuyun; Ainslie, Philip N; Smielewski, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a common final pathway in many acute neurological conditions. However, the cerebral haemodynamic response to acute intracranial hypertension is poorly understood. We assessed cerebral haemodynamics (arterial blood pressure, intracranial pressure, laser Doppler flowmetry, basilar artery Doppler flow velocity, and vascular wall tension) in 27 basilar artery-dependent rabbits during experimental (artificial CSF infusion) intracranial hypertension. From baseline (∼9 mmHg; SE 1.5) to moderate intracranial pressure (∼41 mmHg; SE 2.2), mean flow velocity remained unchanged (47 to 45 cm/s; p = 0.38), arterial blood pressure increased (88.8 to 94.2 mmHg; p intracranial pressure (∼75 mmHg; SE 3.7), both mean flow velocity and laser Doppler flowmetry decreased (45 to 31.3 cm/s p intracranial hypertension demonstrated two intracranial pressure-dependent cerebroprotective mechanisms: with moderate increases in intracranial pressure, wall tension decreased, and arterial blood pressure increased, while with severe increases in intracranial pressure, an arterial blood pressure increase predominated. Clinical monitoring of such phenomena could help individualise the management of neurocritical patients.

  11. Low-level blast raises intracranial pressure and impairs cognitive function in rats: prophylaxis with processed cereal feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säljö, Annette; Bolouri, Hayde; Mayorga, Maria; Svensson, Berndt; Hamberger, Anders

    2010-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that even low levels of blast cause brain injury, but little is known about their thresholds and mechanisms. Exposure of rats to 10-60 kPa blasts elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) in a dose-dependent manner and impair cognitive function. We have evaluated a prophylactic measure against these brain injuries in a rat animal model, consisting of feeding them processed cereal. This type of feed is known to ameliorate disturbances in secretion of body fluids and to have anti-inflammatory effects. In humans, intake of processed cereals is effective against intestinal diarrhea and also reduces the symptoms of Ménière's disease. Rats were given either standard laboratory feed or processed cereal feed for 2 weeks before exposure to blast in a shock tube. The ICP was monitored at different time points up to 1 week after exposure to a 60-kPa blast, and for up to 24 h after exposure to a 30-kPa blast. Maximal ICP elevation was reached at 10 h in both groups. In the group of rats on standard feed exposed to 60 kPa, an ICP increase of 145% was noted at 10 h, and the corresponding increase in the rats fed processed cereal feed was only 50%. In rats exposed to a 30-kPa blast, those fed standard feed and processed cereal feed demonstrated increases of ICP of 80% and 40%, respectively. Cognitive function as measured by the Morris water maze was assessed in other groups of rats at 2 days after exposure to 10- or 30-kPa blasts. Their performance was significantly impaired at both exposure levels in rats on standard feed, but no functional impairment was seen in rats fed processed cereal feed.

  12. Terson syndrome in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage-its relation to intracranial pressure, admission factors, and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joswig, Holger; Epprecht, Lorenz; Valmaggia, Christophe; Leschka, Sebastian; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Fournier, Jean-Yves; Stienen, Martin Nikolaus

    2016-06-01

    A large number of reports have not been able to clarify the pathophysiology of Terson syndrome (TS) in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Prospective single-center study on aSAH patients. Fundoscopic and radiological signs of TS were assessed. The opening intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients who required a ventriculostomy was recorded with a manometer. Six out of 36 included patients had TS (16.7 %), which was associated with unfavorable admission scores. Twenty-nine patients (80.5 %) required ventriculostomy; TS was associated with higher ICP (median, 40 vs. 15 cm cmH2O, p = .003); all patients with TS had pathological ICP values of >20 cmH2O. Patients with a ruptured aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery complex were ten times as likely to suffer from TS (OR 10.0, 95 % CI 1.03-97.50). Detection of TS on CT had a sensitivity of 50 %, a specificity of 98.4 %, a positive predictive value of 83.3 %, and a negative predictive value of 92.4 %. Mortality was 45 times as high in patients with TS (OR 45.0, 95 % CI 3.86-524.7) and neurologic morbidity up until 3 months post-aSAH was significantly higher in patients with TS (mRS 4-6; 100 vs. 17 %; p = .001). Our findings demonstrate an association between raised ICP and the incidence of TS. TS should be ruled out in aSAH patients presenting comatose or with raised ICP to ensure upfront ophthalmological follow-up. In alert patients without visual complaints and a TS-negative CT scan, the likelihood for the presence of TS is very low.

  13. Technique of ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression effectively reduces postoperative complications of severe bifrontal contusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan eSun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Bifrontal contusion is a common clinical brain injury. In the early stage, it is often mild, but it progresses rapidly and frequently worsens suddenly. This condition can become life threatening and therefore requires surgery. Conventional decompression craniectomy is the commonly used treatment method. In this study, the effect of ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression surgery on the prognosis of patients with acute severe bifrontal contusion was investigated. Method A total of 136 patients with severe bifrontal contusion combined with deteriorated intracranial hypertension admitted from March 2001 to March 2014 in our hospital were selected and randomly divided into two groups, i.e., a conventional decompression group and an intracranial pressure (ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression group (68 patients each, to conduct a retrospective study. The incidence rates of acute intraoperative encephalocele, delayed hematomas, and postoperative cerebral infarctions and the Glasgow outcome scores (GOSs 6 months after the surgery were compared between the two groups.Results (1 The incidence rates of acute encephalocele and contralateral delayed epidural hematoma in the stepwise decompression surgery group were significantly lower than those in the conventional decompression group; the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05; (2 6 months after the surgery, the incidence of vegetative state and mortality in the stepwise decompression group were significantly lower than those in the conventional decompression group (P < 0.05; the rate of favorable prognosis in the stepwise decompression group was also significantly higher than that in the conventional decompression group (P < 0.05.Conclusions The ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression technique reduced the perioperative complications of traumatic brain injury through the gradual release of intracranial pressure and was beneficial to the prognosis of

  14. Método para registro continuo da pressão intracraniana A method for continuous monitoring of the intracranial pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique S. Ivamoto

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available Pacientes com hipertensão intracraniana aguda podem ser melhor manipulados se a pressão intracraniana for constantemente medida. Uma série de 91 pacientes com traumatismos cranio-encefálicos agudos, hemorragia subaracnóidea, encefalite, hemorragia intracerebral, ou intoxicação por monóxido de carbono foi acompanhada usando o interruptor a pressão de Numoto por um método aqui descrito. O principal benefício tem sido o conhecimento do valor da pressão intracraniana a todo momento e a detecção rápida de elevações da pressão. Complicações se limitaram a 3 casos de infecção. Dois deles foram pequenas coleções purulentas no ponto de saída do tubo no couro cabeludo. Um paciente com uma fratura craniana exposta, laceração cerebral e hematoma intracerebral desenvolveu uma infecção da ferida operatoria e abscesso cerebral que requereu drenagem.Patients suffering acute intracranial pressure increases can be more advantageously handled if the intracranial pressure is constantly monitored. 91 patients with acute head injuries, hydrocephalus, cerebral infarction, subarachnoid hemorrhage, encephalitis, intracerebral hemorrhage, or carbon monoxide intoxication have been so monitored by using the Numoto pressure switch by a method herein described. The main advantage has been the knowledge of the level of intracranial pressure at any given time and the early detection of a rising pressure when this phenomenon occurred. There were no complications except for 3 cases of infection. Two of these cases were minor purulent collections only at the site of exit of the tube in the scalp. One patient with a compound wound, cerebral laceration, and intracerebral hematoma developed a wound infection and brain abscess which required drainage.

  15. Sickle cell disease with orbital infarction and epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naran, A.D.; Fontana, L. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2001-04-01

    Although bone infarction is a common feature in sickle cell disease, the involvement of the orbit is an unusual complication. Intracranial bleeding is another uncommon and serious complication. Few cases of orbital infarction alone have been reported. We report imaging findings (CT, bone scan, MRI) in a 16-year-old boy with sickle cell disease with orbital infarction and epidural hematoma. The precise cause of epidural hematoma is not well known, but it is probably related to vaso-occlusive episodes and the tearing of small vessels. (orig.)

  16. Intracranial hypertension: classification and patterns of evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iencean, SM

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension (ICH) was systematized in four categories according to its aetiology and pathogenic mechanisms: parenchymatous ICH with an intrinsic cerebral cause; vascular ICH, which has its aetiology in disorders of cerebral blood circulation; ICH caused by disorders of cerebro–spinal fluid dynamics and idiopathic ICH. The increase of intracranial pressure is the first to happen and then intracranial hypertension develops from this initial effect becoming symptomatic; it then acquires its individuality, surpassing the initial disease. The intracranial hypertension syndrome corresponds to the stage at which the increased intracranial pressure can be compensated and the acute form of intracranial hypertension is equivalent to a decompensated ICH syndrome. The decompensation of intracranial hypertension is a condition of instability and appears when the normal intrinsic ratio of intracranial pressure – time fluctuation is changed. The essential conditions for decompensation of intracranial hypertension are: the speed of intracranial pressure increase over normal values, the highest value of abnormal intracranial pressure and the duration of high ICP values. Medical objectives are preventing ICP from exceeding 20 mm Hg and maintaining a normal cerebral blood flow. The emergency therapy is the same for the acute form but each of the four forms of ICH has a specific therapy, according to the pathogenic mechanism and if possible to aetiology. PMID:20108456

  17. Epidural Steroid Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Epidural Steroid Injections Ray Baker MD Ray Baker MD Updated 7/2009 Epidural Steroid Injections (ESIs) are a common method of treating inflammation associated with low back related leg pain, or neck related arm pain. In both of ...

  18. Optic nerve sheath diameter sonography for the diagnosis of increased intracranial pressure: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziarz, Alex; Sne, Niv; Kegel, Fraser; Alhazzani, Waleed; Nath, Siddharth; Badhiwala, Jetan H; Rice, Timothy; Engels, Paul; Samir, Faidi; Healey, Andrew; Kahnamoui, Kamyar; Banfield, Laura; Sharma, Sunjay; Reddy, Kesava; Hawryluk, Gregory W J; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Almenawer, Saleh A

    2017-08-11

    Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is a significant neurological issue that may lead to permanent neurological sequelae. When evaluating patients with traumatic brain injury, it is crucial to identify those with high ICP in order to expedite ICP lowering measures and maintain adequate cerebral perfusion. Several measures are used to recognise patients with increased ICP including CT scan, MRI, ICP monitor, and lumbar puncture (LP). However, these tests can be invasive, associated with radiation exposure, contraindicated, or not readily available. Ultrasonography measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) is proposed as a non-invasive and quick measure to identify high ICP. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis will be to examine the accuracy of ONSD sonography for increased ICP diagnosis. We will include published and unpublished randomised controlled trials, observational studies, and abstracts, with no publication type or language restrictions. Search strategies will be designed to peruse the MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, WHO Clinical Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library databases. We will also implement strategies to search grey literature. Two reviewers will independently complete data abstraction and conduct quality assessment. Included studies will be assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2) tool. We will construct the hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic curve for included studies and pool sensitivity and specificity using the bivariate model. We also plan to conduct prespecified subgroup analyses to explore heterogeneity. The overall quality of evidence will be rated using Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE). Research ethics board approval is not required for this study as it draws from published data and raises no concerns related to patient privacy. This review will provide a comprehensive assessment of

  19. Radiologic findings of intraspinal epidural arachnoid cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jeong Kwon; Eun, Choong Ki; Jeon, Young Seup; Lee, Jong Yuk; Lee, Young Joon; Shim, Jae Hong [Inje Univ. College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soon Seup [Donga Univ. College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    To evaluate the radiologic findings of intraspinal epidural arachnoid cyst. Six patients with surgically proven intraspinal epidural arachnoid cyst were included in this study. Four were free of specific past history, but two had a history of trauma. All underwent examination by plain radiogr4aphy, CT-myelography and MRI, and the following aspects were retrospectively analysed:vertebral pressure erosion, interpedicular distance, enlargement of neural foramina, as seen on plain radiograph, contrast-filling and lateral bulging of lesions through neural foramina on CT-myelograph, and signal intensity, size and shape of margin and epidural fat pattern, as seen on MRI. Three of four congenital intraspinal epidural arachnoid cysts were single in the thoracolumbar region, while in the other case, there were multiple cysts in the mid-and lower thoracic regions. Cysts were equivaleut in size to between four and six vertebral bodies. Plain radiographic findings of pedicular pressure erosion, widened interpedicular distance, and bilateral neural foraminal enlargement of several contiguous vertebrae were observed in all four cases. One showed posterior vertebral scalloping. On CT-myelograph, a contrast-filled cystic lesion occupying the posterior epidural space, with lateral bulging through neural foramina and anterior displacement of the contrast-filled thecal sac, was seen. On MRI, longitudinally elongated, well-demarcated cysts were seen to be present in the posterior epidural space;their signal intensity was the same as in CSF. An epidural fat cap pattern enveloping the upper and lower ends of the cysts was apparent in all cases. In two cases, traumatic intraspinal epidural arachnoid cysts were situated in the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral region, respectively, near a previously injured region and were smaller (equivalent to the height of three vertebral bodies). CT-myelograph and MRI showed that their effect on the thecal sac was compressive only. When pressure erosion of

  20. What Is IH (Intracranial Hypertension)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... But when the body cannot effectively absorb or drain CSF, intracranial pressure increases within the skull, which is made of bone and cannot expand. And since the brain and the vasculature can only be compressed so ...

  1. Benign intracranial hypertension: atypical presentation of Miller Fisher syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Mewasingh, Leena D; Sekhara, Tayeb; Dachy, Bernard; Djeunang, Maurice; Dan, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Acute ocular paresis, nausea, vomiting, and headaches associated with high intracranial pressure without obvious intracranial pathology are typical features of benign intracranial hypertension. We describe two young children whose presentation, initially suggestive of idiopathic or benign intracranial hypertension, evolved to comprise ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. This triad characterizes Miller Fisher syndrome, a clinical variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome that occurs rarely among ...

  2. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype or a...... antibiotic treatment, signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure resolved completely. Syphilis is a rare, but very important, differential diagnosis that in this case was clinically indistinguishable from IIH....

  3. Location of the internal carotid artery and ophthalmic artery segments for non-invasive intracranial pressure measurement by multi-depth TCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamarat, Yasin; Deimantavicius, Mantas; Kalvaitis, Evaldas; Siaudvytyte, Lina; Januleviciene, Ingrida; Zakelis, Rolandas; Bartusis, Laimonas

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to locate the ophthalmic artery by using the edge of the internal carotid artery (ICA) as the reference depth to perform a reliable non-invasive intracranial pressure measurement via a multi-depth transcranial Doppler device and to then determine the positions and angles of an ultrasonic transducer (UT) on the closed eyelid in the case of located segments. High tension glaucoma (HTG) patients and healthy volunteers (HVs) undergoing non-invasive intracranial pressure measurement were selected for this prospective study. The depth of the edge of the ICA was identified, followed by a selection of the depths of the IOA and EOA segments. The positions and angles of the UT on the closed eyelid were measured. The mean depth of the identified ICA edge for HTG patients was 64.3 mm and was 63.0 mm for HVs (p = 0.21). The mean depth of the selected IOA segment for HTG patients was 59.2 mm and 59.3 mm for HVs (p = 0.91). The mean depth of the selected EOA segment for HTG patients was 48.5 mm and 49.8 mm for HVs (p = 0.14). The difference in the located depths of the segments between groups was not statistically significant. The results showed a significant difference in the measured UT angles in the case of the identified edge of the ICA and selected ophthalmic artery segments (p = 0.0002). We demonstrated that locating the IOA and EOA segments can be achieved using the edge of the ICA as a reference point. OA: ophthalmic artery; IOA: intracranial segments of the ophthalmic artery; EOA: extracranial segments of the ophthalmic artery; ICA: internal carotid artery; UT: ultrasonic transducer; HTG: high tension glaucoma; SD: standard deviation; ICP: intracranial pressure; TCD: transcranial Doppler.

  4. Infections following epidural catheterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, MS; Andersen, SS; Andersen, Ove

    1995-01-01

    patients with only local symptoms of infection. The microorganisms isolated from the tips of the epidural catheters were coagulase-negative staphylococci (41%), Staphylococcus aureus (35%), Gram-negative bacilli (14%) and others (10%). The Gram-negative bacilli and S. aureus caused serious infections more...... frequently than the others. We discuss the symptoms and diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and suggest a proposal for prophylactic and diagnostic guidelines for epidural catheter-related infections. Comment in: J Hosp Infect. 1997 Mar;35(3):245....

  5. Intracranial hemorrhage due to intracranial hypertension caused by the superior vena cava syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartek, Jiri; Abedi-Valugerdi, Golbarg; Liska, Jan; Nyström, Harriet; Andresen, Morten; Mathiesen, Tiit

    2013-07-01

    We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have an intracranial hemorrhage secondary to a superior vena cava syndrome. The condition appears to be caused by a reversible transient rise in intracranial pressure, as a result of compression of the venous return from the brain. Treatment consisted of surgery for the aortic pseudoaneurysm, which led to normalization of the intracranial pressure and resorption of the intracranial hemorrhage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, P

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  7. [Possibilities of data acquisition, recording and processing based on the system for continuous intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure monitoring designed at the Department of Neurosurgery of the Jagiellonian University in Cracow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czepko, Ryszard; Cieślicki, Krzysztof; Niedźwiedzki, Jerzy; Libionka, Witold; Pietraszko, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    To describe computer system for intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and for infusion testing (IT), and to present current possibilities of analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure signal. Computer system for pressure signal measurement and acquisition consists of three sensors: for ICP, infusion pressure during IT, and blood pressure measurements. Electric signal from the sensors is transmitted to Temed RMN-201M cardiomonitor, and next after enhancement is subjected to Data Shuttle DS-12-8-5B-AO analog to digital converter. Digital output signal is recorded and analysed'on standard personal computer. Original Windows-compatible software was developed to control the system. The program consists of three blocs: configuration, measurement and readout, and enables selection of voltage range for each of the signal channels, measurement resolution, sampling frequency, calibration and zeroing of the sensors, visualisation of pressure signals on graph, data storage in text format and automatic analysis of IT. Main characteristics of the system include: high sampling frequency (up to 500 Hz), simultaneous data recording from all signal channels, and access to terminal cistern with one puncture needle on IT. Laboratory and clinical tests confirmed high precision of the developed system. ICP CURVE ANALYSIS: The developed software allows for evaluation of the main parameters, of CSF dynamics, prediction of IT course before a steady state is reached as well as spectral analysis of pressure signal. Computer measurement system developed at our department is clinically useful and allows for high precision signal acquisition necessary for advanced scientific analyses of hydrocephalus and intracranial pressure.

  8. Effects of pressure- and volume-controlled inverse ratio ventilation on haemodynamic variables, intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure in rabbits: a model of subarachnoid haemorrhage under isoflurane anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taplu, A; Gökmen, N; Erbayraktar, S; Sade, B; Erkan, N; Karadibak, K; Arkan, A

    2003-09-01

    An inverse I : E ratio (inspiratory time > expiratory time) may have benefits in patients suffering trauma who requiring lung ventilation. However, this application may be deleterious if there is concomitant head injury. We aimed to determine the physiological effects of pressure- and volume-controlled modes of inverse ratio (I : E = 2 : 1) ventilation of the lungs, while maintaining normocapnia, in a rabbit model of raised intracranial pressure (ICP). New Zealand White rabbits were anaesthetized with isoflurane and a tracheostomy was performed. Subarachnoid haemorrhage was simulated in two groups by injecting blood into the cisterna magna. Groups 1 and 2 (n = 6, each), controls, were compared with Groups 3 and 4 (n = 6, each) with the simulated subarachnoid haemorrhage. Each ventilation mode was used with an I : E ratio of 2 : 1 for 30 min. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), mean airway pressure (P(AW)) and arterial blood-gas status were measured. Both modes increased mean P(AW) (P < 0.02). This increase was greater with the volume-controlled mode (P < 0.02). The baseline value averaged 5.8 +/- 0.4 and 5.6 +/- 0.3 mmHg in Groups 3 and 4, respectively, and increased to 7.8 +/- 0.3 and 10.8 +/- 0.4 mmHg. Inducing subarachnoid haemorrhage increased ICP and MAP (P < 0.02). Baseline ICPs were 10.3 +/- 0.5 and 10.3 +/- 0.4 mmHg in Groups 1 and 2, respectively, whereas they were 25.4 +/- 1.2 and 25.8 +/- 0.8 mmHg in Groups 3 and 4. However, ICP, MAP and CPP did not differ significantly according to the mode. An already raised ICP was altered by the application of induced mean PAW increases as a consequence of inverse ratio ventilation of the lungs with normocapnia.

  9. Reye's syndrome: assessment of intracranial monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J G; Glasgow, J F; Black, G W; Fannin, T F; Hicks, E M; Keilty, S R; Crean, P M

    1987-01-01

    Direct measurements of arterial blood pressure and intracranial pressure were recorded in 39 patients aged 3.6 months to 5 years 11 months with Reye's syndrome judged to be stage 2 or beyond. Of 33 patients who survived, 27 made a full recovery and six were severely handicapped. Measurement of cerebral perfusion pressure, which is greatly reduced in the more severe forms of Reye's syndrome, was a better guide to prognosis and management than intracranial pressure alone. The findings emphasise that maintenance of cerebral perfusion pressure is essential if mortality and morbidity are to be reduced. Intracranial monitoring is mandatory in all but the mildest cases of Reye's syndrome. PMID:3101864

  10. Lumbar epidural venography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Sung Whan [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1981-06-15

    Myelography is widely used for radiological diagnosis of herniated lumbar disc. But the diagnostic accuracy is only about 84% with range of 67 to 100% with many cases of false negative and equivocal cases. In cases of extreme lateral disc herniation and short cul de sac or wide epidural space, even quite a large disc herniation cannot be detected on myelography. But with epidural venography these defects of myelography can easily be overcome. 52 cases of epidural venography were performed in department of Radiology of Capital Armed Forces General Hospital during the 20 months from May 1979 to December 1980. And the findings were compared with those of myelography and operative results. The results are as follows; 1. Of 52 cases, satisfactory opacification was obtained in 48 cases (92.3%). 2. Single vein injection was adequate for satisfactory opacification in 40 cases (76.9%). 3. There were 2 cases of retroperitoneal extravasation of contrast media, but the patient recovered without difficulty. 4. Of 24 cases operated, the venographic finding was confirmed in 21 cases (87.5%) and of the 48 cases adequately opacified, there were only 3 cases of confirmed diagnostic error and so the error rate is only 6.25%. 5. Abnormal findings of myelography were exactly reproduced on epidural venography and many cases with equivocal or normal myelographic findings were accurately diagnosed with epidural venography. 6. In cases of total block, epidural venography was very useful for evaluation of the caudal portion. So lumbar epidural venography is very useful not only as an adjunctive method to myelography, but also as the first diagnostic procedure for herniated disc, for the procedure is simple and the diagnostic accuracy is very high.

  11. Effects of Simulation With Problem-Based Learning Program on Metacognition, Team Efficacy, and Learning Attitude in Nursing Students: Nursing Care With Increased Intracranial Pressure Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung-Nam; Nam, Kyung-Dong; Kim, Hyeon-Young

    2017-03-01

    Nursing care for patients with central nervous system problems requires advanced professional knowledge and care skills. Nursing students are more likely to have difficulty in dealing with adult patients who have severe neurological problems in clinical practice. This study investigated the effect on the metacognition, team efficacy, and learning attitude of nursing students after an integrated simulation and problem-based learning program. A real scenario of a patient with increased intracranial pressure was simulated for the students. The results showed that this method was effective in improving the metacognitive ability of the students. Furthermore, we used this comprehensive model of simulation with problem-based learning in order to assess the consequences of student satisfaction with the nursing major, interpersonal relationships, and importance of simulation-based education in relation to the effectiveness of the integrated simulation with problem-based learning. The results can be used to improve the design of clinical practicum and nursing education.

  12. European society of intensive care medicine study of therapeutic hypothermia (32-35°C for intracranial pressure reduction after traumatic brain injury (the Eurotherm3235Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stocchetti Nino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and severe disability worldwide with 1,000,000 hospital admissions per annum throughout the European Union. Therapeutic hypothermia to reduce intracranial hypertension may improve patient outcome but key issues are length of hypothermia treatment and speed of re-warming. A recent meta-analysis showed improved outcome when hypothermia was continued for between 48 hours and 5 days and patients were re-warmed slowly (1°C/4 hours. Previous experience with cooling also appears to be important if complications, which may outweigh the benefits of hypothermia, are to be avoided. Methods/design This is a pragmatic, multi-centre randomised controlled trial examining the effects of hypothermia 32-35°C, titrated to reduce intracranial pressure Participants are randomised to either standard care or standard care with titrated therapeutic hypothermia. Hypothermia is initiated with 20-30 ml/kg of intravenous, refrigerated 0.9% saline and maintained using each centre's usual cooling technique. There is a guideline for detection and treatment of shivering in the intervention group. Hypothermia is maintained for at least 48 hours in the treatment group and continued for as long as is necessary to maintain intracranial pressure 20 mmHg in accordance with the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines, 2007. Discussion The Eurotherm3235Trial is the most important clinical trial in critical care ever conceived by European intensive care medicine, because it was launched and funded by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine and will be the largest non-commercial randomised controlled trial due to the substantial number of centres required to deliver the target number of patients. It represents a new and fundamental step for intensive care medicine in Europe. Recruitment will continue until January 2013 and interested clinicians from intensive care units worldwide can still join this important

  13. Can sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter be used to detect raised intracranial pressure in patients with tuberculous meningitis? A prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti V Sangani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CNS Tuberculosis can manifest as meningitis, arachnoiditis and a tuberculoma. The rupture of a tubercle into the subarachnoid space leads to Tuberculosis Meningitis (TBME; the resulting hypersensitivity reaction can lead to an elevation of the intracranial pressure and hydrocephalus. While bedside optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD ultrasonography (USG can be a sensitive screening test for elevated intracranial pressure in adult head injury, little is known regarding ONSD measurements in Tuberculosis Meningitis. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with TBME had dilation of the optic nerve sheath, as detected by ocular USG performed in the emergency department (ED. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective, observational study on adult ED patients with suspected TBME. Patients underwent USG measurements of the optic nerve followed by MRI. The ONSD was measured 3 mm behind the globe in each eye. MRI evidence of basilar meningeal enhancement and any degree of hydrocephalus was suggestive of TBME. Those patients without evidence of hydrocephalus subsequently underwent a lumbar puncture to confirm the diagnosis. Exclusion criteria were age less than 18 and obvious ocular pathology. In total, the optic nerve sheath diameters of 25 adults with confirmed TBME were measured. These measurements were compared with 120 control patients. Results: The upper limit of normal ONSD was 4.37 mm in control group. Those patients with TBME had a mean ONSD of 5.81 mm (SD 0.42. These results confirm that patients with tuberculosis meningitis have an ONSD in excess of the control data (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The evaluation of the ONSD is a simple non-invasive and potentially useful tool in the assessment of adults suspected of having TBME.

  14. SEGMENTAL EPIDURAL ANAESTHESIA FOR INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachidanand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidural anaesthesia is suitable as a sole agent for lower abdominal surgery and surgery on lower limbs. It has some definite advantages over spinal anaesthesia like avoidance of post spinal headache, minimal chances of meningitis, and minimal chances of nausea and vomiting in postoperative period. But administration of conventional dosage of local epidural anaesthetics (15ml and above for surgical anaesthesia frequently results in multiple hemodynamic changes, including decreases in chronotropism, inotro pism, dromotropism, systemic vascular resistance, cardiac output, and myocardial oxygen consumption. The segmental epidural block denotes the use of a small volume enough to block only the segments involved in the field of surgery. AIM: To study the effect iveness of segmental epidural anaesthesia for inguinal hernia repair. DESIGN: R andomized control study. METHODS: 100 pts belonging to ASA PS I & II posted for inguinal hernia repair given 5ml of 0.5% bupivacaine through epidural route at L1 - L2 level and a fter conforming the adequacy and level of analgesia, the surgery was commenced. If the patient complained of pain during needle prick, then injected local anaesthetic (0.5% Bupivacaine with an incremental dosage of 1ml at a time, till the complete onset o f analgesia Pulse Rate and Blood Pressure were recorded at an interval of 1 minute for first 5 minutes and then every 5 minutes till the end of the surgery. Oxygen saturation and ECG monitoring was done continuously. Onset of analgesia, level of analgesia ( P re & post operatively, duration of analgesia, total dosage of local anaesthetic used were recorded. Complications like bradycardia, hypotension, respiratory depression, shivering, nausea and vomiting, sweating and inadvertent dural puncture were recorde d. RESULTS: 53% of patients had excellent quality of analgesia and relaxation. 34% patients had good quality analgesia and relaxation, mild discomfort while handling sac

  15. Infections following epidural catheterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, MS; Andersen, SS; Andersen, Ove

    1995-01-01

    patients with only local symptoms of infection. The microorganisms isolated from the tips of the epidural catheters were coagulase-negative staphylococci (41%), Staphylococcus aureus (35%), Gram-negative bacilli (14%) and others (10%). The Gram-negative bacilli and S. aureus caused serious infections more......Seventy-eight patients with culture-positive epidural catheters, were studied. Fifty-nine had symptoms of exit site infection and 11 patients had clinical meningitis, two of whom also had an epidural abscess. This corresponds to a local infection incidence of at least 4.3% and an incidence...... of central nervous system infection of at least 0.7% at Odense University Hospital. This degree of infection is of the same magnitude as that reported for intravascular devices. We found that the patients with generalized symptoms of infection had been catheterized for a longer time, and were older than...

  16. Intracranial hypertension: classification and patterns of evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Iencean, SM; Ciurea, AV

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension (ICH) was systematized in four categories according to its aetiology and pathogenic mechanisms: parenchymatous ICH with an intrinsic cerebral cause; vascular ICH, which has its aetiology in disorders of cerebral blood circulation; ICH caused by disorders of cerebro–spinal fluid dynamics and idiopathic ICH. The increase of intracranial pressure is the first to happen and then intracranial hypertension develops from this initial effect becoming symptomatic; it then acq...

  17. Assessment of the role of intracranial hypertension and stress on hippocampal cell apoptosis and hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction after TBI

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Huajun; Yang, Weijian; Wu, Chenggang; Liu, Baolong; Lu, Hao; Wang, Hong; Yan, Hua

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, hypopituitarism caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been explored in many clinical studies; however, few studies have focused on intracranial hypertension and stress caused by TBI. In this study, an intracranial hypertension model, with epidural hematoma as the cause, was used to explore the physiopathological and neuroendocrine changes in the hypothalamic?pituitary axis and hippocampus. The results demonstrated that intracranial hypertension increased the apoptosis ra...

  18. Borderline Intracranial Hypertension Manifesting as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Treated by Venous Sinus Stenting

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, Nicholas; Pickard, John; Lever, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome and cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension without signs of raised intracranial pressure can be impossible to distinguish without direct measurement of intracranial pressure. Moreover, lumbar puncture, the usual method of measuring intracranial pressure, can produce a similar respite from symptoms in patients with chronic fatigue as it does in idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This suggests a connection between them, with chronic fatigue syndrome representi...

  19. Intracranial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenophon Sinopidis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 4-year-old boy who was admitted to hospital with intracranial hypertension, headache, diplopia, papilledema, and a normal brain MRI. Brucella melitensis in the cerebrospinal fluid was confirmed with PCR assay. We believe that neurobrucellosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when headaches persist following brucellosis. In addition, we suggest that when cerebrospinal fluid culture is negative, PCR may prove to be an optimal alternative tool for an immediate and accurate diagnosis.

  20. Comparison of Epidrum, Epi-Jet, and Loss of Resistance syringe techniques for identifying the epidural space in obstetric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, S; Kösem, B; Kılınç, H; Köşker, H; Karabayırlı, S; Çimen, N K; Demircioğlu, R I

    2017-08-01

    Identifying the epidural space is essential during epidural anesthesia (EA). Pressure of the epidural space in pregnancy is higher than that in nonpregnant woman. Loss of resistance (LOR) method is the most commonly preferred method for identifying the epidural space. Epidrum and Epi-Jet are recently innovated supporting devices that facilitate identifying process for epidural space. In this study we aimed to compare Epidrum, Epi-Jet, and LOR methods in identifying the epidural space, feasibility of technique. Two hundred and forty pregnant women who were scheduled for caesarian section surgery under lumbar EA or combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA) were randomized into three groups (Group I Epidrum, n = 80), Group II (Epi-Jet, n = 80), and Group III (LOR, n = 80). We recorded the time required to identify the epidural space and deflation of Epidrum balloon and Epi-Jet syringe, number of attempts, additional methods used to identify epidural space, usefulness of methods, accuracy of identification of epidural space, and outcomes of epidural catheterization. There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to demographic data, duration of deflation of Epidrum balloon and Epi-Jet syringe and distance between skin and epidural space. The mean time required to enter epidural space in Group I was shorter than that in Group II (P = 0.031). Feasibility of Epi-Jet was easier than that of Epidrum (P = 0.015). Number of uncertainties of epidural space identification was higher in Group I than that in Group II (P = 0.009). Also, the requirement for LOR to confirm epidural space and failure rates was higher in Group I than Group II (P Epi-Jet is superior to Epidrum in pregnant patients in terms of clarity of epidural space identification, usefulness, and success rates of EA or CSEA.

  1. Increased pulsatile intracranial pressure in patients with symptomatic pineal cysts and magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers indicative of central venous hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Ringstad, Geir

    2016-08-15

    In symptomatic individuals with non-hydrocephalic pineal cysts (PCs), it remains controversial what causes the symptoms. Based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers, we proposed that PC-associated crowding of the pineal recess may cause central venous hypertension. The aim of this study was to compare pulsatile and static ICP in patients with PCs and chronic daily headache (CDH), and compare ICP data in PC patients with the previously identified MRI biomarkers. All patients assessed with over-night ICP monitoring for PCs or CDH who had been ruled out for idiopathic intracranial hypertension without papilledema (IIHWOP) were retrieved from the database. The symptoms as well as the pulsatile and static ICP scores were compared between the PC and CDH patients, and ICP scores were compared with the MRI biomarkers indicative of central venous hypertension. The pulsatile ICP was significantly increased in the symptomatic patients with non-hydrocephalic PCs as compared to the CDH patients. Pulsatile ICP was significantly increased in the individuals with PC-grades 3-4, who had MRI biomarkers indicative of central venous hypertension. The tectum-splenium-cyst ratio correlated positively with pulsatile ICP and an index of thalamic edema. Pulsatile ICP is increased in symptomatic patients with PCs and imaging evidence of central venous hypertension, supporting the hypothesis that PC-induced crowding of the pineal recess and venous obstruction may cause a central venous hypertension syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Espanol. PARTNERSHIPS Meet our Fundraising Partners Tweet Welcome Intracranial hypertension (IH) is the general term for the neurological ... too high. (Old names for IH include Benign Intracranial Hypertension and Pseudotumor Cerebri). The Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation ...

  3. Acute surgical management in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zakaria, Zaitun

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a headache syndrome with progressive symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Most commonly, it is a slow process where surveillance and medical management are the main treatment modalities. We describe herein an acute presentation with bilateral sixth nerve palsies, papilloedema and visual deterioration, where acute surgical intervention was a vision-saving operation.

  4. Intracranial hypertension and HIV associated meningoradiculitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Prevett, M C; Plant, G T

    1997-01-01

    Two patients with meningoradiculitis associated with HIV presented with symptoms and signs of intracranial hypertension. In the patients described, the raised intracranial pressure resolved after lumbar puncture. After exclusion of opportunistic infection, such patients may be managed with therapeutic lumbar puncture alone.

  5. Moderately elevated intracranial pressure after diffuse traumatic brain injury is associated with exacerbated neuronal pathology and behavioral morbidity in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafrenaye, Audrey D; Krahe, Thomas E; Povlishock, John T

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is correlated with ensuing morbidity/mortality in humans. This relationship is assumed to rely mostly on the recognition that extremely elevated ICP either indicates hematoma/contusions capable of precipitating herniation or alters cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), which precipitates global ischemia. However, whether subischemic levels of elevated ICP without hematoma/contusion contribute to increased morbidity/mortality remains unknown. To address this knowledge gap, we utilized a model of moderate diffuse TBI in rats followed by either intraventricular ICP monitoring or manual ICP elevation to 20 mm Hg, in which CPP was above ischemic levels. The effects of ICP elevation after TBI on acute and chronic histopathology, as well as on behavioral morbidity, were evaluated. ICP elevation after TBI resulted in increased acute neuronal membrane perturbation and was also associated with reduced neuronal density at 4 weeks after injury. Somatosensory hypersensitivity was exacerbated by ICP elevation and was correlated to the observed neuronal loss. In conclusion, this study indicates that morbidity and increased neuronal damage/death associated with elevated ICP can occur without concurrent global ischemia. Therefore, understanding the pathologies associated with subischemic levels of elevated ICP could lead to the development of better therapeutic strategies for the treatment and management of TBI patients.

  6. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension – Pathophysiology Based on Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubisavljević Srdjan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the definition, idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a pathological state characterized by an increase in intracranial pressure; however, there are no obvious intracranial pathological processes. The pathophysiology of this disorder is not clear, although there are many reports related to it.

  7. Epilepsy in primary intracranial tumors in a neurosurgical hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-06

    Apr 6, 2015 ... Background: Seizures may be manifestation of intracranial tumor (IT) and demand thorough neurological evaluation. This paper examines ... lobe most often. Key words: Intracranial tumors, postoperative seizure outcome, seizures ... and other associated symptoms such as raised intracranial pressure and ...

  8. Intracranial elastance is increased in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, J T; Sudhakar, P; Alhajeri, A N; Smith, J H

    2017-12-01

    To date, no pathophysiological model has sufficiently accounted for all the findings encountered in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Intracranial elastance is an index of volume-buffering capacity known to play a role in certain disorders of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, which has not been previously investigated in relation to IIH patients. This was a single-center retrospective cohort study from 1 July 2011 to 1 July 2016. Values for opening pressure (PO ), closing pressure (PC ) and volume (V) of CSF removed were collected, as well as demographic and clinical covariates. Intracranial elastance (E) and pressure-volume index (PVI) were calculated according to established equations: E = (PO -PC )/V and PVI = V/log10 (PO /PC ), respectively. Those with an alternative central nervous system pathology, including meningitis, encephalitis and normal pressure hydrocephalus were excluded. Eligible patients were subdivided into two groups based on final diagnosis: a control group and an IIH group. In our cohort (n = 49), a significant association of both E (P intracranial elastance is increased in IIH, reflecting a novel insight into disease pathogenesis. © 2017 EAN.

  9. Fast circulation of cerebrospinal fluid : an alternative perspective on the protective role of high intracranial pressure in ocular hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wostyn, Peter; De Groot, Veva; Van Dam, Debby; Audenaert, Kurt; Killer, Hanspeter Esriel; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    As ocular hypertension refers to a condition in which the intraocular pressure is consistently elevated but without development of glaucoma, study of it may provide important clues to factors thatmay play a protective role in glaucoma. beta-amyloid, one of the key histopathological findings in

  10. Medicolegal cases for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Keisha L; Daniels, Eldra W; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2013-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess are rare surgical emergencies resulting in significant neurologic deficits. Making the diagnosis for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess can be challenging; however, a delay in recognition and treatment can be devastating. The objective of this retrospective analysis study was to identify risk factors for an adverse outcome for the provider. The LexisNexis Academic legal search database was used to identify a total of 19 cases of spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess filed against medical providers. Outcome data on trial verdicts, age, sex, initial site of injury, time to consultation, time to appropriate imaging studies, time to surgery, and whether a rectal examination was performed or not were recorded. The results demonstrated a significant association between time to surgery more than 48 hours and an unfavorable verdict for the provider. The degree of permanent neurologic impairment did not appear to affect the verdicts. Fifty-eight percent of the cases did not present with an initial deficit, including loss of bowel or bladder control. All medical professionals must maintain a high level of suspicion and act quickly. Physicians who are able to identify early clinical features, appropriately image, and treat within a 48 hour time frame have demonstrated a more favorable medicolegal outcome compared with their counterparts in filed lawsuits for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess cases. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Comparison of equimolar doses of mannitol and hypertonic saline for the treatment of elevated intracranial pressure after traumatic brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Chen, Tao; Chen, Shu-da; Cai, Jing; Hu, Ying-Hong

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare the effectiveness of mannitol and hypertonic saline for reducing intracranial pressure (ICP) after traumatic brain injury (TBI).PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases were searched until July 3, 2014 using the terms intracranial hypertension, mannitol, and hypertonic saline. Randomized controlled trials and 2-arm prospective studies in which elevated ICP was present after TBI treated with mannitol or hypertonic saline were included. The primary outcome was the change of ICP from baseline to termination of the infusion, while the secondary outcomes were change from baseline to 30, 60, and 120 minutes after terminating the infusion and change of osmolarity from baseline to termination.A total 7 studies with 169 patients were included. The mean age of patients receiving mannitol ranged from 30.8 to 47 years, and for patients receiving hypertonic saline ranged from 35 to 47 years. A pooled difference in means = -1.69 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -2.95 to -0.44, P = 0.008) indicated that hypertonic saline reduced ICP more effectively than mannitol when compared from the baseline value to the last measurement after treatment. At 30 minutes after intervention, there was no difference in the mean ICP change between the groups, whereas at 60 minutes after intervention (pooled difference in means = -2.58, 95% CI: -4.37 to -0.80, P = .005) and 120 min after intervention (pooled difference in means = -4.04, 95% CI: -6.75 to -1.32, P = .004) hypertonic saline resulted in a significantly greater decrease in ICP. The pooled difference in means = 1.84 (95% CI: -1.64 to 5.31, P = .301) indicated no difference in serum osmolarity between patients treated with hypertonic saline or mannitol.Hypertonic saline is more effective than mannitol for reducing ICP in cases of TBI.

  12. Dexmedetomidine for Refractory Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomer, Kendra J; Sebat, Christian M; Adams, Jason Y; Duby, Jeremiah J; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Louie, Erin L

    2017-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine (DEX) is a selective α2 adrenergic agonist that is commonly used for sedation in the intensive care unit (ICU). The role of DEX for adjunctive treatment of refractory intracranial hypertension is poorly defined. The primary objective of this study was to determine the effect of DEX on the need for rescue therapy (ie, hyperosmolar boluses, extraventricular drain [EVD] drainages) for refractory intracranial hypertension. Secondary objectives included the number of intracranial pressure (ICP) excursions, bradycardic, hypotensive, and compromised cerebral perfusion pressure episodes. This retrospective cohort study evaluated patients admitted to the neurosurgical ICU from August 1, 2009, to July 29, 2015, and who received DEX for refractory intracranial hypertension. The objectives were compared between the 2 time periods-before (pre-DEX) and during therapy (DEX). Twenty-three patients with 26 episodes of refractory intracranial hypertension met the inclusion criteria. The number of hyperosmolar boluses was decreased after DEX therapy was initiated. Mannitol boluses required were statistically reduced (1 vs 0.5, P = .03); however, reduction in hypertonic boluses was not statistically significant (1.3 vs 0.9, P = .2). The mean number of EVD drainages per 24 hours was not significantly different between the time periods (15.7 vs 14.0, P = .35). The rate of ICP excursions did not differ between the 2 groups (24.3 vs 22.5, P = .62). When compared to pre-DEX data, there was no difference in the median number of hypotensive (0 vs 0), bradycardic (0 vs 0), or compromised cerebral perfusion pressure episodes (0.5 vs 1.0). Dexmedetomidine may avoid increases in the need for rescue therapy when used as an adjunctive treatment of refractory intracranial hypertension without compromising hemodynamics.

  13. Management of intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Sunit C; Tiwari, Lokesh

    2009-05-01

    Raised intracranial pressure (ICP) is a life threatening condition that is common to many neurological and non-neurological illnesses. Unless recognized and treated early it may cause secondary brain injury due to reduced cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and progress to brain herniation and death. Management of raised ICP includes care of airway, ventilation and oxygenation, adequate sedation and analgesia, neutral neck position, head end elevation by 20 degrees-30 degrees, and short-term hyperventilation (to achieve PCO(2) 32-35 mm Hg) and hyperosmolar therapy (mannitol or hypertonic saline) in critically raised ICP. Barbiturate coma, moderate hypothermia and surgical decompression may be helpful in refractory cases. Therapies aimed directly at keeping ICP pressure targeted therapy may offer better outcome than ICP targeted therapies.

  14. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...... or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant...

  15. Simultaneous monitoring of static and dynamic intracranial pressure parameters from two separate sensors in patients with cerebral bleeds: comparison of findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eide Per

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently reported that in an experimental setting the zero pressure level of solid intracranial pressure (ICP sensors can be altered by electrostatics discharges. Changes in the zero pressure level would alter the ICP level (mean ICP; whether spontaneous changes in mean ICP happen in clinical settings is not known. This can be addressed by comparing the ICP parameters level and waveform of simultaneous ICP signals. To this end, we retrieved our recordings in patients with cerebral bleeds wherein the ICP had been recorded simultaneously from two different sensors. Materials and Methods: During a time period of 10 years, 17 patients with cerebral bleeds were monitored with two ICP sensors simultaneously; sensor 1 was always a solid sensor while Sensor 2 was a solid -, a fluid - or an air-pouch sensor. The simultaneous signals were analyzed with automatic identification of the cardiac induced ICP waves. The output was determined in consecutive 6-s time windows, both with regard to the static parameter mean ICP and the dynamic parameters (mean wave amplitude, MWA, and mean wave rise time, MWRT. Differences in mean ICP, MWA and MWRT between the two sensors were determined. Transfer functions between the sensors were determined to evaluate how sensors reproduce the ICP waveform. Results Comparing findings in two solid sensors disclosed major differences in mean ICP in 2 of 5 patients (40%, despite marginal differences in MWA, MWRT, and linear phase magnitude and phase. Qualitative assessment of trend plots of mean ICP and MWA revealed shifts and drifts of mean ICP in the clinical setting. The transfer function analysis comparing the solid sensor with either the fluid or air-pouch sensors revealed more variable transfer function magnitude and greater differences in the ICP waveform derived indices. Conclusions Simultaneous monitoring of ICP using two solid sensors may show marked differences in static ICP but close to identity

  16. Calcified epidural hematoma in pediatric age group: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Trivedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a rare case of calcified (ossified chronic epidural hematoma developed in a six-and-a-half-year-old female patient who was operated for cerebellar astrocytoma 6 months earlier. There was no history of trauma. Ossified epidural hematoma was seen as an incidental finding in the follow-up in computed tomography scan after 6 months of primary glioma surgery. Ossified chronic epidural hematoma with thick collagenous wall and newly formed bone on dura was excised. The development of calcified chronic subdural hematoma after decompressive intracranial surgery is a well-known occurrence, but the fact that a calcified epidural hematoma, which is rare and which can also develop after decompressive surgery, and the occurrence of calcified (ossified epidural hematoma after postfossa a glioma surgery is not yet reported. The second case is a 9-year-old male anemic child with a history of fall while playing 5 months earlier who presented with headache of 3 months duration. He had bifrontal calcified epidural hematoma operated by craniotomy and excision of calcified dural edge.

  17. [A Case of Spinal Epidural Hematoma Presenting with Transient Hemiplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Takanori; Nakashima, Kazuya; Tominaga, Takashi; Nogaki, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with spinal epidural hematoma who presented with transient hemiplegia. A 90-year-old man awakened from sleep due to sudden neck pain. Fifteen minutes later, the man experienced progressively worsening weakness in his left hand, and was transported in an ambulance to our hospital. At the hospital, he presented with hemiplegia, and we suspected intracranial disease. Therefore, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which revealed no intracranial lesions. Shortly after the MRI, the patient showed no signs of hemiplegia. However, since the severe neck pain persisted, we performed cervical MRI, which showed a high-intensity area at the C2-C5 level, predominantly on the left side. Despite recovery from hemiplegia, we performed a laminectomy of C3-C5 with evacuation of a hematoma at the C2-C6 level. After the surgery, the patient had no neck pain.

  18. Hemodynamic Changes during Epidural Anesthesia with Various Local Anesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. M. Shifman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Central hemodynamic stability during gynecological laparoscopic operations remains an important problem of anes-thesiological monitoring. Subjects and methods. Fifty-eight patients who had undergone various gynecological laparoscopic operations were examined. According to the mode of anesthesia, the patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 29 patients who received epidural anesthesia with ropivacaine; 2 29 who had epidural anesthesia using lidocaine. The indices of cardiac performance (stroke volume, stroke index, and cardiac output, blood (diastolic, systolic, and mean pressure, vascular parameters (linear blood flow velocity, total peripheral vascular resistance were determined by volumetric compression oscillometry. Results. The study indicated that all the modes of anesthesia demonstrated the satisfactory condition of the cardiovascular system, but the highest stability of hemodynamic parameters was recorded in the epidural ropivacaine group. In this group, there were steady-state reductions in diastolic, systolic, mean blood pressures, and total vascular peripheral resistance and increases in stroke index, stroke volume, and linear blood flow velocity. Conclusion. Epidural anesthesia using ropivacaine during gynecological surgical endoscopic interventions is the method of analgesia causing minimal hemodynamic disorders. Key words: hemodynamics, epidural anesthesia, laparoscopic gynecological operations.

  19. Percutaneous epidural drainage through a burr hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila M Falsarella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial extradural collection may cause an increase in intracranial pressure, requiring rapid emergency treatment to reduce morbidity and mortality. We described an alternative CT-guided percutaneous access for extradural collection drainage. We report a case of a patient with previous craniectomy for meningioma ressection who presented to the Emergency Department with symptoms of intracranial hypertension. Brains CT showed a extradural collection with subfalcine herniation. After multidisciplinary discussion a CT-guided percutaneous drainage through previous burr hole was performed. The patient was discharged after 36 hours of admission, without further symptoms. We describe a safe and effective alternative percutaneous access for extradural collection drainage in patients with previous burr hole.

  20. Influência da fisioterapia respiratória na pressão intracraniana em pacientes com traumatismo craniencefálico grave Influence of the respiratory physioterapy on intracranial pressure in severe head trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana A. Thiesen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar a influência das manobras de fisioterapia respiratória na pressão intracraniana (PIC dos pacientes com trauma craniencefálico grave. MÉTODO: Trinta e cinco pacientes com trauma craniencefálico grave foram incluídos no estudo, sendo divididos em três grupos: com PIC OBJECTIVE: To evaluate influence of the respiratory physiotherapy on intracranial pressure (ICP in patients with severe head trauma. METHOD: Thirty five patients with severe head trauma were included in the study.The patients were divided into three groups: ICP 0-10, 11-20 and 21-30 mmHg. The following variables were measured: ICP and mean arterial pressure. Cerebral perfusion pressure was calculated as the difference between mean arterial and intracranial pressure. RESULTS: Endotracheal aspiration increased ICP in all patients. The mean arterial pressure didn't change and cerebral perfusion pressure decreased, but remaning normal value. CONCLUSION: Respiratory physiotherapy maneuvers can be safely applied in patients with severe head trauma with ICP below 30 mmHg. More attention should be taken during endotracheal aspiration .

  1. Papilledema and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Deborah I

    2014-08-01

    Papilledema is one of the most concerning physical examination findings in neurology: it has a broad differential diagnosis of intracranial (and occasionally spinal) pathology associated with increased intracranial pressure. Papilledema impairs axoplasmic flow within the optic nerves and compresses the optic nerves externally; it may lead to profound visual loss. Thus, detection of papilledema and assessment of visual function are essential to patient management. This article reviews the treatment of papilledema-related visual loss in pseudotumor cerebri syndrome, one of the most common causes of papilledema encountered by neurologists. Results from the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Trial (IIHTT), the first randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial for the treatment of patients with mild visual loss from idiopathic intracranial hypertension, were published in April 2014. The IIHTT provides the first evidence-based treatment recommendations, showing the benefit of acetazolamide and weight loss for improving visual status in patients with mild visual field loss from idiopathic intracranial hypertension. A detailed ophthalmic examination, including perimetry, is critical to the evaluation, treatment, and assessment of treatment response in patients with papilledema.

  2. Variant Anatomy of Intracranial Part of Middle Meningeal Artery in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomy of the intracranial part of middle meningeal artery is important during ligation or embolization in epidural haematomas, and in surgical approach to the middle cranial fossa. It shows population variations, but reports from African populations are scanty. This study aimed at describing the variant anatomy of ...

  3. Measurement of blood flow in the superior sagittal sinus in healthy volunteers, and in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension with phase-contrast cine MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Thomsen, C; Gjerris, F

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure blood flow and velocity in the superior sagittal ++sinus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: MR velocity mapping was used to examine 14 healthy volunteers, 15 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), 3 patients with high pressure hydrocephalus (HPH), and 11 patients with idiopathic...... intracranial hypertension (IIH). RESULTS: Mean blood flow was 443 ml/min in healthy volunteers with a tendency towards reduced blood flow with increasing age. In NPH patients significantly lower superior sagittal sinus blood flow values were found, but this difference was no longer significant when patients...

  4. Non-invasive estimation of intracranial pressure. MR-based evaluation in children with hydrocephalus; Nichtinvasive Bestimmung des intrakraniellen Drucks. MR-basierte Untersuchung bei Kindern mit Hydrozephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehlmann, M.; Steffinger, D.; Ertl-Wagner, B.; Koerte, I.K. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Peraud, A. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Abteilung fuer Neurochirurgie, Muenchen (Germany); Lehner, M. [Dr. von Haunersches Kinderspital, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Abteilung fuer Kinderchirurgie, Muenchen (Germany); Heinen, F.; Alperin, N. [University Miami, Department of Radiology, Miller School of Medicine, Miami (United States)

    2012-09-15

    The intracranial pressure (ICP) is a crucially important parameter for diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making in patients with hydrocephalus. So far there is no standard method to non-invasively assess the ICP. Various approaches to obtain the ICP semi-invasively or non-invasively are discussed and the clinical application of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based method to estimate ICP (MR-ICP) is demonstrated in a group of pediatric patients with hydrocephalus. Arterial inflow, venous drainage and craniospinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow were quantified using phase-contrast imaging to derive the MR-ICP. A total of 15 patients with hydrocephalus (n=9 treated with shunt placement or ventriculostomy) underwent MRI on a 3 T scanner applying retrospectively-gated cine phase contrast sequences. Of the patients six had clinical symptoms indicating increased ICP (age 2.5-14.61 years, mean 7.4 years) and nine patients had no clinical signs of elevated ICP (age 2.1-15.9 years; mean 9.8 years; all treated with shunt or ventriculostomy). Median MR-ICP in symptomatic patients was 24.5 mmHg (25th percentile 20.4 mmHg; 75th percentile 44.6 mmHg). Median MR-ICP in patients without acute signs of increased ICP was 9.8 mmHg (25th percentile 8.6 mmHg; 75th percentile 11.4 mmHg). Group differences were significant (p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U-test). The MR-ICP technique is a promising non-invasive tool for estimating ICP. Further studies in larger patient cohorts are warranted to investigate its application in children with hydrocephalus. (orig.) [German] Der intrakranielle Druck (''intracranial pressure'' - ICP) ist ein entscheidender Parameter bei der Diagnostik, Therapie und Verlaufsbeurteilung von Patienten mit Hydrozephalus. Derzeit gibt es keine radiologische Standardmethode, um den intrakraniellen Druck quantitativ zu bestimmen. Methoden zur invasiven und nichtinvasiven Einschaetzung des ICP werden diskutiert und die Anwendung eines MR

  5. Imaging Features of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Alexander J P W; Soares, Bruno P; Bruce, Beau B; Saindane, Amit M; Newman, Nancy J; Biousse, Valérie; Peragallo, Jason H

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs of elevated intracranial pressure and idiopathic intracranial hypertension have been well characterized in adults but not in children. The MRIs of 50 children with idiopathic intracranial hypertension and 46 adults with idiopathic intracranial hypertension were reviewed for optic nerve head protrusion, optic nerve head enhancement, posterior scleral flattening, increased perioptic cerebrospinal fluid, optic nerve tortuosity, empty or partially empty sella, tonsillar herniation, enlargement of Meckel's cave meningoceles, and transverse venous sinus stenosis(TSS). Compared to adolescents (11-17 years, n = 40) and adults (>17 years, n = 46), prepubescent children (intracranial hypertension have similar MRI findings as adults, but they are less frequent in prepubescent children.

  6. Epidural empyema and orbital phlegmon. Computer tomographic diagnosis of rare complications of sinusitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigmund, G.; Baehren, W.; Sigg, O.; Ranzinger, G.; Schiefer, U.

    1986-07-01

    Among 4019 computed tomograms of the head performed in 2 years we found 2 epidural empyemas combined with an ipsilateral orbital phlegmon and one periorbital abscess with an incipient orbital phlegmon. In all 3 patients they turned out to be intracranial or orbital complications of an adjacent paranasal sinusitis. The CT diagnosis was a guideline for further therapy and was verified by immediate surgery. The reliable diagnosis of orbital and intracranial spaceoccupying lesions makes CT the radiological method of choice in case of suspicion of a complicated sinusitis.

  7. Case Report Thoracic epidural for modified radical mastectomy in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with lisinopril, amlodipine, and Mixtard insulin injection. However, she was not compliant on her medications. Three days before the scheduled surgery, her blood pressure (BP) .... 76-81. 12. Reihsaus G, Waldbaur H, Seeling W. Spinal epidural abscess: a meta- analysis of 915 patients. Neurosurg Rev 2000; 23(4): 175-204.

  8. Epidural anesthesia, hypotension, and changes in intravascular volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Foss, Nicolai B; Svensén, Christer

    2004-01-01

    hypotension is present, which may have implications for the choice of treatment of hypotension. However, no long-term information or measurements of plasma volumes with or without hypotension after epidural anesthesia are available. METHODS: In 12 healthy volunteers, the authors assessed plasma (125I...... constant was 56 ml/min. CONCLUSIONS: Thoracic epidural anesthesia per se does not lead to changes in blood volumes despite a reduction in blood pressure. When fluid is infused, there is a dilution, and the fluid initially seems to be located centrally. Because administration of hydroxyethyl starch...

  9. Detection of Intracranial Hypertension using Deep Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quachtran, Benjamin; Hamilton, Robert; Scalzo, Fabien

    2016-12-01

    Intracranial Hypertension, a disorder characterized by elevated pressure in the brain, is typically monitored in neurointensive care and diagnosed only after elevation has occurred. This reaction-based method of treatment leaves patients at higher risk of additional complications in case of misdetection. The detection of intracranial hypertension has been the subject of many recent studies in an attempt to accurately characterize the causes of hypertension, specifically examining waveform morphology. We investigate the use of Deep Learning, a hierarchical form of machine learning, to model the relationship between hypertension and waveform morphology, giving us the ability to accurately detect presence hypertension. Data from 60 patients, showing intracranial pressure levels over a half hour time span, was used to evaluate the model. We divided each patient's recording into average normalized beats over 30 sec segments, assigning each beat a label of high (i.e. greater than 15 mmHg) or low intracranial pressure. The model was tested to predict the presence of elevated intracranial pressure. The algorithm was found to be 92.05± 2.25% accurate in detecting intracranial hypertension on our dataset.

  10. Epidural Hematoma Following Interlaminar Epidural Injection in Patient Taking Aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Rebecca A; Bendel, Markus A; Moeschler, Susan M; Mauck, William D

    2018-01-09

    We present a case report of a patient who developed an epidural hematoma following an interlaminar epidural steroid injection with no risk factors aside from old age and aspirin use for secondary prevention. A 79-year-old man developed an epidural hematoma requiring surgical treatment following an uncomplicated interlaminar epidural steroid injection performed for neurogenic claudication. In the periprocedural period, he continued aspirin for secondary prophylaxis following a myocardial infarction. For patients taking aspirin for primary or secondary prophylaxis, the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine antiplatelet and anticoagulation guidelines for spine and pain procedures recommend a shared assessment and risk stratification when deciding to hold the medication for intermediate-risk neuraxial procedures. Cases such as this serve to highlight the importance of giving careful consideration to medical optimization of a patient even when a low- or intermediate-risk procedure is planned.

  11. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliopy Matheos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Papilledema has long been considered a hallmark of idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a disease defined by elevated intracranial pressure with indiscernible etiology. Papilledema is often seen in the pediatric population, and as such can lead to delays in diagnosis, and often misdiagnosis. Here, we describe three children who were confirmed to have idiopathic intracranial hypertension with raised intracranial pressure by repeated lumbar puncture or intracranial pressure monitoring, normal neuroimaging and absence of papilledema. All three cases had atypical clinical presentations with visual disturbances or photophobia. The patients had a normal body mass index. This case series demonstrates that idiopathic intracranial hypertension can manifest in the absence of clinically obvious papilledema, and has, as such, the potential to cause permanent visual loss if the diagnosis is missed.

  12. Syringomyelia Caused by Traumatic Intracranial Hypotension: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Sébastien; Humbertjean, Lisa; Mione, Gioia; Braun, Marc; Schmitt, Emmanuelle; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie

    2016-07-01

    Syringomyelia due to intracranial hypotension is rarely described. As a consequence, intracranial hypotension is less recognized as a potential cause of syringomyelia or mistaken with Chiari type 1 malformation. The pathogeny is poorly understood, and we lack diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for this particular setting. We describe a 45-year-old patient who developed syringomyelia after about 10 years of undiagnosed intracranial hypotension caused by traumatic C6 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Surgical closing of the leak was required to treat intracranial hypotension after failure of conservative measures and blind epidural patches. It led to a marked improvement of cerebral and spinal signs. We discuss the pathogeny of syringomyelia caused by intracranial hypotension and highlight a mechanical theory of hyperpressure against the cervical spine due to blockage of CSF flow by descent of cerebellar tonsils at the foramen magnum level. We describe discriminating clinical and radiologic signs to differentiate intracranial hypotension from Chiari type 1 malformation and discuss mechanisms and causality relating trauma and intracranial hypotension. Syringomyelia can be a consequence of long-term progression of intracranial hypotension, which must be differentiated from Chiari type 1 malformation. In our case, resolution was achieved by detecting and closing the CSF leak causing the intracranial hypotension. Reports of similar cases are necessary to understand the origin of CSF leak in traumatic intracranial hypotension and assess the best therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mannitol-induced rebleeding from intracranial aneurysm. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenørn, J; Westergaard, L; Hansen, P H

    1983-01-01

    A case is presented in which rebleeding from an intracranial saccular aneurysm occurred a few minutes after intravenous administration of mannitol during surgery. The relationship between the reducing effect of mannitol on elevated intracranial pressure and the increased pressure gradient across...

  14. Epidural Hematoma Complication after Rapid Chronic Subdural Hematoma Evacuation: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Aykut; Ucler, Necati; Erdogan, Uzay; Yucetas, Cem Seyho

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 41 Final Diagnosis: Healty Symptoms: Headache Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Chronic subdural hematoma Specialty: Neurosurgery Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Chronic subdural hematoma generally occurs in the elderly. After chronic subdural hematoma evacuation surgery, the development of epidural hematoma is a very rare entity. Case Report: We report the case of a 41-year-old man with an epidural hematoma complication after chronic subdural hematoma evacuation. Under general anesthesia, the patient underwent a large craniotomy with closed system drainage performed to treat the chronic subdural hematoma. After chronic subdural hematoma evacuation, there was epidural leakage on the following day. Conclusions: Although trauma is the most common risk factor in young CSDH patients, some other predisposing factors may exist. Intracranial hypotension can cause EDH. Craniotomy and drainage surgery can usually resolve the problem. Because of rapid dynamic intracranial changes, epidural leakages can occur. A large craniotomy flap and silicone drainage in the operation area are key safety points for neurosurgeons and hydration is essential. PMID:26147957

  15. Intra-arterial papaverine and leg vascular resistance during in situ bypass surgery with high or low epidural anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørdam, Peter; Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, T V

    1993-01-01

    patients were operated during high epidural anaesthesia (> Th. 10). Flow increased and arterial pressure decreased after i.a. papaverine in all patients. When compared with patients operated during high epidural anaesthesia, flow increase and decrease in vascular resistance took place in patients operated...... in flow after i.a. papaverine was not significantly different to that noted during high epidural anaesthesia. The results indicate that the level of analgesia influences graft flow after i.a. papaverine, probably reflecting differences in the effect of epidural anaesthesia on sympathetic tone to the leg....

  16. Meningoceles in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialer, Omer Y.; Rueda, Mario Perez; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie; Saindane, Amit M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE MRI abnormalities have been described in patients with increased intracranial pressure (ICP), including in those with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Spontaneous cerebral spinal fluid (CSF)-filled outpouchings of the dura (meningoceles), and secondary CSF leaks can occur from elevated ICP in patients with IIH, however, few studies have evaluated these findings. Our objective was to evaluate the frequency of spontaneous intracranial meningoceles among IIH patients and determine their association with visual outcome. SUBJECTS AND METHODS We performed a retrospective case-control study of consecutive IIH patients between 2000 and 2011 who underwent MRI including T2-weighted imaging. Demographics, presenting symptoms, CSF opening pressure, and visual outcome were collected for the first and last evaluations. Controls included patients without headache or visual complaints with normal brain MRIs. Stratified analysis was used to control for potential confounding by age, gender, race, and body mass index. RESULTS We included 79 IIH patients and 76 controls. Meningoceles were found in 11% of IIH patients versus 0% of controls (pmeningoceles were found in 9% of IIH patients versus 0% of controls (pmeningocele or prominent Meckel’s caves was not associated with demographics, symptoms, degree of papilledema, CSF opening pressure, visual acuity, or visual field defect severity. CONCLUSION Meningoceles are significantly more common in IIH patients than in controls, and can be considered an additional imaging sign for IIH. Meningoceles are not, however, associated with decreased CSF opening pressure or better visual outcome in IIH. PMID:24555598

  17. Epidural, paraspinal, and subcutaneous lipomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sener, R. Nuri [Department of Radiology, Ege University Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    2003-09-01

    A unique case of idiopathic diffuse lipomatosis is reported. The patient was an 11-year-old boy with diffuse lipomatosis in the epidural space, paraspinal muscles, and thoracolumbar subcutaneous regions. Epidural lipomatosis involved the entire thoracolumbar spine and was associated with filar thickening and lipoma. In addition, paraspinal muscles, especially the erector spinae group, had diffuse fatty infiltration. The ultimate clinical effect of this fatty tissue was urinary dysfunction, radicular pain and hypoesthesia in both legs and difficulty walking. (orig.)

  18. [Prolonged hypothermia in refractory intracranial hypertension. Report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovegno, Maximiliano; Valenzuela, José Luis; Mellado, Patricio; Andresen, Max

    2012-02-01

    The use of hypothermia after cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation is a standard clinical practice, however its use for neuroprotection has been extended to other conditions. We report a 23-year-old male with intracranial hypertension secondary to a parenchymal hematoma associated to acute hydrocephalus. An arterial malformation was found and embolized. Due to persistent intracranial hypertension, moderate hypothermia with a target temperature of 33°C was started. After 12 hours of hypothermia, intracranial pressure was controlled. After 13 days of hypothermia a definitive control of intracranial pressure was achieved. The patient was discharged 40 days after admission, remains with a mild hemiparesia and is reassuming his university studies.

  19. Imaging and interventions in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A pictorial essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, Rajeev; Pant, Rochan; Indrajit, Inna K; Negi, Raj S; Sahu, Samresh; Hashim, P I; D'Souza, John

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure that can be primary or secondary. The primary form, now termed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), was in the past a disease of exclusion and imaging played a limited role of excluding organic causes of raised intracranial pressure. However imaging markers have been described with patients with IIH at the orbit, sella and cerebral venous system. We wish to reiterate the characteristic imaging features of this poorly understood disease and also emphasise that stenting of the transverse sinus in select cases of IIH is an efficacious option.

  20. Imaging and interventions in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A pictorial essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Sivasankar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypertension is a syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure that can be primary or secondary. The primary form, now termed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH, was in the past a disease of exclusion and imaging played a limited role of excluding organic causes of raised intracranial pressure. However imaging markers have been described with patients with IIH at the orbit, sella and cerebral venous system. We wish to reiterate the characteristic imaging features of this poorly understood disease and also emphasise that stenting of the transverse sinus in select cases of IIH is an efficacious option.

  1. Thoracic epidural abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, L K; Rigamonti, D; Wolf, A L; Robinson, W L; Edwards, C C; DiPatri, A

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-one cases of thoracic spinal epidural abscess occurring over a 10-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Diagnosis was made by MRI or myelography and confirmed in the operative cases. A bacterial agent was isolated in 18 of the cases (86%). When measured, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate was elevated in all cases. Four patients who presented without neurologic deficits remained intact. All patients who presented with neurological deficits underwent surgical intervention in addition to intravenous antibiotics. Of the 15 patients who presented with a paraparesis of less than antigravity strength, five eventually were independent ambulators and continent. A good outcome resulted in 80% of those who underwent decompression within 24 h, as opposed to only 10% of the patients decompressed after 24 h. Good results can be obtained despite severe neurologic compromise when treated by rapid diagnosis and decompression of the spinal canal.

  2. [Intracranial hypertension in Proteus syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandine, J-B; James, S; Van Garsse, A; Born, J-D

    2007-11-01

    Proteus syndrome, described for the first time in 1979, is a sporadic congenital poly-malformation syndrome named for its highly variable manifestations. We report the case of a 36-year-old male patient with several malformations including skull hyperostosis and huge frontal sinus hypertrophy compressing the brain. He complained of increasing headache for 5 years. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure monitoring revealed severe hypertension. The patient underwent frontoparietal craniectomy, which allowed partial decompression. Postoperatively headaches decreased and the intracranial pressure normalized. Proteus syndrome is a genetic disease with a mosaic pattern. Only a hundred cases have been reported, mostly in childhood. Common manifestations include disproportionate overgrowth of the limbs and the skull, various subcutaneous tumors, vascular, renal and pulmonary malformations. Brain abnormalities are not common in this syndrome. When present, retardation or seizure disorders are typically seen. Intracranial hypertension is described for the first time in this syndrome.

  3. Osmolality of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibroe, Elisabeth A; Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of increased intracranial fluid pressure (ICP) of unknown etiology. This study aims to investigate osmolality of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with IIH. METHODS: We prospectively collected CSF from individuals referr...

  4. Apolipoprotein E ε4: A Possible Risk Factor of Intracranial Pressure and White Matter Perfusion in Good-Grade Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patients at Early Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jian-Hua; Qin, Xing-Hu; Pang, Jin-Wei; Wu, Yue; Dong, Jin-Hu; Huang, Chang-Ren; Wan, Wei-Feng; Yang, Xiao-Bo; Sun, Xiao-Chuan; Chen, Li-Gang; Jiang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a devastating and complicated disease with significant morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have shown that genetic susceptibility may play an important role in the outcome of a given individual with aSAH. This study evaluates the potential association in effects of the APOE allele on the early brain injury (EBI) in light of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion disorders in a consecutive series of non-comatose Chinese patients with aSAH. A total of 122 patients with aSAH (54 males and 68 females) were enrolled in this study. Demographic and clinical data were collected. We measured ICP before microsurgical clipping or endovascular coiling during the first 72 h after aneurysm rupture. Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) examination in patients was performed before treatment. The distributions of APOE genotypes and alleles matched Hardy-Weinberg law (p > 0.05). In this study, 68 patients (55.7%) had a normal ICP, whereas 54 (44.3%) had an elevated ICP. Fourteen of 21 patients with APOE ε4 had an elevated ICP, which was significantly different from those without APOE ε4 (p = 0.03). The patients with the ε4 allele had a higher incidence of elevated ICP [p = 0.009, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.481-15.432, odds ratio = 4.780] than those without this allele. For CTP measurements, a lower mean cerebral blood flow (difference, -4.74; 95% CI, 0.53-8.94 s, p = 0.03), longer mean transit time (difference, 0.47; 95% CI, -0.87 to -0.78, p = 0.02), and time-to-peak (difference, 2.29; 95% CI, -3.64 to -0.93 s, p = 0.02) were observed in patients with ε4 allele than in those without in the internal capsule regions. In conclusion, the APOE ε4 allele predisposes patients to elevated ICP and perfusion disorders in white matter regions during the first 72 h after aSAH. The presence of an APOE ε4 allele plays an important role in the EBI response to aSAH.

  5. Evaluation of a New Brain Tissue Probe for Intracranial Pressure, Temperature, and Cerebral Blood Flow Monitoring in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seule, Martin; Sikorski, Christopher; Sakowitz, Oliver; von Campe, Gord; Santos, Edgar; Orakcioglu, Berk; Unterberg, Andreas; Keller, Emanuela

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate an intraparenchymal probe for intracranial pressure (ICP) and temperature (TEMP) monitoring as well as determination of cerebral hemodynamics using a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and indocyanine green (ICG) dye dilution method (NIRS-ICP probe). The NIRS-ICP probe was applied after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage if multimodal monitoring was established due to poor neurological condition. ICP and TEMP values were obtained from ventricular catheters and systemic temperature sensors. Repeated NIRS-ICG measurements (2 injections within 30 min) were performed daily for determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time of ICG (mttICG). Secondary neurologic dysfunction was defined as brain tissue oxygen tension 35 obtained from cerebral probing. A total of 128 NIRS-ICG measurements were performed in ten patients. The correlation coefficients between ICP and TEMP values obtained with the NIRS-ICP probe and values from routine monitoring were r = 0.72 and r = 0.96, respectively. The mean values were 30.3 ± 13.6 ml/100 g/min for CBF, 3.3 ± 1.2 ml/100 g for CBV, and 6.8 ± 1.6 s for mttICG. The coefficients of variation from repeated NIRS-ICG measurements were 10.9 % for CBF, 11.7 % for CBV, and 3.8 % for mttICG. The sensitivity for detection of secondary neurologic dysfunction was 85 % and the specificity 83 % using a CBF-threshold of 25 ml/100 g/min. Multimodal monitoring using the NIRS-ICP probe is feasible with high reproducibility of measurement values and the ability to detect secondary neurologic dysfunction. No safety concerns exist for the routine clinical use of the NIRS-ICP probe.

  6. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: diagnosis to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Kaustubh; Samant, Rohan; Lee, Ricky W

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension typically occurs from spontaneous CSF leak. CSF volume depletion rather than decrease in CSF pressure is thought to be the main causative feature for intracranial hypotension. More and more cases of intracranial hypotension are getting diagnosed with the advances in the imaging. The advances in the imaging have also led to the better understanding of the dynamic changes that occur with intracranial hypotension. The old theories of CSF overproduction or CSF underproduction have not been substantially associated with intracranial hypotension. It has also led to the fore different atypical clinical features and presentations. Although, it has been known for a long time, the diagnosis is still challenging and dilemma persists over one diagnostic modality over other and the subsequent management. Spontaneous CSF leaks occur at the spinal level and the skull base and other locations are rare. The anatomy of spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a very complex process with significant overlap in connective tissue disorders, previous dural weakness or meningeal diverticula. To localize the location of the CSF leak-CT myelography is the modality of choice. CSF cysternography may provide additional confirmation in uncertain cases and also MRI spine imaging may be of significant help in some cases. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension continues to be a diagnostic dilemma and our effort was to consolidate available information on the clinical features, diagnostics, and management for a practicing neurologist for a "15-20 min quick update of the topic".

  7. Effect of epidural clonidine on somatosensory evoked potentials to dermatomal stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, C; Hansen, O B; Kehlet, H

    1989-01-01

    The effect of lumbar epidural clonidine 150 micrograms on early (less than 0.5 s) somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) to electrical stimulation of the L1 and S1 dermatomes was examined in twelve cancer patients. Epidural clonidine led to a minor but significant decrease in amplitude of two...... systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased from 118 +/- 4/72 +/- 5 mmHg to 99 +/- 5/60 +/- 3 mmHg (P less than 0.01), respectively. It is concluded that epidural clonidine has a minor effect on the early SEPs to electrical dermatomal stimulation. Additionally, a pronounced effect on cancer pain...

  8. Orthostatic hypotension during postoperative continuous thoracic epidural bupivacaine-morphine in patients undergoing abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crawford, M E; Møiniche, S; Orbæk, Janne

    1996-01-01

    Fifty patients undergoing colonic surgery received combined thoracic epidural and general anesthesia followed by continuous epidural bupivacaine 0.25% and morphine 0.05 mg/mL, 4 mL/h, for 96 h postoperatively plus oral tenoxicam 20 mg daily. Heart rate (HR) and arterial blood pressure (BP) were...... hypotension. The results suggest that patients undergoing abdominal surgery and treated with continuous small-dose thoracic epidural bupivacaine-morphine are subjected to a decrease of BP at rest and during mobilization, but not to an extent that seriously impairs ambulation in most patients....

  9. Efeitos da fisioterapia respiratória na pressão intracraniana e pressão de perfusão cerebral no traumatismo cranioencefálico grave Effects of respiratory physiotherapy on intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure in severe traumatic brain injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassia Toledo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Após um traumatismo cranioencefálico, a hipertensão intracraniana representa a maior causa de mortalidade, além da possibilidade de seqüelas funcionais, comportamentais e cognitivas. A escassez de estudos sobre os efeitos da fisioterapia respiratória nestes pacientes pode levar à condutas contraditórias. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar os efeitos de manobras usuais de fisioterapia respiratória sobre a pressão intracraniana e a pressão de perfusão cerebral em pacientes com traumatismo cranioencefálico grave. MÉTODOS: Ensaio clínico, prospectivo, em pacientes com traumatismo cranioencefálico, ventilados mecanicamente e com medida contínua da pressão intracraniana. Foram avaliados os efeitos das manobras de vibrocompressão manual e aspiração intratraqueal sem e com instilação de soro fisiológico, sobre as medidas de pressão intracraniana e de pressão de perfusão cerebral, entre o primeiro e o terceiro dia após a lesão cerebral. RESULTADOS: Foram obtidos os dados de 11 pacientes com idade de 41anos (mediana APACHE II de 19,5 ± 5. A manobra de vibrocompressão manual não determinou aumento da pressão intracraniana em nenhum dos dias avaliados. A pressão intracraniana aumentou significativamente após manobras de aspiração intratraqueal em relação à medida basal (dia 1, 9,5 ± 0,9 mm Hg vs 18,0 ± 3,2 mm Hg; dia 2, 10,6 ± 1,7 mm Hg vs 21,4 ± 3,8 mm Hg; dia 3, 14,4 ± 1,0 vs 24,9 ± 2,7 mm Hg; pOBJECTIVE: After brain injury intracranial hypertension is the major cause of mortality, in addition to the possibility of functional, behavioral and cognitive sequels. Scarcity of studies on the effects of respiratory physiotherapy on these patients may lead to contradictory performances. This study aimed to assess the effects of customary respiratory physiotherapy maneuvers on intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures in patients with severe brain injury. METHODS: Clinical, prospective trial with

  10. Intracranial hypertension in 2 children with marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne; Kroft, Lucia J M; Pals, Gerard; van Vugt, Jeroen P P; Overweg-Plandsoen, Wouterina C G

    2008-08-01

    Two unrelated children with Marfan syndrome presented with recurrent intracranial hypertension. Both children complained of headache, nausea, and vomiting and one of them had papilledema. Both had increased cerebrospinal fluid pressure, and their complaints disappeared after lumbar puncture. Although severe headache has been reported in Marfan syndrome due to intracranial hypotension, this is to our knowledge the first report of intracranial hypertension in Marfan patients.

  11. Role of epidural anesthesia in a fast track liver resection protocol for cirrhotic patients - results after three years of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Bardi, Tommaso; Laici, Cristiana; Gamberini, Elisa; Francorsi, Letizia; Faenza, Stefano

    2016-09-18

    To evaluate the potential benefits and risks of the use of epidural anaesthesia within an enhanced recovery protocol in this specific subpopulation. A retrospective review was conducted, including all cirrhotic patients who underwent open liver resection between January 2013 and December 2015 at Bologna University Hospital. Patients with an abnormal coagulation profile contraindicating the placement of an epidural catheter were excluded from the analysis. The control group was composed by patients refusing epidural anaesthesia. Of the 183 cirrhotic patients undergoing open liver resections, 57 had contraindications to the placement of an epidural catheter; of the remaining 126, 86 patients received general anaesthesia and 40 combined anaesthesia. The two groups presented homogeneous characteristics. Intraoperatively the metabolic data did not differ between the two groups, whilst the epidural group had a lower mean arterial pressure (P = 0.041) and received more colloid infusions (P = 0.007). Postoperative liver and kidney function did not differ significantly. Length of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.003) and hospital stay (P = 0.032) were significantly lower in the epidural group. No complications related to the epidural catheter placement or removal was recorded. The use of Epidural Anaesthesia within a fast track protocol for cirrhotic patients undergoing liver resections had a positive impact on the patient's outcomes and comfort as demonstrated by a significantly lower length of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay in the epidural group. The technique appears to be safely manageable in this fragile population even though these results need confirmation in larger studies.

  12. Intracranial Hypertension Without Papilledema in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Shawn C; Aronowitz, Catherine; Roach, E Steve

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to determine the frequency of intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children. Charts of patients evaluated in a pediatric intracranial hypertension clinic at our institution were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into 2 groups depending on whether they had presence or absence of optic nerve edema at the time of presentation. Age, body mass index, and opening cerebrospinal fluid pressures were considered continuous variables and compared by Wilcoxon rank sum test because of non-normality. A P-value of 0.05 was considered significant. A total of 228 charts were reviewed; 152 patients met the criteria for intracranial hypertension, and 27 patients (17.8%) met the criteria of headache without optic nerve edema. There was no clinically significant difference in age, body mass index, opening pressure, and modified opening pressure between the 2 groups. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Intracranial hypertension without headache in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Shawn C; Aronowitz, Catherine; Reem, Rachel; Rogers, David; Roach, E Steve

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to determine the frequency of intracranial hypertension without headache in children. We retrospectively analyzed patients evaluated in a pediatric intracranial hypertension referral center. Patients were divided into 2 groups depending on whether they complained of headache at the time of presentation. Age, body mass index, and opening cerebrospinal fluid pressures were considered continuous variables and compared by Wilcoxon rank-sum test because of non-normality. A P value of .05 was considered significant. A total of 228 charts were reviewed; 152 patients met the criteria for intracranial hypertension and 22/152 patients (14.5%) met the criteria of optic nerve edema without headache. There were clinically significant differences in age and body mass index between the 2 groups. The group without headache was typically younger and not obese. The opening pressure and modified opening pressure were not clinically significant between the 2 groups. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Development of intracranial hypertension after surgical management of intracranial arachnoid cyst: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; O'Connor, Brendan; Marks, Charles

    2013-01-01

    To describe three cases of delayed development of intracranial hypertension (IH) after surgical treatment of intracranial arachnoid cyst, including the pathogenesis of IH and a review of the literature. A retrospective and prospective analysis of three male patients (two 18 years old and one 45 years old) was performed. All patients underwent surgical intervention for symptomatic intracranial arachnoid cyst in the form of fenestration of the cyst and a cystoperitoneal shunt. All three patients presented at a later stage with new-onset headaches after the initial management of arachnoid cyst. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography ruled out any intracranial vascular pathology. Lumbar puncture and intracranial pressure monitoring showed increased intracranial pressure suggestive of idiopathic IH. To manage IH, intracranial pressure monitoring, cystoperitoneal shunt, ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and lumboperitoneal shunt were performed. The pathogenesis of delayed development of IH in this clinical setting is not clearly elucidated. When intracranial arachnoid cysts are treated, the possibility of future development of IH should be borne in mind. Delayed presentation with headaches in patients after treatment of intracranial arachnoid cysts should raise the possibility of IH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The relationship between serum sodium and intracranial pressure when using hypertonic saline to target mild hypernatremia in patients with head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Diana L; Swanson, Joseph M; Wood, G Christopher; Magnotti, Louis J; Boucher, Bradley A; Croce, Martin A; Harrison, Charles G; Muhlbauer, Michael S; Fabian, Timothy C

    2012-10-15

    Limited data suggest mild hypernatremia may be related to lower intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The practice at the study center has been to use hypertonic saline (HTS) to generate a targeted serum sodium of 145 to 155 mEq/l in patients with TBI. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between serum sodium values and ICP, and to evaluate the acute effect of HTS on ICP. A retrospective review of patients who were admitted to the trauma ICU for TBI, had an ICP monitor placed, and received at least one dose of HTS between January 2006 and March 2011 was performed. Data were collected for up to 120 hours after ICP monitor placement. The primary outcome was the relationship between serum sodium and maximum ICP. Secondary outcomes were the relationship between serum sodium and the mean number of daily interventions for ICP control, and the acute effect of HTS on ICP during the 6 hours after each dose. Linear regression was used to analyze the primary outcome. Analysis of variance on ranks and repeated measures analysis of variance were used to evaluate the number of interventions and the acute effect of HTS on ICP, respectively. Eighty-one patients were enrolled with mean ± standard deviation age of 36 ± 15 years and median Glasgow Coma Scale score of 7 (interquartile range, 4 to 7). A total of 1,230 serum sodium values (range, 118 to 174 mEq/l) and 7,483 ICP values (range, 0 to 159 mmHg) were collected. There was no correlation between serum sodium and maximum ICP (R(2) = 0.0052). The overall mean ± standard deviation number of interventions for elevated ICP per day was 4.2 ± 2.9, 2.9 ± 2.0, and 2.6 ± 2.3 for patients with a mean serum sodium of 155 mEq/l, respectively (P < 0.001). Regarding the acute effect of HTS on ICP, there was no statistical difference in mean ICP compared with baseline during hours 1 through 6 following HTS doses (baseline, 13.7 ± 8.4 mmHg; hour 1, 13.6 ± 8.3 mmHg; hour 2, 13

  16. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) En Español Read in Chinese What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder that ...

  17. Epidural Naloxone to Prevent Buprenorphine Induced PONV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Jadon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidural infusion of local analgesic and opioid are commonly used for postoperative pain relief. This combina-tion gives excellent anlgesia but nausea and vomiting remains a major concern. Low dose epidural naloxone prevents PONV induced by spinal opioids like morphine, fentanyl and sufentanil. However, it is not known that epidural naloxone administration prevents PONV induced by epidural buprenorphine. We have reported three cases of major abdominal operation in which lowdose epidural infusion of naloxone releived the symptom of buprenorphine induced severe PONV and improved the quality of analgesia.

  18. Genus zero graph segmentation: Estimation of intracranial volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Thorup, Signe Strann; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    The intracranial volume (ICV) in children with premature fusion of one or more sutures in the calvaria is of interest due to the risk of increased intracranial pressure. Challenges for automatic estimation of ICV include holes in the skull e.g. the foramen magnum and fontanelles. In this paper, w...

  19. Report on the second Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanne, Emanuel

    2008-01-01

    This report highlights a conference designed for patient education on elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. The conference centered on chronic intracranial hypertension (IH) including the latest research and clinical information. It was sponsored by the Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation and held at the University of Texas Medical School, Houston, on June 21–22nd, 2008. PMID:18700981

  20. Report on the second Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanne Emanuel

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report highlights a conference designed for patient education on elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure. The conference centered on chronic intracranial hypertension (IH including the latest research and clinical information. It was sponsored by the Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation and held at the University of Texas Medical School, Houston, on June 21–22nd, 2008.

  1. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension with altered consciousness in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a clinical condition of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) without an obvious underlying pathological brain lesion. It is usually characterized by headache, neck pain, vomiting, visual disturbances, papilledema, cranial nerve palsy or a combination of these signs and symptoms.

  2. Genus Zero Graph Segmentation: Estimation of Intracranial Volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Thorup, Signe Strann; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    The intracranial volume (ICV) in children with premature fusion of one or more sutures in the calvaria is of interest due to the risk of increased intracranial pressure. Challenges for automatic estimation of ICV include holes in the skull e.g. the foramen magnum and fontanelles. In this paper, w...

  3. Cervical epidural abscess after cupping and acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Heung; Jo, Dae-Jean

    2012-08-01

    Retrospective case report. Report of an uncommon complication of cupping and acupuncture. Epidural abscess after cupping and acupuncture therapies is quite rare. Only a few cases of epidural abscess after acupuncture have been reported. The present report describes a case of cervical epidural abscess that developed after cupping and acupuncture. A 47-year-old woman presented with swelling and pain in the posterior nuchal region. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed a well-enhanced epidural mass at the C1-C3 level that was determined to be an epidural abscess. The symptoms related to epidural abscess resolved after treatment with antibiotics. Although a rare complication, epidural abscess is a possibility when applying cupping and acupuncture. Therapists need to be aware of human anatomy in the vicinity of the puncture and must give continuous attention to hygiene throughout the procedure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. NOISY INTRACRANIAL TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDOOREN, BTH; VANBRUGGEN, AC; MOOIJ, JJA; HEW, JM; JOURNEE, HL

    1994-01-01

    Transorbital sound recordings were obtained from 21 patients with intracranial tumours, 28 patients with intracranial aneurysms and 20 control patients. The group of patients with tumours consisted of 12 patients with gliomas, of whom 6 had low-grade gliomas and 6 had high-grade gliomas, and 9

  5. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fullam, L

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous\\/primary intracranial hypotension is characterised by orthostatic headache and is associated with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings. CASE REPORT: We present a case report of a patient with typical symptoms and classical radiological images. DISCUSSION: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an under-recognised cause of headache and can be diagnosed by history of typical orthostatic headache and findings on MRI brain.

  6. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF EPIDURAL ADMINISTRATION OF MORPHINE, FENTANYL, METHADONE, LIDOCAINE AND LIDOCAINE WITH EPINEPHRINE IN CATTLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tabatabaei Naeine, A. Rezakhani and J. Fazlinia

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the analgesic efficacy and clinical effects of morphine, fentanyl, methadone, lidocaine, lidocaine with epinephrine and saline (control when injected epidurally into the caudal epidural space in cattle. Epidural analgesia was achieved in five cattle on five successive occasions at weekly intervals. Analgesia was defined as a lack of response to hemostat pressure and pinprick in the skin of the perineal area and ventral aspect of the tail. The results demonstrated that while epidural lidocaine and lidocaine with epinephrine decreased the response to hemostat and pinprick compared to control, there was no reduction in response after the administration of morphine, methadone or fentanyl. Heart rate, pulse and respiratory rates were not significantly altered by any of the drugs. Neither did the drugs produce any change in the electrocardiogram (ECG of the animals.

  7. Effects of lumbosacral epidural ketamine and lidocaine inxylazine-sedated cats : article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. DeRossi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the analgesic and cardiovascular effects of the combination of epidural ketamine and lidocaine, 6 sedated cats were studied. Six healthy, young cats were used in a prospective randomised study. Each cat underwent 3 treatments, at least 1 week apart, via epidural injection: (1 ketamine (2.5 mg/kg, (2 lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg, and (3 ketamine (2.5 mg/kg plus lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg. Epidural injections were administered through the lumbosacral space. Analgesia, motor block, sedation, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate and arterial oxygen saturation were measured. Rectal temperature was compared before and after sedation as well as after epidural administration of the drugs. Epidural administration of the ketamine/lidocaine combination induced prolonged analgesia extending from the coccygeal to the T13-L1 dermatomes, leading to severe ataxia. Cardiovascular effects were significant in all treatments: heart rate decreased, but there was a minimal reduction in arterial pressure. It was concluded that adding a dose of ketamine to epidural lidocaine in cats is feasible and effective.

  8. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome with Intracranial Hypertension: Should Decompressive Craniectomy Be Considered?

    OpenAIRE

    Ségolène Mrozek; Laurent Lonjaret; Aude Jaffre; Anne-Christine Januel; Nicolas Raposo; Sergio Boetto; Jean-François Albucher; Olivier Fourcade; Thomas Geeraerts

    2017-01-01

    Background: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a rare cause of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) causing intracranial hypertension. Methods: Case report. Results: We report a case of RCVS-related ICH leading to refractory intracranial hypertension. A decompressive craniectomy was performed to control intracranial pressure. We discuss here the management of RCVS with intracranial hypertension. Decompressive craniectomy was preformed to avoid the risky option of high cerebral ...

  9. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... one of many methods doctors use to relieve pain, along with physical therapy, oral medications and surgery if a patient is not responding to conservative treatments. An epidural injection may be performed to alleviate pain caused by: A herniated or bulging disk that ...

  10. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome with Intracranial Hypertension: Should Decompressive Craniectomy Be Considered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozek, Ségolène; Lonjaret, Laurent; Jaffre, Aude; Januel, Anne-Christine; Raposo, Nicolas; Boetto, Sergio; Albucher, Jean-François; Fourcade, Olivier; Geeraerts, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a rare cause of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) causing intracranial hypertension. Case report. We report a case of RCVS-related ICH leading to refractory intracranial hypertension. A decompressive craniectomy was performed to control intracranial pressure. We discuss here the management of RCVS with intracranial hypertension. Decompressive craniectomy was preformed to avoid the risky option of high cerebral perfusion pressure management with the risk of bleeding, hemorrhagic complications, and high doses of norepinephrine. Neurological outcome was good. RCVS has a complex pathophysiology and can be very difficult to manage in cases of intracranial hypertension. Decompressive craniectomy should probably be considered.

  11. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome with Intracranial Hypertension: Should Decompressive Craniectomy Be Considered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ségolène Mrozek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS is a rare cause of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH causing intracranial hypertension. Methods: Case report. Results: We report a case of RCVS-related ICH leading to refractory intracranial hypertension. A decompressive craniectomy was performed to control intracranial pressure. We discuss here the management of RCVS with intracranial hypertension. Decompressive craniectomy was preformed to avoid the risky option of high cerebral perfusion pressure management with the risk of bleeding, hemorrhagic complications, and high doses of norepinephrine. Neurological outcome was good. Conclusion: RCVS has a complex pathophysiology and can be very difficult to manage in cases of intracranial hypertension. Decompressive craniectomy should probably be considered.

  12. Intracranial hemorrhage due to intracranial hypertension caused by the superior vena cava syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Abedi-Valugerdi, Golbarg; Liska, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have an intracr......We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have...... an intracranial hemorrhage secondary to a superior vena cava syndrome. The condition appears to be caused by a reversible transient rise in intracranial pressure, as a result of compression of the venous return from the brain. Treatment consisted of surgery for the aortic pseudoaneurysm, which led...

  13. Impact of Helmet Use on Severity of Epidural Hematomas in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Saksham; Iv, Vycheth; Sam, Nang; Vuthy, Din; Klaric, Katherine; Shrime, Mark G; Park, Kee B

    2017-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, often necessitating neurosurgical intervention to evacuate intracranial bleeding. Since the early 2000s, Cambodia has been undergoing a rapid increase in motorcycle transit and in road traffic accidents, but the prevalence of helmet usage remains low. Epidural hematomas are severe traumatic brain injuries that can necessitate neurosurgical intervention. This is a retrospective cohort study of patients with epidural hematoma secondary to motorcycle accidents who presented to a major national tertiary care center in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, between November 2013 and March 2016. All patients were diagnosed with computed tomography of the head. In this cohort, 21.6% of patients in motorcycle accidents presented with epidural hematoma and 89.1% of patients were men, 47.6% were intoxicated, and were 87.8% were not wearing helmets at the moment of impact. Not wearing a helmet was associated with a 6.90-fold increase in odds of presenting with a moderate-to-severe Glasgow coma scale score and a 3.76-fold increase in odds of requiring craniotomy or craniectomy for evacuation of hematoma. Male sex was also associated with increased odds of higher clinical severity at presentation and indication for craniotomy or craniectomy, and alcohol intoxication at the time of accident was not associated with either. Helmet usage is protective in reducing the severity of presentation and need for neurosurgical intervention for patients with epidural hematoma secondary to motorcycle accidents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intracranial hypertension in 2 children with marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne; Kroft, Lucia J. M.; Pals, Gerard; van Vugt, Jeroen P. P.; Overweg-Plandsoen, Wouterina C. G.

    2008-01-01

    Two unrelated children with Marfan syndrome presented with recurrent intracranial hypertension. Both children complained of headache, nausea, and vomiting and one of them had papilledema. Both had increased cerebrospinal fluid pressure, and their complaints disappeared after lumbar puncture.

  15. [Trends in computed tomography characteristics, intracranial pressure monitoring and surgical management in severe traumatic brain injury: Analysis of a data base of the past 25 years in a neurosurgery department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Pedro A; Castaño-León, Ana M; Lora, David; Cepeda, Santiago; Lagares, Alfonso

    To describe the radiological characteristics, surgical indications, procedures, and intracranial pressure monitoring of a representative cohort of severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) cases collected over the past 25years, and to analyse the changes that have occurred by dividing the period into 3 equal time periods. An observational cohort study was conducted on consecutive adult patients (>14years of age) with severe closed TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score [GCS]≤8) who were admitted during the first 48hours after injury to the Hospital 12 de Octubre from 1987 to 2012. The most relevant radiological findings, surgical procedures, and intracranial monitoring indications reported in the literature were defined and compared in 3 equal time periods (1987-1995, 1996-2004, and 2005-2014). A significant increase was observed in subdural haematomas with lesions over 25cc, and midline shift in the last period of time. The incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage increased significantly with time. There was a progression to a worse computed tomography (CT) classification from the initial CT scan in 33% of cases. Surgery was performed on 721 (39.4%) patients. Early surgery (12hours) was most frequently performed due to an intracerebral haematoma. Surgical treatment, both early and late was significantly lower with respect to the first time period. Decompressive craniectomy with evacuation of the mass lesion was the preferred procedure in the last time period. Intracranial pressure monitoring (ICP) was carried out on 1049 (57.3%) patients, with a significantly higher frequency in the second period of time. There was adherence to Guidelines in 64.4% of cases. Elevated/uncontrolled ICP was more significant in the first time period. As a result of the epidemiological changes seen in traumatic brain injury, a different pattern of morphological injury is described, as depicted in the CT, leading to a difference in practice during this period of observation. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad

  16. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sung Hyun; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Yoon Jin; Nam, Sang Ook

    2014-06-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is defined as increased intracranial pressure of unknown origin. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a rare condition in adolescence. We report the case of a 14-year-old girl with sudden onset of decreased visual acuity, headache and menstrual irregularity. Clinical neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and orbit were normal. Lumbar puncture demonstrated an increased opening pressure of 31 cm H2O. Gynecologic investigation indicated PCOS. Her symptoms improved with medical and surgical treatment for the underlying PCOS. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  17. A broken catheter in the epidural space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwari, Jamil S; Al-Wahbi, Yahya; Al-Nahdi, Saleh

    2014-04-01

    The Arrow FlexTip epidural catheter has reinforced coiled stainless steel wire, which facilitates its insertion and is less likely to puncture the blood vessels. However, as compared with non-reinforced, reinforced epidural catheters are more vulnerable to break. We report a case from Saudi Arabia on a retained fragment of a broken epidural catheter. Measures to prevent this mishap and its management are discussed.

  18. Paraplegia After Thoracic Epidural Steroid Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomba, Vivek; Kaveeshvar, Hirsh; Dwivedi, Samvid

    2016-09-01

    Epidural steroid injections are a common procedure performed by pain physicians. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia along with several other groups recently provided guidelines for performing epidural injections in the setting of anticoagulants. We present a case of a patient who developed an epidural hematoma and subsequent paraplegia despite strict adherence to these guidelines. Although new guidelines serve to direct practice, risks of devastating neurologic complications remain as evidenced by our case.

  19. Surgery of intracranial aneurysms at Yonsei University: 780 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K C

    1991-03-01

    Seven hundred and eighty patients with intracranial aneurysm, which were surgically treated by the author since 1976, were analyzed. Strategies important for intracranial aneurysm surgery were the timing of surgery, preoperative preparation and intraoperative management. The best management outcome could be achieved by early operation, removal of subarachnoid blood clot, maintenance of circulating blood volume, administration of nimodipine, and meticulous surgical tactics to avoid pitfalls. Indications for aneurysm surgery in the acute phase were determined by intracerebral hematoma, angiographic findings, clinical grade, general physical status and readiness of the surgical team. Important goals to be considered during the operation were obtaining a slack brain, preparation of proximal control, protection of the brain, awareness of microsurgical anatomy, and complete dissection of the sac. The morbidity and mortality were 2.7% and 4.0%, respectively. The mortality was attributed to intracranial causes in 20 cases (poor grade, delayed ischemic deficits, rebleeding, postoperative infarction, and postoperative epidural hematoma), extracranial causes in 7 cases (pulmonary embolism, heparin induced intracerebral hemorrhage, hepatic failure, myocardial infarction, and gastrointestinal bleeding), and unknown problems in 5 cases. The postoperative intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in 16 cases and seemed to be caused by one or more of the following events: cerebral infarction developed during the preoperative period, occlusion of the cerebral veins during the Sylvian dissection, cerebral retraction and/or sudden change of intracranial hemodynamics. Hydrocephalus, almost always a communicating type as confirmed by isotope cisternography, was managed by lumboperitoneal shunt.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Modern approach to an old technique: Narrative revision of techniques used to locate the epidural space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogly, N; Guasch Arévalo, E; Kollmann Camaiora, A; Alsina Marcos, E; García García, C; Gilsanz Rodríguez, F

    2017-10-01

    Since the first description of the epidural technique during the 1920s, the continuous progress of knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the epidural space has allowed the development of different techniques to locate this space while increasing both the safety and efficacy of the procedure. The most common techniques used today are based on the two main characteristics of the epidural space: the difference in distensibility between the ligamentum flavum and the epidural space, and the existence of negative pressure within the epidural space. However, over recent years, technological advances have allowed the development of new techniques to locate the epidural space based on other physical properties of tissues. Some are still in the experimental phase, but others, like ultrasound-location have reached a clinical phase and are being used increasingly in daily practice. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Pediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaswamy, Lalitha

    2016-10-01

    Investigators from the Ohio State University, Oregon Health and Science University and Rosalind Franklin School of Medicine examined the presenting manifestations, demographics and treatment strategies in children enrolled in the Intracranial Hypertension Registry (IHR).

  2. Spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma: Report of a case managed conservatively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Tariq

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is a rare cause of acute spinal cord compression. A 25-year-old male presented with a history of sudden onset of complete quadriplegia with sensory loss below the neck along with loss of bowel and bladder control. He had no history of any constitutional symptoms. He reported 10 days later. He was managed conservatively and after two weeks of intensive rehabilitation he had complete neural recovery. The spontaneous recovery of neurological impairment is attributed to the spreading of the hematoma throughout the epidural space, thus decreasing the pressure with partial neural recovery. Conservative treatment is a fair option in young patients who present late and show neurological improvement. The neurological status on presentation will guide the further approach to management.

  3. Effectiveness of Pharmacological Therapies for Intracranial Hypertension in Children With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury--Results From an Automated Data Collection System Time-Synched to Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shein, Steven L; Ferguson, Nikki M; Kochanek, Patrick M; Bayir, Hülya; Clark, Robert S B; Fink, Ericka L; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Tian, Ye; Balasubramani, G K; Bell, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    To describe acute cerebral hemodynamic effects of medications commonly used to treat intracranial hypertension in children with traumatic brain injury. Currently, data supporting the efficacy of these medications are insufficient. In this prospective observational study, intracranial hypertension (intracranial pressure ≥ 20 mm Hg for > 5 min) was treated by clinical protocol. Administration times of medications for intracranial hypertension (fentanyl, 3% hypertonic saline, mannitol, and pentobarbital) were prospectively recorded and synchronized with an automated database that collected intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure every 5 seconds. Intracranial pressure crises confounded by external stimulation or mechanical ventilator adjustments were excluded. Mean intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure from epochs following drug administration were compared with baseline values using Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance and Dunn test. Frailty modeling was used to analyze the time to intracranial pressure crisis resolution. Mixed-effect models compared intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure 5 minutes after the medication versus baseline and rates of treatment failure. A tertiary care children's hospital. Children with severe traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 8). None. We analyzed 196 doses of fentanyl, hypertonic saline, mannitol, and pentobarbital administered to 16 children (median: 12 doses per patient). Overall, intracranial pressure significantly decreased following the administration of fentanyl, hypertonic saline, and pentobarbital. After controlling for administration of multiple medications, intracranial pressure was decreased following hypertonic saline and pentobarbital administration; cerebral perfusion pressure was decreased following fentanyl and was increased following hypertonic saline administration. After adjusting for significant covariates (including age, Glasgow Coma Scale score, and

  4. Minocycline-induced fulminant intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Clare L; Biousse, Valerie; Newman, Nancy J

    2012-08-01

    To describe the clinical course of an unusually severe case of minocycline-induced intracranial hypertension. Case study. Academic medical center. Twelve-year-old girl with a fulminant course of intracranial hypertension. Magnetic resonance imaging and venography of the brain, lumbar puncture, and optic nerve sheath fenestration. Although the patient ceased minocycline treatment, there was ongoing and rapid worsening of symptoms and vision loss. Lumbar puncture, which normally acts as a temporizing measure to preserve vision, failed to prevent, and may even have precipitated, further deterioration in vision, necessitating surgical intervention with optic nerve sheath fenestration. Minocycline can cause a fulminant syndrome of elevated intracranial pressure, with severe vision loss, even after the medication has been discontinued.

  5. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of this article are to characterize the headache in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and to field-test the ICHD diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to IIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included 44 patients with new-onset IIH. Thirty-four patients with suspected...... tinnitus may suggest intracranial hypertension. Based on data from a well-defined IIH cohort, we propose a revision of the ICDH-3 beta diagnostic criteria with improved clinical applicability and increased sensitivity and specificity....

  6. Fluid loading to reduce abnormalities of fetal heart rate and maternal hypotension during epidural analgesia in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, K M; Bevan, D R; Beard, R W

    1978-01-01

    Fetal heart rate (FHR) was recorded and maternal blood pressure measured in 104 patients in whom lumbar epidural analgesia was induced in labour. Fifty-one patients received an intravenous load of 11 of Hartmann's solution immediately before the epidural injection. This infusion significantly reduced the incidence of abnormalities of FHR from 34% to 12% and of maternal hypotension from 28% to 2%. We did not study mothers with pre-eclampsia and hypertension, but we conclude that there is a strong case for preloading all other mothers in whom lumbar epidural analgesia is induced in labour. PMID:719463

  7. Borderline Intracranial Hypertension Manifesting as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Treated by Venous Sinus Stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Nicholas; Pickard, John; Lever, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome and cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension without signs of raised intracranial pressure can be impossible to distinguish without direct measurement of intracranial pressure. Moreover, lumbar puncture, the usual method of measuring intracranial pressure, can produce a similar respite from symptoms in patients with chronic fatigue as it does in idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This suggests a connection between them, with chronic fatigue syndrome representing a forme fruste variant of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. If this were the case, then treatments available for idiopathic intracranial hypertension might be appropriate for chronic fatigue. We describe a 49-year-old woman with a long and debilitating history of chronic fatigue syndrome who was targeted for investigation of intracranial pressure because of headache, then diagnosed with borderline idiopathic intracranial hypertension after lumbar puncture and cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Further investigation showed narrowings at the anterior ends of the transverse sinuses, typical of those seen in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and associated with pressure gradients. Stenting of both transverse sinuses brought about a life-changing remission of symptoms with no regression in 2 years of follow-up. This result invites study of an alternative approach to the investigation and management of chronic fatigue.

  8. Magnetic resonance "flip-flop" in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam George

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a headache syndrome with raised CSF pressure in the absence of an intracranial mass lesion. Though earlier confined to excluding intracranial lesions, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in recent years has been shown to identify intracranial changes from prolonged raised CSF pressure, suggestive of IIH. We present the MRI and TOF (time-of-flight venography findings involving the orbit, sella tursica and cerebral venous structures in a 45-year-old lady with IIH and illustrate their reversibility ("flip-flop" following CSF drainage. Our case highlights the role of imaging in evaluation and follow-up of patients with IIH, without the need for repeated lumbar punctures to monitor pressures.

  9. Decompressive laparotomy for refractory intracranial hypertension after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Jon D; Burns, Joseph D; Green, Deborah M; DeFusco, Christina; Agarwal, Suresh

    2011-12-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a crucial modifiable risk factor for poor outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Limited evidence suggests that decompressive laparotomy may be an effective treatment for refractory ICH in patients who have elevated intra-abdominal pressure. Case report. We present a multi-trauma patient who sustained severe TBI in a motor vehicle collision. Intracranial pressure (ICP) was initially medically managed but became refractory to standard therapies. Emergent decompressive laparotomy performed in the surgical intensive care unit for abdominal compartment syndrome concomitantly improved the patient's ICP. Elevated intra-abdominal pressure can exacerbate intracranial hypertension in patients with TBI. Recognition of this condition and treatment with decompressive laparotomy may be useful in patients with intracranial hypertension refractory to optimal medical therapy.

  10. Blood Pressure Is the Determinant for the Increased Risk for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis in Subjects with Elevated Glycated Hemoglobin Levels: The Kangbuk Samsung Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyung-Geun; Rhee, Eun-Jung

    2016-11-01

    Ischemic stroke is known to be an important vascular complication of diabetes. Intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is considered as an important cause of stroke in Asians. We aimed to analyze the risk for ICAS assessed by transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography in different groups of young Korean subjects divided by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. This study included 10,437 participants without history of cardiovascular diseases (81.3% men, mean age 43 years) from a health screening program, in whom TCD ultrasonography was used to detect greater than 50% ICAS based on criteria modified from the SONIA (Stroke Outcomes and Neuroimaging of Intracranial Atherosclerosis) trial. The subjects were divided into 3 groups according to HbA1c levels: HbA1c < 5.7%, 5.7 ≤ HbA1c < 6.5%, and HbA1c ≥ 6.5% or under medication for diabetes. Among the participants, 3.0% of the subjects had ICAS. The subjects with ICAS tended to have higher mean HbA1c level compared with those without ICAS (5.8 ± .8 versus 5.7 ± .6, P = .063). The proportion of subjects with ICAS significantly increased as the HbA1c increased from the first to the third group (2.8%, 3.0%, 4.6%, P for linear trend = .022). In logistic regression analysis with ICAS as the dependent variable, the group with HbA1c ≥ 6.5% showed significantly increased odds ratio for ICAS with subjects with HbA1c < 5.7% as the reference after adjustment for confounding variables (1.575, 95% confidence interval 1.056-2.347). However, this significance disappeared with inclusion of presence of hypertension in the model. The risk for ICAS assessed by TCD was increased in young Korean subjects with HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. However, this significance was attenuated after adjustment for presence of hypertension, suggesting the importance of hypertension in ICAS. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intracranial pressure and cerebral hemodynamic in patients with cerebral tumors: a randomized prospective study of patients subjected to craniotomy in propofol-fentanyl, isoflurane-fentanyl, or sevoflurane-fentanyl anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Kurt D; Landsfeldt, Uffe; Cold, Georg Emil; Petersen, Carsten B; Mau, Søren; Hauerberg, John; Holst, Peter; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2003-02-01

    A critical point during craniotomy is opening of dura, where a high intracranial pressure (ICP) results in swelling of cerebral tissue. Controlled studies concerning ICP, degree of dural tension, and degree of cerebral swelling are therefore warranted. In an open-label study, 117 patients with supratentorial cerebral tumors were randomized to propofol-fentanyl (group 1), isoflurane-fentanyl (group 2), or sevoflurane-fentanyl anesthesia (group 3). Normo- to moderate hypocapnia was applied, with a target level of arterial carbon dioxid tension of 30-40 mmHg. Mean arterial blood pressure was stabilized with intravenous ephedrine (2.5-5 mg) if necessary. Subdural ICP, mean arterial blood pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), arteriovenous oxygen difference (AVDo2), internal jugular vein oxygen saturation were monitored before and after a 10-min period of hyperventilation, and the carbon dioxide reactivity was calculated. Furthermore, the tension of dura before and during hyperventilation and the degree of cerebral swelling during hyperventilation and after opening of the dura were estimated by the neurosurgeon. No differences were found between groups with regard to demographics, neuroradiologic examination, positioning of the head, and time to ICP measurement. Before and during hyperventilation, ICP was significantly lower and mean arterial blood pressure and CPP significantly higher in group 1 compared with groups 2 and 3 (P hyperventilation was significantly lower in group 1 compared with group2 (P hyperventilation, subdural ICP and AVDo2 are lower and CPP higher in propofol-anesthetized patients compared with patients anesthetized with isoflurane or sevoflurane. These findings were associated with less tendency for cerebral swelling after opening of dura in the propofol group. The carbon dioxide reactivity in patients anesthetized with isoflurane and sevoflurane was significantly higher than in the propofol group. The differences in subdural ICP between the

  12. Vascular lesions of the lumbar epidural space: magnetic resonance imaging features of epidural cavernous hemangioma and epidural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basile Júnior Roberto

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the magnetic resonance imaging diagnostic features in two cases with respectively lumbar epidural hematoma and cavernous hemangioma of the lumbar epidural space. Enhanced MRI T1-weighted scans show a hyperintense signal rim surrounding the vascular lesion. Non-enhanced T2-weighted scans showed hyperintense signal.

  13. BLIND OVERNIGHT: A case of fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandohal, Janpreet Singh; Mirza, Taimur

    2017-10-01

    Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) is a syndrome seen predominantly in obese women of reproductive age group, characterized by signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure due to an unknown cause. Some individuals have a more malignant form of disease called fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension with rapid worsening of symptoms over days. We report a case of 33year-old obese female (BMI 36.9) who presented with a severe headache and blurred vision for one week, found to have idiopathic intracranial hypertension with rapid worsening of symptoms suggestive of a fulminant course of disease. She was managed with prompt surgical intervention. In patients with fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension, surgery such as cerebrospinal fluid shunting or optic nerve sheath fenestration should not be delayed to prevent vision loss. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Increased Curvature of the Tentorium Cerebelli in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, P P; Lachman, N; Black, D F; Carter, R A; Port, J; Campeau, N

    2017-09-01

    Transverse sinus effacement is detectable on MRV examinations in almost all patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This effacement of the transverse sinus is presumed to be mediated by elevation of intracranial pressure, resulting in compression and inward collapse of the dural margins of the sinus. We sought to establish whether supratentorial broad-based downward deformity of the tentorium might explain transverse sinus effacement in idiopathic intracranial hypertension. MRV examinations of 53 adult patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension were reviewed retrospectively and compared with 58 contemporaneously acquired controls. The curvature of the tentorium with reference to a line connecting the transverse sinus laterally with the confluence of the tentorial leaves medially was calculated as a segment of a circle. The height and area of the segment and the angle subtended by the midpoint of the tentorium from the falx were calculated. The height and area of the segment described by the chord connecting the transverse sinus with the apex of the tentorial confluence and subtended midtentorial angle were greater in the idiopathic intracranial hypertension group; this finding supports the hypothesis that increased tentorial bowing is present in idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Increased bowing of the tentorium in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension compared with controls is a new observation, lending itself to new hypotheses on the nature and localization of elevated intracranial pressure in idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Bowing of the tentorium may play a part in distorting the contour of the transverse sinuses, resulting, at least in part, in the effacement of the transverse sinuses in idiopathic intracranial hypertension. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  15. Successful management of a broken epidural catheter!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippalgaonkar, Amruta Vinod; Kudalkar, Amala G; Gaikwad, Smita M; Modak, Shailendra; Gupta, Hema B; Tendolkar, Bharati A

    2017-01-01

    Breakage of epidural catheter though rare is a well-known but worrisome complication. Visualization of retained catheter is difficult even with modern radiological imaging techniques, and active surgical intervention might be necessary for removal of catheter fragment. We report such a case of breakage of an epidural catheter during its removal which led to surgical intervention.

  16. Successful management of a broken epidural catheter!!!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amruta Vinod Hippalgaonkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breakage of epidural catheter though rare is a well-known but worrisome complication. Visualization of retained catheter is difficult even with modern radiological imaging techniques, and active surgical intervention might be necessary for removal of catheter fragment. We report such a case of breakage of an epidural catheter during its removal which led to surgical intervention.

  17. Epidural and intramuscular pethidine - a pharmacokinetic study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidural preservative-free pethidine hydrochloride 0,75 mg/kg is rapidly absorbed into the blood. At 1,5 mg/kg the plasma levels reached are similar to those achieved by intramuscular preservative-free pethidine hydrochloride, as is the time course. Plasma levels fall more rapidly after epidural pethidine, Since the plasma ...

  18. Vasovagal Syncope during Epidural Catheterization before ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case of vasovagal response in a healthy young male patient scheduled for excision of extra digits in both feet after catheterization of the epidural space but before administration of epidural medications. The uniqueness of this case is the changes in haemodynamic hypotension, bradycardia and syncope in an ...

  19. Measurement of blood flow in the superior sagittal sinus in healthy volunteers, and in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension with phase-contrast cine MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gideon, P. [Danish Research Centre of Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre Hospital, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, C. [Danish Research Centre of Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre Hospital, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Gjerris, F. [Univ. Clinic of Neurosurgery, Rigshopitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Soerensen, P.S. [Univ. Clinic of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Staahlberg, F. [Danish Research Centre of Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre Hospital, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Henriksen, O. [Danish Research Centre of Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre Hospital, Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1996-03-01

    To measure blood flow and velocity in the superior sagittal sinus. MR velocity mapping was used to examine 14 healthy volunteers, 15 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), 3 patients with high pressure hydrocephalus (HPH), and 11 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Mean blood flow was 443 ml/min in healthy volunteers with a tendency towards reduced blood flow with increasing age. In NPH patients significantly lower superior sagittal sinus blood flow values were found, but this difference was no longer significant when patients and controls were matched for age. In HPH and IIH patients blood flow and velocity were within the normal range. In one patient with thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus the blood flow was reduced to 40 ml/min. MR velocity mapping methods may be of value in the assessment of blood flow in the dural sinuses in various pathologies resulting in dural sinus occlusion, such as dural sinus thrombosis, and for following the progress of these patients while undergoing treatment. (orig.).

  20. Postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis mimicking epidural abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüz, Mehmet Sabri; Erdoğan, Baris; Yüksel, Mehmet Onur; Somay, Hakan

    2013-11-06

    Lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture is a very rare condition. Arachnoiditis may also present with fever and elevated infection markers and may mimic epidural abscess, which is one of the well known infectious complications of lumbar puncture. We report the case of a 56-year-old man with lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture who was operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess. In the intraoperative and postoperative microbiological and histopathological examination, no epidural abscess was detected. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient with postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess reported in the literature. The authors suggest that arachnoiditis may mimic epidural abscess due to its clinical and radiological features and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of complications of lumbar puncture.

  1. Epidural analgesia in veterinary critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, L A; Glowaski, M M

    2000-08-01

    Epidural analgesia has minimal systemic effects and is a useful technique for relieving pain in critical care patients. Before administration, patients must be thoroughly assessed to identify any preexisting conditions that preclude the safe use of this technique. Analgesia can be achieved by administration of local anesthetics, opioids, alpha 2 agonists, or a combination of these analgesic agents. Concurrent administration of more than one drug allows the synergistic interaction of these agents and generally improves the level of analgesia achieved, lengthens the duration of action, and lowers the dose of each drug required to achieve analgesia. Complications of epidural techniques are infrequent and include both iatrogenic and idiopathic problems, most of which have no permanent sequelae. This review provides a detailed description of the epidural analgesia technique and lists multiple sources of specialized supplies necessary for either single injection or epidural catheter placement. It also provides direction for monitoring the critical care patient with an epidural catheter.

  2. Primary thoracic epidural lymphoma: A rare cause of spinal cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary thoracic epidural lymphoma: A rare cause of spinal cord compression. AS Yusuf, KO Omokanye, T Buhari. Abstract. Spinal epidural lymphoma is a rare entity that is not often considered in the differential diagnosis of an epidural mass in a previously healthy individual. Pfatients with Primary Spinal Epidural ...

  3. Epidural blood flow and regression of sensory analgesia during continuous postoperative epidural infusion of bupivacaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, T; Højgaard, L; Scott, N B

    1988-01-01

    Epidural blood flow was measured in seven patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery during combined lumbar epidural and general anesthesia. After an initial dose of 20 ml plain bupivacaine 0.5%, a continuous epidural infusion of bupivacaine 0.5% (8 ml/hr) was given for 16 hours for postopera......Epidural blood flow was measured in seven patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery during combined lumbar epidural and general anesthesia. After an initial dose of 20 ml plain bupivacaine 0.5%, a continuous epidural infusion of bupivacaine 0.5% (8 ml/hr) was given for 16 hours...... surgery, and 8, 12, and 16 hours later during the continuous infusion. Initial blood flow was 6.0 +/- 0.7 ml/min per 100 g tissue (mean +/- SEM). After epidural bupivacaine, blood flow increased in all seven patients to 7.4 +/- 0.7 ml (P less than 0.02). Initial level of sensory analgesia was T4.5 +/- 0...... than 0.03) in the other five patients as the level of sensory analgesia regressed postoperatively. These data suggest that changes in epidural blood flow during continuous epidural infusion of bupivacaine, and thus changes in rates of vascular absorption of bupivacaine from the epidural space, may...

  4. Difficult removal of an epidural catheter in the anterior epidural space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Lin; Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Chan, Shun-Ming; Lin, Chia-Shiang; Wong, Chih-Shung; Juan, Chun-Jung; Yeh, Chun-Chang

    2010-03-01

    When administering postoperative acute pain services, particularly regarding patient- controlled epidural analgesia, difficulties may occasionally be encountered during removal of the epidural catheter. In this report, we present an instance of difficult removal of epidural catheter in a female patient undergoing open reduction and internal fixation of the femoral neck with patient-controlled epidural analgesia as the means of postoperative pain control. The patient had satisfactory analgesia for 3 days; however, during the removal of the epidural catheter, difficulties were encountered and epidurogram revealed that the epidural catheter had become anchored in the anterior epidural space without kinking or knotting. Subsequently, the patient was requested to lie prone on the surgical table with a pillow placed beneath her lower abdomen and catheter removal was tried again. Fortunately, the epidural catheter was removed easily without the need for a guided stylet. We believe that the cause of the difficult removal of the epidural catheter in this case might have resulted from an unusual and unwanted deeper anchorage of the catheter along the anterior epidural space during placement. We also include some discussion on the management of problematic removal. 2010 Taiwan Society of Anesthesiologists. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have little effect on headaches caused by intracranial hypertension, they may temporarily affect the intensity of a ... study in which 26 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) were treated with octreotide, a synthetic hormone ...

  6. Natriuretic pro-peptides in idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Maren Cecilie Kloppenbor; Gøtze, Jens Peter; Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder of unknown pathogenesis. Natriuretic peptides may be involved in intracranial pressure regulation, but cerebrospinal fluid (CNS) and plasma concentrations in this disorder are unknown. We evaluated venous and intrathecal concentrations of ANP, BNP...... and CNP precursor peptides in 40 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 20 controls. Natriuretic pro-peptides were quantitated using processing-independent assays. In CSF, no differences in peptide concentrations between patients and controls were found (proANP: 239 + or - 23 vs 231...

  7. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Jason A; Schweder, Patrick M; Mews, Peter J; Patel, Rakesh; Law, Andrew J J

    2010-09-01

    Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome is a severe childhood epilepsy syndrome characterised by the diagnostic triad of a slow spike and wave pattern on electroencephalogram, multiple seizure types and developmental delay. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a syndrome characterised by raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure in the absence of an intracranial mass lesion or ventricular dilatation and often headache. We present the first reported case of Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome associated with symptomatic idiopathic intracranial hypertension in a 15 year old male, requiring cerebrospinal fluid diversion by means of ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Intracranial Hypertension and Cerebral Hypoperfusion in Children With Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Thresholds and Burden in Accidental and Abusive Insults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller Ferguson, Nikki; Shein, Steven L; Kochanek, Patrick M; Luther, Jim; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Clark, Robert S B; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Adelson, P David; Bell, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    The evidence to guide therapy in pediatric traumatic brain injury is lacking, including insight into the intracranial pressure/cerebral perfusion pressure thresholds in abusive head trauma. We examined intracranial pressure/cerebral perfusion pressure thresholds and indices of intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure burden in relationship with outcome in severe traumatic brain injury and in accidental and abusive head trauma cohorts. A prospective observational study. PICU in a tertiary children's hospital. Children less than18 years old admitted to a PICU with severe traumatic brain injury and who had intracranial pressure monitoring. None. A pediatric traumatic brain injury database was interrogated with 85 patients (18 abusive head trauma) enrolled. Hourly intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure (in mm Hg) were collated and compared with various thresholds. C-statistics for intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure data in the entire population were determined. Intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion indices were formulated based on the number of hours with intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg and cerebral perfusion pressure less than 50 mm Hg, respectively. A secondary analysis was performed on accidental and abusive head trauma cohorts. All of these were compared with dichotomized 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale scores. The models with the number of hours with intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg (C = 0.641; 95% CI, 0.523-0.762) and cerebral perfusion pressure less than 45 mm Hg (C = 0.702; 95% CI, 0.586-0.805) had the best fits to discriminate outcome. Two factors were independently associated with a poor outcome, the number of hours with intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg and abusive head trauma (odds ratio = 5.101; 95% CI, 1.571-16.563). As the number of hours with intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg increases by 1, the odds of a poor outcome increased by 4.6% (odds ratio = 1

  9. Intracranial hypertension secondary to a skull lesion without mass effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serlin, Yonatan; Benifla, Mony; Kesler, Anat; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    We report and discuss five patients with intracranial hypertension due to a skull lesion reducing cerebral sinus patency with a compressive, non-thrombotic mechanism. We illustrate the importance of a high level of suspicion for this condition in patients presenting with headache, papilledema and increased intracranial pressure in the absence of focal signs or radiological evidence of mass effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Epidural analgesia for painless delivery. Our experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, D; Giustiniano, E; Cascini, V

    1999-10-01

    We know that a stress condition causes hormonal responses (cortisol, prolactin, TSH, ACTH, catecholamines, beta-endorphines). This hormonal "storm" causes metabolic and haemodynamic changes that can get worse postoperative outcome as well as birth. Analgesia for labour is an anesthesiological procedure which spreading in Italy resulted very difficult, for instance, especially in southern Italy, "old popular believes" (such as paralysis risk after lumbar puncture, Post-Dural Puncture Headache (PDPH) and the confusion between epidural and subdural anesthesia). In front of these problems we report our experience in this field. Experimental plan: in our retrospective study we examined painless labour cases and we compared them with natural labour cases without analgesia. women of this study were pregnant admitted in obstetrics department of our hospital at the end of pregnancy. pregnant women who wanted epidural analgesia were 50 (group A); data group A were compared with data of 50 pregnant women who refused analgesia (group B). beginning labour, when cervical dilatation was 3 cm and foetal head was going down we performed epidural puncture and positioned, catheter in epidural space giving opiate and local anesthetic drugs using "top-up" method. we compared APGAR-score after birth and the judgement expressed by women of the two groups. APGAR-score in new-borns with epidural analgesia in higher than new-born without epidural analgesia; furthermore, patients who choose painless labour expressed a better judgement than women who refused epidural analgesia.

  11. Cisternostomy for refractory post-traumatic intracranial hypertension: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammattei, L; Messerer, M; Oddo, M; Borsotti, F; Levivier, M; Daniel, R T

    2017-10-25

    The current surgical treatment of choice for refractory intracranial hypertension following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is decompressive craniectomy. Despite efficacy in control of intracranial pressure, its contribution towards an improved outcome is debatable. We present here a case of refractory intracranial hypertension successfully managed with cisternostomy. The rationale of this surgical technique is discussed with a focus on the pathophysiological processes underlying elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) and its improvement following surgery. Cisternostomy proved to have an immediate effect in controlling ICP and improving brain oxygenation and metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Variation in monitoring and treatment policies for intracranial hypertension in traumatic brain injury: A survey in 66 neurotrauma centers participating in the CENTER-TBI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Cnossen (Maryse); Huijben, J.A. (Jilske A.); van der Jagt, M. (Mathieu); Volovici, V. (Victor); van Essen, T. (Thomas); S. Polinder (Suzanne); D. Nelson (David); Ercole, A. (Ari); Stocchetti, N. (Nino); Citerio, G. (Giuseppe); W.C. Peul (Wilco); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew I.R.); D.K. Menon (David ); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout W.); Lingsma, H.F. (Hester F.); Adams, H. (Hadie); Alessandro, M. (Masala); J.E. Allanson (Judith); Amrein, K. (Krisztina); Andaluz, N. (Norberto); N. Andelic (Nada); Andrea, N. (Nanni); L. Andreassen (Lasse); Anke, A. (Audny); Antoni, A. (Anna); Ardon, H. (Hilko); Audibert, G. (Gérard); Auslands, K. (Kaspars); Azouvi, P. (Philippe); Baciu, C. (Camelia); Bacon, A. (Andrew); Badenes, R. (Rafael); Baglin, T. (Trevor); R.H.M.A. Bartels (Ronald); P. Barzo (P.); Bauerfeind, U. (Ursula); R. Beer (Ronny); Belda, F.J. (Francisco Javier); B.-M. Bellander (Bo-Michael); A. Belli (Antonio); Bellier, R. (Rémy); H. Benali (Habib); Benard, T. (Thierry); M. Berardino (Maurizio); L. Beretta (Luigi); Beynon, C. (Christopher); Bilotta, F. (Federico); H. Binder (Harald); Biqiri, E. (Erta); Blaabjerg, M. (Morten); Lund, S.B. (Stine Borgen); Bouzat, P. (Pierre); Bragge, P. (Peter); Brazinova, A. (Alexandra); F. Brehar (Felix); Brorsson, C. (Camilla); Buki, A. (Andras); M. Bullinger (Monika); Bucková, V. (Veronika); Calappi, E. (Emiliana); P. Cameron (Peter); Carbayo, L.G. (Lozano Guillermo); Carise, E. (Elsa); K.L.H. Carpenter (Keri L.H.); Castaño-León, A.M. (Ana M.); Causin, F. (Francesco); Chevallard, G. (Giorgio); A. Chieregato (Arturo); G. Citerio (Giuseppe); Cnossen, M. (Maryse); M. Coburn (Mark); J.P. Coles (Jonathan P.); Cooper, J.D. (Jamie D.); Correia, M. (Marta); A. Covic (Amra); N. Curry (Nicola); E. Czeiter (Endre); M. Czosnyka (Marek); Dahyot-Fizelier, C. (Claire); F. Damas (François); P. Damas (Pierre); H. Dawes (Helen); De Keyser, V. (Véronique); F.D. Corte (Francesco); B. Depreitere (Bart); Ding, S. (Shenghao); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); K. Dizdarevic (Kemal); Dulière, G.-L. (Guy-Loup); Dzeko, A. (Adelaida); G. Eapen (George); Engemann, H. (Heiko); A. Ercole (Ari); P. Esser (Patrick); Ezer, E. (Erzsébet); M. Fabricius (Martin); V.L. Feigin (V.); Feng, J. (Junfeng); Foks, K. (Kelly); F. Fossi (Francesca); Francony, G. (Gilles); J. Frantzén (Janek); Freo, U. (Ulderico); S.K. Frisvold (Shirin Kordasti); Furmanov, A. (Alex); Gagliardo, P. (Pablo); D. Galanaud (Damien); G. Gao (Guoyi); K. Geleijns (Karin); A. Ghuysen (Alexandre); Giraud, B. (Benoit); Glocker, B. (Ben); Gomez, P.A. (Pedro A.); Grossi, F. (Francesca); R.L. Gruen (Russell); Gupta, D. (Deepak); J.A. Haagsma (Juanita); E. Hadzic (Ermin); I. Haitsma (Iain); J.A. Hartings (Jed); R. Helbok (Raimund); E. Helseth (Eirik); Hertle, D. (Daniel); S. Hill (Sean); Hoedemaekers, A. (Astrid); S. Hoefer (Stefan); P.J. Hutchinson (Peter J.); Håberg, K.A. (Kristine Asta); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); Janciak, I. (Ivan); K. Janssens (Koen); Jiang, J.-Y. (Ji-Yao); Jones, K. (Kelly); Kalala, J.-P. (Jean-Pierre); Kamnitsas, K. (Konstantinos); Karan, M. (Mladen); Karau, J. (Jana); A. Katila (Ari); M. Kaukonen (Maija); Keeling, D. (David); Kerforne, T. (Thomas); N. Ketharanathan (Naomi); Kettunen, J. (Johannes); Kivisaari, R. (Riku); A.G. Kolias (Angelos G.); Kolumbán, B. (Bálint); E.J.O. Kompanje (Erwin); D. Kondziella (Daniel); L.-O. Koskinen (Lars-Owe); Kovács, N. (Noémi); F. Kalovits (Ferenc); A. Lagares (Alfonso); L. Lanyon (Linda); S. Laureys (Steven); Lauritzen, M. (Martin); F.E. Lecky (Fiona); C. Ledig (Christian); R. Lefering; V. Legrand (Valerie); Lei, J. (Jin); L. Levi (Leon); R. Lightfoot (Roger); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); D. Loeckx (Dirk); Lozano, A. (Angels); Luddington, R. (Roger); Luijten-Arts, C. (Chantal); Maas, A.I.R. (Andrew I.R.); MacDonald, S. (Stephen); MacFayden, C. (Charles); M. Maegele; M. Majdan (Marek); Major, S. (Sebastian); A. Manara (Alex); Manhes, P. (Pauline); G. Manley (Geoffrey); Martin, D. (Didier); C. Martino (Costanza); Maruenda, A. (Armando); H. Maréchal (Hugues); Mastelova, D. (Dagmara); Mattern, J. (Julia); McMahon, C. (Catherine); Melegh, B. (Béla); Menon, D. (David); T. Menovsky (Tomas); Morganti-Kossmann, C. (Cristina); Mulazzi, D. (Davide); Mutschler, M. (Manuel); H. Mühlan (Holger); Negru, A. (Ancuta); Nelson, D. (David); E. Neugebauer (Eddy); V.F. Newcombe (Virginia F.); Noirhomme, Q. (Quentin); Nyirádi, J. (József); M. Oddo (Mauro); A.W. Oldenbeuving; M. Oresic (Matej); Ortolano, F. (Fabrizio); A. Palotie (Aarno); P.M. Parizel; Patruno, A. (Adriana); J.-F. Payen (Jean-François); Perera, N. (Natascha); V. Perlbarg (Vincent); Persona, P. (Paolo); Peul, W. (Wilco); N. Pichon (Nicolas); Piilgaard, H. (Henning); A. Piippo (Anna); S.P. Floury (Sébastien Pili); M. Pirinen (Matti); H. Ples (Horia); Polinder, S. (Suzanne); Pomposo, I. (Inigo); M. Psota (Marek); P. Pullens (Pim); L. Puybasset (Louis); A. Ragauskas (Arminas); R. Raj (Rahul); Rambadagalla, M. (Malinka); Rehorcíková, V. (Veronika); J.K.J. Rhodes (Jonathan K.J.); S. Richardson (Sylvia); S. Ripatti (Samuli); S. Rocka (Saulius); Rodier, N. (Nicolas); Roe, C. (Cecilie); Roise, O. (Olav); C.M.A.A. Roks (Gerwin); Romegoux, P. (Pauline); J. Rosand (Jonathan); Rosenfeld, J. (Jeffrey); C. Rosenlund (Christina); G. Rosenthal (Guy); R. Rossaint (Rolf); S. Rossi (Sandra); Rostalski, T. (Tim); D. Rueckert (Daniel); de Ruiz, A.F. (Arcaute Felix); M. Rusnák (Martin); Sacchi, M. (Marco); Sahakian, B. (Barbara); J. Sahuquillo (Juan); O. Sakowitz (Oliver); Sala, F. (Francesca); Sanchez-Pena, P. (Paola); Sanchez-Porras, R. (Renan); Sandor, J. (Janos); Santos, E. (Edgar); N. Sasse (Nadine); Sasu, L. (Luminita); Savo, D. (Davide); I.B. Schipper (Inger); Schlößer, B. (Barbara); S. Schmidt (Silke); Schneider, A. (Annette); H. Schoechl (Herbert); G.G. Schoonman; Rico, F.S. (Frederik Schou); E. Schwendenwein (Elisabeth); Schöll, M. (Michael); Sir, O. (özcan); T. Skandsen (Toril); Smakman, L. (Lidwien); D. Smeets (Dominique); Smielewski, P. (Peter); Sorinola, A. (Abayomi); E. Stamatakis (Emmanuel); S. Stanworth (Simon); Stegemann, K. (Katrin); Steinbüchel, N. (Nicole); R. Stevens (Robert); W. Stewart (William); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); N. Stocchetti (Nino); Sundström, N. (Nina); Synnot, A. (Anneliese); J. Szabó (József); J. Söderberg (Jeannette); F.S. Taccone (Fabio); Tamás, V. (Viktória); Tanskanen, P. (Päivi); A. Tascu (Alexandru); Taylor, M.S. (Mark Steven); Te, A.B. (Ao Braden); O. Tenovuo (Olli); Teodorani, G. (Guido); A. Theadom (Alice); Thomas, M. (Matt); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.M. Tolias (Christos M.); Tshibanda, J.-F.L. (Jean-Flory Luaba); Tudora, C.M. (Cristina Maria); P. Vajkoczy (Peter); Valeinis, E. (Egils); Hecke, W.V. (Wim Van); Praag, D.V. (Dominique Van); Dirk, V.R. (Van Roost); Vlierberghe, E.V. (Eline Van); Vyvere, T.V. (Thijs vande); Vanhaudenhuyse, A. (Audrey); A. Vargiolu (Alessia); E. Vega (Emmanuel); J. Verheyden (Jan); Vespa, P.M. (Paul M.); A. Vik (Anne); R. Vilcinis (Rimantas); Vizzino, G. (Giacinta); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); V. Volovici (Victor); P. Vulekovic (Peter); Vámos, Z. (Zoltán); Wade, D. (Derick); Wang, K.K.W. (Kevin K.W.); Wang, L. (Lei); E.D. Wildschut (Enno); G. Williams (Guy); Willumsen, L. (Lisette); Wilson, A. (Adam); Wilson, L. (Lindsay); Winkler, M.K.L. (Maren K.L.); P. Ylén (Peter); Younsi, A. (Alexander); M. Zaaroor (Menashe); Zhang, Z. (Zhiqun); Zheng, Z. (Zelong); Zumbo, F. (Fabrizio); de Lange, S. (Stefanie); G.C.W. De Ruiter (Godard C.W.); den Boogert, H. (Hugo); van Dijck, J. (Jeroen); T.A. van Essen (T.); C.M. van Heugten (Caroline M.); M. van der Jagt (Mathieu); J. van der Naalt (Joukje)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: No definitive evidence exists on how intracranial hypertension should be treated in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is therefore likely that centers and practitioners individually balance potential benefits and risks of different intracranial pressure (ICP)

  13. EPIDURAL FENTANYL SPEEDS THE ONSET OF SENSORY AND MOTOR BLOCKS DURING EPIDURAL ROPIVACAINE ANAESTHESIA

    OpenAIRE

    A. Mohan Rao; A. Hari Prasad; Vankineni Kuchela Babu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Different adjuvants are added to local anaesthetic solutions to hasten the onset of sensory and motor block in epidural anaesthesia. OBJECTIVE To study the effect of epidural and intravenous fentanyl on time of onset of sensory and motor blockade in epidural anaesthesia with 0.75% ropivacaine. MATERIALS AND METHODS After obtaining informed consent and permission from hospital scientific and ethical committee 40 patients with ASA grade I and II who are und...

  14. Epidural blood patch: A study on an experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Epidural blood patch has been used to treat spinal headache with varying success. An experimental model was designed to ascertain whether an epidural blood patch can be used to seal the needle puncture sites in dural repair. Materials and Methods: Bovine dura was secured to the lower end of an open-ended calibrated plastic cylinder. Multiple interrupted stitches were applied over a 02 cm length of the dura without any incision. The cylinder was filled with colored saline gradually with the dura placed in a dependent position. Height of the water column at which sutured dura leaked was recorded. A layer of fresh blood was laid over the dura and allowed to clot. The test was repeated and the hydrostatic pressure at which leak took place was noted again. The test was repeated three times. Similar studies were done with two specimens with 02-cm dural incisions repaired with interrupted stitches of 4-0 silk in one specimen and 4-0 prolene in another, and three specimens with 3-mm unsutured dural rent in one and dural punctures made with 23-G and 26-G spinal needles in the other two. Results: All the dural preparations leaked, at a very low hydrostatic pressure (<30 mm of H 2 O. By covering the needle puncture sites with clotted blood, a watertight closure could be achieved, that can withstand a much higher hydrostatic pressure (mean of 180 mm of H 2 O. Conclusion : The experimental findings indicate that an epidural blood patch does enhance the ability of a dural closure to prevent a leak; however, its utility in clinical setting is questionable.

  15. Orbital and Intracranial Complication Resulting from Acute Rhinosinusitis: Case Report

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    Souza, Luana Alves de

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among the rhinosinusitis complications, the orbital are the most frequent ones, occurring mostly in the youngsters and children. Simultaneous complications involving the intracranial orbit and space are extremely rare, but they must be severely treated for they have a high rate of morbidity and mortality. Case report: In this work, the authors report a case of a patient who appeared to have preseptal cellulites and epidural abscess, in the form of simultaneous complications of an acute rhinosinusitis. In the patient of this case, choice was made for a clinic treatment associated with a nasosinusal endoscopic surgery and neurosurgical drainage of the intracranial abscess. CT was enough to achieve the diagnosis of this case. Final commentaries: However, it is recommended that, in cases where patients have rhinosinusitis complications, an extensive intracranial investigation needs to be deepened even when this is not so evident in the beginning. Given the polymicrobial nature of these infections, an aggressive culture-guided antibiotic therapy and a multidisciplinary follow-up significantly increase the likelihood of success.

  16. Highlighting intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with severe acute brain trauma Ressaltando a monitorização da pressão intracraniana em pacientes com traumatismo cerebral agudo grave

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    Antonio L. E Falcão

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial pressure (ICP monitoring was carried out in 100 patients with severe acute brain trauma, primarily by means of a subarachnoid catheter. Statistical associations were evaluated between maximum ICP values and: 1 Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS scores; 2 findings on computed tomography (CT scans of the head; and 3 mortality. A significant association was found between low GCS scores (3 to 5 and high ICP levels, as well as between focal lesions on CT scans and elevated ICP. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with ICP > 40 mm Hg than in those with ICP Monitorização da pressão intracraniana (PIC foi adotada em 100 pacientes com traumatismo cerebral agudo grave, usando-se preferencialmente um catéter subaracnóide. Associações estatísticas foram avaliadas entre valores máximos de PIC e : 1 número de pontos na Escala de Coma de Glasgow (ECG; 2 achados na tomografia computadorizada (TC da cabeça; e 3 mortalidade. Encontrou-se associação significante entre baixo número de pontos (3 a 5 na ECG e PIC elevada, assim como entre lesões focais na TC e hipertensão intracraniana. A mortalidade foi significantemente maior em pacientes com PIC > 40 mm Hg do que naqueles com PIC < 20 mm Hg.

  17. Infektioner i forbindelse med epidural kateterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, H M; Gahrn-Hansen, B; Andersen, S S

    1996-01-01

    coagulase- negative staphylococci (41%), Staphylococcus aureus (35%), Gram-negative bacilli (14%) and other bacteria (10%). The Gram-negative bacilli and S. aureus caused serious infections more frequently than the others. We discuss the symptoms and diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and propose......Seventy-eight patients with culture-positive epidural catheters were studied. Fifty-nine had symptoms of exit site infection and 11 patients had clinical meningitis, two of whom also had en epidural abscess. This corresponds to a local infection incidence of at least 4.3% and an incidence...

  18. Pediatric intracranial primary anaplastic ganglioglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdemann, Wolf; Banan, Rouzbeh; Hartmann, Christian; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2017-02-01

    Primary intracranial anaplastic gangliogliomas are rare tumors in the pediatric patient group. Most of them present with symptoms of elevated pressure or symptomatic epilepsy. Extraaxial location is far more common than axial location. On MRI examination, they mimic pilocytic astrocytomas. The outcome after surgery depends mainly on the possible amount of surgical resection, and oncological therapy is necessary to prevent recurrence of the disease. An 11-year-old boy presented with headache and double vision due to obstructive hydrocephalus. MRI of the brain revealed an axial partially contrast enhancing lesion in the quadrigeminal plate extending from the cerebellum to the pineal gland and causing hydrocephalus. Subtotal removal of the lesion was performed, and the diagnosis of an anaplastic ganglioglioma was established and confirmed by the reference center. At the latest follow up (3 months), the boy is without any neurological symptoms and scheduled for radiation therapy as well as chemotherapy.

  19. Intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema, T.; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Eshghi, O.; De Keyser, J.; Brouns, R.; van Dijk, J.M.C.; Luijckx, G. J.

    The aim of this narrative review is to evaluate the pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of intracranial artery dissection (IAD). IAD is a rare and often unrecognized cause of stroke or subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), especially in young adults. Two types of IAD can be

  20. Intracranial saccular aneurysm

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    J. R. Pinto

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors report the cases of three patients from the same family, all with intracranial saccular aneurysm (left carotid artery, anterior communicating artery, and middle cerebral artery. All three patients were operated on with good recovery and no complications. The authors call attention for some etipathogenic aspects of familial saccular aneurysms.

  1. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

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    Salgado, P.; Zenteno, M.A.; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J.; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O.

    1989-09-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.).

  2. Worsening Cervical Epidural Hematoma After Tissue Plasminogen Activator Administration for Stroke Like Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Tadatsugu; Yoshihara, Tomohito; Yakushiji, Yusuke; Eriguchi, Makoto; Hara, Hideo; Sonohata, Motoki; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2016-04-01

    Case report. To report an extremely rare case of stroke-mimicking, cervical spontaneous epidural hematoma (SEH) treated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for hemiparesis followed by emergency cervical decompression. Although hemiparesis caused by cervical SEH is a relatively uncommon symptom compared with tetraparesis, such cases were often misdiagnosed as cerebral infarction and worsened by antithrombic therapy. A case report and literature review are presented. A 71-year-old male presented with sudden neck pain followed by left-sided hemiparesis, and was believed to have had a stroke. He was administered tPA as intracranial computed tomography showed no signs of hemorrhage. However, his neurological condition continued to decline, and MRI of the cervical spine revealed a large spontaneous epidural hematoma. He subsequently underwent evacuation of the epidural hematoma and C3-6 laminoplasty, and his clinical status improved after the surgery. To our knowledge, only three cases of cervical SEH with hemiparesis erroneously treated with tPA resulting in neurological decline because of the enlargement of an existing hematoma, including the current case, have been reported in the English literature. It is important for physicians, especially those who administer tPA treatment, to include cervical SEH in the differential diagnosis of stroke in patients presenting with sudden back pain followed by the onset of neurological deficits including hemiparesis. 5.

  3. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension: use of unenhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinones Tapia, D.; Lopez-Ibor, L. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Clinica de La Zarzuela, Aravaca, Madrid (Spain); Pardo, J.; Anciones, V. [Dept. of Neurology, Clinica de La Zarzuela, Aravaca, Madrid (Spain); Serrano, J.M. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    We report a case of spontaneous intracranial hypotension diagnosed with unenhanced cranial MRI, showing laminar subdural fluid and engorgement of the hypophysis and perisellar sinuses. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure was low. MRI was normal after resolution of symptoms. Prior reports emphasise the enhancing pachymeninges seen in this syndrome. We maintain that, when subdural collections and perisellar engorgement are detected on unenhanced MRI in the proper clinical setting, contrast enhancement may not be necessary for the diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. Espondilodiscitis y absceso epidural candidiásico Candida spondylodiscitis and epidural abscess

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    Gisela Di Stilio

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available La espondilodiscitis candidiásica asociada a absceso epidural es una enfermedad de aparición excepcional. Se presenta el caso de un paciente con linfoma de Hodgkin en tratamiento quimioterápico que desarrolló candidiasis sistémica complicada con espondilodiscitis y absceso epidural por dicho germen.Candida spondylodiscitis associatd with epidural abscess is rarely seen. We present a patient with Hodgkin lymphoma who received chemotherapy and developed systemic Candida infection, which was complicated by Candida spondylodiscitis and epidural abscess.

  5. Labour epidural analgesia in Poland in 2009 - a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmanik, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Labour analgesia in most developed countries is funded by the state, available to every woman in labour, and plays an important role in the everyday activities of most anaesthetists. This paper presents the second part of an Obstetric Anaesthesia Survey which was conducted in 2009. The first part of the Survey, relating to anaesthesia for caesarean sections, was published in 2010. The author sent out 432 questionnaires containing questions about hospital size and location, staffing levels and numbers of deliveries per year. There were also questions regarding regional and other pain relief methods used in labour, ways of administration, drugs used and monitoring of patients. The response rate was 24%. Around 45% of responding hospitals had only 1-3 deliveries per year, which makes it difficult to provide separate obstetric anaesthetic cover. Only ten hospitals (11%) employed an anaesthetist for the labour ward. Epidural analgesia was used in 55% of hospitals but only 20% provided the service for 24 hours per day and free of charge. Entonox was used very occasionally, but the most common means of pain relief was pethidine injection. There were marked differences in the medication used for labour epidurals, with 18% of units using high concentrations of local anaesthetics which could result in motor block. Despite a lack of regulations in Polish law and a lack of proper training in 50% of units, midwives were looking after the patients with established labour epidural which could create medico-legal consequences. There was also a marked variation in the parameters monitored during labour analgesia. Epidural labour analgesia was offered for 24 hours per day and free of charge in only 20% of hospitals. Without public pressure it will be difficult to get more funding from the National Health Fund (NFZ) to enable other hospitals, especially those with small obstetric units, to introduce regional labour analgesia. Although the 2009 guidelines addressed most of the issues

  6. OUR EXPERIENCE WITH EPIDURAL LABOUR ANALGESIA

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    Uršula Reš Muravec

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. To evaluate the effects of regional labour analgesia used at the Hospital for Gynecology and Obstetrics in Postojna, Slovenia, in the year 2002.Patients and methods. In this retrospective study we enrolled 294 parturients who delivered in the year 2002 in the Postojna Maternity Hospital: in group 1 there were 147 parturients in whom three different regional analgesic techniques (study group were used at labour; in group 2 there were 147 parturients in whom regional analgesia was not used (control group. In the first step the two groups were compared in terms of maternal demographic data, duration and outcome of labour and 1' and 5' Apgar scores. In the second step the three regional analgesic groups were compared in terms of the course and outcome of labour, fetal condition, side and adverse effects of regional analgesic techniques, and patient satisfaction with a particular analgesic technique.Results. Regional labour analgesia was used in 147 (14% of the 1048 women who delivered in 2002: epidural analgesia (EPI was performed in 51.0%, combined spinal-epidural (CSE in 42.2% and spinal analgesia (SA in 6.8% of cases. The women in the regional analgesia group were significantly older, more educated, more often nulliparous and accompanied by their partner at labour than the women in the control group. Further, the duration of labour was significantly longer, oxytocin more frequently administered than in the control group. In terms of labour outcome there were no differences in the Cesarean section rates and 1- and 5-min Apgar scores minutes, but and the vacuum extraction rate was significantly higher in the regional analgesia group. Among the three regional analgesia techniques used, there were no statistically significant differences observed in terms of labour duration and outcome, and Apgar scores. The patient satisfaction was greatest with CSE. Adverse side effects such as weak muscles, reduced motion abilities, itching, nausea

  7. Study Protocol- Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injections for Spinal Stenosis (LESS: a double-blind randomized controlled trial of epidural steroid injections for lumbar spinal stenosis among older adults

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    Friedly Janna L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most common causes of low back pain among older adults and can cause significant disability. Despite its prevalence, treatment of spinal stenosis symptoms remains controversial. Epidural steroid injections are used with increasing frequency as a less invasive, potentially safer, and more cost-effective treatment than surgery. However, there is a lack of data to judge the effectiveness and safety of epidural steroid injections for spinal stenosis. We describe our prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial that tests the hypothesis that epidural injections with steroids plus local anesthetic are more effective than epidural injections of local anesthetic alone in improving pain and function among older adults with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods We will recruit up to 400 patients with lumbar central canal spinal stenosis from at least 9 clinical sites over 2 years. Patients with spinal instability who require surgical fusion, a history of prior lumbar surgery, or prior epidural steroid injection within the past 6 months are excluded. Participants are randomly assigned to receive either ESI with local anesthetic or the control intervention (epidural injections with local anesthetic alone. Subjects receive up to 2 injections prior to the primary endpoint at 6 weeks, at which time they may choose to crossover to the other intervention. Participants complete validated, standardized measures of pain, functional disability, and health-related quality of life at baseline and at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months after randomization. The primary outcomes are Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and a numerical rating scale measure of pain intensity at 6 weeks. In order to better understand their safety, we also measure cortisol, HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, weight, and blood pressure at baseline, and at 3 and 6 weeks post-injection. We also obtain data on resource utilization

  8. Epidural glucocorticoid use for vertebrogenic pain

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    M.V. Churyukanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review deals with the use of glucocorticoids (GC for nonspecific vertebrogenic pain and radiculopathy. The pathophysiology of radiculopathy and the role of mechanical and chemical components in the development of pain syndrome are discussed. The data of clinical trials analyzing the efficiency of epidural GC use, as well as possible indications for this therapy and its adverse reactions are under consideration. The available concepts of the analgesic effect of epidural CG are discussed.

  9. [Epidural fentanyl delayed emergence from anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Noriyuki; Ishiyama, Tadahiko; Kume, Masaki; Terada, Yoshihide; Shibuya, Kazuhiro; Matsukawa, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    An 83-year-old man (158 cm, 42 kg) was scheduled for cholecystectomy. He had a history of hypertension and atrial fibrillation. The patient received no premedication. An epidural catheter was inserted via the T9-10 interspace and 2% mepivacaine 7 ml was injected, producing a sensory block from T4 to T12. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and remifentanil, and was maintained with propofol, remifentanil, and nitrous oxide in oxygen. Rocuronium was given to provide neuromuscular block. Just before the completion of surgery, a bolus epidural injection of 2% mepivacaine 2 ml with fentanyl 50 microg was performed. Then epidural solution of ropivacaine 0.1% with fentanyl 6.25 microg x ml(-1), and droperidol 25 microg x ml(-1) was infused at 4 ml x hr(-1). Soon after the surgery, the patient developed atrial fibrillation that was treated with external electrocardioversion with 100 watt x sec. After the restoration of sinus rhythm, anesthetics were discontinued. The patient did not emerge from anesthesia though he breathed spontaneously Doxapram was slightly effective, but he did not respond to the verbal command. Epidural infusion was stopped and the patient was transferred to the ward. The patient fully recovered from anesthesia after 2 hours. Epidural infusion was restarted 17 hours later, and the patient fell asleep. He woke up after stopping epidural infusion. Epidurally administered fentanyl must have been the cause of delayed recovery from anesthesia. He could have been highly sensitive to fentanyl. Patient controlled epidural anesthesia may have been useful for this patient.

  10. MRI of intracranial calcifications

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    Kang, Jin Wha; Chang, Kee Hyun; Park, Jung Mi; Han, Moon Hee; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-12-15

    Recently computed tomography(CT) has been rapidly replaced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosis of majority of intracranial diseases. But MRI still has some limitation, one of which is its inferiority in detecting calcification. MRI of intracranial calcification has been known to be variable in signal intensity. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI of 26 patients with intracranial calcified lesions in order to evaluate the MR intensity of calcification and to assess the capability of MRI in detecting calcification in various intracranial lesions. All the MRI were obtained using routine T1-and T2-weighted spin eco pulse sequences on 2.0T superconducting system. The 26 patients consisted of 13 brain tumors (4 oligodendrogliomas, 2 craniopharyngiomas, 2 astrocytomas, 1 gem cell tumor, 1 medulloblastoma, 1 ependympma, and pathologically unconfirmed 2 cases), 11 infectious diseases (1 paragonimiasis, 1 sparganosis, 2 cysticercosis, 3 tuberculosis, and 4 unknown cases), and 2 undetermined pathologies. Eighty-two percent (9/11) of infections disease, and 50% (1/2) of undetermined group showed signal diminution or signal void on both T1-and T2-weighted image (T1W1, T2W1). Twenty-four percent (3/13) of brain tumors showed signal diminution on both T1W1 and T2W1. In 46% (6/13) and 61% (8/13) of brain tumors the signal intensities were isointense on T1W1 and T1W1, respectively. Unexpectedly, 3 oligodendrogliomas showed high signal intensity on T1W1, two of which showed com plexed signal intensity mixed with high, iso, and low signal intensities on T2W1. In remained cases (18% (2/11) of infectious diseases and 50% (1/2) of undetermined group) the signal intensities were mixed. With simultaneous review of CT and MRI in each case, the calcification (at least one in cases showing multiple ones) was identifiable on MRI in 62% (8/13) of rumors, 82% (9/11) of infectious diseases, and 100% (2/2) in undetermined group. In 36% (4/11) of infectious diseases, fewer number of

  11. Epidural morphine for postoperative pain relief in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S W; Hole, P; Haas, Inge Madsen De

    1993-01-01

    Epidural morphine for postoperative pain relief is in general use, and has proved to be very efficient in adults. The epidural technique and the use of epidural morphine are much less frequent in children. For 2 years we have prospectively followed 76 children who had epidural morphine...... the investigation. We observed a change in the sleeping pattern with an increased number of sleep-induced myoclonia during the administration of epidural morphine. In conclusion, the use of epidural morphine in children for postoperative pain relief is very efficient. The minimal effective dose has not been...

  12. The association between hypertension and traumatic intracranial haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Kuang-Yu; Lin, Leng-Chieh; Li, Wen-Cheng; Lin, Martin Hisu-Chu; Wang, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Kai-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Control of blood pressure is considered essential in the management of trauma patients. In patients with head injuries, both hypotension and hypertension are associated with poor outcomes. The present study was undertaken to ascertain whether hypertension at emergency triage is associated with traumatic intracranial haemorrhage. From September 2012 to August 2013, data were collected prospectively for patients who presented with head injury and who received a brain CT examination at a university hospital. Factors associated with intracranial haemorrhage were identified, and logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between hypertension at emergency department triage and traumatic brain haemorrhage. Of a total of 1457 patients enrolled in this study, 252 (17.3%) experienced traumatic intracranial haemorrhage. After controlling for factors associated with traumatic intracranial haemorrhage, an increased risk of intracranial haemorrhage following an initial brain CT scan was identified for patients presenting initially with a systolic blood pressure ≥ 180 mm Hg (odds ratio, 1.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-2.71, compared with those with 90-139 mm Hg). The presence of hypertension at emergency triage is associated with traumatic intracranial haemorrhage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sixth Nerve Palsy in Paediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Julia E; Reem, Rachel E; Aylward, Shawn C; Rogers, David L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the incidence and describe the characteristics of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) palsy in paediatric patients with intracranial hypertension (IH). A retrospective chart review of central Ohio children diagnosed with IH over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. IH without identifiable cause was defined as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), whereas IH with identifiable pathologic aetiology was deemed secondary intracranial hypertension (SIH). A subset of patients with CN VI palsy was identified. Data collected included patient age, gender, past medical history, aetiology of SIH, ophthalmic examination, lumbar puncture results, neuroimaging results, and response to treatment. Seventy-eight children with intracranial hypertension were included in the study. Nine (11.5%) children (four males, five females; median age 14, range: 3-18) were found to have a unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral (n = 7) CN VI palsy. Five children had IIH; the remaining four had SIH from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (n = 2) and infection (n = 2). The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure for the nine patients with CN VI palsy was 40 cm H2O (range: 21-65 cm H2O). Papilloedema was present in 8/9 (89%) patients. One patient required a lumboperitoneal shunt, and two others required optic nerve sheath fenestrations in addition to medical management. All cases of CN VI palsy resolved with treatment. In our primary service area, the incidence of CN VI palsy is approximately 12% among paediatric IH patients. The majority of cases with CN VI palsy presented with papilloedema and all cases resolved with treatment of intracranial hypertension.

  14. [History and Technique of Epidural Anaesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waurick, Katrin; Waurick, René

    2015-07-01

    In 1901, the first Epidural anesthesia via a caudal approach was independently described by two FrenchmanJean-Anthanase Sicard and Fernand Cathelin.. The Spanish military surgeon, Fidel Pagés Miravé, completed the lumbar approach successfully in 1921. The two possibilities for identification of the epidural space the "loss of resistance" technique and the technique of the "hanging drop" were developed by Achille Mario Dogliotti, an Italian, and Alberto Gutierrez, an Argentinean physician, at the same time. In 1956 John J. Bonica published the paramedian approach to the epidural space. As early as 1931 Eugene Aburel, a Romanian obstetrician, injected local anaesthetics via a silk catheter to perform lumbar obstetric Epidural analgesia. In 1949 the first successful continuous lumbar Epidural anaesthesia was reported by Manuel Martinez Curbelo, a Cuban. Epidural anaesthesia can be performed in sitting or lateral position in all segments of the spinal column via the median or paramedian approach. Different off-axis angles pose the challenge in learning the technique. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Slit ventricle syndrome: a case report of intermittent intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Vernier, Eric; Ravenscroft, Sheri; Schwartz, Lauren; Oleske, James; Ming, Xue

    2013-06-01

    Slit ventricle syndrome is a rare condition whereby brain compliance is reduced and can be associated with intermittent intracranial hypertension. A 19-year-old male with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for congenital hydrocephalus presented with a 1-day history of headache and drowsiness-symptoms from which he suffered in many recurrent episodes over the past 5 years. The improvement of headaches without surgical intervention led to the diagnosis of migraine. During this hospitalization, episodes of intermittent intracranial hypertension were documented along with the remission and relapse of the symptoms. While the patient's intracranial pressure was within normal range in over 90% of his monitoring period, which postponed shunting, replacement of his ventriculoperitoneal shut eventually resolved his symptoms. Slit ventricle syndrome with reduced ventricular compliances should be considered in patients with clinical evidence of intermittent intracranial hypertension and small ventricular size. The authors advocate shunt replacement as an appropriate treatment for this condition.

  16. Intermittent epidural TOP-UPS vs. patient control epidural analgesia during labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijic, Vlatka; Bukovic, Damir; Mihaljevic, Slobodan; Oreskovic, Slavko; Persec, Jasminka; Zupic, Tomislav; Juras, Josip; Milinovic, Darko

    2013-12-01

    Pain during labor and delivery is often very unpleasant and stressful for the parturients. Patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been found to be both safe and effective, providing optimal pain relief and allowing women to participate in their own analgesia). Compared to other epidural techniques, intermittent epidural top-ups and continuous epidural analgesia (CEA), PCEA uses diluted local anesthetic solutions with less motor block and less unscheduled clinician interventions. The purpose of our study was to compare intermittent bolus epidural top-ups and PCEA in labor. Sixty ASA I patients who requested epidural analgesia for labor and had written consent were included in the study. 30 patients in the first group received intermittent bolus epidural top-ups, while patients in the second group received PCEA. We evaluated duration of labor, maternal sense of pain using VAS scale and maternal satisfaction during fetal descent in both groups. We found that the duration of labor was significantly shorter and maternal sense of pain was lower in the PCEA group than in the group receiving epidural bolus top-ups. There were no differences between groups in maternal satisfaction during fetal descent.

  17. Proximal Limb Weakness Reverting After CSF Diversion In Intracranial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about two young girls who developed progressive visual failure secondary to increased intracranial pressure and had significant proximal muscle weakness of limbs. Patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP may present with "false localizing signs", besides having headache, vomiting and papilledema. Radicular pain as a manifestation of raised ICP is rare and motor weakness attributable to polyradiculopathy is exceptional. Two patients with increased intracranial pressure without lateralizing signs′ had singnificant muscle weakness. Clinical evaluation and laboratory tests did not disclose any other cause for weakness. Following theco-peritoneal shunt, in both patients, there was variable recovery of vision but the proximal weakness and symptoms of elevated ICP improved rapidly. Recognition of this uncommon manifestation of raised ICP may obviate the need for unnecessary investigation and reduce morbidity due to weakness by CSF diversion procedure.

  18. Thoracic epidural anesthesia attenuates hemorrhagic-induced splanchnic hypo-perfusion in post-resuscitation experimental hemorrhagic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir S Madjid

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of present study was to assess the effects of thoracic epidural anesthesia on splanchnic perfusion, bacterial translocation and histopathologic changes in experimental hemorrhagic shock in short-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina. Sixteen Macaca nemestrinas were randomly assigned to one of two groups i.e. the lidocaine group (n = 8, receiving general anesthesia plus lidocaine thoracic epidural anesthesia; and the saline group (n = 8, receiving general anesthesia alone as control. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by withdrawing blood gradually to a mean arterial pressure (MAP of 40 mm Hg, and maintained for 60 minutes. Animals were then resuscitated with their own blood and ringer lactate solution (RL. After resuscitation, epidural lidocaine 2% was given in the lidocaine group and saline in the control group. Resuscitation that was performed after one hour hemorrhagic shock, with hemodynamic variables and urine output returned to normal, revealed there was no improvement of splanchnic perfusion. PgCO2, P(g-aCO2, and pHi remained in critical value and tended to deteriorate in the saline group. Contrast to saline group, splanchnic perfusion in lidocaine group tended to improve. This condition was supported by the finding of less bacterial translocation and better histopathologic changes in lidocaine thoracic epidural anesthesia group than in saline group. This study concludes that lidocaine thoracic epidural anesthesia attenuates splachnic hypoperfusion in post-resuscitation hemorrhagic shock in Macaca nemestrina. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 73-81Keywords: thoracic epidural anesthesia, lidocaine, hemorrhagic shock, splanchnic hypoperfusion, bacterial translocation

  19. Terson syndrome in conjunction with ruptured intracranial aneurysm and penetrating intracranial injury: a review of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinboldt, Matt; Francis, Kirenza; Parrish, David; Harper, Derrick; Blase, John

    2014-04-01

    Terson syndrome, the presence of intraocular hemorrhage in the setting of acutely elevated intracranial pressure, was historically described in conjunction with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage; however, more recently, it has been associated with a gamut of intracranial pathophysiology ranging from blunt or penetrating injury to neurosurgical procedures. We describe two cases of profound intracranial injury, secondary to ballistic injury, and a ruptured intracranial aneurysm, in which posterior chamber ocular hemorrhage was noted on CT imaging. Though the outcome in such cases, as with ours, is often poor, the findings are germane to clinical care as the presence of Terson syndrome has been noted to be a negative prognostic factor in multiple clinical reviews. Additionally, clinical recovery can be impacted adversely by lasting visual deficits or retinal degradation in the absence of timely ophthalmologic intervention.

  20. Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is the most common proximate mechanism of ischemic stroke worldwide. Approximately half of those affected are Asians. For diagnosis of ICAD, intra-arterial angiography is the gold standard to identify extent of stenosis. However, noninvasive techniques including transcranial ultrasound and MRA are now emerging as reliable modalities to exclude moderate to severe (50%–99% stenosis. Little is known about measures for primary prevention of the disease. In terms of secondary prevention of stroke due to intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis, aspirin continues to be the preferred antiplatelet agent although clopidogrel along with aspirin has shown promise in the acute phase. Among Asians, cilostazol has shown a favorable effect on symptomatic stenosis and is of benefit in terms of fewer bleeds. Moreover, aggressive risk factor management alone and in combination with dual antiplatelets been shown to be most effective in this group of patients. Interventional trials on intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis have so far only been carried out among Caucasians and have not yielded consistent results. Since the Asian population is known to be preferentially effected, focused trials need to be performed to establish treatment modalities that are most effective in this population.

  1. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traver, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the some of the known results of spaceflight induced intracranial hypertension. Historical information from Gemini 5, Apollo, and the space shuttle programs indicated that some vision impairment was reported and a comparison between these historical missions and present missions is included. Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, Choroidal Folds, Hyperopic Shifts and Raised Intracranial Pressure has occurred in Astronauts During and After Long Duration Space Flight. Views illustrate the occurrence of Optic Disc Edema, Globe Flattening, and Choroidal Folds. There are views of the Arachnoid Granulations and Venous return, and the question of spinal or venous compliance issues is discussed. The question of increased blood flow and its relation to increased Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is raised. Most observed on-orbit papilledema does not progress, and this might be a function of plateau homeostasis for the higher level of intracranial pressure. There are seven cases of astronauts experiencing in flight and post flight symptoms, which are summarized and follow-up is reviewed along with a comparison of the treatment options. The question is "is there other involvement besides vision," and other Clinical implications are raised,

  2. Fluoroscopically guided tunneled trans-caudal epidural catheter technique for opioid-free neonatal epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Andrew D; Hughes, Elisabeth M

    2016-06-01

    Epidural analgesia confers significant perioperative advantages to neonates undergoing surgical procedures but may be very technically challenging to place using a standard interlaminar loss-of-resistance to saline technique given the shallow depth of the epidural space. Thoracic epidural catheters placed via the caudal route may reduce the risk of direct neural injury from needle placement, but often pose higher risks of infection and/or improper positioning if placed without radiographic guidance. We present a detailed method of placing a fluoroscopically guided, tunneled transcaudal epidural catheter, which may reduce both of these risks. The accuracy and precision of this technique often provides adequate analgesia to allow for opioid-free epidural infusions as well as significant reductions in systemic opioids through the perioperative period. Opioid-free analgesia using a regional anesthetic technique allows for earlier extubation and reduced perioperative sedation, which may have a less deleterious neurocognitive effect on the developing brain of the neonate.

  3. Bilateral Heel Numbness due to External Compression during Obstetric Epidural Analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian P. Kamphuis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 32-year-old woman who developed bilateral heel numbness after obstetric epidural analgesia. We diagnosed her with bilateral neuropathy of the medial calcaneal nerve, most likely due to longstanding pressure on both heels. Risk factors for the development of this neuropathy were prolonged labour with spinal analgesia and a continuation of analgesia during episiotomy. Padded footrests decrease pressure and can possibly prevent this neuropathy.

  4. Hindlimb Suspension (HLS) in Rodents for the Study of Intracranial Pressure, Molecular and Histologic Changes in the Eye, and CSF Production Regulation and Resorption: A Status Report of Two Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, C. A.; Taibbi, G.; Vizzeri, G.; Parsons-Wingerter, P.; Chevez-Barrios, P.; Rivera, A.; Zanello, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    This status report corresponds to two studies tied to an animal experiment being executed at the University of California Davis (Charles Fuller's laboratory). The animal protocol uses the well-documented rat hindlimb suspension (HLS) model, to examine the relationship between cephalic fluid shifts and the regulation of intracranial (ICP) and intraocular (IOP) pressures as well as visual system structure and function. Long Evans rats are subjected to HLS durations of 7, 14, 28 and 90 days. Subgroups of the 90-day animals are studied for recovery periods of 7, 14, 28 or 90 days. All HLS subjects have age-matched cage controls. Various animal cohorts are planned for this study: young males, young females and old males. In addition to the live measures (ICP by telemetry, IOP and retinal parameters by optical coherence tomography) which are shared with the Fuller study, the specific outcomes for this study include: -Gene expression analysis of the retina -Histologic analysis - Analysis of the microvasculature of retina flat mounts by NASA's VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) Software. To date, the young male and female cohorts are being completed. Due to the need to keep technical variation to a minimum, the histologic and genomic analyses have been delayed until all samples from each cohort are available and can be processed in a single batch per cohort. The samples received so far correspond to young males sacrificed at 7,14, 28 and 90 days of HLS and at 90 days of recovery; and from young females sacrificed at 7, 14 and 28 of HLS. A complementary study titled: "A gene expression and histologic approach to the study of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production and outflow in hindlimb suspended rats" seeks to study the molecular components of CSF production and outflow modulation as a result of HLS, bringing a molecular and histologic approach to investigate genome wide expression changes in the arachnoid villi and choroid plexus of HLS rats compared to rats in normal

  5. Effect of postoperative epidural analgesia on surgical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, K; Holte, Kathrine

    2002-01-01

    Pain relief allowing sufficient mobilization after major surgical procedures can only be achieved by continuous epidural analgesia with local anesthetics, which also reduces the stress response to surgery. However, the role of postoperative epidural analgesia on postoperative morbidity is controv...

  6. A Radiographic Measurement of the Anterior Epidural Space at L4-5 Disc Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui-Sheng; Wu, Jie-Shi; Lu, Hai-Dan; Zhu, Hao-Gang; Li, Xia; Dong, Jian; Yuan, Feng-Lai

    2017-05-01

    To observe the morphology character of the anterior epidural space at the L4-5 disc level and to provide an anatomical basis for safely and accurately performing a percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD). Fifty-five cases with L5 S1 lumbar disc herniation were included in this study, and cases with L4-5 disease were excluded. When the puncture needle reached the epidural space at the L5 S1 level, iohexol was injected at the pressure of 50 cm H2 O during the PELD, then C-Arm fluoroscopy was used to obtain standard lumbar frontal and lateral images. The widths of epidural space at the level of the L4 lower endplate, the L5 upper endplate, as well as the middle point of the L4-5 disc were measured from the lumbar lateral X-ray film. Epidural space at the L4-5 disc plane performs like a trapezium chart with a short side at the head end and a long side at the tail end in the lumbar lateral X-ray radiograph, while the average widths of epidural space were 10.2 ± 2.5, 12.3 ± 2.3, and 13.8 ± 2.6 mm at the upper, middle, and lower level of the L4-5 disc. Understanding the morphological characteristics of epidural space will contribute to improving the safety of the tranforaminal percutaneous endoscopy technique. © 2017 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Epidural failure rate using a standardised definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangamuthu, A; Russell, I F; Purva, M

    2013-11-01

    There is no globally-accepted definition of epidural failure; this leads to wide differences in reported failure rates. A definition of epidural failure was standardised using a modified Delphi approach involving senior obstetric anaesthetists in the UK. Using this definition, epidural failures were calculated in our institution. Following clinical governance approval, anonymised data from 1521 epidurals inserted between September 2010 and December 2011 were collected from our database. Details included pain relief 45 min from the start of the procedure, accidental dural puncture, epidural re-siting, maternal satisfaction, time of insertion and positioning for insertion. The overall failure rate was 23%. Individual failure rates for trainees were: Year 2, 26.8%; Year 3, 26.3%; Year 4, 21.4%; Year 5, 25%; Year 6, 18.5%; and Year 7, 13.5%. Epidural re-site rates for trainees were: Year 2, 6.5%; Year 3, 3.5%; Year 4, 4%; Year 5 and above, 1.5%. Cervical dilatation, time of day and position for insertion did not have a statistically significant association with the failure rate. However, the failure rate of the Year 2, Year 3, and Year 4 trainees was significantly higher when compared to that of Year 5 and above. The re-site rate was statistically higher for Year 2 and Year 4 trainees when compared to those of Year 5 and above. The accidental dural puncture rate was statistically higher among Year 3 trainees when compared to Year 5 and above. The study identified epidural failure rates using a standardised definition. This information could be used to guide training decisions and to support doctors during their training period. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sleep Architecture Linked to Airway Obstruction and Intracranial Hypertension in Children with Syndromic Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruijt, Bart; Mathijssen, Irene M J; Bredero-Boelhouwer, Hansje H; Cherian, Perumpillichira J; Corel, Linda J A; van Veelen, Marie-Lise; Hayward, Richard D; Tasker, Robert C; Joosten, Koen F M

    2016-12-01

    Children with syndromic craniosynostosis often have obstructive sleep apnea and intracranial hypertension. The authors aimed to evaluate (1) sleep architecture, and determine whether this is influenced by the presence of obstructive sleep apnea and/or intracranial hypertension; and (2) the effect of treatment on sleep architecture. This study included patients with syndromic craniosynostosis treated at a national referral center, undergoing screening for obstructive sleep apnea and intracranial hypertension. Obstructive sleep apnea was identified by polysomnography, and categorized into no, mild, moderate, or severe. Intracranial hypertension was identified by the presence of papilledema on funduscopy, supplemented by optical coherence tomography and/or intracranial pressure monitoring. Regarding sleep architecture, sleep was divided into rapid eye movement or non-rapid eye movement sleep; respiratory effort-related arousals and sleep efficiency were scored. The authors included 39 patients (median age, 5.9 years): 19 with neither obstructive sleep apnea nor intracranial hypertension, 11 with obstructive sleep apnea (four moderate/severe), six with intracranial hypertension, and three with obstructive sleep apnea and intracranial hypertension. Patients with syndromic craniosynostosis, independent of the presence of mild obstructive sleep apnea and/or intracranial hypertension, have normal sleep architecture compared with age-matched controls. Patients with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea have a higher respiratory effort-related arousal index (p intracranial hypertension, and sleep. Risk, II.

  9. Hematoma extradural do vértex: relato de caso Epidural hematoma at the vertex: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Haikel Jr.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos caso incomum de um paciente de 37 anos com hematoma extradural traumático do vértex com sintomas de hipertensão intracraniana. O diagnóstico foi feito através da tomografia do crânio em cortes coronais e o paciente foi submetido a craniotomia com drenagem do hematoma.We report the unusual case of a 37 years old man with an epidural traumatic hematoma at the vertex with intracranial hypertension symptoms. The diagnostic was achieved with coronal cranial tomographic scans and a craniotomy was performed for hematoma removal.

  10. Effects of epidural lidocaine anesthesia on bulls during electroejaculation.

    OpenAIRE

    Falk, A J; Waldner, C L; Cotter, B S; Gudmundson, J; Barth, A D

    2001-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether caudal epidural lidocaine anesthesia reduces a stress response to electroejaculation. In the 1st experiment, changes in cortisol and progesterone concentrations in serial blood samples were used to assess the stress response to restraint (control), transrectal massage, caudal epidural injection of saline, electroejaculation after caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, and electroejaculation without epidural lidocaine. In the 2nd experiment,...

  11. Lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis: MRI grading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borre, Daniel G. [Department of MRI, RM-Hastings, Clinica Monte Grande, Monte Grande, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Department of MRI, Oncologic Center of Excellence, Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sociedad Argentina de Radiologia, Arenales 1985 P.B., Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires C1124AAC (Argentina); Borre, Guillermo E. [Department of MRI, RM-Hastings, Clinica Monte Grande, Monte Grande, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Department of MRI, Oncologic Center of Excellence, Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Aude, Flavio [Department of MRI, Oncologic Center of Excellence, Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Palmieri, Gladys N. [Department of MRI, RM-Hastings, Clinica Monte Grande, Monte Grande, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2003-07-01

    Lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis (LEL) is characterized by excessive deposition of epidural fat (EF). The purpose of our retrospective study was to quantify normal and pathologic amounts of EF in order to develop a reproducible MRI grading of LEL. In this study of 2528 patients (1095 men and 1433 women; age range 18-84 years, mean age 47.3 years) we performed a retrospective analysis of MRI exams. We obtained four linear measurements at the axial plane parallel and tangent to the superior end plate of S1 vertebral body: antero-posterior diameter of dural sac (A-Pd DuS), A-Pd of EF, located ventrally and dorsally to the DuS, and A-Pd of the spinal canal (Spi C). We calculated (a) DuS/EF index and (b) EF/Spi C index. We developed the following MRI grading of LEL: normal, grade 0: DuS/EF index {>=}1.5, EF/Spi C index {<=}40%; LEL grade I: DuS/EF index 1.49-1, EF/Spi C index 41-50% (mild EF overgrowth); LEL grade II: DuS/EF index 0.99-0.34, EF/Spi C index 51-74% (moderate EF overgrowth); LEL grade III: DuS/EF index {<=}0.33, EF/Spi C index {>=}75% (severe EF overgrowth). The MRI exams were evaluated independently by three readers. Intra- and interobserver reliabilities were obtained by calculating Kappa statistics. The MRI grading showed the following distribution: grade 0, 2003 patients (79.2%); LEL grade I, 308 patients (12.2%); LEL grade II, 165 patients (6.5%); and LEL grade III, 52 patients (2.1%). The kappa coefficients for intra- and interobserver agreement in a four-grade classification system were substantial to excellent: intraobserver, kappa range 0.79 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.65-0.93] to 0.82 (95% CI, 0.70-0.95); interobserver, kappa range 0.76 (95% CI, 0.62-0.91) to 0.85 (95% CI, 0.73-0.97). In LEL grade I, there were no symptomatic cases due to fat hypertrophy. LEL grade II was symptomatic in only 24 cases (14.5%). In LEL grade III, all cases were symptomatic. A subgroup of 22 patients (42.3%) showed other substantial spinal pathologies (e

  12. Subcutaneous effusion resulting from an epidural catheter fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiraran, Y; Yucel, I; Erdogmus, B

    2006-04-01

    The breakage of an epidural catheter within a patient is uncommon, but troublesome, complication of epidural block, and its cause is rarely discovered. In this case report, our aim was to present an effusion between s.c. tissue and fascia in the lumbar region because of a broken fragment of epidural catheter which was unnoticed during its removal.

  13. Accidental Breakage of Lumbar Epidural Catheter - Case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breakage of epidural catheter is a rare occurrence with only isolated reports. Though insertion of epidural catheter is generally considered a safe procedure, breakage during removal leaving a segment in the patient's back can occur. There are many factors associated with breakage of an epidural catheter, such as the ...

  14. An experience with epidural morphine in lumbar surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, J; Snyder, G

    1987-10-01

    A chart review of the patients who received epidural morphine for lumbar surgery during the first year of implementation of the procedure was conducted. This article reviews the pharmacology and side effects of epidural morphine, describes the procedure of administering epidural morphine, discusses side effects and technical problems encountered, and presents implications for nursing practice.

  15. Epidural steroid injection for lumbosacral radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Mi Sook [The Catholic University of Korea, Pucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Low back pain combined with radicular pain remains as one of the most challenging musculoskeletal problems for its therapeutic management. This malady results from nerve root impingement and/or inflammation that causes neurologic symptoms in the distribution of the affected nerve root(s) Conservative treatment, percutaneous spine interventions and surgery have all been used as treatment; and the particular treatment that's chosen depends on the severity of the clinical and neurologic presentation. In 1930, Evans reported that sciatica could treated by epidural injection. The use of epidural corticosteroid injections for the treatment of axial and radicular back pain was first reported in 1953. Epidural steroid injections are currently used by many medical professionals for the treatment of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Performing 'blind' epidural steroid injection lacks target specificity that often results in incorrect delivery of medication to the lesion. Imaging-guided steroid injections are now becoming more popular despite the controversy regarding their efficacy. Many reports, including a few randomized controlled trials, have documented the clinical utility of epidural steroid injections.

  16. MR findings of spinal epidural mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Choi, Woo Suk; Shin, In Soo; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Yoon, Yup [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-15

    We analyzed the MR findings of spinal epidural mass in 23 patients retrospectively. MR images were performed at 1.5 T unit. The lesion were confirmed as metastasis(12 cases), lymphoma(2 cases), leukemia(1 cases), multiple myeloma(2 cases), meningioma(3 case), neurofibroma(1 case), dysraphism with lipomal(1 caes) and lipomatosis(4 cases). Most MRI examinations consisted of T1, proton density and T2 weighted sagittal imaging of the spine, with additional pulse sequences or image planes as needed for clarification. The level of the spinal epidural mass was cervical spine level in 2 cases, thoracic in 15 cases, lumbar in 7 cases, and sacral in 2 cases. The location of epidural mass within the spinal canal was eccentric in 20 case, multiple in 2 cases, and encirdled in 4 case. Paraspinal mass was seen in 11 cases. Signal intensity of epidural mass was variable. The marrow of spine revealed low signal intensity(SI) on T1WI and high SI on T2WI in 14 cases. In conclusion, MRI is a useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of spinal epidural mass.

  17. Solitary Spinal Epidural Metastasis from Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taisei Sako

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solitary epidural space metastasis of a malignant tumor is rare. We encountered a 79-year-old male patient with solitary metastatic epidural tumor who developed paraplegia and dysuria. The patient had undergone total gastrectomy for gastric cancer followed by chemotherapy 8 months priorly. The whole body was examined for suspected metastatic spinal tumor, but no metastases of the spine or important organs were observed, and a solitary mass was present in the thoracic spinal epidural space. The mass was excised for diagnosis and treatment and was histopathologically diagnosed as metastasis from gastric cancer. No solitary metastatic epidural tumor from gastric cancer has been reported in English. Among the Japanese, 3 cases have been reported, in which the outcome was poor in all cases and no definite diagnosis could be made before surgery in any case. Our patient developed concomitant pneumonia after surgery and died shortly after the surgery. When a patient has a past medical history of malignant tumor, the possibility of a solitary metastatic tumor in the epidural space should be considered.

  18. Thoracic epidural analgesia reduces gastric microcirculation in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrus, Rikard; Strandby, Rune B; Secher, Niels H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) is used for pain relief during and after abdominal surgery, but the effect of TEA on the splanchnic microcirculation remains debated. We evaluated whether TEA affects splanchnic microcirculation in the pig. METHODS: Splanchnic microcirculation...... was assessed in nine pigs prior to and 15 and 30 min after induction of TEA. Regional blood flow was assessed by neutron activated microspheres and changes in microcirculation by laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). RESULTS: As assessed by LSCI 15 min following TEA, gastric arteriolar flow decreased by 22...... regional blood flow 30 min following induction of TEA (p = 0.048). These manifestations took place along with a drop in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.030), but with no significant change in mean arterial pressure, cardiac output, or heart rate. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that TEA may have an adverse...

  19. Sinogenic intracranial complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Mikkel Seremet; Fisker, Niels; Christensen, Anne Estmann

    2018-01-01

    and subcortical abscesses in combination with sinusitis. She was treated with endoscopic sinus surgery and intravenous antibiotics. Both patients had developed psoriasis and episodes of infection during treatment. They were non-septic and had low fever on presentation. None of the patients suffered any long......We present two 11-year-old girls with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, treated with adalimumab. Both developed severe intracranial complications to sinusitis. Patient 1 had been treated with adalimumab for 15 months when she developed acute sinusitis complicated by an orbital abscess...

  20. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Jirásková

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Nada Jirásková, Pavel RozsívalDepartment of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Hradec Králové, Czech RepublicPurpose: To evaluate retrospectively the features, treatment, and outcome of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH in children.Methods: Nine patients, 15 years and younger, diagnosed with IIH. Inclusion criteria were papilledema, normal brain computer tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid pressure greater than 250 mm H2O, normal cerebrospinal fluid content, and a nonfocal neurologic examination except for sixth nerve palsy.Results: Of the nine patients, eight were girls. Five girls were overweight and one boy was obese. The most common presenting symptom was headache (5 patients. Diplopia or strabismus did not occur in our group. Visual field abnormalities were present in all eyes, and severe visual loss resulting in light perception vision occurred in both eyes of one patient. Eight patients were treated medically with acetazolamide alone, and one girl needed a combination of acetazolamide and corticosteroids. This girl also required optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. Resolution of papilledema and recovery of visual function occurred in all patients.Conclusions: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in prepubertal children is rather uncommon. Prompt diagnosis and management are important to prevent permanent visual loss.Keywords: idiopathic intracranial hypertension, pediatric, treatment

  1. Sciatica caused by lumbar epidural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfquih, Hatim; El Mostarchid, Brahim; Akhaddar, Ali; gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Gas production as a part of disc degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. The clinical features are similar to those of common sciatica. CT is very useful in the detection of epidural gas accumulation and nerve root compression. We report a case of symptomatic epidural gas accumulation originating from vacuum phenomenon in the intervertebral disc, causing lumbo-sacral radiculopathy. A 45-year-old woman suffered from sciatica for 9 months. The condition worsened in recent days. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated intradiscal vacuum phenomenon, and accumulation of gas in the lumbar epidural space compressing the dural sac and S1 nerve root. After evacuation of the gas, her pain resolved without recurrence.

  2. [Knot in a thoracic epidural catheter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, F; Helms, O; Hentz, J-G; Steib, A

    2011-02-01

    We report a case of impossible injection into a thoracic epidural catheter associated with a difficult withdrawal of this catheter after its introduction on the T3-T4 level. Thanks to a gentle and continuous traction, the catheter was finally successfully removed without being broken, but presented a simple knot at 13mm from its end. No neurological complication was observed later on. This complication happened during the introduction of the catheter at the thoracic level where anatomic conditions are less favorable for this kind of complication to happen than at the lumbar level. We have been probably confronted with a catheter taking an abnormal direction due to an anatomic structure. This case shows us that knots in an epidural catheter are also possible on the high thoracic level and that its ascent within the epidural space must happen without any resistance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Fentanyl and Midazolam Are Ineffective in Reducing Episodic Intracranial Hypertension in Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Timothy P; Wallendorf, Michael J; Kharasch, Evan D; Leonard, Jeffrey R; Doctor, Allan; Pineda, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of bolus-dose fentanyl and midazolam to treat episodic intracranial hypertension in children with severe traumatic brain injury. Retrospective cohort. PICU in a university-affiliated children's hospital level I trauma center. Thirty-one children 0-18 years of age with severe traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale score of ≤ 8) who received bolus doses of fentanyl and/or midazolam for treatment of episodic intracranial hypertension. None. The area under the curve from high-resolution intracranial pressure-time plots was calculated to represent cumulative intracranial hypertension exposure: area under the curve for intracranial pressure above 20 mm Hg (area under the curve-intracranial hypertension) was calculated in 15-minute epochs before and after administration of fentanyl and/or midazolam for the treatment of episodic intracranial hypertension. Our primary outcome measure, the difference between predrug and postdrug administration epochs (Δarea under the curve-intracranial hypertension), was calculated for all occurrences. We examined potential covariates including age, injury severity, mechanism, and time after injury; time after injury correlated with Δarea under the curve-intracranial hypertension. In a mixed-effects model, with patient as a random effect, drug/dose combination as a fixed effect, and time after injury as a covariate, intracranial hypertension increased after administration of fentanyl and/or midazolam (overall aggregate mean Δarea under the curve-intracranial hypertension = +17 mm Hg × min, 95% CI, 0-34 mm Hg × min; p = 0.04). The mean Δarea under the curve-intracranial hypertension increased significantly after administration of high-dose fentanyl (p = 0.02), low-dose midazolam (p = 0.006), and high-dose fentanyl plus low-dose midazolam (0.007). Secondary analysis using age-dependent thresholds showed no significant impact on cerebral perfusion pressure deficit (mean Δarea under the curve

  4. Pediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Shawn C; Reem, Rachel E

    2017-01-01

    Primary (idiopathic) intracranial hypertension has been considered to be a rare entity, but with no precise estimates of the pediatric incidence in the United States. There have been attempts to revise the criteria over the years and adapt the adult criteria for use in pediatrics. The clinical presentation varies with age, and symptoms tending to be less obvious in younger individuals. In the prepubertal population, incidentally discovered optic disc edema is relatively common. By far the most consistent symptom is headache; other symptoms include nausea, vomiting tinnitus, and diplopia. Treatment mainstays include weight loss when appropriate and acetazolamide. Furosemide may exhibit a synergistic benefit when used in conjunction with acetazolamide. Surgical interventions are required relatively infrequently, but include optic nerve sheath fenestration and cerebrospinal fluid shunting. Pain and permanent vision loss are the two major complications of this disorder and these manifestations justify aggressive treatment. Once intracranial hypertension has resolved, up to two thirds of patients develop a new or chronic headache type that is different from their initial presenting headache. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Intraventricular Hemorrhage after Epidural Blood Patching: An Unusual Complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sorour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present two cases of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH believed to be a result of epidural blood patching. The first was a 71-year-old woman who had new onset of nontraumatic IVH on computed tomography (CT scan after undergoing an epidural blood patch (EBP. This amount of intraventricular blood was deemed an incidental finding since it was of very small volume to account for her overall symptoms. The second patient, a 29-year-old woman, was found to have nontraumatic IVH three days after undergoing an EBP. This was seen on CT scan of the head for workup of pressure-like headaches, nausea, vomiting, and absence seizures. Conservative management was followed in both instances. Serial CT scan of the head in our first patient displayed complete resolution of her IVH. The second patient did not have follow-up CT scans because her overall clinical picture had improved significantly. This highlights a potential sequel of EBP that may be observed on CT scan of the head. In the event that IVH is detected, signs and symptoms of hydrocephalus should be closely monitored with the consideration for a future workup if warranted by the clinical picture.

  6. Radiculopathy as unusual presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Osama; Ghali, Azza; Al-Malt, Ayman; Al-Ahwal, Shereen

    2017-12-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of young obese females and characterized by headache, papilledema with raised intracranial pressure in the absence of known pathological cause. However, ophthalmoplegia is common presentation of IIH, limb weakness is rare and may led to misdiagnosis and poor outcome. We report female patient presented with acute onset of quadriparesis, headache and ophthalmoplegia, the fundus examination showed papilledema, the MRI brain showed no detectable abnormal finding.The intracranial pressure (ICP) was elevate. Nerve conduction study revealed sever radiculopathy. Our provisional diagnosis was fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension versus Gulliane Barre syndrome. The patient was submitted to CSF shunting which resulted in improvement of her symptoms. conclusion quadreparesis is a rare presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension, which may delay diagnosis and affect outcome. And urgent lumbo-peritoneal shunt was critical in saving patient vision and regaining ability to walk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. IDIOPATHIC INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION IN A WOMAN WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan N. Dimitrov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH or benign intracranial hypertension is a neurological syndrome characterized by elevated intracranial pressure. This uncommon disorder occurs primarily in obese women aged 10 to 50 years, sometimes in association with endocrine and metabolic dysfunction, with systemic diseases or when treated with multiple medications. We describe a case of IIH in a 43-year-old woman with schizophrenia treated with risperidone, demonstrating a typical clinical picture of benign intracranial hypertension. For the 5 years of treatment with risperidone she put on 35 kg in total (BMI> 35; for the last 2-3 months she began to complain of visual obscurations, nausea with vomiting. Ophthalmoscopy revealed bilateral asymmetric papilledema (OD>OS. Magnetic resonance imaging was normal, intracranial pressure was elevated IIH was diagnosed. Risperidone was discontinued and replaced with Seroquel 200 mg daily. Treatment with furosemide and mannitol 10 % was initiated. Papilledema resolved completely over the next 2 months. The patient was followed-up for four years after risperidone withdrawal. Weight loss of 28 kg was noted for four years. There were no relapses of headache, nausea, visual obscuration. Ophthalmologic examination revealed no papilledema.We suggest that prolonged use of antipsychotics, such as risperidone, should require proper surveillance for possible development of IIH and routine ophthalmologic examinations should be performed.

  8. Nocardia brasiliensis vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip; Ammar, Hussam

    2013-04-11

    Nocardia species exist in the environment as a saprophyte; it is found worldwide in soil and decaying plant matter. They often infect patients with underlying immune compromise, pulmonary disease or history of trauma or surgery. The diagnosis of nocardiosis can be easily missed as it mimics many other granulomatous and neoplastic disease. We report a 69-year-old man who presented with chronic back pain and paraparesis. He was found to have Nocardial brasiliensis vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Laminectomy and epidural wash out was performed but with no neurological recovery. This is the second reported case of N brasiliensis vertebral osteomyelitis in the literature.

  9. Non-analgetic effects of thoracic epidural anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozian, Alf; Schilling, Thomas; Hachenberg, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    This review presents a brief overview of the non-analgetic effects of thoracic epidural anaesthesia. It covers the cardiac, pulmonary and gastrointestinal effects of thoracic epidural anaesthesia. The results of newer studies are of particular importance regarding mortality and major morbidity after thoracic epidural anaesthesia. The clinical effects of thoracic epidural anaesthesia are mainly attributed to a transient thoracic sympathetic block affecting different organs. Furthermore, local anaesthetic itself reabsorbed from the epidural space may contribute to the non-analgetic effects of thoracic epidural anaesthesia. Experimental studies have suggested that thoracic epidural anaesthesia may attenuate the perioperative stress response after major surgery. The possible beneficial mechanisms of action include an improvement of left ventricular function by direct anti-ischaemic effects, a reduction in cardiovascular complications, an advance on gastrointestinal function, and a reduction in pulmonary complications, as well as a positive impact on the coagulation system and the postoperative inflammatory response. However, it is questionable whether these effects of thoracic epidural anaesthesia may lead to an improved perioperative outcome after major surgery. Recent studies have suggested that, despite the superior quality of pain relief and better quality of life, thoracic epidural anaesthesia does not reduce mortality and major morbidity, especially after major abdominal and cardiac surgery. Despite this controversy, the numerous positive effects and advantages of thoracic epidural anaesthesia are the reasons for its increasing popularity. However, the advantages of thoracic epidural anaesthesia must be incorporated into a multimodal treatment management aimed at improving outcomes after surgery.

  10. [Clinical presentation of a dorsal epidural arachnoid cyst after an epidural anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obil-Chavarría, Claudia Alejandra; García-Ramos, Carla Lisette; Castro-Quiñonez, Sergio Alberto; Huato-Reyes, Raúl; Santillán-Chapa, Concepción Guadalupe; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro Antonio

    Arachnoid cysts are dural diverticula with liquid content similar to cerebrospinal fluid, with 1% occurring in the spinal cord. They locate mainly in the dorsal region of the thoracic spine, and are unusual causes of spinal cord compression. The case is presented of a previously healthy 15-year-old boy, with a 20-month history of spastic paraparesis that started apparently after epidural block for ankle osteosynthesis. There was decreased sensitivity and strength of the pelvic limbs and gradually presented with anaesthesia from T12 to L4 dermatomes, L5 and S1 bilateral hypoaesthesia and 4+/5 bilateral strength, in the L2 root and 2+/5 in L3, L4, L5, S1, hyperreflexia, Babinski and clonus, but with no alteration in the sacral reflexes. In the magnetic resonance it was diagnosed as an extradural arachnoid cyst from T6 to T9. The patient underwent a T6 to T10 laminotomy, cyst resection, dural defect suture, and laminoplasty. One year after surgery, the patient had recovered sensitivity, improvement of muscle strength up to 4+/5 in L2 to S1, and normal reflexes. After the anaesthetic procedure, increased pressure and volume changes within the cyst could cause compression of the spinal cord, leading to symptoms. Despite being a long-term compression, the patient showed noticeable improvement. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Periarticular infiltration for pain relief after total hip arthroplasty: a comparison with epidural and PCA analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandazi, Ageliki; Kanellopoulos, Ilias; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Batistaki, Chrysanthi; Nikolakopoulos, Nikolaos; Matsota, Paraskevi; Babis, George C; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia

    2013-11-01

    Epidural and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) are established methods for pain relief after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Periarticular infiltration is an alternative method that is gaining ground due to its simplicity and safety. Our study aims to assess the efficacy of periarticular infiltration in pain relief after THA. Sixty-three patients undergoing THA under spinal anaesthesia were randomly assigned to receive postoperative analgesia with continuous epidural infusion with ropivacaine (epidural group), intraoperative periarticular infiltration with ropivacaine, clonidine, morphine, epinephrine and corticosteroids (infiltration group) or PCA with morphine (PCA group). PCA morphine provided rescue analgesia in all groups. We recorded morphine consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) scores at rest and movement, blood loss from wound drainage, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and adverse effects at 1, 6, 12, 24 h postoperatively. Morphine consumption at all time points, VAS scores at rest, 6, 12 and 24 h and at movement, 6 and 12 h postoperatively were lower in infiltration group compared to PCA group (p clearly superior to PCA with morphine after THA, providing better pain relief and lower opioid consumption postoperatively. Infiltration seems to be equally effective to epidural analgesia without having the potential side effects of the latter.

  12. Effects of epidural lidocaine anesthesia on bulls during electroejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, A J; Waldner, C L; Cotter, B S; Gudmundson, J; Barth, A D

    2001-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether caudal epidural lidocaine anesthesia reduces a stress response to electroejaculation. In the 1st experiment, changes in cortisol and progesterone concentrations in serial blood samples were used to assess the stress response to restraint (control), transrectal massage, caudal epidural injection of saline, electroejaculation after caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, and electroejaculation without epidural lidocaine. In the 2nd experiment, behavioral responses were subjectively scored in bulls that were electroejaculated with or without caudal epidural lidocaine anesthesia. Cortisol and progesterone concentrations were significantly elevated after electroejaculation, whether or not bulls received caudal epidural anesthesia. Elevations in cortisol and progesterone were lower and fewer bulls vocalized during electroejaculation when given caudal epidural anesthesia; however, the differences were not significant.

  13. Imaging signs in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Are these signs seen in secondary intracranial hypertension too?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyata R Hingwala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference in the occurrence of the various "traditional" imaging signs of intracranial hypertension (IIH on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in patients with idiopathic (IIH and secondary intracranial hypertension. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective analysis, the MRI findings of 21 patients with IIH and 60 patients with secondary intracranial hypertension (41 with tumors; 19 with intracranial venous hypertension were evaluated for the presence or absence of various "traditional" imaging signs of IIH (perioptic nerve sheath distention, vertical buckling of optic nerve, globe flattening, optic nerve head protrusion and empty sella using the Fisher′s exact test. Odds ratios were also calculated. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17.0 was used for statistical analysis. Subgroup analysis of the IIH versus tumors and IIH versus venous hypertension were performed. Results: Optic nerve head protrusion and globe flattening were significantly associated with IIH. There was no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of rest of the findings. On subgroup analysis, globe flattening and optic nerve head protrusion occurred significantly more often in IIH than in tumors. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of any of these findings in patients with IIH and venous hypertension. Conclusions: IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion. While secondary causes of raised intracranial pressure (ICP have obvious clinical findings on MRI, some conditions like cerebral venous thrombosis may have subtle signs and differentiating between primary and secondary causes may be difficult. In the absence of any evident cause of raised ICP, presence of optic nerve head protrusion or globe flattening can suggest the diagnosis of IIH.

  14. Comparison of the effects of lidocaine and fentanyl in epidural anesthesia in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritas, Z K; Saritas, T B; Pamuk, K; Korkmaz, M; Demirkan, I; Yaprakci, M V; Sivaci, R G

    2014-01-01

    The study included 12 clinically healthy, adult male dogs of various breeds, admitted to our clinic for castration. After general anesthesia with sevoflurane, we administered epidural fentanyl (1 mcg/kg) to fentanyl group, while lidocaine group was given Lidocaine (3 mg/kg) through epidural administration. When hemodynamic parameters were stabilized, first measurements were recorded at minutes 0, 15, 30, 60 in both groups, which included Heart Rate (HR), body temperature, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), glucose (GLC), and hemoglobin (HB) measurements. In addition, serum samples were obtained from arterial blood at the same measurement times, and pH, pO₂, pCO₂, HCO₃, %O₂ Saturation, BE levels were measured. For hematological analysis, WBC, RBC, HCT, THR counts were performed. For serum biochemical analysis, venous blood samples were collected at minutes 0 and 60 and CK, TP, UREA, ALT, AST, ALB, GGT, CRE, CK-MB parameters were assessed using auto-analyzer. Moreover, cortisol levels were measured in the samples collected at minutes 0, 30, and 60.Mean arterial blood pressure values measured at minutes 15, 30 and 60 were found significantly lower in the fentanyl group (p<0.01). In conclusion, we suggest that epidural anesthesia with lidocaine and fentanyl can provide an effective and safe option in high-risk groups (Tab. 5, Fig. 1, Ref. 24).

  15. Spinal epidural abscess and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative analgaesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Tolenaar, Jip L; Smits, Anke B; Go, Peter M N Y H

    2015-08-20

    We present a case of a patient with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative pain relief after a laparoscopic sigmoid resection. On the fifth postoperative day, 2 days after removal of the epidural catheter, the patient developed high fever, leucocytosis and elevated C reactive protein. Blood cultures showed a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. A photon emission tomography scan revealed increased activity of the spinal canal, suggesting S. aureus meningitis. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed a SEA that was localised at the epidural catheter insertion site. Conservative management with intravenous flucloxacillin was initiated, as no neurological deficits were seen. At last follow-up, 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient showed complete recovery. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Secondary Intracranial Hypotension: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Gundogan Bozdag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypotension is a clinical condition that characterized by postural (orthostatic headache and low pressure. It apperas with cerebrospinal fluid leak which occurs spontaneous or depending on the secondary attempts. 31 years old female patient which has diagnosis of acute appendicitis and underwent appendectomy under spinal anesthesia. postoperative 5.day she admitted with a postural headache, diplopia. Patient was treated with conservative methods after diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging. We aim to asses an encountered complication after spinal anesthesia which widely applied for surgical procedures with imaging findings and literature.

  17. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and transverse sinus stenoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyrman, Simon; Fytagoridis, Anders; Andresen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    An 18-year-old woman was diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and bilateral transverse sinus stenoses (TSS), after presenting with papilledema and decreased visual acuity. Lumbar puncture revealed an opening pressure of >60 cm H2O. MRI showed bilateral TSS believed to be asso...... was inserted since the patient had improved with CSF diversion. MRI verified reopening of the venous sinuses after shunt placement, and the patient remains asymptomatic with no signs of relapse after 3 years of follow-up....

  18. Ciclosporin does not attenuate intracranial hypertension in rats with acute hyperammonaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rikke Hebo; Kjær, Mette S; Eefsen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the neuroprotective potential of ciclosporin during acute liver failure. We evaluated the effect of intrathecally administered ciclosporin on intracranial pressure, brain water content and aquaporin-4 expression in a rat model with acute hyperammonaemia....

  19. Seasonal variation and atypical presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension in pre-pubertal children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distelmaier, F.; Tibussek, D.; Schneider, D.T.; Mayatepek, E.

    2007-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is an enigmatic disorder of elevated cerebrospinal fluid pressure. In adulthood, patients are typically obese women of childbearing age; however, in young children the clinical picture is strikingly different, indicating age-related differences in the aetiology

  20. Epidural blood flow and regression of sensory analgesia during continuous postoperative epidural infusion of bupivacaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, T; Højgaard, L; Scott, N B

    1988-01-01

    surgery, and 8, 12, and 16 hours later during the continuous infusion. Initial blood flow was 6.0 +/- 0.7 ml/min per 100 g tissue (mean +/- SEM). After epidural bupivacaine, blood flow increased in all seven patients to 7.4 +/- 0.7 ml (P less than 0.02). Initial level of sensory analgesia was T4.5 +/- 0......Epidural blood flow was measured in seven patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery during combined lumbar epidural and general anesthesia. After an initial dose of 20 ml plain bupivacaine 0.5%, a continuous epidural infusion of bupivacaine 0.5% (8 ml/hr) was given for 16 hours...... for postoperative pain relief. The epidural blood flow was measured by a local 133Xe clearance technique in which 15-35 MBq 133Xe diluted in 1 ml saline was injected through the epidural catheter on the day before surgery (no bupivacaine), 30 minutes after the initial dose of bupivacaine on the morning before...

  1. Manifestations of Pediatric Intracranial Hypertension From the Intracranial Hypertension Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaswamy, Lalitha

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from the Ohio State University, Oregon Health and Science University and Rosalind Franklin School of Medicine examined the presenting manifestations, demographics and treatment strategies in children enrolled in the Intracranial Hypertension Registry (IHR).

  2. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage After Lumboperitoneal Shunt for Fulminant Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Anthony; Chandra, Ronil V; Gutman, Matthew; Ligtermoet, Matthew; Seneviratne, Udaya; Kempster, Peter

    2016-06-01

    A 33-year-old woman presented with severe visual loss from fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Her lumbar puncture opening pressure was 97 cm H2O. Soon after lumboperitoneal shunt surgery, she had a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated frontal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and neuroimaging findings consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). We hypothesize that an abrupt drop in intracranial pressure after lumboperitoneal shunting led to maladjustment of cerebral vascular autoregulation, which caused SAH and PRES.

  3. Takayasu's arteritis: Anesthetic significance and management of a patient for cesarean section using the epidural volume extension technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Akhilesh Kumar; Tomar, Gaurav Singh; Chadha, Madhur; Kapoor, Mukul C

    2011-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis (TA) is a rare, chronic progressive pan-endarteritis involving the aorta and its main branches. Anesthesia for patients with TA is complicated by severe uncontrolled hypertension, end-organ dysfunction, stenosis of major blood vessels, and difficulties in monitoring arterial blood pressure. We present the successful anesthetic management of a 23-year-old woman having TA with bilateral subclavian and renal artery stenosis posted for emergency cesarean section by using the epidural volume extension technique, which offers the combined advantage of both spinal and epidural anesthesia and, at the same time, also avoids the need of sophisticated neurological monitors like EEG and transcranial Doppler.

  4. MRI features of epidural extramedullary hematopoiesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alorainy, Ibrahim A. E-mail: alorainy@ksu.edu.sa; Al-Asmi, Abdullah R.; Carpio, Raquel del

    2000-07-01

    A case of {beta}-thalassemia intermedia with spinal cord compression due to extramedullary hematopoiesis, which was successfully treated by blood transfusion, is presented. Emphasis was made on the MRI appearance of extramedullary hematopoiesis on different pulse sequences. The theories that aimed to explain the involvement of the epidural space by extramedullary hematopoiesis are discussed.

  5. Thoracic epidural anaesthesia for major abdominal surgeries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Thoracic epidural anaesthesia (TEA) has many benefits over general anaesthesia in major abdominal surgeries including avoidance of endotracheal intubation. Aims: To evaluate the ... Information obtained included: age, gender, ASA status, diagnosis and type of surgery performed. Data analysis was ...

  6. The experience of labour with epidural analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Ingrid; Keller, Kurt Dauer

    2014-01-01

    to the labouring woman’s relationship with the midwife, which represents an essential influencing factor on the woman’ experience of labour. Within this relationship, some rather unnoticed matters of communication and recognition appear to be of decisive significance. Conclusion: After initiation of epidural...

  7. Perioperative effect of epidural dexmedetomidine with intrathecal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-10

    Jun 10, 2011 ... dexmedetomidine with 0.75% ropivacaine, and observed that epidural dexmedetomidine 1 mg/kg enhances motor and sensory blockade, and prolongs analgesia duration.15. The analgesic effect of dexmedetomidine is produced by the stimulation of the drug at spinal cord level.16 At the dorsal root neuron ...

  8. Thoracic epidural anaesthesia for major abdominal surgeries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Thoracic epidural anaesthesia (TEA) has many benefits over general anaesthesia in major abdominal surgeries including avoidance of endotracheal intubation. Aims: To evaluate the feasibility of TEA for major abdominal surgeries in the private hospital setting. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective ...

  9. Perioperative effect of epidural dexmedetomidine with intrathecal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-10

    Jun 10, 2011 ... 9. Fukushima K, Nishini Y, Mori K, Takeda J. The effect of epidurally administered dexmedetomidine on central and peripheral nervous system in man. Anesth Analg. 1997;84:S292. 10. Hogue CW, Jalke P, Stein PK, et al. Autonomic nervous system responses during sedative infusions of dexmedetomidine.

  10. Errores en el procedimiento del bloqueo epidural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Murad

    2015-07-01

    Conclusión: El bloqueo epidural es una práctica frecuentemente usada en el manejo del dolor lumbar crónico. Los errores técnicos y las complicaciones del procedimiento son poco comunes, pero para su manejo y posterior corrección es importante conocerlos y contar con un médico experimentado.

  11. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in two patients with Alagille syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouzaki, Marialena; Nichter, Charles; Qureshi, Muhammad; Rountree, Bart; Furuya, Katryn N

    2010-08-01

    Alagille syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance that is associated mostly with hepatic, cardiac, and skeletal abnormalities. In addition, the association of Alagille syndrome with ocular abnormalities is well known and is considered one of the characteristic features of this condition. Most commonly, posterior embryotoxon, glaucoma, or retinopathy has been identified in these children. The authors present 2 patients with Alagille syndrome who, before the age of 3 years old, developed idiopathic intracranial hypertension with documented increased intracranial pressure by lumbar puncture and papilledema, which was responsive to acetazolamide.

  12. Anaesthetic management of a case of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bina P Butala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a rare headache syndrome characterized by prolonged elevation of intracranial pressure without related pathology in either the brain or the composition of cerebrospinal fluid. Herein, we provide a brief review of the clinical presentation of IIH and the anaesthetic considerations in a female posted for transcervical resection of the endometrium and right nephrectomy with the disorder. Most of patients with IIH are reported during pregnancy and came for management of labour and delivery. To our knowledge no such case has been described previously.

  13. Frontal sinus mucocele with intracranial and intraorbital extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peral Cagigal, Beatriz; Barrientos Lezcano, Javier; Floriano Blanco, Raúl; García Cantera, José Miguel; Sánchez Cuéllar, Luis Antonio; Verrier Hernández, Alberto

    2006-11-01

    Frontal sinus mucoceles can present with a multitude of different symptoms including ophthalmic disturbances. Even benign, they have a tendency to expand by eroding the surrounding bony walls that displaces and destroys structures by pressure and bony resorption. A 32-year-old man with diplopia, proptosis of the right eye and headache was presented. The diagnosis was frontal sinus mucocele with intracranial and intraorbital extension. Possible clinical manifestations of mucoceles, diagnostic imaging techniques and treatment used are discussed. Frontal mucoceles are benign and curable, early recognition and management of them is of paramount importance, because they can cause local, orbital or intracranial complications.

  14. Subperiostal Orbital Abscess and Frontal Epidural Abscess Due to Sinusitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Ulaş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A seventeen-year-old girl was admitted to our clinic with complaint of rubor, swelling, and pain on the left upper eyelid. Her medical history revealed that she had received high-dose oral steroid treatment for one week for the diagnosis of acute angioedema in another clinic. On ophthalmologic examination, her left upper eyelid had edema, swelling, and hyperemia. Additionally, she had restriction in up-gaze in the left eye. Her best-corrected visual acuity was 0.7. The patient’s computerized tomography revealed ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinusitis, as well as subperiostal orbital abscess, and frontal epidural abscess. Intravenous antibiotic treatment has been arranged. Due to persistence of the clinical signs, surgical drainage of the abscesses has been performed. Following, she has been discharged from the hospital on oral antibiotic treatment. Postoperatively, at the first-month visit, the left eye’s up-gaze restriction was recovered, and visual acuity was improved to 1.0. If a patient presents with eyelid swelling, differential diagnosis should be performed carefully before making the decision to start steroid treatment. Sinusitis, which is seen frequently in clinical practice, should be kept in mind due to its potential to cause orbital abscess, epidural abscess, and intracranial complications. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 464-7

  15. Epidural analgesia with morphine or buprenorphine in ponies with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced carpal synovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Gabrielle C; Carregaro, Adriano B; Gehrcke, Martielo I; De La Côrte, Flávio D; Lara, Valéria M; Pozzobon, Ricardo; Brass, Karin E

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the analgesia effects of the epidural administration of 0.1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW) of morphine or 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine in ponies with radiocarpal joint synovitis. Six ponies were submitted to 3 epidural treatments: the control group (C) received 0.15 mL/kg BW of a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution; group M was administered 0.1 mg/kg BW of morphine; and group B was administered 5 μg/kg BW of buprenorphine, both diluted in 0.9% NaCl to a total volume of 0.15 mL/kg BW administered epidurally at 10 s/mL. The synovitis model was induced by injecting 0.5 ng of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the left or right radiocarpal joint. An epidural catheter was later introduced in the lumbosacral space and advanced up to the thoracolumbar level. The treatment started 6 h after synovitis induction. Lameness, maximum angle of carpal flexion, heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, respiratory rate, temperature, and intestinal motility were evaluated before LPS injection (baseline), 6 h after LPS injection (time 0), and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h after treatments. Although the model of synovitis produced clear clinical signs of inflammation, the lameness scores in group C were different from the baseline for only up to 12 h. Both morphine and buprenorphine showed a reduction in the degree of lameness starting at 0.5 and 6 h, respectively. Reduced intestinal motility was observed at 0.5 h in group M and at 0.5 to 1 h in group B. Epidural morphine was a more effective analgesic that lasted for more than 12 h and without side effects. It was concluded that morphine would be a valuable analgesic option to alleviate joint pain in the thoracic limbs in ponies.

  16. Intracranial Birth Injury of Newborns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T.I. Shevtsova

    2015-01-01

    The lecture presents the modern views on the problem of intracranial birth injury, considers risk factors, features of clinical manifestations at different types of this trauma, issues of diagnosis...

  17. Sympathetic activity of S-(+-ketamine low doses in the epidural space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Mihaljevic

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: S-(+-ketamine is an intravenous anaesthetic and sympathomimetic with properties of local anaesthetic. It has an effect of an analgetic and local anaesthetic when administered epidurally, but there are no data whether low doses of S-(+-ketamine have sympathomimetic effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether low doses of S-(+-ketamine, given epidurally together with local anaesthetic, have any effect on sympathetic nervous system, both systemic and below the level of anaesthetic block. METHODS: The study was conducted on two groups of patients to whom epidural anaesthesia was administered to. Local anaesthesia (0.5% bupivacaine was given to one group (control group while local anaesthesia and S-(+-ketamine were given to other group. Age, height, weight, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure were measured. Non-competitive enzyme immunochemistry method (Cat Combi ELISA was used to determine the concentrations of catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline. Immunoenzymometric determination with luminescent substrate on a machine called Vitros Eci was used to determine the concentration of cortisol. Pulse transit time was measured using photoplethysmography. Mann-Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon test and Friedman ANOVA were the statistical tests. Blood pressure, pulse, adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol concentrations were measured in order to estimate systemic sympathetic effects. RESULTS: 40 patients in the control group were given 0.5% bupivacaine and 40 patients in the test group were given 0.5% bupivacaine with S-(+-ketamine. Value p < 0.05 has been taken as a limit of statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: Low dose of S-(+-ketamine administered epidurally had no sympathomimetic effects; it did not change blood pressure, pulse, serum hormones or pulse transit time. Low dose of S-(+-ketamine administered epidurally did not deepen sympathetic block. Adding 25 mg of S-(+-ketamine to 0

  18. Complete ophthalmoplegia: A rare presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Irfan Yousuf; Verma, Sawan; Wani, Mushtaq; Asimi, Ravouf; Sheikh, Saleem; Wani, Maqbool; Sheikh, Nawaz; Shah, Irfan; Mushtaq, Mudasir

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder defined by clinical criteria that include signs and symptoms isolated to those produced by increased intracranial pressure (ICP; e. g., headache, papilledema, and vision loss), elevated ICP with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition, and no other cause of intracranial hypertension evident on neuroimaging or other evaluations. The most common signs in IIH are papilledema, visual field loss, and unilateral or bilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy. Here we report a case of IIH presenting as headache with vision loss, papilledema, complete ophthalmoplegia with proptosis in one eye, and sixth cranial nerve palsy in the other eye. Patient was managed with acetazolamide, topiramate, and diuretics. Symptoms remained static and she was planned for urgent CSF diversion procedure.

  19. Complete ophthalmoplegia: A rare presentation of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Yousuf Wani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a disorder defined by clinical criteria that include signs and symptoms isolated to those produced by increased intracranial pressure (ICP; e. g., headache, papilledema, and vision loss, elevated ICP with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF composition, and no other cause of intracranial hypertension evident on neuroimaging or other evaluations. The most common signs in IIH are papilledema, visual field loss, and unilateral or bilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy. Here we report a case of IIH presenting as headache with vision loss, papilledema, complete ophthalmoplegia with proptosis in one eye, and sixth cranial nerve palsy in the other eye. Patient was managed with acetazolamide, topiramate, and diuretics. Symptoms remained static and she was planned for urgent CSF diversion procedure.

  20. The syndrome of pseudotumour cerebri and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Clare; Plant, Gordon T

    2011-02-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition in which raised intracranial pressure is associated with a high body mass index, and in those societies in which the prevalence of obesity is increasing the disorder is of increasing importance. It is one cause of the syndrome of pseudotumour cerebri but the cause and the link with a rise in body weight are not understood. Furthermore the treatment of the more severe, sight-threatening cases is controversial. A major theme in recent years has been an attempt to identify the underlying mechanism of IIH. Some theories - such as the dural sinus stenosis theory - seem to ignore the relationship with weight gain; others have proposed a direct link between obesity and raised intracranial pressure through a specific fat distribution in the body; others through the production of lipokines; and yet others have suggested a converse causation with raised intracranial pressure giving rise to obesity. Uncontrolled case series continue to demonstrate the success of interventions such as cerebrospinal fluid diversion procedures, venous sinus stenting and bariatric surgery but there are no level 1 clinical trials. Interest in IIH is increasing and currently generating numerous studies but there is no consensus view on either cause or management.

  1. Update on idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Beau B; Biousse, Valérie; Newman, Nancy J

    2011-08-01

    To provide an update on various features of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Perspective. Selected articles on the epidemiology, clinical and imaging features, natural history, pathophysiology, and treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were reviewed and interpreted in the context of the authors' clinical and research experience. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension primarily is a disease of obese women of childbearing age, but it can affect patients of any weight, sex, and age. Although a relatively rare disorder, idiopathic intracranial hypertension's associated costs in the United States entail hundreds of millions of dollars. Even after treatment, headaches frequently are persistent and may require the continued involvement of a neurologist. Quality-of-life reductions and depression are common among idiopathic intracranial hypertension patients. However, visual dysfunction, especially visual field abnormalities, represents the major morbidity of this disorder, and serial automated perimetry remains the primary method of patient monitoring. Patients who are men, black, very obese, or anemic are at higher risk of visual loss. Vitamin A metabolism, adipose tissue as an actively secreting endocrine tissue, and cerebral venous abnormalities are areas of active study regarding the pathophysiology of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Treatment studies show that lumbar puncture is a valuable treatment (in addition to its crucial diagnostic role), and that weight management is critical. However, open questions remain regarding the efficacy of acetazolamide, cerebrospinal fluid diversion procedures, and cerebral venous stenting. Many questions remain unanswered about idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Ongoing studies, especially an ongoing National Institutes of Health-funded clinical trial of acetazolamide, should provide more insight into this important, yet poorly understood, syndrome of isolated intracranial hypertension. Copyright © 2011

  2. Pediatric Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Presenting With Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

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    Reitsma, Sietze; Stokroos, Robert; Weber, Jacobiene W; van Tongeren, Joost

    2015-12-01

    To present the rare case of a young boy with idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss developing over several months. This was accompanied by headaches, otalgia, tinnitus, and vertigo. Furthermore, we aim to provide a concise review on this matter, as this report represents the second case in literature of pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting with hearing loss. Workup of a 9-year-old boy with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, including (among others) physical examination, audiometry, diagnostic imaging, and lumbar puncture. Physical examination including fundoscopy as well as imaging showed no abnormalities. At presentation, pure tone audiometry revealed bone conduction thresholds of about 30 dB HL in both ears. Two months later, this declined to about 35 dB HL in both ears. Lumbar puncture revealed an increased intracranial pressure. The boy was thus diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. After the lumbar puncture, the otological complaints gradually resolved, and the hearing normalized (bone conduction thresholds of 0-5 dB HL). Although rare, sensorineural hearing loss in the pediatric population together with otalgia, tinnitus, and vertigo can be due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension and as such can be reversible. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Anaesthetic management of a pregnant patient with intracranial space occupying lesion for craniotomy

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    Vinay Marulasiddappa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial space occupying lesion [SOL] during pregnancy presents several challenges to the neurosurgeons, obstetricians and anaesthesiologists in not only establishing the diagnosis, but also in the perioperative management as it requires a careful plan to balance both maternal and foetal well-being. It requires modification of neuroanaesthetic and obstetric practices which often have competing clinical goals to achieve the optimal safety of both mother and foetus. Intracranial tuberculoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intracranial SOL in pregnant women with signs and symptoms of raised intracranial pressure with or without neurological deficits, especially when they are from high incidence areas. We report a 28-week pregnant patient with intracranial SOL who underwent craniotomy and excision of the lesion, subsequently diagnosed as cranial tuberculoma.

  4. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: a possible complication in the natural history of advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcamonico, Francesca; Arcangeli, Giuseppina; Consoli, Francesca; Nonnis, Daniela; Grisanti, Salvatore; Gatti, Enza; Berruti, Alfredo; Ferrari, Vittorio

    2014-03-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a variety of intracranial hypertension that is extremely rare in men. Obesity and hypogonadism are the most important predictive factors. Etiological hypotheses include increased central venous pressure, and various hormonal and metabolic changes commonly found in obese patients. We described the case of an obese man with prostate cancer who showed a consistent bodyweight increase during treatment with taxanes and prednisone. He was hospitalized because of a severe loss of vision as a consequence of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. A complete symptom remission was obtained after 3 weeks of anti-edema therapies (steroids, acetazolamide). Castration-resistant prostate cancer is a risk factor for idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Long-term androgen deprivation therapy, bodyweight increase, and fluid retention during chronic steroid administration and taxane chemotherapy might favor the disease onset. This severe complication has a good outcome, and should be suspected in the presence of symptoms and signs of intracranial hypertension. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  5. Recurrent acute low back pain secondary to lumbar epidural calcification

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    Ziade, M.; Zufferey, P.; So, A.K.L. [Centre Hospitalier Vaudois, Service de Rhumatologie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    Epidural calcification is a rare cause of back pain, and spontaneous epidural calcification has not been reported previously. We describe a patient with acute low back pain and signs of lumbar nerve root compression due to epidural calcification, as demonstrated by CT-scan and MRI. Radiological signs of spondylodiscitis led to a search for an infectious cause, which was negative, and her symptoms responded rapidly to NSAID treatment alone. Her symptoms recurred 18 months later, and further imaging studies again revealed epidural calcification, but with a changed distribution. Her symptoms were relieved once more by NSAID treatment alone. We propose that epidural calcification secondary to aseptic spondylodiscitis is the main cause of acute back pain in this patient. A possible mechanism may be the pro-inflammatory effects of calcium pyrophosphate or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition within the epidural space. (orig.)

  6. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis after repeat epidural blood patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlswärd, C; Darvish, B; Tunelli, J; Irestedt, L

    2015-08-01

    Epidural blood patching is an effective treatment for postdural puncture headache but has potential risks. Arachnoiditis is a very rare disabling condition and few cases have been described following an epidural blood patch. We present a case of chronic adhesive arachnoiditis in a parturient treated with a repeat epidural blood patch. A healthy 29-year-old woman had an accidental dural puncture following epidural insertion during labour. Initial treatment of postdural puncture headache with an epidural blood patch was ineffective and was therefore repeated. She gradually developed severe neurological symptoms consistent with arachnoiditis confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Despite intensive multimodal treatment with analgesics and physiotherapy, her neurological condition remains unresolved two years later. This serious but rare complication should encourage caution when treating parturients with postdural puncture headache with a repeat epidural blood patch. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pleural puncture with thoracic epidural: A rare complication?

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    Rachna Wadhwa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Freedom from pain has almost developed to be a fundamental human right. Providing pain relief via epidural catheters in thoracic and upper abdominal surgeries is widely accepted. Pain relief through this technique not only provides continuous analgesia but also reduces post-operative pulmonary complications and also hastens recovery. But being a blind procedure it is accompanied by certain complications. Hypotension, dura puncture, high epidural, total spinal, epidural haematoma, spinal cord injury and infection are some of the documented side effects of epidural block. There are case reports eliciting neurological complications, catheter site infections, paresthesias, radicular symptoms and worsening of previous neurological conditions. Few technical problems related to breakage of epidural catheter are also mentioned in the literature. The patient had no sequelae on long term follow up even when a portion of catheter was retained. We present a case report where epidural catheter punctured pleura in a patient undergoing thoracotomy for carcinoma oesophagus.

  8. Epidural catheter fragment entrapment: a case report

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    Mohammadi M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Epidural catheters are seldom difficult to remove from patients. The breakage of the catheters is uncommon, troublesome and occasionally dangerous. "n"nCase presentation: A lumbar epidural catheter inserted in a 17 year-old man for applying anesthesia for internal fixation of femur fracture and subsequent postoperative epidural analgesia. In the third postoperative day, during unsuccessful attempt for removing the catheter, it was broken and was retained in his back. A CT- scan was performed and shows a fragment of catheter in the sub- laminar ligament between L3 and L4 without any connection with epidural space. As the patient had no complaint the fractured fragment was left in site and he was just followed up in the clinic."n"nConclusion: The knowledge of practical method in locating the retained epidural catheter, and the indication for surgical removal are very important. CT- scan is useful in showing the mechanism and locating the epidural catheter entrapment and facilitating surgical follow-up.

  9. Algorithm for the Management of Intracranial Hypertension in Children with Syndromic Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruijt, Bart; Joosten, Koen F M; Driessen, Caroline; Rizopoulos, Dimitris; Naus, Nicole C; van der Schroeff, Marc P; Wolvius, Eppo B; van Veelen, Marie-Lise C; Tasker, Robert C; Mathijssen, Irene M J

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of head growth, obstructive sleep apnea, and intracranial hypertension in patients with syndromic or complex craniosynostosis, and to evaluate the authors' standardized treatment protocol for the management of intracranial hypertension in these patients. The authors conducted a prospective observational cohort study of patients with syndromic craniosynostosis at a national referral center, treated according to a standardized protocol. Measurements included occipitofrontal head circumference, with growth arrest defined as downward deflection in occipitofrontal head circumference trajectory greater than or equal to a 0.5 SD fall from baseline over 2 years, or lack of change in occipitofrontal head circumference growth curve; sleep studies, with results dichotomized into no/mild versus moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea; and funduscopy to indicate papilledema, supplemented by optical coherence tomography and/or intracranial pressure monitoring to identify intracranial hypertension. The authors included 62 patients, of whom 21 (33.9 percent) had intracranial hypertension, 39 (62.9 percent) had obstructive sleep apnea, and 20 (32.3 percent) had occipitofrontal head circumference growth arrest during the study. Age at which intracranial hypertension first occurred was 2.0 years (range, 0.4 to 6.0 years). Preoperatively, 13 patients (21.0 percent) had intracranial hypertension, which was associated only with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea (p = 0.012). In the first year after surgery, intracranial hypertension was particularly related to occipitofrontal head circumference growth arrest (p = 0.006). Beyond 1 year after surgery, intracranial hypertension was associated with a combination of occipitofrontal head circumference growth arrest (p intracranial hypertension. The major determinant of this after vault expansion is impaired head growth, which may occur at varying ages. The presence of moderate

  10. A Study on Epidural Tramadol Compared with Epidural Fentanyl Combined with Low Dose Bupivacaine for the Control of Metastatic Cancer Pain

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    Resham Bahadur Rana

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite advances in the knowledge of pathophysiology of pain and its management, patients continue to suffer from pain in many terminal stage cancer. Tramadol hydrochloride is a weak opioid with analgesic properties, and can be tried for cancer pain management. Objectives: This study was performed to find out the efficacy of the analgesic property of Tramadol through epidural route in cancer patients as an combination with low dose(.125% Bupivacaine and to compare with Fentanyl, a μ opioid agonist. Methods: 50 Cancer patients with or without previous pain management were randomly allocated to one of the two study regime- Group-A (tramadol 50 mg and Group-B (Fentanyl 50 mgm in combination with .125% Bupivacaine. Drugs were administered epidurally 6 hourly, 8 hourly and 12 hourly respectively for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd day. Low dose bupivacaine was added to both groups to enhance quality. Pain scores, blood pressure, respiratory rate, heart rate, side effects and patients' satisfaction score was recorded 6 hourly for 72 hrs. The data yielded from this study were compiled and analyzed by unpaired and paired ‘t' test with 95% confidence limit. A value of P< 0.05 was considered to be significant. ÷ square test was done for some of the data. Results: Pain scores were significantly decreased in both the groups but were not significantly different. The incidence of side effects including nausea and vomiting was found in both the groups and was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: The use of epidural Tramadol in selected cancer pain patients (especially pain in lower abdomen and lower back may be very useful and is comparable to opioid in certain situations. Key words: Metastatic cancer pain; Epidural tramadol. DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v2i2.4760 BSMMU J 2009; 2(2: 66-72

  11. Breakage of an Epidural Catheter Inserted for Labor Analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Üşar, Pınar; Kar, Aysun Afife; Çıtak, Güven; Maral, Jale; Canlı, Şeyda

    2015-01-01

    The breakage of an epidural catheter, which is usually not noticed, is a rare but important complication encountered while inserting or removing the catheter during epidural blockade. While the epidural catheter was being inserted for labor analgesia, despite no problem being encountered in advancing the catheter, it was drawn back to verify the location; it was observed that 2 cm of the distal end of the catheter was missing. A neurosurgical consultation was requested; it was reported that t...

  12. Angioma cavernoso espinhal epidural: relato de caso Epidural spinal cavernous angioma: case report

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    Alexandre Félix

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A ocorrência de um angioma cavernoso epidural primário é incomum, constituindo aproximadamente 4% de todos os tumores epidurais espinhais, entretanto o número de relatos desta entidade tem aumentado nos últimos anos, provavelmente devido aos melhores recursos diagnósticos. Relatamos o caso de um paciente com um angioma cavernoso epidural puro em nível espinhal de L1-L2 , que apresentava quadro clínico de compressão medular lenta e progressiva, com piora importante recente. A ressonância magnética de coluna lombosacra demonstrou lesão hipo e isointensa em T1 e hiperintensa em T2. O paciente foi submetido a tratamento cirúrgico com boa recuperação neurológica. Os achados clínicos, de imagem, anátomo-patológicos e de tratamento desta patologia são analisados e discutidos.Epidural spinal cavernous angiomas account for approximately 4% of all spinal epidural tumors. More recently the diagnosis has become more frequent due to refinement of imaging modalities. We describe a 50-year-old woman with a spinal epidural cavernous angioma at L1-L2, which was successfully surgical treated. Clinical picture, imaginology and treatment of this entity is reviewed.

  13. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haritanti, A. [Department of Radiology, Aristotele' s University School of Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, 54636 Thessaloniki (Greece); Karacostas, D. [Department of Neurology, Aristotele' s University School of Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, 54636 Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: bneurol@med.auth.gr; Drevelengas, A. [Department of Radiology, Aristotele' s University School of Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, 54636 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kanellopoulos, V. [Department of Radiology, Aristotele' s University School of Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, 54636 Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: vasikanel@hotmail.com; Paraskevopoulou, E. [Department of Neurology, Aristotele' s University School of Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, 54636 Thessaloniki (Greece); Lefkopoulos, A.; Economou, I.; Dimitriadis, A.S. [Department of Radiology, Aristotele' s University School of Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, 54636 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2009-02-15

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon but increasingly recognized syndrome. Orthostatic headache with typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the key to diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis of this condition may subject patients to unnecessary procedures and prolong morbidity. We describe six patients with SIH and outline the important clinical and neuroimaging findings. They were all relatively young, 20-54 years old, with clearly orthostatic headache, minimal neurological signs (only abducent nerve paresis in two) and diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement on brain MRI, while two of them presented subdural hygromas. Spinal MRI was helpful in detecting a cervical cerebrospinal fluid leak in three patients and dilatation of the vertebral venous plexus with extradural fluid collection in another. Conservative management resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms in five patients (10 days-3 weeks) and in one who developed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the condition resolved in 2 months. However, this rapid clinical improvement was not accompanied by an analogous regression of the brain MR findings that persisted on a longer follow-up. Along with recent literature data, our patients further point out that SIH, to be correctly diagnosed, necessitates increased alertness by the attending physician, in the evaluation of headaches.

  14. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  15. [Complications related to epidural catheter in caesarean delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leykin, Y; Lucca, M

    2001-09-01

    A review of complications related to epidural catheters in caesarean delivery is presented. Catheters for prolongation of nerve blocks were first used in 1940s. Thereafter, there has been steady development in the design and plastic material technology of the different catheters. In the last decade the regional anaesthesia for caesarean section became very popular, as well as continuous increase in the use of epidural catheters. The anatomical changes of pregnancy like marked distension of the epidural veins resulted in increased risk of the complications due to the epidural catheter placement. It is likely that permanent neurologic sequelae due to regional anaesthesia in obstetrics almost never occur, while minor self-limiting complications do occur. The possible complications of epidural catheter techniques are: trauma, malposition and migration of the catheter, knotting and breaking, radiculopathy, dural puncture, subdural injection, abscess and infection, haematoma and wrong solution injection. Most of the malpositions of the epidural catheter can be avoided by a careful technique, advancing the catheter with no forceful movement and not more than 3 to 4 cm into epidural space. Broken parts of the catheters should be left as a rule within the spinal space. Test dose should be always done for continuous epidural anaesthesia. Early diagnosis and prompt appropriate treatment will usually lead to complete resolution of the neurological deficit even in cases of epidural haematoma or abscess.

  16. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala, Foram B; Aswani, Yashant

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication. PMID:27857455

  17. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay

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    Foram B Gala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication.

  18. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala, Foram B; Aswani, Yashant

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication.

  19. Effect and placental transfer of dexmedetomidine during caesarean section under epidural anaesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changsheng; Liu, Shijiang; Han, Chuanbao; Yu, Min; Hu, Youli

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the neonatal effect and placental transfer of dexmedetomidine during caesarean section under epidural anaesthesia. Methods Forty parturients with a single newborn who were scheduled for caesarean section were enrolled. Patients received 0.5 µg/kg dexmedetomidine 10 min after epidural anaesthesia, followed by 0.5 µg/kg/h until abdominal closure (Dex group) or infusion of normal saline (NS group). Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate (HR) were monitored before infusion (T0), 10 min after infusion (T1), at delivery (T2), and at the end of the operation (T3). Umbilical vein and artery blood was collected. Apgar scores were evaluated at 1 and 5 min after delivery. Results SBP, DBP, and HR in the Dex group were decreased at T3 compared with T0 (116 ± 10.4 vs 111 ± 9.2 mmHg, 74 ± 6.7 vs 66 ± 7.9 mmHg, 91 ± 12.1 vs 71 ± 8.4 beats/min, respectively, P  0.05). Conclusion Dexmedetomidine during caesarean section under epidural anaesthesia is beneficial to parturients. The placental transfer rate is 0.68. PMID:28449631

  20. Modulação da pressão intracraniana em um modelo experimental de hipertensão abdominal e lesão pulmonar aguda Factors associated with variation in intracranial pressure in a model of intra-abdominal hypertension with acute lung injury

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    Fernando Godinho Zampieri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito de alterações hemodinâmicas, respiratórias e metabólicas sobre a pressão intracraniana em um modelo de lesão pulmonar aguda e síndrome compartimental abdominal. MÉTODOS: Oito porcos Agroceres foram submetidos, após a instrumentação, a cinco cenários clínicos: 1 estado basal com baixa pressão intra-abdominal e pulmão sadio; 2 pneumoperitôneo, com pressão intra-abdominal de 20 mm Hg; 3 lesão pulmonar aguda induzida por lavagem pulmonar e desativação de surfactante; 4 pneumoperitôneo com pressão intra-abdominal de 20 mm Hg na vigência de lesão pulmonar aguda e com PEEP baixo; e 5 PEEP ajustado a 27 cm H2O na vigência de pneumoperitôneo e lesão pulmonar aguda. Variáveis respiratórias e hemodinâmicas foram coletadas. Análise multivariada foi realizada buscando as variáveis associadas com elevação da pressão intracraniana nos cinco cenários estudados. RESULTADOS: Após a análise multivariada, nas situações não associadas com lesão pulmonar aguda apenas a pressão de platô das vias aéreas se correlacionou positivamente com a pressão intracraniana. Nos modelos associados com lesão pulmonar aguda, a pressão de platô de vias aéreas, a pressão arterial de CO2, o CO2 no final da expiração e a pressão venosa central se correlacionaram positivamente com incrementos da pressão intracraniana. CONCLUSÃO: Em um modelo de disfunção orgânica múltipla com situações clínicas associadas com aumento da pressão torácica e abdominal, o incremento da pressão intracraniana desencadeado pela elevação da pressão abdominal parece ser decorrente da piora da complacência do sistema respiratório e da redução do gradiente para drenagem venosa cerebral ocasionado pela elevação da pressão venosa central.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of hemodynamic, respiratory and metabolic changes on intracranial pressure in a model of acute lung injury and abdominal compartment syndrome

  1. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: descriptive analysis in our setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Martin, Y; Bueno-Perdomo, J H

    2015-03-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by increased intracranial pressure without evidence of an expansive intracranial process or cerebrospinal fluid cytochemical alterations. We reviewed the medical records of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension admitted to our hospital between 1999 and 2009 and who met the modified Dandy criteria. We collected the following data: age, body mass index (BMI), outlet pressure of cerebrospinal fluid, cardiovascular history, imaging studies, treatment, and outcome. We analysed 61 patients (19 males and 42 females) with a mean age of 35.38 years. A BMI above the normal range was determined for 72.13% of the patients, although 47.37% of males showed normal weight. Fifty per cent of patients had a cardiovascular risk factor, especially dyslipidaemia, hypertension, and contraceptive drugs in women. Headache was the main presenting symptom, followed by visual field defects and other visual disturbances. Bilateral papilledema was present in 81.96% of the patients. The approximate incidence is 1.2/100,000 individuals/year. The condition is more common in young women with higher body weight and it is also associated with contraceptive drugs. Headache with bilateral papilloedema and impaired visual acuity stand out as the main symptoms. An interesting finding from this study is that male patients had a lower BMI, a lower incidence of headache and increased visual impairment. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Refractory intracranial hypertension in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Alberto; Magnoni, Sandra; Civelli, Vittorio; Triulzi, Fabio; Nosotti, Mario; Stocchetti, Nino

    2013-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a largely reversible disease with long-term favorable outcome. A minority of patients, however, may develop progressive cerebral edema and ischemia resulting in severe disability or death. We report a case of severe intracranial hypertension associated with PRES that was successfully treated according to intracranial pressure (ICP)- and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP)-driven therapy. Case report. A 42-year-old woman underwent bilateral lung transplantation for severe bronchiectasis. Her immunosuppressive regimen consisted of azathioprine, prednisone, and tacrolimus. She acutely developed an aggressive form of PRES that rapidly resulted in severe refractory intracranial hypertension despite discontinuation of potentially causative medications and adequate supportive therapy. Accordingly, second-tier therapies, including barbiturate infusion, were instituted and immunosuppression was switched to anti-thymocyte globulin followed by mycophenolate mofetil. Within 10 h of barbiturate administration, ICP dropped to 20 mmHg. Thiopental was administered for two days and then rapidly tapered because of severe urosepsis. Six months after discharge from the intensive care unit the patient returned to near-normal life, her only complaint being short-term amnesia. The decision to undertake ICP monitoring in medical conditions in which no clear recommendations exist greatly relies on physicians' judgment. This case suggests that ICP monitoring may be considered in the setting of acute PRES among selected patients, when severe intracranial hypertension is suspected, provided that a multidisciplinary team of neurocritical care specialists is readily available.

  3. CT in thrombosed dilated posterior epidural vein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bammatter, S.; Schnyder, P.; Preux, J. de

    1987-05-01

    The authors report a case of thrombosis of the distal end of an enlarged right posterior epidural vein. The patient had a markedly narrow lumbar canal due to L5 spondylolisthesis. The dilated vein and the thrombosis were displayed by computed tomography but remained unrecognized until surgery. Pathogenesis of this condition is discussed. A review of the English, French and German literature revealed no prior radiological reports of a similar condition.

  4. [Intracranial carotid artery bifurcation aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Basulto, S D; Montejo-Montejo, J

    Intracranial carotid artery bifurcation aneurysms are infrequent but its clinical behavior, high risk of bleeding and complex anatomic relationships of the sac permit to consider these lesions as a challenge cases. 497 patients harboring intracranial aneurysms were operated on at Manuel Ascunce Domenech Hospital, Camagüey, Cuba between January 1982 to august 2001. We utilized microsurgical procedures, optical magnification, specialized neuroanesthesia and Intensive Care Unit postoperatory following. All patients were evaluated clinically with World Federation Neurological Surgeon Scale and Glasgow Outcome Scale. There were 16 patients with intracranial carotid artery bifurcation aneurysms (3.2 %). 12 patients were under 40 years and 50% were between 16 and 30 years old. All patients present intracranial bleeding. There was 87.5% of total or partial recuperation. There was one death only. Postoperative deficit were observed at 44% but 31% disappeared three month later. Intracranial carotid artery bifurcation aneurysms are complex anatomoclinical lesions. Clinically, we observed high tendency to bleed and multiplicity. Anatomically, these sacs have complex arterial relationship that difficult dissection and clipping. They have frequent postoperative morbidity. Multiple or bilateral aneurysmal sacs will be clipped by one surgical procedure.

  5. Analgesia epidural com clonidina ou romifidina em cães submetidos à cirurgia coxofemoral Epidural analgesia with clonidine or romifidine in dogs submitted to coxofemoral surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.T. Brondani

    2004-04-01

    rate and respiratory rate, systolic arterial rate, hemoglobin oxygen saturation and halothane concentration were assessed before anesthetic induction, and at each 10 minutes until the end of the surgery. Samples of arterial blood were collected after anesthesic induction and at the end of the surgical procedure in order to assess pH, PaCO2, PaO2, SaO2, BE and HCO3- levels. The analgesia degree (intense, middle or inadequated was evaluated for two postoperative hours. Numerical data were analysed with ANOVA and Bonferroni's test (P< 0.05. Dogs of Romi group had bradycardia, bradyarrhrytmia, and hypertension. The heart rate and systolic arterial pressure in the Cloni group were within the physiologic variation parameter to dogs. In conclusion epidural administration of clonidine or romifidine produce intense intraoperative analgesia, with no respiratory depression, and middle analgesia for two postoperative hours. Bradycardia and hypotension were not observed with epidural clonidine, however, bradyarrhytmia and hypertension ocurred with epidural romifidine.

  6. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhair Bani Ismail

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1 and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2. The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg, bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg, ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg, xylazine (0.05 mg/kg, medetomidine (15 μg/kg, romifidine (30-50 μg/kg, ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg, tramadol (1 mg/kg, and neostigmine (10 μg/kg, and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed.

  7. Intracranial dural metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Lakshmi; Abrey, Lauren E; Iwamoto, Fabio M

    2009-05-01

    : Intracranial dural metastases (IDM) are found at autopsy in 9% of patients with advanced systemic cancer. However, to the authors' knowledge, IDM have not been studied systematically in the modern neuroimaging era. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the demographics, clinical presentation, imaging, treatment, and prognosis of patients with IDM. : The current study was a retrospective review of 122 patients with IDM diagnosed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1999 and 2006. Patients with concurrent brain or leptomeningeal metastases were excluded. : Sixty-one percent of the patients were women; the median age at diagnosis was 59 years, the median Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) at diagnosis was 80, and the median time to IDM diagnosis from initial cancer diagnosis was 37 months. Breast (34%) and prostate (17%) cancers were the most frequent primary tumors associated with IDM. Fifty-six percent of patients had a single dural metastasis. On imaging, 70% had metastases of the overlying skull, 44% had dural tail metastases, 53% had vasogenic edema, and 34% had brain invasion. Direct extension from skull metastases was the most common mode of spread. Eighty-three percent of patients had active systemic disease at the time of IDM diagnosis. A lower KPS and lung cancer were associated with worse overall survival. Surgical resection and chemotherapy improved progression-free survival, but only resection was found to be associated with improved overall survival. : IDM affect a significant proportion of cancer patients. KPS and status of systemic cancer should guide treatment decisions. Cancer 2009. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.

  8. Venoconstrictor agents mobilize blood from different sources and increase intrathoracic filling during epidural anesthesia in supine humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanton-Hicks, M.; Hoeck, A.S.; Stuehmeier, K.D.A.; Arndt, J.O.

    1987-03-01

    The authors studied the effects of dihydroergotamine (DHE) and etilefrine hydrochloride (E) on the regional distribution of /sup 99m/Tc-marked erythrocytes during epidural anesthesia in eight supine men to determine if vasoactive agents with venoconstrictor action would enhance cardiac filling during epidural anesthesia. Radioactivity was recorded with a gamma camera, and its distribution determined in the thorax, abdomen, and limbs. Arterial and central venous pressure, heart rate, and calf volume by plethysmography were measured. During epidural anesthesia with a sensory block up to T4/5, DHE (7.5 micrograms/kg) reduced the radioactivity, i.e., blood volume, in both the innervated (-5.9 +/- 3.5%) and denervated muscle/skin (-16.9 +/- 7%) regions, and increased it in both the intrathoracic (+7.0 +/- 2.3%), and splanchnic vasculature (+4.2 +/- 3.2). In contrast, E (6 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) decreased the blood volume most markedly in the splanchnic region (-5.4 +/- 0.7%) and increased it in the thorax (+2 +/- 0.6%). All these changes were statistically significant. The combined effects were estimated to be equivalent to a transfusion of nearly 1.01 of blood. Both drugs reversed the hypotensive action of epidural anesthesia. During epidural anesthesia, DHE preferentially constricted the capacitance vessels in skeletal muscle and skin irrespective of the state of innervation, whereas E preferentially constricted the splanchnic vasculature. In the doses used, the two agents replenished in an additive fashion the central circulation during epidural anesthesia.

  9. Multiple intracranial hydatid cysts: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pumar, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alvarez, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Leira, R. [Dept. of Neurology, University Hospital, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Prieto, J.M. [Dept. of Neurology, University Hospital, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Arrojo, L. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pereira, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Vidal, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    1992-08-01

    Multiple intracranial hydatid cysts are uncommon and usually localized in the supratentorial compartment. We report a case studied by CT and MR of multiple intracranial hydatid cysts scattered in various anatomic sites: supratentorial, infratentorial and also intraventricular. (orig.)

  10. Novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Children With Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirfanoglu, Tugba; Aydin, Kursad; Serdaroglu, Ayse; Havali, Cengiz

    2015-08-01

    Increased intracranial hypertension is defined as elevated intracranial pressure with absence of hydrocephalus, vascular or structural abnormalities, and normal cerebrospinal fluid content. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities of the optic nerve and sheath that have been described in adults include increased nerve tortuosity, flattening in posterior aspect of globe, intraocular protrusion of the optic nerve, and enlarged optic nerve sheath. We evaluated accuracy of those proposed markers on magnetic resonance imaging in children with increased intracranial hypertension that are described in adults. Eleven patients between 3 and 15 years of age with intracranial hypertension were selected for re-evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging that had been previously described as normal to determine the presence of: (1) increased tortuosity and elongation of the optic nerve; (2) enlargement of the optic nerve sheath on axial and coronal T2 so called by us "target sign" and postcontrast T1 sequences; (3) flattening in posterior aspect of the globe; and (4) intraocular protrusion of the optic nerve head. Of the 11 patients, tortuosity of the optic nerve (10/11, 90.9%) and enlarged optic nerve sheath--target sign (7/11, 63.6%)--were the most common findings. Flattening in the posterior aspect of globe (5/11, 45.5%) and intraocular protrusion (3/11, 27.3%) were also detected as a novel magnetic resonance imaging findings. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of the optic nerve and sheath include valuable signs of intracranial hypertension not only in adults but also in children. This is the first detailed analysis of the magnetic resonance imaging findings in children with increased intracranial hypertension. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Primary "pseudotumor cerebri" syndrome or idiopathic intracranial hypertension: clinical features and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, G; Scholtes, F; Andris, C; Martin, D

    2015-10-01

    "Pseudotumor cerebri" generally refers to a syndrome associating signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension, increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and normal CSF composition, without any identifiable intracranial abnormality, particularly by neuroimaging studies. Although the "idiopathic" variant of the syndrome is most common, there are secondary forms where a cause can be found. The term "benign intracranial hypertension" should be abandoned, since permanent visual impairment can complicate the condition. This disaster can be avoided by early recognition and medical or surgical treatment of the disease. This article discusses the terminology, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the syndrome.

  12. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious condition, occurring more frequently in females than in males. SAH is mainly caused by rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which is formed by localized dilation of the intracranial arterial vessel wall, usually at the apex of the arterial bifurcation. T....... The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  13. Intracranial Complications of Pediatric Sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Alexandria J; Vu, Tien

    2017-06-13

    "Headache and fever" is a common presentation to the urgent care and emergency department setting and can have many etiologies. We present a case of a 10-year-old girl who presented with headache and fever and was found to have intracranial extension of sinusitis despite lack of typical sinus or chronic upper respiratory tract infection symptoms. This case illustrates the need in the emergency department or urgent care to keep a broad differential diagnosis for pediatric headache, especially when initial interventions are unsuccessful. We also review the epidemiology of pediatric sinusitis, age at sinus development, and associated intracranial complications.

  14. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R. [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); Pandey, Tarun [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Radiology Department, Little Rock, AR (United States); Badawi, Mona H. [Al-Adan Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2008-01-15

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  15. Clinical audit of knowledge and practice of epidural labour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidural analgesia (EA) is the most ideal method for pain relief during labour. We sought to highlight the current knowledge and practice of the obstetricians regarding epidural labour analgesia (ELA). An audit was conducted amongst obstetricians in two teaching hospitals in the south west of Nigeria. Most of our ...

  16. Posterior epidural migration of lumbar intervertebral fragment: case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Posterior epidural migrated lumbar disc fragments are often confused with other posterior epidural space-occupying lesions (cysts, abscesses, tumors, and hematomas). We reported the case of a 52- year-old man presented with progressive not systematizes bilateral radiculopathy complicated one week before admission a ...

  17. Epidural morphine for postoperative pain relief in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S W; Hole, P; Haas, Inge Madsen De

    1993-01-01

    Epidural morphine for postoperative pain relief is in general use, and has proved to be very efficient in adults. The epidural technique and the use of epidural morphine are much less frequent in children. For 2 years we have prospectively followed 76 children who had epidural morphine for postop......Epidural morphine for postoperative pain relief is in general use, and has proved to be very efficient in adults. The epidural technique and the use of epidural morphine are much less frequent in children. For 2 years we have prospectively followed 76 children who had epidural morphine...... for postoperative pain relief after major abdominal surgery. The age distribution was from newborn to 13 years, with a median age of 12 months. It was estimated that 94% of the patients had good analgesia for the first 24 postoperative hours and no other opioids were given. The side effects were few, but one case...... of respiratory depression was seen and 20% of the children had pruritus. There were four dural punctures and three catheters slipped out accidentally, but otherwise the treatment was continued as long as it was considered necessary (1-11 days). The use of postoperative ventilatory support decreased during...

  18. Vertex epidural haematoma manifesting with bilateral upper limb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vertex epidural haematomas (VEDH) are rare and difficulties are encountered in diagnosis and management. This is a case report of a patient with a vertex epidural haematoma who presented with signs of severe head injury with upper limb decerebrate posture. We discuss the challenges of radiological investigation and ...

  19. Focal stenosis of the sigmoid sinus causing intracranial venous hypertension: Case report, endovascular management, and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarmand, Amir R; Hurley, Michael C; Ansari, Sameer A; Alden, Tord D; Kuhn, Ryan; Shaibani, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Regardless of the underlying pathology, elevated intracranial pressure is the endpoint of any impairment in either cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorption (including arachnoid villi) or intracranial venous drainage. In all age groups, the predominant final common pathway for CSF drainage is the dural venous sinus system. Intracranial venous hypertension (ICVH) is an important vascular cause of intracranial hypertension (and its subsequent sequelae), which has often been ignored due to excessive attention to the arterial system and, specifically, arteriovenous shunts. Various anatomical and pathological entities have been described to cause ICVH. For the second time, we present a unique case of severe focal stenosis in the distal sigmoid sinus associated with concurrent hypoplasia of the contralateral transverse sinus causing a significant pressure gradient and intracranial hypertension, which was treated with endovascular stent placement and angioplasty. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid pulse pressure and craniospinal dynamics : a theoretical, clinical and experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.J. Avezaat (Cees); J.H.M. van Eijndhoven (Johannes Hubertus Marcellianus)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractSince the introduction of continuous recording of intracranial pressure (ICP) in neurosurgical practice (Guillaume and Janny, 1951; Lundberg, 1960) this method has greatly contributed to clinical research in the field of intracranial hypertension. Numerous publications have enriched the