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Sample records for epidermal melanin concentration

  1. Remittance at a single wavelength of 390 nm to quantify epidermal melanin concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkruysse, Wim; Svaasand, Lars O.; Franco, Walfre; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Objective quantification of epidermal melanin concentration (EMC) should be useful in laser dermatology to determine the individual maximum safe radiant exposure (IMSRE). We propose a single-wavelength remittance measurement at 390 nm as an alternative optical method to determine EMC and IMSRE. Remittance spectra (360 to 740 nm), melanin index (MI) measurements and the transient radiometric temperature increase, ΔT(t), upon skin irradiation with an Alexandrite laser (755 nm, 3-ms pulse duration, 6 J/cm2) were measured on 749 skin spots (arm and calf) on 23 volunteers (skin phototypes I to IV). Due to the shallow penetration depth and independence of blood oxygen saturation (isosbestic point), remittance at 390 nm appears to provide better estimates for EMC and IMSRE than MI. PMID:19256693

  2. Hesperetin induces melanin production in adult human epidermal melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usach, Iris; Taléns-Visconti, Raquel; Magraner-Pardo, Lorena; Peris, José-Esteban

    2015-06-01

    One of the major sources of flavonoids for humans are citrus fruits, hesperidin being the predominant flavonoid. Hesperetin (HSP), the aglycon of hesperidin, has been reported to provide health benefits such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects. However, the effect of HSP on skin pigmentation is not clear. Some authors have found that HSP induces melanogenesis in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells, which, if extrapolated to in vivo conditions, might protect skin against photodamage. Since the effect of HSP on normal melanocytes could be different to that observed on melanoma cells, the described effect of HSP on murine melanoma cells has been compared to the effect obtained using normal human melanocytes. HSP concentrations of 25 and 50 µM induced melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in human melanocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Compared to control melanocytes, 25 µM HSP increased melanin production and tyrosinase activity 1.4-fold (p < 0.01) and 1.1-fold (p < 0.01), respectively, and the corresponding increases in the case of 50 µM HSP were 1.9-fold (p < 0.001) and 1.3-fold (p < 0.001). Therefore, HSP could be considered a valuable photoprotective substance if its capacity to increase melanin production in human melanocyte cultures could be reproduced on human skin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic thermal effects of epidermal melanin and plasmonic nanoparticles during photoacoustic breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Wang, Quanzeng; Pfefer, T. Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT) employs high-power near-infrared (near-IR) laser pulses to generate structural and functional information on tissue chromophores up to several centimeters below the surface. Such insights may facilitate detection of breast cancer - the most common cancer in women. PAT mammography has been the subject of extensive research, including techniques based on exogenous agents for PAT contrast enhancement and molecular specificity. However, photothermal safety risks of PAT due to strong chromophores such as epidermal melanin and plasmonic nanoparticles have not been rigorously studied. We have used computational and experimental approaches to elucidate highly dynamic optical-thermal processes during PAT. A Monte Carlo model was used to simulate light propagation at 800 and 1064 nm in a multi-layer breast tissue geometry with different epidermal pigmentation levels and a tumorsimulating inclusion incorporating nanoparticles. Energy deposition results were then used in a bioheat transfer model to simulate temperature transients. Experimental measurements involved multi-layer hydrogel phantoms with inclusions incorporating gold nanoparticles. Phantom optical properties were measured using the inverse adding-doubling technique. Thermal imaging was performed as phantoms were irradiated with 5 ns near-IR pulses. Scenarios using 10 Hz laser irradiation of breast tissue containing various nanoparticle concentrations were implemented experimentally and computationally. Laser exposure levels were based on ANSI/IEC limits. Surface temperature measurements were compared to corresponding simulation data. In general, the effect of highly pigmented skin on temperature rise was significant, whereas unexpectedly small levels of temperature rise during nanoparticle irradiation were attributed to rapid photodegradation. Results provide key initial insights into light-tissue interactions impacting the safety and effectiveness of PAT.

  4. Photoprotective role of epidermal melanin granules against ultraviolet damage and DNA repair in guinea pig skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, T.; Kodama, K.; Matsumoto, J.; Takayama, S.

    1984-11-01

    We previously developed a quantitative autoradiographic technique with special forceps for measuring unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in mouse skin after treatment with ultraviolet light in vivo. By this method, we investigated the relationship between the protective role of melanin and UV-induced DNA repair in black-and-white guinea pigs. Flat areas containing a sharp border between pigmented and unpigmented skin were selected. The skin of the selected areas was shaved and irradiated with short-wave UV (254 nm) or UV-AB (270 to 440 nm, emission peak at 312 nm) at various doses. Immediately after irradiation, the skin was clamped off with forceps, and an isotonic aqueous solution of (methyl-/sup 3/H)thymidine was injected s.c. into the clamped off portion. UDS was clearly demonstrated as silver grains in this portion of the skin after irradiation with 254 nm UV or UV-AB. Errors due to individual differences were avoided by comparing the intensities of UDS in basal cells from pigmented skin and unpigmented skin of the same animals. Unexpectedly, in groups of animals treated with 254 nm UV or UV-AB, no difference in UDS in pigmented and unpigmented skin was seen at any UV dose. These results suggested that epidermal melanin granules do not significantly protect DNA of basal cells against 254 nm UV or UV-AB irradiation. Results of a study on the effect of the wavelength of irradiation on the UDS response of albino guinea pigs are also reported.

  5. Autophagy participates in isoliquiritigenin-induced melanin degradation in human epidermal keratinocytes through PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhibo; Zeng, Biyun; Pan, Yi; Huang, Pan; Wang, Chang

    2018-01-01

    Melanin is the pigment responsible for the color of human skin and hair. Melanin serves as a double-edge sword which can exert both protective and spot-causing effects on skin. Although melanin has an important role in protecting the skin against UV damage, an excessive or uneven melanin production can lead to the formation of freckles and age spots. Isoliquiritigenin (ISL) has been reported to inhibit melanin synthesis; however, its role in melanin degradation remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the detailed function of ISL in melanin degradation in human epidermal keratinocytes. Since autophagy has been reported to be related to melanin degradation, we also examined the activation of autophagy by ISL treatment in keratinocytes by measurement of autophagy-related proteins, ATG7, LC3 and p62. Moreover, si-ATG7-induced ATG7 knockdown and autophagy inhibitor 3-MA decreased LC3 II protein levels and increased PMEL17, p62 and melanin levels in HaCaT cells, which could be partially reversed by ISL treatment, indicating that autophagy participated in melanin degradation. The decreased p-AKT and p-mTOR proteins upon ISL treatment indicated the involvement of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling in ISL-induced melanin degradation. Taken together, we demonstrated that autophagy participates in ISL-induced melanin degradation in human epidermal keratinocytes through PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. Predicting human epidermal melanin concentrations for different skin tones

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, Jacoba E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past 50 years lasers has found numerous applications in medicine. One of their advantages is their use for minimalistic or non-invasive diagnosis and treatment. Often that means light penetration through skin and the correct dose required...

  7. Dependence of third-harmonic generation on melanin concentration in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tung-Yu; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Yang, Chih-Yuan; Zhuo, Zong-Yan; Chen, Szu-Yu; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we performed theoretical analysis and experimental measurement of third harmonic generation (THG) in melanin solution with different concentrations. As predicted by theory, only THG at glass/solution interface was observed due to Guoy phase shift effect. We have shown that this interfacial THG intensity is strongly affected by index matching condition between the two media, leading to minimal THG at a certain melanin concentration. By fitting the dependence of THG intensity versus melanin concentration, linear and nonlinear electric susceptibilities of melanin are obtained, providing a valuable tool to characterize optical properties of biological molecules.

  8. Applying photoacoustics to quantification of melanin concentration in retinal pigment epithelium (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiao; Zhang, Hao F.; Liu, Wenzhong

    2016-03-01

    The melanin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) protects retina and other ocular tissues by photo-screening and acting as antioxidant and free radical scavenger. It helps maintain normal visual functions since human eye is subjected to lifelong high oxygen stress and photon exposure. Loss of the RPE melanin weakens the protection mechanism and jeopardizes ocular health. Local decrease in the RPE melanin concentration is believed to be both a cause and a sign of early-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading blinding disease in developed world. Current technology cannot quantitatively measure the RPE melanin concentration which might be a promising marker in early AMD screening. Photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM), as an emerging optical absorption-based imaging technology, can potentially be applied to measure the RPE melanin concentration if the dependence of the detectable photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitudes on the RPE melanin concentrations is verified. In this study, we tested the feasibility of using PA signal ratio from RPE melanin and the nearby retinal blood vessels as an indicator of the RPE melanin variation. A novel whole eye optical model was designed and Monte Carlo modeling of light (MCML) was employed. We examined the influences on quantification from PAOM axial resolution, the depth and diameter of the retinal blood vessel, and the RPE thickness. The results show that the scheme is robust to individual histological and illumination variations. This study suggests that PAOM is capable of quantitatively measuring the RPE melanin concentration in vivo.

  9. Melanin concentration gradients in modern and fossil feathers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Field

    Full Text Available In birds and feathered non-avian dinosaurs, within-feather pigmentation patterns range from discrete spots and stripes to more subtle patterns, but the latter remain largely unstudied. A ∼55 million year old fossil contour feather with a dark distal tip grading into a lighter base was recovered from the Fur Formation in Denmark. SEM and synchrotron-based trace metal mapping confirmed that this gradient was caused by differential concentration of melanin. To assess the potential ecological and phylogenetic prevalence of this pattern, we evaluated 321 modern samples from 18 orders within Aves. We observed that the pattern was found most frequently in distantly related groups that share aquatic ecologies (e.g. waterfowl Anseriformes, penguins Sphenisciformes, suggesting a potential adaptive function with ancient origins.

  10. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH: a new sleep factor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo eTorterolo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurons that utilize the neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH as a neuromodulator are mainly located in the lateral hypothalamus and the incerto-hypothalamic area, and have widespread projections throughout the brain. While the biological functions of this neuropeptide are exerted in humans through two metabotropic receptors, the MCHR1 and MCHR2, only the MCHR1 is present in rodents. Recently, it has been shown that the MCHergic system is involved in the control of sleep. We can summarize the experimental findings as follows:1. The areas related to the control of sleep and wakefulness have an important density of MCHergic fibers and receptors.2. MCHergic neurons are active during sleep, especially during REM sleep.3. Genetically-modified animals without MCH have less REM sleep, notably under conditions of negative energy balance. 4. Systemically administered MCHR1 antagonists reduce sleep. 5. Intraventricular microinjection of MCH increases both slow wave sleep (SWS and REM sleep; however, the increment in REM sleep is more pronounced.6. Microinjection of MCH into the dorsal raphe nucleus increases REM sleep time. REM seep is inhibited by immunoneutralization of MCH within this nucleus.7. Microinjection of MCH in the nucleus pontis oralis of the cat enhances REM sleep time and reduces REM sleep latency.All these data strongly suggest that MCH has a potent role in the promotion of sleep. Although both SWS and REM sleep are facilitated by MCH, REM sleep seems to be more sensitive to MCH modulation.

  11. Melanin concentrating hormone modulates oxytocin-mediated marble burying.

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    Sanathara, Nayna M; Garau, Celia; Alachkar, Amal; Wang, Lien; Wang, Zhiwei; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Xu, Xiangmin; Civelli, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    Repetitive and perseverative behaviors are common features of a number of neuropsychiatric diseases such as Angelman's syndrome, Tourette's syndrome, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and autism spectrum disorders. The oxytocin system has been linked to the regulation of repetitive behavior in both animal models and humans, but many of its downstream targets have still to be found. We report that the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) system is a target of the oxytocin system in regulating one repetitive behavior, marble burying. First we report that nearly 60% of MCH neurons express oxytocin receptors, and demonstrate using rabies mediated tract tracing that MCH neurons receive direct presynaptic input from oxytocin neurons. Then we show that MCH receptor knockout (MCHR1KO) mice and MCH ablated animals display increased marble burying response while central MCH infusion decreases it. Finally, we demonstrate the downstream role of the MCH system on oxytocin mediated marble burying by showing that central infusions of MCH and oxytocin alone or together reduce it while antagonizing the MCH system blocks oxytocin-mediated reduction of this behavior. Our findings reveal a novel role for the MCH system as a mediator of the role of oxytocin in regulating marble-burying behavior in mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) antagonists - Still a viable approach for obesity treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, T.; Frimurer, T.M.; Sasmal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic associated with multiple severe diseases. Several pharmacotherapies have been investigated including the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and its receptor 1. The development of MCHR1 antagonists are described with a specific perspective on different chemotypes...

  13. Modelling and verification of melanin concentration on human skin type

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Karsten, AE

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available /or in vitro and elucidated the melanosomal differences between 5 the different skin types. Meinhardt et al (9) measured the absorption spectra of in vivo human 6 skin from the lighter skin types before and after exposure to natural UV radiation, while Wan 7... et al (10) measured the epidermal (including the Stratum corneum) transmittance of in vitro 8 light and dark coloured human skin over the UVA, UVB and visible wavelength ranges. 9 None of these studies however specifically determined epidermal...

  14. Human hypocretin and melanin-concentrating hormone levels are linked to emotion and social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Ashley M; Fried, Itzhak; Wilson, Charles L; Staba, Richard J; Behnke, Eric J; Lam, Hoa A; Maidment, Nigel T; Karlsson, Karl Æ; Lapierre, Jennifer L; Siegel, Jerome M

    2013-01-01

    The neurochemical changes underlying human emotions and social behaviour are largely unknown. Here we report on the changes in the levels of two hypothalamic neuropeptides, hypocretin-1 and melanin-concentrating hormone, measured in the human amygdala. We show that hypocretin-1 levels are maximal during positive emotion, social interaction and anger, behaviours that induce cataplexy in human narcoleptics. In contrast, melanin-concentrating hormone levels are minimal during social interaction, but are increased after eating. Both peptides are at minimal levels during periods of postoperative pain despite high levels of arousal. Melanin-concentrating hormone levels increase at sleep onset, consistent with a role in sleep induction, whereas hypocretin-1 levels increase at wake onset, consistent with a role in wake induction. Levels of these two peptides in humans are not simply linked to arousal, but rather to specific emotions and state transitions. Other arousal systems may be similarly emotionally specialized.

  15. Determination of melanin types and relative concentrations: an observational study using a non-invasive inverse skin reflectance analysis.

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    Hani, A F M; Baba, R; Shamsuddin, N; Nugroho, H

    2014-10-01

    Melanin is a major skin colour pigment that is made up of eumelanin (the dark brown-black colour) and pheomelanin (the light red-yellow colour) pigments. Skin-whitening products typically contain depigmentation agents that reduce the level of pigmentation by changing the pheomelanin-eumelanin production. Similarly, in skin pigment treatment of skin disorders, the melanin production is managed accordingly. To assess and improve treatment efficacy, it is important to have a measurement tool that is capable of determining the melanin types objectively. So far, the efficacy assessment is subjective. In this study, an inverse skin reflectance pigmentation analysis system that determines eumelanin and pheomelanin content is developed and evaluated in an observational study involving 36 participants with skin photo type IV. The reflectance spectra of the left forearms of participants were analysed by the pigmentation analysis system to determine their skin parameters--pheomelanin and eumelanin concentrations, melanosome volume fraction, and epidermal thickness. The determined skin parameters are then inputted into the realistic skin model (RSM) of the Advanced Systems Analyses Program (asap®) to generate the ground truth reflectance spectra for the given skin parameters to validate the system. The developed pigmentation analysis system is found to be accurate with a spectral error of 0.0163 ± 0.009 between measured reflectance and the reflectance output of the analysis system and RSM. The regression analysis shows a strong linear relationship (R(2) = 0.994) indicating good precision. The relative concentrations of pheomelanin (38.23 ± 15.04) and eumelanin (1.68 ± 0.91) analysed by the system gives a ratio of pheomelanin to eumelanin of 0.048 ± 0.029; this value is consistent with previously reported figure of 0.049. The proposed pigmentation analysis system is able to determine melanin types and their relative concentrations. It has the potential to assess the

  16. Mitigation of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-induced side effects utilizing melanin and vascular-specific lasers: A case report series.

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    Kuo, Karen Y; Kwong, Bernice; Rahman, Zakia

    2017-10-01

    The advent of targeted chemotherapy has led to the emergence of new dermatologic toxicities. We sought to use lasers and light devices to treat recalcitrant cutaneous adverse effects related to cancer treatment. Three stage III or IV cancer patients with cutaneous complications due to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors were treated with melanin and vascular-specific laser and light technologies. Two patients reported reduction in papulopustular eruption following pulse dye laser (PDL) treatment. Two patients noted reduction in hair growth following intense pulsed light (IPL) and/or Alexandrite laser treatments. One patient was treated with both the PDL and IPL and reported improvement of both EGFR-induced hypertrichosis and papulopustular eruption. Laser and light devices targeting melanin and hemoglobin can be utilized to mitigate the cutaneous adverse effects associated with EGFR inhibitors in patients who have failed traditional therapies. This represents a new option for the cancer patient who is suffering from chemotherapy-induced side effects.

  17. Differences in the melanosome distribution within the epidermal melanin units and its association with the impairing background of leukoderma in vitiligo and halo nevi: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xi-Xi; Ding, Gao-Zhong; Zhao, Wen-E; Li, Xue; Ling, Yu-Ting; Sun, Li; Gong, Qing-Li; Lu, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Skin color is determined by the number of melanin granules produced by melanocytes that are transferred to keratinocytes. Melanin synthesis and the distribution of melanosomes to keratinocytes within the epidermal melanin unit (EMU) within the skin of vitiligo patients have been poorly studied. The ultrastructure and distribution of melanosomes in melanocytes and surrounding keratinocytes in perilesional vitiligo and normal skin were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, we performed a quantitative analysis of melanosome distribution within the EMUs with scatter plot. Melanosome count within keratinocytes increased significantly compared with melanocytes in perilesional stable vitiligo (P < 0.001), perilesional halo nevi (P < 0.01) and the controls (P < 0.01), but not in perilesional active vitiligo. Furthermore, melanosome counts within melanocytes and their surrounding keratinocytes in perilesional active vitiligo skin decreased significantly compared with the other groups. In addition, taking the means-standard error of melanosome count within melanocytes and keratinocytes in healthy controls as a normal lower limit, EMUs were graded into 3 stages (I-III). Perilesional active vitiligo presented a significantly different constitution in stages compared to other groups (P < 0.001). The distribution and constitution of melanosomes were normal in halo nevi. Impaired melanin synthesis and melanosome transfer are involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Active vitiligo varies in stages and in stage II, EMUs are slightly impaired, but can be resuscitated, providing a golden opportunity with the potential to achieve desired repigmentation with an appropriate therapeutic choice. Adverse milieu may also contribute to the low melanosome count in keratinocytes.

  18. Influence of melanocytes in the ex-vivo reconstructed epidermal melanin unit following an acute UV irradiation; Role des melanocytes dans l'unite epidermique de melanisation reconstruite ex-vivo apres une irradiation UV aigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cario-Andre, M

    2000-11-15

    Influence of melanocytes in skin pigmentation is well documented, however its photo-protective role has given rise to controversy. The role of melanocytes have been investigated on reconstructed epidermis with 100 % of keratinocytes or 95 % of keratinocytes and 5 % of melanocytes. In a first time, the effect of an acute UVB dose has been studied on both reconstructed epidermis, next we have investigated UVA and UVA+B effects on these epidermis. Following irradiation, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis protects against apoptosis without protecting significantly against DNA damage formation (CPD, 6-4PP) and protects against UV-induced unbalance of the SOD/catalase ratio (antioxidants enzymes). On the contrary, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis amplifies lipids and proteins oxidations but seems to protect against DNA oxidations. Melanocytes differ from keratinocytes by their melanin content and their more important concentration in polyunsaturated fatty acids. To evaluate what is the part of melanin and the part of polyunsaturated fatty acids in epidermal UV responses, reconstructed epidermis with keratinocytes have been supplemented with polyunsaturated fatty acid. This study indicates that polyunsaturated fatty acids are responsible for lipids and proteins oxidations and that melanin protect against DNA oxidation induced by lipid peroxidation. All these studies demonstrate that, model of reconstructed epidermis and epidermis in-vivo have the same behaviour following UV irradiation. In the last part, sunscreens and antioxidants have been tested on reconstructed epidermis and have demonstrated that model of reconstructed epidermis is suitable for photo-protective molecules screening. (author)

  19. Diurnal variation of the melanin-concentrating hormone level in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerics, Balázs; Szalay, Ferenc; Sótonyi, Péter; Jancsik, Veronika

    2017-03-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), the neuropeptide produced mainly in the hypothalamus, plays an operative role in regulating food intake and the sleep/wake cycle. Considering that these physiological functions pursue diurnal variations, we checked whether the total hypothalamic MCH level depends on the time of the day. The aggregated MCH peptide content of the whole MCH neuron population was significantly higher at the end of the sleeping period (lights on), than at the end of the active period (lights off). This result, together with earlier observations, indicates that in contrast to the MCH gene expression, the level of MCH peptide is object of circadian variation in the hypothalamus.

  20. Neurochemical characterization of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in the mouse hypothalamus1

    OpenAIRE

    Chee, Melissa J. S.; Pissios, Pavlos; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that acts via MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) in the mouse. It promotes positive energy balance thus mice lacking MCH or MCHR1 are lean, hyperactive, and resistant to diet-induced obesity. Identifying the cellular targets of MCH is an important step to understanding the mechanisms underlying MCH actions. We generated the Mchr1-cre mouse that expressed cre recombinase driven by the MCHR1 promoter and crossed it with a tdTomato reporter ...

  1. Two important systems in energy homeostasis: melanocortins and melanin-concentrating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tritos, N A; Maratos-Flier, E

    1999-10-01

    Our understanding of the regulation of appetite and energy balance has advanced significantly over the past decade as several peptides, centrally or peripherally expressed, have been characterized and shown to profoundly influence food intake and energy expenditure. (1)The growing number of putative appetite-regulating neuropeptides includes peptides that are orexigenic (appetite-stimulating) signals and anorectic peptides. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), melanin concentrating hormone (MCH), orexins A and B, galanin, and agouti -related peptide (AgRP) all act to stimulate feeding while alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alphaMSH), corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), cholecystokinin (CCK), cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), neurotensin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP 1), and bombesin have anorectic actions.(1) Leptin, expressed in the periphery in white adipose tissue, acts in the CNS to modulate the expression of several of these hypothalamic peptides.(1) This creates a functional link between the adipose tissue and the brain that translates the information on body fat provided by leptin to input into energy balance regulating processes. In the current review we examine the significant role of the melanocortin system (alphaMSH, agouti and AgRP peptides, and their receptors and mahogany protein) and melanin concentrating hormone in the regulation of energy balance. Copyright 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  2. Melanin-concentrating hormone and its receptors: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Jean A; Suply, Thomas; Audinot, Valérie; Rodriguez, Marianne; Beauverger, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-Paul; Galizzi, Jean-Pierre; Fauchère, Jean-Luc

    2002-05-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a cyclic neuropeptide of nineteen amino acids in mammals. Its involvement in the feeding behaviour has been well established during the last few years. A first receptor subtype, now termed MCHIR, was discovered in 1999, following the desorphanisation of the SLCI orphan receptor, using either reverse pharmacology or systematic screening of agonist candidates. A second MCH receptor, MCH2R, has been discovered recently, by several groups working on data mining of genomic banks. The molecular pharmacology of these two receptors is only described on the basis of the action of peptides derived from MCH. The present review tentatively summarizes the knowledge on these two receptors and presents the first attempts to discover new classes of antagonists that might have major roles in the control of obesity and feeding behaviour.

  3. A comparative analysis shows morphofunctional differences between the rat and mouse melanin-concentrating hormone systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Croizier

    Full Text Available Sub-populations of neurons producing melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH are characterized by distinct projection patterns, birthdates and CART/NK3 expression in rat. Evidence for such sub-populations has not been reported in other species. However, given that genetically engineered mouse lines are now commonly used as experimental models, a better characterization of the anatomy and morphofunctionnal organization of MCH system in this species is then necessary. Combining multiple immunohistochemistry experiments with in situ hybridization, tract tracing or BrdU injections, evidence supporting the hypothesis that rat and mouse MCH systems are not identical was obtained: sub-populations of MCH neurons also exist in mouse, but their relative abundance is different. Furthermore, divergences in the distribution of MCH axons were observed, in particular in the ventromedial hypothalamus. These differences suggest that rat and mouse MCH neurons are differentially involved in anatomical networks that control feeding and the sleep/wake cycle.

  4. In vivo measurements of cutaneous melanin across spatial scales: using multiphoton microscopy and spatial frequency domain spectroscopy

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    Saager, Rolf B.; Balu, Mihaela; Crosignani, Viera; Sharif, Ata; Durkin, Anthony J.; Kelly, Kristen M.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2015-06-01

    The combined use of nonlinear optical microscopy and broadband reflectance techniques to assess melanin concentration and distribution thickness in vivo over the full range of Fitzpatrick skin types is presented. Twelve patients were measured using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and spatial frequency domain spectroscopy (SFDS) on both dorsal forearm and volar arm, which are generally sun-exposed and non-sun-exposed areas, respectively. Both MPM and SFDS measured melanin volume fractions between ˜5% (skin type I non-sun-exposed) and 20% (skin type VI sun exposed). MPM measured epidermal (anatomical) thickness values ˜30-65 μm, while SFDS measured melanin distribution thickness based on diffuse optical path length. There was a strong correlation between melanin concentration and melanin distribution (epidermal) thickness measurements obtained using the two techniques. While SFDS does not have the ability to match the spatial resolution of MPM, this study demonstrates that melanin content as quantified using SFDS is linearly correlated with epidermal melanin as measured using MPM (R2=0.8895). SFDS melanin distribution thickness is correlated to MPM values (R2=0.8131). These techniques can be used individually and/or in combination to advance our understanding and guide therapies for pigmentation-related conditions as well as light-based treatments across a full range of skin types.

  5. Melanin-concentrating hormone: unique peptide neuronal systems in the rat brain and pituitary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamir, N.; Skofitsch, G.; Bannon, M.J.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-03-01

    A unique neuronal system was detected in the rat central nervous system by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay with antibodies to salmon melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). MCH-like immunoreactive (MCH-LI) cell bodies were confined to the hypothalamus. MCH-LI fibers were found throughout the brain but were most prevalent in hypothalamus, mesencephalon, and pons-medulla regions. High concentrations of MCH-LI were measured in the hypothalamic medial forebrain bundle (MFB), posterior hypothalamic nucleus, and nucleus of the diagonal band. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of MFB extracts from rat brain indicate that MCH-like peptide from the rat has a different retention time than that of the salmon MCH. An osmotic stimuls (2% NaCl as drinking water for 120 hr) caused a marked increase in MCH-LI concentrations in the lateral hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe. The present studies establish the presence of MCH-like peptide in the rat brain. The MCH-LI neuronal system is well situated to coordinate complex functions such as regulation of water intake.

  6. Hypocretin and melanin-concentrating hormone in patients with Huntington disease.

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    Aziz, Ahmad; Fronczek, Rolf; Maat-Schieman, Marion; Unmehopa, Unga; Roelandse, Freek; Overeem, Sebastiaan; van Duinen, Sjoerd; Lammers, Gert-Jan; Swaab, Dick; Roos, Raymund

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate whether hypocretin-1 (orexin-A) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurotransmission are affected in patients with Huntington disease (HD), we immunohistochemically stained hypocretin and MCH neurons and estimated their total numbers in the lateral hypothalamus of both HD patients and matched controls. In addition, hypocretin-1 levels were determined in prefrontal cortical tissue and post-mortem ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using a radioimmunoassay. The total number of hypocretin-1 neurons was significantly reduced by 30% in HD brains (P = 0.015), while the total number of MCH neurons was not significantly altered (P = 0.100). Levels of hypocretin-1 were 33% lower in the prefrontal cortex of the HD patients (P = 0.025), but ventricular CSF levels were similar to the control values (P = 0.306). Neuronal intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions of mutant huntingtin were present in all HD hypothalami, although with a variable distribution across different hypothalamic structures. We found a specific reduction in hypocretin signaling in patients with HD as MCH cell number was not significantly affected. It remains to be shown whether the moderate decrease in hypocretin neurotransmission could contribute to clinical symptoms. As the number of MCH-expressing neurons was not affected, alterations in MCH signaling are unlikely to have clinical effects in HD patients.

  7. Involvement of melanin-concentrating hormone 2 in background color adaptation of barfin flounder Verasper moseri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizusawa, Kanta; Kawashima, Yusuke; Sunuma, Toshikazu; Hamamoto, Akie; Kobayashi, Yuki; Kodera, Yoshio; Saito, Yumiko; Takahashi, Akiyoshi

    2015-04-01

    In teleosts, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) plays a key role in skin color changes. MCH is released into general circulation from the neurohypophysis, which causes pigment aggregation in the skin chromatophores. Recently, a novel MCH (MCH2) precursor gene, which is orthologous to the mammalian MCH precursor gene, has been identified in some teleosts using genomic data mining. The physiological function of MCH2 remains unclear. In the present study, we cloned the cDNA for MCH2 from barfin flounder, Verasper moseri. The putative prepro-MCH2 contains 25 amino acids of MCH2 peptide region. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with a high resolution mass analyzer were used for confirming the amino acid sequences of MCH1 and MCH2 peptides from the pituitary extract. In vitro synthesized MCH1 and MCH2 induced pigment aggregation in a dose-dependent manner. A mammalian cell-based assay indicated that both MCH1 and MCH2 functionally interacted with both the MCH receptor types 1 and 2. Mch1 and mch2 are exclusively expressed in the brain and pituitary. The levels of brain mch2 transcript were three times higher in the fish that were chronically acclimated to a white background than those acclimated to a black background. These results suggest that in V. moseri, MCH1 and MCH2 are involved in the response to changes in background colors, during the process of chromatophore control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Anti-melanin-concentrating hormone treatment attenuates chronic experimental colitis and fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziogas, Dimitrios C; Gras-Miralles, Beatriz; Mustafa, Sarah; Geiger, Brenda M; Najarian, Robert M; Nagel, Jutta M; Flier, Sarah N; Popov, Yury; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Kokkotou, Efi

    2013-05-15

    Fibrosis represents a major complication of several chronic diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Treatment of IBD remains a clinical challenge despite several recent therapeutic advances. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide shown to regulate appetite and energy balance. However, accumulating evidence suggests that MCH has additional biological effects, including modulation of inflammation. In the present study, we examined the efficacy of an MCH-blocking antibody in treating established, dextran sodium sulfate-induced experimental colitis. Histological and molecular analysis of mouse tissues revealed that mice receiving anti-MCH had accelerated mucosal restitution and lower colonic expression of several proinflammatory cytokines, as well as fibrogenic genes, including COL1A1. In parallel, they spared collagen deposits seen in the untreated mice, suggesting attenuated fibrosis. These findings raised the possibility of perhaps direct effects of MCH on myofibroblasts. Indeed, in biopsies from patients with IBD, we demonstrate expression of the MCH receptor MCHR1 in α-smooth muscle actin(+) subepithelial cells. CCD-18Co cells, a primary human colonic myofibroblast cell line, were also positive for MCHR1. In these cells, MCH acted as a profibrotic modulator by potentiating the effects of IGF-1 and TGF-β on proliferation and collagen production. Thus, by virtue of combined anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects, blocking MCH might represent a compelling approach for treating IBD.

  9. A role of melanin-concentrating hormone producing neurons in the central regulation of paradoxical sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salin Paul

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidergic neurons containing the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH and the hypocretins (or orexins are intermingled in the zona incerta, perifornical nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area. Both types of neurons have been implicated in the integrated regulation of energy homeostasis and body weight. Hypocretin neurons have also been involved in sleep-wake regulation and narcolepsy. We therefore sought to determine whether hypocretin and MCH neurons express Fos in association with enhanced paradoxical sleep (PS or REM sleep during the rebound following PS deprivation. Next, we compared the effect of MCH and NaCl intracerebroventricular (ICV administrations on sleep stage quantities to further determine whether MCH neurons play an active role in PS regulation. Results Here we show that the MCH but not the hypocretin neurons are strongly active during PS, evidenced through combined hypocretin, MCH, and Fos immunostainings in three groups of rats (PS Control, PS Deprived and PS Recovery rats. Further, we show that ICV administration of MCH induces a dose-dependant increase in PS (up to 200% and slow wave sleep (up to 70% quantities. Conclusion These results indicate that MCH is a powerful hypnogenic factor. MCH neurons might play a key role in the state of PS via their widespread projections in the central nervous system.

  10. Analyzing the Role of Receptor Internalization in the Regulation of Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Signaling

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    Jay I. Moden

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of appetite is complex, though our understanding of the process is improving. The potential role for the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH signaling pathway in the treatment of obesity is being explored by many. It was hypothesized that internalization of MCH receptors would act to potently desensitize cells to MCH. Despite potent desensitization of ERK signaling by MCH in BHK-570 cells, we were unable to observe MCH-mediated internalization of MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1 by fluorescence microscopy. A more quantitative approach using a cell-based ELISA indicated only 15% of receptors internalized, which is much lower than that reported in the literature. When -arrestins were overexpressed in our system, removal of receptors from the cell surface was facilitated and signaling to a leptin promoter was diminished, suggesting that internalization of MCHR1 is sensitive to cellular -arrestin levels. A dominant-negative GRK construct completely inhibited loss of receptors from the cell surface in response to MCH, suggesting that the internalization observed is phosphorylation-dependent. Since desensitization of MCH-mediated ERK signaling did not correlate with significant loss of MCHR1 from the cell surface, we hypothesize that in this model system regulation of MCH signaling may be the result of segregation of receptors from signaling components at the plasma membrane.

  11. Novel Neuroprotective Effects of Melanin-Concentrating Hormone in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yeun; Kim, Seung-Nam; Yoo, Junsang; Jang, Jaehwan; Lee, Ahreum; Oh, Ju-Young; Kim, Hongwon; Oh, Seung Tack; Park, Seong-Uk; Kim, Jongpil; Park, Hi-Joon; Jeon, Songhee

    2017-12-01

    Acupuncture has shown the therapeutic effect on various neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD). While investigating the neuroprotective mechanism of acupuncture, we firstly found the novel function of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) as a potent neuroprotective candidate. Here, we explored whether hypothalamic MCH mediates the neuroprotective action of acupuncture. In addition, we aimed at evaluating the neuroprotective effects of MCH and elucidating underlying mechanism in vitro and in vivo PD models. First, we tested whether hypothalamic MCH mediates the neuroprotective effects of acupuncture by challenging MCH-R1 antagonist (i.p.) in mice PD model. We also investigated whether MCH has a beneficial role in dopaminergic neuronal protection in vitro primary midbrain and human neuronal cultures and in vivo MPTP-induced, Pitx3 -/- , and A53T mutant mice PD models. Transcriptomics followed by quantitative PCR and western blot analyses were performed to reveal the neuroprotective mechanism of MCH. We first found that hypothalamic MCH biosynthesis was directly activated by acupuncture treatment and that administration of an MCH-R1 antagonist reverses the neuroprotective effects of acupuncture. A novel finding is that MCH showed a beneficial role in dopaminergic neuron protection via downstream pathways related to neuronal survival. This is the first study to suggest the novel neuroprotective action of MCH as well as the involvement of hypothalamic MCH in the acupuncture effects in PD, which holds great promise for the application of MCH in the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Development of a sensitive solid-phase radioimmunoassay for melanin-concentrating hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberle, A.N.; Baumann, J.B.; Girard, J. (Univ. Children' s Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)); Baker, B.I.; Kishida, M. (Univ. of Bath (England))

    1989-01-01

    A two-step solid-phase radioimmunoassay for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) was developed for direct determination of the hormone in plasma samples. To this end, synthetic MCH was coupled to bovine thyreoglobulin and the complex was injected into rabbits. Specific antisera of high titer were obtained which did not crossreact with other hormones. The IgGs were chemically linked to immunobeads, an acrylamide/acrylic acid polymer matrix. In the first step, plasma MCH was immunoextracted by incubation of diluted plasma samples with anti-MCH immunobeads. In the second step, the washed polymer was incubated with radioiodinated MCH tracer for titration of non-occupied sites. This procedure made it possible to determine as little as 4 pg MCH per ml of plasma. Application of the radioimmunoassay to plasma levels of black or white background-adapted trout showed a marked difference in circulating MCH: while trout on a black background contained a mean value of 29 {plus minus} 5.6 pg/ml, animals on a white background had 106 {plus minus} 19 pg/ml.

  13. Neurons Containing Orexin or Melanin Concentrating Hormone Reciprocally Regulate Wake and Sleep

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    Roda Rani eKonadhode

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable amount of data on arousal neurons whereas there is a paucity of knowledge regarding neurons that make us fall asleep. Indeed, current network models of sleep-wake regulation list many arousal neuronal populations compared to only one sleep group located in the preoptic area. There are neurons outside the preoptic area that are active during sleep, but they have never been selectively manipulated. Indeed, none of the sleep-active neurons have been selectively stimulated. To close this knowledge gap we used optogenetics to selectively manipulate neurons containing melanin concentrating hormone (MCH. The MCH neurons are located in the posterior hypothalamus intermingled with the orexin arousal neurons. Our data indicated that optogenetic stimulation of MCH neurons in wildtype mice (J Neuroscience, 2013 robustly increased both non-REM and REM sleep. MCH neuron stimulation increased sleep during the animal’s normal active period, which is compelling evidence that stimulation of MCH neurons has a powerful effect in counteracting the strong arousal signal from all of the arousal neurons. The MCH neurons represent the only group of sleep-active neurons that when selectively stimulated induce sleep. From a translational perspective this is potentially useful in sleep disorders, such as insomnia, where sleep needs to be triggered against a strong arousal drive. Our studies indicate that the MCH neurons belong within an overall model of sleep-wake regulation.

  14. Novel analgesic effects of melanin-concentrating hormone on persistent neuropathic and inflammatory pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae-Hwan; Park, Ji-Yeun; Oh, Ju-Young; Bae, Sun-Jeong; Jang, Hyunchul; Jeon, Songhee; Kim, Jongpil; Park, Hi-Joon

    2018-01-15

    The melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a peptidergic neuromodulator synthesized by neurons in the lateral hypothalamus and zona incerta. MCHergic neurons project throughout the central nervous system, indicating the involvements of many physiological functions, but the role in pain has yet to be determined. In this study, we found that pMCH -/- mice showed lower baseline pain thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimuli than did pMCH +/+ mice, and the time to reach the maximum hyperalgesic response was also significantly earlier in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain. To examine its pharmacological properties, MCH was administered intranasally into mice, and results indicated that MCH treatment significantly increased mechanical and thermal pain thresholds in both pain models. Antagonist challenges with naltrexone (opioid receptor antagonist) and AM251 (cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonist) reversed the analgesic effects of MCH in both pain models, suggesting the involvement of opioid and cannabinoid systems. MCH treatment also increased the expression and activation of CB1R in the medial prefrontal cortex and dorsolateral- and ventrolateral periaqueductal grey. The MCH1R antagonist abolished the effects induced by MCH. This is the first study to suggest novel analgesic actions of MCH, which holds great promise for the application of MCH in the therapy of pain-related diseases.

  15. Sub-cellular organization of the melanin-concentrating hormone neurons in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancsik, Veronika; Bene, Roland; Sótonyi, Péter; Zachar, Gergely

    2018-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a potent orexigenic and sleep-promoting neuropeptide in mammals produced predominately by hypothalamic neurons which project to a wide variety of brain areas. Several MCH producing neurons contain MCH as the only neuropeptide, while others comprise cocaine- and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) as well. The intrahypothalamic localization and the projection pattern of these two subpopulations are distinct. To provide structural grounding to understand the mechanism of action of MCH neurons we show here the subcellular localization of the neuropeptides in the two subpopulations within the hypothalamus of healthy young male mice by applying single and double immunofluorescence labelling.; Thick, prominent MCH immunopositive reticulation and fine discrete granules are detected within the perikarya of both CART positive and CART-free MCH neurons. Typically, one or more immunoreactive processes emanate from the perikarya. The bulk of CART immunoreactivity is also centrally positioned, surrounded by sparse immunoreactive granules within the perikarya and in the processes. In double immunopositive neurons, the two neuropeptides seem to colocalize in the heavily labelled central area, while the immunopositive granules in the cell body periphery and in the processes apparently contain either MCH or CART. This spatial arrangement suggests that MCH and CART, after being synthetized and processed in the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi complex, are sorted into separate dense core vesicles, which then enter into the cell processes. This mechanism allows for both concerted and independent regulation of the transport and release of MCH and CART. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sleep architecture of the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamantidis, Antoine; Salvert, Denise; Goutagny, Romain; Lakaye, Bernard; Gervasoni, Damien; Grisar, Thierry; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice

    2008-04-01

    Growing amounts of data indicate involvement of the posterior hypothalamus in the regulation of sleep, especially paradoxical sleep (PS). Accordingly, we previously showed that the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-producing neurons of the rat hypothalamus are selectively activated during a PS rebound. In addition, intracerebroventricular infusion of MCH increases total sleep duration, suggesting a new role for MCH in sleep regulation. To determine whether activation of the MCH system promotes sleep, we studied spontaneous sleep and its homeostatic regulation in mice with deletion of the MCH-receptor 1 gene (MCH-R1-/- vs. MCH-R1+/+) and their behavioural response to modafinil, a powerful antinarcoleptic drug. Here, we show that the lack of functional MCH-R1 results in a hypersomniac-like phenotype, both in basal conditions and after total sleep deprivation, compared to wild-type mice. Further, we found that modafinil was less potent at inducing wakefulness in MCH-R1-/- than in MCH-R1+/+ mice. We report for the first time that animals with genetically inactivated MCH signaling exhibit altered vigilance state architecture and sleep homeostasis. This study also suggests that the MCH system may modulate central pathways involved in the wake-promoting effect of modafinil.

  17. A role of melanin-concentrating hormone producing neurons in the central regulation of paradoxical sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verret, Laure; Goutagny, Romain; Fort, Patrice; Cagnon, Laurène; Salvert, Denise; Léger, Lucienne; Boissard, Romuald; Salin, Paul; Peyron, Christelle; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé

    2003-09-09

    Peptidergic neurons containing the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and the hypocretins (or orexins) are intermingled in the zona incerta, perifornical nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area. Both types of neurons have been implicated in the integrated regulation of energy homeostasis and body weight. Hypocretin neurons have also been involved in sleep-wake regulation and narcolepsy. We therefore sought to determine whether hypocretin and MCH neurons express Fos in association with enhanced paradoxical sleep (PS or REM sleep) during the rebound following PS deprivation. Next, we compared the effect of MCH and NaCl intracerebroventricular (ICV) administrations on sleep stage quantities to further determine whether MCH neurons play an active role in PS regulation. Here we show that the MCH but not the hypocretin neurons are strongly active during PS, evidenced through combined hypocretin, MCH, and Fos immunostainings in three groups of rats (PS Control, PS Deprived and PS Recovery rats). Further, we show that ICV administration of MCH induces a dose-dependent increase in PS (up to 200%) and slow wave sleep (up to 70%) quantities. These results indicate that MCH is a powerful hypnogenic factor. MCH neurons might play a key role in the state of PS via their widespread projections in the central nervous system.

  18. GABAergic control of hypothalamic melanin-concentrating hormone-containing neurons across the sleep-waking cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutagny, Romain; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Salvert, Denise; Gervasoni, Damien; Fort, Patrice

    2005-07-13

    The perifornical-lateral hypothalamic area is implicated in regulating waking and paradoxical sleep. The blockade of GABAA receptors by iontophoretic applications of bicuculline (or gabazine) into the perifornical-lateral hypothalamic area induced a continuous quiet waking state associated to a robust muscle tone in head-restrained rats. During the effects, sleep was totally suppressed. In rats killed at the end of a 90 min ejection of bicuculline, Fos expression was induced in approximately 28% of the neurons immunoreactive for hypocretin and in approximately 3% of the neurons immunostained for melanin-concentrating hormone within the ejection site. These results suggest that neurons containing melanin-concentrating hormone are not active during waking and that the lack of a potent GABAergic influence during waking is consistent with their role in sleep regulation.

  19. Melanin concentrating hormone and estrogen receptor-α are coexstensive but not coexpressed in cells of male rat hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Muschamp, John W.; Hull, Elaine M.

    2007-01-01

    In male rats, estradiol (E2) exerts marked anorectic effects. One mechanism proposed for this effect is an E2-mediated down-regulation of the orexigenic neuropeptide melanin concentrating hormone (MCH). Previous anatomical work has shown that both MCH and estrogen receptor α (ERα) are found in quantity in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), a structure long associated with appetite and ingestive behavior. It has been hypothesized that the most direct manner by which E2 could affect MCH expre...

  20. The orexigenic effect of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is influenced by sex and stage of the estrous cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Santollo, Jessica; Eckel, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that that the orexigenic effect of melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) is attenuated by estradiol treatment in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. This suggests that female rats may be less responsive than male rats to the behavioral effects of MCH. To investigate this hypothesis, the effects of lateral ventricular infusions of MCH on food intake, water intake, meal patterns, and running wheel activity were examined in male and female rats. To further characterize the impact of ...

  1. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH: role in REM sleep and depression

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    Pablo eTorterolo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH is a peptidergic neuromodulator synthesized by neurons of the lateral hypothalamus and incerto-hypothalamic area. MCHergic neurons project throughout the central nervous system, including areas such as the dorsal (DR and median (MR raphe nuclei, which are involved in the control of sleep and mood.Major Depression (MD is a prevalent psychiatric disease diagnosed on the basis of symptomatic criteria such as sadness or melancholia, guilt, irritability and anhedonia. A short REM sleep latency (i.e. the interval between sleep onset and the first REM sleep period, as well as an increase in the duration of REM sleep and the density of rapid-eye movements during this state, are considered important biological markers of depression. The fact that the greatest firing rate of MCHergic neurons occurs during REM sleep and that optogenetic stimulation of these neurons induces sleep, tends to indicate that MCH plays a critical role in the generation and maintenance of sleep, especially REM sleep. In addition, the acute microinjection of MCH into the DR promotes REM sleep, while immunoneutralization of this peptide within the DR decreases the time spent in this state. Moreover, microinjections of MCH into either the DR or MR promote a depressive-like behavior. In the DR, this effect is prevented by the systemic administration of antidepressant drugs (either fluoxetine or nortriptyline and blocked by the intra-DR microinjection of a specific MCH receptor antagonist. Using electrophysiological and microdialysis techniques we demonstrated also that MCH decreases the activity of serotonergic DR neurons.Therefore, there are substantive experimental data suggesting that the MCHergic system plays a role in the control of REM sleep and, in addition, in the pathophysiology of depression. Consequently, in the present report, we summarize and evaluate the current data and hypotheses related to the role of MCH in REM sleep and MD.

  2. Cytoskeleton-related regulation of primary cilia shortening mediated by melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoshige, Sakura; Kobayashi, Yuki; Hosoba, Kosuke; Hamamoto, Akie; Miyamoto, Tatsuo; Saito, Yumiko

    2017-11-01

    Primary cilia are specialized microtubule-based organelles. Their importance is highlighted by the gamut of ciliary diseases associated with various syndromes including diabetes and obesity. Primary cilia serve as signaling hubs through selective interactions with ion channels and conventional G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) receptor 1 (MCHR1), a key regulator of feeding, is selectively expressed in neuronal primary cilia in distinct regions of the mouse brain. We previously found that MCH acts on ciliary MCHR1 and induces cilia shortening through a Gi/o-dependent Akt pathway with no cell cycle progression. Many factors can participate in cilia length control. However, the mechanisms for how these molecules are relocated and coordinated to activate cilia shortening are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in regulating MCH-induced cilia shortening using clonal MCHR1-expressing hTERT-RPE1 cells. Pharmacological and biochemical approaches showed that cilia shortening mediated by MCH was associated with increased soluble cytosolic tubulin without changing the total tubulin amount. Enhanced F-actin fiber intensity was also observed in MCH-treated cells. The actions of various pharmacological agents revealed that coordinated actin machinery, especially actin polymerization, was required for MCHR1-mediated cilia shortening. A recent report indicated the existence of actin-regulated machinery for cilia shortening through GPCR agonist-dependent ectosome release. However, our live-cell imaging experiments showed that MCH progressively elicited cilia shortening without exclusion of fluorescence-positive material from the tip. Short cilia phenotypes have been associated with various metabolic disorders. Thus, the present findings may contribute toward better understanding of how the cytoskeleton is involved in the GPCR ligand-triggered cilia shortening with cell mechanical

  3. Intestinal upregulation of melanin-concentrating hormone in TNBS-induced enterocolitis in adult zebrafish.

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    Brenda M Geiger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH, an evolutionarily conserved appetite-regulating neuropeptide, has been recently implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Expression of MCH is upregulated in inflamed intestinal mucosa in humans with colitis and MCH-deficient mice treated with trinitrobenzene-sulfonic acid (TNBS develop an attenuated form of colitis compared to wild type animals. Zebrafish have emerged as a new animal model of IBD, although the majority of the reported studies concern zebrafish larvae. Regulation MCH expression in the adult zebrafish intestine remains unknown. METHODS: In the present study we induced enterocolitis in adult zebrafish by intrarectal administration of TNBS. Follow-up included survival analysis, histological assessment of changes in intestinal architecture, and assessment of intestinal infiltration by myeloperoxidase positive cells and cytokine transcript levels. RESULTS: Treatment with TNBS dose-dependently reduced fish survival. This response required the presence of an intact microbiome, since fish pre-treated with vancomycin developed less severe enterocolitis. At 6 hours post-challenge, we detected a significant influx of myeloperoxidase positive cells in the intestine and upregulation of both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Most importantly, and in analogy to human IBD and TNBS-induced mouse experimental colitis, we found increased intestinal expression of MCH and its receptor in TNBS-treated zebrafish. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together these findings not only establish a model of chemically-induced experimental enterocolitis in adult zebrafish, but point to effects of MCH in intestinal inflammation that are conserved across species.

  4. The Melanin-Concentrating Hormone as an Integrative Peptide Driving Motivated Behaviors

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    Giovanne B. Diniz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH is an important peptide implicated in the control of motivated behaviors. History, however, made this peptide first known for its participation in the control of skin pigmentation, from which its name derives. In addition to this peripheral role, MCH is strongly implicated in motivated behaviors, such as feeding, drinking, mating and, more recently, maternal behavior. It is suggested that MCH acts as an integrative peptide, converging sensory information and contributing to a general arousal of the organism. In this review, we will discuss the various aspects of energy homeostasis to which MCH has been associated to, focusing on the different inputs that feed the MCH peptidergic system with information regarding the homeostatic status of the organism and the exogenous sensory information that drives this system, as well as the outputs that allow MCH to act over a wide range of homeostatic and behavioral controls, highlighting the available morphological and hodological aspects that underlie these integrative actions. Besides the well-described role of MCH in feeding behavior, a prime example of hypothalamic-mediated integration, we will also examine those functions in which the participation of MCH has not yet been extensively characterized, including sexual, maternal, and defensive behaviors. We also evaluated the available data on the distribution of MCH and its function in the context of animals in their natural environment. Finally, we briefly comment on the evidence for MCH acting as a coordinator between different modalities of motivated behaviors, highlighting the most pressing open questions that are open for investigations and that could provide us with important insights about hypothalamic-dependent homeostatic integration.

  5. Neurochemical characterization of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in the mouse hypothalamus1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Melissa J. S.; Pissios, Pavlos; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that acts via MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) in the mouse. It promotes positive energy balance thus mice lacking MCH or MCHR1 are lean, hyperactive, and resistant to diet-induced obesity. Identifying the cellular targets of MCH is an important step to understanding the mechanisms underlying MCH actions. We generated the Mchr1-cre mouse that expressed cre recombinase driven by the MCHR1 promoter and crossed it with a tdTomato reporter mouse. The resulting Mchr1-cre/tdTomato progeny expressed easily detectable tdTomato fluorescence in MCHR1 neurons, which were found throughout the olfactory system, striatum, and hypothalamus. To chemically identify MCH-targeted cell populations that play a role in energy balance, MCHR1 hypothalamic neurons were characterized by colabeling select hypothalamic neuropeptides with tdTomato fluorescence. TdTomato fluorescence colocalized with dynorphin, oxytocin, vasopressin, enkephalin, thyrothropin-releasing hormone, and corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus. In the lateral hypothalamus, neurotensin but neither orexin nor MCH neurons expressed tdTomato. In the arcuate nucleus, both Neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin cells expressed tdTomato. We further demonstrated that some of these arcuate neurons were also targets of leptin action. Interestingly, MCHR1 was expressed in the vast majority of leptin-sensitive proopiomelanocortin neurons, highlighting their importance for the orexigenic actions of MCH. Taken together, this study supports the use of the Mchr1-cre mouse for outlining the neuroanatomical distribution and neurochemical phenotype of MCHR1 neurons. PMID:23605441

  6. Chronic loss of melanin-concentrating hormone affects motivational aspects of feeding in the rat.

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    Joram D Mul

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Current epidemic obesity levels apply great medical and financial pressure to the strenuous economy of obesity-prone cultures, and neuropeptides involved in body weight regulation are regarded as attractive targets for a possible treatment of obesity in humans. The lateral hypothalamus and the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh form a hypothalamic-limbic neuropeptide feeding circuit mediated by Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH. MCH promotes feeding behavior via MCH receptor-1 (MCH1R in the AcbSh, although this relationship has not been fully characterized. Given the AcbSh mediates reinforcing properties of food, we hypothesized that MCH modulates motivational aspects of feeding.Here we show that chronic loss of the rat MCH-precursor Pmch decreased food intake predominantly via a reduction in meal size during rat development and reduced high-fat food-reinforced operant responding in adult rats. Moreover, acute AcbSh administration of Neuropeptide-GE and Neuropeptide-EI (NEI, both additional neuropeptides derived from Pmch, or chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of NEI, did not affect feeding behavior in adult pmch(+/+ or pmch(-/- rats. However, acute administration of MCH to the AcbSh of adult pmch(-/- rats elevated feeding behavior towards wild type levels. Finally, adult pmch(-/- rats showed increased ex vivo electrically evoked dopamine release and increased limbic dopamine transporter levels, indicating that chronic loss of Pmch in the rat affects the limbic dopamine system.Our findings support the MCH-MCH1R system as an amplifier of consummatory behavior, confirming this system as a possible target for the treatment of obesity. We propose that MCH-mediated signaling in the AcbSh positively mediates motivational aspects of feeding behavior. Thereby it provides a crucial signal by which hypothalamic neural circuits control energy balance and guide limbic brain areas to enhance motivational or incentive-related aspects of food consumption.

  7. Neurochemical characterization of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Melissa J S; Pissios, Pavlos; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2013-07-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that acts via MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) in the mouse. It promotes positive energy balance; thus, mice lacking MCH or MCHR1 are lean, hyperactive, and resistant to diet-induced obesity. Identifying the cellular targets of MCH is an important step to understanding the mechanisms underlying MCH actions. We generated the Mchr1-cre mouse that expresses cre recombinase driven by the MCHR1 promoter and crossed it with a tdTomato reporter mouse. The resulting Mchr1-cre/tdTomato progeny expressed easily detectable tdTomato fluorescence in MCHR1 neurons, which were found throughout the olfactory system, striatum, and hypothalamus. To chemically identify MCH-targeted cell populations that play a role in energy balance, MCHR1 hypothalamic neurons were characterized by colabeling select hypothalamic neuropeptides with tdTomato fluorescence. TdTomato fluorescence colocalized with dynorphin, oxytocin, vasopressin, enkephalin, thyrothropin-releasing hormone, and corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus. In the lateral hypothalamus, neurotensin, but neither orexin nor MCH neurons, expressed tdTomato. In the arcuate nucleus, both Neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin cells expressed tdTomato. We further demonstrated that some of these arcuate neurons were also targets of leptin action. Interestingly, MCHR1 was expressed in the vast majority of leptin-sensitive proopiomelanocortin neurons, highlighting their importance for the orexigenic actions of MCH. Taken together, this study supports the use of the Mchr1-cre mouse for outlining the neuroanatomical distribution and neurochemical phenotype of MCHR1 neurons. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Modulation of primary cilia length by melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Akie; Yamato, Shogo; Katoh, Yohei; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Takeda, Sen; Kobayashi, Yuki; Saito, Yumiko

    2016-06-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) receptor 1 (MCHR1) is a class A G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). The MCH-MCHR1 system has been implicated in the regulation of feeding, emotional processing, and sleep in rodents. Recent work revealed that MCHR1 is selectively expressed in neuronal primary cilia of the central nervous system. Cilia have various chemosensory functions in many types of cell, and ciliary dysfunction is associated with ciliopathies such as polycystic kidney disease and obesity. Although dynamic modulation of neuronal cilia length is observed in obese mice, the functional interaction of neuronal ciliary GPCR and its endogenous ligand has not yet been elucidated. We report here that MCH treatment significantly reduced cilia length in hTERT-RPE1 cells (hRPE1 cells) transfected with MCHR1. Quantitative analyses indicated that MCH-induced cilia shortening progressed in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 lower than 1nM when cells were treated for 6h. Although the assembly and disassembly of primary cilia are tightly coupled to the cell cycle, cell cycle reentry was not a determinant of MCH-induced cilia shortening. We confirmed that MCH elicited receptor internalization, Ca(2+) mobilization, ERK and Akt phosphorylation, and inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in MCHR1-expressing hRPE1 cells. Among these diverse pathways, we revealed that Gi/o-dependent Akt phosphorylation was an important component in the initial stage of MCH-induced cilia length shortening. Furthermore, induction of fewer cilia by Kif3A siRNA treatment significantly decreased the MCH-mediated phosphorylation of Akt, indicating the functional importance of the MCHR1-Akt pathway in primary cilia. Taken together, the present data suggest that the MCH-MCHR1 axis may modulate the sensitivity of cells to external environments by controlling the cilia length. Therefore, further characterization of MCHR1 as a ciliary GPCR will provide a potential molecular mechanism to link cilia length

  9. The melanin-concentrating hormone receptors: neuronal and non-neuronal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presse, F; Conductier, G; Rovere, C; Nahon, J-L

    2014-07-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a cyclic peptide highly conserved in vertebrates and was originally identified as a skin-paling factor in Teleosts. In fishes, MCH also participates in the regulation of the stress-response and feeding behaviour. Mammalian MCH is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that displays multiple functions, mostly controlling feeding behaviour and energy homeostasis. Transgenic mouse models and pharmacological studies have shown the importance of the MCH system as a potential target in the treatment of appetite disorders and obesity as well as anxiety and psychiatric diseases. Two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) binding MCH have been characterized so far. The first, named MCH-R1 and also called SLC1, was identified through reverse pharmacology strategies by several groups as a cognate receptor of MCH. This receptor is expressed at high levels in many brain areas of rodents and primates and is also expressed in peripheral organs, albeit at a lower rate. A second receptor, designated MCH-R2, exhibited 38% identity to MCH-R1 and was identified by sequence analysis of the human genome. Interestingly, although MCH-R2 orthologues were also found in fishes, dogs, ferrets and non-human primates, this MCH receptor gene appeared either lacking or non-functional in rodents and lagomorphs. Both receptors are class I GPCRs, whose main roles are to mediate the actions of peptides and neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. However, examples of action of MCH on neuronal and non-neuronal cells are emerging that illustrate novel MCH functions. In particular, the functionality of endogenously expressed MCH-R1 has been explored in human neuroblastoma cells, SK-N-SH and SH-SY5Y cells, and in non-neuronal cell types such as the ependymocytes. Indeed, we have identified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent or calcium-dependent signalling cascades that ultimately contributed to neurite outgrowth in neuroblastoma cells or to modulation of

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and hypocretin-1 (HCRT-1, orexin-A) in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frank M; Kratzsch, Juergen; Gertz, Hermann-Josef; Tittmann, Mandy; Jahn, Ina; Pietsch, Uta-Carolin; Kaisers, Udo X; Thiery, Joachim; Hegerl, Ulrich; Schönknecht, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Ancillary to decline in cognitive abilities, patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) frequently suffer from behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). Hypothalamic polypeptides such as melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and hypocretin-1 (HCRT-1, orexin-A) are promoters of sleep-wake regulation and energy homeostasis and are found to impact on cognitive performance. To investigate the role of MCH and HCRT-1 in AD, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels were measured in 33 patients with AD and 33 healthy subjects (HS) using a fluorescence immunoassay (FIA). A significant main effect of diagnosis (F(1,62) = 8.490, pGender differences of CSF-HCRT-1 controversially portend a previously reported gender dependence of HCRT-1-regulation. Histochemical and actigraphic explorations are warranted to further elucidate alterations of hypothalamic transmitter regulation in AD.

  11. Functional characterization of two melanin-concentrating hormone genes in the color camouflage, hypermelanosis, and appetite of starry flounder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Duk-Young; Kim, Hyo-Chan

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the involvement of two melanin-concentrating hormones (MCHs) in skin color change and appetite in flatfish, we isolated two forms of prepro-melanin concentrating hormone (pMCHs) mRNA in the starry flounder Platichthys stellatus and compared their amino acid structures to those of other animals. Then, we examined the relationship of the two starry flounder pMCH (sf-pMCH) with physiological color change, blind-side malpigmentation, and feeding by quantifying mRNA expression level. Sf-pMCH1 cDNA had a 387-bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded a protein consisting of 129 amino acid residues. The sf-pMCH1 protein included a signal peptide composed of 24 amino acid residues; MCH1 encoded a protein consisting of 17 amino acids. The sf-pMCH2 cDNA had a 450-bp ORF that encoded a protein consisting of 150 amino acid residues, which included a signal peptide comprising 23 amino acid residues; MCH2 encoded a protein consisting of 23 amino acids that was structurally similar to mammalian MCH. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that the strongest sf-pMCHs gene expression was observed in the brain and pituitary, but weak or no amplification was detected in other tissues. The expression of sf-pMCH1 was relatively high compared to that of sf-pMCH2 in the brain. The relative levels of mRNA were significantly lower in dark background-reared and hypermelanic fish, indicating that the two pMCHs and background color are related to the physiological and morphological color changes of skin. In term of feeding regulation, we found an obvious functional role of pMCH1 in appetite, whereas the pMCH2 gene was not found to play a role in feeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The gene encoding the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 is associated with schizophrenia in a Danish case-control sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demontis, Ditte; Nyegaard, Mette; Christensen, Jane H

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The MCHR1 gene encoding the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 is located on chromosome 22q13.2 and has previously been associated with schizophrenia in a study of cases and controls from the Faroe Islands and Scotland. Herein we report an association between variations in the MCHR...

  13. Melanin distribution in human epidermis affords localized protection against DNA photodamage and concurs with skin cancer incidence difference in extreme phototypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajuyigbe, Damilola; Lwin, Su M; Diffey, Brian L; Baker, Richard; Tobin, Desmond J; Sarkany, Robert P E; Young, Antony R

    2018-02-02

    Epidermal DNA damage, especially to the basal layer, is an established cause of keratinocyte cancers (KCs). Large differences in KC incidence (20- to 60-fold) between white and black populations are largely attributable to epidermal melanin photoprotection in the latter. The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) is the most mutagenic DNA photolesion; however, most studies suggest that melanin photoprotection against CPD is modest and cannot explain the considerable skin color-based differences in KC incidence. Along with melanin quantity, solar-simulated radiation-induced CPD assessed immediately postexposure in the overall epidermis and within 3 epidermal zones was compared in black West Africans and fair Europeans. Melanin in black skin protected against CPD by 8.0-fold in the overall epidermis and by 59.0-, 16.5-, and 5.0-fold in the basal, middle, and upper epidermis, respectively. Protection was related to the distribution of melanin, which was most concentrated in the basal layer of black skin. These results may explain, at least in part, the considerable skin color differences in KC incidence. These data suggest that a DNA protection factor of at least 60 is necessary in sunscreens to reduce white skin KC incidence to a level that is comparable with that of black skin.-Fajuyigbe, D., Lwin, S. M., Diffey, B. L., Baker, R., Tobin, D. J., Sarkany, R. P. E., Young, A. R. Melanin distribution in human epidermis affords localized protection against DNA photodamage and concurs with skin cancer incidence difference in extreme phototypes.

  14. Effects of intracerebroventricular and intra-accumbens melanin-concentrating hormone agonism on food intake and energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guesdon, Benjamin; Paradis, Eric; Samson, Pierre; Richard, Denis

    2009-03-01

    The brain melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) system represents an anabolic system involved in energy balance regulation through influences exerted on the homeostatic and nonhomeostatic controls of food intake and energy expenditure. The present study was designed to further delineate the effect of the MCH system on energy balance regulation by assessing the actions of the MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) agonism on both food intake and energy expenditure after intracerebroventricular (third ventricle) and intra-nucleus-accumbens-shell (intraNAcSH) injections of a MCHR1 agonist. Total energy expenditure and substrate oxidation were assessed following injections in male Wistar rats using indirect calorimetry. Food intake was also measured. Pair-fed groups were added to evaluate changes in thermogenesis that would occur regardless of the meal size and its thermogenic response. Using such experimental conditions, we were able to demonstrate that acute MCH agonism in the brain, besides its orexigenic effect, induced a noticeable change in the utilization of the main metabolic fuels. In pair-fed animals, MCH significantly reduced lipid oxidation when it was injected in the third ventricle. Such an effect was not observed following the injection of MCH in the NAcSH, where MCH nonetheless strongly stimulated appetite. The present results further delineate the influence of MCH on energy expenditure and substrate oxidation while confirming the key role of the NAcSH in the effects of the MCH system on food intake.

  15. Characterization of two melanin-concentrating hormone genes in zebrafish reveals evolutionary and physiological links with the mammalian MCH system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jennifer R; Skariah, Gemini; Maro, Géraldine S; Mignot, Emmanuel; Mourrain, Philippe

    2009-12-10

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) regulates feeding and complex behaviors in mammals and pigmentation in fish. The relationship between fish and mammalian MCH systems is not well understood. Here, we identify and characterize two MCH genes in zebrafish, Pmch1 and Pmch2. Whereas Pmch1 and its corresponding MCH1 peptide resemble MCH found in other fish, the zebrafish Pmch2 gene and MCH2 peptide share genomic structure, synteny, and high peptide sequence homology with mammalian MCH. Zebrafish Pmch genes are expressed in closely associated but non-overlapping neurons within the hypothalamus, and MCH2 neurons send numerous projections to multiple MCH receptor-rich targets with presumed roles in sensory perception, learning and memory, arousal, and homeostatic regulation. Preliminary functional analysis showed that whereas changes in zebrafish Pmch1 expression correlate with pigmentation changes, the number of MCH2-expressing neurons increases in response to chronic food deprivation. These findings demonstrate that zebrafish MCH2 is the putative structural and functional ortholog of mammalian MCH and help elucidate the nature of MCH evolution among vertebrates.

  16. Abnormal response of melanin-concentrating hormone deficient mice to fasting: hyperactivity and rapid eye movement sleep suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willie, J T; Sinton, C M; Maratos-Flier, E; Yanagisawa, M

    2008-10-28

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that has been implicated in energy homeostasis. Pharmacological studies with MCH and its receptor antagonists have suggested additional behavioral roles for the neuropeptide in the control of mood and vigilance states. These suggestions have been supported by a report of modified sleep in the MCH-1 receptor knockout mouse. Here we found that MCH knockout (MCH(-)(/)(-)) mice slept less during both the light and dark phases under baseline conditions. In response to fasting, MCH(-)(/)(-) mice exhibited marked hyperactivity, accelerated weight loss and an exaggerated decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Following a 6-h period of sleep deprivation, however, the sleep rebound in MCH(-)(/)(-) mice was normal. Thus MCH(-)(/)(-) mice adapt poorly to fasting, and their loss of bodyweight under this condition is associated with behavioral hyperactivity and abnormal expression of REM sleep. These results support a role for MCH in vigilance state regulation in response to changes in energy homeostasis and may relate to a recent report of initial clinical trials with a novel MCH-1 receptor antagonist. When combined with caloric restriction, the treatment of healthy, obese subjects with this compound resulted in some subjects experiencing vivid dreams and sleep disturbances.

  17. Melanin concentrating hormone and estrogen receptor-α are coexstensive but not coexpressed in cells of male rat hypothalamus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschamp, John W.; Hull, Elaine M.

    2009-01-01

    In male rats, estradiol (E2) exerts marked anorectic effects. One mechanism proposed for this effect is an E2-mediated down-regulation of the orexigenic neuropeptide melanin concentrating hormone (MCH). Previous anatomical work has shown that both MCH and estrogen receptor α (ERα) are found in quantity in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), a structure long associated with appetite and ingestive behavior. It has been hypothesized that the most direct manner by which E2 could affect MCH expression and feeding would be via classical nuclear ERα located in MCH neurons. To evaluate this notion, we performed double-label immunohistochemistry for MCH and ERα in male rat hypothalamus. We report here that MCH neurons do not contain ERα, suggesting that the primary locus for estrogenic control of feeding is not the MCH neurons themselves. Rather, we show substantial overlap in the anatomical distribution of both cell types, raising the possibility that E2 influences MCH signaling indirectly via adjacent ERα-containing cells. PMID:17933463

  18. [(18)F]FE@SNAP-a specific PET tracer for melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Cécile; Haeusler, Daniela; Scherer, Thomas; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Zeilinger, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Shanab, Karem; Spreitzer, Helmut; Hacker, Marcus; Mitterhauser, Markus

    2016-12-01

    The melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1), which is highly expressed in the lateral hypothalamus, plays a key role in energy homeostasis, obesity and other endocrine diseases. Hence, there is a major interest in in vivo imaging of this receptor. A PET tracer would allow non-invasive in vivo visualization and quantification of the MCHR1. The aim of the study was the ex vivo evaluation of the MCHR1 ligand [(18)F]FE@SNAP as a potential PET tracer for the MCHR1. [(18)F]FE@SNAP was injected directly into the jugular vein of awake naïve rats for ex vivo brain autoradiography, biodistribution and additional blood metabolite analysis. Blocking experiments were conducted using the unlabeled MCHR1 ligand SNAP-7941. A high uptake of [(18)F]FE@SNAP was observed in the lateral hypothalamus and the ventricular system. Both regions were significantly blocked by SNAP-7941. Biodistribution evinced the highest uptake in the kidneys, adrenals, lung and duodenum. Specific blocking with SNAP-7941 led to a significant tracer reduction in the heart and adrenals. In plasma samples, 47.73 ± 6.1 % of a hydrophilic radioactive metabolite was found 45 min after tracer injection. Since [(18)F]FE@SNAP uptake was significantly blocked in the lateral hypothalamus, there is strong evidence that [(18)F]FE@SNAP is a highly suitable agent for specific MCHR1 imaging in the central nervous system. Additionally, this finding is supported by the specific blocking in the ventricular system, where the MCHR1 is expressed in the ependymal cells. These findings suggest that [(18)F]FE@SNAP could serve as a useful imaging and therapy monitoring tool for MCHR1-related pathologies.

  19. Role of REM Sleep, Melanin Concentrating Hormone and Orexin/Hypocretin Systems in the Sleep Deprivation Pre-Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Marta; Adamantidis, Antoine; Facchin, Laura; Bassetti, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Sleep reduction after stroke is linked to poor recovery in patients. Conversely, a neuroprotective effect is observed in animals subjected to acute sleep deprivation (SD) before ischemia. This neuroprotection is associated with an increase of the sleep, melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and orexin/hypocretin (OX) systems. This study aims to 1) assess the relationship between sleep and recovery; 2) test the association between MCH and OX systems with the pathological mechanisms of stroke. Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four experimental groups: (i) SD_IS: SD performed before ischemia; (ii) IS: ischemia; (iii) SD_Sham: SD performed before sham surgery; (iv) Sham: sham surgery. EEG and EMG were recorded. The time-course of the MCH and OX gene expression was measured at 4, 12, 24 hours and 3, 4, 7 days following ischemic surgery by qRT-PCR. A reduction of infarct volume was observed in the SD_IS group, which correlated with an increase of REM sleep observed during the acute phase of stroke. Conversely, the IS group showed a reduction of REM sleep. Furthermore, ischemia induces an increase of MCH and OX systems during the acute phase of stroke, although, both systems were still increased for a long period of time only in the SD_IS group. Our data indicates that REM sleep may be involved in the neuroprotective effect of SD pre-ischemia, and that both MCH and OX systems were increased during the acute phase of stroke. Future studies should assess the role of REM sleep as a prognostic marker, and test MCH and OXA agonists as new treatment options in the acute phase of stroke.

  20. Role of REM Sleep, Melanin Concentrating Hormone and Orexin/Hypocretin Systems in the Sleep Deprivation Pre-Ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pace

    Full Text Available Sleep reduction after stroke is linked to poor recovery in patients. Conversely, a neuroprotective effect is observed in animals subjected to acute sleep deprivation (SD before ischemia. This neuroprotection is associated with an increase of the sleep, melanin concentrating hormone (MCH and orexin/hypocretin (OX systems. This study aims to 1 assess the relationship between sleep and recovery; 2 test the association between MCH and OX systems with the pathological mechanisms of stroke.Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four experimental groups: (i SD_IS: SD performed before ischemia; (ii IS: ischemia; (iii SD_Sham: SD performed before sham surgery; (iv Sham: sham surgery. EEG and EMG were recorded. The time-course of the MCH and OX gene expression was measured at 4, 12, 24 hours and 3, 4, 7 days following ischemic surgery by qRT-PCR.A reduction of infarct volume was observed in the SD_IS group, which correlated with an increase of REM sleep observed during the acute phase of stroke. Conversely, the IS group showed a reduction of REM sleep. Furthermore, ischemia induces an increase of MCH and OX systems during the acute phase of stroke, although, both systems were still increased for a long period of time only in the SD_IS group.Our data indicates that REM sleep may be involved in the neuroprotective effect of SD pre-ischemia, and that both MCH and OX systems were increased during the acute phase of stroke. Future studies should assess the role of REM sleep as a prognostic marker, and test MCH and OXA agonists as new treatment options in the acute phase of stroke.

  1. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone inhibits melanin concentrating hormone neurons- implications for TRH mediated anorexic and arousal actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaobing; van den Pol, Anthony N.

    2013-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) increases activity and decreases food intake, body weight, and sleep, in part through hypothalamic actions. The mechanism of this action is unknown. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and hypocretin/orexin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) together with neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus play central roles in energy homeostasis. Here, we provide electrophysiological evidence from GFP-reporter transgenic mouse brain slices that shows TRH modulates the activity of MCH neurons. Using whole-cell current-clamp recording, we unexpectedly found that TRH and its agonist, montrelin, dose-dependently inhibited MCH neurons. Consistent with previous reports, TRH excited hypocretin/orexin neurons. No effect was observed on arcuate nucleus POMC or NPY neurons. The TRH inhibition of MCH neurons was eliminated by bicuculline and tetrodotoxin, suggesting that the effect was mediated indirectly through synaptic mechanisms. TRH increased spontaneous IPSC frequency without affecting amplitude and had no effect on miniature IPSCs or EPSCs. Immunocytochemistry revealed little interaction between TRH axons and MCH neurons, but showed TRH axons terminating on or near GABA neurons. TRH inhibition of MCH neurons was attenuated by Na+-Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) inhibitors, TRPC channel blockers and the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122. TRH excited LH GABA neurons, and this was also reduced by NCX inhibitors. Finally, TRH attenuated the excitation of MCH neurons by hypocretin. Taken together, our data suggest that TRH inhibits MCH neurons by increasing synaptic inhibition from local GABA neurons. Inhibition of MCH neurons may contribute to the TRH-mediated reduction in food intake and sleep. PMID:22378876

  2. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) inhibits melanin-concentrating hormone neurons: implications for TRH-mediated anorexic and arousal actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaobing; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2012-02-29

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) increases activity and decreases food intake, body weight, and sleep, in part through hypothalamic actions. The mechanism of this action is unknown. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and hypocretin/orexin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) together with neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus play central roles in energy homeostasis. Here, we provide electrophysiological evidence from GFP-reporter transgenic mouse brain slices that shows TRH modulates the activity of MCH neurons. Using whole-cell current-clamp recording, we unexpectedly found that TRH and its agonist, montrelin, dose-dependently inhibited MCH neurons. Consistent with previous reports, TRH excited hypocretin/orexin neurons. No effect was observed on arcuate nucleus POMC or NPY neurons. The TRH inhibition of MCH neurons was eliminated by bicuculline and tetrodotoxin, suggesting that the effect was mediated indirectly through synaptic mechanisms. TRH increased spontaneous IPSC frequency without affecting amplitude and had no effect on miniature IPSCs or EPSCs. Immunocytochemistry revealed little interaction between TRH axons and MCH neurons, but showed TRH axons terminating on or near GABA neurons. TRH inhibition of MCH neurons was attenuated by Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) inhibitors, TRPC channel blockers and the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122. TRH excited LH GABA neurons, and this was also reduced by NCX inhibitors. Finally, TRH attenuated the excitation of MCH neurons by hypocretin. Together, our data suggest that TRH inhibits MCH neurons by increasing synaptic inhibition from local GABA neurons. Inhibition of MCH neurons may contribute to the TRH-mediated reduction in food intake and sleep.

  3. The orexigenic effect of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is influenced by sex and stage of the estrous cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santollo, Jessica; Eckel, Lisa A

    2008-03-18

    Recently, it was shown that the orexigenic effect of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is attenuated by estradiol treatment in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. This suggests that female rats may be less responsive than male rats to the behavioral effects of MCH. To investigate this hypothesis, the effects of lateral ventricular infusions of MCH on food intake, water intake, meal patterns, and running wheel activity were examined in male and female rats. To further characterize the impact of estradiol on MCH-induced food intake, female rats were OVX and tested with and without 17-beta-estradiol benzoate (EB) replacement. In support of our hypothesis, food and water intakes following MCH treatment were greater in male rats, relative to female rats. Specifically, the orexigenic effect of MCH was maximal in male rats and minimal in EB-treated OVX rats. In both sexes, the orexigenic effect of MCH was mediated by a selective increase in meal size, which was attenuated in EB-treated OVX rats. MCH-induced a short-term (2 h) decrease in wheel running that, unlike its effects on ingestive behavior, was similar in males and females. Thus, estradiol decreases some, but not all, of the behavioral effects of MCH. To examine the influence of endogenous estradiol, food intake was monitored following MCH treatment in ovarian-intact, cycling rats. As predicted by our findings in OVX rats, the orexigenic effect of MCH was attenuated in estrous rats, relative to diestrous rats. We conclude that the female rat's reduced sensitivity to the orexigenic effect of MCH may contribute to sex- and estrous cycle-related differences in food intake.

  4. Temporal dynamics of epidermal responses of guppies Poecilia reticulata to a sublethal range of waterborne zinc concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, C; Marcogliese, D J; Scott, M E

    2009-12-01

    This study assessed the histological changes in the epidermis of guppies Poecilia reticulata induced by waterborne zinc (Zn). Laboratory-reared P. reticulata fry were maintained individually in separate vessels containing artificial water (8 microg l(-1) Zn) to which 0, 15, 30, 60 or 120 microg l(-1) Zn was added. Their epidermal response to Zn was monitored regularly over 4 weeks. Compared with controls, mucus was rapidly released and mucous cell numbers decreased at all concentrations. Thereafter mucous release, epidermal thickness, numbers and size of mucous cells fluctuated at a rate that varied with Zn concentration, but fluctuations declined after day 18. Results clearly highlight the dynamic nature of the epidermal response to sublethal concentrations of waterborne Zn. In general, low concentrations of Zn induced a rapid response with reduced numbers and size of mucous cells and shift in mucin composition, and a subsequent thickening of the epidermis. Epidermal thickness and mucous cell area fluctuated over time but were normal after a month of exposure to low Zn concentrations. The number of mucous cells, however, remained low. Virtually all mucous cells from fish maintained in 15 and 60 microg l(-1) Zn contained acidic mucins throughout the month, whereas fish maintained at 30 microg l(-1) Zn responded by production of neutral mucins during the first 12 days followed by a mixture of neutral and acidic mucins. At 120 microg l(-1) Zn, the most dramatic effects were the gradual but sustained decrease in numbers and area of mucous cells, and the shift to acidic mucins in these cells. Thus, as concentration of Zn increased, the epidermal responses indicated a disturbed host response (dramatic decline in mucous cell numbers, with mixed composition of mucins), which may have been less effective in preventing Zn uptake across the epithelium.

  5. In vitro induction of melanin synthesis and extrusion by tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamá, T; Araújo, R; Preto, A; Cavaco-Paulo, A; Gomes, A C

    2013-08-01

    Physical appearance has significant importance psychologically and socially, with skin and hair being of prime relevance. Effective ingredients that modulate melanin synthesis are of growing interest. Tamoxifen, a widely used selective oestrogen receptor modulator, SERM, was described occasionally in medical case reports as causing grey hair repigmentation. This work aimed to study, in vitro, the effect of tamoxifen and 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen, one of its most bioactive derivatives, on melanin production in human melanocytes. Adult normal human epidermal melanocytes (NHEM) were treated with physiological concentrations of tamoxifen and 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen during 72 hours. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage. Total melanin was quantified by spectrophotometry, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was determined by competitive ELISA. The relative mRNA levels of several genes involved in melanogenesis were investigated by real-time PCR. Under the conditions used, the results showed that tamoxifen and 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen treatments, none of them toxic to NHEM, induced a time-dependent increase in the amount of melanin released to the culture medium. cAMP, one of the major second messenger in signalling pathways important to melanogenesis, was decreased after treatment. The transcript levels of genes coding for catalase, premelanosome protein and melan-A, directly related to skin and hair pigmentation, showed an increased tendency upon tamoxifen and 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen treatment. Induction of catalase gene expression in NHEM points towards a promelanogenic effect mediated by ROS. According to the results, even in such a short treatment period, tamoxifen and 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen promoted melanin extrusion and they seem to act as melanogenesis stimulators at the molecular level. Our data suggest that SERMs might be a new tool for increasing melanogenesis and might be of great interest for topical formulations in cosmetic industry. © 2013 John

  6. Melanin-Concentrating Hormone and Its MCH-1 Receptor: Relationship Between Effects on Alcohol and Caloric Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Camilla; Aziz, Abdul Maruf Asif; Rehman, Faazal; Pitcairn, Caleb; Barchiesi, Riccardo; Barbier, Estelle; Wendel Hansen, Mikaela; Gehlert, Don; Steensland, Pia; Heilig, Markus; Thorsell, Annika

    2016-10-01

    Reward and energy homeostasis are both regulated by a network of hypothalamic neuropeptide systems. The melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and its MCH-1 receptor (MCH1-R) modulate alcohol intake, but it remains unknown to what extent this reflects actions on energy balance or reward. Here, we evaluated the MCH1-R in regulation of caloric intake and motivation to consume alcohol in states of escalated consumption. Rats had intermittent access (IA) to alcohol and were divided into high- and low-drinking groups. Food and alcohol consumption was assessed after administration of an MCH1-R antagonist, GW803430. Next, GW803430 was evaluated on alcohol self-administration in protracted abstinence induced by IA in high-drinking rats. Finally, the effect of GW803430 was assessed on alcohol self-administration in acute withdrawal in rats exposed to alcohol vapor. Gene expression of MCH and MCH1-R was measured in the hypothalamus and nucleus accumbens (NAc) in both acute and protracted abstinence. High-drinking IA rats consumed more calories from alcohol than chow and GW803430 decreased both chow and alcohol intake. In low-drinking rats, only food intake was affected. In protracted abstinence from IA, alcohol self-administration was significantly reduced by pretreatment with GW803430 and gene expression of both MCH and the MCH1-R were dysregulated in hypothalamus and NAc. In contrast, during acute withdrawal from vapor exposure, treatment with GW803430 did not affect alcohol self-administration, and no changes in MCH or MCH1-R gene expression were observed. Our data suggest a dual role of MCH and the MCH1-R in regulation of alcohol intake, possibly through mechanisms involving caloric intake and reward motivation. A selective suppression of alcohol self-administration during protracted abstinence by GW803430 was observed and accompanied by adaptations in gene expression of MCH and MCH1-R. Selective suppression of escalated consumption renders the MCH1-R an attractive target

  7. Meta-analysis of melanin-concentrating hormone signaling-deficient mice on behavioral and metabolic phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenkichi Takase

    Full Text Available The demand for meta-analyses in basic biomedical research has been increasing because the phenotyping of genetically modified mice does not always produce consistent results. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH has been reported to be involved in a variety of behaviors that include feeding, body-weight regulation, anxiety, sleep, and reward behavior. However, the reported behavioral and metabolic characteristics of MCH signaling-deficient mice, such as MCH-deficient mice and MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1-deficient mice, are not consistent with each other. In the present study, we performed a meta-analysis of the published data related to MCH-deficient and MCHR1-deficient mice to obtain robust conclusions about the role of MCH signaling. Overall, the meta-analysis revealed that the deletion of MCH signaling enhanced wakefulness, locomotor activity, aggression, and male sexual behavior and that MCH signaling deficiency suppressed non-REM sleep, anxiety, responses to novelty, startle responses, and conditioned place preferences. In contrast to the acute orexigenic effect of MCH, MCH signaling deficiency significantly increased food intake. Overall, the meta-analysis also revealed that the deletion of MCH signaling suppressed the body weight, fat mass, and plasma leptin, while MCH signaling deficiency increased the body temperature, oxygen consumption, heart rate, and mean arterial pressure. The lean phenotype of the MCH signaling-deficient mice was also confirmed in separate meta-analyses that were specific to sex and background strain (i.e., C57BL/6 and 129Sv. MCH signaling deficiency caused a weak anxiolytic effect as assessed with the elevated plus maze and the open field test but also caused a weak anxiogenic effect as assessed with the emergence test. MCH signaling-deficient mice also exhibited increased plasma corticosterone under non-stressed conditions, which suggests enhanced activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. To the best of our

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH and hypocretin-1 (HCRT-1, orexin-A in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank M Schmidt

    Full Text Available Ancillary to decline in cognitive abilities, patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD frequently suffer from behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD. Hypothalamic polypeptides such as melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH and hypocretin-1 (HCRT-1, orexin-A are promoters of sleep-wake regulation and energy homeostasis and are found to impact on cognitive performance. To investigate the role of MCH and HCRT-1 in AD, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels were measured in 33 patients with AD and 33 healthy subjects (HS using a fluorescence immunoassay (FIA. A significant main effect of diagnosis (F(1,62 = 8.490, p<0.01 on MCH levels was found between AD (93.76±13.47 pg/mL and HS (84.65±11.40 pg/mL. MCH correlated with T-tau (r = 0.47; p<0.01 and P-tau (r = 0.404; p<0.05 in the AD but not in the HS. CSF-MCH correlated negatively with MMSE scores in the AD (r = -0.362, p<0.05 and was increased in more severely affected patients (MMSE≤20 compared to HS (p<0.001 and BPSD-positive patients compared to HS (p<0.05. In CSF-HCRT-1, a significant main effect of sex (F(1,31 = 4.400, p<0.05 with elevated levels in females (90.93±17.37 pg/mL vs. 82.73±15.39 pg/mL was found whereas diagnosis and the sex*diagnosis interaction were not significant. Elevated levels of MCH in patients suffering from AD and correlation with Tau and severity of cognitive impairment point towards an impact of MCH in AD. Gender differences of CSF-HCRT-1 controversially portend a previously reported gender dependence of HCRT-1-regulation. Histochemical and actigraphic explorations are warranted to further elucidate alterations of hypothalamic transmitter regulation in AD.

  9. Identification of mRNAs coding for mammalian-type melanin-concentrating hormone and its receptors in the scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizusawa, Kanta; Amiya, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Takabe, Souichirou; Amano, Masafumi; Breves, Jason P; Fox, Bradley K; Grau, E Gordon; Hyodo, Susumu; Takahashi, Akiyoshi

    2012-10-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a neuromodulator, synthesized in the hypothalamus, that regulates both appetite and energy homeostasis in mammals. MCH was initially identified in teleost fishes as a pituitary gland hormone that induced melanin aggregation in chromatophores in the skin; however, this function of MCH has not been observed in other vertebrates. Recent studies suggest that MCH is involved in teleost feeding behavior, spurring the hypothesis that the original function of MCH in early vertebrates was appetite regulation. The present study reports the results of cDNAs cloning encoding preproMCH and two MCH receptors from an elasmobranch fish, Sphyrna lewini, a member of Chondrichthyes, the earliest diverged class in gnathostomes. The putative MCH peptide is composed of 19 amino acids, similar in length to the mammalian MCH. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that MCH is expressed in the hypothalamus in S. lewini MCH cell bodies and fibers were identified by immunochemistry in the hypothalamus, but not in the pituitary gland, suggesting that MCH is not released via the pituitary gland into general circulation. MCH receptor genes mch-r1 and mch-r2 were expressed in the S. lewini hypothalamus, but were not found in the skin. These results indicate that MCH does not have a peripheral function, such as a melanin-concentrating effect, in the skin of S. lewini hypothalamic MCH mRNA levels were not affected by fasting, suggesting that feeding conditions might not affect the expression of MCH in the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Computational model of heterogeneous heating in melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellicker, Jason; DiMarzio, Charles A.; Kowalski, Gregory J.

    2015-03-01

    Melanin particles often present as an aggregate of smaller melanin pigment granules and have a heterogeneous surface morphology. When irradiated with light within the absorption spectrum of melanin, these heterogeneities produce measurable concentrations of the electric field that result in temperature gradients from thermal effects that are not seen with spherical or ellipsoidal modeling of melanin. Modeling melanin without taking into consideration the heterogeneous surface morphology yields results that underestimate the strongest signals or over{estimate their spatial extent. We present a new technique to image phase changes induced by heating using a computational model of melanin that exhibits these surface heterogeneities. From this analysis, we demonstrate the heterogeneous energy absorption and resulting heating that occurs at the surface of the melanin granule that is consistent with three{photon absorption. Using the three{photon dluorescence as a beacon, we propose a method for detecting the extents of the melanin granule using photothermal microscopy to measure the phase changes resulting from the heating of the melanin.

  11. Characterization of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and its receptor in chickens: Tissue expression, functional analysis, and fasting-induced up-regulation of hypothalamic MCH expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lin; Lv, Can; Zhang, Jiannan; Mo, Chunheng; Lin, Dongliang; Li, Juan; Wang, Yajun

    2017-06-05

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a neuropeptide expressed in the brain and exerts its actions through interaction with the two known G protein-coupled receptors, namely melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 and 2 (MCHR1 and MCHR2) in mammals. However, the information regarding the expression and functionality of MCH and MCHR(s) remains largely unknown in birds. In this study, using RT-PCR and RACE PCR, we amplified and cloned a MCHR1-like receptor, which is named cMCHR4 according to its evolutionary origin, and a MCHR2 from chicken brain. The cloned cMCHR4 was predicted to encode a receptor of 367 amino acids, which shares high amino acid identities with MCHR4 of ducks (90%), western painted turtles (85%), and coelacanths (77%), and a comparatively low identity to human MCHR1 (58%) and MCHR2 (38%), whereas chicken MCHR2 encodes a putative C-terminally truncated receptor and is likely a pseudogene. Using cell-based luciferase reporter assays or Western blot, we further demonstrated that chicken (and duck) MCHR4 could be potently activated by chicken MCH 1-19 , and its activation can elevate calcium concentration and activate MAPK/ERK and cAMP/PKA signaling pathways, indicating an important role of MCHR4 in mediating MCH actions in birds. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that both cMCH and cMCHR4 mRNA are expressed in various brain regions including the hypothalamus, and cMCH expression in the hypothalamus of 3-week-old chicks could be induced by 36-h fasting, indicating that cMCH expression is correlated with energy balance. Taken together, characterization of chicken MCH and MCHR4 will aid to uncover the conserved roles of MCH across vertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Peripheral injections of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonist S38151 decrease food intake and body weight in rodent obesity models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Zuana, Odile; Audinot, Valérie; Levenez, Viviane; Ktorza, Alain; Presse, Françoise; Nahon, Jean-Louis; Boutin, Jean A

    2012-01-01

    The compound S38151 is a nanomolar antagonist that acts at the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH(1)). S38151 is more stable than its purely peptide counterpart, essentially because of the blockade of its N-terminus. Therefore, its action on various models of obesity was studied. Acute intra-cerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of S38151 in wild-type rats counteracted the effect of the stable precursor of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), NEI-MCH, in a dose-dependent manner (from 0.5 to 50 nmol/kg). In genetically obese Zucker fa/fa rats, daily i.c.v. administration of S38151 induced dose-dependent (5, 10, and 20 nmol/kg) inhibition of food intake, water intake, and body weight gain, as well as increased motility (maximal effect observed at 20 nmol/kg). In Zucker fa/fa rats, intraperitoneal injection of S38151 (30 mg/kg) induced complete inhibition of food consumption within 1 h. Daily intraperitoneal injection of S38151 (10 and 30 mg/kg) into genetically obese ob/ob mice or diet-induced obese mice is able to limit body weight gain. Furthermore, S38151 administration (10 and 30 mg/kg) does not affect food intake, water intake, or body weight gain in MCHR1-deleted mice, demonstrating that its effects are linked to its interaction with MCH(1). These results validate MCH(1) as a target of interest in obesity. S38151 cannot progress to the clinical phase because it is still too poorly stable in vivo.

  13. Photoelectrochemical properties of melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Arturo Solis; Maria E. Lara; Luis E. Rendon

    2007-01-01

    Melanin is to the animal kingdom like chlorophyll to the vegetal kingdom(1). Melanin collects energy from lower-energy radiation sources, kicks electrons into excited states, initiating a process that would end up producing chemical energy, similar to the way in which photosynthesis supplies energy to plants. However, the precise roles of melanin during this process are unknown. Here we show that the increase in the electron-transfer properties of melanin is independent of the energy of the i...

  14. Fluorescent quantification of melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Bruno Pacheco; Matamá, Maria Teresa; Guimarães, Diana Isabel Pereira; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Melanin quantification is reportedly performed by absorption spectroscopy, commonly at 405 nm. Here, we propose the implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy for melanin assessment. In a typical in vitro assay to assess melanin production in response to an external stimulus, absorption spectroscopy clearly overvalues melanin content. This method is also incapable of distinguishing non-melanotic/amelanotic control cells from those that are actually capable of performing melanogenesis. Theref...

  15. Control of ventricular ciliary beating by the melanin concentrating hormone-expressing neurons of the lateral hypothalamus: a functional imaging survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conductier, Grégory; Martin, Agnès O; Risold, Pierre-Yves; Jego, Sonia; Lavoie, Raphaël; Lafont, Chrystel; Mollard, Patrice; Adamantidis, Antoine; Nahon, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    The cyclic peptide Melanin Concentrating Hormone (MCH) is known to control a large number of brain functions in mammals such as food intake and metabolism, stress response, anxiety, sleep/wake cycle, memory, and reward. Based on neuro-anatomical and electrophysiological studies these functions were attributed to neuronal circuits expressing MCHR1, the single MCH receptor in rodents. In complement to our recently published work (1) we provided here new data regarding the action of MCH on ependymocytes in the mouse brain. First, we establish that MCHR1 mRNA is expressed in the ependymal cells of the third ventricle epithelium. Second, we demonstrated a tonic control of MCH-expressing neurons on ependymal cilia beat frequency using in vitro optogenics. Finally, we performed in vivo measurements of CSF flow using fluorescent micro-beads in wild-type and MCHR1-knockout mice. Collectively, our results demonstrated that MCH-expressing neurons modulate ciliary beating of ependymal cells at the third ventricle and could contribute to maintain cerebro-spinal fluid homeostasis.

  16. A new strategy to improve the predictive ability of the local lazy regression and its application to the QSAR study of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiazhong; Li, Shuyan; Lei, Beilei; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun; Liu, Mancang; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-04-15

    In the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study, local lazy regression (LLR) can predict the activity of a query molecule by using the information of its local neighborhood without need to produce QSAR models a priori. When a prediction is required for a query compound, a set of local models including different number of nearest neighbors are identified. The leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-CV) procedure is usually used to assess the prediction ability of each model, and the model giving the lowest LOO-CV error or highest LOO-CV correlation coefficient is chosen as the best model. However, it has been proved that the good statistical value from LOO cross-validation appears to be the necessary, but not the sufficient condition for the model to have a high predictive power. In this work, a new strategy is proposed to improve the predictive ability of LLR models and to access the accuracy of a query prediction. The bandwidth of k neighbor value for LLR is optimized by considering the predictive ability of local models using an external validation set. This approach was applied to the QSAR study of a series of thienopyrimidinone antagonists of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1. The obtained results from the new strategy shows evident improvement compared with the commonly used LOO-CV LLR methods and the traditional global linear model. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 polymorphisms are associated with components of energy balance in the Complex Diseases in the Newfoundland Population: Environment and Genetics (CODING) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine-Bisson, Bénédicte; Thorburn, James; Gregory, Anne; Zhang, Hongwei; Sun, Guang

    2014-02-01

    The melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that regulates energy balance and body composition in animal models. Inconsistent effects of MCHR1 polymorphisms on energy homeostasis in humans may partly be attributable to environmental factors. We examined the effect of 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs133073, rs133074, rs9611386, and rs882111) in the MCHR1 gene on body composition as well as energy-related lifestyle factors (diet and physical activity). We also examined the effect of gene-lifestyle interactions on body composition. A total of 1153 participants (248 men and 905 women) from the cross-sectional Complex Diseases in the Newfoundland Population: Environment and Genetics (CODING) study were genotyped by using probe-based chemistry validated assays. Diet and physical activity were estimated by using validated frequency questionnaires, and body composition was assessed by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Three polymorphisms (rs9611386, rs882111, and rs133073) were associated with differences in body-composition measurements (all P physical activity score on body-composition measurements (all P composition and interact with physiologic and energy-related lifestyle factors.

  18. Melanin-Concentrating Hormone acts through hypothalamic kappa opioid system and p70S6K to stimulate acute food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Picó, Amparo; Sanchez-Rebordelo, Estrella; Imbernon, Monica; González-Touceda, David; Folgueira, Cintia; Senra, Ana; Fernø, Johan; Blouet, Clémence; Cabrera, Roberto; van Gestel, Margriet; Adan, Roger A; López, Miguel; Maldonado, Rafael; Nogueiras, Ruben; Diéguez, Carlos

    2018-03-01

    Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH) is one of the most relevant orexigenic factors specifically located in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), with its physiological relevance demonstrated in studies using several genetically manipulated mice models. However, the central mechanisms controlling MCH-induced hyperphagia remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we show that central injection of MCH in mice deficient for kappa opoid receptor (k-OR) failed to stimulate feeding. To determine the hypothalamic area responsible for this MCH/k-OR interaction, we performed virogenetic studies and found that downregulation of k-OR by adeno-associated viruses (shOprk1-AAV) in LHA, but not in other hypothalamic nuclei, was sufficient to block MCH-induced food intake. Next, we sought to investigate the molecular signaling pathway within the LHA that mediates acute central MCH stimulation of food intake. We found that MCH activates k-OR and that increased levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) are associated with downregulation of phospho-S6 Ribosomal Protein. This effect was prevented when a pharmacological inhibitor of k-OR was co-administered with MCH. Finally, the specific activation of the direct upstream regulator of S6 (p70S6K) in the LHA attenuated MCH-stimulated food consumption. Our results reveal that lateral hypothalamic k-OR system modulates the orexigenic action of MCH via the p70S6K/S6 pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Litter size determines the number of melanin-concentrating hormone neurons in the medial preoptic area of Sprague Dawley lactating dams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jozelia Gomes Pacheco; Duarte, Jessica Catharine Gomes; Diniz, Giovanne Baroni; Bittencourt, Jackson Cioni

    2017-11-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone [MCH] is an important neuromodulator related to motivated behaviors. The MCH-containing neurons are mainly located in the lateral hypothalamic area, zona incerta, and incerto-hypothalamic area. In the medial preoptic area [MPOA], a key region for the regulation of maternal behavior, Pmch mRNA expression and MCH synthesis can be detected exclusively during the lactation period. As litter size affects different parameters of maternal physiology, the aim of this study was to verify whether litter size can modulate the number of MCH-containing neurons in the MPOA of lactating rats. The dams were divided into the following groups: postpartum day 12, 15, or 19, with a large, small or reduced litter. Our results show that the number of MCH-immunoreactive neurons in the MPOA is positively correlated with the number of pups in the litter and that artificially reducing the number of pups can also decrease the number of MCH-immunoreactive neurons in the MPOA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Control of ventricular ciliary beating by the Melanin Concentrating Hormone-expressing neurons of the lateral hypothalamus : a functional imaging survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory eConductier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The cyclic peptide Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH is known to control a large number of brain functions in mammals such as food intake and metabolism, stress response, anxiety, sleep/wake cycle, memory and reward. Based on neuroanatomical and electrophysiological studies these functions were attributed to neuronal circuits expressing MCHR1, the single MCH receptor in rodents. In complement to our recently published work (Conductier et al. 2013 we provided here new data regarding the action of MCH on ependymocytes in the mouse brain. First, we establish that MCHR1 mRNA is expressed in the ependymal cells of the third ventricle epithelium. Second, we demonstated a tonic control of MCH-expressing neurons on ependymal cilia beat frequency using in vitro optogenics. Finally, we performed in vivo measurements of CSF flow using fluorescent micro-beads in wild-type and MCHR1 knockout mice. Collectively, our results demonstrated that MCH-expressing neurons modulate ciliary beating of ependymal cells at the third ventricle and could contribute to maintain cerebro-spinal fluid homeostasis.

  1. Translational Modeling to Guide Study Design and Dose Choice in Obesity Exemplified by AZD1979, a Melanin-concentrating Hormone Receptor 1 Antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennemark, P; Trägårdh, M; Lindén, D; Ploj, K; Johansson, A; Turnbull, A; Carlsson, B; Antonsson, M

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we present the translational modeling used in the discovery of AZD1979, a melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHr1) antagonist aimed for treatment of obesity. The model quantitatively connects the relevant biomarkers and thereby closes the scaling path from rodent to man, as well as from dose to effect level. The complexity of individual modeling steps depends on the quality and quantity of data as well as the prior information; from semimechanistic body-composition models to standard linear regression. Key predictions are obtained by standard forward simulation (e.g., predicting effect from exposure), as well as non-parametric input estimation (e.g., predicting energy intake from longitudinal body-weight data), across species. The work illustrates how modeling integrates data from several species, fills critical gaps between biomarkers, and supports experimental design and human dose-prediction. We believe this approach can be of general interest for translation in the obesity field, and might inspire translational reasoning more broadly. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  2. Demonstration of tyrosinase in the vitiligo skin of human beings by a sensitive fluorometric method as well as by 14C(U)-L-tyrosine incorporation into melanin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, I.; Vijayan, E.; Ramaiah, A.; Pasricha, J.S.; Madan, N.C.

    1982-03-01

    Tyrosinase activity (Monophenol, dihydroxyphenylalanine: oxygen oxidoreductase EC 1.14.18.1) in vitiligo and normal epidermal homogenates of skin from human beings was measured by estimating beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) by a highly sensitive fluorometric method described in this paper. The tyrosine activity in the vitiligo skin was about 4 to 37% of corresponding normal skin. The activity of tyrosinase in normal human skin from different individuals and from different regions of the body was in the range of 4 to 140 picomoles of beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine formed per min/mg protein of epidermal homogenate. The enzyme from vitiligo and normal skin was severely inhibited by substance(s) of low molecular weight. The enzyme exhibits a lag of about 4 hr in the absence of added beta 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 1 hr in presence of 5 microM dopa. Tyrosinase from the normal and vitiligo skin was inhibited by excess concentration of tyrosine. The homogenates from vitiligo skin could synthesize melanin from C14(U)-L-Tyrosine. The rate of tyrosine incorporation into melanin by the epidermal homogenates is increased by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) disproportionate to its effect on tyrosinase activity. Based on the data presented in this paper it is concluded that melanocytes are present in the vitiligo skin. A tentative hypothesis is put forward to explain the lack of melanin synthesis by the vitiligo skin under in vivo conditions, although melanocytes are present.

  3. Antiradiation properties of melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Bushmanov A.Ju.; Ivanov А.А.; Andrianova I.E.; Stavrakova N.M.; Bulinina T.M.; Dorozhkina O.V.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: to examine the therapeutic efficiency of melanin administered to mice after irradiation at lethal and sublethal doses. Material and methods: Survival and hematological states were studied on CD-1 mice receiving on acute or fractionated whole-body doses on X-rays or gamma-irradiation. Melanin soluble was given with water ad libitum from the first to the 30th-day after irradiation. Results. It was shown that melanin produced a significant therapeutic and protective-therapeutic action again...

  4. Antibodies Against Melanin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... \\Vith the later more refined preparations using baboon eye melanin, very little residual melanin could be demon- strated subcutaneom!y. The usual appearance was that seen after injection of Freund's adjuvant, with large spaces, foam cells, occasional giant cells and epithelioid type granulomas (Fig. 4).

  5. (melanin) production in Streptomyces

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    ultraviolet radiation (Vinarov et al., 2002). Melanins are frequently used in medicine, pharmacology, and cosmetics preparations. Biosynthesis of melanin with .... is quite difficult to determine, whether the diffusible pigments produced are melanoid (dark brown) or merely a brown substance, especially when complex organic ...

  6. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  7. A novel and selective melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonist ameliorates obesity and hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yayoi; Okuda, Shoki; Hotta, Natsu; Igawa, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Masashi; Ikoma, Minoru; Kasai, Shizuo; Ando, Ayumi; Satomi, Yoshinori; Nishida, Mayumi; Nakayama, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Syunsuke; Nagisa, Yasutaka; Takekawa, Shiro

    2017-02-05

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), a cyclic neuropeptide expressed predominantly in the lateral hypothalamus, plays an important role in the control of feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. Mice lacking MCH or MCH1 receptor are resistant to diet-induced obesity (DIO) and MCH1 receptor antagonists show potent anti-obesity effects in preclinical studies, indicating that MCH1 receptor is a promising target for anti-obesity drugs. Moreover, recent studies have suggested the potential of MCH1 receptor antagonists for treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In the present study, we show the anti-obesity and anti-hepatosteatosis effect of our novel MCH1 receptor antagonist, Compound A. Repeated oral administration of Compound A resulted in dose-dependent body weight reduction and had an anorectic effect in DIO mice. The body weight lowering effect of Compound A was more potent than that of pair-feeding. Compound A also reduced lipid content and the expression level of lipogenesis-, inflammation-, and fibrosis-related genes in the liver of DIO mice. Conversely, intracerebroventricular infusion of MCH caused induction of hepatic steatosis as well as increase in body weight in high-fat diet-fed wild type mice, but not MCH1 receptor knockout mice. The pair-feeding study revealed the MCH-MCH1 receptor system affects hepatic steatosis through a mechanism that is independent of body weight change. Metabolome analysis demonstrated that Compound A upregulated lipid metabolism-related molecules, such as acylcarnitines and cardiolipins, in the liver. These findings suggest that our novel MCH1 receptor antagonist, Compound A, exerts its beneficial therapeutic effect on NAFLD and obesity through a central MCH-MCH1 receptor pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression levels of genes encoding melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and MCH receptor change in taste aversion, but MCH injections do not alleviate aversive responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Anaya; Klockars, Anica; Gosnell, Blake A; Le Grevès, Madeleine; Olszewski, Pawel K; Levine, Allen S; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2012-01-01

    Melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) stimulates feeding driven by energy needs and reward and modifies anxiety behavior. Orexigenic peptides of similar characteristics, including nociceptin/orphanin FQ, Agouti-related protein and opioids, increase consumption also by reducing avoidance of potentially tainted food in animals displaying a conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Herein, using real-time PCR, we assessed whether expression levels of genes encoding MCH and its receptor, MCHR1, were affected in CTA in the rat. We also investigated whether injecting MCH intracerebroventricularly (ICV) during the acquisition and retrieval of LiCl-induced CTA, would alleviate aversive responses. MCHR1 gene was upregulated in the hypothalamus and brain stem of aversive animals, MCH mRNA was significantly higher in the hypothalamus, whereas a strong trend suggesting upregulation of MCH and MCHR1 genes was detected in the amygdala. Despite these expression changes associated with aversion, MCH injected prior to the induction of CTA with LiCl as well as later, during the CTA retrieval upon subsequent presentations of the aversive tastant, did not reduce the magnitude of CTA. We conclude that MCH and its receptor form an orexigenic system whose expression is affected in CTA. This altered MCH expression may contribute to tastant-targeted hypophagia in CTA. However, changing the MCH tone in the brain by exogenous peptide was insufficient to prevent the onset or facilitate extinction of LiCl-induced CTA. This designates MCH as one of many accessory molecules associated with shaping an aversive response, but not a critical one for LiCl-dependent CTA to occur. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Expression patterns of corticotropin-releasing factor, arginine vasopressin, histidine decarboxylase, melanin-concentrating hormone, and orexin genes in the human hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krolewski, David M; Medina, Adriana; Kerman, Ilan A; Bernard, Rene; Burke, Sharon; Thompson, Robert C; Bunney, William E; Schatzberg, Alan F; Myers, Richard M; Akil, Huda; Jones, Edward G; Watson, Stanley J

    2010-11-15

    The hypothalamus regulates numerous autonomic responses and behaviors. The neuroactive substances corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), arginine-vasopressin (AVP), histidine decarboxylase (HDC), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), and orexin/hypocretins (ORX) produced in the hypothalamus mediate a subset of these processes. Although the expression patterns of these genes have been well studied in rodents, less is known about them in humans. We combined classical histological techniques with in situ hybridization histochemistry to produce both 2D and 3D images and to visually align and quantify expression of the genes for these substances in nuclei of the human hypothalamus. The hypothalamus was arbitrarily divided into rostral, intermediate, and caudal regions. The rostral region, containing the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), was defined by discrete localization of CRF- and AVP-expressing neurons, whereas distinct relationships between HDC, MCH, and ORX mRNA-expressing neurons delineated specific levels within the intermediate and caudal regions. Quantitative mRNA signal intensity measurements revealed no significant differences in overall CRF or AVP expression at any rostrocaudal level of the PVN. HDC mRNA expression was highest at the level of the premammillary area, which included the dorsomedial and tuberomammillary nuclei as well as the dorsolateral hypothalamic area. In addition, the overall intensity of hybridization signal exhibited by both MCH and ORX mRNA-expressing neurons peaked in distinct intermediate and caudal hypothalamic regions. These results suggest that human hypothalamic neurons involved in the regulation of the HPA axis display distinct neurochemical patterns that may encompass multiple local nuclei. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Chronic heart failure alters orexin and melanin concentrating hormone but not corticotrophin releasing hormone-related gene expression in the brain of male Lewis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Linda F; Hampton, Erin E; Ferreira, Leonardo F; Christou, Demetra D; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Hernandez, Morgan E; Martin, Eric J

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic heart failure (HF; 16 weeks post left coronary artery ligation) on the brain's orexin (ORX) and related neuropeptide systems. Indicators of cardiac function, including the percent fractional shortening (%FS) left ventricular posterior wall shortening velocity (LVPWSV) were assessed via echocardiography at 16 weeks post myocardial infarction or sham treatment in male Lewis rats (n=5/group). Changes in gene expression in HF versus control (CON) groups were quantified by real-time PCR in the hypothalamus, amygdala and dorsal pons. HF significantly reduced both the %FS and LVPWSV when compared to CON animals (Pgene expression was significantly reduced in HF and correlated with changes in cardiac function when compared to CON (Pgene expression were identified. Alternatively hypothalamic melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) gene expression was significantly upregulated in HF animals and negatively correlated with LVPWSV (P<0.006). In both the amygdala and dorsal pons ORX type 2 receptor expression was significantly down-regulated in HF compared to CON. ORX receptor type 1, CRH and CRH type 1 and type 2 receptor expressions were unchanged by HF in all brain regions analyzed. These observations support previous work demonstrating that cardiovascular disease modulates the ORX system and identify that in the case of chronic HF the ORX system is altered in parallel with changes in MCH expression but independent of any significant changes in the central CRH system. This raises the new possibility that ORX and MCH systems may play an important role in the pathophysiology of HF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic deletion of melanin-concentrating hormone neurons impairs hippocampal short-term synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent forms of short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Barillier, Léa; Léger, Lucienne; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice; Malleret, Gaël; Salin, Paul-Antoine

    2015-11-01

    The cognitive role of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons, a neuronal population located in the mammalian postero-lateral hypothalamus sending projections to all cortical areas, remains poorly understood. Mainly activated during paradoxical sleep (PS), MCH neurons have been implicated in sleep regulation. The genetic deletion of the only known MCH receptor in rodent leads to an impairment of hippocampal dependent forms of memory and to an alteration of hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. By using MCH/ataxin3 mice, a genetic model characterized by a selective deletion of MCH neurons in the adult, we investigated the role of MCH neurons in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent forms of memory. MCH/ataxin3 mice exhibited a deficit in the early part of both long-term potentiation and depression in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. Post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) was diminished while synaptic depression induced by repetitive stimulation was enhanced suggesting an alteration of pre-synaptic forms of short-term plasticity in these mice. Behaviorally, MCH/ataxin3 mice spent more time and showed a higher level of hesitation as compared to their controls in performing a short-term memory T-maze task, displayed retardation in acquiring a reference memory task in a Morris water maze, and showed a habituation deficit in an open field task. Deletion of MCH neurons could thus alter spatial short-term memory by impairing short-term plasticity in the hippocampus. Altogether, these findings could provide a cellular mechanism by which PS may facilitate memory encoding. Via MCH neuron activation, PS could prepare the day's learning by increasing and modulating short-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effects of a novel potent melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonist, AZD1979, on body weight homeostasis in mice and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploj, Karolina; Benthem, Lambertus; Kakol-Palm, Dorota; Gennemark, Peter; Andersson, Liselotte; Bjursell, Mikael; Börjesson, Jenny; Kärrberg, Lillevi; Månsson, Marianne; Antonsson, Madeleine; Johansson, Anders; Iverson, Suzanne; Carlsson, Björn; Turnbull, Andrew; Lindén, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is an orexigen, and while rodents express one MCH receptor (MCH1 receptor), humans, non-human primates and dogs express two MCH receptors (MCH1 and MCH2 ). MCH1 receptor antagonists have been developed for the treatment of obesity and lower body weight in rodents. However, the mechanisms for the body weight loss and whether MCH1 receptor antagonism can lower body weight in species expressing both MCH receptors are not fully understood. A novel recently identified potent MCH1 receptor antagonist, AZD1979, was studied in wild type and Mchr1 knockout (KO) mice and by using pair-feeding and indirect calorimetry in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. The effect of AZD1979 on body weight was also studied in beagle dogs. AZD1979 bound to MCH1 receptors in the CNS and dose-dependently reduced body weight in DIO mice leading to improved homeostasis model assessment-index of insulin sensitivity. AZD1979 did not affect food intake or body weight in Mchr1 KO mice demonstrating specificity for the MCH1 receptor mechanism. In DIO mice, initial AZD1979-mediated body weight loss was driven by decreased food intake, but an additional component of preserved energy expenditure was apparent in pair-feeding and indirect calorimetry studies. AZD1979 also dose-dependently reduced body weight in dogs. AZD1979 is a novel potent MCH1 receptor antagonist that affects both food intake and energy expenditure. That AZD1979 also lowers body weight in a species expressing both MCH receptors holds promise for the use of MCH1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of human obesity. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua: tissue distributions, early ontogeny and effects of fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuziak, Sarah M; Volkoff, Hélène

    2013-12-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is classically known for its role in regulating teleost fish skin color change for environmental adaptation. Recent evidence suggests that MCH also has appetite-stimulating properties. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) peptide family has dual roles in endocrine control of reproduction and energy status in fish. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are a commercially important aquaculture species inhabiting the shores of Atlantic Canada. In this study, we examine MCH and GnRH transcript expression profiles during early development as well as in central and peripheral tissues and quantify juvenile Atlantic cod MCH and GnRH hypothalamic mRNA expressions following food deprivation. MCH and GnRH3 cDNAs are maternally deposited into cod eggs, while MCH has variable expression throughout early development. GnRH2 and GnRH3 mRNAs "turn-on" during mid-segmentation once the brain is fully developed. For both MCH and GnRH, highest expression appears during the exogenous feeding stages, perhaps supporting their functions as appetite regulators during early development. MCH and GnRH transcripts are found in brain regions related to appetite regulation (telencephalon/preoptic area, optic tectum/thalamus, hypothalamus), as well as the pituitary gland and the stomach, suggesting a peripheral function in food intake regulation. Atlantic cod MCH mRNA is upregulated during fasting, while GnRH2 and GnRH3 transcripts do not appear to be influenced by food deprivation. In conclusion, MCH might be involved in stimulating food intake in juvenile Atlantic cod, while GnRHs may play a more significant role in appetite regulation during early development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of melanin concentrating hormone (MCH in the central chemoreflex: a knockdown study by siRNA in the lateral hypothalamus in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningjing Li

    Full Text Available Melanin concentrating hormone (MCH, a neuropeptide produced mainly in neurons localized to the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA, has been implicated in the regulation of food intake, energy balance, sleep state, and the cardiovascular system. Hypothalamic MCH neurons also have multisynaptic connections with diaphragmatic motoneurons and project to many central chemoreceptor sites. However, there are few studies of MCH involvement in central respiratory control. To test the hypothesis that MCH plays a role in the central chemoreflex, we induced a down regulation of MCH in the central nervous system by knocking down the MCH precursor (pMCH mRNA in the LHA using a pool of small interfering RNA (siRNA, and measured the resultant changes in breathing, metabolic rate, body weight, and blood glucose levels in conscious rats. The injections of pMCH-siRNA into the LHA successfully produced a ∼ 62% reduction of pMCH mRNA expression in the LHA and a ∼ 43% decrease of MCH levels in the cerebrospinal fluid relative to scrambled-siRNA treatment (P = 0.006 and P = 0.02 respectively. Compared to the pretreatment baseline and the scrambled-siRNA treated control rats, knockdown of MCH resulted in: 1 an enhanced hypercapnic chemoreflex (∼ 42 & 47% respectively; P < 0.05 only in wakefulness; 2 a decrease in body weight and basal glucose levels; and 3 an unchanged metabolic rate. Our results indicate that MCH participates not only in the regulation of glucose and sleep-wake homeostasis but also the vigilance-state dependent regulation of the central hypercapnic chemoreflex and respiratory control.

  15. Effect of UV irradiation on free radicals in synthetic melanin and melanin biopolymer from Sepia officinalis – EPR examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdybel Magdalena

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals in synthetic melanin and melanin from Sepia officinalis were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy. The effect of time of ultraviolet (UV irradiation on free radicals in these melanins was tested. The samples were exposed to UV during 15, 30, and 60 minutes. EPR spectra were measured with microwaves from an X-band (9.3 GHz in the range of microwave power of 2.2–70 mW. The performed EPR examinations indicate that high concentrations (~1021–1022 spin/g of o-semiquinone free radicals with g factors of 2.0039–2.0045 exist in all the tested samples. For nonirradiated samples, free radical concentration was higher in natural melanin than in synthetic melanin. UV irradiation caused the increase of free radical concentrations in synthetic melanin samples and this effect depends on the time of irradiation. The largest free radical formation in the both melanins was obtained for 60 min of UV irradiation. Free radical concentrations after the UV irradiation of melanins during 30 min were lower than during irradiation by 15 min, and probably this effect was the result of recombination of the radiatively formed free radicals. EPR lines of the tested samples broadened with increasing microwave power, so these lines were homogeneously broadened. The two types of melanins differed in the time of spin-lattice relaxation processes. Slower spin-lattice relaxation processes exist in melanin from Sepia officinalis than in synthetic melanin. UV irradiation did not change the time of spin-lattice relaxation processes in the tested melanins. The performed studies confirmed the usefulness of EPR spectroscopy in cosmetology and medicine.

  16. Antiradiation properties of melanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushmanov A.Ju.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to examine the therapeutic efficiency of melanin administered to mice after irradiation at lethal and sublethal doses. Material and methods: Survival and hematological states were studied on CD-1 mice receiving on acute or fractionated whole-body doses on X-rays or gamma-irradiation. Melanin soluble was given with water ad libitum from the first to the 30th-day after irradiation. Results. It was shown that melanin produced a significant therapeutic and protective-therapeutic action against acute radiation injury in the dose range 6,5-7,5 Gy (LD80-LD under our conditions. Cumulative survival melanin treated mice was increased to 14,4%, in control group — 1,9%. After fractionated injury (1 Gy daily, total dose 10 Gy all mice which consumed melanin remained alive, versus 43,7% in control. Melanin decreased radiation-induced damage and stimulated the hematopoiesis recovery after sublethal exposure (5Gy. Conclusion. The results permit to regard melanin as a therapeutic agent for treatment of radiation injuries.

  17. Melanin, melanin "ghosts," and melanin composition in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Y; Aisen, P; Casadevall, A

    1996-01-01

    Melanin synthesis is associated with virulence for the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans. Exposure of nonmelanized C. neoformans 4067 cells to 4 M guanidinium isothiocyanate followed by 6 M HCl at 100 degrees C resulted in complete solubilization of cellular structures. However, exposure of melanized C. neoformans 24067 to the same conditions produced a suspension of black particles. Analysis of black particles with transmission and scanning electron microscopy revealed cell "ghosts" ...

  18. Melanin: A scavenger in gingival inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Nilima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the major direct or indirect targets of ultraviolet exposure of skin is the melanocyte or the melanin -forming cell. Epidermal melanocytes act as a trap for free radicals. Based on the protective role of melanocytes in medical literature, the role of melanin pigmentation in gingiva needs to be elucidated. Periodontal pathogens and their products demonstrate the ability to induce the generation of reactive oxygen species. Hence purpose of this study was to unravel the protective role of melanin (if any against the gingival inflammation. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 subjects; 20 in each group were selected. The selection of subjects regarding gingival pigmentation was based on Dummett′s scoring criteria 0, 3. A complete medical, dental history and an informed consent were obtained from the patients. After evaluation of clinical parameters the GCF was collected using microcapillary pipettes at the selected sites. IL-1β levels were quantitated using ELISA. Results: In non-pigmented healthy and gingivitis groups, there was a positive correlation between plaque index, gingival index and bleeding index versus IL-1β level: indicating an increase in the biochemical mediator of inflammation corresponding to an increase in the clinical parameters of inflammation. Also a positive correlation was found between the gingival index and bleeding index versus the IL-1β levels in the pigmented healthy group. The pigmented gingivitis groups showed a negative correlation between the plaque index, gingival index and bleeding index. Conclusions: The clinical markers of inflammation such as gingival index, bleeding index was of low numerical value in pigmented group than in the non-pigmented group, supposedly due to the protective action of melanin. The negative correlation of clinical markers of inflammation to the IL-1β levels in the pigmented gingivitis group could possibly be attributed to the protective role of melanins.

  19. Melanin determination by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for K. marxianus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultraviolet light (UV) mutated K. marxianus was found to turn dark brown during a growth assay. This brown color was hypothesized to be melanin overproduction influenced by the UV exposure. Cell cultures were oxidized and HPLC analyzed to determine melanin concentrations. The resulting melanin con...

  20. (melanin) production in Streptomyces

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    the classification of the Stretomyces group. Key words: Pigment, melanin, Streptomyeces, taxonomy. INTRODUCTION. Actinomycetes also synthesizes and ... various microorganisms by the fermentative oxidation, and have the radioprotective and antioxidant properties that can effectively protect the living organisms from.

  1. Melanins are Biological Diamonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Venger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article the physical, chemical, biological properties, the significance and the role in Nature of melanin pigments are considered. Very long time these pigments were considered as metabolism garbage in the living organisms. The comparison of the only same results and facts from the huge masses of the science information with main principles of the new science paradigm – the Theory of Torsion Fields and the Theory of Physical Vacuum – allow to change the view on the true invention, the biological role and the functions of Melanins in Nature. Many theoretical and experimental facts specify on the active participation of melanins in the energyand-informative processes and their first degree role on the all evolution stages of living organisms: from the chemical evolution to the brain and consciousness functions. In the sense Melanins are the most precious substance for the living organisms, true their Diamonds.

  2. Paradoxical (REM) sleep deprivation in mice using the small-platforms-over-water method: polysomnographic analyses and melanin-concentrating hormone and hypocretin/orexin neuronal activation before, during and after deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthaud, Sebastien; Varin, Christophe; Gay, Nadine; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Chauveau, Frederic; Fort, Patrice; Luppi, Pierre-Herve; Peyron, Christelle

    2015-06-01

    Studying paradoxical sleep homeostasis requires the specific and efficient deprivation of paradoxical sleep and the evaluation of the subsequent recovery period. With this aim, the small-platforms-over-water technique has been used extensively in rats, but only rare studies were conducted in mice, with no sleep data reported during deprivation. Mice are used increasingly with the emergence of transgenic mice and technologies such as optogenetics, raising the need for a reliable method to manipulate paradoxical sleep. To fulfil this need, we refined this deprivation method and analysed vigilance states thoroughly during the entire protocol. We also studied activation of hypocretin/orexin and melanin-concentrating hormone neurones using Fos immunohistochemistry to verify whether mechanisms regulating paradoxical sleep in mice are similar to those in rats. We showed that 48 h of deprivation was highly efficient, with a residual amount of paradoxical sleep of only 2.2%. Slow wave sleep and wake quantities were similar to baseline, except during the first 4 h of deprivation, where slow wave sleep was strongly reduced. After deprivation, we observed a 124% increase in paradoxical sleep quantities during the first hour of rebound. In addition, 34% of hypocretin/orexin neurones were activated during deprivation, whereas melanin-concentrated hormone neurones were activated only during paradoxical sleep rebound. Corticosterone level showed a twofold increase after deprivation and returned to baseline level after 4 h of recovery. In summary, a fairly selective deprivation and a significant rebound of paradoxical sleep can be obtained in mice using the small-platforms-over-water method. As in rats, rebound is accompanied by a selective activation of melanin-concentrating hormone neurones. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  3. Photothermal imaging of melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimo, Josef; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2013-02-01

    We present photothermal images of melanin using modulation with two laser beams. Strong melanin absorption followed by efficient nonradiative relaxation caused heating and an increase in temperature. This temperature effect was used as an imaging contrast to detect melanin. Melanin from several samples including Sepia officinalis, black human hair, and live zebra fish, were imaged with a high signal-to-noise ratio. For the imaging, we focused two near infrared laser beams (pump and probe) collinearly with different wavelengths and the pump was modulated in amplitude. The thermally induced variations in the refractive index, at the modulation frequency, were detected by the scattering of the probe beam. The Photothermal method brings several imaging benefits including the lack of background interference and the possibility of imaging for an extended period of time without photodamage to the melanin. The dependence of the photothermal signal on the laser power, modulation frequency, and spatial offset of the probe is discussed. The new photothermal imaging method is promising and provides background-free and label-free imaging of melanin and can be implemented with low-cost CW lasers.

  4. Melanin content of hamster tissues, human tissues, and various melanomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, K.P.; Fairchild, R.G.; Slatkin, D.N.; Greenberg, D.; Packer, S.; Atkins, H.L.; Hannon, S.J.

    1981-02-01

    Melanin content (percentage by weight) was determined in both pigmented and nonpigmented tissues of Syrian golden hamsters bearing Greene melanoma. Melanin content was also measured in various other melanoma models (B-16 in C57 mice, Harding-Passey in BALB/c mice, and KHDD in C3H mice) and in nine human melanomas, as well as in selected normal tissues. The purpose was to evaluate the possible efficacy of chlorpromazine, which is known to bind to melanin, as a vehicle for boron transport in neutron capture therapy. Successful therapy would depend upon selective uptake and absolute concentration of borated compounds in tumors; these parameters will in turn depend upon melanin concentration in melanomas and nonpigmented ''background'' tissues. Hamster whole eyes, hamster melanomas, and other well-pigmented animal melanomas were found to contain 0.3 to 0.8% melanin by weight, whereas human melanomas varied from 0.1 to 0.9% (average, 0.35%). Other tissues, with the exception of skin, were lower in content by a factor of greater than or equal to30. Melanin pigment was extracted from tissues, and the melanin content was determined spectrophotometrically. Measurements were found to be sensitive to the presence of other proteins. Previous procedures for isolating and quantifying melanin often neglected the importance of removing proteins and other interfering nonmelanic substances.

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Melanin from Cuttlefish and Squid Ink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuspihana Fitrial

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine environment comprises of many organism which are known to posses bioactive compound as a common means of self-defense or for the protection of eggs and embryos. Class Cephalopods (such as squidand cuttlefish are notable for their defences, such as jetting escape movements, changes in colouration, toxic venom and inking.This study aims to compare the antibacterial activity of melanin from cuttlefish ink (Sepia sp. with squid ink (Loligo sp. against E. coli. Extraction and purification studies were carried out on Sepia and Loligo melanin using a hydrochloric acid 0,5M treatment under mechanical.The melanins were obtained and further evaluated their activity by direct contact methods between melanin and E. coli in nutrient broth.Total microbes was counted by total plate count.Both inks also was tested their activity against E. coli. The results showed that melanin from cuttlefish and squid inks had inhibitory activity at concentrations of 10 mg / ml and 20 mg / mL, respectively reaching 99.99% against E. coli.The inks of both Cephalopods at the same concentration as melanin, did not show any inhibitory activity against E. coli.  The melanin of Sepia sp. have a higher antibacterial activity than the melanin of Loligo sp.

  6. Characterization of [3H]flunitrazepam binding to melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testorf, M F; Kronstrand, R; Svensson, S P; Lundström, I; Ahlner, J

    2001-11-15

    In both clinical and forensic toxicology, the analysis of hair for drugs is an important tool to determine drug use in the past or to verify abstinence from illegal drugs during extended periods. Melanin is proposed as one of the factors that influences drug incorporation to hair and we have characterized the binding of the drug flunitrazepam to melanin in vitro. The drug was 3H labeled and melanin granules from cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, were used according to the suggested standard for melanin studies. We observed a rapid Langmuir-like binding followed by a slower diffusion-limited binding that may be interpreted as an initial surface binding followed by deeper bulk binding. From three concentrations of melanin, with a 60-min incubation time, a mean saturation value of 180 +/- 20 pmol/mg was calculated. The binding of a group of benzodiazepines and tranquilizers was compared to the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam by means of displacement experiments. These drugs showed binding characteristics similar to [3H]flunitrazepam except phenobarbital, which had a lower affinity to melanin. The method presented in this study allowed measurements with low melanin and drug concentrations and it has the strength of directly measuring the amount of drug bound to melanin, in contrast to previous indirect methods. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  7. Tyrisonase inhibition and melanin reduction of human melanocytes (HEMn-MP) using Anacardium occidentale L extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Gaffar, R; Abdul Majid, F A; Sarmidi, M R

    2008-07-01

    Cashew (Anacardium occindentale L) leaves extract (CLE) has potential as tyrosinase inhibitor that can be used for therapeutic in pigmentation problem. This study investigates the real potential of CLE to inhibit tyrosinase and melanin reduction using human epidermal melanocytes. The extracts were exposed to the human melanocytes for more than 24 hours. The CLE extract exhibited potential as tyrosinase inhibitor, reduced melanin and high in antioxidant activity relative to commercial extract of Emblica sp.

  8. Ultraviolet B, melanin and mitochondrial DNA: Photo-damage in human epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes modulated by alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Böhm

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH increases melanogenesis and protects from UV-induced DNA damage. However, its effect on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage is unknown. We have addressed this issue in a pilot study using human epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes incubated with alpha-MSH and irradiated with UVB. Real-time touchdown PCR was used to quantify total and deleted mtDNA. The deletion detected encompassed the common deletion but was more sensitive to detection. There were 4.4 times more mtDNA copies in keratinocytes than in melanocytes. Irradiation alone did not affect copy numbers. Alpha-MSH slightly increased copy numbers in both cell types in the absence of UVB and caused a similar small decrease in copy number with dose in both cell types. Deleted copies were nearly twice as frequent in keratinocytes as in melanocytes. Alpha-MSH reduced the frequency of deleted copies by half in keratinocytes but not in melanocytes. UVB dose dependently led to an increase in the deleted copy number in alpha-MSH-treated melanocytes. UVB irradiation had little effect on deleted copy number in alpha-MSH-treated keratinocytes. In summary, alpha-MSH enhances mtDNA damage in melanocytes presumably by increased melanogenesis, while α-MSH is protective in keratinocytes, the more so in the absence of irradiation.

  9. Epidermal growth factor causes hypocalcemia in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, G P; Wilkinson, M; Panaretto, B A; Delbridge, L W; Posen, S

    1986-04-01

    During iv infusions of epidermal growth factor into sheep, serum calcium concentrations fell, whereas serum magnesium and serum immunoreactive PTH levels increased. Urinary calcium and magnesium decreased significantly. The role of epidermal growth factor in calcium homeostasis is discussed.

  10. Melanin pigmented solar absorbing surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallas, J.M.; Eisner, M.

    1980-01-01

    Selectivity enhancement is shown to result for melanin, a black biopolymer pigment, for sufficiently low sample density. The effect is proposed to follow from a consideration of the evanescent waves associated with the total internal reflection phenomenon. A relationship is discussed among powder density, pH and the paramagnetic properties of melanin; this relationship is shown to be consistent with, and offer support to an amino-acid side group proposed earlier as part of the melanin structure. A brief discussion is also presented on the optical properties of melanin and the relative importance of quinhydrone, a change transfer complex believed to exist in the polymeric structure of melanin.

  11. The epidermal growth factor-like domain of the human cartilage large aggregating proteoglycan, aggrecan: increased serum concentration in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H J; Ingemann-Hansen, T; Poulsen, J H

    1994-01-01

    The large aggregating proteoglycan from human cartilage, aggrecan, has recently been shown to possess an immunologically detectable domain with close homology to epidermal growth factor (EGF), that is variably expressed by alternative mRNA splicing. Using a competitive ELISA we detected this domain...... in sera from both patients with RA and normal controls. The EGF-like domain could only be detected after digestion of sera with chondroitinase ABC, which demonstrates its proteoglycan origin. The concentration of the aggrecan EGF-like domain was considerably elevated in sera from patients with RA...

  12. Effect of melanin, oxyhemoglobin and bilirubin on transcutaneous bilirubinometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onks, D; Silverman, L; Robertson, A

    1993-01-01

    To determine the effect of skin pigments on transcutaneous bilirubinometer readings, we measured the effect of bilirubin, melanin, and oxyhemoglobin solutions on transcutaneous bilirubinometer readings in vitro. Our results showed that the variability of the readings in vitro was related to the instrument's non-linear response to bilirubin and melanin concentration and an inaccurate oxyhemoglobin correction factor. These factors should be considered in developing a more accurate non-invasive method of monitoring serum bilirubin concentration.

  13. Antibodies Against Melanin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... This study reports on unsuccessful attempts to produce antibodies against melanoprotein in rabbits. Available evidence suggests antibodies against melanocytes in the aetiology of vitiligo, but there is no convincing evidence for antibodies against melanin per se. It is suggested that the demonstration of ...

  14. The epidermal melanocyte system in individuals of Scandinavian origin, determined by DOPA-staining and TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drzewiecki, K T; Piltz-Drzewiecka, J

    1979-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of DOPA-positive epidermal melanocytes in 16 patients of Scandinavian origin showed both individual and regional differences in the melanocyte count. Our data is in agreement with other published studies. The distribution in the number of melanocytes varies significant...... concerning the presence of the epidermal melanin unit....

  15. Differential Antifungal Activity of Human and Cryptococcal Melanins with Structural Discrepancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Correa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Melanin is a pigment found in all biological kingdoms, and plays a key role in protection against ultraviolet radiation, oxidizing agents, and ionizing radiation damage. Melanin exerts an antimicrobial activity against bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We demonstrated an antifungal activity of synthetic and human melanin against Candida sp. The members of the Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii species complexes are capsulated yeasts, which cause cryptococcosis. For both species melanin is an important virulence factor. To evaluate if cryptococcal and human melanins have antifungal activity against Cryptococcus species they both were assayed for their antifungal properties and physico-chemical characters. Melanin extracts from human hair and different strains of C. neoformans (n = 4 and C. gattii (n = 4 were investigated. The following minimum inhibitory concentrations were found for different melanins against C. neoformans and C. gattii were (average/range: 13.7/(7.8–15.6 and 19.5/(15.6–31.2 μg/mL, respectively, for human melanin; 273.4/(125–>500 and 367.2/(125.5–>500 μg/mL for C. neoformans melanin and 125/(62.5–250 and 156.2/(62–250 μg/mL for C. gattii melanin. Using Scanning Electron Microscopy we observed that human melanin showed a compact conformation and cryptococcal melanins exposed an amorphous conformation. Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR showed some differences in the signals related to C-C bonds of the aromatic ring of the melanin monomers. High Performance Liquid Chromatography established differences in the chromatograms of fungal melanins extracts in comparison with human and synthetic melanin, particularly in the retention time of the main compound of fungal melanin extracts and also in the presence of minor unknown compounds. On the other hand, MALDI-TOF-MS analysis showed slight differences in the spectra, specifically the presence of a minor intensity ion in synthetic and human melanin, as well as in some fungal

  16. Leaf stomatal and epidermal cell development: identification of putative quantitative trait loci in relation to elevated carbon dioxide concentration in poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Rachel; Long, L; Bunn, S M; Robinson, K M; Bradshaw, H D; Rae, A M; Taylor, Gail

    2002-06-01

    Genetic variation in stomatal initiation and density, and epidermal cell size and number were examined in a hybrid pedigree of Populus trichocarpa T. & G. and P. deltoides Marsh in both ambient ([aCO2]) and elevated ([eCO2]) concentrations of CO2. We aimed to link anatomical traits with the underlying genetic map of F2 Family 331, composed of 350 markers across 19 linkage groups. Leaf stomatal and epidermal cell traits showed pronounced differences between the original parents. We considered the following traits in the F2 population: stomatal density (SD), stomatal index (SI), epidermal cell area (ECA) and the number of epidermal cells per leaf (ECN). In [eCO2], adaxial SD and SI were reduced in the F2 population, whereas ECA increased and ECN remained unchanged. In [aCO2], four putative quantitative trait loci (QTL) with logarithm of the odds ratio (LOD) scores greater than 2.9 were found for stomatal traits on linkage group B: adaxial SI (LOD scores of 5.4 and 5.2); abaxial SI (LOD score of 3.3); and SD (LOD score of 3.2). These results imply that QTL for SI and SD share linkage group B and are under genetic control. More moderate LOD scores (LOD scores >/= 2.5) suggest QTL for SI on linkage groups A and B and for SD on linkage groups B, D and X with a probable co-locating quantitative trait locus for SI and SD on linkage group D (position 46.3 cM). The QTL in both [aCO2] and [eCO2] for adaxial SD were co-located on linkage group X (LOD scores of 3.5 and 2.6, respectively) indicating a similar response across both treatments. Putative QTL were located on linkage group A (position 89.2 cM) for both leaf size and ECN in [aCO2] and for ECA at almost the same position. The data provide preliminary evidence that leaf stomatal and cell traits are amenable to QTL analysis.

  17. Comparative EPR studies of free radicals in melanin synthesized by Bacillus weihenstephanensis soil strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Drewnowska, Justyna M.; Swiecicka, Izabela

    2017-07-01

    EPR spectroscopy was used to examine the properties of and free radical concentrations in atypical water-soluble melanin-like pigments from Bacillus weihenstephanensis strains. The same EPR spectral shape was observed in bacterial melanins as in eumelanin. The EPR lines were homogeneously broadened. Continuous microwave saturation of the EPR lines indicated slow spin-lattice relaxation processes in the samples. Strong dipolar interactions characterized the tested melanin samples. Higher free radical concentrations were found in bacterial melanin than in synthetic melanin. The free radical concentrations in melanin from B. weihenstephanensis increased in the following order: strain JAS 81/4 < JAS 83/3 < JAS 86/1 < JAS 39/1.

  18. Quantitative variation of melanins in alpaca (Lama pacos L.

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    Marco Antonini

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The amount of melanin pigments was investigated in 95 Peruvian alpaca, representative of six different fleece colours, by means of spectrophotometric assays: SpEM (Spectrophoto­metric Eumelanin, SpPM (Spectrophotometric Pheomelanin, SpASM (Spectrophotometric Alkali Soluble Melanin, and SpTM (Spectro­photometric Total Melanin. It was found that these melanin pigments were suitable for identifying three homogeneous groups, each consisting of two closely related colours. A low, an intermediate, and a high amount of SpASM, SpTM, and SpPM characterize pinkish grey and light reddish brown, brown and reddish brown, dark reddish brown and black fleeces, respectively. SpEM and SpTM provide a further split within this latter group; higher concentrations of these pigments distinguish black fleece from dark reddish brown.

  19. Ions doped melanin nanoparticle as a multiple imaging agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Shin-Woo; Cho, Hee-Sang; Yoon, Young Il; Jang, Moon-Sun; Hong, Kwan Soo; Hui, Emmanuel; Lee, Jung Hee; Yoon, Tae-Jong

    2017-10-10

    Multimodal nanomaterials are useful for providing enhanced diagnostic information simultaneously for a variety of in vivo imaging methods. According to our research findings, these multimodal nanomaterials offer promising applications for cancer therapy. Melanin nanoparticles can be used as a platform imaging material and they can be simply produced by complexation with various imaging active ions. They are capable of specifically targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-expressing cancer cells by being anchored with a specific antibody. Ion-doped melanin nanoparticles were found to have high bioavailability with long-term stability in solution, without any cytotoxicity in both in vitro and in vivo systems. By combining different imaging modalities with melanin particles, we can use the complexes to obtain faster diagnoses by computed tomography deep-body imaging and greater detailed pathological diagnostic information by magnetic resonance imaging. The ion-doped melanin nanoparticles also have applications for radio-diagnostic treatment and radio imaging-guided surgery, warranting further proof of concept experimental.

  20. Analysis of the prognostic value of soluble epidermal growth factor receptor plasma concentration in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Sirera, Rafael; Cabrera, Andrea; Blasco, Ana; Caballero, Cristina; Iranzo, Vega; Rosell, Rafael; Camps, Carlos

    2011-09-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in a variety of epithelial malignancies including lung cancer. A soluble fragment of the EGFR extracellular domain (sEGFR) can be detected in the blood of patients who have non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but its clinical/ prognostic role must be further elucidated. sEGFR concentration was retrospectively determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in plasma samples from 308 advanced NSCLC patients (before treatment) and 109 healthy controls and correlated with clinico-pathological variables. The concentration of sEGFR was lower in NSCLC patients than in controls (P concentration and demographic/clinical characteristics such as gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, stage, and number or location of the metastatic sites. sEGFR was lower in patients with progressive disease or in squamous cell carcinoma compared with adenocarcinoma, but these differences were not significant. Patients with sEGFR ≤ 34.56 ng/mL showed a shorter overall survival (median 9.1 versus 12.2 months, P = .019) than others. Moreover, in multivariate analysis, sEGFR remained a significant independent prognostic marker. Low baseline sEGFR is associated with reduced survival in advanced NSCLC. Therefore, our findings in this large cohort of patients suggest that the determination of sEGFR concentration provides valuable prognostic information. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Data on melanin production in B16F1 melanoma cells in the presence of emu oil

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    Minoru Ito

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present data on the effects of emu oil, obtained from emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae fat deposits, on melanogenesis in B16F1 murine melanoma cells. The cells were cultured in media containing different concentrations of emu oil, and the melanin content of these cells was measured using a microplate reader. Next, melanin content was measured for cells cultured with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. This article reports the different melanin contents as μg melanin/mg cellular protein, by using bar graphs with error bars. The present data imply that emu oil reduces the cellular melanin production.

  2. LASP1, a Newly Identified Melanocytic Protein with a Possible Role in Melanin Release, but Not in Melanoma Progression.

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    Anjana Vaman V S

    Full Text Available The LIM and SH3 protein 1 (LASP1 is a focal adhesion protein. Its expression is increased in many malignant tumors. However, little is known about the physiological role of the protein. In the present study, we investigated the expression and function of LASP1 in normal skin, melanocytic nevi and malignant melanoma. In normal skin, a distinct LASP1 expression is visible only in the basal epidermal layer while in nevi LASP1 protein is detected in all melanocytes. Melanoma exhibit no increase in LASP1 mRNA compared to normal skin. In melanocytes, the protein is bound to dynamin and mainly localized at late melanosomes along the edges and at the tips of the cell. Knockdown of LASP1 results in increased melanin concentration in the cells. Collectively, we identified LASP1 as a hitherto unknown protein in melanocytes and as novel partner of dynamin in the physiological process of membrane constriction and melanosome vesicle release.

  3. Sponge-Associated Bacteria Produce Non-cytotoxic Melanin Which Protects Animal Cells from Photo-Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Vijitha; Jasmin, Chekidhenkuzhiyil; Anas, Abdulaziz; Parakkaparambil Kuttan, Sreelakshmi; Vinothkumar, Saradavey; Perunninakulath Subrayan, Parameswaran; Nair, Shanta

    2017-09-01

    Melanin is a photo-protective polymer found in many organisms. Our research shows that the bacteria associated with darkly pigmented sponges (Haliclona pigmentifera, Sigmadocia pumila, Fasciospongia cavernosa, Spongia officinalis, and Callyspongia diffusa) secrete non-cytotoxic melanin, with antioxidant activity that protects animal cells from photo-toxicity. Out of 156 bacterial strains screened, 22 produced melanin and these melanin-producing bacteria (MPB) were identified as Vibrio spp., Providencia sp., Bacillus sp., Shewanella sp., Staphylococcus sp., Planococcus sp., Salinococcus sp., and Glutamicibacter sp. Maximum melanin production was exhibited by Vibrio alginolyticus Marine Microbial Reference Facility (MMRF) 534 (50 mg ml -1 ), followed by two isolates of Vibrio harveyi MMRF 535 (40 mg ml -1 ) and MMRF 546 (30 mg ml -1 ). Using pathway inhibition assay and FT-IR spectral analysis, we identified the melanin secreted into the culture medium of MPB as 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene-melanin. The bacterial melanin was non-cytotoxic to mouse fibroblast L929 cells and brine shrimps up to a concentration of 200 and 500 ppm, respectively. Bacterial melanin showed antioxidant activity at very low concentration (IC 50 -9.0 ppm) and at 50 ppm, melanin protected L929 cells from UV-induced intracellular reactive oxygen stress. Our study proposes sponge-associated bacteria as a potential source of non-cytotoxic melanin with antioxidant potentials.

  4. Melanin-Based Functional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ischia, Marco

    2018-01-12

    Melanin biopolymers are currently the focus of growing interest for a broad range of applications at the cutting edge of biomedical research and technology. This Special Issue presents a collection of papers dealing with melanin-type materials, e.g., polydopamine, for classic and innovative applications, offering a stimulating perspective of current trends in the field. Besides basic scientists, the Special Issue is directed to researchers from industries and companies that are willing to invest in melanin research for innovative and inspiring solutions.

  5. Melanin-Based Functional Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco d’Ischia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanin biopolymers are currently the focus of growing interest for a broad range of applications at the cutting edge of biomedical research and technology. This Special Issue presents a collection of papers dealing with melanin-type materials, e.g., polydopamine, for classic and innovative applications, offering a stimulating perspective of current trends in the field. Besides basic scientists, the Special Issue is directed to researchers from industries and companies that are willing to invest in melanin research for innovative and inspiring solutions.

  6. Amine-free melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists: Novel non-basic 1-(2H-indazole-5-yl)pyridin-2(1H)-one derivatives and mitigation of mutagenicity in Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Masashi; Ikoma, Minoru; Kaku, Hiromi; Kakegawa, Keiko; Kina, Asato; Aida, Jumpei; Okuda, Shoki; Kawata, Yayoi; Noguchi, Toshihiro; Hotta, Natsu; Yamamoto, Syunsuke; Nakayama, Masaharu; Nagisa, Yasutaka; Kasai, Shizuo; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    To develop non-basic melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) antagonists with a high probability of target selectivity and therapeutic window, we explored neutral bicyclic motifs that could replace the previously reported imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine or 1H-benzimidazole motif. The results indicated that the binding affinity of a chemically neutral 2H-indazole derivative 8a with MCHR1 (hMCHR1: IC50=35nM) was comparable to that of the imidazopyridine and benzimidazole derivatives (1 and 2, respectively) reported so far. However, 8a was positive in the Ames test using TA1537 in S9- condition. Based on a putative intercalation of 8a with DNA, we introduced a sterically-hindering cyclopropyl group on the indazole ring to decrease planarity, which led to the discovery of 1-(2-cyclopropyl-3-methyl-2H-indazol-5-yl)-4-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)thiophen-3-yl]methoxy}pyridin-2(1H)-one 8l without mutagenicity in TA1537. Compound 8l exerted significant antiobesity effects in diet-induced obese F344 rats and exhibited promising safety profile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assignment of the human pro-melanin-concentrating hormone gene (PMCH) to chromosome 12q23-q24 and two variant genes (PMCHL1 and PMCHL2) to chromosome 5p14 and 5q12-q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedeutour, F. (Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire des Cancers Humans, Nice (France)); Szpirer, C. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Rhode-St-Genese (Belgium)); Nahon, J.L. (Institut de Pharmacologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Valbonne (France))

    1994-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a peptide that has been isolated from salmon pituitary and rat hypothalamus. In mammals, pro-MCH (PMCH) encodes two putative peptides, named NEI and NGE, in addition to MCH. Those peptides are expressed predominantly in hypothalamus and display a broad array of functions in rat brain. The authors have previously mapped the PMCH locus on human chromosome 12q and rat chromosome 7. Genomic cloning has revealed the existence of two distinct MCH genes in human: one authentic and one variant. In this report, they describe Southern blotting analysis with DNA from a panel of somatic cell hybrids and demonstrate that the authentic human MCH (hMCH) gene is located as expected on chromosome 12, while the variant form of hMCH gene is located on chromosome 5. Direct chromosomal assignment of the authentic and variant hMCH genes was obtained by using fluorescence in situ hybridization on metaphase chromosomes. A strong signal was observed in 12q23-q24 with the authentic HMCH genomic DNA probe. Surprisingly, two signals were conspicuously found in 5p14 and 5q12-q13 with different variant hMCH genomic DNA probes. These loci were designated PMCHL1 and PMCHL2. Evidence of physiological and pathological data in rodents together with locus linkage analyses in human suggests that hMCH authentic and variant genes may be involved in human brain disorders. 44 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. E-cadherin mediates ultraviolet radiation- and calcium-induced melanin transfer in human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suman K; Baker, Richard; Sikkink, Stephen K; Nizard, Carine; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Kurfurst, Robin; Tobin, Desmond J

    2017-11-01

    Skin pigmentation is directed by epidermal melanin units, characterized by long-lived and dendritic epidermal melanocytes (MC) that interact with viable keratinocytes (KC) to contribute melanin to the epidermis. Previously, we reported that MC:KC contact is required for melanosome transfer that can be enhanced by filopodi, and by UVR/UVA irradiation, which can upregulate melanosome transfer via Myosin X-mediated control of MC filopodia. Both MC and KC express Ca 2+ -dependent E-cadherins. These homophilic adhesion contacts induce transient increases in intra-KC Ca 2+ , while ultraviolet radiation (UVR) raises intra-MC Ca 2+ via calcium-selective ORAI1 ion channels; both are associated with regulating melanogenesis. However, how Ca 2+ triggers melanin transfer remains unclear. Here we evaluated the role of E-cadherin in UVR-mediated melanin transfer in human skin cells. MC and KC in human epidermis variably express filopodia-associated E-cadherin, Cdc42, VASP and β-catenin, all of which were upregulated by UVR in human MC in vitro. Knockdown of E-cadherin revealed that this cadherin is essential for UVR-induced MC filopodia formation and melanin transfer. Moreover, Ca 2+ induced a dose-dependent increase in filopodia formation and melanin transfer, as well as increased β-catenin, Cdc42, Myosin X and E-cadherin expression in these skin cells. Together, these data suggest that filopodial proteins and E-cadherin, which are upregulated by intracellular (UVR-stimulated) and extracellular Ca 2+ availability, are required for filopodia formation and melanin transfer. This may open new avenues to explore how Ca 2+ signalling influences human pigmentation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Examination by EPR spectroscopy of free radicals in melanins isolated from A-375 cells exposed on valproic acid and cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodurek, Ewa; Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Dzierzewicz, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Drug binding by melanin biopolymers influence the effectiveness of the chemotherapy, radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy. Free radicals of melanins take part in formation of their complex with drugs. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of the two compounds: valproic acid (VPA) and cisplatin (CPT) on free radicals properties of melanin isolated from A-375 melanoma cells. Free radicals were examined by an X-band (9.3 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. EPR spectra were measured for the model synthetic eumelanin - DOPA-melanin, the melanin isolated from the control A-375 cells and these cells treated by VPA, CPT and both VPA and CPT. For all the examined samples broad EPR lines (deltaBpp: 0.48-0.68 mT) with g-factors of 2.0045-2.0060 characteristic for o-semiquinone free radicals were observed. Free radicals concentrations (N) in the tested samples, g-factors, amplitudes (A), integral intensities (I) and linewidths (deltaBpp) of the EPR spectra, were analyzed. The EPR lines were homogeneously broadened. Continuous microwave saturation of the EPR spectra indicated that slow spin-lattice relaxation processes existed in all the tested melanin samples. The relatively slowest spin-lattice relaxation processes characterized melanin isolated from A-375 cells treated with both VPA and CPT. The changes of the EPR spectra with increasing microwave power in the range of 2.2-70 mW were evaluated. Free radicals concentrations in the melanin from A-375 cells were higher than in the synthetic DOPA-melanin. The strong increase of free radicals concentration in the melanin from A-375 cells was observed after their treating by VPA. CPT also caused the increase of free radicals concentrations in the examined natural melanin. The free radicals concentration in melanin isolated from A-375 cells treated with both VPA and CPT was slightly higher than those in melanin from the control cells.

  10. Melanin-Based Functional Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Marco d’Ischia

    2018-01-01

    Melanin biopolymers are currently the focus of growing interest for a broad range of applications at the cutting edge of biomedical research and technology. This Special Issue presents a collection of papers dealing with melanin-type materials, e.g., polydopamine, for classic and innovative applications, offering a stimulating perspective of current trends in the field. Besides basic scientists, the Special Issue is directed to researchers from industries and companies that are willing to inv...

  11. Melanins Protect Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii from the Antifungal Effects of Terbinafine.

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    Rodrigo Almeida-Paes

    Full Text Available Terbinafine is a recommended therapeutic alternative for patients with sporotrichosis who cannot use itraconazole due to drug interactions or side effects. Melanins are involved in resistance to antifungal drugs and Sporothrix species produce three different types of melanin. Therefore, in this study we evaluated whether Sporothrix melanins impact the efficacy of antifungal drugs. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC of two Sporothrix brasiliensis and four Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in the presence of the melanin precursors L-DOPA and L-tyrosine were similar to the MIC determined by the CLSI standard protocol for S. schenckii susceptibility to amphotericin B, ketoconazole, itraconazole or terbinafine. When MICs were determined in the presence of inhibitors to three pathways of melanin synthesis, we observed, in four strains, an increase in terbinafine susceptibility in the presence of tricyclazole, a DHN-melanin inhibitor. In addition, one S. schenckii strain grown in the presence of L-DOPA had a higher MFC value when compared to the control. Growth curves in presence of 2×MIC concentrations of terbinafine showed that pyomelanin and, to a lesser extent, eumelanin were able to protect the fungi against the fungicidal effect of this antifungal drug. Our results suggest that melanin protects the major pathogenic species of the Sporothrix complex from the effects of terbinafine and that the development of new antifungal drugs targeting melanin synthesis may improve sporotrichosis therapies.

  12. Melanins Protect Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii from the Antifungal Effects of Terbinafine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Brito-Santos, Fábio; Almeida-Silva, Fernando; Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2016-01-01

    Terbinafine is a recommended therapeutic alternative for patients with sporotrichosis who cannot use itraconazole due to drug interactions or side effects. Melanins are involved in resistance to antifungal drugs and Sporothrix species produce three different types of melanin. Therefore, in this study we evaluated whether Sporothrix melanins impact the efficacy of antifungal drugs. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC) of two Sporothrix brasiliensis and four Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in the presence of the melanin precursors L-DOPA and L-tyrosine were similar to the MIC determined by the CLSI standard protocol for S. schenckii susceptibility to amphotericin B, ketoconazole, itraconazole or terbinafine. When MICs were determined in the presence of inhibitors to three pathways of melanin synthesis, we observed, in four strains, an increase in terbinafine susceptibility in the presence of tricyclazole, a DHN-melanin inhibitor. In addition, one S. schenckii strain grown in the presence of L-DOPA had a higher MFC value when compared to the control. Growth curves in presence of 2×MIC concentrations of terbinafine showed that pyomelanin and, to a lesser extent, eumelanin were able to protect the fungi against the fungicidal effect of this antifungal drug. Our results suggest that melanin protects the major pathogenic species of the Sporothrix complex from the effects of terbinafine and that the development of new antifungal drugs targeting melanin synthesis may improve sporotrichosis therapies.

  13. EFFECT OF CADMIUM(II) ON FREE RADICALS IN DOPA-MELANIN TESTED BY EPR SPECTROSCOPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Chodurek, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy may be applied to examine interactions of melanin with metal ions and drugs. In this work EPR method was used to examination of changes in free radical system of DOPA-melanin--the model eumelanin after complexing with diamagnetic cadmium(II) ions. Cadmium(II) may affect free radicals in melanin and drugs binding by this polymer, so the knowledge of modification of properties and free radical concentration in melanin is important to pharmacy. The effect of cadmium(II) in different concentrations on free radicals in DOPA-melanin was determined. EPR spectra of DOPA-melanin, and DOPA-melanin complexes with cadmium(II) were measured by an X-band (9.3 GHz) EPR spectrometer produced by Radiopan (Poznań, Poland) and the Rapid Scan Unit from Jagmar (Krak6w, Poland). The DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) to metal ions molar ratios in the reaction mixtures were 2:1, 1:1, and 1: 2. High concentrations of o-semiquinone (g ~2.0040) free radicals (~10(21)-10(22) spin/g) characterize DOPA-melanin and its complexes with cadmium(II). Formation of melanin complexes with cadmium(II) increase free radical concentration in DOPA-melanin. The highest free radical concentration was obtained for DOPA-melanin-cadmium(II) (1:1) complexes. Broad EPR lines with linewidths: 0.37-0.73 mT, were measured. Linewidths increase after binding of cadmium(II) to melanin. Changes of integral intensities and linewidths with increasing microwave power indicate the homogeneous broadening of EPR lines, independently on the metal ion concentration. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes existed in all the tested samples, their EPR lines saturated at low microwave powers. Cadmium(II) causes fastening of spin-lattice relaxation processes in DOPA-melanin. The EPR results bring to light the effect of cadmium(II) on free radicals in melanin, and probably as the consequence on drug binding to eumelanin.

  14. Melanosomal proteins--role in melanin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Savitha; Wagh, Sushama; Govindarajan, Raman

    2002-04-01

    Melanin, the major determinant of skin colour, is a tyrosine-based heteropolymer of indeterminate molecular weight. In vivo, melanin synthesis occurs within highly specialized organelles called melanosomes. Coated vesicles encapsulating the enzyme tyrosinase and tyrosinase related proteins, fuse with premelanosomes that contain structural proteins to form mature melanosomes. Coated vesicles and premelanosomes have been shown to have only melanin monomers but not the polymer. Our earlier results have clearly shown that the presence of proteins other than tyrosinase are critical for the post-tyrosinase steps of melanin polymerization at acidic pH. Proteins in melanosomes are difficult to purify because of their firm association with melanin. Thus, with progressive melanization, melanoproteins become progressively insoluble. In this paper, we discuss the isolation and purification of melanosomal proteins and their role in melanin polymerization. We have hypothesized that the initiation of polymerization and the binding of melanin to proteins are two discrete events and we have developed assays to quantify these events. Purified melanosomal proteins differ in their ability to polymerize melanin monomers. Further, we have also shown that two polypeptides (28 and 45 kDa) purified from melanosomes inhibit melanin polymerization but can bind preformed melanin. In conclusion, melanosomal proteins regulate melanin polymerization and differ in their ability to bind melanin. Polymerization and binding abilities of melanosomal proteins are specific to each protein and melanin-protein interaction is not nonspecific.

  15. Melanin quantification by in vitro and in vivo analysis of near-infrared fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Sunil; Zhao, Jianhua; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David; Kollias, Nikiforos; Lui, Harvey

    2018-01-01

    Objective measurements of melanin can provide important information for differentiating melanoma from benign pigmented lesions and in assessing pigmentary diseases. Herein, we evaluate near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence as a possible tool to quantify melanin. Various concentrations of in vitro Sepia melanin in tissue phantoms were measured with NIR fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Similar optic measurements were conducted in vivo on 161 normal human skin sites. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy was used to quantify the melanin content via Stamatas-Kollias algorithm. At physiologic concentrations, increasing in vitro melanin concentrations demonstrated higher fluorescence that was linearly correlated (R 2  = 0.99, p < .001). At higher concentrations, the fluorescence signal plateaued. A linear relationship was also observed with melanin content in human skin (R 2  = 0.59, p < .001). Comparing the fluorescence and reflectance signals with in vitro and in vivo samples, the estimated melanin concentration in human skin ranged between 0 and 1.25 mg/ml, consistent with previous quantitative studies involving invasive methods. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Normal Morning Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Levels and No Association with Rapid Eye Movement or Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Parameters in Narcolepsy Type 1 and Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrölkamp, Maren; Jennum, Poul J; Gammeltoft, Steen; Holm, Anja; Kornum, Birgitte R; Knudsen, Stine

    2017-02-15

    Other than hypocretin-1 (HCRT-1) deficiency in narcolepsy type 1 (NT1), the neurochemical imbalance of NT1 and narcolepsy type 2 (NT2) with normal HCRT-1 levels is largely unknown. The neuropeptide melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is mainly secreted during sleep and is involved in rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep regulation. Hypocretin neurons reciprocally interact with MCH neurons. We hypothesized that altered MCH secretion contributes to the symptoms and sleep abnormalities of narcolepsy and that this is reflected in morning cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MCH levels, in contrast to previously reported normal evening/afternoon levels. Lumbar CSF and plasma were collected from 07:00 to 10:00 from 57 patients with narcolepsy (subtypes: 47 NT1; 10 NT2) diagnosed according to International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Third Edition (ICSD-3) and 20 healthy controls. HCRT-1 and MCH levels were quantified by radioimmunoassay and correlated with clinical symptoms, polysomnography (PSG), and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) parameters. CSF and plasma MCH levels were not significantly different between narcolepsy patients regardless of ICSD-3 subtype, HCRT-1 levels, or compared to controls. CSF MCH and HCRT-1 levels were not significantly correlated. Multivariate regression models of CSF MCH levels, age, sex, and body mass index predicting clinical, PSG, and MSLT parameters did not reveal any significant associations to CSF MCH levels. Our study shows that MCH levels in CSF collected in the morning are normal in narcolepsy and not associated with the clinical symptoms, REM sleep abnormalities, nor number of muscle movements during REM or NREM sleep of the patients. We conclude that morning lumbar CSF MCH measurement is not an informative diagnostic marker for narcolepsy.

  17. D-tyrosine negatively regulates melanin synthesis by competitively inhibiting tyrosinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisu; Jung, Hyejung; Kim, Kyuri; Lim, Kyung-Min; Kim, Ji-Young; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2017-11-09

    Although L-tyrosine is well known for its melanogenic effect, the contribution of D-tyrosine to melanin synthesis was previously unexplored. Here, we reveal that, unlike L-tyrosine, D-tyrosine dose-dependently reduced the melanin contents of human MNT-1 melanoma cells and primary human melanocytes. In addition, 500 μM of D-tyrosine completely inhibited 10 μM L-tyrosine-induced melanogenesis, and both in vitro assays and L-DOPA staining MNT-1 cells showed that tyrosinase activity is reduced by D-tyrosine treatment. Thus, D-tyrosine appears to inhibit L-tyrosine-mediated melanogenesis by competitively inhibiting tyrosinase activity. Furthermore, we found that D-tyrosine inhibited melanogenesis induced by α-MSH treatment or UV irradiation, which are the most common environmental factors responsible for melanin synthesis. Finally, we confirmed that D-tyrosine reduced melanin synthesis in the epidermal basal layer of a 3D human skin model. Taken together, these data suggest that D-tyrosine negatively regulates melanin synthesis by inhibiting tyrosinase activity in melanocyte-derived cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Fungal melanins differ in planar stacking distances.

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    Arturo Casadevall

    Full Text Available Melanins are notoriously difficult to study because they are amorphous, insoluble and often associated with other biological materials. Consequently, there is a dearth of structural techniques to study this enigmatic pigment. Current models of melanin structure envision the stacking of planar structures. X ray diffraction has historically been used to deduce stacking parameters. In this study we used X ray diffraction to analyze melanins derived from Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus niger, Wangiella dermatitides and Coprinus comatus. Analysis of melanin in melanized C. neoformans encapsulated cells was precluded by the fortuitous finding that the capsular polysaccharide had a diffraction spectrum that was similar to that of isolated melanin. The capsular polysaccharide spectrum was dominated by a broad non-Bragg feature consistent with origin from a repeating structural motif that may arise from inter-molecular interactions and/or possibly gel organization. Hence, we isolated melanin from each fungal species and compared diffraction parameters. The results show that the inferred stacking distances of fungal melanins differ from that reported for synthetic melanin and neuromelanin, occupying intermediate position between these other melanins. These results suggest that all melanins have a fundamental diffracting unit composed of planar graphitic assemblies that can differ in stacking distance. The stacking peak appears to be a distinguishing universal feature of melanins that may be of use in characterizing these enigmatic pigments.

  19. Fungal melanins differ in planar stacking distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo; Nakouzi, Antonio; Crippa, Pier R; Eisner, Melvin

    2012-01-01

    Melanins are notoriously difficult to study because they are amorphous, insoluble and often associated with other biological materials. Consequently, there is a dearth of structural techniques to study this enigmatic pigment. Current models of melanin structure envision the stacking of planar structures. X ray diffraction has historically been used to deduce stacking parameters. In this study we used X ray diffraction to analyze melanins derived from Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus niger, Wangiella dermatitides and Coprinus comatus. Analysis of melanin in melanized C. neoformans encapsulated cells was precluded by the fortuitous finding that the capsular polysaccharide had a diffraction spectrum that was similar to that of isolated melanin. The capsular polysaccharide spectrum was dominated by a broad non-Bragg feature consistent with origin from a repeating structural motif that may arise from inter-molecular interactions and/or possibly gel organization. Hence, we isolated melanin from each fungal species and compared diffraction parameters. The results show that the inferred stacking distances of fungal melanins differ from that reported for synthetic melanin and neuromelanin, occupying intermediate position between these other melanins. These results suggest that all melanins have a fundamental diffracting unit composed of planar graphitic assemblies that can differ in stacking distance. The stacking peak appears to be a distinguishing universal feature of melanins that may be of use in characterizing these enigmatic pigments.

  20. Melanin-concentrating hormone inputs to the nucleus accumbens originate from distinct hypothalamic sources and are apposed to GABAergic and cholinergic cells in the Long-Evans rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemmerle, C A S; Campos, A M P; Bittencourt, J C

    2015-03-19

    Melanin-concentrating hormone [MCH] is a neuropeptide that modulates several behaviors, such as feeding and reward. Because the hedonic and rewarding features of a food also influence feeding behavior, the nucleus accumbens [Acb] has been highlighted as a key area integrating these roles. Functional data confirm that MCH acts on a subdivision of the Acb; however, considering the importance of finding anatomical and neurochemical data that correlate the previously demonstrated function of MCH, we delineated this investigation based on the following points: (1) Is there a pattern of innervation by MCH fibers regarding the subregions within the Acb? (2) Specifically, which hypothalamic nuclei synthesize MCH and innervate the Acb? (3) Finally, what are the neurochemical identities of the accumbal neurons innervated by MCH inputs? We examined the MCH immunoreactivity [MCH-ir] in the Acb in rat brains using the peroxidase technique. Additionally, after injecting retrograde neuronal tracer [Fluoro-Gold® - FG®] into subdivisions of the Acb [shell or core], we mapped single- or double-labeled cells. Moreover, using a double immunoperoxidase protocol, we investigated the MCH-ir fibers for gamma-aminobutyric acid [GABA]-ir and choline acetyltransferase [ChAT]-ir cells in the shell subdivision of the Acb [AcbSh]. We found that the MCH-ir fibers preferentially innervate the medial AcbSh, particularly the septal pole. This innervation originated from the incerto-hypothalamic area [IHy], internuclear area, lateral hypothalamic area, perifornical area, periventricular nucleus and posterior hypothalamus. Moreover, the IHy has the highest relationship between double/single retrogradely labeled cells [n=5.33±0.66/16±0.93, i.e. 33.33%] in the whole hypothalamus. Furthermore, our data suggest that MCH-ir fibers are in apposition to GABAergic and cholinergic cells in the AcbSh. Therefore, we provide anatomical support to the ongoing functional studies investigating the relation

  1. Sexual Dichromatism of the Damselfly Calopteryx japonica Caused by a Melanin-Chitin Multilayer in the Male Wing Veins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Leertouwer, Hein L.; Hariyama, Takahiko; De Raedt, Hans A.; Wilts, Bodo D.

    2012-01-01

    Mature male Calopteryx japonica damselflies have dark-blue wings, due to darkly coloured wing membranes and blue reflecting veins. The membranes contain a high melanin concentration and the veins have a multilayer of melanin and chitin. Female and immature C. japonica damselflies have brown wings.

  2. Sexual dimorphism in melanin pigmentation, feather coloration and its heritability in the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saino, Nicola; Romano, Maria; Rubolini, Diego; Teplitsky, Celine; Ambrosini, Roberto; Caprioli, Manuela; Canova, Luca; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-01-01

    Melanin is the main pigment in animal coloration and considerable variation in the concentrations of the two melanin forms (pheo- and eumlanin) in pigmented tissues exists among populations and individuals. Melanin-based coloration is receiving increasing attention particularly in socio-sexual communication contexts because the melanocortin system has been hypothesized to provide a mechanistic basis for covariation between coloration and fitness traits. However, with few notable exceptions, little detailed information is available on inter-individual and inter-population variation in melanin pigmentation and on its environmental, genetic and ontogenetic components. Here, we investigate melanin-based coloration in an Italian population of a passerine bird, the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica rustica), its sex- and age-related variation, and heritability. The concentrations of eu- and pheomelanin in the throat (brown) and belly (white-to-brownish) feathers differed between sexes but not according to age. The relative concentration of either melanin (Pheo:Eu) differed between sexes in throat but not in belly feathers, and the concentrations in males compared to females were larger in belly than in throat feathers. There were weak correlations between the concentrations of melanins within as well as among plumage regions. Coloration of belly feathers was predicted by the concentration of both melanins whereas coloration of throat feathers was only predicted by pheomelanin in females. In addition, Pheo:Eu predicted coloration of throat feathers in females and that of belly feathers in males. Finally, we found high heritability of color of throat feathers. Melanization was found to differ from that recorded in Hirundo rustica rustica from Scotland or from H. r. erythrogaster from North America. Hence, present results show that pigmentation strategies vary in a complex manner according to sex and plumage region, and also among geographical populations, potentially

  3. Sexual dimorphism in melanin pigmentation, feather coloration and its heritability in the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Saino

    Full Text Available Melanin is the main pigment in animal coloration and considerable variation in the concentrations of the two melanin forms (pheo- and eumlanin in pigmented tissues exists among populations and individuals. Melanin-based coloration is receiving increasing attention particularly in socio-sexual communication contexts because the melanocortin system has been hypothesized to provide a mechanistic basis for covariation between coloration and fitness traits. However, with few notable exceptions, little detailed information is available on inter-individual and inter-population variation in melanin pigmentation and on its environmental, genetic and ontogenetic components. Here, we investigate melanin-based coloration in an Italian population of a passerine bird, the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica rustica, its sex- and age-related variation, and heritability. The concentrations of eu- and pheomelanin in the throat (brown and belly (white-to-brownish feathers differed between sexes but not according to age. The relative concentration of either melanin (Pheo:Eu differed between sexes in throat but not in belly feathers, and the concentrations in males compared to females were larger in belly than in throat feathers. There were weak correlations between the concentrations of melanins within as well as among plumage regions. Coloration of belly feathers was predicted by the concentration of both melanins whereas coloration of throat feathers was only predicted by pheomelanin in females. In addition, Pheo:Eu predicted coloration of throat feathers in females and that of belly feathers in males. Finally, we found high heritability of color of throat feathers. Melanization was found to differ from that recorded in Hirundo rustica rustica from Scotland or from H. r. erythrogaster from North America. Hence, present results show that pigmentation strategies vary in a complex manner according to sex and plumage region, and also among geographical populations

  4. The acid-catalyzed interaction of melanin with nitrite ions. An EPR investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matuszak Zenon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of synthetic dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA melanin (DM with nitrite ions, NO2−, in the pH 3.6–7.0 range, has been investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR. We found that especially at pH <5.5 (from ca. 5.5 to 3.6 the reaction of DM with nitrite generated large quantities of new melanin radicals, which implies the involvement of nitrous acid, HNO2, in the radical formation process. Measurements carried out at constant pH of 3.6 showed that the melanin signal increased together with nitrite concentration, reaching a plateau level which was more than fourfold larger compared to the initial signal amplitude observed in a nitrite-free buffer of the same pH. The effects of nitrite and DM concentrations on the melanin-free radical content were also investigated. It is proposed that the radicals are generated by one electron oxidation of melanin ortho-hydroquinone groups to ortho-semiquinones by HNO2 or related nitrogen oxides such as NO2• radicals. The possible involvement of nitric oxide (•NO and peroxynitrite (ONOO− in DM oxidation was also examined. In air-free solutions, nitric oxide per se did not generate melanin radicals; however, in the presence of oxygen a marked increase in the melanin EPR signal intensity was observed. This result is interpreted in terms of the generation of radicals via the oxidation of DM by peroxynitrite. Our findings suggest that melanin can function as a natural scavenger of nitrous acid and some nitrous acid-derived species. This property may be relevant to physiological functions of melanin pigments in vivo.

  5. Variation of Human Hairiness: A Possible Adaptation to Solar Radiation and Melanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhugga Amrita

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many theories have been advanced to explain human hairlessness, however, there is no consensus. This study of 76 males observed that skin reflectance measuring skin colouration and melanin pigmentation correlated with hair size and follicle density. Individuals with a greater concentration of melanin within the superficial layer of the skin had a lower follicle density and smaller sizes of hairs. In contrast, individuals with a lower melanin concentration and lighter skin colour had a full range of hairiness. This leads to the suggestion that over the course of human evolution, high concentrations of melanin in consistently exposed to ultraviolet radiation areas developed first and that hair loss was a consequence of competition in the skin between melanin production and hair growth. Darker pigmented skin and lower follicle density are significantly correlated (R2=0.283; p<0.05. Individuals with darker skin had a mean of 4.91 follicles per cm2 whereas those with lighter skin reflectance had 11.20 follicles per cm2. This suggests that increased concentrations of melanin in the basal layer of the epidermis may limit hairiness by negatively influencing the skin's ability to produce hair.

  6. Sexual dichromatism of the damselfly Calopteryx japonica caused by a melanin-chitin multilayer in the male wing veins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doekele G Stavenga

    Full Text Available Mature male Calopteryx japonica damselflies have dark-blue wings, due to darkly coloured wing membranes and blue reflecting veins. The membranes contain a high melanin concentration and the veins have a multilayer of melanin and chitin. Female and immature C. japonica damselflies have brown wings. We have determined the refractive index of melanin by comparing the differently pigmented wing membranes and applying Jamin-Lebedeff interference microscopy. Together with the previously measured refractive index of chitin the blue, structural colour of the male wing veins could be quantitatively explained by an optical multilayer model. The obtained melanin refractive index data will be useful in optical studies on melanized tissues, especially where melanin is concentrated in layers, thus causing iridescence.

  7. Role of Melanin in Melanocyte Dysregulation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah C. Jenkins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported a potential alternative tumor suppressor function for p16 relating to its capacity to regulate oxidative stress and observed that oxidative dysregulation in p16-depleted cells was most profound in melanocytes, compared to keratinocytes or fibroblasts. Moreover, in the absence of p16 depletion or exogenous oxidative insult, melanocytes exhibited significantly higher basal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS than these other epidermal cell types. Given the role of oxidative stress in melanoma development, we speculated that this increased susceptibility of melanocytes to oxidative stress (and greater reliance on p16 for suppression of ROS may explain why genetic compromise of p16 is more commonly associated with predisposition to melanoma rather than other cancers. Here we show that the presence of melanin accounts for this differential oxidative stress in normal and p16-depleted melanocytes. Thus the presence of melanin in the skin appears to be a double-edged sword: it protects melanocytes as well as neighboring keratinocytes in the skin through its capacity to absorb UV radiation, but its synthesis in melanocytes results in higher levels of intracellular ROS that may increase melanoma susceptibility.

  8. EPR characteristics of free radicals in DOPA-melanin-moxifloxacin complexes at ambient level of UVA radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beberok, Artur; Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Buszman, Ewa; Wrześniok, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    EPR studies pointed out that o-semiquinone free radicals with g-values 2.0038-2.0040 take part in moxifloxacin-melanin complex formation. The process contributed to increase in free radicals concentration in nonirradiated complexes. This effect was observed for the complexes with 1 × 10-4 M, 1 × 10-3 M and 4 × 10-3 M drug concentrations. UV irradiation contributed to decrease in free radicals concentration in DOPA-melanin complexes with moxifloxacin, besides the complexes with the drug concentration of 1 × 10-4 M. The strongest decrease was observed for DOPA-melanin-moxifloxacin complexes with the drug concentration of 1 × 10-3 M. Homogeneous broadening of EPR lines, strong dipolar interactions and slow spin-lattice relaxation processes characterized all the tested melanin samples.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of melanin in DMSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronze-Uhle, Erika S.; Batagin-Neto, Augusto; Xavier, Pedro H. P.; Fernandes, Nicole I.; de Azevedo, Eduardo R.; Graeff, Carlos F. O.

    2013-09-01

    Recently soluble melanin derivatives have been obtained by a synthetic procedure carried out in DMSO (D-melanin). In this work a comparative study of the structural characteristics of synthetic melanin derivatives obtained by oxidation of L-DOPA in H2O and DMSO are presented. To this end, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy as well as proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance techniques has been employed. In addition, aging effects have been investigated for D-melanin. The results suggest that sulfonate groups (-SO2CH3) from the oxidation of DMSO, are incorporated into melanin, which confers protection to the phenolic hydroxyl group present in its structure. The solubility of D-melanin in DMSO is attributed to the presence of these groups. When D-melanin is left in air for long time periods, the sulfonate groups leave the structure, and an insoluble compound is obtained. NaOH and water have been used, in order to accelerate the release of the sulfonate groups attached to D-melanin, thereby corroborating the proposed structure and the synthesis mechanism.

  10. Inhibitory effect of a novel combination of Salvia hispanica (chia) seed and Punica granatum (pomegranate) fruit extracts on melanin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwakar, Ganesh; Rana, Jatinder; Saito, Lisa; Vredeveld, Doug; Zemaitis, Dorothy; Scholten, Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, dietary fatty acids have been extensively evaluated for nutritional as well as cosmetic benefits. Among the dietary fats, the omega-3 (ω3) and omega-6 (ω6) forms of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been found to exhibit many biological functions in the skin such as prevention of transepidermal water loss, maintenance of the stratum corneum epidermal barrier, and disruption of melanogenesis in epidermal melanocytes. In this study, we examined the effect of chia seed extract, high in ω3 (linolenic acid) and ω6 (linoleic acid) PUFAs, for its capacity to affect melanogenesis. Chia seed extract was shown to inhibit melanin biosynthesis in Melan-a cells; however, linoleic and α-linolenic acids alone did not effectively reduce melanin content. Further investigation demonstrated that chia seed extract in combination with pomegranate fruit extract had a synergistic effect on the inhibition of melanin biosynthesis with no corresponding effect on tyrosinase activity. Investigation of the possible mechanism of action revealed that chia seed extract downregulated expression of melanogenesis-related genes (Tyr, Tyrp1, and Mc1r), alone and in combination with pomegranate fruit extract, suggesting that the inhibition of melanin biosynthesis by a novel combination of chia seed and pomegranate fruit extracts is possibly due to the downregulation of gene expression of key melanogenic enzymes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Epidermal hairs of Acanthaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, Khwaja J.

    1978-01-01

    Structure and distribution of the foliar epidermal hairs of 109 species and two varieties belonging to 39 genera of the family Acanthaceae have been studied. Both glandular and non-glandular epidermal hairs have been recorded in the investigated taxa. The glandular hairs may be subsessile or

  12. Effect of oxygen on free radicals in DOPA-melanin complexes with netilmicin, diamagnetic Zn(II), and paramagnetic Cu(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Buszman, Ewa; Wrześniok, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to examine interactions between molecules of oxygen O2 and free radicals of DOPA-melanin and its complexes with netilmicin, Zn(II) and Cu(II). EPR spectra were measured for evacuated samples and then compared to earlier data for the samples in air. The concentrations of free radicals in the evacuated samples were higher than for samples in air. The strongest effect was observed for DOPA-melanin and melanin samples containing Cu(II). Evacuation of DOPA-melanin and DOPA-melanin-Cu(II) samples causes high EPR line broadening. Faster spin-lattice relaxation processes exist in evacuated melanin samples than in samples in air.

  13. The interaction of melanin with ionizing and UVC radiations: Characterization of thymine damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huselton, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to determine whether melanin could protect DNA against the harmful effects of ionizing or UVC radiations. A simple, in vitro, model system was developed to evaluate eumelanin (Sigma melanin) as a radioprotector of solutions of 0.1 mM thymine or thymidine exposed to 570Gy of ionizing radiation. Sigma melanin was compared to several amino acids, other biomolecules or to other forms of melanin. To investigate the role of melanin as a passive screen of UVC radiation, melanotic (I{sub 3}), amelanotic (AMEL) cells (both derived from a Cloudman S91 melanoma) and non-melanotic (EMT6) cells were labelled with radioactive dTHd and exposed to 0, 1, 5 or 10KJ/m{sup 2} of UVC. The DNA was extracted; the bases hydrolyzed with concentrated HCl. Thymine bases were separated by reverse phase HPLC. No difference in dimer content was observed between I{sub 3} and AMEL cells, but EMT6 cells had nearly twice the amount of dimer. Overall thymine degradation was more pronounced in I{sub 3} cells than in the other two cell lines, due to the production of non-dimer thymine damage. This damage was identified as thymine glycol by HPLC and mass spectrometry. Melanin, upon exposure to UVC, appears to enhance thymine damage by producing oxidative damage.

  14. Melanin standard method: empirical formula 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedekel, M R; Ahene, A B; Zeise, L

    1992-11-01

    Natural melanins are composed of two distinct portions; a protein fraction and a chromophoric backbone. There is no unequivocal evidence for covalent bonding between these two fractions, and standard protocols used in protein purification have failed to separate the protein fraction from the chromophoric fraction. In order to study the chromophoric backbone, many workers have resorted to harsh isolation and purification protocols that are now known to degrade and damage the chromophoric portion. These artifactual melanin preparations are poor models for valid chemical, physical, and biological studies. We have developed a mild isolation and purification protocol for melanins that takes into consideration both the particulate nature of natural melanins and the stability characteristics of the chromophoric fraction. Mathematical factoring of the quantitative amino acid data into the elemental analysis was used to obtain the empirical formula of the chromophoric backbone of melanins. The analyses have shown that melanins from various sources have significantly different amino acid compositions and contents, molar C/N ratios, and empirical formulae. This method successfully differentiates melanins from a variety of sources, namely, human hair, Sepia officinalis, Sigma Chemical Company (cat. no. M8631), autoxidation of dopa, and from the feathers of Rhode Island Red chickens. Analytical results from these studies are presented and discussed.

  15. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for sepia melanin

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbonyiryivuze, A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available as active ingredients; including creams that act as filters for single-response protection against UV radiation [5]. Melanin is used in cosmetics to fade defects of the skin diseases called “vitiligo” which is caused by a loss of melanin in the skin...,” Physics and Materials Chemistry, vol. 3(1), pp. 1-6, 2015. [14] M. Magarelli, Purification, characterization and photodegradation studies of modified sepia melanin Sepia (Sepia officinalis). Determination of Eumelanin content in fibers from Alpaca...

  16. Evaluation of melanin production by Sporothrix luriei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ingrid Ludmilla Rodrigues; Figueiredo-Carvalho, Maria Helena Galdino; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo

    2018-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies on the cell biology of Sporothrix luriei, the less common of the pathogenic Sporothrix species worldwide. The production of DHN-melanin, eumelanin, and pyomelanin were evaluated on the mycelial and yeast forms of the S. luriei ATCC 18616 strain. The mycelial form of this species produced only pyomelanin, which protected the fungus against environmental stressors such as ultraviolet light, heat, and cold. The yeast form was unable to produce any of the tested melanin types. The lack of melanin in the parasitic form of S. luriei may be an explanation for its low frequency in human infections.

  17. Evaluation of melanin production by Sporothrix luriei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Ludmilla Rodrigues Cruz

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of studies on the cell biology of Sporothrix luriei, the less common of the pathogenic Sporothrix species worldwide. The production of DHN-melanin, eumelanin, and pyomelanin were evaluated on the mycelial and yeast forms of the S. luriei ATCC 18616 strain. The mycelial form of this species produced only pyomelanin, which protected the fungus against environmental stressors such as ultraviolet light, heat, and cold. The yeast form was unable to produce any of the tested melanin types. The lack of melanin in the parasitic form of S. luriei may be an explanation for its low frequency in human infections.

  18. Characterization of pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes in a long-term in vivo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Biedermann, Thomas; Klar, Agnieszka S; Widmer, Daniel S; Neuhaus, Kathrin; Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    In our laboratory, we have been using human pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes for short-term experiments since several years. Little is known, however, about the long-term biology of such constructs after transplantation. We constructed human, melanocyte-containing dermo-epidermal skin substitutes of different (light and dark) pigmentation types and studied them in a long-term animal experiment. Developmental and maturational stages of the epidermal and dermal compartment as well as signs of homoeostasis were analysed 15 weeks after transplantation. Keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts from human skin biopsies were isolated and assembled into dermo-epidermal skin substitutes. These were transplanted onto immuno-incompetent rats and investigated 15 weeks after transplantation. Chromameter evaluation showed a consistent skin colour between 3 and 4 months after transplantation. Melanocytes resided in the epidermal basal layer in physiological numbers and melanin accumulated in keratinocytes in a supranuclear position. Skin substitutes showed a mature epidermis in a homoeostatic state and the presence of dermal components such as Fibrillin and Tropoelastin suggested advanced maturation. Overall, pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes show a promising development towards achieving near-normal skin characteristics and epidermal and dermal tissue homoeostasis. In particular, melanocytes function correctly over several months whilst remaining in a physiological, epidermal position and yield a pigmentation resembling original donor skin colour. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A Photoplethysmography Melanin Evaluation System by Modified Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chieh Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advance in cosmetic medical technology in recent years, more and more people get cosmetic medical treatments, especially skin whitening treatments. Nevertheless, people usually assess the effect of skin whitening products by vision, which is subjective and will be different from each person. To acquire the value of melanin concentration objectively, people need to go to cosmetic medical clinics. This will cause inconvenience to people. This paper develops a novel evaluation platform based on optical assessment methods, which employ different absorption and scattering properties to different wavelengths of light in human tissue to obtain melanin concentration. Moreover, this paper proposes a new method that compensates the interaction between epidermis and dermis to acquire the melanin concentration more accurately. The novel platform designed in this paper is smaller and consumes lower-power and smaller when comparing to other conventional devices in market.

  20. Acetylcholine esterase inhibitors and melanin synthesis inhibitors from Salvia officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Amal; Mira, Amira; Ashour, Ahmed; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2016-09-15

    Salvia officinalis is a traditionally used herb with a wide range of medicinal applications. Many phytoconstituents have been isolated from S. officinalis, mainly phenolic diterpenes, which possess many biological activities. This study aimed to evaluate the ability of the phenolic diterpenes of S. officinalis to inhibit acetylcholine esterase (AChE) as well as their ability to inhibit melanin biosynthesis in B16 melanoma cells. The phenolic diterpenes isolated from the aerial parts of S. officinalis were tested for their effect on melanin biosynthesis in B16 melanoma cell lines. They were also tested for their ability to inhibit AChE using Ellman's method. Moreover, a molecular docking experiment was used to investigate the binding affinity of the isolated phenolic diterpenes to the amino acid residues at the active sites of AChE. Seven phenolic diterpenes-sageone, 12-methylcarnosol, carnosol, 7b-methoxyrosmanol, 7a-methoxyrosmanol, isorosmanol and epirosmanol-were isolated from the methanolic extract of the aerial parts of S. officinalis. Isorosmanol showed a melanin-inhibiting activity as potent as that of arbutin. Compounds 7a-methoxyrosmanol and isorosmanol inhibited AChE activity by 50% and 65%, respectively, at a concentration of 500 µM. The results suggest that isorosmanol is a promising natural compound for further studies on development of new medications which might be useful in ageing disorders such as the declining of cognitive functions and hyperpigmentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel 43-kDa protein as a negative regulatory component of phenoloxidase-induced melanin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingyi; Söderhäll, Irene; Park, Ji Won; Ma, Young Gerl; Osaki, Tsukusa; Ha, Nam-Chul; Wu, Chun Fu; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Lee, Bok Luel

    2005-07-01

    The melanization reaction induced by activated phenoloxidase in arthropods is important in the multiple host defense innate immune reactions, leading to the sequestration and killing of invading microorganisms. This reaction ought to be tightly controlled because excessive formation of quinones and systemic hypermelanization are deleterious to the hosts, suggesting that a negative regulator(s) of melanin synthesis may exist in hemolymph. Here, we report the purification and cloning of a cDNA of a novel 43-kDa protein, from the meal-worm Tenebrio molitor, which functions as a melanization-inhibiting protein (MIP). The deduced amino acid sequence of 352 residues has no homology to known sequences in protein data bases. When the concentration of the 43-kDa protein was examined by Western blot analysis in a melanin-induced hemolymph prepared by injection of Candida albicans into T. molitor larvae, the 43-kDa protein specifically decreased in the melanin-induced hemolymph compared with control hemolymph. Recombinant MIP expressed in a baculovirus system had an inhibitory effect on melanin synthesis in vitro. RNA interference using a synthetic 445-mer double-stranded RNA of MIP injected into Tenebrio larvae showed that melanin synthesis was markedly induced. These results suggest that this 43-kDa MIP inhibits the formation of melanin and thus is a modulator of the melanization reaction to prevent the insect from excessive melanin synthesis in places where it should be inappropriate.

  2. Two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging and spectroscopy of melanins in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Stringari, Chiara; Liu, Feng; Sun, Chung-Ho; Kong, Yu; Balu, Mihaela; Meyskens, Frank L.; Gratton, Enrico; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-03-01

    Changes in the amounts of cellular eumelanin and pheomelanin have been associated with carcinogenesis. The goal of this work is to develop methods based on two-photon-excited-fluorescence (TPEF) for measuring relative concentrations of these compounds. We acquire TPEF emission spectra (λex=1000 nm) of melanin in vitro from melanoma cells, hair specimens, and in vivo from healthy volunteers. We find that the pheomelanin emission peaks at approximately 615 to 625 nm and eumelanin exhibits a broad maximum at 640 to 680 nm. Based on these data we define an optical melanin index (OMI) as the ratio of fluorescence intensities at 645 and 615 nm. The measured OMI for the MNT-1 melanoma cell line is 1.6±0.22 while the Mc1R gene knockdown lines MNT-46 and MNT-62 show substantially greater pheomelanin production (OMI=0.5±0.05 and 0.17±0.03, respectively). The measured values are in good agreement with chemistry-based melanin extraction methods. In order to better separate melanin fluorescence from other intrinsic fluorophores, we perform fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of in vitro specimens. The relative concentrations of keratin, eumelanin, and pheomelanin components are resolved using a phasor approach for analyzing lifetime data. Our results suggest that a noninvasive TPEF index based on spectra and lifetime could potentially be used for rapid melanin ratio characterization both in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Epidermal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Köse

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The epidermis is the outermost layer of the human skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. There are many origins of stem cells in the skin and skin appendages. These stem cells are localized in different part of the pilosebaseous units and also express many different genes. Epidermal stem cells in the pilosebaseous units not only ensure the maintenance of epidermal homeostasis and hair regeneration, but also contribute to repair of the epidermis after injury. In recent years, human induced pluripotent skin stem cells are produced from the epidermal cells such as keratinocytes, fibroblasts and melanocytes. These cells can be transdifferentiated to embriyonic stem cells. Human induced pluripotent stem cells have potential applications in cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. These cells provide a means to create valuable tools for basic research and may also produce a source of patient-matched cells for regenerative therapies. In this review, we aimed an overview of epidermal stem cells for better understanding their functions in the skin. Skin will be main organ for using the epidermal cells for regenerative medicine in near future.

  4. Loss of Melanin by Eye Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells Is Associated with Its Oxidative Destruction in Melanolipofuscin Granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontsov, A E; Sakina, N L; Ostrovsky, M A

    2017-08-01

    The effect of superoxide radicals on melanin destruction and degradation of melanosomes isolated from cells of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the human eye was studied. We found that potassium superoxide causes destruction of melanin in melanosomes of human and bovine RPE, as well as destruction of melanin from the ink bag of squid, with the formation of fluorescent decay products having an emission maximum at 520-525 nm. The initial kinetics of the accumulation of the fluorescent decay products is linear. Superoxide radicals lead simultaneously to a decrease in the number of melanosomes and to a decrease in concentration of paramagnetic centers in them. Complete degradation of melanosomes leads to the formation of a transparent solution containing dissolved proteins and melanin degradation products that do not exhibit paramagnetic properties. To completely degrade one melanosome of human RPE, 650 ± 100 fmol of superoxide are sufficient. The concentration of paramagnetic centers in a melanolipofuscin granule of human RPE is on average 32.5 ± 10.4% (p < 0.05, 150 eyes) lower than in a melanosome, which indicates melanin undergoing a destruction process in these granules. RPE cells also contain intermediate granules that have an EPR signal with a lower intensity than that of melanolipofuscin granules, but higher than that of lipofuscin granules. This signal is due to the presence of residual melanin in these granules. Irradiation of a mixture of melanosomes with lipofuscin granules with blue light (450 nm), in contrast to irradiation of only melanosomes, results in the appearance of fluorescent melanin degradation products. We suggest that one of the main mechanisms of age-related decrease in melanin concentration in human RPE cells is its destruction in melanolipofuscin granules under the action of superoxide radicals formed during photoinduced oxygen reduction by lipofuscin fluorophores.

  5. Melanin Transfer in Human 3D Skin Equivalents Generated Exclusively from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Gledhill

    Full Text Available The current utility of 3D skin equivalents is limited by the fact that existing models fail to recapitulate the cellular complexity of human skin. They often contain few cell types and no appendages, in part because many cells found in the skin are difficult to isolate from intact tissue and cannot be expanded in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs present an avenue by which we can overcome this issue due to their ability to be differentiated into multiple cell types in the body and their unlimited growth potential. We previously reported generation of the first human 3D skin equivalents from iPSC-derived fibroblasts and iPSC-derived keratinocytes, demonstrating that iPSCs can provide a foundation for modeling a complex human organ such as skin. Here, we have increased the complexity of this model by including additional iPSC-derived melanocytes. Epidermal melanocytes, which are largely responsible for skin pigmentation, represent the second most numerous cell type found in normal human epidermis and as such represent a logical next addition. We report efficient melanin production from iPSC-derived melanocytes and transfer within an entirely iPSC-derived epidermal-melanin unit and generation of the first functional human 3D skin equivalents made from iPSC-derived fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanocytes.

  6. Role of GTP-CHI links PAH and TH in melanin synthesis in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Wang, Jiying; Li, Haiyin; Li, Yan; Chen, Peng; Li, Tian; Chen, Xi; Xiao, Junjie; Zhang, Liang

    2015-08-10

    In insects, pigment patterns are formed by melanin, ommochromes, and pteridines. Here, the effects of pteridine synthesis on melanin formation were studied using 4th instar larvae of a wild-type silkworm strain, dazao (Bombyx mori), with normal color and markings. Results from injected larvae and in vitro integument culture indicated that decreased activity of guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTP-CH I, a rate-limiting enzyme for pteridine synthesis), lowers BH4 (6R-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin, a production correlated with GTP-CH I activity) levels and eliminates markings and coloration. The conversion of phenylalanine and tyrosine to melanin was prevented when GTP-CH I was inhibited. When BH4 was added, phenylalanine was converted to tyrosine, and the tyrosine concentration increased. Tyrosine was then converted to melanin to create normal markings and coloration. Decreasing GTP-CH I activity did not affect L-DOPA (3,4-l-dihydroxyphenylalanine). GTP-CH I affected melanin synthesis by generating the BH4 used in two key reaction steps: (1) conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine by PAH (phenylalanine hydroxylase) and (2) conversion of tyrosine to L-DOPA by TH (tyrosine hydroxylase). Expression profiles of BmGTPCH Ia, BmGTPCH Ib, BmTH, and BmPAH in the integument were consistent with the current findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Interference of melanin in the susceptibility profile of Sporothrix species to amphotericin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mario, Débora Alves Nunes; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; Denardi, Laura Bedin; Vaucher, Rodrigo de Almeida; Santurio, Janio Morais; Alves, Sydney Hartz

    2016-01-01

    The presence of melanin in the fungal cell is a major virulence factor of the genus Sporothrix since it protects the fungal cells against the defense systems. The present study aimed to investigate the interference of melanin in the susceptibility of Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto to amphotericin B and itraconazole, drugs recommended as therapy for disseminated and subcutaneous sporotrichosis, respectively. Yeast cells were cultivated in minimal medium with or without l-DOPA in order to induce the production of melanin. Microdilution and killing assay methods were used to determine the antifungal activity against yeast cells with different amounts of melanin. The killing assay showed that melanization protected isolates within the S. schenckii complex from amphotericin B, particularly in the lower concentrations tested. Studies combining amphotericin B and inhibitors of melanin are required in order to avoid this effect. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. A melanin-mediated cancer immunotherapy patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yanqi; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xudong; Hu, Quanyin; Zhang, Yuqi; Liu, Qi; Wen, Di; Milligan, Joshua; Bellotti, Adriano; Huang, Leaf; Dotti, Gianpietro; Gu, Zhen

    2017-11-10

    Melanin is capable of transforming 99.9% of the absorbed sunlight energy into heat, reducing the risk of skin cancer. We here develop a melanin-mediated cancer immunotherapy strategy through a transdermal microneedle patch. B16F10 whole tumor lysate containing melanin is loaded into polymeric microneedles that allow sustained release of the lysate upon insertion into the skin. In combination with the near-infrared light irradiation, melanin in the patch mediates the generation of heat, which further promotes tumor-antigen uptake by dendritic cells, and leads to enhanced antitumor vaccination. We found that the spatiotemporal photoresponsive immunotherapy increases infiltration of polarized T cells and local cytokine release. These immunological effects increase the survival of mice after tumor challenge and elicited antitumor effects toward established primary tumor and distant tumor. Collectively, melanin generates local heat, boosts T cell activities by transdermal vaccines, and promotes antitumor immune responses. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  9. Interaction of melanosomal proteins with melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donatien, P D; Orlow, S J

    1995-08-15

    Melanin is deposited in melanosomes upon a proteinaceous matrix enveloped by a melanosomal membrane. Since melanin is highly detergent insoluble, we hypothesized that the detergent solubility of proteins of the melanosomal matrix might be inversely related to the state of melanosomal melanization. Immunoblotting analyses were performed on extracts of albino and black melanocytes to test this hypothesis. The protein products of the silver (si) and the pink-eyed-dilution (p) loci as well as other matrix constituents were present at twofold higher levels in extracts of albino cells. When black cells were rendered amelanotic by growing cultures in the presence of the tyrosinase inhibitor phenylthiourea, the apparent levels of these proteins were also increased. To obviate the potential role of different levels of synthesis in contributing to these differences, we developed a cell-free melanosomal melanization assay. Upon incubation of a melanosome-rich fraction with the melanin precursor L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) followed by immunoblot analysis, the si locus protein, the p locus protein, and other putative matrix constituents became rapidly insoluble in SDS when compared with the members of the tyrosinase-related family of melanosomal membrane proteins. Our results suggest that melanosomal proteins that interact with melanin may be identified by their relative insolubility in SDS under conditions of increasing melanization. In addition to the si locus protein and other putative melanosomal matrix proteins, the membrane-bound p locus protein may also interact closely with melanin.

  10. Does melanin matter in the dark?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płonka, Przemysław M; Picardo, Mauro; Slominski, Andrzej T

    2017-07-01

    In living cells, melanin pigment is formed within melanosomes, which not only protect the cells from autodestruction, but also serve as second messenger organelles regulating important skin functions, with melanocytes acting as primary sensory and regulatory cells of the epidermis. Yet, one can argue that skin melanin, which may negatively affect cellular homeostasis in melanoma, really exerts protective functions. Consequently, the actual functions of melanin and the melanogenic pathway in skin biology remains enigmatic. Yet, the solution of this riddle seems simple - to check the actual influence of natural melanin on skin cells in the dark. Since many interesting hypotheses and theories put forward in this respect did not survive confrontation with the experiment, a leading pigment research group from Naples was brave to "jump off the cliff" by confronting theory with experimental reality. They showed that, in the dark, human hair-derived melanin promotes inflammatory responses in keratinocytes, lowers their viability, promotes oxidative stress, and that pheomelanin does so more strongly than eumelanin. Thus, pheomelanin hardly protects red-haired individuals, even when avoiding the sun. Black hairs do not do much better either, unless they undergo graying. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Pigment Melanin Scavenges Nitric Oxide In Vitro: Possible Relevance to Keloid Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian M. Menter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, nitric oxide (NO has been implicated in the formation of keloids, preferentially formed in dark-skinned persons, and we suspected that pigment melanin itself may play a direct role by adsorbing NO. We tested the ability of cuttlefish sepia melanin to scavenge (adsorb NO, generated in situ by 2-(N.N Diethylamino diazeneolate-2-oxide (DEA/NO, through a dialysis membrane. NO was measured as NO2_ and NO3_ by the Griess method and as N2O3 by trapping experiments with the fluorogenic substrate 4,5-diaminofluorescein (DAF-2. Initial NO2_ and NO3_ concentrations were significantly lower in the test dialyzates than in controls. Scavenging of NO was rapid enough to compete with DAF adduct formation. Both analytical methods gave comparable results. Adsorbed NO and/or its oxidized products may undergo interactions with melanin, adsorbed O2, and/or dermal material that may lead to keloid formation.

  12. Optical and photoelectronic properties of melanin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capozzi, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, I-71100 Foggia (Italy)]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Perna, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, I-71100 Foggia (Italy)]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Carmone, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, I-71100 Foggia (Italy); Gallone, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, I-71100 Foggia (Italy); Lastella, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, I-71100 Foggia (Italy); Mezzenga, E. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, I-71100 Foggia (Italy); Quartucci, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, I-71100 Foggia (Italy); Ambrico, M. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi del C.N.R., Via Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Augelli, V.; Biagi, P.F.; Ligonzo, T.; Minafra, A.; Schiavulli, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Sezione di Bari, Via Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy)]|[Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Universita di Bari, Via Amendola 173, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Pallara, M. [Dipartimento Geomineralogico, Universita di Bari, via Amendola 173, Bari (Italy); Cicero, R. [Dipartimento di Biochimica Medica e Biologia Medica, Sezione di Biologia Medica, Facolta di Medicina e Chirurgia, Universita di Bari, Policlinico, I-70124 Bari (Italy)

    2006-07-26

    A study of the structural, optical and electrical properties of synthetic and natural melanin by means of X-ray diffraction, absorption and photocurrent techniques is reported. The model of the natural melanin film as a network of nano-aggregates of polymeric units based on the indolic structure is proposed to explain the X-ray diffraction results. The shape of the absorption spectra is similar to that of amorphous and disordered semiconductors, with a very strong, broad band UV and visible absorption and an optical gap value of about 0.5 eV. Photosensitivity to sun spectra has been demonstrated by photoconductivity measurements of synthetic melanin pellets under AM1 light source illumination.

  13. EPR examination of free radical properties of DOPA-melanin complexes with ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin and sparfloxacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beberok, Artur; Buszman, Ewa; Zdybel, Magdalena; Pilawa, Barbara; Wrześniok, Dorota

    2010-09-01

    Paramagnetic complexes of DOPA-melanin with ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin and sparfloxacin were studied by EPR spectroscopy. The aim of this work was to determine free radical concentration and properties of these complexes. Free radical concentrations in the studied complexes were ∼1019-1020 spin/g. Relatively lower and similar (5.1-6.6 × 1019 spin/g) free radical concentrations characterized DOPA-melanin complexes with ciprofloxacin, and lomefloxacin. Higher concentrations (0.8-1.2 × 1020 spin/g) were obtained for complexes of norfloxacin and sparfloxacin. Effect of the drug concentration on free radicals in melanin was observed. Strong dipolar spin-spin interactions and slow spin-lattice relaxation processes exist in all of the samples.

  14. Influence of epidermal growth factor on liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Peter Skov; Boesby, S.; Kirkegaard, P.

    2013-01-01

    The role of epidermal growth factor on liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in rats was investigated. After a 70% hepatectomy in rats, the concentration of epidermal growth factor in portal venous blood was unchanged compared with unoperated controls. However, small amounts of epidermal...... growth factor could be identified in portal venous blood after intestinal instillation of epidermal growth factor. Brunner's glands and the submandibular glands secrete epidermal growth factor. Extirpation of Brunner's glands decreased liver regeneration, whereas removal of the submandibular glands had...... no effect on liver regeneration. Epidermal growth factor antiserum reduced liver regeneration significantly. Oral or s.c. administration of epidermal growth factor had no effect on liver regeneration, whereas epidermal growth factor enhanced the effect of insulin and glucagon on liver regeneration...

  15. Detection of DOPA-melanin in the dimorphic fungal pathogen Penicillium marneffei and its effect on macrophage phagocytosis in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghua Liu

    Full Text Available The fungal pathogen Penicillium marneffei produces melanin-like pigment in vitro. The synthetic pathway of melanin and its possible influence in the protective yeast cells surviving within macrophage cells are not known. In this work, P. marneffei produced brown black pigment in the presence of L-DOPA and black particles were extracted from yeast cells treated with proteolytic enzymes, denaturant and concentrated hot acid. Kojic acid inhibited the brown-black pigment production of P. marneffei yeast grown on brain heart infusion agar. Transmitting electron microscopy showed spherical granular electron-dense particles with an average diameter of 100 nm in a beaded arrangement in the innermost cell wall. Electron-paramagnetic resonance revealed that the black particles contain a stable free radical compound. The UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectra of particles extracted from P. marneffei and synthetic DOPA-melanin showed a high degree of similarity. Melanized yeast cells decreased phagocytosis by macrophage cells and increased resistance to intracellular digestion in vitro. These results indicate that P. marneffei can synthesize DOPA-melanin or melanin-like compounds in vitro and suggest that the DOPA-melanin pathway is associated with cell wall structure and enhances the resistance to phagocytosis by macrophages.

  16. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez; Juliana Calle; Howard, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs) are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ). These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Er...

  17. Melanin, Radiation, and Energy Transduction in Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo; Cordero, Radames J B; Bryan, Ruth; Nosanchuk, Joshua; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2017-03-01

    Melanin pigments are found in many diverse fungal species, where they serve a variety of functions that promote fitness and cell survival. Melanotic fungi inhabit some of the most extreme habitats on earth such as the damaged nuclear reactor at Chernobyl and the highlands of Antarctica, both of which are high-radiation environments. Melanotic fungi migrate toward radioactive sources, which appear to enhance their growth. This phenomenon, combined with the known capacities of melanin to absorb a broad spectrum of electromagnetic radiation and transduce this radiation into other forms of energy, raises the possibility that melanin also functions in harvesting such energy for biological usage. The ability of melanotic fungi to harness electromagnetic radiation for physiological processes has enormous implications for biological energy flows in the biosphere and for exobiology, since it provides new mechanisms for survival in extraterrestrial conditions. Whereas some features of the way melanin-related energy transduction works can be discerned by linking various observations and circumstantial data, the mechanistic details remain to be discovered.

  18. Melanin as an active layer in biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Piacenti da Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of pH sensors is of great interest due to its extensive application in several areas such as industrial processes, biochemistry and particularly medical diagnostics. In this study, the pH sensing properties of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET based on melanin thin films as active layer are investigated and the physical mechanisms related to the device operation are discussed. Thin films were produced from different melanin precursors on indium tin oxide (ITO and gold substrates and were investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in the pH range from 2 to 12. EGFETs with melanin deposited on ITO and on gold substrates showed sensitivities ranging from 31.3 mV/pH to 48.9 mV/pH, depending on the melanin precursor and the substrate used. The pH detection is associated with specific binding sites in its structure, hydroxyl groups and quinone imine.

  19. Melanin biosynthesis pathway in Agaricus bisporus mushrooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijn, A.; Bastiaan-Net, S.; Wichers, H.J.; Mes, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    With the full genome sequence of Agaricus bisporus available, it was possible to investigate the genes involved in the melanin biosynthesis pathway of button mushrooms. Based on different BLAST and alignments, genes were identified in the genome which are postulated to be involved in this pathway.

  20. Melanin as an active layer in biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacenti da Silva, Marina; Fernandes, Jéssica Colnaghi; de Figueiredo, Natália Biziak; Congiu, Mirko; Mulato, Marcelo; de Oliveira Graeff, Carlos Frederico

    2014-03-01

    The development of pH sensors is of great interest due to its extensive application in several areas such as industrial processes, biochemistry and particularly medical diagnostics. In this study, the pH sensing properties of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET) based on melanin thin films as active layer are investigated and the physical mechanisms related to the device operation are discussed. Thin films were produced from different melanin precursors on indium tin oxide (ITO) and gold substrates and were investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in the pH range from 2 to 12. EGFETs with melanin deposited on ITO and on gold substrates showed sensitivities ranging from 31.3 mV/pH to 48.9 mV/pH, depending on the melanin precursor and the substrate used. The pH detection is associated with specific binding sites in its structure, hydroxyl groups and quinone imine.

  1. Melanin as an active layer in biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piacenti da Silva, Marina, E-mail: marinaness@yahoo.com; Congiu, Mirko, E-mail: congiumat@gmail.com; Oliveira Graeff, Carlos Frederico de, E-mail: graeff@fc.unesp.br [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences - UNESP, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Fernandes, Jéssica Colnaghi, E-mail: jeziga-cf@yahoo.com.br; Biziak de Figueiredo, Natália, E-mail: natbiziak@yahoo.com.br; Mulato, Marcelo, E-mail: mmulato@ffclrp.usp.br [Department of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy, Science and Letters at Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    The development of pH sensors is of great interest due to its extensive application in several areas such as industrial processes, biochemistry and particularly medical diagnostics. In this study, the pH sensing properties of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET) based on melanin thin films as active layer are investigated and the physical mechanisms related to the device operation are discussed. Thin films were produced from different melanin precursors on indium tin oxide (ITO) and gold substrates and were investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in the pH range from 2 to 12. EGFETs with melanin deposited on ITO and on gold substrates showed sensitivities ranging from 31.3 mV/pH to 48.9 mV/pH, depending on the melanin precursor and the substrate used. The pH detection is associated with specific binding sites in its structure, hydroxyl groups and quinone imine.

  2. Renal cell carcinoma with melanin pigment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Jayaprakash; Chandrika; Laxman, Prabhu

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma has been steadily increasing. There are several morphological types of renal cell carcinoma. Recognizing histologic patterns of renal cell carcinoma is important for correct diagnosis and subsequent medical care for the patient. Melanotic tumors in the kidney are very rare. Here, we present an unusual case of renal cell carcinoma with melanin pigment. PMID:20877613

  3. Antibodies Against Melanin | Wassermann | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports on unsuccessful attempts to produce antibodies against melanoprotein in rabbits. Available evidence suggests antibodies against melanocytes in the aetiology of vitiligo, but there is no convincing evidence for antibodies against melanin per se. It is suggested that the demonstration of antibodif's against ...

  4. Melanin production from marine Streptomyces | Vasanthabharathi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Melanin pigments are frequently used in medicine, food and cosmetic preparations. In this study, three strains among 21 Actinomycetes sp isolates produced a diffusible dark pigment on starch casein an agar medium which was water soluble. The pigment production was estimated using L-tyrosine as substrate. Among the ...

  5. Induced melanin reduces mutations and cell killing in mouse melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Hill, H Z

    1997-03-01

    When melanin absorbs light energy, it can produce potentially damaging active oxygen species. There is little doubt that constitutive pigment in dark-skinned individuals is photoprotective against skin cancer, but induced pigment-as in tanning-may not be. The first step in cancer induction is mutation in DNA. The most suitable systems for evaluating the role of melanin are those in which pigment can be varied and mutations can be measured. Several cell lines from Cloudman S91 mouse melanoma can be induced to form large quantities of melanin pigment after treatment with a number of different agents enabling comparison of mutant yields in the same cells differing principally in pigment concentration. In these studies, melanin was induced with synthetic alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and with isobutyl methyl xanthine in the cell line S91/mel. The former inducer produced about 50% more pigment than the latter. Survival and mutation induction at the Na+/K(+)-ATPase locus were studied using ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS), a standard mutagen and five UV lamps emitting near monochromatic and polychromatic UV light in the three wave-length ranges of UV. There was greater protection against killing and mutation induction in the more heavily pigmented cells after exposure to EMS and after irradiation with monochromatic UVC and UVB. There was significant protection against killing by polychromatic UVB + UVA (FS20), but the small degree of protection against mutation was not significant. No significant change in killing and mutation using the same protocol was seen in S91/amel, a related cell line that does not respond to these inducers. No mutants were produced by either monochromatic or polychromatic UVA at doses that killed 50% of the cells. Our results show that induced pigment-shown earlier to be eumelanin (K. A. Cieszka et al., Exp. Dermatol. 4, 192-198, 1995)-is photo- and chemoprotective, but it is less effective in protection against mutagenesis by polychromatic

  6. Silver nanoparticles mediated altered gene expression of melanin biosynthesis genes in Bipolaris sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sandhya; Singh, H B

    2015-03-01

    Melanin production in many fungal phytopathogens has been investigated to play direct or indirect role in pathogenesis. However, in Bipolaris sorokiniana, the spot blotch pathogen of wheat, much less is known about the role melanin play in pathogenesis. As an extension of our previous report, the present study aims to investigate the plausible association between melanin production and virulence factor in B. sorokiniana. In the previous study, we carried out analysis on the antifungal efficacy of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against B. sorokiniana. The present investigation revealed the gene expression analysis of melanin biosynthesis genes viz. polyketide synthase (PKS1) and scytalone dehydratase (SCD1) under the influence of AgNPs. The 0.05mg/ml concentration of AgNPs yielded noticeable inhibition of B. sorokiniana growth, while 0.1mg/ml concentration of AgNPs accounted for complete inhibition of pathogen growth. In addition, the semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis exhibited reduced expression of PKS1 and SCD1 under the influence of AgNPs treatment. Furthermore, the qRT-PCR demonstrated 6.47 and 1.808 fold significant decrease in the expression pattern of PKS1 and SCD1, respectively, in B. sorokiniana treated with AgNPs. The present study provides probable understanding of molecular events underlying the antifungal role of AgNPs against B. sorokiniana. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of melanin on high- and low- linear energy transfer (LET) radiation response of human epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossi, G.F.; Durante, M.; Gialanella, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. di Napoli and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Pugliese, M. [Servizio di Radioprotezione, Univ. di Napoli (Italy); Mosse, I. [Institute of Genetics and Cytology of Belarus Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus)

    1998-04-01

    The search for effective radioprotectors is of major concern in the medical, military, environmental, and space sciences. Conventional radioprotectors are generally effective only during a single irradiation and display their radioprotective properties only at high, toxic concentrations. In addition, they reduce somatic radiation effects but are poorly efficient in protecting from hereditary stochastic radiation effects. In this respect, the pigment melanin merits attention. Experiments referring to potential melanin effects on the ionising radiation response have been carried out with different biological systems, both in vivo and in vitro. In this paper, we present results on the response to high- and low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10, supplemented by melanin. The incorporation of auto-oxidative (l-dopa) melanin was linear for concentrations from 3 to 10 {mu}g/ml in the growth medium. Concentrations of up to 250 {mu}g/ml did not significantly impair the cells proliferative ability. No significant protective effect of melanin on the survival of cultured cells after exposure to alpha-particles (130 keV/{mu}m) or x-rays was observed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 3 tabs., 35 refs.

  8. Interaction of radicals from water radiolysis with melanin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarna, T.; Pilas, B.; Land, E.J.; Truscott, T.G.

    1986-08-06

    Melanins are considered to be natural photoprotectors in the melanocytes and keratinocytes of the skin. These pigments have also been suggested to play an important role in protection of melanin-containing cells against ionising radiation. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the protective role of melanin which invoke the radical scavenging properties of the polymer. In the present work the reactions of melanins with radicals generated in aqueous media by pulse radiolysis have been studied. Time-resolved changes in absorbance of the melanin or the radical species were recorded at selected wavelengths. Experiments were carried out on synthetic dopa- and 5-S-cysteinyldopa-melanins and a natural melanin in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Under the conditions employed, melanin reacted predominantly with either oxidising (OH., N3.) or reducing (eaq-, CO2-) species. We were also able to monitor the interaction of melanin with superoxide radical, which was reducing in this case. Detailed analysis of transient changes in melanin absorbance, detected at different wavelengths, was demonstrated to be a convenient method for studying redox processes of this substance, as shown by model experiments using ferricyanide and dithionite as oxidising and reducing agents, respectively. Among the radicals studied, OH. exhibited the strongest reactivity with melanins. Apparent rate constants for the reactions of radicals with autoxidative dopa-melanin (1.5 X 10(9) M-1 X s-1, 2.6 X 10(8) M-1 X s-1, 1.8 X 10(8) M-1 X s-1, 5 X 10(5) M-1 X s-1, 10(6)-10(7) M-1 X s-1 for OH., eaq-, N.3. O2- and CO2-, respectively) are reported. The reactivity of melanins with radicals from water radiolysis and their effect on pigment properties are discussed in terms of the structure and possible biological role of the pigments.

  9. Adaptive melanin response of the soil fungus Aspergillus niger to UV radiation stress at "Evolution Canyon", Mount Carmel, Israel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Singaravelan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adaptation is an evolutionary process in which traits in a population are tailored by natural selection to better meet the challenges presented by the local environment. The major discussion relating to natural selection concerns the portraying of the cause and effect relationship between a presumably adaptive trait and selection agents generating it. Therefore, it is necessary to identify trait(s that evolve in direct response to selection, enhancing the organism's fitness. "Evolution Canyon" (EC in Israel mirrors a microcosmic evolutionary system across life and is ideal to study natural selection and local adaptation under sharply, microclimatically divergent environments. The south-facing, tropical, sunny and xeric "African" slope (AS receives 200%-800% higher solar radiation than the north-facing, temperate, shady and mesic "European" slope (ES, 200 meters apart. Thus, solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR is a major selection agent in EC influencing the organism-environment interaction. Melanin is a trait postulated to have evolved for UV-screening in microorganisms. Here we investigate the cause and effect relationship between differential UVR on the opposing slopes of EC and the conidial melanin concentration of the filamentous soil fungus Aspergillus niger. We test the working hypothesis that the AS strains exhibit higher melanin content than strains from the ES resulting in higher UV resistance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured conidial melanin concentration of 80 strains from the EC using a spectrophotometer. The results indicated that mean conidial melanin concentration of AS strains were threefold higher than ES strains and the former resisted UVA irradiation better than the latter. Comparisons of melanin in the conidia of A. niger strains from sunny and shady microniches on the predominantly sunny AS and predominantly shady ES indicated that shady conditions on the AS have no influence on the selection on melanin

  10. Inhibitory effect of Cinnamomum osmophloeum Kanehira ethanol extracts on melanin synthesis via repression of tyrosinase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Chun-Hao; Yu, Chih-Wen; Chen, Hsiao Ling; Huang, Wei-Tung; Chang, Yun-Shiang; Hung, Shu-Hsien; Lee, Tai-Lin

    2016-09-01

    Melanin contributes to skin color, and tyrosinase is the enzyme that catalyzes the initial steps of melanin formation. Therefore, tyrosinase inhibitors may contribute to the control of skin hyperpigmentation. The inhibition of tyrosinase activity by Cinnamomum zeylanicum extracts was previously reported. In this report, we test the hypothesis that Cinnamomum osmophloeum Kanehira, an endemic plant to Taiwan, contains compounds that inhibit tyrosinase activity, similar to C. zeylanicum. The cytotoxicity of three sources of C. osmophloeum Kanehira ethanol extracts was measured in B16-F10 cells using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. At concentrations greater than 21.25 μg/mL, the ethanol extracts were toxic to the cells; therefore, 21.25 μg/mL was selected to test the tyrosinase activities. At this concentration, all three ethanol extracts decreased the melanin content by 50% in IBMX-induced B16-F10 cells. In addition to the melanin content, greater than 20% of the tyrosinase activity was inhibited by these ethanol extracts. The RT-PCR results showed that tyrosinase and transcription factor MITF mRNAs expression were down-regulated. Consistent with the mRNA results, greater than 40% of the human tyrosinase promoter activity was inhibited based on the reporter assay. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the ethanol extracts protect cells from UV exposure. C. osmophloeum Kanehira neutralized the IBMX-induced increase in melanin content in B16-F10 cells by inhibiting tyrosinase gene expression at the level of transcription. Moreover, the ethanol extracts also partially inhibited UV-induced cell damage and prevented cell death. Taken together, we conclude that C. osmophloeum Kanehira is a potential skin-whitening and protective agent. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibitory Effect of Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii Extract on Melanin Synthesis via Repression of Tyrosinase Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hwayong; Song, Kwang Hoon; Jung, Pil Mun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Ro, Hyunju; Kim, Mi Yoon; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2013-01-01

    To identify the active compound arctigenin in Fructus Arctii (dried seed of medicinal plant Arctium lappa) and to elucidate the inhibitory mechanism in melanogenesis, we analyzed melanin content and tyrosinase activity on B16BL6 murine melanoma and melan-A cell cultures. Water extracts of Fructus Arctii were shown to inhibit tyrosinase activity in vitro and melanin content in α -melanocyte stimulating hormone-stimulated cells to similar levels as the well-known kojic acid and arbutin, respectively. The active compound arctigenin of Fructus Arctii displayed little or no cytotoxicity at all concentrations examined and decreased the relative melanin content and tyrosinase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Melanogenic inhibitory activity was also identified in vivo with zebrafish embryo. To determine the mechanism of inhibition, the effects of arctigenin on tyrosinase gene expression and tyrosinase promoter activity were examined. Also in addition, in the signaling cascade, arctigenin dose dependently decreased the cAMP level and promoted the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. This result suggests that arctigenin downregulates cAMP and the tyrosinase enzyme through its gene promoter and subsequently upregulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity by increasing phosphorylation in the melanogenesis signaling pathway, which leads to a lower melanin content.

  12. Inhibitory Effect of Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii Extract on Melanin Synthesis via Repression of Tyrosinase Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwayong Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify the active compound arctigenin in Fructus Arctii (dried seed of medicinal plant Arctium lappa and to elucidate the inhibitory mechanism in melanogenesis, we analyzed melanin content and tyrosinase activity on B16BL6 murine melanoma and melan-A cell cultures. Water extracts of Fructus Arctii were shown to inhibit tyrosinase activity in vitro and melanin content in α-melanocyte stimulating hormone-stimulated cells to similar levels as the well-known kojic acid and arbutin, respectively. The active compound arctigenin of Fructus Arctii displayed little or no cytotoxicity at all concentrations examined and decreased the relative melanin content and tyrosinase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Melanogenic inhibitory activity was also identified in vivo with zebrafish embryo. To determine the mechanism of inhibition, the effects of arctigenin on tyrosinase gene expression and tyrosinase promoter activity were examined. Also in addition, in the signaling cascade, arctigenin dose dependently decreased the cAMP level and promoted the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. This result suggests that arctigenin downregulates cAMP and the tyrosinase enzyme through its gene promoter and subsequently upregulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity by increasing phosphorylation in the melanogenesis signaling pathway, which leads to a lower melanin content.

  13. Inhibitory Effect of Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii Extract on Melanin Synthesis via Repression of Tyrosinase Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hwayong; Song, Kwang Hoon; Jung, Pil Mun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Mi Yoon; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2013-01-01

    To identify the active compound arctigenin in Fructus Arctii (dried seed of medicinal plant Arctium lappa) and to elucidate the inhibitory mechanism in melanogenesis, we analyzed melanin content and tyrosinase activity on B16BL6 murine melanoma and melan-A cell cultures. Water extracts of Fructus Arctii were shown to inhibit tyrosinase activity in vitro and melanin content in α-melanocyte stimulating hormone-stimulated cells to similar levels as the well-known kojic acid and arbutin, respectively. The active compound arctigenin of Fructus Arctii displayed little or no cytotoxicity at all concentrations examined and decreased the relative melanin content and tyrosinase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Melanogenic inhibitory activity was also identified in vivo with zebrafish embryo. To determine the mechanism of inhibition, the effects of arctigenin on tyrosinase gene expression and tyrosinase promoter activity were examined. Also in addition, in the signaling cascade, arctigenin dose dependently decreased the cAMP level and promoted the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. This result suggests that arctigenin downregulates cAMP and the tyrosinase enzyme through its gene promoter and subsequently upregulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity by increasing phosphorylation in the melanogenesis signaling pathway, which leads to a lower melanin content. PMID:23781272

  14. Bioinspired bright noniridescent photonic melanin supraballs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Hu, Ziying; Wang, Zhao; Li, Yiwen; Tormo, Alejandro Diaz; Le Thomas, Nicolas; Wang, Boxiang; Gianneschi, Nathan C; Shawkey, Matthew D; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-09-01

    Structural colors enable the creation of a spectrum of nonfading colors without pigments, potentially replacing toxic metal oxides and conjugated organic pigments. However, significant challenges remain to achieve the contrast needed for a complete gamut of colors and a scalable process for industrial application. We demonstrate a feasible solution for producing structural colors inspired by bird feathers. We have designed core-shell nanoparticles using high-refractive index (RI) (~1.74) melanin cores and low-RI (~1.45) silica shells. The design of these nanoparticles was guided by finite-difference time-domain simulations. These nanoparticles were self-assembled using a one-pot reverse emulsion process, which resulted in bright and noniridescent supraballs. With the combination of only two ingredients, synthetic melanin and silica, we can generate a full spectrum of colors. These supraballs could be directly added to paints, plastics, and coatings and also used as ultraviolet-resistant inks or cosmetics.

  15. Inhibitory components from the buds of clove (Syzygium aromaticum) on melanin formation in B16 melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arung, Enos Tangke; Matsubara, Eri; Kusuma, Irawan Wijaya; Sukaton, Edi; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2011-03-01

    In the course to find a new whitening agent, we evaluated the methanol extract from bud of clove (Syzygium aromaticum) on melanin formation in B16 melanoma cells. Eugenol and eugenol acetate were isolated as the active compounds and showed melanin inhibition of 60% and 40% in B16 melanoma cell with less cytotoxicity at the concentration of 100 and 200 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, an essential oil prepared from the bud of clove, which contain eugenol and eugenol acetate as dominant components, showed melanin inhibition of 50% and 80% in B16 melanoma cells at the concentration of 100 and 200 μg/mL, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of variation in melanin content on absorbance spectra of liquid skin phantoms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, Jacoba E

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This presentation looked at the influence of variation in melanin content on absorbance spectra of liquid skin phantoms. Reasons for studying melanin, plus skin pigments, melanocytes, melanosomes, and melanin in particular, are discussed...

  17. Melanin biosynthesis pathway in Agaricus bisporus mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijn, A; Bastiaan-Net, S; Wichers, H J; Mes, J J

    2013-06-01

    With the full genome sequence of Agaricus bisporus available, it was possible to investigate the genes involved in the melanin biosynthesis pathway of button mushrooms. Based on different BLAST and alignments, genes were identified in the genome which are postulated to be involved in this pathway. Seven housekeeping genes were tested of which 18S rRNA was the only housekeeping gene that was stably expressed in various tissues of different developmental stages. Gene expression was determined for most gene homologs (26 genes) involved in the melanin pathway. Of the analysed genes, those encoding polyphenol oxidase (PPO), the PPO co-factor L-chain (unique for A. bisporus), and a putative transcription factor (photoregulator B) were among the highest expressed in skin tissue. An in depth look was taken at the clustering of several PPO genes and the PPO co-factor gene on chromosome 5, which showed that almost 25% of the protein encoding genes in this cluster have a conserved NACHT and WD40 domain or a P-loop nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase. This article will be the start for an in depth study of the melanin pathway and its role in quality losses of this economically important product. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Microneedling dilates the follicular infundibulum and increases transfollicular absorption of liposomal sepia melanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano G

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel Serrano,1 Patricia Almudéver,2 Juan M Serrano,3 Julio Cortijo,2 Carmen Faus,1 Magda Reyes,1 Inmaculada Expósito,3 Ana Torrens,3 Fernando Millán1 1Clínica Dermatológica Serrano, 2Department of Pharmacology, University of Valencia, 3Research and Development Department, Sesderma Laboratories, Valencia, Spain Abstract: Encapsulation of chemicals in liposomes and microneedling are currently used techniques to enhance the penetration of several substances through skin and hair. In this study, we apply a liposomal melanin–fluorescein compound to an ex vivo model of human skin, using a new electrical microneedling device (Nanopore turbo roller. The product was applied by hand massage (A or with the assistance of the electrical roller for 2 minutes (B. An additional test was performed free of product and with only the E-roller (C. Histological changes and product absorption were evaluated by optical and fluorescent microscopy 60 and 90 minutes after the treatment. Site B showed larger deposits of melanin–fluorescein at superficial and deep levels of hair structures in comparison to site A. Light, epidermal deposits of the melanin–fluorescein complex were also observed. Sites B and C showed a significant widening (47% of the follicular infundibulum which could explain the increased penetration of the formulation. Microneedling also removed the scales and sebum residues in the neighborhood of the infundibulum. Targeting hair follicles with melanin may be useful to dye poorly pigmented hairs, improving laser hair removal. The procedure accelerates the delivery of melanin into hair structures allowing an even absorption, larger pigment deposits, and deeper penetration of the formulation into the hair. Keywords: liposomes, melanin, microneedling, follicular infundibulum, hair removal

  19. Thioamides as false melanin precursors. Studies in murine melanomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, K.; Larsson, B.; Dencker, L. (Department of Toxicology, University of Uppsala, Sweden)

    1983-01-01

    Melanotic melanomas show a high rate of melanin synthesis. Foreign substances that are accepted as precursors in the formation of melanin may therefore be useful in the diagnosis and therapy of malignant melanotic melanomas, if labelled with suitable radionuclides. We have earlier reported that 2-thiouracil is incorporated in melanotic melanomas, apparently as a false melanin precursor. In the present study it is shown that methimazole and 5-iodo-2-thiouracil are as well accepted as melanin precursors. 5-Iodo-2-thiouracil is of special interest, since iodine has many clinically useful radioisotopes. The chemical properties that characterize substances which are incorporated as false precursors into melanin are discussed. A free sulfur ligand of the thioamides (2-thiouracil, 5-iodo-2-thiouracil, methimazole and thiourea are all incorporated into melanin) seems to be essential and the link between these substances and the melanin. Uracil (which lacks sulfur) and 2-benzylthiouracil (where the sulfur is blocked with a benzyl group) do not attach to melanin. Our conclusion therefore is that the thioureylene structure is the smallest common molecular fragment of the false melanin precursors.

  20. Implications of melanin binding in ocular drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimpelä, Anna-Kaisa; Reinisalo, Mika; Hellinen, Laura; Grazhdankin, Evgeni; Kidron, Heidi; Urtti, Arto; Del Amo, Eva M

    2017-12-13

    Pigmented ocular tissues contain melanin within the intracellular melanosomes. Drugs bind to melanin at varying extent that ranges from no binding to extensive binding. Binding may lead to drug accumulation to the pigmented tissues and prolonged drug retention in the melanin containing cells. Therefore, melanin binding is an important feature that affects ocular drug delivery and biodistribution, but this topic has not been reviewed since 1998. In this review, we present current knowledge on ocular melanin, melanosomes and binding of drugs to pigmented cells and tissues. In vitro, in vivo and in silico methods in the field were critically evaluated, because the literature in this field can be confusing if the reader does not properly understand the methodological aspects. Literature analysis includes a comprehensive table of literature data on melanin binding of drugs. Furthermore, we aimed to give some insights beyond the current literature by making a chemical structure based classification model for melanin binding of drugs and kinetic simulations that revealed significant interplay between melanin binding and drug permeability across the melanosomal and plasma membranes. Overall, more mechanistic and systematic research is needed before the impact of melanin binding on ocular drug delivery can be properly understood and predicted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrastructure: effects of melanin pigment on target specificity using a pulsed dye laser (577 nm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, A.K.; Tan, O.T.; Boll, J.; Parrish, J.A.; Murphy, G.F.

    1987-06-01

    It has been shown recently that brief pulses of 577 nm radiation from the tunable dye laser are absorbed selectively by oxyhemoglobin. This absorption is associated with highly specific damage to superficial vascular plexus blood vessels in those with lightly pigmented (type I-II) skin. To determine whether pigmentary differences in the overlying epidermis influence this target specificity, we exposed both type I (fair) and type V (dark) normal human skin to varying radiant exposure doses over 1.5-microsecond pulse durations from the tunable dye laser at a wavelength of 577 nm. Using ultrastructural techniques, we found in type I skin that even clinical subthreshold laser exposures caused reproducible alterations of erythrocytes and adjacent dermal vascular endothelium without comparable damage to the overlying epidermis. In contrast, degenerated epidermal basal cells represented the predominant form of cellular damage after laser exposure of type V skin at comparable doses. We conclude that epidermal melanin and vascular hemoglobin are competing sites for 577 nm laser absorption and damage, and that the target specificity of the 577 nm tunable dye laser is therefore influenced by variations in epidermal pigmentation. This finding is relevant to the clinical application of the tunable dye laser in the ablative treatment of vascular lesions. We also found on ultrastructure that the presence of electron-lucent circular structures of approximately 800 A in diameter were observed only at and above clinical threshold doses in those with type I skin and at the highest dose of 2.75 J/cm2 in type V skin. It has been proposed that these structures might be heat-fixed molds of water vapor. Both this and ultrastructural changes of epidermal basal cells demonstrate mechanisms responsible for alteration of tissue after exposure to 577 nm, which are discussed.

  2. In vivo stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence imaging of melanin in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; Abbas, Saleh; Lowe, Jared; Sierra, Heidy; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin because the activation and excitation can be a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser. Our previous work has demonstrated the melanin SMPAF images in sepia melanin, mouse hair, and mouse skin. In this study, we show the feasibility of using SMPAF to detect melanin in vivo. in vivo melanin SMPAF images of normal skin and benign nevus are demonstrated. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection than MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF is a promising technology to enable early detection of melanoma for dermatologists.

  3. Sulfitolytic and keratinolytic potential of Chryseobacterium sp. RBT revealed hydrolysis of melanin containing feathers

    OpenAIRE

    Gurav, Ranjit G.; Tang, Jingchun; Jadhav, Jyoti P.

    2016-01-01

    In black feathers, melanin is embedded in keratin matrix that makes feather more resistance to the microbial degradation. Chryseobacterium sp. RBT previously isolated from the poultry waste disposable site revealed strong sulfitolytic and keratinolytic activities. Maximum keratinase activity was observed at 48?h (89.12?U?ml?1) showed 83?% of native black feather degradation. The concentration of free sulfhydryl groups released during degradation was 0.648???10?4?M?(12?h), 2.144???10?4?M?(96?h...

  4. Photoinduced oxygen consumption in melanin systems. Action spectra and quantum yields for eumelanin and synthetic melanin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarna, T.; Sealy, R.C. (Medical Coll. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (USA))

    1984-01-01

    Consumption of oxygen during irradiation of melanins with either visible or ultraviolet light (230 to 600 nm) was monitored using a spin-probe nitroxide-electron spin resonance spectroscopic approach. Eumelanins are moderately effective in promoting oxygen consumption; quantum yields are low for irradiation with visible light, but increase sharply with light of shorter wavelengths. The absolute quantum yield for oxygen consumption is about 0.1% for natural melanin at 320 nm. The action spectrum is similar for both natural and synthetic melanins indicating that the major chromophore responsible for oxygen consumption is the same for both kinds of material. This chromophore is not the major melanin chromophore responsible for absorption of visible light. The action spectrum also clearly differs from published action spectra for melanogenesis; however, the weak wavelength dependence for visible light is similar to that found for immediate pigment darkening. Catalase decreases the rate of oxygen consumption by 50% confirming that hydrogen peroxide is the major molecular product of oxygen reduction. The results suggest that a Type I (free radical) mechanism predominates in the oxygen consumption process.

  5. Protective role of Aspergillus fumigatus melanin against ultraviolet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Melanin content increased in Aspergillus fumigatus mycelium exposed to ultraviolet for 10 min but gradually decreased after 60 min of UV exposure. So, it can be concluded that melanin protects fungus for survival until 60 min which was obvious after studying conidia and mycelia by transmission electron microscope (TEM).

  6. Effect of melanin on radiation response of CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopwood, L.E. (Medical Coll. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (USA). Dept. of Radiation Oncology); Swartz, H.M. (Illinois Univ., Urbana (USA). Coll. of Medicine); Pajak, S. (Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Krakow (Poland))

    1985-05-01

    The effect of the presence of melanin on the response of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation was investigated in a model system utilizing the ability of Chinese hamster ovary cells to incorporate melanin by endocytosis. Cells were incubated in monolayer cultures from 2 to 20 hours with melanin prepared from 'beef eye' or synthesized by air oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine. For asynchronous cultures, the survival curve parameters for cells incubated with both types of melanin were indistinguishable from those of the same cells without added melanin. The radiation response to fractionated doses of 6 Gy separated by various periods did not indicate any effect of melanin on the extent or kinetics of repair of sublethal damage. Likewise, the repair of potentially lethal damage in plateau phase cultures was unaffected by the presence of melanin. Thus the explanation for the clinical radiation resistance of melanomas in the absence of a direct radiation effect might more likely be found in consideration of other factors such as the role of melanin in oxygen consumption or in differentiation.

  7. Aspergillus fumigatus conidial melanin modulates host cytokine response.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, L.; Netea, M.G.; Sugui, J.; Vonk, A.G.; Sande, W.W. van de; Warris, A.; Kwon-Chung, K.J.; Kullberg, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Melanin biopigments have been linked to fungal virulence. Aspergillus fumigatus conidia are melanised and are weakly immunogenic. We show that melanin pigments on the surface of resting Aspergillus fumigatus conidia may serve to mask pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs)-induced cytokine

  8. Temperature-enhanced synthesis of DMSO-Melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacenti-Silva, M.; Bronze-Uhle, E. S.; Paulin, J. V.; Graeff, C. F. O.

    2014-01-01

    Melanins are a class of pigmentary conjugated macromolecules found in many biological systems. Functionalization of synthetic melanin provides interesting new properties like the greater solubility of melanin synthesized in dimethyl sulfoxide, D-Melanin. In this work we have studied the influence of temperature on D-Melanin synthesis and its properties. To this end, UV-Vis, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) techniques have been employed to analyze D-Melanin synthesized within the range of 25-100 °C. Our results reveal that by increasing the synthesis temperature up to 100 °C, the synthesis time can be decreased by a factor of 7 when compared to room temperature. From FTIR and 13C CP/MAS NMR analyses the increase in temperature causes a decrease in the number of carbonyl groups from carboxylic acid and from ionized carboxylic acid. The decarboxylation of D-Melanin monomers at higher temperatures shows that the use of higher synthesis temperatures influences the elimination of carbonyls present in the precursor molecules, thus facilitating the polymerization of D-Melanin.

  9. Aspergillus fumigatus conidial melanin modulates host cytokine response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.Y.A. Chai (Louis); M.G. Netea (Mihai); J. Sugui (Janyce); A.G. Vonk (Alieke); W.W.J. van de Sande (Wendy); A. Warris (Adilia); K.J. Kwon-Chung (Kyung); B. Jan Kullberg (Bart)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMelanin biopigments have been linked to fungal virulence. Aspergillus fumigatus conidia are melanised and are weakly immunogenic. We show that melanin pigments on the surface of resting Aspergillus fumigatus conidia may serve to mask pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs)-induced

  10. Expression of melanin and insecticidal protein from Rhodotorula ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both the salmon/red melanin and the insecticidal producing genes of Rhodotorula glutinis was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli using plasmid pZErO-1. This work suggests that in Rhodotorula species melanin and insecticidal toxin are co-expressed and therefore possibly co-evolved. Keywords: Rhodotorula ...

  11. Epidermal cell death in frogs with chytridiomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Brannelly

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Amphibians are declining at an alarming rate, and one of the major causes of decline is the infectious disease chytridiomycosis. Parasitic fungal sporangia occur within epidermal cells causing epidermal disruption, but these changes have not been well characterised. Apoptosis (planned cell death can be a damaging response to the host but may alternatively be a mechanism of pathogen removal for some intracellular infections. Methods In this study we experimentally infected two endangered amphibian species Pseudophryne corroboree and Litoria verreauxii alpina with the causal agent of chytridiomycosis. We quantified cell death in the epidermis through two assays: terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL and caspase 3/7. Results Cell death was positively associated with infection load and morbidity of clinically infected animals. In infected amphibians, TUNEL positive cells were concentrated in epidermal layers, correlating to the localisation of infection within the skin. Caspase activity was stable and low in early infection, where pathogen loads were light but increasing. In animals that recovered from infection, caspase activity gradually returned to normal as the infection cleared. Whereas, in amphibians that did not recover, caspase activity increased dramatically when infection loads peaked. Discussion Increased cell death may be a pathology of the fungal parasite, likely contributing to loss of skin homeostatic functions, but it is also possible that apoptosis suppression may be used initially by the pathogen to help establish infection. Further research should explore the specific mechanisms of cell death and more specifically apoptosis regulation during fungal infection.

  12. Cryosurgical treatment of melanin-pigmented gingiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, C J

    1998-12-01

    Abnormal deposition of melanin in gingiva can often occur. Complaints of "black gums" are common, and demand for depigmentation is usually made for esthetic reasons. A simple and effective cryosurgical technique to eliminate the pigmentation is the subject of this article. Twenty patients with dark gingiva were treated by direct application of liquid nitrogen with a cotton swab for 20 to 30 seconds. The treated gingiva appeared normal within 1 to 2 weeks after 1 or 2 cryosurgical treatments. The acceptance of the treatment was excellent. This was a simple, bloodless cryosurgery for the depigmentation of gingiva, requiring no local anesthesia or sophisticated equipment.

  13. Matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition of melanin thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloisi, F.; Pezzella, A.; Barra, M.; Chiarella, F.; Cassinese, A.; Vicari, L.

    2011-07-01

    Melanins constitute a very important class of organic pigments, recently emerging as a potential material for a new generation of bioinspired biocompatible electrically active devices. In this paper, we report about the deposition of synthetic melanin films starting from aqueous suspensions by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). In particular, we demonstrate that it is possible to deposit melanin films by MAPLE even if melanin (a) is not soluble in water and (b) absorbs light from UV to IR. AFM images reveal that the film surface features are highly depending on the deposition parameters. UV-VIS and FTIR spectra show both the optical properties and the molecular structure typical of melanins are preserved.

  14. Natural melanin composites by layer-by-layer assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Taesik; Shim, Bong Sub

    2015-04-01

    Melanin is an electrically conductive and biocompatible material, because their conjugated backbone structures provide conducting pathways from human skin, eyes, brain, and beyond. So there is a potential of using as materials for the neural interfaces and the implantable devices. Extracted from Sepia officinalis ink, our natural melanin was uniformly dispersed in mostly polar solvents such as water and alcohols. Then, the dispersed melanin was further fabricated to nano-thin layered composites by the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technique. Combined with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), the melanin nanoparticles behave as an LBL counterpart to from finely tuned nanostructured films. The LBL process can adjust the smart performances of the composites by varying the layering conditions and sandwich thickness. We further demonstrated the melanin loading degree of stacked layers, combination nanostructures, electrical properties, and biocompatibility of the resulting composites by UV-vis spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM), multimeter, and in-vitro cell test of PC12, respectively.

  15. Prostaglandin D2 production in FM55 melanoma cells is regulated by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and is not related to melanin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Mojgan; Nicolaou, Anna; Gledhill, Karl; Rhodes, Lesley E; Tobin, Desmond J; Thody, Anthony J

    2010-01-01

    This study shows that prostaglandins in human FM55 melanoma cells and epidermal melanocytes are produced by COX-1. Prostaglandin production in FM55 melanoma cells was unrelated to that of melanin suggesting that the two processes can occur independently. α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone, which had no effect on melanin production in FM55 cells, stimulated PGD2 production in these cells without affecting PGE2. While cAMP pathways may be involved in regulating PGD2 production, our results suggest that α-MSH acts independently of cAMP, possibly by regulating the activity of lipocalin-type PGD synthase. This α-MSH-mediated effect may be associated with its role as an immune modulator. PMID:20482620

  16. Relationship between p-boronophenylalanine and polymerization of melanin monomers in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamijyo, M.; Yoshino, Kazuo [Shinshu Univ., Faculty of Science, Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan); Kondo, H.; Kadota, M.; Mishima, Y.

    1998-12-01

    p-boronophenylalanine (p-BPA) is now employed in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for cancer. However, it has been confirmed that {sup 10}B content accumulated in melanomas decreases with time. It is suggested that p-BPA has suppressive ability for the formation of the melanin polymer substrate which would stabilize the p-BPA taken in. To make clear the mechanism for this, the present authors investigated chemical reactions taking place in the DOPA chrome solution added with p-BPA using {sup 11}B-NMR method. It was concluded that p-BPA when complexed with dihydroxy derivatives of melanin precursors (L-DOPA, DHICA) reacts with dissolved oxygen to give boric acid and tyrosine. Effects of the pH and the concentration of DOPA chrome on the reaction were also studied. (S. Ohno)

  17. Affinity of labetalol for ocular melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynter, D; Martin, L E; Harrison, C; Cook, J

    1976-08-01

    1 The toxicity of labetalol has been studied in mice, rats, rabbits, and dogs, and reproductive studies have been carried out in rats and rabbits. Nothing was observed in any of these species to suggest that patients taking labetalol might be exposed to any toxic hazard. 2 During the reproductive studies 14C-labetalol was used to study placental transfer. Radioactivity was present in the uveal tract of the foetal eye. 3 Radioactive labetalol but not its metabolites was bound to the melanin pigment of the eye. This binding was reversible. It was not possible to saturate the melanin of the cat and dog eye even with prolonged dosing with labetalol. 4 Chloroquine, given orally at doses of 1.5-6 mg/kg/d for 4-7 weeks, produced changes in the cat retina. When oral doses of 20 mg labetalol/d were given to cats for 7 months, no oculotoxic effects were observed. 5 Detailed ophthalmological and histological examinations were carried out on the rats, rabbits, cats and dogs used in these studies. No changes indicative of oculotoxicity were observed. In the reproductive studies no effects were observed in the developing rat or rabbit eye, which could be consequent on the placental transfer of labetalol or its metabolites.

  18. Inhibitory effects of different fractions of Nepeta satureioides on melanin synthesis through reducing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Seyed Ahmad; Yazdian-Robati, Rezvan; Sadeghi, Mohammad; Baharara, Javad; Amini, Elaheh; Salek, Farzaneh; Tayarani-Najaran, Zahra

    2017-04-01

    Nepeta satureioides Boiss. has been used in traditional medicine of eastern countries and is famous for its medicinal properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of methanol (MeOH), n-hexane and dichloromethane (CH2Cl2) fractions of the extract on melanin synthesis and oxidative stress in B16F10 melanoma cell line. The B16F10 cell line viability after treatment with increasing concentrations of different fractions of the plant (5-60 μg/mL) was measured using MTT assay. The inhibitory effect on synthesis of melanin, mushroom tyrosinase activity, cellular tyrosinase and oxidative stress were determined by the colorimetric and fluorometric methods. The data showed that at concentrations below 60 μg/mL, fractions did not show significant toxicity on melanoma cells. The amount of melanin synthesis by MeOH and CH2Cl2 fractions and mushroom tyrosinase activity by the MeOH fraction declined in B16F10 cells. In addition to the capacity of MeOH, n-hexane and CH2Cl2 fractions in decreasing the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in melanoma cells, all fractions revealed remarkable antioxidant activity. The melanogenesis inhibitory and antioxidant effects of N. satureioides on B16F10 cells may suggest this plant as a new pharmaceutical agent in reducing skin pigment and skin aging in cosmetic industry.

  19. Low-melanin containing pullulan production from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by Aureobasidium pullulans in fermentations assisted by light-emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terán Hilares, Ruly; Orsi, Camila Ayres; Ahmed, Muhammad Ajaz; Marcelino, Paulo Franco; Menegatti, Carlos Renato; da Silva, Silvio Silvério; Dos Santos, Júlio César

    2017-04-01

    Pullulan is a polymer produced by Aureobasidium pullulans and the main bottleneck for its industrial production is the presence of melanin pigment. In this study, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) of different wavelengths were used to assist the fermentation process aiming to produce low-melanin containing pullulan by wild strain of A. pullulans LB83 with different carbon sources. Under white light using glucose-based medium, 11.75g.L-1 of pullulan with high melanin content (45.70UA540nm.g-1) was obtained, this production improved in process assisted by blue LED light, that resulted in 15.77g.L-1 of pullulan with reduced content of melanin (4.46UA540nm.g-1). By using sugarcane bagasse (SCB) hydrolysate as carbon source, similar concentration of pullulan (about 20g.L-1) was achieved using white and blue LED lights, with lower melanin contents in last. Use of LED light was found as a promising approach to assist biotechnological process for low-melanin containing pullulan production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin

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    Srijana Upadhyay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes.

  1. A Pathway Analysis of Melanin Patterning in a Hemimetabolous Insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Lemonds, Thomas R; Marden, James H; Popadić, Aleksandar

    2016-05-01

    Diversity in insect pigmentation, encompassing a wide range of colors and spatial patterns, is among the most noticeable features distinguishing species, individuals, and body regions within individuals. In holometabolous species, a significant portion of such diversity can be attributed to the melanin synthesis genes, but this has not been formally assessed in more basal insect lineages. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of how a set of melanin genes (ebony, black, aaNAT, yellow, and tan) contributes to the pigmentation pattern in a hemipteran, Oncopeltus fasciatus For all five genes, RNA interference depletion caused alteration of black patterning in a region-specific fashion. Furthermore, the presence of distinct nonblack regions in forewings and hindwings coincides with the expression of ebony and aaNAT in these appendages. These findings suggest that the region-specific phenotypes arise from regional employment of various combinations of the melanin genes. Based on this insight, we suggest that melanin genes are used in two distinct ways: a "painting" mode, using predominantly melanin-promoting factors in areas that generally lack black coloration, and, alternatively, an "erasing" mode, using mainly melanin-suppressing factors in regions where black is the dominant pigment. Different combinations of these strategies may account for the vast diversity of melanin patterns observed in insects. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  2. Melanin photosensitizes ultraviolet light (UVC) DNA damage in pigmented cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huselton, C.A.; Hill, H.Z. (New Jersey Medical School, Newark (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Melanins, pigments of photoprotection and camouflage, are very photoreactive and can both absorb and emit active oxygen species. Nevertheless, black skinned individuals rarely develop skin cancer and melanin is assumed to act as a solar screen. Since DNA is the target for solar carcinogenesis, the effect of melanin on Ultraviolet (UV)-induced thymine lesions was examined in mouse melanoma and carcinoma cells that varied in melanin content. Cells prelabeled with 14C-dThd were irradiated with UVC; DNA was isolated, purified, degraded to bases by acid hydrolysis and analyzed by HPLC. Thymine dimers were detected in all of the extracts of irradiated cells. Melanotic and hypomelanotic but not mammary carcinoma cell DNA from irradiated cells contained hydrophilic thymine derivatives. The quantity of these damaged bases was a function of both the UVC dose and the cellular melanin content. One such derivative was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy as thymine glycol. The other appears to be derived from thymine glycol by further oxidation during acid hydrolysis of the DNA. The finding of oxidative DNA damage in melanin-containing cells suggests that melanin may be implicated in the etiology of caucasian skin cancer, particularly melanoma. Furthermore, the projected decrease in stratospheric ozone could impact in an unanticipated deleterious manner on dark-skinned individuals.

  3. Melanin in Fonsecaea pedrosoi: a trap for oxidative radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Souza Wanderley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenic fungus Fonsecaea pedrosoi constitutively produces the pigment melanin, an important virulence factor in fungi. Melanin is incorporated in the cell wall structure and provides chemical and physical protection for the fungus. We evaluated the production of nitric oxide (NO in macrophages, the oxidative burst and the inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS activity in interactions between activated murine macrophages and F. pedrosoi. Experiments were carried out with or without tricyclazole (TC treatment, a selective inhibitor of the dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN-melanin biosynthesis pathway in F. pedrosoi. The paramagnetisms of melanin and the TC-melanin were analysed by electron spin resonance. The fungal growth responses to H2O2 and to S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP, a nitric oxide donor, were also evaluated. Results Melanised F. pedrosoi cells were more resistant to both H2O2 and NO. Nitrite was not detected in the supernatant of macrophages incubated with melanised fungal cells. However, i-NOS expression was unaffected by the presence of either untreated control F. pedrosoi or TC-treated F. pedrosoi. In addition, the inhibition of the DHN-melanin pathway by TC improved the oxidative burst capability of the macrophages. Conclusion The NO-trapping ability of F. pedrosoi melanin is an important mechanism to escape the oxidative burst of macrophages.

  4. Photocrosslinkable Gelatin Hydrogel for Epidermal Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Lang, Qi; Yildirimer, Lara; Lin, Zhi Yuan; Cui, Wenguo; Annabi, Nasim; Ng, Kee Woei; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-07

    Natural hydrogels are promising scaffolds to engineer epidermis. Currently, natural hydrogels used to support epidermal regeneration are mainly collagen- or gelatin-based, which mimic the natural dermal extracellular matrix but often suffer from insufficient and uncontrollable mechanical and degradation properties. In this study, a photocrosslinkable gelatin (i.e., gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA)) with tunable mechanical, degradation, and biological properties is used to engineer the epidermis for skin tissue engineering applications. The results reveal that the mechanical and degradation properties of the developed hydrogels can be readily modified by varying the hydrogel concentration, with elastic and compressive moduli tuned from a few kPa to a few hundred kPa, and the degradation times varied from a few days to several months. Additionally, hydrogels of all concentrations displayed excellent cell viability (>90%) with increasing cell adhesion and proliferation corresponding to increases in hydrogel concentrations. Furthermore, the hydrogels are found to support keratinocyte growth, differentiation, and stratification into a reconstructed multilayered epidermis with adequate barrier functions. The robust and tunable properties of GelMA hydrogels suggest that the keratinocyte laden hydrogels can be used as epidermal substitutes, wound dressings, or substrates to construct various in vitro skin models. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Melanin: a photoprotection for Bacillus thuringiensis based biopesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansinenea, Estibaliz; Ortiz, Aurelio

    2015-03-01

    Melanins are negatively-charged, hydrophobic, dark high molecular weight irregular biopolymers, composed of polymerized phenolic and/or indolic compounds. They are produced by most organisms. Bacillus thuringiensis is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, soil bacterium and the most successful biological control agent that produces distinctly shaped crystals during sporulation that have insecticidal activity. However, one of the main disadvantages is that the insecticidal activity of B. thuringiensis formulation is unstable and rapidly loses its activity under field conditions due to UV radiation. Melanin absorbs radiation; therefore photoprotection of B. thuringiensis based on melanin has been studied and is herewith reviewed.

  6. Fungal melanin: what do we know about structure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Nosanchuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of melanin significantly enhances the virulence of many important human pathogenic fungi. Despite fungal melanin’s importance in human disease, as well as melanin’s contribution to the ability of fungi to survive in diverse hostile environments, the structure of melanin remains unsolved. Nevertheless, ongoing research efforts have progressively revealed several notable structural characteristics of this enigmatic pigment, which will be the focus of this review. These compositional and organizational insights could further our ability to develop novel therapeutic approaches to combat fungal disease and enhance our understanding of how melanin is inserted into the cell wall.

  7. Dual role of melanins and melanin precursors as photoprotective and phototoxic agents: inhibition of ultraviolet radiation-induced lipid peroxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, S.; Jimbow, K. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Dermatology and Cutaneous Sciences; Thomas, P.D.; Poznansky, M.J. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Physiology; Allen, T.M. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Pharmacology

    1995-06-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is one of the risk factors for skin cancer and the main inducer of melanin pigmentation, the major protective mechanism of mammalian skin against radiation damage. The melanin pigments, eumelanin and pheomelanin, are likely to be important in protection against UVR, but their precursors are generally considered as phototoxic. The available data suggest DNA damage as the mechanism of phototoxicity. However, the effect of melanin precursors on membrane damage through lipid peroxidation, another important and probably more relevant (from the point-of-view of the melanosomal confinement of these molecules) mechanism of phototoxicity, is not known. As a model system for UVR-melanin-membrane interactions, we irradiated liposomes in the presence of eumelanin, pheomelanin and two of their major precursors, 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and 5-S-cysteinyldopa (SCD). The presence of the two melanin precursors substantially reduced the formation of lipid peroxidation products resulting from UVR exposure. The antioxidant activity of the melanin precursors was diminished under strong prooxidant conditions (presence of Fe{sub 3+}). These results suggest that melanin precursors may have an important role in the protection of skin against the harmful effects of UVR including photocarcinogenesis. (Author).

  8. Multi-spectral mapping of in vivo skin hemoglobin and melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Spigulis, Janis; Saknite, Inga

    2010-04-01

    The multi-spectral imaging technique has been used for distant mapping of in-vivo skin chromophores by analyzing spectral data at each reflected image pixel and constructing 2-D maps of the relative concentrations of oxy-/deoxyhemoglobin and melanin. Instead of using a broad visible-NIR spectral range, this study focuses on narrowed spectral band 500-700 nm, so speeding-up the signal processing procedure. Regression analysis confirmed that superposition of three Gaussians is optimal analytic approximation for the oxy-hemoglobin absorption tabular spectrum in this spectral band, while superposition of two Gaussians fits well for deoxy-hemoglobin absorption and exponential function - for melanin absorption. The proposed approach was clinically tested for three types of in-vivo skin provocations - ultraviolet irradiance, chemical reaction with vinegar essence and finger arterial occlusion. Spectral range 500-700 nm provided better sensitivity to oxy-hemoglobin changes and higher response stability to melanin than two reduced ranges 500-600 nm and 530-620 nm.

  9. Two-photon excited fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging of melanin in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Liu, Feng; Sun, Chung-Ho; Kong, Yu; Balu, Mihaela; Meyskens, Frank L.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to detect early melanoma non-invasively would improve clinical outcome and reduce mortality. Recent advances in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in vivo microscopy offer a powerful tool in early malignant melanoma diagnostics. The goal of this work was to develop a TPEF optical index for measuring relative concentrations of eumelanin and pheomelanin since ex vivo studies show that changes in this ratio have been associated with malignant transformation. We acquired TPEF emission spectra (λex=1000 nm) of melanin from several specimens, including human hair, malignant melanoma cell lines, and normal melanocytes and keratinocytes in different skin layers (epidermis, papillary dermis) in five healthy volunteers in vivo. We found that the pheomelanin emission peaks at around 620 nm and is blue-shifted from the eumelanin with broad maximum at 640-680nm. We defined "optical melanin index" (OMI) as a ratio of fluorescence signal intensities measured at 645 nm and 615nm. The measured OMI for a melanoma cell line MNT-1 was 1.6+/-0.2. The MNT-46 and MNT-62 lines (Mc1R gene knockdown) showed an anticipated change in melanins production ratio and had OMI of 0.55+/-0.05 and 0.17+/-0.02, respectively, which strongly correlated with HPLC data obtained for these lines. Average OMI measured for basal cells layers (melanocytes and keratinocytes) in normal human skin type I, II-III (not tanned and tanned) in vivo was 0.5, 1.05 and 1.16 respectively. We could not dependably detect the presence of pheomelanin in highly pigmented skin type V-VI. These data suggest that a non-invasive TPEF index could potentially be used for rapid melanin ratio characterization both in vitro and in vivo, including pigmented lesions.

  10. Enzymatic synthesis of arbutin undecylenic acid ester and its inhibitory effect on melanin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Masaru; Raku, Takao; Yanagitani, Shusaku; Yoshino, Kenji

    2007-06-01

    Transesterification of arbutin and undecylenic acid vinyl ester was catalyzed by alkaline protease, Bioprase, in dimethylformamide to get arbutin derivative having undecylenic acid at 6-position of glucose moiety, 6-O-undecylenoyl p-hydroxyphenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside. The reaction rate increased with increase of arbutin concentration, and when its concentration was 0.9 M, the conversion rate was more than 90% under addition of 2 M undecylenic acid vinyl ester. The obtained arbutin ester significantly suppressed melanin production in murine B16 melanoma cells.

  11. Optimizing conditions for melanin extraction from black tea leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu ZOU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Melanin is a natural pigment with great development potential as a healthful food colorant. In this study, extraction conditions of natural melanin from black tea leaves were investigated. Temperature, duration and liquid-solid ratio were chosen to optimize extraction conditions using response surface methodology (RSM. The Box-Behnken experimental results showed the optimum extraction conditions as follows: a temperature of 97.92oC, a duration of 44.93 min and a liquid-solid ratio of 106.76 ml/g. Under these conditions, the maximal melanin yield was 271.40 mg/100 g. The results of this study showed that black tea leaves could be used as a good source of the new-type natural melanin.

  12. Melanin fluorescence spectra by step-wise three photon excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2012-03-01

    Melanin is the characteristic chromophore of human skin with various potential biological functions. Kerimo discovered enhanced melanin fluorescence by stepwise three-photon excitation in 2011. In this article, step-wise three-photon excited fluorescence (STPEF) spectrum between 450 nm -700 nm of melanin is reported. The melanin STPEF spectrum exhibited an exponential increase with wavelength. However, there was a probability of about 33% that another kind of step-wise multi-photon excited fluorescence (SMPEF) that peaks at 525 nm, shown by previous research, could also be generated using the same process. Using an excitation source at 920 nm as opposed to 830 nm increased the potential for generating SMPEF peaks at 525 nm. The SMPEF spectrum peaks at 525 nm photo-bleached faster than STPEF spectrum.

  13. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

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    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  14. Epidermal protection with cryogen spray cooling during high fluence pulsed dye laser irradiation: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnell, J W; Nelson, J S; Torres, J H; Anvari, B

    2000-01-01

    Higher laser fluences than currently used in therapy (5-10 J/cm(2)) are expected to result in more effective treatment of port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks. However, higher incident fluences increase the risk of epidermal damage caused by absorption of light by melanin. Cryogen spray cooling offers an effective method to reduce epidermal injury during laser irradiation. The objective of this study was to determine whether high laser incident fluences (15-30 J/cm(2)) could be used while still protecting the epidermis in ex vivo human skin samples. Non-PWS skin from a human cadaver was irradiated with a Candela ScleroPlus Laser (lambda = 585 nm; pulse duration = 1.5 msec) by using various incident fluences (8-30 J/cm(2)) without and with cryogen spray cooling (refrigerant R-134a; spurt durations: 40-250 msec). Assessment of epidermal damage was based on histologic analysis. Relatively short spurt durations (40-100 msec) protected the epidermis for laser incident fluences comparable to current therapeutic levels (8-10 J/cm(2)). However, longer spurt durations (100-250 msec) increased the fluence threshold for epidermal damage by a factor of three (up to 30 J/cm(2)) in these ex vivo samples. Results of this ex vivo study show that epidermal protection from high laser incident fluences can be achieved by increasing the cryogen spurt duration immediately before pulsed laser exposure. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Melanin-binding drugs and ultrasonics-induced cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinness, J.; Corry, P.M.; Armour, E.

    1973-01-01

    In vitro experiments with human melanoma cells indicate that ultrasonic induced killing of melanin-containing cells can be potentiated by the proper choice of temperature and drugs. These agents appear to be interacting through electron-phonon coupling in the melanins within the melanosome itself. As the mechanism of these interactions becomes clearer, it may be possible to relate these phenomena to some human syndromes and perhaps develop controlled methods to kill pigmented tumor cells.

  16. Kinetics of Melanin Polymerization during Enzymatic and Nonenzymatic Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sayan; Thampi, Arya; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2018-02-22

    Melanin is an abundant biopigment in the animal kingdom, but its structure remains poorly understood. This is a substantial impediment to understanding the mechanistic origin of its observed functions. Proposed models of melanin structure include aggregates of both linear and macrocyclic units and noncovalently held monomers. Both models are broadly in agreement with current experimental data. To constrain the structural and kinetic models of melanin, experimental data of high resolution with chemical specificity accompanied by atomistic modeling are required. We have addressed this by obtaining electronic absorption, infrared, and ultraviolet resonance Raman (RR) spectra of melanin at several wavelengths of excitation that are sensitive to small changes in structure. From these experiments, we observed kinetics of the formation of different species en route to melanin polymerization. Exclusive chemical signatures of monomer 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa), intermediate dopachrome (DC), and early-time polymer are established through their vibrational bands at 1292, 1670, and 1616 cm -1 respectively. Direct evidence of reduced heterogeneity of melanin oligomers in tyrosinase-induced formation is provided from experimental measurements of vibrational bandwidths. Models made with density functional theory show that the linear homopolymeric structures of 5,6-dihydroxyindole can account for experimentally observed wavenumbers and broad bandwidth in Raman spectra of dopa-melanin. We capture resonance Raman (RR) signature of DC, the intermediate stabilized by the enzyme tyrosinase, for the first time in an enzyme-assisted melanization reaction using 488 nm excitation wavelength and propose that this wavelength can be used to probe reaction intermediates of melanin formation in solution.

  17. The stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence guided ablation of melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; DiMarzio, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated and excited by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser, is a low-cost and reliable method for detecting melanin. We have developed a device utilizing the melanin SMPAF to guide the ablation of melanin with a 975 nm CW laser. This method provides the ability of targeting individual melanin particles with micrometer resolution, and enables localized melanin ablation to be performed without collateral damage. Compared to the traditional selective photothermolysis, which uses pulsed lasers for melanin ablation, this method demonstrates higher precision and lower cost. Therefore, the SMPAF guided selective ablation of melanin is a promising tool of melanin ablation for both medical and cosmetic purposes.

  18. [Intervention of nicotinamide on skin melanin genesis after UVA exposed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patam, Muhammad; Jin, Xi-peng; Zhang, Yu-bin; Pan, Jian-ying; Shen, Guang-zu

    2007-08-01

    To investigate the interference effect of nicotinamide on UVA-induced melanin genesis and melanin transport in human skin melanocyte. The optimum UVA dose expected to cause cell proliferation: 0.2 J/cm(2), nicotinamide was added immediately after the 0.2 J/cm(2) UVA exposure and the melanin content, cell cycles, cell apoptosis and mRNA express level were measured respectively. Melanin content in melanocytes was increased significantly after exposed to 0.2 J/cm(2) UVA. Melanin content in melanocytes was decreased after treatment with 10.0 mmol/ml nicotinamide following UVA exposure, but the cell cycles and the cell apoptosis rate were not significantly altered. mRNA express levels of TYR, TRP-1 were modulated by nicotinamide. Nicotinamide has more effect on decreasing melanin genesis after UVA exposure, nicotinamide also plays a role in modulating the mRNA express of TYR, TRP-1 gene. It is possible to consider nicotinamide as an efficient and safe sun screen to provide a certain level of protection for UVA exposed skin.

  19. Bird Integumentary Melanins: Biosynthesis, Forms, Function and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Galván

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Melanins are the ubiquitous pigments distributed in nature. They are one of the main pigments responsible for colors in living cells. Birds are among the most diverse animals regarding melanin-based coloration, especially in the plumage, although they also pigment bare parts of the integument. This review is devoted to the main characteristics of bird melanins, including updated views of the formation and nature of melanin granules, whose interest has been raised in the last years for inferring the color of extinct birds and non-avian theropod dinosaurs using resistant fossil feathers. The molecular structure of the two main types of melanin, eumelanin and pheomelanin, and the environmental and genetic factors that regulate avian melanogenesis are also presented, establishing the main relationship between them. Finally, the special functions of melanin in bird feathers are also discussed, emphasizing the aspects more closely related to these animals, such as honest signaling, and the factors that may drive the evolution of pheomelanin and pheomelanin-based color traits, an issue for which birds have been pioneer study models.

  20. Development of gadolinium based nanoparticles having an affinity towards melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlieras, Jessica; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Roux, Amandine; Heinrich-Balard, Laurence; Cohen, Richard; Tarrit, Sébastien; Truillet, Charles; Mignot, Anna; Hachani, Roxanne; Kryza, David; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Perriat, Pascal; Janier, Marc; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Small Rigid Platforms (SRPs) are sub-5 nanometre gadolinium based nanoparticles that have been developed for multimodal imaging and theranostic applications. They are composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. A covalent coupling with quinoxaline derivatives has been performed. Such derivatives have proven their affinity for melanin frequently expressed in primary melanoma cases. Three different quinoxaline derivatives have been synthesised and coupled to the nanoparticles. The affinity of the grafted nanoparticles for melanin has then been shown in vitro by surface plasmon resonance on a homemade melanin grafted gold chip.Small Rigid Platforms (SRPs) are sub-5 nanometre gadolinium based nanoparticles that have been developed for multimodal imaging and theranostic applications. They are composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. A covalent coupling with quinoxaline derivatives has been performed. Such derivatives have proven their affinity for melanin frequently expressed in primary melanoma cases. Three different quinoxaline derivatives have been synthesised and coupled to the nanoparticles. The affinity of the grafted nanoparticles for melanin has then been shown in vitro by surface plasmon resonance on a homemade melanin grafted gold chip. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33457g

  1. Photodegradation of melanin thin films by UV lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, C. W.; Kassu, A.; Sharma, A.

    2011-09-01

    Effect of ambient humidity on the photodegradation of melanin is investigated using an interferometric technique to fabricate gratings on thin films. A low power 355 nm diode laser is used to fabricate gratings on melanin thin films, while a 1 mW He-Ne laser is used to probe grating formation. Effects at several different UV intensities, ranging from 10 mW to 30 mW, and ambient humidities, ranging from 13% to 93%, are investigated on melanin thin films of two different thicknesses; 22 nm and 40nm. It is found that humidity has a great effect on the photodegradation of melanin. It is also found that existing gratings on melanin thin films can be enhanced by raising ambient humidity. These results have implications in the biological evolution of many mammals; as well as implications in fabrication and effective lifetime of organic electronics. The interferometric technique used shows great promise for fabricating grating to analyze photodegradation of different biomolecules under varying conditions. A simple mathematical model is developed to help explain the contribution of light intensity and ambient humidity to the photodegradation of melanin.nage.

  2. Frontiers in epidermal barrier homeostasis--an approach to mathematical modelling of epidermal calcium dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denda, Mitsuhiro; Denda, Sumiko; Tsutsumi, Moe; Goto, Makiko; Kumamoto, Junichi; Nakatani, Masashi; Takei, Kentaro; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Nakata, Satoshi; Sawabu, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Yasuaki; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2014-02-01

    Intact epidermal barrier function is crucial for survival and is associated with the presence of gradients of both calcium ion concentration and electric potential. Although many molecules, including ion channels and pumps, are known to contribute to maintenance of these gradients, the mechanisms involved in epidermal calcium ion dynamics have not been clarified. We have established that a variety of neurotransmitters and their receptors, originally found in the brain, are expressed in keratinocytes and are also associated with barrier homeostasis. Moreover, keratinocytes and neurons show some similarities of electrochemical behaviour. As mathematical modelling and computer simulation have been employed to understand electrochemical phenomena in brain science, we considered that a similar approach might be applicable to describe the dynamics of epidermal electrochemical phenomena associated with barrier homeostasis. Such methodology would also be potentially useful to address a number of difficult problems in clinical dermatology, such as ageing and itching. Although this work is at a very early stage, in this essay, we discuss the background to our approach and we present some preliminary results of simulation of barrier recovery. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Raccoon Dog Skin to Determine Melanin Content in Hair and Melanin Distribution in Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Zhanyu Du; Kai Huang; Jiaping Zhao; Xingchao Song; Xiumei Xing; Qiong Wu; Linbo Zhang; Chao Xu

    2017-01-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is an important canid fur-bearing animal species worldwide. Chinese raccoon dogs that present a white mutation, especially those with a white coat. Exploring melanin biosynthesis in the hair and skin of raccoon dogs is important for understanding the survival and evolutionary mechanisms of them. In this study, we measured the content of melanin in the hair of two types of raccoon dog and generated stained slices of skin tissue. The results indicated ...

  4. Light-emitting diode 585nm photomodulation inhibiting melanin synthesis and inducing autophagy in human melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Xu, Zhongyi; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Chengfeng; Wang, Xuan; Xiang, Leihong

    2018-01-01

    Melasma is a common hyperpigmentation skin disease on face. Light-emitting diode (LED) photomodulation (585nm) is reported to be effective for the treatment of melasma. However, whether and how LED photomodulation would influence melanogenesis of human epidermal melanocytes (HEMs) is unknown. To evaluate the effects of LED photomodulation (585nm) on melanogenesis in HEMs. HEMs were irradiated with fluences of 0, 5, 10 and 20J/cm 2 585nm LED light. After 5-day treatment, cell viability was analyzed by CCK-8 assay, and apoptosis was assessed by Annexin V APC assay. Melanin content and tyrosinase activity were measured by spectrophotometer. Melanosome stage and autophagosomes were determined under transmission electron microscope (TEM). The formation of autophagic punctate structures was observed under confocal microscope. RT-PCR and western blotting were used to assess the expression of relative mRNA and protein levels. Yellow light LED 585nm had no effects on HEMs cell viability and apoptosis. Treatment with LED 585nm from 5J/cm 2 to 20J/cm 2 inhibited melanosome maturation, decreased melanin content and tyrosinase activity. Inhibition was accompanied by the decreased expression of tyrosinase (TYR), tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) on both mRNA and protein levels. Autophagosomes were observed under TEM. Autophagic punctate structures of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) proteins were induced by LED 585nm light. The configuration change of LC3 from LC3-I to LC3-II, and the degradation of p62 protein were observed after LED 585nm. Furthermore, we also revealed that the anti-melanogenic effect of LED 585nm photomodulation was reversed by 3-Methyladenine (3-MA), which inhibits autophagy by blocking autophagosome formation via the inhibition of type III Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI-3K). Our finding demonstrated that LED photomodulation with 585nm wavelength suppressed melanin content in

  5. The protective effect of melanin against radiation. Final technical report, Oct 1975--Oct 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swan, G.A.; Baldry, P.A.

    1976-10-01

    Oxidation and reduction of autoxidative dopa-melanin were studied. Reduction with neither ascorbic acid nor sodium dithionite led to any overall increase in the number of 5,6-dihydroxyindole units in the melanin polymer. The melanin was oxidised using repsectivley potassium ferricyanide and ceric sulphate solutions but in neither case was the melanin e.s.r. signal diminished. The interaction of melanin's free radicals with cupric ions was shown not to be chemical in nature. The number of bound cupric ions was determined and the value used to calculate the number of free radicals in autoxidative dopa-melanin.

  6. Melanin-embedded materials effectively remove hexavalent chromium (CrVI) from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuong, An Manh; Le Na, Nguyen Thi; Thang, Pham Nhat; Diep, Trinh Ngoc; Thuy, Ly Bich; Thanh, Nguyen Lai; Thang, Nguyen Dinh

    2018-02-23

    Currently, it is recognized that water polluted with toxic heavy metal ions may cause serious effects on human health. Therefore, the development of new materials for effective removal of heavy metal ions from water is still a widely important area. Melanin is being considered as a potential material for removal of heavy metal from water. In this study, we synthesized two melanin-embedded beads from two different melanin powder sources and named IMB (Isolated Melanin Bead originated from squid ink sac) and CMB (Commercial Melanin Bead originated from sesame seeds). These beads were of globular shape and 2-3 mm in diameter. We investigated and compared the sorption abilities of these two bead materials toward hexavalent-chromium (Cr VI ) in water. The isotherm sorption curves were established using Langmuir and Freundlich models in the optimized conditions of pH, sorption time, solid/liquid ratio, and initial concentration of Cr VI . The FITR analysis was also carried out to show the differences in surface properties of these two beads. The optimized conditions for isotherm sorption of Cr VI on IMB/CMB were set at pH values of 2/2, sorption times of 90/300 min, and solid-liquid ratios of 10/20 mg/mL. The maximum sorption capacities calculated based on the Langmuir model were 19.60 and 6.24 for IMB and CMB, respectively. However, the adsorption kinetic of Cr VI on the beads fitted the Freundlich model with R 2 values of 0.992 for IMB and 0.989 for CMB. The deduced Freundlich constant, 1/n, in the range of 0.2-0.8 indicated that these beads are good adsorption materials. In addition, structure analysis data revealed great differences in physical and chemical properties between IMB and CMB. Interestingly, FTIR analysis results showed strong signals of -OH (3295.35 cm - 1 ) and -C=O (1608.63 cm - 1 ) groups harboring on the IMB but not CMB. Moreover, loading of Cr VI on the IMB caused a shift of broad peaks from 3295.35 cm - 1 and 1608.63 cm - 1 to 3354

  7. GH administration patterns differently regulate epidermal growth factor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, Maria E.; Miquet, Johanna Gabriela; Rossi, Soledad Paola; Irene, Pablo E.; Sotelo, Ana Isabel; Frungieri, Monica Beatriz; Turyn, Daniel; Gonzalez, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    Current GH administration protocols imply frequent s.c. injections, resulting in suboptimal compliance. Therefore, there is interest in developing delivery systems for sustained release of the hormone. However, GH has different actions depending on its continuous or pulsatile plasma concentration pattern. GH levels and circulating concentration patterns could be involved in the regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in liver. Aberrant expression of this receptor and/...

  8. Chronic systemic treatment with epidermal growth factor induces hypergastrinaemia in Goettingen minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinter-Jensen, Lars; Juhl, C O; Rehfeld, J F

    1995-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is an inhibitor of gastric acid secretion. The impact of chronic systemic treatment with EGF on intragastric pH and serum gastrin concentrations has not been investigated previously.......Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is an inhibitor of gastric acid secretion. The impact of chronic systemic treatment with EGF on intragastric pH and serum gastrin concentrations has not been investigated previously....

  9. Optical properties of cells with melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Barukh; Coats, Israel; Krueger, James; Gareau, Dan

    2014-02-01

    The optical properties of pigmented lesions have been studied using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in a noninvasive configuration on optically thick samples such as skin in vivo. However, it is difficult to un-mix the effects of absorption and scattering with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy techniques due to the complex anatomical distributions of absorbing and scattering biomolecules. We present a device and technique that enables absorption and scattering measurements of tissue volumes much smaller than the optical mean-free path. Because these measurements are taken on fresh-frozen sections, they are direct measurements of the optical properties of tissue, albeit in a different hydration state than in vivo tissue. Our results on lesions from 20 patients including melanomas and nevi show the absorption spectrum of melanin in melanocytes and basal keratinocytes. Our samples consisted of fresh frozen sections that were unstained. Fitting the spectrum as an exponential decay between 500 and 1100 nm [mua = A*exp(-B*(lambda-C)) + D], we report on the fit parameters of and their variation due to biological heterogeneity as A = 4.20e4 +/- 1.57e5 [1/cm], B = 4.57e-3 +/- 1.62e-3 [1/nm], C = 210 +/- 510 [nm] , D = 613 +/- 534 [1/cm]. The variability in these results is likely due to highly heterogeneous distributions of eumelanin and pheomelanin.

  10. Turnover of pigment granules: cyclic catabolism and anabolism of ommochromes within epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insausti, T C; Casas, J

    2009-12-01

    Ommochromes are end products of the tryptophan metabolism in arthropods. While the anabolism of ommochromes has been well studied, the catabolism is totally unknown. In order to study it, we used the crab-spider Misumena vatia, which is able to change color reversibly in a few days, from yellow to white and back. Ommochromes is the only pigment class responsible for the body coloration in this animal. The aim of this study was to analyze the fine structure of the epidermal cells in bleaching spiders, in an attempt to correlate morphological changes with the fate of the pigment granules. Central to the process of bleaching is the lysis of the ommochrome granules. In the same cell, intact granules and granules in different degradation stages are found. The degradation begins with granule autolysis. Some components are extruded in the extracellular space and others are recycled via autophagy. Abundant glycogen appears associated to granulolysis. In a later stage of bleaching, ommochrome progranules, typical of white spiders, appear in the distal zone of the same epidermal cell. Catabolism and anabolism of pigment granules thus take place simultaneously in spider epidermal cells. A cyclic pathway of pigment granules formation and degradation, throughout a complete cycle of color change is proposed, together with an explanation for this turnover, involving photoprotection against UV by ommochromes metabolites. The presence of this turnover for melanins is discussed.

  11. Evolution of dinosaur epidermal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Paul M; Evans, David C; Campione, Nicolás E

    2015-06-01

    Spectacularly preserved non-avian dinosaurs with integumentary filaments/feathers have revolutionized dinosaur studies and fostered the suggestion that the dinosaur common ancestor possessed complex integumentary structures homologous to feathers. This hypothesis has major implications for interpreting dinosaur biology, but has not been tested rigorously. Using a comprehensive database of dinosaur skin traces, we apply maximum-likelihood methods to reconstruct the phylogenetic distribution of epidermal structures and interpret their evolutionary history. Most of these analyses find no compelling evidence for the appearance of protofeathers in the dinosaur common ancestor and scales are usually recovered as the plesiomorphic state, but results are sensitive to the outgroup condition in pterosaurs. Rare occurrences of ornithischian filamentous integument might represent independent acquisitions of novel epidermal structures that are not homologous with theropod feathers. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Clinical Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    compli- cations and identify at-risk patients for post- discharge mortality 8) Ophthalmologic consultation is highly recommended for patients with...gastrointestinal tract, vaginal mucosa, anal canal and the eyes and mouth. TEN does not affect columnar or cuboidal epithelium. Sloughing of the epidermal-dermal...proven infection may select for resistant organisms and may contribute to increased mortality.24 The principal of skin care in TENS is to prevent

  13. Genetic validation and spectroscopic detailing of DHN-melanin extracted from an environmental fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitya Meenakshi Raman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate characterization of melanin using analytical methodologies has proved to be difficult due to its heterogeneity, insolubility in wide pH and broad range of solvents. The present study was undertaken to characterize melanin extracted from an environmental Aspergillus fumigatus AFGRD105 by studying its genes, chemical properties and spectral data. A gene based approach to confirm the type of melanin carried out indicated the extracted melanin to be of the dihydroxynaphthalene type. On comparison with synthetic melanin, UV–Vis and IR spectra of the extracted melanin revealed characteristic peaks that can be further used for confirmation of DHN-melanin extracted from any source. Solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy established the presence of the hydroxyl-naphthalene moiety and validated the results obtained by genetic analysis. The correct assignment of the observed spectral frequency characteristic of functional groups can be further adapted in future works that deal with binding capacities and biomolecule systems involving melanin.

  14. Genetic validation and spectroscopic detailing of DHN-melanin extracted from an environmental fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Nitya Meenakshi; Ramasamy, Suganthi

    2017-12-01

    Accurate characterization of melanin using analytical methodologies has proved to be difficult due to its heterogeneity, insolubility in wide pH and broad range of solvents. The present study was undertaken to characterize melanin extracted from an environmental Aspergillus fumigatus AFGRD105 by studying its genes, chemical properties and spectral data. A gene based approach to confirm the type of melanin carried out indicated the extracted melanin to be of the dihydroxynaphthalene type. On comparison with synthetic melanin, UV-Vis and IR spectra of the extracted melanin revealed characteristic peaks that can be further used for confirmation of DHN-melanin extracted from any source. Solid state 13 C NMR spectroscopy established the presence of the hydroxyl-naphthalene moiety and validated the results obtained by genetic analysis. The correct assignment of the observed spectral frequency characteristic of functional groups can be further adapted in future works that deal with binding capacities and biomolecule systems involving melanin.

  15. Inhibition of two stages of melanin synthesis by sesamol, sesamin and sesamolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montra Srisayam

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Three sesame lignans prevent melanin synthesis through 2 stages: (a by blocking melanin-induction and (b by interrupting melanogenic enzyme production. This study provides evidence that sesamol, sesamin and sesamolin are potential for antimelanogenesis agents.

  16. Melanin Transferred to Keratinocytes Resides in Nondegradative Endocytic Compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Maria S; Moreiras, Hugo; Pereira, Francisco J C; Neto, Matilde V; Festas, Tiago C; Tarafder, Abul K; Ramalho, José S; Seabra, Miguel C; Barral, Duarte C

    2018-03-01

    Melanin transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes and subsequent accumulation in the supranuclear region is a critical process in skin pigmentation and protection against UVR. We have previously proposed that the main mode of transfer between melanocytes and keratinocytes is through exo/endocytosis of the melanosome core, termed melanocore. In this study, we developed an in vitro uptake assay using melanocores secreted by melanocytes. We show that the uptake of melanocores, but not melanosomes, by keratinocytes is protease-activated receptor-2-dependent. Furthermore, we found that the silencing of the early endocytic regulator Rab5b, but not the late endocytic regulators Rab7a or Rab9a, significantly impairs melanocore uptake by keratinocytes. After uptake, we observed that melanin accumulates in compartments that are positive for both early and late endocytic markers. We found that melanin does not localize to either highly degradative or acidic organelles, as assessed by LysoTracker and DQ-BSA staining, despite the abundance of these types of organelles within keratinocytes. Therefore, we propose that melanocore uptake leads to storage of melanin within keratinocytes in hybrid endocytic compartments that are not highly acidic or degradative. By avoiding lysosomal degradation, these specialized endosomes may allow melanin to persist within keratinocytes for long periods. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic validation and spectroscopic detailing of DHN-melanin extracted from an environmental fungus

    OpenAIRE

    Nitya Meenakshi Raman; Suganthi Ramasamy

    2017-01-01

    Accurate characterization of melanin using analytical methodologies has proved to be difficult due to its heterogeneity, insolubility in wide pH and broad range of solvents. The present study was undertaken to characterize melanin extracted from an environmental Aspergillus fumigatus AFGRD105 by studying its genes, chemical properties and spectral data. A gene based approach to confirm the type of melanin carried out indicated the extracted melanin to be of the dihydroxynaphthalene type. On c...

  18. Effects of melanin-induced free radicals on the isolated rat peritoneal mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranadive, N.S.; Shirwadkar, S.; Persad, S.; Menon, I.A.

    1986-03-01

    Pheomelanin from human red hair (RHM) produces considerably more cellular damage in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells when subjected to radiations of wavelength 320-700 nm than eumelanin from black hair (BHM). Irradiation of RHM generated large amounts of superoxide while BHM did not produce detectable amounts of superoxide. The present investigations describe the effects of irradiation of mast cells in the presence of various natural and synthetic melanins. Irradiation of mast cells in the presence of RHM and red hair melanoprotein released large amounts of histamine while BHM and synthetic melanins prepared from dopa, cysteinyldopa, or a mixture of dopa and cysteinyldopa did not release histamine. The release of histamine at lower concentrations of RHM was not accompanied by the release of /sup 51/Cr from chromium-loaded cells, suggesting that this release was of noncytotoxic nature. On the other hand, the release of histamine at higher concentrations of RHM was due to cell lysis since both histamine and cytoplasmic marker /sup 51/Cr were released to the same extent. The release evoked by large concentration RHM was not inhibited by superoxide dismutase or catalase. This suggests that the cell lysis under these conditions was not due to H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or O-2. The finding that mast cells release histamine when irradiated in the presence of RHM suggests that the immediate and late-phase reactions seen in sunburn may in part be due to the release of mediators from these cells.

  19. Estimation of Melanin and Hemoglobin Using Spectral Reflectance Images Reconstructed from a Digital RGB Image by the Wiener Estimation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Aizu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A multi-spectral diffuse reflectance imaging method based on a single snap shot of Red-Green-Blue images acquired with the exposure time of 65 ms (15 fps was investigated for estimating melanin concentration, blood concentration, and oxygen saturation in human skin tissue. The technique utilizes the Wiener estimation method to deduce spectral reflectance images instantaneously from an RGB image. Using the resultant absorbance spectrum as a response variable and the extinction coefficients of melanin, oxygenated hemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin as predictor variables, multiple regression analysis provides regression coefficients. Concentrations of melanin and total blood are then determined from the regression coefficients using conversion vectors that are numerically deduced in advance by the Monte Carlo simulations for light transport in skin. Oxygen saturation is obtained directly from the regression coefficients. Experiments with a tissue-like agar gel phantom validated the method. In vivo experiments on fingers during upper limb occlusion demonstrated the ability of the method to evaluate physiological reactions of human skin.

  20. A melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signaling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolnicka-Glubisz, Agnieszka; Strickland, Faith M; Wielgus, Albert; Anver, Miriam; Merlino, Glenn; De Fabo, Edward C; Noonan, Frances P

    2015-02-15

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) signaling stimulates black eumelanin production through a cAMP-dependent pathway. MC1R polymorphisms can impair this process, resulting in a predominance of red phaeomelanin. The red hair, fair skin and UV sensitive phenotype is a well-described melanoma risk factor. MC1R polymorphisms also confer melanoma risk independent of pigment. We investigated the effect of Mc1r deficiency in a mouse model of UV-induced melanoma. C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF transgenic mice have a characteristic hyperpigmented black phenotype with extra-follicular dermal melanocytes located at the dermal/epidermal junction. UVB induces melanoma, independent of melanin pigmentation, but UVA-induced and spontaneous melanomas are dependent on black eumelanin. We crossed these mice with yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e animals which have a non-functional Mc1r and produce predominantly yellow phaeomelanin. Yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e-HGF mice produced no melanoma in response to UVR or spontaneously even though the HGF transgene and its receptor Met were expressed. Total melanin was less than in C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF mice, hyperpigmentation was not observed and there were few extra-follicular melanocytes. Thus, functional Mc1r was required for expression of the transgenic HGF phenotype. Heterozygous C57BL/6-Mc1re/+-HGF mice were black and hyperpigmented and, although extra-follicular melanocytes and skin melanin content were similar to C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF animals, they developed UV-induced and spontaneous melanomas with significantly less efficiency by all criteria. Thus, heterozygosity for Mc1r was sufficient to restore the transgenic HGF phenotype but insufficient to fully restore melanoma. We conclude that a previously unsuspected melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signaling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma and postulate that this pathway is involved in human melanoma. 2014 UICC.

  1. A melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signalling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolnicka-Glubisz, Agnieszka; Strickland, Faith M.; Wielgus, Albert; Anver, Miriam; Merlino, Glenn; De Fabo, Edward C.; Noonan, Frances P.

    2014-01-01

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) signaling stimulates black eumelanin production through a cAMP dependent pathway. MC1R polymorphisms can impair this process, resulting in a predominance of red phaeomelanin. The red hair, fair skin and UV sensitive phenotype is a well-described melanoma risk factor. MC1R polymorphisms also confer melanoma risk independent of pigment. We investigated the effect of Mc1r deficiency in a mouse model of UV-induced melanoma. C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF transgenic mice have a characteristic hyperpigmented black phenotype with extra-follicular dermal melanocytes located at the dermal/epidermal junction. UVB induces melanoma, independent of melanin pigmentation, but UVA-induced and spontaneous melanomas are dependent on black eumelanin. We crossed these mice with yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e animals which have a non-functional Mc1r and produce predominantly yellow phaeomelanin. Yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e-HGF mice produced no melanoma in response to UVR or spontaneously even though the HGF transgene and its receptor Met were expressed. Total melanin was less than in C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF mice, hyperpigmentation was not observed and there were few extra-follicular melanocytes. Thus, functional Mc1r was required for expression of the transgenic HGF phenotype. Heterozygous C57BL/6-Mc1re/+-HGF mice were black and hyperpigmented and, although extra-follicular melanocytes and skin melanin content were similar to C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF animals, they developed UV-induced and spontaneous melanomas with significantly less efficiency by all criteria. Thus, heterozygosity for Mc1r was sufficient to restore the transgenic HGF phenotype but insufficient to fully restore melanoma. We conclude that a previously unsuspected melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signaling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma and postulate that this pathway is involved in human melanoma. PMID:24975581

  2. Morphological and chemical composition characterization of commercial sepia melanin

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbonyiryivuze, A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available commercial products contain melanin as active ingredients; including creams that act as filters for single- response protection against UV radiation [11]. Melanins are used in cosmetics to fade defects of the skin diseases called ‘vitiligo’ which is caused...).Determination of Eumelanin content in fibers from Alpaca (Vicugna pacos), Doctoral Thesis., Macerata: University of Camerino, 2011. [14] D. Peruru, R. S, N. Ahmed VH, P. S. Sandeep, S. Raju, S. Nazan and S. Begum, “Isolation of eumelanin from Sepia officinalis...

  3. Epidermal nevus syndrome and dysplatic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Nickavar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal nevus syndrome is a rare congenital disorder, characterized by epidermal nevi and multiple organ involvement. Multicystic kidney disease has been very rarely reported in this syndrome. Here is the report of a boy presented with multiple epidermal nevi, cardiac anomaly, seizure attack, hemi hypertrophy, and multicystic dysplastic kidney complicated with Wilms' tumor. According to this association, it is suggested to search for dysplastic kidney disease in patients with neurocutaneous disorders.

  4. Techniques of digital image analysis for histological quantification of melanin Técnicas de análise de imagem digital para quantificação histológica da melanina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Amante Miot

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Morphometric analysis of tissue melanin may quantitatively contribute to research on pigmentation disorders. The authors present three methods for image analysis, which allow for identification of melanin-equivalent pixels in the epidermis using Fontana-Masson stain and, therefore, for the calculation of its percentage in the different epidermal layers. Moreover, they discuss the main elements related to the analysis and the need for rigorous standardization of the process.A análise morfométrica da melanina tecidual pode subsidiar quantitativamente a pesquisa em discromias. Os autores demonstram três técnicas de análise de imagem digital que permitem a identificação dos pixels equivalentes à melanina na epiderme pela coloração de Fontana-Masson, possibilitando o cálculo da sua porcentagem nas diferentes camadas da epiderme, e discutem os principais elementos relacionados à análise e a necessidade de rigorosa padronização do processo.

  5. Staphylococcus hyicus virulence in relation to exudative epidermitis in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar; Andresen, Lars Ole; Bille-Hansen, Vivi

    1993-01-01

    Staphylococcus hyicus strains with different phage types, plasmid profiles, and antibiotic resistance patterns were isolated from piglets with exudative epidermitis. The strains could be divided into virulent strains, producing exudative epidermitis, and avirulent strains, producing no dermal...... changes when injected in experimental piglets. The results showed that both virulent and avirulent strains were present simultaneously on diseased piglets. This constitutes a diagnostic problem. Concentrated culture supernatants from nine virulent strains injected in the skin of healthy piglets produced...... a crusting reaction in all piglets. Acanthosis was observed in the histopathological examination of the crustaceous skin. Concentrated culture supernatants from nine avirulent strains produced no macroscopic or microscopic skin changes. Protein profiles from all virulent strains and seven out of nine...

  6. Evidence for excitation of fluorescence in RPE melanin by multiphoton absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Denton, Michael L.

    2002-06-01

    Previously, we reported that ultrashort, near infrared (NIR) laser pulses caused more DNA breakage in cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells than did CW, NIR laser radiation delivering a similar radiant exposure. We hypothesized that this difference was due to multiphoton absorption in an intracellular chromophore such as the RPE melanin. We investigated two-photon excitation of fluorescence in a suspension of isolated bovine RPE melanosomes exposed to a 1-KHz train of approximately 50- fsec laser pulses at 810 nm from a Ti:Sapphire laser, and compared this to the fluorescence excited by CW exposures at 406 nm from a Krypton ion laser. Fluorescence was measured with a PC-based spectrometer. The CW sources excited fluorescence with a peak at 525 nm. The fluorescence intensity depended on the irradiance of the sample, as well as the melanosome concentration. Peak fluorescence was obtained with a suspension of ~2 x 107 melanin granules/ml. The 810-nm, ultrashort pulses also excited fluorescence, but with a broader, lower-amplitude peak. The weaker fluorescence signal excited by the 810-nm ultrashort pulse laser for a given melanosome concentration, compared to 406-nm CW excitation, is possibly due to the smaller two- photon absorption cross-section. These results indicate the involvement of multiphoton absorption in DNA damage.

  7. A drug release system induced by near infrared laser using alginate microparticles containing melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Ah; Yoon, Soon Do; Lee, Chang-Moon

    2017-10-01

    The photothermal effect is used in a new drug release system to control drug delivery in a specific region. Melanin absorbs near-infrared (NIR) light with a high photothermal conversion efficiency, and as a result, an NIR laser can be used to induced drug release from alginate microparticles containing melanin (ALG-Mel microparticles). The temperature of the ALG-Mel microparticle solution at a concentration of 5mg/mL increased to 38.1°C from 26.0°C after irradiation with 808nm NIR at 1.5W/cm 2 for 5min, and this increase in temperature was found to be independent of the ALG-Mel microparticle concentration. After the NIR laser irradiation, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was released from the ALG-Mel microparticles to 87.4±0.5% of the total loaded drug for 24h. Without NIR laser irradiation, 5-FU was released from the ALG-Mel microparticles to 60.8±1.5% of the total loaded drug for 24h. These results indicate that NIR laser irradiation can be used with ALG-Mel microparticles as a drug delivery system for release within a target region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cloning and identification of a novel tyrosinase and its overexpression in Streptomyces kathirae SC-1 for enhancing melanin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Rao, Zhiming; Yang, Taowei; Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Zhang, Xian; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-04-01

    A 30-kDa novel tyrosinase was purified to homogeneity. The Km for L-Dopa and L-tyrosine were determined as 0.42 and 0.25 mM. The 1231 bp (base pair) melC gene and its 167 bp promoter Pskmel were obtained by thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction based on the amino acids fragment obtained from MS results of the purified enzyme. The protein sequence of tyrosinase shows maximum identity (84%) to tyrosinase from Streptomyces galbus. The melC was introduced into S. kathirae. The melanin production and the transcriptional level of melC in recombinant S. kathirae [pIJPskmelmelC] were about 2.1-fold and 2-fold higher than the wild-type strain, respectively. The melanin concentration was maximized at 28.8 g L(-1). © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Epidermal growth factor in rat milk is dependent on insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexo, E

    1993-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was measured in milk from four groups of rats: untreated diabetic, insulin-treated diabetic, insulin-treated normal and control rats. In the untreated diabetic group the volume of milk, and the concentration of EGF and the total output of EGF were significantly decre...... of EGF from the mammary glands is dependent on insulin and that the decrement in milk-EGF from diabetic rats is selective when compared to the content of protein in milk....

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Ro 03-8799 in mice bearing melanosarcoma: comparison with tumors without melanin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, F.; Canal, P.; Soula, G.

    1989-04-01

    The pharmacokinetics of Ro 03-8799 has been studied in melanic and non-melanic tumor bearing mice after iv administration of 150 mg/kg. The peak concentration in B16 melanosarcoma tumor reached 152 micrograms/g, that is 7.6-fold higher than the plasma concentration at the same time. This concentration is 3-times greater than that obtained in the tumor of mice bearing non-melanic sarcoma (DB16) or Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL). The exposure of B16 tumor (AUC) is respectively 15-times and 11-times higher than the 3LL and the DB16 ones. These experimental data confirm that this 2-nitro-imidazol compound has an important affinity for melanin and suggest that it might be used as a radiosensitizer for the treatment of malignant melanoma.

  11. Effects of ultraviolet-visible irradiation in the presence of melanin isolated from human black or red hair upon Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, I.A.; Persad, S.; Ranadive, N.S.; Haberman, H.F.

    1983-07-01

    The present study is an attempt to investigate the possibility that ultraviolet irradiation in the presence of pheomelanin may be more harmful to cells than the irradiation in the presence of eumelanin. The effects of UV-visible irradiation upon Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells in the presence of the melanin isolated from human black hair (eumelanin) or from red hair (pheomelanin) were investigated. Irradiation of these cells was found to produce cell lysis, as observed by leakage of 51Cr from labeled cells and intracellular lactic dehydrogenase from the cells and decrease in cell viability demonstrated by the trypan blue exclusion test. The three parameters were quantitatively parallel to one another under various experimental conditions, namely different periods of irradiation and irradiation in the presence of different concentrations of melanin. The above effects were more pronounced when the irradiation was carried out in the presence of melanin from red hair than in the presence of black-hair melanin. In the absence of either melanin, the irradiation did not produce any significant effect in cell viability or cell lysis. Irradiation of the cells in the presence of red-hair melanin also decreased the transplantability of these cells. These observations clearly show that irradiation of cells in the presence of pheomelanin could produce cytotoxic effects. The present experimental design may have application in the development of in vitro models for the study of UV radiation-induced cutaneous carcinogenesis. The reactions of pheomelanin may be related to the susceptibility of ''Celtic'' skin to UV radiation-induced skin damage and carcinogenesis.

  12. Effects of ascorbic acid on gingival melanin pigmentation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yasuko; Tai, Hideaki; Tanaka, Aya; Ikezawa-Suzuki, Ikuyo; Takagi, Keiji; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2009-02-01

    Gingival melanin pigmentation may cause esthetic concerns, even if no serious medical problem is present. As an inhibitor of melanin formation, ascorbic acid is often used to treat skin melanin pigmentation. Thus, the present study investigated the effects of ascorbic acid on gingival melanin pigmentation in vitro and in vivo. The effects of ascorbic acid on melanin formation were evaluated in vitro in B16 mouse melanoma cells and three-dimensional human skin models. In addition, a clinical trial was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of a gel containing ascorbic acid 2-glucoside (AS-G gel) on gingival melanin pigmentation. This study used a double-masked, split-mouth design on 73 subjects with symmetric gingival melanin pigmentation. AS-G gel was applied to one side of the gingiva for 12 weeks, whereas placebo gel was applied to the other side as a control. Luminance (L*)-value, which describes the lightness of gingiva, was determined by spectrophotometry to obtain an objective measure of melanin pigmentation every 4 weeks. Ascorbic acid significantly inhibited tyrosinase activity and melanin formation in B16 mouse melanoma cells (P ascorbic acid on melanin formation were also significant in three-dimensional human skin models (P Ascorbic acid (AS-G) has potential for the treatment of gingival melanin pigmentation.

  13. Red blood cell membrane-camouflaged melanin nanoparticles for enhanced photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qin; Luo, Zimiao; Men, Yongzhi; Yang, Peng; Peng, Haibao; Guo, Ranran; Tian, Ye; Pang, Zhiqing; Yang, Wuli

    2017-10-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) has represented a promising noninvasive approach for cancer treatment in recent years. However, there still remain challenges in developing non-toxic and biodegradable biomaterials with high photothermal efficiency in vivo. Herein, we explored natural melanin nanoparticles extracted from living cuttlefish as effective photothermal agents and developed red blood cell (RBC) membrane-camouflaged melanin (Melanin@RBC) nanoparticles as a platform for in vivo antitumor PTT. The as-obtained natural melanin nanoparticles demonstrated strong absorption at NIR region, higher photothermal conversion efficiency (∼40%) than synthesized melanin-like polydopamine nanoparticles (∼29%), as well as favorable biocompatibility and biodegradability. It was shown that RBC membrane coating on melanin nanoparticles retained their excellent photothermal property, enhanced their blood retention and effectively improved their accumulation at tumor sites. With the guidance of their inherited photoacoustic imaging capability, optimal accumulation of Melanin@RBC at tumors was achieved around 4 h post intravenous injection. Upon irradiation by an 808-nm laser, the developed Melanin@RBC nanoparticles exhibited significantly higher PTT efficacy than that of bare melanin nanoparticles in A549 tumor-bearing mice. Given that both melanin nanoparticles and RBC membrane are native biomaterials, the developed Melanin@RBC platform could have great potential in clinics for anticancer PTT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Scavenging or Quenching Effect of Melanin on Superoxide Anion and Singlet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Mika; Kohno, Masahiro; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2010-01-01

    Although photoprotective properties of skin melanin have been well documented, a few studies on the effect of melanin on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation have been reported. To study the interaction of melanin with ROS, scavenging or quenching effect of melanin on O2•− and 1O2 was examined by electron spin resonance (ESR)-spin trapping methods and a spectrophotometric method, respectively. Melanin potently interacted with O2•− generated in a hypoxanthine (HPX)-xanthine oxidase (XOD) reaction, and with 1O2 generated from a peroxidase, H2O2, and halide system. In the HPX-XOD reaction, it was proved that melanin doses not interfere with the enzyme reaction. It is confirmed that one of the mechanisms by which melanin protects UV-induced skin damage is likely scavenging or quenching activity against ROS such as O2•− and 1O2. PMID:20490317

  15. Agaritine from Agaricus bisporus is capable of preventing melanin formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Espin, J.C.; Jolivet, S.; Overeem, A.; Wichers, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Agaritine [(β-N-(γ-L(+)-glutamyl)-4-hydroxymethylphenylhydrazine] was isolated and purified from the mushroom Agaricus bisporus. The prevention of melanin formation by agaritine is reported here for the first time. This compound, characteristic for the Agaricus genus, was a nucleophile in its

  16. Electronic Properties of Random Polymers: Modelling Optical Spectra of Melanins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenek, Kinga; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2003-05-01

    Melanins are a group of complex pigments of biological origin, widely spread in all species from fungi to man. Among diverse types of melanins, the human melanins, eumelanins, are brown or black nitrogen-containing pigments, mostly known for their photoprotective properties in human skin. We have undertaken theoretical studies aimed to understand absorption spectra of eumelanins and their chemical precursors. The structure of the biopigment is poorly defined, although it is believed to be composed of cross-linked heteropolymers based on indolequinones. As a basic model of the eumelanin structure, we have chosen pentamers containing hydroquinones (HQ) and/or 5,6-indolequinones (IQ) and/or semiquinones (SQ) often listed as structural melanin monomers. The eumelanin oligomers have been constructed as random compositions of basic monomers and optimized for the energy of bonding. Absorption spectra of model assemblies have been calculated within the semiempirical intermediate neglect of differential overlap (INDO) approximation. Model spectrum of eumelanin has been further obtained by sum of independent spectra of singular polymers. By comparison with experimental data it is shown that the INDO/CI method manages to reproduce well characteristic properties of experimental spectrum of synthetic eumelanins.

  17. Structural, electrical, electronic and optical properties of melanin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M.; D'Amico, F.; Morresi, L.; Pinto, N.; Ficcadenti, M.; Natali, R.; Ottaviano, L.; Passacantando, M.; Cuccioloni, M.; Angeletti, M.; Gunnella, R.

    2009-03-01

    We present thick, uniform and rather flat melanin films obtained using spray deposition. The morphology of the films was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Temperature-dependent electrical resistance of melanin thin films evidenced a semiconductor-like character and a hysteretic behavior linked to an irreversible process of water molecule desorption from the melanin film. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was carried out to analyze the role of the functional groups in the primary and secondary structure of the macromolecule, showing that the contribution of the 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA) subunit to the molecule is about 35%. Comparison of the optical absorption of the thick (800nm) and thin (80nm) films showed a spectral change when the thickness increases. From in vacuum photoconductivity (PC) measured at controlled temperatures, we suggest that the melanin films exhibit a possible charge transport mechanism by means of delocalized π states along the stacked planar secondary structure.

  18. [Staphylococcal epidermal exfoliation (Ritter's disease)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Maldonado, R; Tamayo, L; Vazquez, V; Dominguez, J

    1976-01-01

    According to the authors the best designation of Ritter's disease would be "staphilococcic epidermal exfoliation" SEE. The physiopathological and agnoslogical basis for this denomination could be the following: 1st The "S. aureus" is the ehtiological agent of the SSE in man. The Koch postulates necessary to confirm this hypothesis have been accomplished. 2nd "Staphylococcus aureus" produces a thermostable toxin that is active indepently of the staphilococcus and gives rise to the separation of the cells of the stratum granulosus of the epidermis and eventually exfoliation in suckling babies and in the newborn mouse. 3rd The "Staphylococcus aureus" may be present on the skin or in other localisations such as the bowel or pharinx. 4th The viable "S. aureus" when administered subcutaneously to the adult mice gives rise to lesions clinically and histologically similar to the impetigo observed in children. 5th The "S. aureus" killed by means of autoclave (that is, the staphylococcic toxine by itself does not give rise to any lesion when administered to the healthy adult mouse). Neijther has the SEE been observed in healthy adult man. The authors reach the conclusion that the SSE and the toxic epidermal necrolysis are basically different according to the histopathology therapeutic response and prognosis and they must be considered as independant entities.

  19. Melanin: spin behaviour and implications for bioelectronic devices (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Paul; Sheliakina, Margarita; Mostert, Bernard

    2015-10-01

    The melanins are a broad class of pigmentary macromolecules found through nature that perform a wide range of functions including photo-protection [1]. The most common melanin - the brown, black pigment eumelanin, has been much studied because of its role in melanoma and also for its functional material properties [2]. Synthetic eumelanin has been shown to be photoconductive in the solid state and also possess a water content dependent dark conductivity [3]. It is now well established that these electrical properties arise from hybrid ionic-electronic behaviour, leading to the proposition that melanins could be model biocompatible systems for ion-to-electron transduction in bioelectronics. In my talk, I will discuss the basic science behind these bioelectronics properties - electrical and optical. In this context I will also describe recent electron paramagnetic spin studies which isolate the role of the various chemical moieties responsible for the hybrid ionic-electronic behaviour. I will also highlight preliminary results on prototype melanin-based bioelectronics devices and discuss possible architectures to realise elements such as solid-state switches and transducers. [1] "The physical and chemical properties of eumelanin", P. Meredith and T. Sarna, Pigment Cell Research, 19(6), pp572-594 (2006). [2] "Electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices inspired by nature", P Meredith, C.J. Bettinger, M. Irimia-Vladu, A.B. Mostert and P.E. Schwenn, Reports on Progress in Physics, 76, 034501 (2013). [3] "Is melanin a semiconductor: humidity induced self doping and the electrical conductivity of a biopolymer", A.B. Mostert, B.J. Powell, F.L. Pratt, G.R. Hanson, T. Sarna, I.R. Gentle and P. Meredith, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 109(23), 8943-8947 (2012).

  20. Epidermal Stem Cells in Orthopaedic Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Zhen, Gehua; Tsai, Shin-Yi; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, great advances have been made in epidermal stem cell studies at the cellular and molecular level. These studies reported various subpopulations and differentiations existing in the epidermal stem cell. Although controversies and unknown issues remain, epidermal stem cells possess an immune-privileged property in transplantation together with easy accessibility, which is favorable for future clinical application. In this review, we will summarize the biological characteristics of epidermal stem cells, and their potential in orthopedic regenerative medicine. Epidermal stem cells play a critical role via cell replacement, and demonstrate significant translational potential in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases, including treatment for wound healing, peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury, and even muscle and bone remodeling. PMID:23727934

  1. Melanin-Based Contrast Agents for Biomedical Optoacoustic Imaging and Theranostic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Dario Livio; Stefania, Rachele; Aime, Silvio; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2017-08-07

    Optoacoustic imaging emerged in early 1990s as a new biomedical imaging technology that generates images by illuminating tissues with short laser pulses and detecting resulting ultrasound waves. This technique takes advantage of the spectroscopic approach to molecular imaging, and delivers high-resolution images in the depth of tissue. Resolution of the optoacoustic imaging is scalable, so that biomedical systems from cellular organelles to large organs can be visualized and, more importantly, characterized based on their optical absorption coefficient, which is proportional to the concentration of absorbing chromophores. Optoacoustic imaging was shown to be useful in both preclinical research using small animal models and in clinical applications. Applications in the field of molecular imaging offer abundant opportunities for the development of highly specific and effective contrast agents for quantitative optoacoustic imaging. Recent efforts are being made in the direction of nontoxic biodegradable contrast agents (such as nanoparticles made of melanin) that are potentially applicable in clinical optoacoustic imaging. In order to increase the efficiency and specificity of contrast agents and probes, they need to be made smart and capable of controlled accumulation in the target cells. This review was written in recognition of the potential breakthroughs in medical optoacoustic imaging that can be enabled by efficient and nontoxic melanin-based optoacoustic contrast agents.

  2. Relationship of the eye uptake of N-isopropyl-p-(/sup 123/I)iodoamphetamine to melanin production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, B.L.; Wick, M.M.; Kaplan, M.L.; Hill, T.C.; Lee, R.G.L.; Wu, J.; Lin, T.H.

    1984-03-01

    Eye uptake has been a potential concern with N-isopropyl-p-(/sup 123/I)iodoamphetamine (I-123 IMP) because it has been observed in certain animal species. The authors have investigated the cause of the eye uptake and its relationship to melanin synthesis. In a 1-yr-old cynomolgus monkey, high concentration of the tracer was seen in the eyes regardless of the type of anesthesia (pentobarbital or ketamine) or the oral administration of Lugol's solution. The eye uptake at 24 hr after injection of I-123 IMP was equally high in an 8-yr-old rhesus monkey. The ratio of radioactivity in the eye of black compared with white albino mice was 10:1 at 30 min, 18:1 at 2 hr and 36:1 at 24 hr after injection if I-123 IMP. No eye uptake above soft-tissue background was seen in five patients at 2, 24, and 48 hr after injection. I-123 IMP is avidly incorporated into melanocytes actively producing melanin, but substantially less in melanocytes where production of melanin has ceased as in the human eye.

  3. Laccase Gene Sh-lac Is Involved in the Growth and Melanin Biosynthesis of Scleromitrula shiraiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lǚ, Zhiyuan; Kang, Xin; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2017-03-01

    Scleromitrula shiraiana causes the popcorn disease in mulberry trees resulting in severe economic losses. Previous studies have shown that melanin may play a vital role in establishing the pathogenicity of fungi. In the present study, we identified the melanin produced in S. shiraiana belongs to DHN melanin by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and cloned the laccase Sh-lac, a potential DHN melanin biosynthesis gene from S. shiraiana. We obtained two stable Sh-lac silenced transformants using RNAi, ilac-4 and 8 to elucidate the DHN melanin biosynthetic pathway in S. shiraiana. The melanin production of ilac-4 and ilac-8 was significantly reduced, and their vegetative growth was also suppressed. Results such as these led to a proposal that Sh-lac played a key role in DHN melanin formation in S. shiraiana and may function differentially with other melanin biosynthetic genes. The inhibition of melanin was accompanied by the decrease of oxalic acid and the adhesion of hyphae was impaired. Our results indicated that laccase was an important enzyme in the synthesis of melanin and might play a critical role in the pathogenicity of S. shiraiana.

  4. Isolation and characterization of melanin pigment from yesso scallop Patinopecten yessoensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiujun; Wu, Biao; Zhou, Liqing; Liu, Zhihong; Dong, Yinghui; Yang, Aiguo

    2017-04-01

    Melanin is one of the essential compounds in the pigments of molluscan shells. However, the effects of melanin on color variations in molluscs are largely unknown. Our previous study suggests that Yesso scallop Patinopecten yessoensis might contain melanin pigment in the dark brown shell. We therefore isolated melanin from the pigmented shells using hydrochloric acid method, and characterized the types of melanin pigments by spectrophotometry. The purified melanin, which was verified by spectrophotometry scanning and HPLC analysis, showed the typical characteristics of melanin absorption spectra and HPLC chromatograms. The contents of pheomelanin and eumelanin in pigmented shells, which were determined by the linear standard curve of melanin at 405 nm and 350 nm absorbance, were 48.23 ± 1.350 and 157.65 ± 5.905 mg, respectively. The present results indicate that the brown-pigmented shells of scallops comprise approximately 76.6% of eumelanin and 23.4% of pheomelanin, which supports the presence of eumelanin-rich pigment in scallop shells. Therefore, the combination of hydrochloric acid extraction and spectrophotometric quantification is a rapid and efficient method to isolate and quantify melanin in shells. This will facilitate the melanin studies related to shell color polymorphism and the selective breeding of bivalves with different shell colors.

  5. The effect of melanin on the bystander effect in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosse, I. [Institute of Genetics and Cytology of the National Academy of Sciences, Academicheskaya Str. 27, Minsk (Belarus)]. E-mail: i.mosse@igc.bas-net.by; Marozik, P. [Institute of Genetics and Cytology of the National Academy of Sciences, Academicheskaya Str. 27, Minsk (Belarus); Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, DIT, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Seymour, C. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. (Canada); Mothersill, C. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. (Canada)

    2006-05-11

    The influence of melanin on radiation-induced bystander effects has been studied. Melanin is known to be a natural substance with proved radioprotective properties in different organisms and cell lines. It is non-toxic and is effective against acute and chronic irradiation. The lower the radiation dose, the higher the relative impact of melanin protection. In this study influence of melanin on human keratinocytes (HPV-G cells) has been studied using the colony-forming assay. We have shown that bystander donor medium from 0.5 Gy irradiated cells when transferred to unirradiated cells, caused almost the same effect as direct irradiation. Melanin increased the colony-forming ability of bystander recipient cells when it was added into culture medium before irradiation. The effect of melanin added after irradiation was to produce less protection in both the directly irradiated and bystander medium treated groups. The absorption spectrum of the filtered medium is identical to one of the intact culture medium showing that melanin was not present in filtered medium. Thus, it cannot protect recipient cells but reduces the amount of the bystander effect. It is concluded that melanin added before irradiation effectively decreased the radiation dose. The reduction of the impact of the bystander signal on recipient cells when melanin was added to the donor medium after harvest but before filtration, may mean that the bystander signal has a physical component as melanin can absorb all types of physical energy.

  6. Melanin and Melanin-Related Polymers as Materials with Biomedical and Biotechnological Applications-Cuttlefish Ink and Mussel Foot Proteins as Inspired Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Francisco

    2017-07-18

    The huge development of bioengineering during the last years has boosted the search for new bioinspired materials, with tunable chemical, mechanical, and optoelectronic properties for the design of semiconductors, batteries, biosensors, imaging and therapy probes, adhesive hydrogels, tissue restoration, photoprotectors, etc. These new materials should complement or replace metallic or organic polymers that cause cytotoxicity and some adverse health effects. One of the most interesting biomaterials is melanin and synthetic melanin-related molecules. Melanin has a controversial molecular structure, dependent on the conditions of polymerization, and therefore tunable. It is found in animal hair and skin, although one of the common sources is cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) ink. On the other hand, mussels synthesize adhesive proteins to anchor these marine animals to wet surfaces. Both melanin and mussel foot proteins contain a high number of catecholic residues, and their properties are related to these groups. Dopamine (DA) can easily polymerize to get polydopamine melanin (PDAM), that somehow shares properties with melanin and mussel proteins. Furthermore, PDAM can easily be conjugated with other components. This review accounts for the main aspects of melanin, as well as DA-based melanin-like materials, related to their biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  7. Melanin and Melanin-Related Polymers as Materials with Biomedical and Biotechnological Applications—Cuttlefish Ink and Mussel Foot Proteins as Inspired Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Solano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The huge development of bioengineering during the last years has boosted the search for new bioinspired materials, with tunable chemical, mechanical, and optoelectronic properties for the design of semiconductors, batteries, biosensors, imaging and therapy probes, adhesive hydrogels, tissue restoration, photoprotectors, etc. These new materials should complement or replace metallic or organic polymers that cause cytotoxicity and some adverse health effects. One of the most interesting biomaterials is melanin and synthetic melanin-related molecules. Melanin has a controversial molecular structure, dependent on the conditions of polymerization, and therefore tunable. It is found in animal hair and skin, although one of the common sources is cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis ink. On the other hand, mussels synthesize adhesive proteins to anchor these marine animals to wet surfaces. Both melanin and mussel foot proteins contain a high number of catecholic residues, and their properties are related to these groups. Dopamine (DA can easily polymerize to get polydopamine melanin (PDAM, that somehow shares properties with melanin and mussel proteins. Furthermore, PDAM can easily be conjugated with other components. This review accounts for the main aspects of melanin, as well as DA-based melanin-like materials, related to their biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  8. Epidermal electronic systems for sensing and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nanshu; Ameri, Shideh K.; Ha, Taewoo; Nicolini, Luke; Stier, Andrew; Wang, Pulin

    2017-04-01

    Epidermal electronic system is a class of hair thin, skin soft, stretchable sensors and electronics capable of continuous and long-term physiological sensing and clinical therapy when applied on human skin. The high cost of manpower, materials, and photolithographic facilities associated with its manufacture limit the availability of disposable epidermal electronics. We have invented a cost and time effective, completely dry, benchtop "cut-and-paste" method for the green, freeform and portable manufacture of epidermal electronics within minutes. We have applied the "cut-and-paste" method to manufacture epidermal electrodes, hydration and temperature sensors, conformable power-efficient heaters, as well as cuffless continuous blood pressure monitors out of metal thin films, two-dimensional (2D) materials, and piezoelectric polymer sheets. For demonstration purpose, we will discuss three examples of "cut-and-pasted" epidermal electronic systems in this paper. The first will be submicron thick, transparent epidermal graphene electrodes that can be directly transferred to human skin like a temporary transfer tattoo and can measure electrocardiogram (ECG) with signal-to-noise ratio and motion artifacts on par with conventional gel electrodes. The second will be a chest patch which houses both electrodes and pressure sensors for the synchronous measurements of ECG and seismocardiogram (SCG) such that beat-to-beat blood pressure can be inferred from the time interval between the R peak of the ECG and the AC peak of the SCG. The last example will be a highly conformable, low power consumption epidermal heater for thermal therapy.

  9. Determination of melanin and haemoglobin in the skin of idiopathic cutaneous hyperchromia of the orbital region (ICHOR: A study of Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Verschoore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Idiopathic cutaneous hyperchromia at the orbital region (ICHOR is a cutaneous hyperchromia characterised by bilateral darkening of the eyelid and orbital skin that contrasts with the adjoining facial skin. ICHOR is frequent in dark skin. It interferes with the face appearance which often causes difficulties in societal acceptance and may impact quality of life. Objective : The aim of this investigation was to study the epidemiology, clinical features and risk factors associated with ICHOR in Indian patients and also to study the distribution of melanin and haemoglobin in ICHOR patients. This study also assessed the relevance of SIAscopy technique (spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis (SIA, a new objective non-invasive method to measure melanin and haemoglobin concentration in vivo. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients diagnosed with ICHOR at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Dehli, India, were included in the study. Epidemiological data were collected through a self-administrated questionnaire. Standard photographs were taken from each patient and SIAscopy measurements were done on dark circles and normal skin. Results: Surprisingly our study showed no significant correlation between ICHOR prevalence and family history, atopic and contact dermatitis, contemporaneous melasma and hormonal factors. The study confirms that sun exposure is a risk factor of dark circles aggravation. Indeed patients tend to reduce sun exposure after the onset of dark circles. SIAscopy analysis reveals significant differences in the concentration of total melanin, of dermal melanin and of haemoglobin between ICHOR skin and normal skin of the same patient. Conclusion: This study confirms that melanin deposits and blood stasis in dark circles may play a role in ICHOR pathogenesis and cause the darkening of skin under eyes. SIAscopy provides objective diagnostic information about ICHOR.

  10. Structure and Function of Iron-Loaded Synthetic Melanin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yiwen; Xie, Yijun; Wang, Zhao; Zang, Nanzhi; Carniato, Fabio; Huang, Yuran; Andolina, Christopher M.; Parent, Lucas R.; Ditri, Treffly B.; Walter, Eric D.; Botta, Mauro; Rinehart, Jeffrey D.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2016-11-22

    We describe a synthetic method for increasing and controlling the iron loading of synthetic melanin nanoparticles and use the resulting materials to perform a systematic quantitative investigation on their structure- property relationship. A comprehensive analysis by magnetometry, electron paramagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion reveals the complexities of their magnetic behavior and how these intraparticle magnetic interactions manifest in useful material properties such as their performance as MRI contrast agents. This analysis allows predictions of the optimal iron loading through a quantitative modeling of antiferromagnetic coupling that arises from proximal iron ions. This study provides a detailed understanding of this complex class of synthetic biomaterials and gives insight into interactions and structures prevalent in naturally occurring melanins.

  11. Optimization of culture medium for production of melanin by Auricularia auricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu ZOU

    Full Text Available Abstract Melanin is a natural high molecular weight pigment with the huge application value and development potential in food industry. In the present study, medium composition for melanin production by fungus Auricularia auricula was investigated. Wheat bran extract, l-tyrosine, and CuSO4 were determined to optimize medium composition by response surface methodology with Box–Behnken design. Results indicated that the optimal medium composition was 26.80% (v/v wheat bran extract, 1.59 g/L l-tyrosine, and 0.11 g/L CuSO4, and the maximum melanin yield was 519.54 mg/L. Melanin production through A. auricula fermentation avoided expensive enzymatic or complicated chemical methods for melanin extraction from tissues of plant or animal, which had the huge application value and development potential for efficient production of melanin.

  12. Inhibitory effect of artocarpanone from Artocarpus heterophyllus on melanin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arung, Enos Tangke; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2006-09-01

    In our previous efforts to find new tyrosinase inhibitory materials, we investigated 44 Indonesian medicinal plants belonging to 24 families. Among those plants, the extract of Artocarpus heterophyllus was one of the strongest inhibitors of tyrosinase activity. By activity-guided fractionation of A. heterophyllus wood extract, we isolated artocarpanone, which inhibited both mushroom tyrosinase activity and melanin production in B16 melanoma cells. This compound is a strong candidate as a remedy for hyperpigmentation in human skin.

  13. Melanin-based colour polymorphism responding to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, Alexandre

    2014-11-01

    Climate warming leads to a decrease in biodiversity. Organisms can deal with the new prevailing environmental conditions by one of two main routes, namely evolving new genetic adaptations or through phenotypic plasticity to modify behaviour and physiology. Melanin-based colouration has important functions in animals including a role in camouflage and thermoregulation, protection against UV-radiation and pathogens and, furthermore, genes involved in melanogenesis can pleiotropically regulate behaviour and physiology. In this article, I review the current evidence that differently coloured individuals are differentially sensitive to climate change. Predicting which of dark or pale colour variants (or morphs) will be more penalized by climate change will depend on the adaptive function of melanism in each species as well as how the degree of colouration covaries with behaviour and physiology. For instance, because climate change leads to a rise in temperature and UV-radiation and dark colouration plays a role in UV-protection, dark individuals may be less affected from global warming, if this phenomenon implies more solar radiation particularly in habitats of pale individuals. In contrast, as desertification increases, pale colouration may expand in those regions, whereas dark colourations may expand in regions where humidity is predicted to increase. Dark colouration may be also indirectly selected by climate warming because genes involved in the production of melanin pigments confer resistance to a number of stressful factors including those associated with climate warming. Furthermore, darker melanic individuals are commonly more aggressive than paler conspecifics, and hence they may better cope with competitive interactions due to invading species that expand their range in northern latitudes and at higher altitudes. To conclude, melanin may be a major component involved in adaptation to climate warming, and hence in animal populations melanin-based colouration is

  14. Madecassoside Inhibits Melanin Synthesis by Blocking Ultraviolet-Induced Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Eunsun Jung; Jung-A Lee; Seoungwoo Shin; Kyung-Baeg Roh; Jang-Hyun Kim; Deokhoon Park

    2013-01-01

    Madecassoside (MA), a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from Centella asitica (L.), is used as a therapeutic agent in wound healing and also as an anti-inflammatory and anti-aging agent. However, the involvement of MA in skin-pigmentation has not been reported. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of MA on ultraviolet (UV)-induced melanogenesis and mechanisms in a co-culture system of keratinocytes and melanocytes. MA significantly inhibited UVR-induced melanin synthesis and mel...

  15. Snapshot RGB mapping of skin melanin and hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigulis, Janis; Oshina, Ilze

    2015-05-01

    The concept of snapshot red-green-blue (RGB) multispectral imaging was applied for skin chromophore mapping. Three monochromatic spectral images have been extracted from a single RGB image dataset at simultaneous illumination of skin by 473-, 532-, and 659-nm laser lines. The spectral images were further transformed into distribution maps of skin melanin, oxyhemoglobin, and deoxyhemoglobin, related to pigmented and vascular skin malformations. The performance and clinical potential of the proposed technique are discussed.

  16. Flavonoids and Melanins: A Common Strategy across Two Kingdoms

    OpenAIRE

    Carletti, Giorgia; Nervo, Giuseppe; Cattivelli, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiations alter a number of metabolic functions in vivant. They produce damages to lipids, nucleic acids and proteins, generating reactive oxygen species such as singlet oxygen (O2), hydroxyl radical (HO) and superoxide anion (O2 -). Plants and animals, after their water emersion, have developed biochemical mechanisms to protect themselves from that environmental threat through a common strategy. Melanins in animals and flavonoids in plants are antioxidant pigments acting as...

  17. Pigmentation and dermal conservative effects of the astonishing algae Sargassum polycystum and Padina tenuis on guinea pigs, human epidermal melanocytes (HEM) and Chang cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Chin Chew; Kim, Kah Hwi; Lau, Mei Siu; Kim, Wee Ric; Cheah, Swee Hung; Gundamaraju, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    The preference for a fairer skin-tone has become a common trend among both men and women around the world. In this study, seaweeds Sargassum polycystum and Padina tenuis were investigated for their in vitro and in vivo potentials in working as skin whitening agents. Seaweed has been used as a revolutionary skin repairing agent in both traditional and modern preparations. The high antioxidant content is one of the prime reasons for its potent action. It has been employed in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine. For centuries, most medical practitioners in the Asian cultures have known seaweed as an organic source of vitamins, minerals, fatty acids like omega-3 and omega-6 and antioxidants. The present objective of the study was to evaluate the potent dermal protective effect of the two seaweeds Sargassum polycystum and Padina tenuis on human cell lines and guinea pigs. Seaweeds were extracted with ethanol and further fractionated with hexane, ethyl acetate and water. The extracts were tested for mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity, cytotoxicity in human epidermal melanocyte (HEM), and Chang cells. Extracts with potent melanocytotoxicity were formulated into cosmetic cream and tested on guinea pigs in dermal irritation tests and de-pigmentation assessments. Both Sargassum polycystum and Padina tenuis seaweeds showed significant inhibitory effect on mushroom tyrosinase in the concentration tested. SPEt showed most potent cytotoxicity on HEM (IC50 of 36µg/ml), followed by SPHF (65µg/ml), and PTHF (78.5µg/ml). SPHF and SPEt reduced melanin content in skin of guinea pigs when assessed histologically. SPEt, SPHF and PTHF were able to inhibit HEM proliferation in vitro, with SPHF being most potent and did not cause any dermal irritation in guinea pigs. The results obtained indicate that SPHF is a promising pharmacological or cosmetic agent.

  18. [Epidermal growth factor, innovation and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquirol Caussa, Jordi; Herrero Vila, Elisabeth

    2015-10-05

    Bioidentical recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) is available in concentrations and purity suitable for therapeutic use in long time stable formulations. Beneficial effects in several skin pathologies and lesions have been reported (traumatic and surgical wound healing, laser induced wounds, abnormal scars, keloids, radiation or chemotherapy induced dermatitis, post inflammatory hyperpigmentation or for skin aging damage repairing) and also may be considered for the treatment of several oropharingeal and high gastroesophageal tract mucosa diseases (mouth sores, pharyngeal fistulas, ulcers), and several corneal or conjunctive mucosa lesions. rhEGF has not shown any important side or collateral effects in humans or in laboratory experimentation animals, showing optimal tolerability and safety with continuous use for months. Compounding gives advantages of versatility, individualization, personalization, molecular stability, safety and effectiveness in ideal conditions, showing good tissue penetration, both on intact skin and skin lesions that expose the lower planes to the surface. rhEGF compounds can be considered for prevention or as a treatment of diverse skin and mucosa diseases and conditions through compounding preparations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene cluster involved in melanin biosynthesis of the filamentous fungus Alternaria alternata.

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, N.; Tsuge, T.

    1993-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Alternaria alternata produces melanin, a black pigment, from acetate via 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene. To isolate a fungal gene required for melanin biosynthesis, we transformed an A. alternata Brm1- (light brown) mutant with the DNA of a wild-type strain genomic library constructed by use of a cosmid carrying the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene. When hygromycin B-resistant transformants were screened for melanin production, 1 of 1,363 transformants appeared to regain ...

  20. Inhibitory effects of Taraxacum mongolicum with phreatic water on melanin synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Moon-Hee; Ahn, Taek-Won

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recently, people have begun showing heightened interest in skin whitening. Melanin is an important factor that determines skin color. The purpose of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of Taraxacum mongolicum (TAM) with phreatic water (PW) from Dogo Hot Springs on melanin synthesis. Methods: We assessed the inhibitory effects of TAM on melanin synthesis in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells. The mRNA levels of tyrosinase related protein (TRP)-1, TRP-2, tyrosinase, MITF,...

  1. Electron spin resonance of melanin from hair. Effects of temperature, pH and light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, R.; Perbet, G. (Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France)); Deflandre, A.; Lang, G. (Centre de Recherches de la Societe L' Oreal, Aulnay Sous Bois (France) Dept. de Chimie Generale)

    1983-08-01

    The variation with temperature, pH and light of the ESR signal of hydrated melanin powders from Japanese black hair has been studied. An explanation of the results is proposed on the basis of quinhydrone type complexes and of acid-base equilibria of melanin and its semiquinone radicals. During exposure to light of wavelengths 254-600 nm, both stable and unstable radicals have been observed. The action spectrum for the formation of stable melanin radicals has been determined.

  2. Ovarian Sex Cord-stromal Tumors With Melanin Pigment: Report of a Previously Undescribed Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jennifer; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2017-11-14

    We report 2 ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, a luteinized adult granulosa cell tumor and a cellular fibroma, with melanin pigment. These occurred in 44 and 61-yr-old patients, respectively. As far as we are aware, melanin pigment has not been described previously in an ovarian sex cord-stromal tumor, although it has been reported in a testicular Sertoli cell tumor. We review ovarian neoplasms containing melanin pigment.

  3. Flavonoids and Melanins: A Common Strategy across Two Kingdoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carletti, Giorgia; Nervo, Giuseppe; Cattivelli, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiations alter a number of metabolic functions in vivant. They produce damages to lipids, nucleic acids and proteins, generating reactive oxygen species such as singlet oxygen (O2), hydroxyl radical (HO) and superoxide anion (O2-). Plants and animals, after their water emersion, have developed biochemical mechanisms to protect themselves from that environmental threat through a common strategy. Melanins in animals and flavonoids in plants are antioxidant pigments acting as free radical scavenging mechanisms. Both are phenol compounds constitutively synthesized and enhanced after exposure to UV rays, often conferring a red-brown-dark tissue pigmentation. Noteworthy, beside anti-oxidant scavenging activity, melanins and flavonoids have acquired secondary functions that, both in plants and animals, concern reproductions and fitness. Plants highly pigmented are more resistant to biotic and abiotic stresses. Darker wild vertebrates are generally more aggressive, sexually active and resistant to stress than lighter individuals. Flavonoids have been associated with signal attraction between flowers and insects and with plant-plant interaction. Melanin pigmentation has been proposed as trait in bird communication, acting as honest signals of quality. This review shows how the molecular mechanisms leading to tissue pigmentation have many functional analogies between plants and animals and how their origin lies in simpler organisms such as Cyanobacteria. Comparative studies between plant and animal kingdoms can reveal new insight of the antioxidant strategies in vivant. PMID:25516714

  4. Flavonoids and Melanins: a common strategy across two kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carletti, Giorgia; Nervo, Giuseppe; Cattivelli, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiations alter a number of metabolic functions in vivant. They produce damages to lipids, nucleic acids and proteins, generating reactive oxygen species such as singlet oxygen (O2), hydroxyl radical (HO) and superoxide anion (O2 (-)). Plants and animals, after their water emersion, have developed biochemical mechanisms to protect themselves from that environmental threat through a common strategy. Melanins in animals and flavonoids in plants are antioxidant pigments acting as free radical scavenging mechanisms. Both are phenol compounds constitutively synthesized and enhanced after exposure to UV rays, often conferring a red-brown-dark tissue pigmentation. Noteworthy, beside anti-oxidant scavenging activity, melanins and flavonoids have acquired secondary functions that, both in plants and animals, concern reproductions and fitness. Plants highly pigmented are more resistant to biotic and abiotic stresses. Darker wild vertebrates are generally more aggressive, sexually active and resistant to stress than lighter individuals. Flavonoids have been associated with signal attraction between flowers and insects and with plant-plant interaction. Melanin pigmentation has been proposed as trait in bird communication, acting as honest signals of quality. This review shows how the molecular mechanisms leading to tissue pigmentation have many functional analogies between plants and animals and how their origin lies in simpler organisms such as Cyanobacteria. Comparative studies between plant and animal kingdoms can reveal new insight of the antioxidant strategies in vivant.

  5. Genetic Basis of Melanin Pigmentation in Butterfly Wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Martin, Arnaud; Perry, Michael W; van der Burg, Karin R L; Matsuoka, Yuji; Monteiro, Antónia; Reed, Robert D

    2017-04-01

    Despite the variety, prominence, and adaptive significance of butterfly wing patterns, surprisingly little is known about the genetic basis of wing color diversity. Even though there is intense interest in wing pattern evolution and development, the technical challenge of genetically manipulating butterflies has slowed efforts to functionally characterize color pattern development genes. To identify candidate wing pigmentation genes, we used RNA sequencing to characterize transcription across multiple stages of butterfly wing development, and between different color pattern elements, in the painted lady butterfly Vanessa cardui This allowed us to pinpoint genes specifically associated with red and black pigment patterns. To test the functions of a subset of genes associated with presumptive melanin pigmentation, we used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome editing in four different butterfly genera. pale, Ddc, and yellow knockouts displayed reduction of melanin pigmentation, consistent with previous findings in other insects. Interestingly, however, yellow-d, ebony, and black knockouts revealed that these genes have localized effects on tuning the color of red, brown, and ochre pattern elements. These results point to previously undescribed mechanisms for modulating the color of specific wing pattern elements in butterflies, and provide an expanded portrait of the insect melanin pathway. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. Simvastatin-induced Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Petrou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis comprises a severe immune-complex mediated hypersensitivity reaction that typically involves the skin and mucous membranes. Herein, we describe a 68-year -old man who presented with the condition after simvastatin administration.

  7. Production and cytotoxicity of extracellular insoluble and droplets of soluble melanin by Streptomyces lusitanus DMZ-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, D N; Mazhari, Bi Bi Zainab; Dastager, Syed G; Agsar, Dayanand

    2014-01-01

    A Streptomyces lusitanus DMZ-3 strain with potential to synthesize both insoluble and soluble melanins was detected. Melanins are quite distinguished based on their solubility for varied biotechnological applications. The present investigation reveals the enhanced production of insoluble and soluble melanins in tyrosine medium by a single culture. Streptomyces lusitanus DMZ-3 was characterized by 16S rRNA gene analysis. An enhanced production of 5.29 g/L insoluble melanin was achieved in a submerged bioprocess following response surface methodology. Combined interactive effect of temperature (50°C), pH (8.5), tyrosine (2.0 g/L), and beef extract (0.5 g/L) were found to be critical variables for enhanced production in central composite design analysis. An optimized indigenous slant culture system was an innovative approach for the successful production (264 mg/L) of pure soluble melanin from the droplets formed on the surface of the culture. Both insoluble and soluble melanins were confirmed and characterized by Chemical, reactions, UV, FTIR, and TLC analysis. First time, cytotoxic study of melanin using brine shrimps was reported. Maximum cytotoxic activity of soluble melanin was Lc50-0.40 µg/mL and insoluble melanin was Lc50-0.80 µg/mL.

  8. The Analgesic Acetaminophen and the Antipsychotic Clozapine Can Each Redox-Cycle with Melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temoçin, Zülfikar; Kim, Eunkyoung; Li, Jinyang; Panzella, Lucia; Alfieri, Maria Laura; Napolitano, Alessandra; Kelly, Deanna L; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2017-12-20

    Melanins are ubiquitous but their complexity and insolubility has hindered characterization of their structures and functions. We are developing electrochemical reverse engineering methodologies that focus on properties and especially on redox properties. Previous studies have shown that melanins (i) are redox-active and can rapidly and repeatedly exchange electrons with diffusible oxidants and reductants, and (ii) have redox potentials in midregion of the physiological range. These properties suggest the functional activities of melanins will depend on their redox context. The brain has a complex redox context with steep local gradients in O 2 that can promote redox-cycling between melanin and diffusible redox-active chemical species. Here, we performed in vitro reverse engineering studies and report that melanins can redox-cycle with two common redox-active drugs. Experimentally, we used two melanin models: a convenient natural melanin derived from cuttlefish (Sepia melanin) and a synthetic cysteinyldopamine-dopamine core-shell model of neuromelanin. One drug, acetaminophen (APAP), has been used clinically for over a century, and recent studies suggest that low doses of APAP can protect the brain from oxidative-stress-induced toxicity and neurodegeneration, while higher doses can have toxic effects in the brain. The second drug, clozapine (CLZ), is a second generation antipsychotic with polypharmacological activities that remain incompletely understood. These in vitro observations suggest that the redox activities of drugs may be relevant to their modes-of-action, and that melanins may interact with drugs in ways that affect their activities, metabolism, and toxicities.

  9. Different culture media containing methyldopa for melanin production by Cryptococcus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralciane de Paula Menezes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Melanin production by species of Cryptococcus is widely used to characterize C. neoformans complex in mycology laboratories. This study aims to test the efficacy of methyldopa from pharmaceutical tablet as a substrate for melanin production, to compare the production of melanin using different agar base added with methyldopa, and to compare the melanin produced in those media with that produced in Niger seed agar and sunflower seed agar by C. neoformans, C. laurentii, and C. albidus. Two isolates of each species, C. neoformans, C. laurentii, and C. albidus, and one of Candida albicans were used to experimentally detect conditions for melanin production. METHODS: The following media were tested: Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA, brain and heart infusion agar (BHIA, blood agar base (BAB, and minimal medium agar (MMA, all added with methyldopa, and the media Niger seed agar (NSA and sunflower seed agar (SSA. RESULTS: All isolates grew in most of the culture media after 24h. Strains planted on media BAB and BHIA showed growth only after 48h. All isolates produced melanin in MMA, MHA, SSA, and NSA media. CONCLUSIONS: Methyldopa in the form pharmaceutical tablet can be used as a substrate for melanin production by Cryptococcus species; minimal medium plus methyldopa was more efficient than the BAB, MHA, and BHIA in the melanin production; and NSA and SSA, followed by MMA added with methyldopa, were more efficient than other media studied for melanin production by all strains studied.

  10. Non-contact assessment of melanin distribution via multispectral temporal illumination coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelard, Robert; Scharfenberger, Christian; Wong, Alexander; Clausi, David A.

    2015-03-01

    Melanin is a pigment that is highly absorptive in the UV and visible electromagnetic spectra. It is responsible for perceived skin tone, and protects against harmful UV effects. Abnormal melanin distribution is often an indicator for melanoma. We propose a novel approach for non-contact melanin distribution via multispectral temporal illumination coding to estimate the two-dimensional melanin distribution based on its absorptive characteristics. In the proposed system, a novel multispectral, cross-polarized, temporally-coded illumination sequence is synchronized with a camera to measure reflectance under both multispectral and ambient illumination. This allows us to eliminate the ambient illumination contribution from the acquired reflectance measurements, and also to determine the melanin distribution in an observed region based on the spectral properties of melanin using the Beer-Lambert law. Using this information, melanin distribution maps can be generated for objective, quantitative assessment of skin type of individuals. We show that the melanin distribution map correctly identifies areas with high melanin densities (e.g., nevi).

  11. Production and Cytotoxicity of Extracellular Insoluble and Droplets of Soluble Melanin by Streptomyces lusitanus DMZ-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Madhusudhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A Streptomyces lusitanus DMZ-3 strain with potential to synthesize both insoluble and soluble melanins was detected. Melanins are quite distinguished based on their solubility for varied biotechnological applications. The present investigation reveals the enhanced production of insoluble and soluble melanins in tyrosine medium by a single culture. Streptomyces lusitanus DMZ-3 was characterized by 16S rRNA gene analysis. An enhanced production of 5.29 g/L insoluble melanin was achieved in a submerged bioprocess following response surface methodology. Combined interactive effect of temperature (50°C, pH (8.5, tyrosine (2.0 g/L, and beef extract (0.5 g/L were found to be critical variables for enhanced production in central composite design analysis. An optimized indigenous slant culture system was an innovative approach for the successful production (264 mg/L of pure soluble melanin from the droplets formed on the surface of the culture. Both insoluble and soluble melanins were confirmed and characterized by Chemical, reactions, UV, FTIR, and TLC analysis. First time, cytotoxic study of melanin using brine shrimps was reported. Maximum cytotoxic activity of soluble melanin was Lc50-0.40 µg/mL and insoluble melanin was Lc50-0.80 µg/mL.

  12. Epidermal growth factor in the rat prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Niels; Jørgensen, P E; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1998-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces proliferation in prostate epithelial and stromal cells in primary culture. This investigation was set up to characterize the time and spatial expression of EGF in the rat prostate.......Epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces proliferation in prostate epithelial and stromal cells in primary culture. This investigation was set up to characterize the time and spatial expression of EGF in the rat prostate....

  13. Review of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Harris

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN is a rare but life threatening mucocutaneous reaction to drugs or their metabolites. It is characterised by widespread keratinocyte apoptosis and sloughing of the skin, erosions of the mucous membranes, painful blistering, and severe systemic disturbance. The pathophysiology of TEN is incompletely understood. Historically, it has been regarded as a drug-induced immune reaction initiated by cytotoxic lymphocytes via a human leukocyte antigen (HLA-restricted pathway. Several mediators have been identified as contributors to the cell death seen in TEN, including; granulysin, soluble Fas ligand, perforin/granzyme, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. Currently, granulysin is accepted as the most important mediator of T cell proliferation. There is uncertainty around the accepted management of TEN. The lack of definitive management guidelines for TEN is explained in part by the rarity of the disease and its high mortality rate, which makes it difficult to conduct randomised control trials on emerging therapies. Developments have been made in pharmacogenomics, with numerous HLA alleles identified; however, these have largely been ethnically specific. These associations have translated into screening recommendations for Han Chinese.

  14. Rapidly Developing Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Oline Barrios Poulsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe cutaneous reactions with potentially fatal outcomes can have many different causes. The Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN are rare. They are characterized by a low incidence but high mortality, and drugs are most commonly implicated. Urgent active therapy is required. Prompt recognition and withdrawal of suspect drug and rapid intervention can result in favourable outcome. No further international guidelines for treatment exist, and much of the treatment relies on old or experimental concepts with no scientific evidence. We report on a 54-year-old man experiencing rapidly developing drug-induced severe TEN and presented multiorgan failure involving the respiratory and circulatory system, coagulopathy, and renal insufficiency. Detachment counted 30% of total body surface area (TBSA. SCORTEN = 5, indicating a mortality rate >90%. The patient was sedated and mechanically ventilated, supported with fluids and inotropes to maintain a stable circulation. Component therapy was guided by thromboelastography (TEG. The patient received plasmapheresis, and shock reversal treatment was initiated. He was transferred to a specialized intensive care burn unit within 24 hours from admittance. The initial care was continued, and hemodialysis was started. Pulmonary, circulatory, and renal sequelae resolved with intensive care, and re-epithelialization progressed slowly. The patient was discharged home on hospital day 19.

  15. EPR persistence measurements of UV-induced melanin free radicals in whole skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, B.; Poehler, T.O. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Bryden, W.A. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States). Applied Physics Lab.

    1995-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance is used to detect the formation of free radicals caused by exposure to ultraviolet radiation in chemically untreated rabbit skin. A fast jump in EPR signal level, occurring over a few seconds, is observed immediately after a skin sample is exposed to UV. This is followed by a slower increase toward an elevated steady-state signal over a period of hours as the skin is continuously exposed to a UV light source. Upon cessation of UV light exposure, EPR signal levels undergo an abrupt drop followed by a slower decay toward natural levels. Elevated free radical concentrations following UV exposure are found to persist for several hours in whole skin. These results are consistent with time resolved EPR measurements of photoinduced radicals in various natural melanins. (Author).

  16. Curcumin does not switch melanin synthesis towards pheomelanin in B16F10 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolnicka-Glubisz, Agnieszka; Nogal, Katarzyna; Żądło, Andrzej; Płonka, Przemysław M

    2015-01-01

    Melanin, the basic skin pigment present also in the majority of melanomas, has a huge impact on the efficiency of photodynamic, radio- or chemotherapies of melanoma. Moreover, the melanoma cells produce more melanin than normal melanocytes in adjacent skin do. Thus, attention has been paid to natural agents that are safe and effective in suppression of melanogenesis. B16F10 cells were studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The cells were cultured for 24-72 h in RPMI or DMEM with or without curcumin. The results confirmed that curcumin has no significant effect on B16F10 cells viability at concentrations of 1-10 µM. Curcumin at concentration of 10 µM significantly inhibited their proliferation and stimulated differentiation. We have not stimulated melanogenesis hormonally but we found a strong increase in melanogenesis in DMEM, containing more L-Tyr, as compared to RPMI. The EPR studies revealed that the effect of curcumin on melanogenesis in RPMI-incubated cells was not significant, and only in DMEM was curcumin able to inhibit melanogenesis. The effect of curcumin was only quantitative, as it did not switch eumelanogenesis towards pheomelanogenesis under any conditions. Interestingly, we observed elevation of production of hydrogen peroxide in DMEM-incubated cells, in parallel to the facilitation of melanogenesis. Curcumin significantly but transiently intensified the already pronounced generation of H2O2 in DMEM. We conclude that the quantitative effect of curcumin on melanogenesis in melanoma is intricate. It depends on the basic melanogenetic efficiency of the cells, and can be observed only in strongly pigmented cells. Qualitatively, curcumin does not switch melanogenesis towards pheomelanogenesis, either in strongly, or in weakly melanized melanoma cells.

  17. Upregulation of Mitf by Phenolic Compounds-Rich Cymbopogon schoenanthus Treatment Promotes Melanogenesis in B16 Melanoma Cells and Human Epidermal Melanocytes

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    Myra O. Villareal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanin provides inherent protection against skin cancer by absorbing broad-spectrum radiant energy of UV radiation. Cutaneous malignant melanoma incidence has recently been observed to increase and the frequency is closely associated with the skin color, highlighting the importance of skin pigmentation. Here, we showed how melanin biosynthesis is enhanced by treatment with phenolic compounds-rich Cymbopogon schoenanthus (CYM in B16 murine melanoma cells and human epidermal melanocytes (HEM. CYM increased the melanin content of the cells by upregulating the expression of tyrosinase (TYR, tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1, and dopachrome tautomerase (DCT at the protein and mRNA levels, comparable to the effect of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH, in both B16 cells and HEM. Moreover, global gene expression analysis showed that at least 44 pigmentation-associated genes were modulated, including the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf and its transcriptional regulators (Sox10, Pax3, and Lef1. Upregulation of copper transport-associated gene Atp7b indicates that CYM also promotes tyrosinase activity. CYM upregulated Mitf and possibly activates tyrosinase enzyme, providing evidence for its possible use to promote melanogenesis and as a therapeutic agent against hypopigmentation disorders.

  18. Mechanotransduction in epidermal Merkel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Masashi; Maksimovic, Srdjan; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2015-01-01

    The cellular and molecular basis of vertebrate touch reception remains least understood among the traditional five senses. Somatosensory afferents that innervate the skin encode distinct tactile qualities, such as flutter, slip, and pressure. Gentle touch is thought to be transduced by somatosensory afferents whose tactile end organs selectively filter mechanical stimuli. These tactile end organs comprise afferent terminals in association with non-neuronal cell types such as Merkel cells, keratinocytes, and Schwann cells. An open question is whether these non-neuronal cells serve primarily as passive mechanical filters or whether they actively participate in mechanosensory transduction. This question has been most extensively studied in Merkel cells, which are epidermal cells that complex with sensory afferents in regions of high tactile acuity such as fingertips, whisker follicles, and touch domes. Merkel cell-neurite complexes mediate slowly adapting type I (SAI) responses, which encode sustained pressure and represent object features with high fidelity. How Merkel cells contribute to unique SAI firing patterns has been debated for decades; however, three recent studies in rodent models provide some direct answers. First, whole-cell recordings demonstrate that Merkel cells are touch-sensitive cells with fast, mechanically activated currents that require Piezo2. Second, optogenetics and intact recordings show that Merkel cells mediate sustained SAI firing. Finally, loss-of-function studies in transgenic mouse models reveal that SAI afferents are also touch sensitive. Together, these studies identify molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in Merkel cells, reveal unexpected functions for these cells in touch, and support a revised, two-receptor site model of mechanosensory transduction.

  19. Melanin, a promising radioprotector: Mechanisms of actions in a mice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunwar, A., E-mail: amitbio@rediffmail.com [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Adhikary, B. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Jayakumar, S. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Barik, A. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Chattopadhyay, S. [Bio-Organic Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Raghukumar, S. [Myko Tech Private Limited, Dona Paula, Goa‐403004 (India); Priyadarsini, K.I., E-mail: kindira@barc.gov.in [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2012-10-15

    The radioprotective effect of extracellular melanin, a naturally occurring pigment, isolated from the fungus Gliocephalotrichum simplex was examined in BALB/C mice, and the probable mechanism of action was established. At an effective dose of 50 mg/kg body weight, melanin exhibited both prophylactic and mitigative activities, increasing the 30-day survival of mice by 100% and 60%, respectively, after exposure to radiation (7 Gy, whole body irradiation (WBI)). The protective activity of melanin was primarily due to inhibition of radiation-induced hematopoietic damages as evidenced by improvement in spleen parameters such as index, total cellularity, endogenous colony forming units, and maintenance of circulatory white blood cells and platelet counts. Melanin also reversed the radiation-induced decrease in ERK phosphorylation in splenic tissue, which may be the key feature in its radioprotective action. Additionally, our results indicated that the sustained activation of AKT, JNK and P38 proteins in splenic tissue of melanin pre-treated group may also play a secondary role. This was also supported by the fact that melanin could prevent apoptosis in splenic tissue by decreasing BAX/Bcl-XL ratio, and increasing the expressions of the proliferation markers (PCNA and Cyclin D1), compared to the radiation control group. Melanin also reduced the oxidative stress in hepatic tissue and abrogated immune imbalance by reducing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL6 and TNFα). In conclusion, our results confirmed that fungal melanin is a very effective radioprotector against WBI and the probable mechanisms of radioprotection are due to modulation in pro-survival (ERK) signaling, prevention of oxidative stress and immunomodulation. -- Highlights: ► Melanin showed promising radioprotection under pre and post irradiation condition. ► Melanin protects the hematopoietic system from radiation induced damage. ► Melanin modulates pro-survival pathways, immune system

  20. Melanin-gamma rays assistants for bismuth oxide nanoparticles synthesis at room temperature for enhancing antimicrobial, and photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Batal, Ahmed I; El-Sayyad, Gharieb S; El-Ghamry, Abbas; Agaypi, Kerolos M; Elsayed, Mohamed A; Gobara, Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Melanin pigment has been deemed as a natural photoprotector with strong hydrophobicity. It allured considerable compatibility with many applications in medicine, food, and nanotechnology. Penicillium chrysogenium has been devoted to the green synthesis of melanin whereby optimizing its culture and environmental conditions. The impacts of alternative economic L-tyrosine natural sources (unprecedented alternate origins) and gamma radiation were pledged for the potential growing of the pigment. Herein, notable increases in melanin yield (6.4mg/ml; much higher than nonoptimized one by 40 folds) was obtained by optimizing the culture, and environmental requirements [potato starch (3.0%), yeast extract (5.0%), copper sulfate (0.2mM), 0.25% L-tyrosine, 0.1% L-glycine, and 0.1% Tween 20 at pH5.0, and 30°C for 7.0days using 180.0rpm shaking speed]. The addition of banana's peel (2.0%) has been led to increase the melanin production up to (8.3mg/ml; much higher than optimized one by 1.29 folds). It stimulated the induced enzymes, (i.e., tyrosinase) because it contained significant amounts of L-tyrosine, dopamine, and L-DOPA as resources for melanin biosynthesis. Then irradiated P. chrysogenium (2.5kGy) induced the pigment yield to 10.3mg/ml; much higher than optimized one by (1.61 folds). On the other hand, we tailored a methodology involved the product of melanin and gamma rays (25.0kGy) to an eco-friendly synthesis of Bismuth oxide nanoparticles (BiONPs) at the room temperature. Melanin under such alkaline condition functioning as simultaneously hydrolyzes, photoprotection of the Bi seeds, and stabilizer against the uncontrolled growth and the free radicals attack. Whereas the gamma irradiation induced the room temperature condensation reaction to occur, a novel mechanism proposal was discussed. BiONPs were characterized by UV-Vis., DLS, XRD, SEM, EDX, and FTIR. DLS and XRD calculations with TEM analysis exhibited the mean diameter of BiONPs was 29.82nm. Moreover, the as

  1. Quercus infectoria and Terminalia chebula decrease melanin content and tyrosinase activity in B16/F10 cell lines

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    Akram Jamshidzadeh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: One of the most complained skin cares in ethnic skin like Asian women is hyperpigmentation, and lightening preparations have been long-standing desired. Due to the side effects of current drugs, medicinal plants have attracted more attentions as a source of novel drugs. Mazo (Quercus infectoria galls and Terminalia chebula fruits have been suggested in Persian Traditional Medicine as a safe treatment for hyperpigmentation. Aims: To evaluate the cytotoxicity and the effect on melanin synthesis in B16/F10 melanoma of Q. infectoria and T. chebula extracts. Methods: After collection and scientific authentication, plants were extracted by maceration method with methanol and were standardized based on total phenolic content. MTT assay and colorimetric method were used for cytotoxicity and determination of melanin content and tyrosinase activity in B16/F10 cells, respectively. Kojic acid was used as a reference compound. Results: Total phenolic content of Q. infectoria and T. chebula was determined as 287.34 ± 4.21 and 172.61 ± 8.67 mg gallic acid equivalent/g dried extract, respectively. Both plants decreased cell viability at 100 µg/mL and significantly reduced intercellular melanin to 66.25% and 71.1%, respectively in comparison to kojic acid (56.63% at 50 µg/mL. In the same concentration, 65.7% and 71.2% tyrosinase activity was inhibited by Q. infectoria and T. chebula, which significantly were different from control (p<0.001. Conclusions: These findings suggest that both plants especially Q. infectoria could inhibit melanogenesis in non-toxic concentrations and would be a good candidate for further studies.

  2. Bio-inspired Structural Colors from Deposition of Synthetic Melanin Nanoparticles by Evaporative Self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Li, Yiwen; Deheyn, Dimitri; Yue, Xiujun; Gianneschi, Nathan; Shawkey, Matthew; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Melanin, a ubiquitous black or brown pigment in the animal kingdom, is a unique but poorly understood biomaterial. Many bird feathers contain melanosomes (melanin-containing organelles), which pack into ordered nanostructures, like multilayer or two-dimensional photonic crystal structures, to produce structural colors. To understand the optical properties of melanin and how melanosomes assemble into certain structures to produce colors, we prepared synthetic melanin (polydopamine) particles with variable sizes and aspect ratios. We have characterized the absorption and refractive index of the synthetic melanin particles. We have also shown that we can use an evaporative process to self-assemble melanin films with a wide range of colors. The colors obtained using this technique is modeled using a thin-film interference model and the optical properties of the synthetic melanin nanoparticles. Our results on self-assembly of synthetic melanin nanoparticles provide an explanation as why the use of melanosomes to produce colors is prevalent in the animal kingdom. National science foundation, air force office of scientific research, human frontier science program.

  3. (Pheo)melanin photosensitizes UVA-induced DNA damage in cultured human melanocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenczl, E.; Schans, G.P. van der; Roza, L.; Kolb, R.M.; Timmerman, A.J.; Smit, N.P.M.; Pavel, S.; Schothorst, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    The question of whether melanins are photoprotecting and/or photosensitizing in human skin cells continues to be debated. To evaluate the role of melanin upon UVA irradiation, DNA single-strand breaks (ssb) were measured in human melanocytes differing only in the amount of pigment produced by

  4. Gingival melanin depigmentation by Er:YAG laser: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlic, Verica; Brkic, Zlata; Marin, Sasa; Cicmil, Smiljka; Gojkov-Vukelic, Mirjana; Aoki, Akira

    2017-10-06

    Laser ablation is recently suggested as a most effective and reliable technique for depigmentation of melanin hyperpigmented gingiva. To date, different lasers have been used for gingival depigmentation (CO 2 , diode, Nd:YAG, Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG lasers). The use of Er:YAG laser for depigmentation of melanin hyperpigmented gingiva has gained increasing importance in recent years. The purpose of this study was to report removal of gingival melanin pigmentation using an Er:YAG laser in a literature review. The main outcomes, such as improvement of signs (clinical parameters of bleeding, erythema, swelling and wound healing), symptoms (pain) and melanin recurrence/repigmentation were measured. The literature demonstrated that depigmentation of gingival melanin pigmentation can be performed safely and effectively by Er:YAG laser resulting in healing and an esthetically significant improvement of gingival discoloration. Thus, Er:YAG laser seems to be safe and useful in melanin depigmentation procedure. However, the main issue in giving the final conclusion of the optimal Er:YAG laser use in melanin depigmentation is that, to date, studies are offering completely discrepant Er:YAG laser procedure protocols (complex settings of laser parameters), and different criteria for the assessment of depigmentation and repigmentation (recurrence), thus hampering the comparison of the results. Therefore, further studies are necessary to give an optimal recommendation on the use of Er:YAG laser in gingival melanin hyperpigmentation.

  5. Macular pigment and melanin in age-related maculopathy in a general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendschot, Tos T. J. M.; Willemse-Assink, Jacqueline J. M.; Bastiaanse, Mieke; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; van Norren, Dirk

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that macular pigment (MP) and melanin may protect against age-related maculopathy (ARM). To check this, MP and melanin optical density were measured in a random population-based sample of subjects 55 years of age or older. Spectral fundus reflectance of the fovea was measured

  6. Reflectance Spectra of Peacock Feathers and the Turning Angles of Melanin Rods in Barbules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Toshio

    2018-02-01

    I analyzed the association between the reflectance spectra and melanin rod arrangement in barbules of the eyespot of peacock feathers. The reflectance spectra from the yellow-green feather of the eyespot indicated double peaks of 430 and 540 nm. The maximum reflectance spectrum of the blue feather was 480 nm, and that of the dark blue feather was 420 nm. The reflectance spectra from brown feathers indicated double peaks of 490 and 610 nm. Transmission electron microscopic analysis confirmed that melanin rods were arranged fanwise in the outer layer toward the barbule tips. In addition, using polarized light microscope, I attempted to determine whether the turning angles of melanin rods in the barbules reflected different colors. The turning angle of the polarizing axis of the barbules was supported by that of the melanin rods, observed using transmission electron microscopic images. To compare the turning angle of melanin rods in the respective barbules, I calculated the opening width of the fanwise melanin rods by dividing the width of the barbules by the turning angle of the polarizing axis of barbules and obtained a positive correlation between the reflectance spectra and opening width of the fanwise melanin rods. Moreover, the widely spreading reflection from the barbules may occur because of the fanwise melanin rod arrangement.

  7. Melanin binding study of clinical drugs with cassette dosing and rapid equilibrium dialysis inserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkonen, Laura; Tengvall-Unadike, Unni; Ruponen, Marika; Kidron, Heidi; Del Amo, Eva M; Reinisalo, Mika; Urtti, Arto

    2017-11-15

    Melanin pigment is a negatively charged polymer found in pigmented human tissues. In the eye, iris, ciliary body, choroid and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are heavily pigmented. Several drug molecules are known to bind to melanin, but larger sets of drugs have not been compared often in similar test conditions. In this study, we introduce a powerful tool for screening of melanin binding. The binding of a set of 34 compounds to isolated porcine RPE melanin was determined by cassette (n-in-one) dosing in rapid equilibrium dialysis inserts and the binding was quantitated with LC-MS/MS analytics. The compounds represented large variety in melanin binding (from 8.6%, ganciclovir) to over 95% bound (ampicillin and ciprofloxacin). The data provides information on melanin binding of small molecular weight compounds that are used for ocular (e.g. brinzolamide, ganciclovir) and systemic (e.g. tizanidine, indomethacin) therapy. Interestingly, competition among compounds was seen for melanin binding and the binding did not show any correlation with plasma protein binding. These results increase the understanding of melanin binding of ocular drugs and can be further exploited to predict pharmacokinetics in the eye. Pigment binding provides an interesting option for improved drug distribution to retina and choroid that are difficult target tissues in drug delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. CONSTITUTIVE MELANIN IN THE CELL WALL OF THE ETIOLOGIC AGENT OF LOBO'S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TABORDA Valeria B.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Lobo's disease is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by the obligate pathogenic fungus, whose cell walls contain constitutive melanin. In contrast, melanin does not occur in the cell walls of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis when stained by the Fontana-Masson stain.

  9. Condition-dependent expression of melanin-based coloration in the Eurasian kestrel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piault, Romain; van den Brink, Valentijn; Roulin, Alexandre

    Melanin is the most common pigment in animal integuments and is responsible for some of the most striking ornaments. A central tenet of sexual selection theory states that melanin-based traits can signal absolute individual quality in any environment only if their expression is condition-dependent.

  10. Interactions between Melanin Enzymes and Their Atypical Recruitment to the Secretory Pathway by Palmitoylation

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    Srijana Upadhyay

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Melanins are biopolymers that confer coloration and protection to the host organism against biotic or abiotic insults. The level of protection offered by melanin depends on its biosynthesis and its subcellular localization. Previously, we discovered that Aspergillus fumigatus compartmentalizes melanization in endosomes by recruiting all melanin enzymes to the secretory pathway. Surprisingly, although two laccases involved in the late steps of melanization are conventional secretory proteins, the four enzymes involved in the early steps of melanization lack a signal peptide or a transmembrane domain and are thus considered “atypical” secretory proteins. In this work, we found interactions among melanin enzymes and all melanin enzymes formed protein complexes. Surprisingly, the formation of protein complexes by melanin enzymes was not critical for their trafficking to the endosomal system. By palmitoylation profiling and biochemical analyses, we discovered that all four early melanin enzymes were strongly palmitoylated during conidiation. However, only the polyketide synthase (PKS Alb1 was strongly palmitoylated during both vegetative hyphal growth and conidiation when constitutively expressed alone. This posttranslational lipid modification correlates the endosomal localization of all early melanin enzymes. Intriguingly, bioinformatic analyses predict that palmitoylation is a common mechanism for potential membrane association of polyketide synthases (PKSs and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs in A. fumigatus. Our findings indicate that protein-protein interactions facilitate melanization by metabolic channeling, while posttranslational lipid modifications help recruit the atypical enzymes to the secretory pathway, which is critical for compartmentalization of secondary metabolism.

  11. From tyrosine to melanin: Signaling pathways and factors regulating melanogenesis

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    Zuzanna Rzepka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Melanins are natural pigments of skin, hair and eyes and can be classified into two main types: brown to black eumelanin and yellow to reddish-brown pheomelanin. Biosynthesis of melanins takes place in melanosomes, which are specialized cytoplasmic organelles of melanocytes - dendritic cells located in the basal layer of the epidermis, uveal tract of the eye, hair follicles, as well as in the inner ear, central nervous system and heart. Melanogenesis is a multistep process and begins with the conversion of amino acid L-tyrosine to DOPAquinone. The addition of cysteine or glutathione to DOPAquinone leads to the intermediates formation, followed by subsequent transformations and polymerization to the final product, pheomelanin. In the absence of thiol compounds DOPAquinone undergoes an intramolecular cyclization and oxidation to form DOPAchrome, which is then converted to 5,6-dihydroksyindole (DHI or 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA. Eumelanin is formed by polymerization of DHI and DHICA and their quinones. Regulation of melanogenesis is achieved by physical and biochemical factors. The article presents the intracellular signaling pathways: cAMP/PKA/CREB/MITF cascade, MAP kinases cascade, PLC/DAG/PKCβ cascade and NO/cGMP/PKG cascade, which are involved in the regulation of expression and activity of the melanogenesis-related proteins by ultraviolet radiation and endogenous agents (cytokines, hormones. Activity of the key melanogenic enzyme, tyrosinase, is also affected by pH and temperature. Many pharmacologically active substances are able to inhibit or stimulate melanin biosynthesis, as evidenced by in vitro studies on cultured pigment cells.

  12. Size Control and Fluorescence Labeling of Polydopamine Melanin-Mimetic Nanoparticles for Intracellular Imaging

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    Devang R. Amin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available As synthetic analogs of the natural pigment melanin, polydopamine nanoparticles (NPs are under active investigation as non-toxic anticancer photothermal agents and as free radical scavenging therapeutics. By analogy to the widely adopted polydopamine coatings, polydopamine NPs offer the potential for facile aqueous synthesis and incorporation of (biofunctional groups under mild temperature and pH conditions. However, clear procedures for the convenient and reproducible control of critical NP properties such as particle diameter, surface charge, and loading with functional molecules have yet to be established. In this work, we have synthesized polydopamine-based melanin-mimetic nanoparticles (MMNPs with finely controlled diameters spanning ≈25 to 120 nm and report on the pH-dependence of zeta potential, methodologies for PEGylation, and the incorporation of fluorescent organic molecules. A comprehensive suite of complementary techniques, including dynamic light scattering (DLS, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, zeta-potential, ultraviolet–visible (UV–Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and confocal microscopy, was used to characterize the MMNPs and their properties. Our PEGylated MMNPs are highly stable in both phosphate-buffered saline (PBS and in cell culture media and exhibit no cytotoxicity up to at least 100 µg mL−1 concentrations. We also show that a post-functionalization methodology for fluorophore loading is especially suitable for producing MMNPs with stable fluorescence and significantly narrower emission profiles than previous reports, suggesting they will be useful for multimodal cell imaging. Our results pave the way towards biomedical imaging and possibly drug delivery applications, as well as fundamental studies of MMNP size and surface chemistry dependent cellular interactions.

  13. Size Control and Fluorescence Labeling of Polydopamine Melanin-Mimetic Nanoparticles for Intracellular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Devang R; Sugnaux, Caroline; Lau, King Hang Aaron; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2017-09-01

    As synthetic analogs of the natural pigment melanin, polydopamine nanoparticles (NPs) are under active investigation as non-toxic anticancer photothermal agents and as free radical scavenging therapeutics. By analogy to the widely adopted polydopamine coatings, polydopamine NPs offer the potential for facile aqueous synthesis and incorporation of (bio)functional groups under mild temperature and pH conditions. However, clear procedures for the convenient and reproducible control of critical NP properties such as particle diameter, surface charge, and loading with functional molecules have yet to be established. In this work, we have synthesized polydopamine-based melanin-mimetic nanoparticles (MMNPs) with finely controlled diameters spanning ≈25 to 120 nm and report on the pH-dependence of zeta potential, methodologies for PEGylation, and the incorporation of fluorescent organic molecules. A comprehensive suite of complementary techniques, including dynamic light scattering (DLS), cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), zeta-potential, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and confocal microscopy, was used to characterize the MMNPs and their properties. Our PEGylated MMNPs are highly stable in both phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and in cell culture media and exhibit no cytotoxicity up to at least 100 μg mL -1 concentrations. We also show that a post-functionalization methodology for fluorophore loading is especially suitable for producing MMNPs with stable fluorescence and significantly narrower emission profiles than previous reports, suggesting they will be useful for multimodal cell imaging. Our results pave the way towards biomedical imaging and possibly drug delivery applications, as well as fundamental studies of MMNP size and surface chemistry dependent cellular interactions.

  14. Involvement of a novel copper chaperone in tyrosinase activity and melanin synthesis in Marinomonas mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Serrano, D; Solano, F; Sanchez-Amat, A

    2007-07-01

    Tyrosinase activity and melanin synthesis in the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea in media with very low copper concentrations are dependent on the presence of a protein (PpoB2) that functions as a chaperone to deliver copper to tyrosinase (PpoB1). Under these conditions, mutants in ppoB2 (such as strain T105) produce PpoB1 as an apoenzyme that can be reconstituted to the active holoenzyme by the addition of cupric ions to cell extracts. To study PpoB2 functionality, a system was developed for genetic complementation in M. mediterranea. Using this approach, melanin synthesis was restored in strain T105 when a wild-type copy of ppoB2 was introduced. PpoB2 is a novel protein since it is believed to be the first to be described that contains several motifs similar to metal binding motifs present separately in other types of copper-related protein. At least three motifs, a His-rich N-terminal region, and the short CxxxC and MxxxMM sequences, are essential for the functionality of PpoB2, since site-directed mutagenesis of these motifs resulted in a non-functional protein. In addition, it was demonstrated that PpoB2 is a membrane copper transporter putatively participating in the delivery of this ion specifically to the tyrosinase of M. mediterranea and not to a second copper oxidase showing laccase activity that this micro-organism also expresses. PpoB2 has similarities with the COG5486 group encoding putative transmembrane metal binding proteins, and is believed to be the first protein in this group to be experimentally characterized. It may constitute the first example of a novel type of protein involved in copper trafficking in bacteria.

  15. Demethyleugenol β-Glucopyranoside Isolated from Agastache rugosa Decreases Melanin Synthesis via Down-regulation of MITF and SOX9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek Hwan; Park, SeonJu; Yoo, Guijae; Jang, Cheongyun; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2016-10-05

    Agastache rugosa (Fisch. & C. A. Mey.) Kuntze has been well-known for its antioxidative properties. This study investigated the anti-melanogenesis effect of demethyleugenol β-d-glucopyranoside (1) from A. rugosa by studying molecular regulation of melanogenesis in melan-a mouse melanocytes and normal human epidermal melanocytes (NHEMs) and in in vivo models. The SRY (sex-determining region on the Y chromosome)-related high-mobility group (HMG) box 9 (SOX9), one of the critical factors that affect skin pigmentation, is up-regulated. Interestingly, 1 down-regulated the expression of SOX9 and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). Reduction of these two transcription factors resulted in a decrease in melanogenic enzymes such as tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein 1, and dopachrome tautomerase. As a result, 1 significantly inhibited melanin synthesis in melan-a mouse melanocytes and NHEMs. In addition, the anti-melanogenic effect of 1 was confirmed in zebrafish and reconstructed skin tissue models. In conclusion, 1, as a potent SOX9 regulator, ameliorates skin pigmentation.

  16. ESTIMATION OF MELANIN CONTENT IN IRIS OF HUMAN EYE

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    E. A. Genina

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the experimental data obtained in vivo from digital analysis of color images of human irises, the mean melanin content in human eye irises has been estimated. For registration of color images the digital camera Olympus C-5060 has been used. The images have been obtained from irises of healthy volunteers as well as from irises of patients with open-angle glaucoma. The computer program has been developed for digital analysis of the images. The result has been useful for development of novel methods and optimization of already existing ones for non-invasive glaucoma diagnostics.

  17. Synthetic melanin bound to subunit vaccine antigens significantly enhances CD8+ T-cell responses.

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    Antoine F Carpentier

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs play a key role in immunity against cancer; however, the induction of CTL responses with currently available vaccines remains difficult. Because several reports have suggested that pigmentation and immunity might be functionally linked, we investigated whether melanin can act as an adjuvant in vaccines. Short synthetic peptides (8-35 amino acids long containing T-cell epitopes were mixed with a solution of L-Dopa, a precursor of melanin. The mixture was then oxidized to generate nanoparticles of melanin-bound peptides. Immunization with melanin-bound peptides efficiently triggered CTL responses in mice, even against self-antigens and at a very low dose of peptides (microgram range. Immunization against a tumor antigen inhibited the growth of established tumors in mice, an effect that was abrogated by the depletion of CD8+ lymphocytes. These results demonstrate the efficacy of melanin as a vaccine adjuvant.

  18. Accumulation of melanin in the peritoneum causes black abdomens in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Wang, Y; Luo, C; Qu, H; Shu, D

    2014-03-01

    A suspected case of localized visceral hyperpigmentation was described for a breed of broiler in China. Using optical microscopy, the accumulation of pigments in the abdominal skin and visceral peritoneum was observed. Electron microscopy was used to further study the ultrastructure of the pigmented peritoneum, and pigment granules resembling melanosomes at different stages were found, and melanocytes were present in this tissue. Infrared spectroscopy was used to analyze the physical-chemical properties of pigments extracted from these broilers. Using synthetic melanin as a reference and the melanin from the peritoneum of Silkie fowls as a control, the pigments in the peritonea of these broilers were found to be melanin, and it had a chemical structure similar to that of melanin from the Silkie fowl peritoneum. In this way, the black abdomens of these broilers were found to have been caused by accumulation of melanin produced by melanocytes in visceral peritonea.

  19. Immuno-Histochemical and Quantitative Study of Melanocytes and Melanin Granules in Oral Epithelial Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honwad, Swapna; Ravi, S V; Donoghue, Mandana; Joshi, Manjiri

    2017-07-01

    Oral Epithelial dysplasia (OED) is a potentially malignant disorder that is characterized by the presence of architectural and cytological changes. One of the prime factors responsible for the development of these lesions is the usage of tobacco. A variety of factors provide protective mechanism in order to prevent the effects of chemotoxic agents including tobacco products of which, melanin pigmentation is one of the vital elements. Role of melanocytes in progression of OED has remained unclear, so the present study was done to evaluate density of melanocyte and melanin granules in different grades of epithelial dysplasia and to correlate both findings with different grades of epithelial dysplasia. The study included 60 OED cases, of which three histopathogical sections were prepared from each block. The sections were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin, Masson Fontana and Human Melanoma Black (HMB-45), an immunohistochemical stain. Quantification of melanin granules was evaluated under 40X magnification using arbitrary scale with micrometer square as, 0= Absence of melanin granules, 1= Rare and scattered melanin granules, 2= Dense but not aggregated melanin granules, 3= Dense and aggregated melanin granules. Density of melanocytes was evaluated under 10X magnification. Five consecutive fields were evaluated for melanocytes and melanin granules starting from the field of highest density. There was an insignificant increase in number of melanocytes and melanin granules in mild and moderate dysplasia compared to normal but significant reduction was observed in severe dysplasia. The decrease in number of melanocytes and melanin granules was proportional to severity of epithelial dysplasia. This could be due to chronic irritation by chemical products leading to death of melanocytes.

  20. CO2 and chamber effects on epidermal development in field grown peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peanut, (Arachis hypogaea L.) cvar. C76–16, was grown either in the field, or in open gas exchange chambers under elevated or ambient CO2 concentrations. Stomatal density and other selected epidermal parameters associated with leaf development and gas exchange were measured on recently fully expande...

  1. International ring trial of the epidermal equivalent sensitizer potency assay: reproducibility and predictive-capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunis, M.A.T.; Spiekstra, S.W.; Smits, M.; Adriaens, E.; Eltze, T.; Galbiati, V.; Krul, C.A.M.; Landsiedel, R.; Pieters, R.; Reinders, J.; Roggen, E.; Corsini, E.; Gibbs, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the international ring trial of the epidermal-equivalent (EE) sensitizer potency assay. This assay does not distinguish a sensitizer from a non-sensitizer, but may classify known skin sensitizers according to their potency. It assesses the chemical concentration resulting in 50%

  2. International ring trial of the epidermal equivalent sensitizer potency assay : reproducibility and predictive-capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunis, Marc A T; Spiekstra, Sander W; Smits, Mieke; Adriaens, Els; Eltze, Tobias; Galbiati, Valentina; Krul, Cyrille; Landsiedel, Robert; Pieters, Raymond; Reinders, Judith; Roggen, Erwin; Corsini, Emanuela; Gibbs, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the international ring trial of the epidermal-equivalent (EE) sensitizer potency assay. This assay does not distinguish a sensitizer from a non-sensitizer, but may classify known skin sensitizers according to their potency. It assesses the chemical concentration resulting in 50%

  3. Radiation, heat and anti-melanin drug response of a transformed mouse embryo cell line with varying melanin content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Azzam, E.I.

    1987-11-01

    The R25 melanoma-like cell line, produced by transformation of the C3H-10T1/2 mouse embryo cell line, was studied to determine 1) whether the increased size of the survival curve shoulder indicated an increased capacity for radiation damage repair, 2) whether the presence of melanin influences radiosensitivity and heat sensitivity and 3) whether this melanoma cell line is sensitive in its response to anti-melanoma chemical agents compared to its normal parental cell line and other transformants not exhibiting melanoma like properties. (U.K.).

  4. Madecassoside inhibits melanin synthesis by blocking ultraviolet-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunsun; Lee, Jung-A; Shin, Seoungwoo; Roh, Kyung-Baeg; Kim, Jang-Hyun; Park, Deokhoon

    2013-12-16

    Madecassoside (MA), a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from Centella asitica (L.), is used as a therapeutic agent in wound healing and also as an anti-inflammatory and anti-aging agent. However, the involvement of MA in skin-pigmentation has not been reported. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of MA on ultraviolet (UV)-induced melanogenesis and mechanisms in a co-culture system of keratinocytes and melanocytes. MA significantly inhibited UVR-induced melanin synthesis and melanosome transfer in the co-culture system. These effects were further demonstrated by the MA-induced inhibition of protease-activated receptor-2 expression and its signaling pathway, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2 alpha in keratinocytes. The clinical efficacy of MA was confirmed on artificially tanned human skin. MA significantly reduced UV-induced melanin index at 8 weeks after topical application. Overall, the study demonstrated significant benefits of MA use in the inhibition of hyperpigmentation caused by UV irradiation.

  5. Madecassoside Inhibits Melanin Synthesis by Blocking Ultraviolet-Induced Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunsun Jung

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Madecassoside (MA, a pentacyclic triterpene isolated from Centella asitica (L., is used as a therapeutic agent in wound healing and also as an anti-inflammatory and anti-aging agent. However, the involvement of MA in skin-pigmentation has not been reported. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of MA on ultraviolet (UV-induced melanogenesis and mechanisms in a co-culture system of keratinocytes and melanocytes. MA significantly inhibited UVR-induced melanin synthesis and melanosome transfer in the co-culture system. These effects were further demonstrated by the MA-induced inhibition of protease-activated receptor-2 expression and its signaling pathway, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2 alpha in keratinocytes. The clinical efficacy of MA was confirmed on artificially tanned human skin. MA significantly reduced UV-induced melanin index at 8 weeks after topical application. Overall, the study demonstrated significant benefits of MA use in the inhibition of hyperpigmentation caused by UV irradiation.

  6. Comparison of Antioxidant Activities of Melanin Fractions from Chestnut Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Yu Yao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chestnut shell melanin can be used as a colorant and antioxidant, and fractionated into three fractions (Fr. 1, Fr. 2, and Fr. 3 with different physicochemical properties. Antioxidant activities of the fractions were comparatively evaluated for the first time. The fractions exhibited different antioxidative potential in different evaluation systems. Fr. 1, which is only soluble in alkaline water, had the strongest peroxidation inhibition and superoxide anion scavenging activity; Fr. 2, which is soluble in alkaline water and hydrophilic organic solvents but insoluble in neutral and acidic water, had the greatest power to chelate ferrous ions; and Fr. 3, which is soluble both in hydrophilic organic solvents and in water at any pH conditions, had the greatest hydroxyl (·OH and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH· radicals scavenging abilities, reducing power, and phenolic content. The pigment fractions were superior to butylated hydroxytolune (BHT in ·OH and DPPH· scavenging and to ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA in the Fe2+–chelation. They were inferior to BHT in peroxidation inhibition and O2·− scavenging and reducing power. However, BHT is a synthetic antioxidant and cannot play the colorant role. The melanin fractions might be used as effective biological antioxidant colorants.

  7. Bioinspired near-infrared-excited sensing platform for in vitro antioxidant capacity assay based on upconversion nanoparticles and a dopamine-melanin hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Chen, Chuan; Ke, Xuebin; Kang, Ning; Shen, Yuqing; Liu, Yongliang; Zhou, Xi; Wang, Hongjun; Chen, Changqing; Ren, Lei

    2015-02-11

    A novel core-shell structure based on upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles (UCNPs) and dopamine-melanin has been developed for evaluation of the antioxidant capacity of biological fluids. In this approach, dopamine-melanin nanoshells facilely formed on the surface of UCNPs act as ultraefficient quenchers for upconversion fluorescence, contributing to a photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism. This spontaneous oxidative polymerization of the dopamine-induced quenching effect could be effectively prevented by the presence of various antioxidants (typically biothiols, ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), and Trolox). The chemical response of the UCNPs@dopamine-melanin hybrid system exhibited great selectivity and sensitivity toward antioxidants relative to other compounds at 100-fold higher concentration. A satisfactory correlation was established between the ratio of the "anti-quenching" fluorescence intensity and the concentration of antioxidants. Besides the response of the upconversion fluorescence signal, a specific evaluation process for antioxidants could be visualized by the color change from colorless to dark gray accompanied by the spontaneous oxidation of dopamine. The near-infrared (NIR)-excited UCNP-based antioxidant capacity assay platform was further used to evaluate the antioxidant capacity of cell extracts and human plasma, and satisfactory sensitivity, repeatability, and recovery rate were obtained. This approach features easy preparation, fluorescence/visual dual mode detection, high specificity to antioxidants, and enhanced sensitivity with NIR excitation, showing great potential for screening and quantitative evaluation of antioxidants in biological systems.

  8. Multimodal microscopy and the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua

    The author's work is divided into three aspects: multimodal microscopy, stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, and customized-profile lenses (CPL) for on-axis laser scanners, which will be introduced respectively. A multimodal microscope provides the ability to image samples with multiple modalities on the same stage, which incorporates the benefits of all modalities. The multimodal microscopes developed in this dissertation are the Keck 3D fusion multimodal microscope 2.0 (3DFM 2.0), upgraded from the old 3DFM with improved performance and flexibility, and the multimodal microscope for targeting small particles (the "Target" system). The control systems developed for both microscopes are low-cost and easy-to-build, with all components off-the-shelf. The control system have not only significantly decreased the complexity and size of the microscope, but also increased the pixel resolution and flexibility. The SMPAF of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near-infrared (NIR) laser, has potential applications for a low-cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. The photophysics of melanin SMPAF has been studied by theoretical analysis of the excitation process and investigation of the spectra, activation threshold, and photon number absorption of melanin SMPAF. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin, mouse melanoma, and human black and white hairs are compared with images taken by conventional multi-photon fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). SMPAF images significantly increase specificity and demonstrate the potential to increase sensitivity for melanin detection compared to MPFM images and CRM images. Employing melanin SMPAF imaging to detect melanin inside human skin in vivo has been demonstrated, which proves the effectiveness of melanin detection using SMPAF for medical purposes. Selective melanin ablation with micrometer resolution has been presented using the Target system

  9. Toxic epidermal necrolysis, DRESS, AGEP : Do overlap cases exist?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvresse, Sophie; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Ortonne, Nicolas; Konstantinou, Marie Pauline; Kardaun, Sylvia H.; Bagot, Martine; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Roujeau, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Background: Severe cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs (SCARs) include acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) and epidermal necrolysis (Stevens-Johnson syndrome-toxic epidermal necrolysis [SJS-TEN]). Because of the varied

  10. Towards a quantitative theory of epidermal calcium profile formation in unwounded skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Adams

    Full Text Available We propose and mathematically examine a theory of calcium profile formation in unwounded mammalian epidermis based on: changes in keratinocyte proliferation, fluid and calcium exchange with the extracellular fluid during these cells' passage through the epidermal sublayers, and the barrier functions of both the stratum corneum and tight junctions localised in the stratum granulosum. Using this theory, we develop a mathematical model that predicts epidermal sublayer transit times, partitioning of the epidermal calcium gradient between intracellular and extracellular domains, and the permeability of the tight junction barrier to calcium ions. Comparison of our model's predictions of epidermal transit times with experimental data indicates that keratinocytes lose at least 87% of their volume during their disintegration to become corneocytes. Intracellular calcium is suggested as the main contributor to the epidermal calcium gradient, with its distribution actively regulated by a phenotypic switch in calcium exchange between keratinocytes and extracellular fluid present at the boundary between the stratum spinosum and the stratum granulosum. Formation of the extracellular calcium distribution, which rises in concentration through the stratum granulosum towards the skin surface, is attributed to a tight junction barrier in this sublayer possessing permeability to calcium ions that is less than 15 nm s-1 in human epidermis and less than 37 nm s-1 in murine epidermis. Future experimental work may refine the presented theory and reduce the mathematical uncertainty present in the model predictions.

  11. Towards a quantitative theory of epidermal calcium profile formation in unwounded skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matthew P; Mallet, Daniel G; Pettet, Graeme J

    2015-01-01

    We propose and mathematically examine a theory of calcium profile formation in unwounded mammalian epidermis based on: changes in keratinocyte proliferation, fluid and calcium exchange with the extracellular fluid during these cells' passage through the epidermal sublayers, and the barrier functions of both the stratum corneum and tight junctions localised in the stratum granulosum. Using this theory, we develop a mathematical model that predicts epidermal sublayer transit times, partitioning of the epidermal calcium gradient between intracellular and extracellular domains, and the permeability of the tight junction barrier to calcium ions. Comparison of our model's predictions of epidermal transit times with experimental data indicates that keratinocytes lose at least 87% of their volume during their disintegration to become corneocytes. Intracellular calcium is suggested as the main contributor to the epidermal calcium gradient, with its distribution actively regulated by a phenotypic switch in calcium exchange between keratinocytes and extracellular fluid present at the boundary between the stratum spinosum and the stratum granulosum. Formation of the extracellular calcium distribution, which rises in concentration through the stratum granulosum towards the skin surface, is attributed to a tight junction barrier in this sublayer possessing permeability to calcium ions that is less than 15 nm s-1 in human epidermis and less than 37 nm s-1 in murine epidermis. Future experimental work may refine the presented theory and reduce the mathematical uncertainty present in the model predictions.

  12. Epidermal naevi and bullous aplasia cutis congenita in a neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryburg, J S; Greer, K E

    1993-01-01

    The case of a neonate with cutaneous lesions consistent with epidermal naevi is presented. In addition to typical epidermal naevi, this baby had an unusual, bullous form of aplasia cutis congenita. Although aplasia cutis has been described as bullous and has been found in association with the epidermal naevus syndrome, both of these occurrences are rare in medical publications. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of epidermal naevi with bullous aplasia cutis congenita and raises difficult diagnostic and counselling issues. Images PMID:8301655

  13. Pigmented-MDCK (P-MDCK) cell line with tunable melanin expression: an in vitro model for the outer blood-retinal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Rajendra S; Scheinman, Robert I; Kompella, Uday B

    2012-11-05

    Retinal pigment epithelium, which forms the outer blood-retinal barrier, is a critical barrier for transport of drugs to the retina. The purpose of this study was to develop a pigmented MDCK (P-MDCK) cell line as a rapidly established in vitro model for the outer blood-retinal barrier to assess the influence of melanin pigment on solute permeability. A melanin synthesizing P-MDCK cell line was developed by lentiviral transduction of human tyrosinase and p-protein genes in MDCK (NBL-2) cells. Melanin content, tyrosinase activity (conversion of L-dopa to dopachrome), and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) were measured. Expression of tyrosinase protein and p-protein in P-MDCK cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy. Effect of l-tyrosine (0 to 2 mM) in culture medium on melanin synthesis in P-MDCK cells was evaluated. Cell uptake and transepithelial transport of pigment-binding chloroquine (Log D = 1.59) and a negative control salicylic acid (Log D = -1.14) were investigated. P-MDCK cells expressed tyrosinase and p-protein. Tyrosinase activity was 4.5-fold higher in P-MDCK cells compared to wild type MDCK cells. The transepithelial electrical resistance stabilized by day 4 in both cell types, with the TEER being 958 ± 33 and 964 ± 58 Ω·cm(2) for P-MDCK and wild type cells, respectively. Melanin content in P-MDCK cells depended on the concentration of l-tyrosine in culture medium, and increased from 3 to 54 μg/mg protein with an increase in l-tyrosine content from 0 to 2 mM. When the cells were grown in 2 mM l-tyrosine, uptake of chloroquine was 2.3-fold higher and the transepithelial transport was 2.2-fold lower in P-MDCK cells when compared to wild type MDCK cells. No significant difference was observed for both cell uptake and transport of salicylic acid. We developed a P-MDCK cell line with tunable melanin synthesis as a rapidly developing surrogate for retinal pigment epithelium.

  14. Stevens Johnsons syndrom og toksisk epidermal nekrolyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Zachariae, Claus; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2013-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are acute mucocutaneous diseases primarily due to drug intake. The diseases are characterised by the separation of epidermis from dermis which can be life-threatening. Mortality is often caused by sepsis and multiple organ failure. The most...

  15. FOLIAR EPIDERMAL AND PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    alkaloid, saponin, inulin, cellulose, tannin and lignin; Eragrostis tremula tested negative for lignin and positive for cellulose, saponin and alkaloids while Axonopus compressus tested negative for lignin, but positive for alkaloid, saponin, inulin, cellulose and tannin respectively. Leaf epidermal studies help to determine ...

  16. Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current clinical practice employs the use of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), as biomarkers to appropriately select patients that would benefit from targeted therapy against these major molecular pathways of the disease. This study aims at ...

  17. Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER 2)/neu expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... 3Department of Pathology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430060, China. 4Department of ... To investigate the relationship between the expression/amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor ... epidermal growth factor receptor family; HER 2, human epidermal ...

  18. Taxonomic significance of leaf epidermal anatomy of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaf epidermal anatomy of selected Persicaria Mill. species of the family Polygonaceae revealed variation in size and shape of epidermal cells, stomata, glandular and non glandular trichomes. This study proves to be taxonomically important tool in the delimitation of taxa. Epidermal cell shapes are variable but mostly ...

  19. Gastric luminal epidermal growth factor is affected by diet

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intragastric epidermal growth factor level, diet and intragastric pH. Setting and subjects. A dietary survey was co-ordinated with studies of gastric luminal epidermal growth factor and gastric fluid pH in 120 rural Transkeians. Results. Gastric .... Playford RJ, Marchbank T, Calnan DP, et at. Epidermal growth factor is digested to ...

  20. Taxonomic significance of leaf epidermal anatomy of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... Leaf epidermal anatomy of selected Persicaria Mill. species of the family Polygonaceae revealed variation in size and shape of epidermal cells, stomata, glandular and non glandular trichomes. This study proves to be taxonomically important tool in the delimitation of taxa. Epidermal cell shapes are.

  1. Chemical, experimental, and morphological evidence for diagenetically altered melanin in exceptionally preserved fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleary, Caitlin; Dolocan, Andrei; Gardner, James; Singh, Suresh; Wuttke, Michael; Rabenstein, Renate; Habersetzer, Jörg; Schaal, Stephan; Feseha, Mulugeta; Clemens, Matthew; Jacobs, Bonnie F; Currano, Ellen D; Jacobs, Louis L; Sylvestersen, Rene Lyng; Gabbott, Sarah E; Vinther, Jakob

    2015-10-13

    In living organisms, color patterns, behavior, and ecology are closely linked. Thus, detection of fossil pigments may permit inferences about important aspects of ancient animal ecology and evolution. Melanin-bearing melanosomes were suggested to preserve as organic residues in exceptionally preserved fossils, retaining distinct morphology that is associated with aspects of original color patterns. Nevertheless, these oblong and spherical structures have also been identified as fossilized bacteria. To date, chemical studies have not directly considered the effects of diagenesis on melanin preservation, and how this may influence its identification. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify and chemically characterize melanin in a diverse sample of previously unstudied extant and fossil taxa, including fossils with notably different diagenetic histories and geologic ages. We document signatures consistent with melanin preservation in fossils ranging from feathers, to mammals, to amphibians. Using principal component analyses, we characterize putative mixtures of eumelanin and phaeomelanin in both fossil and extant samples. Surprisingly, both extant and fossil amphibians generally exhibit melanosomes with a mixed eumelanin/phaeomelanin composition rather than pure eumelanin, as assumed previously. We argue that experimental maturation of modern melanin samples replicates diagenetic chemical alteration of melanin observed in fossils. This refutes the hypothesis that such fossil microbodies could be bacteria, and demonstrates that melanin is widely responsible for the organic soft tissue outlines in vertebrates found at exceptional fossil localities, thus allowing for the reconstruction of certain aspects of original pigment patterns.

  2. Vayg1 is required for microsclerotium formation and melanin production in Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong; Klosterman, Steven J; Wang, Conghao; Subbarao, Krishna V; Xu, Xiangming; Shang, Wenjing; Hu, Xiaoping

    2017-01-01

    The fungus Verticillium dahliae causes vascular wilt disease on many plant species, including economically important crop and ornamental plants worldwide. It produces darkly pigmented resting structures known as microsclerotia, which are able to survive for up to 14years in soil, and represent one of the defining characteristics of this species. The pigment produced in V. dahliae is dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin, a form of melanin common among fungi and named so for the intermediary of this melanin biosynthetic pathway. In this study, we characterized the function of the V. dahliae Vayg1 gene, whose homologs were involved in melanin biosynthesis in Exophiala dermatitidis (Wayg1) and Aspergillus fumigatus (Aayg1), by deletion and complementation of the gene and co-incubating deletion mutant with wild-type strain. Results showed that melanin production and microsclerotial formation in deletion mutants are inhibited. The Vayg1 deletion mutant also exhibited reduced pathogenicity. These results showed that Vayg1 is necessary for melanin and microsclerotium production, and we may thus hypothesize that the Vayg1 product may catalyze two different precursors, one of which is essential for DHN melanin production and the other one is involved in a signal network for microsclerotial formation in V. dahliae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcriptional network of multiple capsule and melanin genes governed by the Cryptococcus neoformans cyclic AMP cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Gerrald, Quincy D; Kraus, Peter R; Boily, Marie-Josée; Davis, Matthew J; Giles, Steven S; Cox, Gary M; Heitman, Joseph; Alspaugh, J Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen that elaborates several virulence attributes, including a polysaccharide capsule and melanin pigments. A conserved Galpha protein/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway controls melanin and capsule production. To identify targets of this pathway, we used an expression profiling approach to define genes that are transcriptionally regulated by the Galpha protein Gpa1. This approach revealed that Gpa1 transcriptionally regulates multiple genes involved in capsule assembly and identified two additional genes with a marked dependence on Gpa1 for transcription. The first is the LAC1 gene, encoding the laccase enzyme that catalyzes a rate-limiting step in diphenol oxidation and melanin production. The second gene identified (LAC2) is adjacent to the LAC1 gene and encodes a second laccase that shares 75% nucleotide identity with LAC1. Similar to the LAC1 gene, LAC2 is induced in response to glucose deprivation. However, LAC2 basal transcript levels are much lower than those for LAC1. Accordingly, a lac2 mutation results in only a modest delay in melanin formation. LAC2 overexpression suppresses the melanin defects of gpa1 and lac1 mutants and partially restores virulence of these strains. These studies provide mechanistic insights into the regulation of capsule and melanin production by the C. neoformans cAMP pathway and demonstrate that multiple laccases contribute to C. neoformans melanin production and pathogenesis.

  4. A Non-canonical Melanin Biosynthesis Pathway Protects Aspergillus terreus Conidia from Environmental Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, Elena; Gressler, Markus; Viediernikova, Iuliia; Hillmann, Falk; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hertweck, Christian; Brock, Matthias

    2016-05-19

    Melanins are ubiquitous pigments found in all kingdoms of life. Most organisms use them for protection from environmental stress, although some fungi employ melanins as virulence determinants. The human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and related Ascomycetes produce dihydroxynaphthalene- (DHN) melanin in their spores, the conidia, and use it to inhibit phagolysosome acidification. However, biosynthetic origin of melanin in a related fungus, Aspergillus terreus, has remained a mystery because A. terreus lacks genes for synthesis of DHN-melanin. Here we identify genes coding for an unusual NRPS-like enzyme (MelA) and a tyrosinase (TyrP) that A. terreus expressed under conidiation conditions. We demonstrate that MelA produces aspulvinone E, which is activated for polymerization by TyrP. Functional studies reveal that this new pigment, Asp-melanin, confers resistance against UV light and hampers phagocytosis by soil amoeba. Unexpectedly, Asp-melanin does not inhibit acidification of phagolysosomes, thus likely contributing specifically to survival of A. terreus conidia in acidic environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantification method for the appearance of melanin pigmentation using independent component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Nobutoshi; Okiyama, Natsuko; Okaguchi, Saya; Tsumura, Norimichi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Hori, Kimihiko; Miyake, Yoichi

    2005-04-01

    In the cosmetics industry, skin color is very important because skin color gives a direct impression of the face. In particular, many people suffer from melanin pigmentation such as liver spots and freckles. However, it is very difficult to evaluate melanin pigmentation using conventional colorimetric values because these values contain information on various skin chromophores simultaneously. Therefore, it is necessary to extract information of the chromophore of individual skins independently as density information. The isolation of the melanin component image based on independent component analysis (ICA) from a single skin image was reported in 2003. However, this technique has not developed a quantification method for melanin pigmentation. This paper introduces a quantification method based on the ICA of a skin color image to isolate melanin pigmentation. The image acquisition system we used consists of commercially available equipment such as digital cameras and lighting sources with polarized light. The images taken were analyzed using ICA to extract the melanin component images, and Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG) filter was applied to extract the pigmented area. As a result, for skin images including those showing melanin pigmentation and acne, the method worked well. Finally, the total amount of extracted area had a strong correspondence to the subjective rating values for the appearance of pigmentation. Further analysis is needed to recognize the appearance of pigmentation concerning the size of the pigmented area and its spatial gradation.

  6. Structural Studies of Bleached Melanin by Synchrotron Small-angle X-ray Scattering¶

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littrell, Kenneth C.; Gallas, James M.; Zajac, Gerry W.; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan

    2003-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to measure the effects of chemical bleaching on the size and morphology of tyrosine-derived synthetic melanin dispersed in aqueous media. The average size as measured by the radius of gyration of the melanin particles in solution, at neutral to mildly basic pH, decreases from 16.5 to 12.5 angstroms with increased bleaching. The melanin particles exhibit scattering characteristic of sheet-like structures with a thickness of approximately 11 angstroms at all but the highest levels of bleaching. The scattering data are well described by the form factor for scattering from a pancake-like circular cylinder. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that unbleached melanin, at neutral to mildly basic pH, is a planar aggregate of 6- to 10-nm-sized melanin protomolecules, hydrogen bonded through their quinone and phenolic perimeters. The observed decrease in melanin particle size with increased bleaching is interpreted as evidence for deaggregation, most probably the result of oxidative disruption of hydrogen bonds and an increase in the number of charged, carboxylic acid groups, whereby the melanin aggregates disassociate into units composed of decreasing numbers of protomolecules.

  7. Thallium-201: Autoradiography in pigmented mice and melanin-binding in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjaelve, H.; Nilsson, M.; Larsson, B. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden))

    1982-01-01

    Autoradiography with /sup 201/Tl/sup +/ in C57Bl mice showed a strong labelling of the eye melanin and of pigmented hair follicles. An analysis of the affinity of thallium for pigment from cow eyes indicated a binding to three groups of sites and showed a marked sensitivity to the addition of H/sup +/-ions. The results are consistent with the conception that a binding of thallium occurs to the free carboxyl groups of the melanin and that the structure of the polymer has a marked influence on the affinity. Similar results have previously been obtained with other cations. There was no indication that the strong in vivo affinity of thallium to melanin is due to a more firm binding than for other cations which do not localize on melanin in vivo. Instead, the ability of cations to pass the melanocyte membranes and reach the melanin granules is probably decisive for whether a melanin-binding will take place in vivo. Toxic effects on the eye and epilation are symptoms of thallium intoxication which may be related to its melanin-binding. The fate of /sup 201/Tl/sup +/ in some other tissues is also described and discussed.

  8. Stepwise multiphoton activation fluorescence reveals a new method of melanin detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; Mega, Yair; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2013-06-01

    The stepwise multiphoton activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave mode near infrared (NIR) laser, reveals a broad spectrum extending from the visible spectra to the NIR and has potential application for a low-cost, reliable method of detecting melanin. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin are compared with conventional multiphoton fluorescence microscopy and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). By combining CRM with SMPAF, we can locate melanin reliably. However, we have the added benefit of eliminating background interference from other components inside mouse hair and skin. The melanin SMPAF signal from the mouse hair is a mixture of a two-photon process and a third-order process. The melanin SMPAF emission spectrum is activated by a 1505.9-nm laser light, and the resulting spectrum has a peak at 960 nm. The discovery of the emission peak may lead to a more energy-efficient method of background-free melanin detection with less photo-bleaching.

  9. Chemical, experimental, and morphological evidence for diagenetically altered melanin in exceptionally preserved fossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleary, Caitlin; Dolocan, Andrei; Gardner, James; Singh, Suresh; Wuttke, Michael; Rabenstein, Renate; Habersetzer, Jörg; Schaal, Stephan; Feseha, Mulugeta; Clemens, Matthew; Jacobs, Bonnie F.; Currano, Ellen D.; Jacobs, Louis L.; Lyng Sylvestersen, Rene; Gabbott, Sarah E.; Vinther, Jakob

    2015-10-01

    In living organisms, color patterns, behavior, and ecology are closely linked. Thus, detection of fossil pigments may permit inferences about important aspects of ancient animal ecology and evolution. Melanin-bearing melanosomes were suggested to preserve as organic residues in exceptionally preserved fossils, retaining distinct morphology that is associated with aspects of original color patterns. Nevertheless, these oblong and spherical structures have also been identified as fossilized bacteria. To date, chemical studies have not directly considered the effects of diagenesis on melanin preservation, and how this may influence its identification. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify and chemically characterize melanin in a diverse sample of previously unstudied extant and fossil taxa, including fossils with notably different diagenetic histories and geologic ages. We document signatures consistent with melanin preservation in fossils ranging from feathers, to mammals, to amphibians. Using principal component analyses, we characterize putative mixtures of eumelanin and phaeomelanin in both fossil and extant samples. Surprisingly, both extant and fossil amphibians generally exhibit melanosomes with a mixed eumelanin/phaeomelanin composition rather than pure eumelanin, as assumed previously. We argue that experimental maturation of modern melanin samples replicates diagenetic chemical alteration of melanin observed in fossils. This refutes the hypothesis that such fossil microbodies could be bacteria, and demonstrates that melanin is widely responsible for the organic soft tissue outlines in vertebrates found at exceptional fossil localities, thus allowing for the reconstruction of certain aspects of original pigment patterns.

  10. Biosynthesis of catechol melanin from glycerol employing metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Caballero, Alejandra; de Anda, Ramón; Hernández-Chávez, Georgina; Rogg, Simone; Martinez, Alfredo; Bolívar, Francisco; Castaño, Victor M; Gosset, Guillermo

    2016-09-22

    Melanins comprise a chemically-diverse group of polymeric pigments whose function is related to protection against physical and chemical stress factors. These polymers have current and potential applications in the chemical, medical, electronics and materials industries. The biotechnological production of melanins offers the possibility of obtaining these pigments in pure form and relatively low cost. In this study, Escherichia coli strains were engineered to evaluate the production of melanin from supplemented catechol or from glycerol-derived catechol produced by an Escherichia coli strain generated by metabolic engineering. It was determined that an improved mutant version of the tyrosinase from Rhizobium etli (MutmelA), could employ catechol as a substrate to generate melanin. Strain E. coli W3110 expressing MutmelA was grown in bioreactor batch cultures with catechol supplemented in the medium. Under these conditions, 0.29 g/L of catechol melanin were produced. A strain with the capacity to synthesize catechol melanin from a simple carbon source was generated by integrating the gene MutmelA into the chromosome of E. coli W3110 trpD9923, that has been modified to produce catechol by the expression of genes encoding a feedback inhibition resistant version of 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase, transketolase and anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. In batch cultures with this strain employing complex medium with 40 g/L glycerol as a carbon source, 1.21 g/L of catechol melanin were produced. The melanin was analysed by employing Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, revealing the expected characteristics for a catechol-derived polymer. This constitutes the first report of an engineered E. coli strain and a fermentation process for producing a catechol melanin from a simple carbon source (glycerol) at gram level, opening the possibility of generating a large quantity of this polymer for its detailed characterization

  11. The role of alpha-synuclein in melanin synthesis in melanoma and dopaminergic neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tianhong; Zhu, Julie; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Jankovic, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The relatively high co-occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD) and melanoma has been established by a large number of epidemiological studies. However, a clear biological explanation for this finding is still lacking. Ultra-violet radiation (UVR)-induced skin melanin synthesis is a defense mechanism against UVR-induced damage relevant to the initiation of melanoma, whereas, increased neuromelanin (NM), the melanin synthesized in dopaminergic neurons, may enhance the susceptibility to oxidative stress-induced neuronal injury relevant to PD. SNCA is a PD-causing gene coding for alpha-Synuclein (α-Syn) that expresses not only in brain, but also in skin as well as in tumors, such as melanoma. The findings that α-Syn can interact with tyrosinase (TYR) and inhibit tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), both of which are enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of melanin and dopamine (DA), led us to propose that α-Syn may participate in the regulation of melanin synthesis. In this study, by applying ultraviolet B (UVB) light, a physiologically relevant stimulus of melanogenesis, we detected melanin synthesis in A375 and SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells and in SH-SY5Y and PC12 dopaminergic neuronal cells and determined effects of α-Syn on melanin synthesis. Our results showed that UVB light exposure increased melanin synthesis in all 4 cell lines. However, we found that α-Syn expression reduced UVB light-induced increase of melanin synthesis and that melanin content was lower when melanoma cells were expressed with α-Syn, indicating that α-Syn may have inhibitory effects on melanin synthesis in melanoma cells. Different from melanoma cells, the melanin content was higher in α-Syn-over-expressed dopaminergic neuronal SH-SY5Y and PC12 cells, cellular models of PD, than that in non-α-Syn-expressed control cells. We concluded that α-Syn could be one of the points responsible for the positive association between PD and melanoma via its differential roles in melanin synthesis in melanoma

  12. Screening of micro-organisms for decolorization of melanins produced by bluestain fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rättö, M; Chatani, M; Ritschkoff, A C; Viikari, L

    2001-03-01

    A total of 17 fungi and four bacteria were screened for their ability to decolorize melanin, using isolated extracellular melanin of the bluestain fungus Aureobasidium pullulans as substrate. On agar media, decolorization was observed by four fungal strains: Bjerkandera adusta VTT-D-99746, Galactomyces geotrichum VTT-D-84228, Trametes hirsuta VTT-D-95443 and Trametes versicolor VTT-D-99747. The four fungi were more efficient on nitrogen-limited medium than on complete medium. The melanin-decolorizing activity of G. geotrichum appeared to be located on the mycelium and could be liberated into the medium enzymatically.

  13. The role of alpha-synuclein in melanin synthesis in melanoma and dopaminergic neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhong Pan

    Full Text Available The relatively high co-occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD and melanoma has been established by a large number of epidemiological studies. However, a clear biological explanation for this finding is still lacking. Ultra-violet radiation (UVR-induced skin melanin synthesis is a defense mechanism against UVR-induced damage relevant to the initiation of melanoma, whereas, increased neuromelanin (NM, the melanin synthesized in dopaminergic neurons, may enhance the susceptibility to oxidative stress-induced neuronal injury relevant to PD. SNCA is a PD-causing gene coding for alpha-Synuclein (α-Syn that expresses not only in brain, but also in skin as well as in tumors, such as melanoma. The findings that α-Syn can interact with tyrosinase (TYR and inhibit tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, both of which are enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of melanin and dopamine (DA, led us to propose that α-Syn may participate in the regulation of melanin synthesis. In this study, by applying ultraviolet B (UVB light, a physiologically relevant stimulus of melanogenesis, we detected melanin synthesis in A375 and SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells and in SH-SY5Y and PC12 dopaminergic neuronal cells and determined effects of α-Syn on melanin synthesis. Our results showed that UVB light exposure increased melanin synthesis in all 4 cell lines. However, we found that α-Syn expression reduced UVB light-induced increase of melanin synthesis and that melanin content was lower when melanoma cells were expressed with α-Syn, indicating that α-Syn may have inhibitory effects on melanin synthesis in melanoma cells. Different from melanoma cells, the melanin content was higher in α-Syn-over-expressed dopaminergic neuronal SH-SY5Y and PC12 cells, cellular models of PD, than that in non-α-Syn-expressed control cells. We concluded that α-Syn could be one of the points responsible for the positive association between PD and melanoma via its differential roles in melanin synthesis in

  14. Epidermal growth factor inhibits cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1983-01-01

    mg/kg, s.c.). Furthermore, measurements on tissue extracts of the pouches revealed that 5 h after cysteamine treatment, Brunner's glands were depleted of epidermal growth factor. The effect on ulcer development of intraduodenally applied exogenous epidermal growth factor (1 micrograms/kg . h) also...... was studied. Luminal epidermal growth factor significantly inhibited the formation of cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer, compared with controls receiving saline. The effect was not due to inhibition of gastric acid secretion or stimulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion since the dose of epidermal growth...... of synthesis and secretion of endogenous epidermal growth factor may be a pathogenetic factor in cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer....

  15. Can a one-layer optical skin model including melanin and inhomogeneously distributed blood explain spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectra?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hanna; Pettersson, Anders; Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2011-02-01

    Model based analysis of calibrated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can be used for determining oxygenation and concentration of skin chromophores. This study aimed at assessing the effect of including melanin in addition to hemoglobin (Hb) as chromophores and compensating for inhomogeneously distributed blood (vessel packaging), in a single-layer skin model. Spectra from four humans were collected during different provocations using a twochannel fiber optic probe with source-detector separations 0.4 and 1.2 mm. Absolute calibrated spectra using data from either a single distance or both distances were analyzed using inverse Monte Carlo for light transport and Levenberg-Marquardt for non-linear fitting. The model fitting was excellent using a single distance. However, the estimated model failed to explain spectra from the other distance. The two-distance model did not fit the data well at either distance. Model fitting was significantly improved including melanin and vessel packaging. The most prominent effect when fitting data from the larger separation compared to the smaller separation was a different light scattering decay with wavelength, while the tissue fraction of Hb and saturation were similar. For modeling spectra at both distances, we propose using either a multi-layer skin model or a more advanced model for the scattering phase function.

  16. Analysis on unevenness of skin color using the melanin and hemoglobin components separated by independent component analysis of skin color image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Nobutoshi; Fujiwara, Izumi; Inoue, Yayoi; Tsumura, Norimichi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Iwata, Kayoko

    2011-03-01

    Uneven distribution of skin color is one of the biggest concerns about facial skin appearance. Recently several techniques to analyze skin color have been introduced by separating skin color information into chromophore components, such as melanin and hemoglobin. However, there are not many reports on quantitative analysis of unevenness of skin color by considering type of chromophore, clusters of different sizes and concentration of the each chromophore. We propose a new image analysis and simulation method based on chromophore analysis and spatial frequency analysis. This method is mainly composed of three techniques: independent component analysis (ICA) to extract hemoglobin and melanin chromophores from a single skin color image, an image pyramid technique which decomposes each chromophore into multi-resolution images, which can be used for identifying different sizes of clusters or spatial frequencies, and analysis of the histogram obtained from each multi-resolution image to extract unevenness parameters. As the application of the method, we also introduce an image processing technique to change unevenness of melanin component. As the result, the method showed high capabilities to analyze unevenness of each skin chromophore: 1) Vague unevenness on skin could be discriminated from noticeable pigmentation such as freckles or acne. 2) By analyzing the unevenness parameters obtained from each multi-resolution image for Japanese ladies, agerelated changes were observed in the parameters of middle spatial frequency. 3) An image processing system modulating the parameters was proposed to change unevenness of skin images along the axis of the obtained age-related change in real time.

  17. Structure Characterization and Lead Detoxification Effect of Carboxymethylated Melanin Derived from Lachnum Sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Shuai; Li, Lan; Li, Jinglei; Shaikh, Farnaz; Yang, Liu; Ye, Ming

    2017-06-01

    In the present study, an intracellular melanin, named LIM205, was separated from Lachnum YM205 mycelia and was purified on a Sephadex G-15 column. The molecular weight of LIM205 was determined as 522 Da, and its molecular formula was speculated as C 28 H 14 N 2 O 7 S. The possible chemical structure of LIM205 was determined according to the results of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, and pyrolysis/GC-MS analysis. With the aim to increase its water solubility, its carboxymethylated derivative, named CLIM205, was formed by the substitution of hydrogen atoms in LIM205 with one, two, and three carboxymethylate groups. FT-IR, UV, and ESI-MS analysis demonstrated that the carboxymethylate groups were conjugated onto LIM205. The lead detoxification activities of LIM205 and CLIM205 had also been investigated. In vivo test showed that both LIM205 and CLIM205 reduced the tissue lead concentration, enhanced lead excretion, and reversed lead-induced alterations in superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in mice, with CLIM205 showed better efficacy. The study indicates that LIM205 and CLIM205 have significant lead detoxification effect which will contribute to solve related problems.

  18. Melanin is not required for turgor generation but enhances cell-wall rigidity in appressoria of the corn pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Nancy; Löhrer, Marco; Hempel, Marcus; Mathea, Sebastian; Schliebner, Ivo; Menzel, Matthias; Kiesow, Andreas; Schaffrath, Ulrich; Deising, Holger B; Horbach, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    The ascomycete and causative agent of maize anthracnose and stem rot, Colletotrichum graminicola, differentiates melanized infection cells called appressoria that are indispensable for breaching the plant cell wall. High concentrations of osmolytes accumulate within the appressorium, and the internal turgor pressure of up to 5.4 MPa provides sufficient force to penetrate the leaf epidermis directly. In order to assess the function of melanin in C. graminicola appressoria, we identified and characterized the polyketide synthase 1 (CgPKS1) gene which displayed high similarity to fungal polyketide synthases (PKS) involved in synthesis of 1,3,6,8-tetrahydronaphthalene, the first intermediate in melanin biosynthesis. Cgpks1 albino mutants created by targeted gene disruption were unable to penetrate intact leaves and ruptured frequently but, surprisingly, were able to penetrate ultrathin polytetrafluoroethylene membranes mimicking the plant surface. Nonmelanized Cgpks1 appressoria were sensitive to externally applied cell-wall-degrading enzymes whereas melanized appressoria were not affected. Expression studies using a truncated CgPKS1 fused to green fluorescent protein revealed fluorescence in immature appressoria and in setae, which is in agreement with transcript data obtained by RNA-Seq and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Unexpectedly, surface scans of mutant and wild-type appressoria revealed considerable differences in cell-wall morphology. Melanization of appressoria is indispensable for successful infection of intact leaves. However, cell collapse experiments and analysis of the appressorial osmolyte content by Mach-Zehnder interferometry convincingly showed that melanin is not required for solute accumulation and turgor generation, thus questioning the role of melanin as a barrier for osmolytes in appressoria of C. graminicola.

  19. Decreased levels of salivary prostaglandin E2 and epidermal growth factor in recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu-Wang, C Y; Patel, M; Feng, J; Milles, M; Wang, S L

    1995-12-01

    Prostaglandin E2 and epidermal growth factor are two important cytoprotective compounds in saliva. This study investigated their salivary levels in controls and individuals with minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The development of recurrent aphthous stomatitis was divided into three stages: (1) early active stage (mucosal redness); (2) active stage (mucosal ulceration); (3) convalescent stage. Unstimulated mixed saliva was collected from each volunteer. Salivary prostaglandin E2 and epidermal growth factor concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. Their levels (mean +/- SEM) were significantly lower during the active stage of ulceration as compared to the control: (a) for prostaglandin E2, 200 +/- 55 versus 73 +/- 11 pg/mg salivary protein (p stomatitis. The prostaglandin E2 concentration decreased significantly during the active stage of ulceration, and then increased significantly during the convalescent stage. However, the recovery of salivary epidermal growth factor after the ulceration was slower than that of the prostaglandin E2. It is suggested that the diminution of prostaglandin E2 and epidermal growth factor in the saliva may be associated with the ulcer development.

  20. Bio-Inspired Structural Colors Produced via Self-Assembly of Synthetic Melanin Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Li, Yiwen; Allen, Michael C; Deheyn, Dimitri D; Yue, Xiujun; Zhao, Jiuzhou; Gianneschi, Nathan C; Shawkey, Matthew D; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-05-26

    Structural colors arising from interactions of light with submicron scale periodic structures have been found in many species across all taxa, serving multiple biological functions including sexual signaling, camouflage, and aposematism. Directly inspired by the extensive use of self-assembled melanosomes to produce colors in avian feathers, we set out to synthesize and assemble polydopamine-based synthetic melanin nanoparticles in an effort to fabricate colored films. We have quantitatively demonstrated that synthetic melanin nanoparticles have a high refractive index and broad absorption spanning across the UV-visible range, similar to natural melanins. Utilizing a thin-film interference model, we demonstrated the coloration mechanism of deposited films and showed that the unique optical properties of synthetic melanin nanoparticles provide advantages for structural colors over other polymeric nanoparticles (i.e., polystyrene colloidal particles).

  1. Lasers in esthetic treatment of gingival melanin hyperpigmentation: a review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Mahin; Rahmani, Somayeh; Rahmani, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The health and suitability of mouth components play an important role towards defining facial attractiveness. An important component of the oral cavity is the color of the gingival tissue. Gingival melanin hyperpigmentation is caused by several reasons and affects people across ethnicity, race, age, and both gender. Lasers are presently being used for gingival melanin depigmentation. In this article, we reviewed studies on laser parameters, duration of gingival healing, pain perception during and after the operation, scores used for the evaluation of gingival melanin hyperpigmentation, follow-up period, treatment results, and recurrence reports. We conclude that laser ablation for gingival depigmentation is one of the most pleasant, reliable, acceptable, and impressive techniques available for treating gingival melanin hyperpigmentation.

  2. Mechanisms of branching reactions in melanin formation - Ab initio quantum engineering approach -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Ryo; Menez Aspera, Susan; Kasai, Hideaki

    Melanin, a pigment found in animals, consists of two types of oligomeric unit: eumelanin and pheomelanin. The color of the skin, the hair, and the eyes is controlled by the ratio of eumelanin/pheomelanin production. Especially, dopachrome and dopaquinone are the precursor molecules of melanin which directly affect the composition of melanin through their branching reactions. Dopachrome is converted into two possible monomers of eumelanin. Dopaquinone can undergo both eumelanin and pheomelanin synthesis. To understand the mechanisms and controlling factors that govern the conversions, reactions of the two molecules are investigated using density functional theory-based first-principles calculations. Our results deepen mechanistic understanding of the reactions and open possibilities to design properties and functions of melanin. In this talk, we will discuss about the competitions of the branching reactions.

  3. Screening of Auricularia auricula strains for strong production ability of melanin pigments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu ZOU

    Full Text Available Abstract Melanin pigments have great application value and development potential in food industry to use as nature functional food colorants. In initial study, twenty-two Auricularia auricula strains were screened for stronger production ability of melanin pigments by solid culture. Three A. auricula strains (RF201, QD2 and QD6 with higher pigment production capacity were selected for further study through submerged culture supplementing 1 g/L l-tyrosine. The maximal pigment yields of A. auricula RF201, QD2 and QD6 were 493.9, 367.6 and 318.5 mg/L, respectively. Among three strains, A. auricula RF201 possessed the strongest production ability of melanin pigments. The present study indicated that A. auricula RF201 could be used as potential excellent producer of melanin pigments.

  4. Gamma-resonance study of the reaction of iron ions with synthetic L-dopa melanin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagirov, R.M.; Stukan, R.A.; Lapina, V.A.; Dontsov, A.E.; Ostrovskii, M.A.

    1986-07-01

    The reaction of Fe/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 2 +/ ions with synthetic L-dopa melanin, which is a model compound of natural melanin (the melanoprotein granules in the pigment epithelial cells in vertebrate and human eyes), has been studied by gamma-resonance spectroscopy. The investigations showed that L-dopa melanin is capable of effectively binding iron ions and that it displays oxidative or reducing properties with respect to Fe, depending on the composition of the subsystem of the Fe ions and the ambient pH. Trivalent Fe/sup 3 +/ ions form stronger complexes with L-dopa melanin than do Fe/sup 2 +/ ions. The coordination takes place mainly with the carboxyl groups and the amino and imino groups of the polymer. The conformational state of the polymer apparently changes as the pH is varied.

  5. Flux pinning mechanism and Hc2-anisotropy in melanin doped bulk MgB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabuddin Shah, M.; Shahabuddin, Mohammed; Alzayed, Nasser S.; Parakkandy, Jafar M.

    2014-06-01

    Flux pinning mechanism in melanin doped MgB2 superconductor has been studied using a scaling law proposed by Dew-Hughes and another method proposed by Eisterer. Our experimental data could be fitted very closely by the aforementioned scaling law. The fitting parameters, the positions of peaks bpeak and k = bpeak/bn confirm a grain-boundary pinning in the 10% melanin doped sample, while the undoped sample consists of mixed pinning. Furthermore, percolation theory was utilized under grain-boundary approximation to investigate the role of Hc2-anisotropy in the critical current density, and its dependence on applied field as well as temperature. The Hc2-anisotropy decreases with melanin doping resulting in the increase of Jc in high field. There is suppression of flux pinning maximum due to melanin doping, which is found to be the main reason for the degradation of low-field Jc.

  6. Blood Supply--Susceptible Formation of Melanin Pigment in Hair Bulb Melanocytes of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Maeda, MD

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Melanin pigment formation in the hair bulb melanocytes appeared to be susceptible to the blood supply, and melanocytosis was promoted in the follicles and in the epidermis of Kitl-Tg C57BL/6 mice.

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor (EGF is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health.

  8. Abnormal epidermal changes after argon laser treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, R.A.; Knobler, R.M.; Aberer, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Ott, E. (Univ. of Vienna (Austria))

    1991-02-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a congenital port-wine stain on the forehead was treated three times at 2-month intervals with an argon laser. Six months after the last treatment, moderate blanching and mild scaling confined to the treated area was observed. A biopsy specimen of the treated area revealed a significant decrease in ectatic vessels. However, epidermal changes similar to those of actinic keratosis with disorganized cell layers and marked cytologic abnormalities were seen. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes for a defect in DNA repair was negative. Multiple, argon laser-induced photothermal effects may be responsible for the changes observed in our case and may lead to premalignant epidermal transformation.

  9. Inhibitory Effect of Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii Extract on Melanin Synthesis via Repression of Tyrosinase Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Hwayong Park; Kwang Hoon Song; Pil Mun Jung; Ji-Eun Kim; Hyunju Ro; Mi Yoon Kim; Jin Yeul Ma

    2013-01-01

    To identify the active compound arctigenin in Fructus Arctii (dried seed of medicinal plant Arctium lappa) and to elucidate the inhibitory mechanism in melanogenesis, we analyzed melanin content and tyrosinase activity on B16BL6 murine melanoma and melan-A cell cultures. Water extracts of Fructus Arctii were shown to inhibit tyrosinase activity in vitro and melanin content in ? -melanocyte stimulating hormone-stimulated cells to similar levels as the well-known kojic acid and arbutin, respect...

  10. An Ultra-Violet Tolerant Wild-Type Strain of Melanin-Producing Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansinenea, Estibaliz; Salazar, Francisco; Ramirez, Melanie; Ortiz, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacillus thuringiensis is the most successful biological control agent used in agriculture, forestry and mosquito control. However, the insecticidal activity of the B. thuringiensis formulation is not very stable and rapidly loses its biological activity under field conditions, due to the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. Melanin is known to absorb radiation therefore photo protection of B. thuringiensis based on melanin has been extensively studied. Objectives: The aim of this study was to find a wild type strain of naturally melanin-producing B. thuringiensis to avoid any mutation or manipulation that can affect the Cry protein content. Materials and Methods: Bacillus thuringiensis strains were isolated from soils of different States of Mexico and pigment extraction was followed by lowering the pH to 2 using 1N HCl. Pigment was characterized by some chemical tests based on its solubility, bleaching by H2O2 and flocculation with FeCl3, and using an Infrared (IR) spectrum. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiment was performed to probe the melanin efficacy. Results: ELI52 strain of B. thuringiensis was confirmed to naturally produce melanin. The Cry protein analysis suggested that ELI52 is probably a B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain with toxic activity against the Diptera order of insects. Ultra Violet protection efficacy of melanin was probed counting total viable colonies after UV radiation and comparing the results with the non-producing melanin strain L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) was also detected in the culture. ELI52 strain showed an antagonistic effect over some common bacteria from the environment. Conclusions: ELI52 wild-type strain of B. thuringiensis is a good bio-insecticide that produces melanin with UV-resistance that is probably toxic against the Diptera order of insects and can inhibit the growth of other environmental bacteria. PMID:26421136

  11. Inhibitory effect of isoprenoid-substituted flavonoids isolated from Artocarpus heterophyllus on melanin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arung, Enos Tangke; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2006-07-01

    Isoprenoid-substituted flavonoids were isolated from the wood of Artocarpus heterophyllus by means of activity-guided fractionation. Artocarpin (1), cudraflavone C (2), 6-prenylapigenin (3), kuwanon C (4), norartocarpin (5) and albanin A (6) inhibited melanin biosynthesis in B16 melanoma cells without inhibiting tyrosinase. A structure-activity investigation indicated that the presence of the isoprenoid-substituted moiety enhanced the inhibitory activity on melanin production in B16 melanoma cells.

  12. Melanin externalization in Candida albicans depends on cell wall chitin structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Claire A; Gómez, Beatriz L; Mora-Montes, Héctor M; Mackenzie, Kevin S; Munro, Carol A; Brown, Alistair J P; Gow, Neil A R; Kibbler, Christopher C; Odds, Frank C

    2010-09-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans produces dark-pigmented melanin after 3 to 4 days of incubation in medium containing l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) as a substrate. Expression profiling of C. albicans revealed very few genes significantly up- or downregulated by growth in l-DOPA. We were unable to determine a possible role for melanin in the virulence of C. albicans. However, we showed that melanin was externalized from the fungal cells in the form of electron-dense melanosomes that were free or often loosely bound to the cell wall exterior. Melanin production was boosted by the addition of N-acetylglucosamine to the medium, indicating a possible association between melanin production and chitin synthesis. Melanin externalization was blocked in a mutant specifically disrupted in the chitin synthase-encoding gene CHS2. Melanosomes remained within the outermost cell wall layers in chs3Delta and chs2Delta chs3Delta mutants but were fully externalized in chs8Delta and chs2Delta chs8Delta mutants. All the CHS mutants synthesized dark pigment at equivalent rates from mixed membrane fractions in vitro, suggesting it was the form of chitin structure produced by the enzymes, not the enzymes themselves, that was involved in the melanin externalization process. Mutants with single and double disruptions of the chitinase genes CHT2 and CHT3 and the chitin pathway regulator ECM33 also showed impaired melanin externalization. We hypothesize that the chitin product of Chs3 forms a scaffold essential for normal externalization of melanosomes, while the Chs8 chitin product, probably produced in cell walls in greater quantity in the absence of CHS2, impedes externalization.

  13. Analysis of lysosomal membrane proteins exposed to melanin in HeLa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Seung Hyuck; Park, Dong Jun; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There have been developed to use targeting ability for antimicrobial, anticancerous, gene therapy and cosmetics through analysis of various membrane proteins isolated from cell organelles. Methods It was examined about the lysosomal membrane protein extracted from lysosome isolated from HeLa cell treated by 100 ppm melanin for 24 hours in order to find associated with targeting ability to melanin using by 2-dimensional electrophoresis. Results The result showed 14 up-regulated (1.5...

  14. Melanin Externalization in Candida albicans Depends on Cell Wall Chitin Structures▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Claire A.; Gómez, Beatriz L.; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.; Mackenzie, Kevin S.; Munro, Carol A.; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Gow, Neil A. R.; Kibbler, Christopher C.; Odds, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans produces dark-pigmented melanin after 3 to 4 days of incubation in medium containing l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) as a substrate. Expression profiling of C. albicans revealed very few genes significantly up- or downregulated by growth in l-DOPA. We were unable to determine a possible role for melanin in the virulence of C. albicans. However, we showed that melanin was externalized from the fungal cells in the form of electron-dense melanosomes that were free or often loosely bound to the cell wall exterior. Melanin production was boosted by the addition of N-acetylglucosamine to the medium, indicating a possible association between melanin production and chitin synthesis. Melanin externalization was blocked in a mutant specifically disrupted in the chitin synthase-encoding gene CHS2. Melanosomes remained within the outermost cell wall layers in chs3Δ and chs2Δ chs3Δ mutants but were fully externalized in chs8Δ and chs2Δ chs8Δ mutants. All the CHS mutants synthesized dark pigment at equivalent rates from mixed membrane fractions in vitro, suggesting it was the form of chitin structure produced by the enzymes, not the enzymes themselves, that was involved in the melanin externalization process. Mutants with single and double disruptions of the chitinase genes CHT2 and CHT3 and the chitin pathway regulator ECM33 also showed impaired melanin externalization. We hypothesize that the chitin product of Chs3 forms a scaffold essential for normal externalization of melanosomes, while the Chs8 chitin product, probably produced in cell walls in greater quantity in the absence of CHS2, impedes externalization. PMID:20543065

  15. The Role of Alpha-Synuclein in Melanin Synthesis in Melanoma and Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tianhong Pan; Julie Zhu; Wen-Jen Hwu; Joseph Jankovic

    2012-01-01

    The relatively high co-occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD) and melanoma has been established by a large number of epidemiological studies. However, a clear biological explanation for this finding is still lacking. Ultra-violet radiation (UVR)-induced skin melanin synthesis is a defense mechanism against UVR-induced damage relevant to the initiation of melanoma, whereas, increased neuromelanin (NM), the melanin synthesized in dopaminergic neurons, may enhance the susceptibility to oxidative...

  16. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seher Erdogan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN are severe, acute reactions of the skin and mucosa that can result in serious clinical outcomes and morbidity. We report a case of TEN resulting in mortality, following the use of tablets containing paracetamol, codeine phosphate, and chlorpheniramine for an upper respiratory tract infection. Conditions such as SJS and TEN that can lead to serious clinical outcomes should be considered in juvenile patients, and unnecessary drug use should be avoided.

  17. Photocrosslinkable Gelatin Hydrogel for Epidermal Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xin; Lang, Qi; Yildirimer, Lara; Lin, Zhi Yuan; Cui, Wenguo; Annabi, Nasim; Ng, Kee Woei; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Natural hydrogels are promising scaffolds to engineer epidermis. Currently, natural hydrogels used to support epidermal regeneration are mainly collagen- or gelatin-based, which mimic the natural dermal extracellular matrix but often suffer from insufficient and uncontrollable mechanical and degradation properties. In this study, a photocrosslinkable gelatin (i.e., gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA)) with tunable mechanical, degradation, and biological properties is used to engineer the epidermis...

  18. Topical Hesperidin Improves Epidermal Permeability Barrier Function and Epidermal Differentiation in Normal Murine Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Maihua; Man, Mona; Man, Wenyan; Zhu, Wenyuan; Hupe, Melanie; Park, Kyungho; Crumrine, Debra; Elias, Peter M.; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Orange peel extract appears to exhibit beneficial effects on skin whitening, inflammation, UVB protection, as well as keratinocyte proliferation. In the present study, we determine whether topical hesperidin influences epidermal permeability barrier function and its underlying mechanisms. Hairless mice were treated topically with 2% hesperidin or 70% ethanol alone twice daily for 6 days. At the end of treatment, basal barrier function as well as transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured 2 and 4 hours post barrier disruption. Epidermal proliferation and differentiation were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis. Additionally, lamellar body density and secretion were assessed by electron microscopy. Although there were no significant differences in basal barrier function, in comparison to control animals, topical hesperidin significantly accelerated barrier recovery at both 2 and 4 hours after acute barrier abrogation. Enhanced barrier function in hesperidin-treated skin correlated with stimulation of both epidermal proliferation and differentiation, as well as enhanced lamellar body secretion. These results indicate that topical hesperidin enhances epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis at least in part due to stimulation of epidermal proliferation, differentiation, as well as lamellar body secretion. PMID:22509829

  19. BmPAH catalyzes the initial melanin biosynthetic step in Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Chen

    Full Text Available Pigmentation during insect development is a primal adaptive requirement. In the silkworm, melanin is the primary component of larval pigments. The rate limiting substrate in melanin synthesis is tyrosine, which is converted from phenylalanine by the rate-limiting enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH. While the role of tyrosine, derived from phenylalanine, in the synthesis of fiber proteins has long been known, the role of PAH in melanin synthesis is still unknown in silkworm. To define the importance of PAH, we cloned the cDNA sequence of BmPAH and expressed its complete coding sequence using the Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system. Purified recombinant protein had high PAH activity, some tryptophan hydroxylase activity, but no tyrosine hydroxylase activity, which are typical properties of PAH in invertebrates. Because melanin synthesis is most robust during the embryonic stage and larval integument recoloring stage, we injected BmPAH dsRNA into silkworm eggs and observed that decreasing BmPAH mRNA reduced neonatal larval tyrosine and caused insect coloration to fail. In vitro cultures and injection of 4(th instar larval integuments with PAH inhibitor revealed that PAH activity was essential for larval marking coloration. These data show that BmPAH is necessary for melanin synthesis and we propose that conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine by PAH is the first step in the melanin biosynthetic pathway in the silkworm.

  20. The contribution of the melanin pathway to overall body pigmentation during ontogenesis of Periplaneta americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemonds, Thomas R; Liu, Jin; Popadić, Aleksandar

    2016-08-01

    The most prominent colors observed in insects are black or brown, whose production is attributed to the melanin pathway. At present, though, the contribution of this pathway to overall body pigmentation throughout ontogenesis is still lacking. To address this question we examined the roles of 2 key melanin genes (TH and DDC), in embryonic and postembryonic development of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Our results show that the melanin pathway does not contribute to the light brown coloration observed in the first nymphs. However, the dark brown coloration in mid nymphs and adults is produced solely from the melanin pathway. In addition, the DDC RNAi results reveal that it is dopamine melanin, not DOPA melanin, acts as the main contributor in this process. Overall, present study provides a new insight into insect pigmentation suggesting that genetic mechanisms of coloration can change during ontogenesis. Future studies of additional basal insect lineages will be required to assess in more details the generality of this phenomenon. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Arbutin encapsulated micelles improved transdermal delivery and suppression of cellular melanin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ke; Xu, Keming; Bessarab, Dmitri; Obaje, Jonathan; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-04-30

    Hyperpigmentation is a skin disorder characterized by elevated production of melanin. Current treatment approaches mainly rely on the application of skin lightening chemicals, most of which have safety issues. Efficacy of delivery of the active ingredients to the target organ has also been a challenge. Transdermal based drug delivery platform has been shown to improve drug bioavailability, avoiding the hepatic first pass metabolism, decrease gastrointestinal side effects, and eventually enhance patient compliance. This article explores the utilization of micellar transdermal delivery technology to improve skin penetration and efficacy of arbutin, a hyperpigmentation agent. The suppression efficacy of cellular melanin production versus cell viability of four active ingredients commonly used in skin lightening products, namely allantoin, arbutin, glycolic acid, and hyaluronic acid were first compared. Arbutin was selected for the micellar delivery studies base on its comparatively low cytotoxicity and better performance in reducing melanin production. Micellar Arbutin cream was formulated using Urah® proprietary micellar technology and was assessed for its cellular melanin suppression efficacy and skin penetration capacity. The results show that micellar arbutin cream improved both the delivery and cellular melanin suppression, suggesting that micellar transdermal delivery may have potential application in addressing hyperpigmentation skin disorders. Graphical abstract Transdermal delivery of arbutin with micelles for melanin production suppression.

  2. Influence of melanin on mutation load in Drosophila populations after long-term irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosse, I.B.; Lyakh, I.P. [Belarus Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus)

    1994-09-01

    The effect of melanin on the level of mutation load has been studied in experimental Drosophila populations exposed to radiation for 115 generations. Four types of populations have been analyzed: (1) control; (2) treated with melanin; (3) irradiated; (4) irradiated and treated with melanin. Melanin was produced by auto-oxidation of 1-dioxyphenylallanine and was constantly added to food. Populations were X-irradiated twice in each generation (at the larvae stage with 6 Gy and at the imago stage with 9 Gy). The level of recessive mutation on the third chromosome was analyzed by a standard genetic method of balanced lethals. The data obtained have shown that the populations exposed to long-term irradiation have the greatest number of mutations decreasing viability. Melanin exhibited radioprotective properties-it reduced the percentage of lethal, semilethal and subvital mutations. Thus the possibility of effective protection of populations exposed to radiation for many generations by melanin has been shown for the first time. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Tyrosinase-catalyzed melanin as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, Arie; Chavez, Sarah; Yao, Junjie; Fleming, Timothy; Gillanders, William E.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    It is difficult to distinguish between tumor cells and surrounding cells without staining as is done in histology. We developed tyrosinase-catalyzed melanin as a reporter gene for photoacoustic tomography. Tyrosinase is the primary enzyme responsible for the production of melanin and alone is sufficient to produce melanin in non-melanogenic cells. Two cell lines were created: a stably transfected HeLa line and a transiently transfected 293 line. A phantom experiment was performed with the 293 transfected cells 48 hours post transfection and the results compared with oxygenated whole blood, B16 melanoma and 293 control cells. An in vivo experiment was performed using the transfected HeLa cells xenografted into a nude mouse ear, and then imaged. The results show strong contrast for tyrosinase-catalyzed melanin in both the 293 cells in the tube phantom as well as the in vivo result showing melanin in a nude mouse ear. Transfection increased expression in 293 cells 159 fold and image contrast compared to blood by as much as 50 fold. Due to the strong signal obtained at longer wavelengths and the decrease of blood signal at the same wavelengths, tyrosinase catalyzed melanin is a good candidate as a molecular imaging contrast agent for photoacoustic tomography.

  4. Efektivitas kurkumin sebagai antioksidan dan inhibitor melanin pada kultur sel B16F1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiharto Sugiharto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Melanin inhibitors have become increasingly important ingredients in medication and cosmetics for the prevention ofhyperpigmentation. In the last few years, a huge number of natural herbal extracts have been tested as inhibitors of melanin synthesisand some of these effects are related to the antioxidant properties. The objectives of this study were to determine of curcumin propertiesas antioxidant activity and melanin inhibitors. In this study, our data indicated that antioxidant assay with DPPH showed IC50 was16,05 μg/ml. In the absence of α-MSH (α-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone, melanin content assay in cell B16-F1 indicated thatthe highest activity of curcumin to reduce melanin content of 45,67% at 25 μg/ml. Meanwhile, in the presence of α-MSH at the sameconcentration indicated that the highest activity was 53,87%. Based on the data, curcumin has potential properties as antioxidantactivity and melanin inhibitor.

  5. Melanin from the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum: a spectroscopic characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aulie Banerjee

    Full Text Available Melanins, the ubiquitous hetero-polymer pigments found widely dispersed among various life forms, are usually dark brown/black in colour. Although melanins have variety of biological functions, including protection against ultraviolet radiation of sunlight and are used in medicine, cosmetics, extraction of melanin from the animal and plant kingdoms is not an easy task. Using complementary physicochemical techniques (i.e. MALDI-TOF, FTIR absorption and cross-polarization magic angle spinning solid-state (13C NMR, we report here the characterization of melanins extracted from the nitrogen-fixing non-virulent bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum, a safe viable source. Moreover, considering dihydroxyindole moiety as the main constituent, an effort is made to propose the putative molecular structure of the melanin hetero-polymer extracted from the bacterium. Characterization of the melanin obtained from Azotobacter chroococcum would provide an inspiration in extending research activities on these hetero-polymers and their use as protective agent against UV radiation.

  6. Redox Active Transition Metal ions Make Melanin Susceptible to Chemical Degradation Induced by Organic Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadlo, Andrzej; Pilat, Anna; Sarna, Michal; Pawlak, Anna; Sarna, Tadeusz

    2017-12-01

    With aging, retinal pigment epithelium melanosomes, by fusion with the age pigment lipofuscin, form complex granules called melanolipofuscin. Lipofuscin granules may contain oxidized proteins and lipid hydroperoxides, which in melanolipofuscin could chemically modify melanin polymer, while transition metal ions present in melanin can accelerate such oxidative modifications. The aim of this research was to examine the effect of selected transition metal ions on melanin susceptibility to chemical modification induced by the water-soluble tert-butyl hydroperoxide used as an oxidizing agent. Synthetic melanin obtained by DOPA autooxidation and melanosomes isolated from bovine retinal pigment epithelium were analyzed. To monitor tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative changes of DMa and BMs, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry were employed. These measurements revealed that both copper and iron ions accelerated chemical degradation induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide, while zinc ions had no effect. Strong prooxidant action was detected only in the case of melanosomes and melanin degraded in the presence of iron. It can be postulated that similar chemical processes, if they occur in situ in melanolipofuscin granules of the human retinal pigment epithelium, would modify antioxidant properties of melanin and its reactivity.

  7. Modeling drug-melanin interaction with theoretical linear solvation energy relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, A H; Famini, G R; Loumbev, V; Wilson, L Y; Tosk, J M

    1997-10-01

    The affinity of drugs and other xenobiotic agents for melanin is a well-known phenomenon, often occurring with serious physiological consequences. For example, the interaction of anti-psychotic drugs with neuromelanin may play a pivotal role in the induction of extrapyramidal movement disorders associated with the chronic administration of phenothiazine and other neuroleptic agents. Little, however, is known about the complete nature of melanin-drug binding and the impact of these interactions on the physico-chemical properties of melanin. Data, such as binding affinities, can be analyzed using recently developed computational methods that combine mathematical models of chemical structure with statistical analysis. In particular, theoretical linear solvation energy relationships provide a convenient model for understanding and predicting biological, chemical, and physical properties. By using this modeling technique, drug-melanin binding of a set of 16 compounds has been analyzed with correlation analysis and a set of theoretical molecular parameters in order to better understand and characterize drug-melanin interactions. The resulting correlation equation supports a charge transfer model for drug-melanin complex formation and can also be used to estimate binding constants for related compounds.

  8. Vaccinia virus-mediated melanin production allows MR and optoacoustic deep tissue imaging and laser-induced thermotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritzker, Jochen; Kirscher, Lorenz; Scadeng, Miriam; Deliolanis, Nikolaos C; Morscher, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Schaefer, Karin; Zhang, Qian; Buckel, Lisa; Hess, Michael; Donat, Ulrike; Bradley, William G; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Szalay, Aladar A

    2013-02-26

    We reported earlier the delivery of antiangiogenic single chain antibodies by using oncolytic vaccinia virus strains to enhance their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we provide evidence that gene-evoked production of melanin can be used as a therapeutic and diagnostic mediator, as exemplified by insertion of only one or two genes into the genome of an oncolytic vaccinia virus strain. We found that produced melanin is an excellent reporter for optical imaging without addition of substrate. Melanin production also facilitated deep tissue optoacoustic imaging as well as MRI. In addition, melanin was shown to be a suitable target for laser-induced thermotherapy and enhanced oncolytic viral therapy. In conclusion, melanin as a mediator for thermotherapy and reporter for different imaging modalities may soon become a versatile alternative to replace fluorescent proteins also in other biological systems. After ongoing extensive preclinical studies, melanin overproducing oncolytic virus strains might be used in clinical trials in patients with cancer.

  9. The Relationship of Brimonidine Concentration in Vitreous Body to the Free Concentration in Retina/Choroid Following Topical Administration in Pigmented Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinno, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Kazuya; Kozai, Seiko; Kawamura, Akio; Inada, Katsuhiro; Tokushige, Hideki

    2017-05-01

    Several studies showed that repeated topical administration of brimonidine tartrate ophthalmic solution reached the human vitreous concentration above 2 nM, which is the concentration necessary to activate the α2-adrenergic receptor. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship of the brimonidine concentration in the vitreous body to the free concentration in the retina/choroid which is the target site of brimonidine on neuroprotective effect after topical administration. Brimonidine concentrations in the eye tissues of pigmented rabbits were determined following single ocular administration of 0.1% brimonidine tartrate ophthalmic solution at pH 7.3. Binding affinity of brimonidine to melanin and melanin content in the retina/choroid of pigmented rabbits was also examined. The concentration of free brimonidine which did not bind to melanin in the retina/choroid was calculated using the binding parameters to melanin. Topically applied brimonidine rapidly distributed to intraocular tissues. The elimination rate from melanin-containing tissues such as the iris/ciliary body and retina/choroid was slower than the aqueous humor and vitreous body in pigmented rabbits. In both the anterior and posterior retina/choroid, the free brimonidine concentrations were over 100-fold lower than the total concentrations. The concentrations in the vitreous body closely matched to the free concentrations in the posterior retina/choroid. Simulated free concentrations in the posterior retina/choroid were gradually increased when 0.1% solution was instilled twice daily. The present data indicated that the brimonidine concentration in the vitreous body was comparable to the free concentration in the posterior retina/choroid. This suggests that the vitreous concentration can be a surrogate indicator of the free brimonidine concentration in the posterior retina/choroid. From the present findings, it is expected that multiple instillation of brimonidine tartrate ophthalmic

  10. Within-male melanin-based plumage and bill elaboration in male house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Václav, Radovan

    2006-12-01

    If there is a cost to producing a dark color patch, the size of a patch may not correspond with its pigment concentration. The plumage of male house sparrows represents a case of dark, melanin-based ornamentation, but also a case of neglecting the composite nature of dark signals in birds. Here, I investigated what kind of associations exist between the brightness, chroma, and hue of dark integumentary patches and the size of a secondary sexual trait, the bib, in male house sparrows. I found that males with a larger bib also had a darker bib and bill, and a more saturated bib, bill, epaulets, head crown, and breast than small-bibbed males. Male bib coloration in terms of brightness and chroma was more strongly related to bib size than the coloration of other integumentary patches. However, with respect to hue, only the hue of the bill and cheeks was related to bib size. My results indicate that size, brightness, and chroma of the bib, but also chroma of other deeply colored patches, convey redundant information about the signaler's quality in male house sparrows.

  11. Inhibitory Effects of Adlay Extract on Melanin Production and Cellular Oxygen Stress in B16F10 Melanoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Huey-Chun Huang; Wan-Yu Hsieh; Yu-Lin Niu; Tsong-Min Chang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of adlay extract on melanin production and the antioxidant characteristics of the extract. The seeds were extracted by the supercritical fluid CO2 extraction (SFE) method. The effect of adlay extract on melanin production was evaluated using mushroom tyrosinase activity assay, intracellular tyrosinase activity, antioxidant properties and melanin content. Those assays were performed spectrophotometrically. In addition, the expression of melan...

  12. A Comparative Study of Melanin Content and Skin Morphology for Three Commonly Used Laboratory Swine (Sus scrofa domestica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Branch AFRL-RH-FS-TR-2013-0004 A Comparative Study of Melanin Content and Skin Morphology for Three Commonly Used Laboratory Swine (Sus scrofa...A Comparative Study of Melanin Content and Skin Morphology for Three Commonly Used Laboratory Swine (Sus scrofa domestica) 2013 0004 Benjamin A...REPORT TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) May 2009- May 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Comparative Study of Melanin Content and Skin

  13. Expression of melanin-related genes in cultured adult human retinal pigment epithelium and uveal melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fan; Yan, Dongsheng; Zhou, Xiangtian; Hu, Dan-Ning; Qu, Jia

    2007-11-03

    Controversy exists over melanogenesis of adult human RPE cells in vitro. This study investigated melanin content and production and expression of tyrosinase (TYR), tyrosinase-related-protein-1 (TRP1), tyrosinase-related-protein-2 (TRP2), and P gene in cultured human RPE cells and uveal melanoma cells. RPE cells were isolated and cultured from three adult donor eyes. A continuous human uveal melanoma cell line was established from primary choroidal melanoma. Melanin content and production were measured, and the expression of TYR, TRP1, TRP2, and P gene at the mRNA and protein levels were detected by RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. Melanin content per cell of cultured RPE decreased rapidly and in proportion to cell division. No melanin production could be demonstrated in any passages. In cultured RPE cells, mRNA expression of TYR, TRP1, TRP2, and P-gene and protein expression of TYR, TRP1, and TRP2 could not be detected. In uveal melanoma cells, melanin content per cell remained stable, and melanin production could be detected in each passage. Expression of mRNA of TYR, TRP1, TRP2, and P-gene and protein of TYR, TRP1, and TRP2 could be detected in melanoma cells. Human RPE cells under standard culture circumstances do not produce melanin and do not express the four key genes required in melanin biosynthesis pathway. In contrast, human uveal melanoma cells produce melanin and express all of these melanogenic genes in vitro.

  14. Memory-like behavior as a feature of electrical signal transmission in melanin-like bio-polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrico, M.; Ambrico, P. F.; Ligonzo, T.; Cardone, A.; Cicco, S. R.; Lavizzera, A.; Augelli, V.; Farinola, G. M.

    2012-06-01

    The memory-like behavior of melanin biopolymer under electrical stimuli is shown through electrical transport characterization performed on melanin based metal insulator semiconductor structures on silicon. The presence of a memory window and retention behavior is verified by capacitance-voltage read outs before and after the application of voltage pulses. Interestingly, these phenomena occur without the presence of metallic nanoclusters enclosed in the melanin matrix. Charge trapping is considered the main mechanism responsible for the melanin memory-like character. The inability to erase the memory window has been ascribed to the permanent polarization effect during the application of the voltage pulse.

  15. Late onset epidermal nevus with hypertrichosis and facial hemihypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Saritha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal nevus syndromes are rare conditions, characterized by different types of keratinocytic or organoid epidermal nevi in association with ocular, neurological, and skeletal manifestations. We present a case of late onset epidermal nevus with hypertrichosis and hemihypertrophy of face. Genetic analysis did not reveal presence of FGFR3 or PIK3CA mutations. The patient has features that cannot be categorized into the present well-known syndromes.

  16. Melanin-Like Pigment Synthesis by Soil Bacillus weihenstephanensis Isolates from Northeastern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnowska, Justyna M; Zambrzycka, Monika; Kalska-Szostko, Beata; Fiedoruk, Krzysztof; Swiecicka, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Although melanin is known for protecting living organisms from harmful physical and chemical factors, its synthesis is rarely observed among endospore-forming Bacillus cereus sensu lato. Here, for the first time, we reported that psychrotolerant Bacillus weihenstephanensis from Northeastern Poland can produce melanin-like pigment. We assessed physicochemical properties of the pigment and the mechanism of its synthesis in relation to B. weihenstephanensis genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy displayed a stable free radical signal of the pigment from environmental isolates which are consistent with the commercial melanin. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and physicochemical tests indicated the phenolic character of the pigment. Several biochemical tests showed that melanin-like pigment synthesis by B. weihenstephanensis was associated with laccase activity. The presence of the gene encoding laccase was confirmed by the next generation whole genome sequencing of one B. weihenstephanensis strain. Biochemical (API 20E and 50CHB tests) and genetic (Multi-locus Sequence Typing, 16S rRNA sequencing, and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis) characterization of the isolates revealed their close relation to the psychrotrophic B. weihenstephanensis DSMZ 11821 reference strain. The ability to synthesize melanin-like pigment by soil B. weihenstephanensis isolates and their psychrotrophic character seemed to be a local adaptation to a specific niche. Detailed genetic and biochemical analyses of melanin-positive environmental B. weihenstephanensis strains shed some light on the evolution and ecological adaptation of these bacteria. Moreover, our study raised new biotechnological possibilities for the use of water-soluble melanin-like pigment naturally produced by B. weihenstephanensis as an alternative to commercial non-soluble pigment.

  17. Physiological oral melanin pigmentation in a South African sample: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilana, Aubrey; Khammissa, Razia A G; Lemmer, Johan; Feller, Liviu

    2017-11-01

    Physiological oral melanin pigmentation is genetically determined, more frequently affecting people with darker skin. It can involve any oral mucosal site, but predominantly the gingiva. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and to characterize the clinical features of physiological oral melanin pigmentation in a South African population sample. A trainee in the discipline of periodontology and oral medicine interviewed all participants and examined the oral soft tissues. The diagnosis of physiological oral melanin pigmentation was based on clinical findings and on the history reported by the patient. A predetermined list of exclusion criteria was applied. The study population comprised 430 participants, of whom 319 (74%) were black, 55 (13%) Indian, 54 (12.5%) white, and two (0.5%) were mixed race. A total of 182 participants were diagnosed with physiological oral melanin pigmentation. The overall prevalence of physiological oral melanin pigmentation in the ethnically-mixed study population was 42%: 54% of blacks were affected, 16% of Indians, and 21% of whites. The female (101): male (81) ratio was 1.2:1; the gingiva was the site most frequently affected (73%). The total number of oral mucosal sites with physiological oral melanin pigmentation in the study population was 263; 68% of participants had one, 22% had two, 7% had three, and 3% had four sites affected. There was no significant association between the number of sites affected and sex or age. In this study of a South African population sample, the prevalence of physiological oral melanin pigmentation was higher in blacks than in Indians or whites, and the gingiva was the oral mucosal site most frequently affected. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Melanin-Like Pigment Synthesis by Soil Bacillus weihenstephanensis Isolates from Northeastern Poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna M Drewnowska

    Full Text Available Although melanin is known for protecting living organisms from harmful physical and chemical factors, its synthesis is rarely observed among endospore-forming Bacillus cereus sensu lato. Here, for the first time, we reported that psychrotolerant Bacillus weihenstephanensis from Northeastern Poland can produce melanin-like pigment. We assessed physicochemical properties of the pigment and the mechanism of its synthesis in relation to B. weihenstephanensis genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy displayed a stable free radical signal of the pigment from environmental isolates which are consistent with the commercial melanin. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and physicochemical tests indicated the phenolic character of the pigment. Several biochemical tests showed that melanin-like pigment synthesis by B. weihenstephanensis was associated with laccase activity. The presence of the gene encoding laccase was confirmed by the next generation whole genome sequencing of one B. weihenstephanensis strain. Biochemical (API 20E and 50CHB tests and genetic (Multi-locus Sequence Typing, 16S rRNA sequencing, and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis characterization of the isolates revealed their close relation to the psychrotrophic B. weihenstephanensis DSMZ 11821 reference strain. The ability to synthesize melanin-like pigment by soil B. weihenstephanensis isolates and their psychrotrophic character seemed to be a local adaptation to a specific niche. Detailed genetic and biochemical analyses of melanin-positive environmental B. weihenstephanensis strains shed some light on the evolution and ecological adaptation of these bacteria. Moreover, our study raised new biotechnological possibilities for the use of water-soluble melanin-like pigment naturally produced by B. weihenstephanensis as an alternative to commercial non-soluble pigment.

  19. Effects of melanin from Sepiella Maindroni ink (MSMI) on the intestinal Microbiome of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Song, Weiwei; Wang, Chunlin; Mu, Changkao; Li, Ronghua

    2017-07-03

    By the search for new natural compounds with beneficial health effects, cephalopod ink has been considered as an attempt to develop new drugs and functional foods, which is an especially active field in Asia, where cephalopods are a major fishery catch, for which ink sacs are a bi-product and where homeopathic medicine has deep roots. There is a demand to evaluate the safety and influence to the organism. The specific composition and relative abundance of the gut microbiota, which is potentially a major modulator of host metabolism, drives the interaction between functional foods and host health. We explore the effects of melanin from Sepiella Maindroni, most common cuttlefish in China, on the intestinal microbiome of mice. ICR mice were randomly divided four groups, which were normal group (S), low melanin dose group (D; 120 mg/kg), medium melanin dose group (Z; 240 mg/kg), and high melanin dose group (G; 480 mg/kg). Melanin was delivered for 28 consecutive days. Fecal samples were used to generate 7715 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) via high-throughput sequencing. There were significant shifts in relative abundance of the dominant taxa at the phylum, class, order, family, and genus levels following melanin treatment. MSMI had no significant effect on the structure of intestinal flora in mice. The main effect was in the proportion of dominant bacterial communities. The effect positively correlated with the dose. From a health point of view, the use of melanin does not cause intestinal flora disorder. Our results may have important implications for MSMI as functional food component and potential therapeutic for manipulating gut microbiota.

  20. Giant epidermal cyst of the tarsal plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohana Majumdar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old male patient presented with a right upper eyelid mass with mechanical ptosis. The patient gave no history of trauma or surgery. On examination, there was a huge cystic mass fixed to the tarsal plate. Excisional biopsy with tarsectomy was done. Histopathology sections demonstrated a keratin-filled cyst arising from the tarsus. A thorough Pubmed search did not reveal an epidermal cyst of the tarsal plate of this size which was successfully managed. The incision was made in such a way that postoperative ptosis would be avoided. Excess skin was removed during the surgery.

  1. [Bilateral segmental neurofibromatosis simulating epidermal nevus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambichler, T; Küster, W; Wolter, M; Rapp, S; Altmeyer, P; Hoffmann, K

    2000-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis is a neuroectodermal systemic disease. A rare variant of this condition is bilateral segmental neurofibromatosis. A 29-year-old man presented with bilateral papillomatous plaques in the lumbar dermatomes. Clinically, the lesions were very similar to an epidermal nevus but histologic examination revealed superficial neurofibromas. Family history, ophthalmologic and neurologic investigations were unremarkable. The unusual morphologic presentation of bilateral segmental neurofibromas in this case points to the wide clinical spectrum of the disease and the significance of histologic examination in systematic nevoid lesions.

  2. Interactions between Melanin Enzymes and Their Atypical Recruitment to the Secretory Pathway by Palmitoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping; Lin, Xiaorong

    2016-11-22

    Melanins are biopolymers that confer coloration and protection to the host organism against biotic or abiotic insults. The level of protection offered by melanin depends on its biosynthesis and its subcellular localization. Previously, we discovered that Aspergillus fumigatus compartmentalizes melanization in endosomes by recruiting all melanin enzymes to the secretory pathway. Surprisingly, although two laccases involved in the late steps of melanization are conventional secretory proteins, the four enzymes involved in the early steps of melanization lack a signal peptide or a transmembrane domain and are thus considered "atypical" secretory proteins. In this work, we found interactions among melanin enzymes and all melanin enzymes formed protein complexes. Surprisingly, the formation of protein complexes by melanin enzymes was not critical for their trafficking to the endosomal system. By palmitoylation profiling and biochemical analyses, we discovered that all four early melanin enzymes were strongly palmitoylated during conidiation. However, only the polyketide synthase (PKS) Alb1 was strongly palmitoylated during both vegetative hyphal growth and conidiation when constitutively expressed alone. This posttranslational lipid modification correlates the endosomal localization of all early melanin enzymes. Intriguingly, bioinformatic analyses predict that palmitoylation is a common mechanism for potential membrane association of polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) in A. fumigatus Our findings indicate that protein-protein interactions facilitate melanization by metabolic channeling, while posttranslational lipid modifications help recruit the atypical enzymes to the secretory pathway, which is critical for compartmentalization of secondary metabolism. Subcellular compartmentalization is increasingly recognized as an important aspect of fungal secondary metabolism. It facilitates sequential enzymatic reactions, provides

  3. Histamine and epidermal growth factor in women with fibrocystic changes of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieja, K; Stanosz, S; Glowińska, N

    2003-04-01

    In this study, the blood serum concentrations of histamine (HA) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) of women with fibrocystic changes (FCCs) of the breast were estimated. The control group comprised 32 women (mean age 44.9+/-4.4 years) without any pathologic changes in their breasts. The study group was made up of 81 women (mean age 44.5+/-3.5 years) with FCCs. The changes were divided into three subtypes: fibrous, cystic, and fibrocystic. In women with FCCs the concentrations of HA (Pbreasts (control group). The concentration of EGF in blood serum was significantly higher in women with the fibrocystic subtype of FCC (Pdisease.

  4. Melanin pigmentation gives rise to black spots on the wings of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Katsuhiko; Yoshikawa, Manabu; Fujii, Takeshi; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Several mutants of the silkworm Bombyx mori show body color variation at the larval and adult stages. The Wild wing spot (Ws) mutant exhibits a phenotype in which the moth has a spot on the apex of the forewing. In this study, we investigated this trait to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the color pattern. Microscopy of the black spot of Ws mutants showed that the pigment emerges in the scales of the wing, and accumulation of the pigment becomes strong just before eclosion. We next examined the relationship between the black spot of the Ws mutant and melanin. The spectrophotometry using alkaline extracts from the black spot in the wing showed the highest absorption intensity at 405nm, which is the absorbance wavelength of melanin. Moreover, inhibition assays for enzymes implicated in melanin synthesis using 3-iodo-l-tyrosine (a tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor) and L-α-methyl-DOPA (a dopa decarboxylase inhibitor) revealed that treatment with each inhibitor disrupted the pigmentation of the wing of the Ws mutant. On the basis of these results, we analyzed the expression pattern of five genes involved in melanin formation, and found that the expression levels of yellow and laccase2 were increased just before pigmentation, whereas those of DDC, tan, and TH were increased when the apex of the wing turned black. These results showed that melanin pigmentation gives rise to the black spot on the wing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High diversity of polyketide synthase genes and the melanin biosynthesis gene cluster in Penicillium marneffei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Tam, Emily W T; Chong, Ken T K; Cai, James J; Tung, Edward T K; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2010-09-01

    Despite the unique phenotypic properties and clinical importance of Penicillium marneffei, the polyketide synthase genes in its genome have never been characterized. Twenty-three putative polyketide synthase genes and two putative polyketide synthase nonribosomal peptide-synthase hybrid genes were identified in the P. marneffei genome, a diversity much higher than found in other pathogenic thermal dimorphic fungi, such as Histoplasma capsulatum (one polyketide synthase gene) and Coccidioides immitis (10 polyketide synthase genes). These genes were evenly distributed on the phylogenetic tree with polyketide synthase genes of Aspergillus and other fungi, indicating that the high diversity was not a result of lineage-specific gene expansion through recent gene duplication. The melanin-biosynthesis gene cluster had gene order and orientations identical to those in the Talaromyces stipitatus (a teleomorph of Penicillium emmonsii) genome. Phylogenetically, all six genes of the melanin-biosynthesis gene cluster in P. marneffei were also most closely related to those in T. stipitatus, with high bootstrap supports. The polyketide synthase gene of the melanin-biosynthesis gene cluster (alb1) in P. marneffei was knocked down, which was accompanied by loss of melanin pigment production and reduced ornamentation in conidia. The survival of mice challenged with the alb1 knockdown mutant was significantly better than those challenged with wild-type P. marneffei (P melanin-biosynthesis gene cluster contributed to virulence through decreased susceptibility to killing by hydrogen peroxide. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS.

  6. Alterations in the secretory pattern of dermal dendritic cells following melanin uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mareike; Elsässer, Hans Peter

    2013-06-01

    Under a variety of circumstances, melanin occurs in the dermal compartment of the skin, being mostly observed in cells that have been termed melanophages, some of which have been identified as dermal dendritic cells. We analysed changes in the expression and secretion pattern of cytokines by dendritic cells after the uptake of melanin from various sources. Dendritic cells were derived from human primary blood monocytes or from the human monocytic cell line THP-1. Melanin uptake increased the secretion of the chemokines MIP-1β (CCL4) and MCP-1 (CCL2). The higher MIP-1β secretion was accompanied by higher MIP-1β gene expression. Elevation of MIP-1β secretion was dependent on the uptake of melanin but could not be induced by the phagocytosis of latex beads, indicating that the phagocytic process itself was not sufficient to increase the secretion of this cytokine. The data thus show that the uptake of melanin changes the cytokine expression and secretion pattern of dendritic-like cells.

  7. Functional analysis of a melanin biosynthetic gene using RNAi-mediated gene silencing in Rosellinia necatrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takeo; Ito, Tsutae; Kanematsu, Satoko

    2014-04-01

    Rosellinia necatrix causes white root rot in a wide range of fruit trees and persists for extended periods as pseudosclerotia on root debris. However, the pathogenesis of this disease has yet to be clarified. The functions of endogeneous target genes have not been determined because of the inefficiency in genetic transformation. In this study, the function of a melanin biosynthetic gene was determined to examine its role in morphology and virulence. A polyketide synthase gene (termed as RnPKS1) in the R. necatrix genome is homologous to the 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin biosynthetic gene of Colletotrichum lagenarium. Melanin-deficient strains of R. necatrix were obtained by RNA interference-mediated knockdown of RnPKS1. The virulence of these strains was not significantly reduced compared with the parental melanin-producing strain. However, knockdown strains failed to develop pseudosclerotia and were degraded sooner in soil than the parental strain. Microscopic observations of albino conidiomata produced by knockdown strains revealed that melanization is involved in synnema integrity. These results suggest that melanin is not necessary for R. necatrix pathogenesis but is involved in survival through morphogenesis. This is the first report on the functional analysis of an endogenous target gene in R. necatrix. Copyright © 2014 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to optimize melanin synthesis from glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Béjar, María I; Balderas-Hernandez, Victor E; Gutiérrez-Alejandre, Aída; Martinez, Alfredo; Bolívar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo

    2013-11-13

    Natural aromatic polymers, mainly melanins, have potential and current applications in the cosmetic, pharmaceutical and chemical industries. The biotechnological production of this class of compounds is based on tyrosinase-dependent conversion of L-tyrosine and other aromatic substrates into melanins. The purpose of this work was to apply metabolic engineering for generating Escherichia coli strains with the capacity to synthesize an aromatic polymer from a simple carbon source. The strategy was based on the expression in E. coli of the MutmelA gene from Rhizobium etli, encoding an improved mutant tyrosinase. To direct the carbon flow from central metabolism into the common aromatic and the L-tyrosine biosynthetic pathways, feedback inhibition resistant versions of key enzymes were expressed in strains lacking the sugar phosphotransferase system and TyrR repressor. The expressed tyrosinase consumed intracellular L-tyrosine, thus causing growth impairment in the engineered strains. To avoid this issue, a two phase production process was devised, where tyrosinase activity was controlled by the delayed addition of the cofactor Cu. Following this procedure, 3.22 g/L of melanin were produced in 120 h with glucose as carbon source. Analysis of produced melanin by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed similar characteristics to a pure eumelanin standard. This is the first report of a process for producing melanin from a simple carbon source at grams level, having the potential for reducing production cost when compared to technologies employing L-tyrosine as raw material.

  9. Condition-dependent expression of melanin-based coloration in the Eurasian kestrel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piault, Romain; van den Brink, Valentijn; Roulin, Alexandre

    2012-05-01

    Melanin is the most common pigment in animal integuments and is responsible for some of the most striking ornaments. A central tenet of sexual selection theory states that melanin-based traits can signal absolute individual quality in any environment only if their expression is condition-dependent. Significant costs imposed by an ornament would ensure that only the highest quality individuals display the most exaggerated forms of the signal. Firm evidence that melanin-based traits can be condition-dependent is still rare in birds. In an experimental test of this central assumption, we report condition-dependent expression of a melanin-based trait in the Eurasian kestrel ( Falco tinnunculus). We manipulated nestling body condition by reducing or increasing the number of nestlings soon after hatching. A few days before fledging, we measured the width of sub-terminal black bands on the tail feathers. Compared to nestlings from enlarged broods, individuals raised in reduced broods were in better condition and thereby developed larger sub-terminal bands. Furthermore, in 2 years, first-born nestlings also developed larger sub-terminal bands than their younger siblings that are in poorer condition. This demonstrates that expression of melanin-based traits can be condition-dependent.

  10. Production of melanin pigment from Pseudomonas stutzeri isolated from red seaweed Hypnea musciformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh Kumar, C; Sahu, N; Narender Reddy, G; Prasad, R B N; Nagesh, N; Kamal, A

    2013-10-01

    Hypnea musciformis red seaweed is popularly known to produce carrageenan was collected from the Gulf of Mannar, India. Strain HMGM-7 [MTCC 11712] was isolated from the surface of this seaweed, which was capable of producing an extracellular black-coloured polymeric pigment. Based on phenotypic characterization and 16S rDNA sequencing, the strain HMGM-7 was identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri. Biophysical characterization by UV-visible, FT-IR, EPR and XRD spectroscopic studies confirmed the pigment as melanin. Further chemical characterization showed that it was acid-resistant, alkali-soluble and alkali-insoluble in most of the organic solvents and distilled water. To our knowledge, this is a first report on a marine Pseudomonas stutzeri strain producing significant amounts of melanin of about 6·7 g l(-1) without L-tyrosine supplementation in the sea-water production medium. This investigation reports a marine Pseudomonas stutzeri strain HMGM-7 [MTCC 11712] that produces significant quantities of melanin (6·7 g l(-1) ) in sea-water medium without the supplementation of L-tyrosine. The confirmation of the produced melanin was carried out by various chemical and physical characterization studies. The isolated melanin may find potential application for use in cosmetic and/or pharmaceutical industries. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Epidermal cell proliferation and terminal differentiation in skin organ culture after topical exposure to sodium dodecyl sulphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandt, J.J.M. van de; Bos, T.A.; Rutten, A.A.J.J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Epidermal cell proliferation and differentiation were investigated in vitro after exposure to the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Human skin organ cultures were exposed topically to various concentrations of SDS for 22 h, after which the irritant was removed. Cell proliferation was

  12. Colonization of epidermal tissue by Staphylococcus aureus produces localized hypoxia and stimulates secretion of antioxidant and caspase-14 proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    A partial-thickness epidermal explant model was colonized with GFP-expressing S. aureus and the pattern of S. aureus biofilm growth was characterized using electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Oxygen concentration in explants and H2O2 in media was quantified using microelectrodes. The re...

  13. Hypothalamic melanin concentrating hormone neurons communicate the nutrient value of sugar

    OpenAIRE

    Domingos, Ana I; Sordillo, Aylesse; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Tellez, Luis A; Vaynshteyn, Jake; Ferreira, Jozelia G; Ekstrand, Mats I.; Horvath, Tamas L.; de Araujo, Ivan E.; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    eLife digest Sales of full-sugar fizzy drinks are almost triple those of diet versions, providing real-world confirmation of the laboratory finding that humans, as well as animals, prefer sugar to artificial sweeteners. However, it is not simply that sugary things taste better. Mice with a mutation that prevents them from perceiving sweet tastes still prefer the natural sugar sucrose over the artificial sweetener sucralose. This is because sugar, unlike artificial sweeteners, has nutritional ...

  14. Olanzapine-induced changes in glucose metabolism are independent of the melanin-concentrating hormone system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girault, Elodie M.; Toonen, Pim W.; Eggels, Leslie; Foppen, Ewout; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2013-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs such as Olanzapine (Ola) induce weight gain and metabolic changes associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms underlying these undesired side-effects are currently unknown. Chagnon et al. showed that the common allele rs7973796 of the

  15. 2-Heteroaryl Benzimidazole Derivatives as Melanin Concentrating Hormone Receptor 1 (MCH-R1) Antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chae Jo; Kim, Jeong Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Oh, Kwangseok; Yi, Kyu Yang [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    A novel series of 2-heteroaryl substituted benzimidazole derivatives, containing the piperidinylphenyl acetamide group at the 1-position, were synthesized and evaluated as MCH-R1 antagonists. Extensive SAR investigation probing the effects of C-2 heteroaryl group led to the identification of 2-[2-(pyridin-3-yl)ethyl] analog 3o, which exhibits highly potent MCH-R1 binding activity with an IC{sub 50} value of 1 nM. This substance 3o also has low hERG binding activity, good metabolic stability, and favorable pharmacokinetic properties.

  16. 4-Acylamino-and 4-ureidobenzamides as melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) receptor 1 antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Receveur, Jean-Marie; Bjurling, Emelie; Ulven, Trond

    2004-01-01

    Synthesis, in vitro biological evaluation and structure-activity relationships of 4-acylamino-and 4-ureidobenzamides as novel hMCH1R-antagonists are disclosed. The nature of the amine side chains could be varied considerably in contrast to the central benzamide scaffold and aromatic substituents....

  17. Chronic loss of melanin-concentrating hormone affects motivational aspects of feeding in the rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, J.D.; Fleur, S.E. la; Toonen, P.W.; Afrasiab-Middelman, A.; Binnekade, R.; Schetters, D.; Verheij, M.M.M.; Sears, R.M.; Homberg, J.R.; Schoffelmeer, A.N.; Adan, R.A.; DiLeone, R.J.; Vries, T.J. de; Cuppen, E.

    2011-01-01

    Current epidemic obesity levels apply great medical and financial pressure to the strenuous economy of obesity-prone cultures, and neuropeptides involved in body weight regulation are regarded as attractive targets for a possible treatment of obesity in humans. The lateral hypothalamus and the

  18. Chronic loss of melanin-concentrating hormone affects motivational aspects of feeding in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, J.D.; la Fleur, S.E.; Toonen, P.W.; Afrasiab-Middelman, A.; Binnekade, R.; Schetters, D.; Verheij, M.M.; Sears, R.; Homberg, J.R.; Schoffelmeer, A.N.M.; Adan, R.A.; DiLeone, R.J.; Vries, T.; Cuppen, E.

    2011-01-01

    Current epidemic obesity levels apply great medical and financial pressure to the strenuous economy of obesity-prone cultures, and neuropeptides involved in body weight regulation are regarded as attractive targets for a possible treatment of obesity in humans. The lateral hypothalamus and the

  19. Epidermal Inclusion Cyst Embedded in a Recurrent Benign Fibrous Histiocytoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mani Makhija

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal infundibular cysts have been known to arise from implantation of epidermis in the dermis or subcutaneous tissues. The present case illustrates the theory of implantation in an epidermal inclusion cyst in a previously operated case of recurrent benign fibrous histiocytoma.

  20. Epidermal inclusion cyst embedded in a recurrent benign fibrous histiocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Makhija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal infundibular cysts have been known to arise from implantation of epidermis in the dermis or subcutaneous tissues. The present case illustrates the theory of implantation in an epidermal inclusion cyst in a previously operated case of recurrent benign fibrous histiocytoma.

  1. Epidermal Inclusion Cyst Embedded in a Recurrent Benign Fibrous Histiocytoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Mani

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal infundibular cysts have been known to arise from implantation of epidermis in the dermis or subcutaneous tissues. The present case illustrates the theory of implantation in an epidermal inclusion cyst in a previously operated case of recurrent benign fibrous histiocytoma. PMID:25284857

  2. Post-circumcision giant epidermal clitoral inclusion cyst: Case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A large epidermal clitoral inclusion cyst may pose a diagnostic dilemma involving several differential diagnoses. Case: We describe a case of post-circumcision giant epidermal clitoral inclusion cyst including the aetiology, presentation, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, management and reason for its late ...

  3. Foliar epidermal morphology of the genera Aneilema and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim was to study the structure of the foliar epidermis of five species belonging to the two genera and thus provide anatomical information that will help to possibly eliminate identification problems that exist among species of the genera using diagnostic characters of the foliar epidermal morphology. Epidermal peels of ...

  4. Estimating melanin location in the pigmented skin lesions by hue-saturation-lightness color space values of dermoscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Ando, Yoshimi; Ikinaga, Kuniko; Tanaka, Masaru

    2017-05-01

    The depth of melanin in the skin can be estimated roughly by observation of the color exhibited on dermoscopy. Currently, there are no objective methods to estimate it. The aim of the present study was to clarify the relationship between the depth of melanin in the skin and the color variation exhibited, and to objectively estimate the 3-D location of melanin in the pigmented skin lesions from dermoscopic images. Representative colors in dermoscopic images of acral compound nevus, Spitz nevus and blue nevus were evaluated by the subjectively perceived color on dermoscopy and objective values in hue-saturation-lightness color space values. Brown colors due to small quantities of superficial melanin in the skin had high saturation and low lightness values, whereas black colors due to large quantities of superficial melanin had low saturation and low lightness values. On the other hand, colors due to melanin in the dermis were perceived as blue-gray on dermoscopy, but extracted colors showed gray-brown hue and intermediate saturation and high lightness values. In all cases, extracted representative colors of pigmented skin lesions had similar hue values within the red-orange range. Objective estimation of the 3-D location of melanin in the pigmented skin lesions is possible by the saturation and lightness values of the colors extracted from dermoscopic images. Subjectively perceived colors of melanin, especially in the dermis, can be modified by the surrounding environment effect and blue color perception. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  5. Melanin offers protection against induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts by UVB in cultured human melanocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, N.P.M.; Vink, A.A.; Kolb, R.M.; Steenwinkel, M.J.S.T.; Berg, P.T.M. van den; Nieuwpoort, F. van; Roza, L.; Pavel, S.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to correlate the melanin content in human pigmentary cells with the generation of UVB-induced photoproducts and to examine the relationship between the melanin content and the removal of the photoproducts. Cultured melanocytes from light-skinned individuals

  6. Regulation of melanin biosynthesis via the dihydroxynaphthalene pathway is dependent on sexual development in the ascomycete Sordaria macrospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engh, Ines; Nowrousian, Minou; Kück, Ulrich

    2007-10-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora accumulates melanin during sexual development. The four melanin biosynthesis genes pks, teh, sdh and tih were isolated and their homology to genes involved in 1,8 dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin biosynthesis was shown. The presence of DHN melanin in S. macrospora was further confirmed by disrupting the pks gene encoding a putative polyketide synthase and by RNA interference-mediated silencing of the sdh gene encoding a putative scytalone dehydratase. Because melanin occurs in fruiting bodies that develop through several intermediate stages within 7 days of growth, a Northern analysis of a developmental time-course was conducted. These data revealed a time-dependent regulation of teh and sdh transcript levels. Comparing the transcriptional expression by real-time PCR of melanin biosynthesis genes in the wild type under conditions allowing or repressing sexual development, a significant downregulation during vegetative growth was detected. Quantitative real-time PCR and Northern blot analysis of melanin biosynthesis gene expression in different developmental mutants confirmed that melanin biosynthesis is linked to fruiting body development and is under the control of specific regulatory genes that participate in sexual differentiation.

  7. Melanin deposition ruled out as cause of color changes in the red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dainan; Gong, Shiping; Yang, Jiangbo; Li, Weiye; Ge, Yan; Wei, Yufeng

    2018-03-01

    Animal coloration primarily depends on the presence of pigments and the mixing ratio of eumelanin and pheomelanin. The color of red-eared slider's carapace varies with age, from an olive green to a yellow green, and then to a yellow brown in juveniles, generally. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether this color change is related to the difference in melanin expression. Melanin deposition levels were examined in the carapace, skin, eye and muscle of the three color-types using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Moreover, the full-length coding sequence (CDS) of red-eared slider turtle melanin biosynthesis regulatory genes TYR, TYRP1, MITF and SLC24A5 were cloned, sequenced and quantitatively analyzed. Both histological view of melanin deposition and quantitative real-time PCR test of melanin-regulated gene expressions showed that there are significant differences among different tissues of red-eared slider, but no significant difference among different color-types, indicating that melanin deposition is not associated with ontogenetic color change in the carapace of red-eared slider. This study initially explore the melanin deposition and the mRNA expression of melanin biosynthesis regulatory genes in red-eared slider, which serve as a foundation for further insight into the pigmentation patterns and the mechanism of body color change in turtles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Flux pinning mechanism and H{sub c2}-anisotropy in melanin doped bulk MgB{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabuddin Shah, M., E-mail: mshahabuddin@ksu.edu.sa; Shahabuddin, Mohammed; Alzayed, Nasser S.; Parakkandy, Jafar M.

    2014-06-15

    Highlights: • Melanin doping enhances superconducting properties of MgB{sub 2}. • Grain boundary pinning is the dominant pinning mechanism in melanin doped MgB{sub 2}. • Experimental J{sub c} data could be very closely fitted using Percolation model. • Anisotropy is reduced due to melanin doping resulting in increase in J{sub c} in high field. • Pinning force maximum is suppressed due to melanin doping. - Abstract: Flux pinning mechanism in melanin doped MgB{sub 2} superconductor has been studied using a scaling law proposed by Dew-Hughes and another method proposed by Eisterer. Our experimental data could be fitted very closely by the aforementioned scaling law. The fitting parameters, the positions of peaks b{sub peak} and k = b{sub peak}/b{sub n} confirm a grain-boundary pinning in the 10% melanin doped sample, while the undoped sample consists of mixed pinning. Furthermore, percolation theory was utilized under grain-boundary approximation to investigate the role of H{sub c2}-anisotropy in the critical current density, and its dependence on applied field as well as temperature. The H{sub c2}-anisotropy decreases with melanin doping resulting in the increase of J{sub c} in high field. There is suppression of flux pinning maximum due to melanin doping, which is found to be the main reason for the degradation of low-field J{sub c}.

  9. Journey From Black To Pink Gums: Management Of Melanin Induced Physiological Gingival Hyper Pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Huma; Shinwari, Muhammad Saad; Khan, Farhan Raza; Tanwir, Farzin

    2017-01-01

    Smile is an expression of happiness, self-confidence, kindness and beauty. Along with teeth and lips, gingiva is also a vital component of smile. Melanin induced gingival hyper pigmentation may appear un-aesthetic especially when it is associated with high smile line, upper anterior labial segment and is uneven in appearance. It affects individuals from all races. Generally, it is believed that melanin induced gingival hyper pigmentation is confined to individuals from dark races. But studies have shown that Iranian, Indian, Italian, Arabian, Greek. German, French, Japanese, Chinese, Jewish, Thai, Malaysian and other ethnic groups also display clinical gingival pigmentation.1 Gingival hyper pigmentation may result in psychological distress especially when the appearance is of utmost importance for the individuals. This article aims to focus on the physiology, clinical appearance and treatment options available for the melanin induced gingival hyper pigmentation along with the reported recurrence in the light of current literature.

  10. Phenolic melanin precursors provide a rational approach to the design of antitumor agents for melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimbow, K.; Miura, T.; Ito, S.; Ishikawa, K.

    1989-01-01

    A unique biological property of the melanocyte, melanin synthesis may permit a rational approach to design agents for better management of malignant melanoma. This in vivo and in vitro study examined the selective melanocytotoxicity and antimelanoma effects of phenolic compounds, cysteinylphenol (CP), cysteaminylphenol (CAP), and related compounds, and found (1) that both 4-S-CP and 4-S-CAP are melanin precursors, (2) that 4-S-CAP possesses a marked depigmenting potency with selective destruction of melanocytes in black follicles, and (3) a significant inhibition in the protein synthesis and tumor growth of B16 melanoma. Importantly, a whole body autoradiography indicated that these phenolic melanin precursors are selectively incorporated into melanoma tissues after i.p. administration.

  11. Skip areas of retained melanin: A clue to the histopathological diagnosis of idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Joshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biopsy findings in 55 cases of idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis (IGH are reported. Most cases had a flat epidermis with loss of the rete pattern and a thickened orthokeratotic basket weave stratum corneum. The epidermis had markedly decreased to absent melanin in the basal layer and reduced numbers of melanocytes at the dermoepidermal junction. One-third of patients had a sparse perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate, whereas the rest had no significant dermal inflammation. These findings are in concordance with current literature.However, small foci of retained melanin in the basal layer (skip areas alternating with larger areas of melanin loss were present in almost 80% of cases. This finding has not been reported earlier and appears to be quite specific to IGH and may be used as a clue to differentiate IGH from other similar conditions such as vitiligo and guttate morphea.

  12. Early diagnosis of melanotic melanoma based on laser-induced melanin fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Reinhold; Wessler, Gerd; Scholz, Matthias; Leupold, Dieter; Stankovic, Goran; Buder, Susanne; Stücker, Markus; Hoffmann, Klaus

    2009-05-01

    Because of the increasing incidence of skin cancer, interest in using the autofluorescence of skin tissue as a noninvasive tool for early diagnosis is enforced. Focus is especially on malignant melanotic melanoma. On the basis of a newly developed method to selectively excite melanin fluorescence of skin tissue by stepwise two-photon excitation with nanosecond laser pulses at 810 nm, we have investigated information from this melanin fluorescence with respect to the differentiation of pigmented lesions. A distinct difference in the melanin fluorescence spectrum of malignant melanoma (including melanoma in situ) when compared to that of benign melanocytic lesions (i.e., common nevi) has been found for freshly excised samples as well as for histopathological samples. There is also specific fluorescence from dysplastic nevi. In this way, early detection of malignant melanoma is possible.

  13. Analysis of the melanin distribution in different ethnic groups by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, C.; Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Astner, S.; Patzelt, A.; Zastrow, L.; Sterry, W.; Koch, S.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSM) is able to visualize differences in melanin content and distribution in different Skin Phototypes. The investigations were carried out on six healthy volunteers with Skin Phototypes II, IV, and VI. Representative skin samples of Skin Phototypes II, V, and VI were obtained for histological analysis from remaining tissue of skin grafts and were used for LSM-pathologic correlation. LSM evaluation showed significant differences in melanin distribution in Skin Phototypes II, IV, and VI, respectively. Based on the differences in overall reflectivity and image brightness, a visual evaluation scheme showed increasing brightness of the basal and suprabasal layers with increasing Skin Phototypes. The findings correlated well with histological analysis. The results demonstrate that LSM may serve as a promising adjunctive tool for real time assessment of melanin content and distribution in human skin, with numerous clinical applications and therapeutic and preventive implications.

  14. Melanin pigments in the melanocytic nevus regress spontaneously after inactivation by high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Michiharu; Morimoto, Naoki; Jinno, Chizuru; Mahara, Atsushi; Ogino, Shuichi; Suzuki, Shigehiko; Kusumoto, Kenji; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2017-01-01

    We report a novel treatment for giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMN) that involves the reuse of resected nevus tissue after high hydrostatic pressurization (HHP). However, the remaining melanin pigments in the inactivated nevus tissue pose a problem; therefore, we performed a long-term observation of the color change of inactivated nevus tissue after HHP. Pressurized nevus specimens (200 MPa group, n = 9) and non-pressurized nevus tissues (control group, n = 9) were subcutaneously implanted into nude mice (BALB/c-nu) and then harvested 3, 6, and 12 months later. Color changes of the nevus specimens were evaluated. In the 200 MPa group, the specimen color gradually regressed and turned white, and brightness values were significantly higher in the 200 MPa group than in the control group after 6 months. This indicated that melanin pigments in the pressurized nevus tissue had spontaneously degraded and regressed. Therefore, it is not necessary to remove melanin pigments in HHP-treated nevus tissue.

  15. Herbal medicines that benefit epidermal permeability barrier function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhi Hu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal permeability barrier function plays a critical role in regulating cutaneous functions. Hence, researchers have been searching for effective and affordable regimens to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function. In addition to topical stratum corneum lipids, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, and liver X receptor ligands, herbal medicines have been proven to benefit epidermal permeability barrier function in both normal and diseased skin, including atopic dermatitis, glucocorticoid-induced skin damage, and UVB-damaged skin. The potential mechanisms by which herbal medicines improve the permeability barrier include stimulation of epidermal differentiation, lipid production, antimicrobial peptide expression, and antioxidation. Therefore, utilization of herbal medicines could be a valuable alternative approach to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function in order to prevent and/or treat skin disorders associated with permeability barrier abnormalities.

  16. Effect of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and somatostatin on secretion of epidermal growth factor and bicarbonate from Brunner's glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1984-01-01

    The effect of VIP and somatostatin on secretion of epidermal growth factor and bicarbonate from Brunner's glands was investigated in the rat. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide infused in doses of 10 and 100 ng/kg/h significantly increased epidermal growth factor and bicarbonate output......, but the concentrations did not change. Somatostatin infused at doses of 1, 10, 100 and 1000 ng/kg/h against a background of VIP 100 ng/kg/h inhibited in dose-dependent fashion the stimulated epidermal growth factor and bicarbonate outputs from rat Brunner's gland pouches. Also basal secretion was inhibited...... growth factor and bicarbonate from Brunner's glands, an effect which is inhibited by somatostatin. A possible role for somatostatin in the control of Brunner's gland secretion is suggested....

  17. Prevention of melanin formation during aryl alcohol oxidase production under growth-limited conditions using an Aspergillus nidulans cell factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Planas, Oscar; Prade, Rolf A; Müller, Michael; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Wilkins, Mark R

    2017-11-01

    An Aspergillus nidulans cell factory was genetically engineered to produce an aryl alcohol oxidase (AAO). The cell factory initiated production of melanin when growth-limited conditions were established using stationary plates and shaken flasks. This phenomenon was more pronounced when the strain was cultured in a trickle bed reactor (TBR). This study investigated different approaches to reduce melanin formation in fungal mycelia and liquid medium in order to increase the enzyme production yield. Removal of copper from the medium recipe reduced melanin formation in agar cultures and increased enzyme activities by 48% in agitated liquid cultures. Copper has been reported as a key element for tyrosinase, an enzyme responsible for melanin production. Ascorbic acid (0.44g/L) stopped melanin accumulation, did not affect growth parameters and resulted in AAO activity that was more than two-fold greater than a control treatment with no ascorbic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidermal homeostasis in long-term scaffold-enforced skin equivalents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stark, Hans-Jürgen; Boehnke, Karsten; Mirancea, Nicolae; Willhauck, Michael J; Pavesio, Alessandra; Fusenig, Norbert E; Boukamp, Petra

    2006-01-01

    Epidermal homeostasis is understood as the maintenance of epidermal tissue structure and function by a fine tuned regulatory mechanism balancing proliferation and cell loss by desquamation and apoptosis...

  19. A novel S-sulfhydrated human serum albumin preparation suppresses melanin synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Ikeda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Products of ultraviolet (UV irradiation such as reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO stimulate melanin synthesis. Reactive sulfur species (RSS have been shown to have strong ROS and NO scavenging effects. However, the instability and low retention of RSS limit their use as inhibitors of melanin synthesis. The free thiol at Cys34 on human serum albumin (HSA is highly stable, has a long retention and possess a high reactivity for RSS. We report herein on the development of an HSA based RSS delivery system. Sulfane sulfur derivatives released from sodium polysulfides (Na2Sn react readily with HSA. An assay for estimating the elimination of sulfide from polysulfide showed that almost all of the sulfur released from Na2Sn bound to HSA. The Na2Sn-treated HSA was found to efficiently scavenge ROS and NO produced from chemical reagents. The Na2Sn-treated HSA was also found to inhibit melanin synthesis in B16 melanoma cells and this inhibition was independent of the number of added sulfur atoms. In B16 melanoma cells, the Na2Sn-treated HSA also inhibited the levels of ROS and NO induced by UV radiation. Finally, the Na2Sn-treated HSA inhibited melanin synthesis from L-DOPA and mushroom tyrosinase and suppressed the extent of aggregation of melanin pigments. These data suggest that Na2Sn-treated HSA inhibits tyrosinase activity for melanin synthesis via two pathways; by directly inhibiting ROS signaling and by scavenging NO. These findings indicate that Na2Sn-treated HSA has potential to be an attractive and effective candidate for use as a skin whitening agent. Keywords: Ultraviolet irradiation, Human serum albumin, Reactive sulfur species, Whitening agent, Oxidative stress

  20. Multivariate heredity of melanin-based coloration, body mass and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S-Y; Fargallo, J A; Vergara, P; Martínez-Padilla, J

    2013-08-01

    The genetic covariation among different traits may cause the appearance of correlated response to selection on multivariate phenotypes. Genes responsible for the expression of melanin-based color traits are also involved in other important physiological functions such as immunity and metabolism by pleiotropy, suggesting the possibility of multivariate evolution. However, little is known about the relationship between melanin coloration and these functions at the additive genetic level in wild vertebrates. From a multivariate perspective, we simultaneously explored inheritance and selection of melanin coloration, body mass and phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-mediated immune response by using long-term data over an 18-year period collected in a wild population of the common kestrel Falco tinnunculus. Pedigree-based quantitative genetic analyses showed negative genetic covariance between melanin-based coloration and body mass in male adults and positive genetic covariance between body mass and PHA-mediated immune response in fledglings as predicted by pleiotropic effects of melanocortin receptor activity. Multiple selection analyses showed an increased fitness in male adults with intermediate phenotypic values for melanin color and body mass. In male fledglings, there was evidence for a disruptive selection on rump gray color, but a stabilizing selection on PHA-mediated immune response. Our results provide an insight into the evolution of multivariate traits genetically related with melanin-based coloration. The differences in multivariate inheritance and selection between male and female kestrels might have resulted in sexual dimorphism in size and color. When pleiotropic effects are present, coloration can evolve through a complex pathway involving correlated response to selection on multivariate traits.

  1. Condition-dependence, pleiotropy and the handicap principle of sexual selection in melanin-based colouration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, Alexandre

    2016-05-01

    The signalling function of melanin-based colouration is debated. Sexual selection theory states that ornaments should be costly to produce, maintain, wear or display to signal quality honestly to potential mates or competitors. An increasing number of studies supports the hypothesis that the degree of melanism covaries with aspects of body condition (e.g. body mass or immunity), which has contributed to change the initial perception that melanin-based colour ornaments entail no costs. Indeed, the expression of many (but not all) melanin-based colour traits is weakly sensitive to the environment but strongly heritable suggesting that these colour traits are relatively cheap to produce and maintain, thus raising the question of how such colour traits could signal quality honestly. Here I review the production, maintenance and wearing/displaying costs that can generate a correlation between melanin-based colouration and body condition, and consider other evolutionary mechanisms that can also lead to covariation between colour and body condition. Because genes controlling melanic traits can affect numerous phenotypic traits, pleiotropy could also explain a linkage between body condition and colouration. Pleiotropy may result in differently coloured individuals signalling different aspects of quality that are maintained by frequency-dependent selection or local adaptation. Colouration may therefore not signal absolute quality to potential mates or competitors (e.g. dark males may not achieve a higher fitness than pale males); otherwise genetic variation would be rapidly depleted by directional selection. As a consequence, selection on heritable melanin-based colouration may not always be directional, but mate choice may be conditional to environmental conditions (i.e. context-dependent sexual selection). Despite the interest of evolutionary biologists in the adaptive value of melanin-based colouration, its actual role in sexual selection is still poorly understood.

  2. A novel S-sulfhydrated human serum albumin preparation suppresses melanin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Mayumi; Ishima, Yu; Kinoshita, Ryo; Chuang, Victor T G; Tasaka, Nanami; Matsuo, Nana; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Taro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2018-04-01

    Products of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) stimulate melanin synthesis. Reactive sulfur species (RSS) have been shown to have strong ROS and NO scavenging effects. However, the instability and low retention of RSS limit their use as inhibitors of melanin synthesis. The free thiol at Cys34 on human serum albumin (HSA) is highly stable, has a long retention and possess a high reactivity for RSS. We report herein on the development of an HSA based RSS delivery system. Sulfane sulfur derivatives released from sodium polysulfides (Na 2 S n ) react readily with HSA. An assay for estimating the elimination of sulfide from polysulfide showed that almost all of the sulfur released from Na 2 S n bound to HSA. The Na 2 S n -treated HSA was found to efficiently scavenge ROS and NO produced from chemical reagents. The Na 2 S n -treated HSA was also found to inhibit melanin synthesis in B16 melanoma cells and this inhibition was independent of the number of added sulfur atoms. In B16 melanoma cells, the Na 2 S n -treated HSA also inhibited the levels of ROS and NO induced by UV radiation. Finally, the Na 2 S n -treated HSA inhibited melanin synthesis from L-DOPA and mushroom tyrosinase and suppressed the extent of aggregation of melanin pigments. These data suggest that Na 2 S n -treated HSA inhibits tyrosinase activity for melanin synthesis via two pathways; by directly inhibiting ROS signaling and by scavenging NO. These findings indicate that Na 2 S n -treated HSA has potential to be an attractive and effective candidate for use as a skin whitening agent. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mutational analysis of leucine 47 in human epidermal growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunami, R K; Yette, M L; Stevens, A; Niyogi, S K

    1991-07-01

    Seven site-specific mutants (including changes to other hydrophobic, charged, and heterocyclic amino acids) of leucine 47 of human epidermal growth factor (EGF) were generated by protein engineering and characterized for their activity in three assays: radioreceptor competition binding in membrane fractions, the stimulation of the EGF receptor's tyrosine kinase activity, and the stimulation of thymidine uptake in tissue culture cells. K1/2 (concentration required for half maximum response) values for each of the mutants are reported in the three assays. The results show that the native leucine residue is quite important for EGF activity. Substitutions are tolerated to different degrees, depending upon hydrophobicity and size of the side chain. Substitution with ionic residues led to the most drastic reduction in activity. One-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, at physiological pH, of several of the mutants did not detect any major structural perturbations which would account for the loss of activity. The results suggest that the side chain of leucine 47, because of its charge neutrality, size, and hydrophobicity, is highly important, although not absolutely essential for the interaction of EGF with its receptor. A striking finding was the lower (compared with wild type) Vmax values of the mutants in the tyrosine kinase reaction, but these low Vmax mutants, in cell culture experiments, were able to stimulate at high concentrations a growth response equivalent to wild type EGF.

  4. Photon absorption in step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of Sepia melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; DiMarzio, Charles

    2013-02-01

    Previous research has shown that melanin goes through a step-wise three-photon absorption process when the fluorescence is activated with high laser intensity. We have conducted further research using even higher laser intensity for the activation, and have shown the possibility of observing power dependence other than third-order. This article discusses the possible energy states of Sepia melanin by studying the power dependence curves of the step-wise multi-photon activated fluorescence signal. Three different excitation channels are activated. Possible reasons causing the three channels are discussed.

  5. On the origin of electrical conductivity in the bio-electronic material melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardus Mostert, A.; Powell, Ben J.; Gentle, Ian R.; Meredith, Paul

    2012-02-01

    The skin pigment melanin is one of a few bio-macromolecules that display electrical and photo-conductivity in the solid-state. A model for melanin charge transport based on amorphous semiconductivity has been widely accepted for 40 years. In this letter, we show that a central pillar in support of this hypothesis, namely experimental agreement with a hydrated dielectric model, is an artefact related to measurement geometry and non-equilibrium behaviour. Our results cast significant doubt on the validity of the amorphous semiconductor model and are a reminder of the difficulties of electrical measurements on low conductivity, disordered organic materials.

  6. Simultaneous in vivo imaging of melanin and lipofuscin in the retina with multimodal photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hao F.; Zhou, Lixiang; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-02-01

    We combined photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) with autofluorescence imaging for simultaneous in vivo imaging of dual molecular contrasts in the retina using a single light source. The dual molecular contrasts come from melanin and lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Melanin and lipofuscin are two types of pigments and are believed to play opposite roles (protective vs. exacerbate) in the RPE in the aging process. We successfully imaged the retina of pigmented and albino rats at different ages. The experimental results showed that multimodal PAOM system can be a potentially powerful tool in the study of age-related degenerative retinal diseases.

  7. Protection of Melanized Cryptococcus neoformans from Lethal Dose Gamma Irradiation Involves Changes in Melanin's Chemical Structure and Paramagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajo, Abdelahad; Bryan, Ruth A.; Friedman, Matthew; Burger, Richard M.; Levitsky, Yan; Casadevall, Arturo; Magliozzo, Richard S.; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2011-01-01

    Certain fungi thrive in highly radioactive environments including the defunct Chernobyl nuclear reactor. Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans), which uses L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) to produce melanin, was used here to investigate how gamma radiation under aqueous aerobic conditions affects the properties of melanin, with the aim of gaining insight into its radioprotective role. Exposure of melanized fungal cell in aqueous suspensions to doses of γ-radiation capable of killing 50 to 80% of the cells did not lead to a detectable loss of melanin integrity according to EPR spectra of melanin radicals. Moreover, upon UV-visible (Xe-lamp) illumination of melanized cells, the increase in radical population was unchanged after γ-irradiation. Gamma-irradiation of frozen cell suspensions and storage of samples for several days at 77 K however, produced melanin modification noted by a reduced radical population and reduced photoresponse. More direct evidence for structural modification of melanin came from the detection of soluble products with absorbance maxima near 260 nm in supernatants collected after γ-irradiation of cells and cell-free melanin. These products, which include thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive aldehydes, were also generated by Fenton reagent treatment of cells and cell-free melanin. In an assay of melanin integrity based on the metal (Bi+3) binding capacity of cells, no detectable loss in binding was detected after γ-irradiation. Our results show that melanin in C. neoformans cells is susceptible to some damage by hydroxyl radical formed in lethal radioactive aqueous environments and serves a protective role in melanized fungi that involves sacrificial breakdown. PMID:21966422

  8. Protection of melanized Cryptococcus neoformans from lethal dose gamma irradiation involves changes in melanin's chemical structure and paramagnetism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelahad Khajo

    Full Text Available Certain fungi thrive in highly radioactive environments including the defunct Chernobyl nuclear reactor. Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans, which uses L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA to produce melanin, was used here to investigate how gamma radiation under aqueous aerobic conditions affects the properties of melanin, with the aim of gaining insight into its radioprotective role. Exposure of melanized fungal cell in aqueous suspensions to doses of γ-radiation capable of killing 50 to 80% of the cells did not lead to a detectable loss of melanin integrity according to EPR spectra of melanin radicals. Moreover, upon UV-visible (Xe-lamp illumination of melanized cells, the increase in radical population was unchanged after γ-irradiation. Gamma-irradiation of frozen cell suspensions and storage of samples for several days at 77 K however, produced melanin modification noted by a reduced radical population and reduced photoresponse. More direct evidence for structural modification of melanin came from the detection of soluble products with absorbance maxima near 260 nm in supernatants collected after γ-irradiation of cells and cell-free melanin. These products, which include thiobarbituric acid (TBA-reactive aldehydes, were also generated by Fenton reagent treatment of cells and cell-free melanin. In an assay of melanin integrity based on the metal (Bi(+3 binding capacity of cells, no detectable loss in binding was detected after γ-irradiation. Our results show that melanin in C. neoformans cells is susceptible to some damage by hydroxyl radical formed in lethal radioactive aqueous environments and serves a protective role in melanized fungi that involves sacrificial breakdown.

  9. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Is a Regulator of Epidermal Complement Component Expression and Complement Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Humaidan, Anas H A; Ananthoju, Nageshwar; Mohanty, Tirthankar

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is activated in response to tissue injury. During wound healing, complement activation seems beneficial in acute wounds but may be detrimental in chronic wounds. We found that the epidermal expression of many complement components was only increased to a minor extent in skin...... components in keratinocytes and epidermis following stimulation with proinflammatory cytokines. Importantly, EGFR inhibition of cultured keratinocytes either alone or in combination with proinflammatory stimulus promoted activation of the complement system after incubation with serum. In keratinocytes...... wounds in vivo and in cultured keratinocytes after exposure to supernatant from stimulated mononuclear cells. In contrast, the epidermal expression of complement components was downregulated in ex vivo injured skin lacking the stimulation from infiltrating inflammatory cells but with intact injury...

  10. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Caused by Amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celalettin Sever

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN is a severe skin reaction related to drugs and infections, characterized by fever, stomatitis and conjunctivitis. Many drug related TEN cases have been reported in literature but amoxicillin related TEN cases are rare. In this article, a case of amoxicillin related severe TEN in a female patient during treatment of tonsillitis has been reported. The increased use of amoxicillin, especially for control of infection, may be the reason for the increased incidence TEN due to the same drug. The identification of a drug as the cause for the immune related cytotoxic reaction may be difficult if the molecule is not generally known to be a classical cause of this reaction.

  11. Micropatterned dermal-epidermal regeneration matrices create functional niches that enhance epidermal morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Amanda L; Moutinho, Thomas J; Pins, George D

    2013-12-01

    Although tissue engineered skin substitutes have demonstrated some clinical success for the treatment of chronic wounds such as diabetic and venous ulcers, persistent graft take and stability remain concerns. Current bilayered skin substitutes lack the characteristic microtopography of the dermal-epidermal junction that gives skin enhanced mechanical stability and creates cellular microniches that differentially promote keratinocyte function to form skin appendages and enhance wound healing. We developed a novel micropatterned dermal-epidermal regeneration matrix (μDERM) which incorporates this complex topography and substantially enhances epidermal morphology. Here, we describe the use of this three-dimensional (3-D) in vitro culture model to systematically evaluate different topographical geometries and to determine their relationship to keratinocyte function. We identified three distinct keratinocyte functional niches: the proliferative niche (narrow geometries), the basement membrane protein synthesis niche (wide geometries) and the putative keratinocyte stem cell niche (narrow geometries and corners). Specifically, epidermal thickness and keratinocyte proliferation is significantly (p<0.05) increased in 50 and 100 μm channels while laminin-332 deposition is significantly (p<0.05) increased in 400 μm channels compared to flat controls. Additionally, β1(bri)p63(+) keratinocytes, putative keratinocyte stem cells, preferentially cluster in channel geometries (similar to clustering observed in native skin) compared to a random distribution on flats. This study identifies specific target geometries to enhance skin regeneration and graft performance. Furthermore, these results suggest the importance of μDERM microtopography in designing the next generation of skin substitutes. Finally, we anticipate that 3-D organotypic cultures on μDERMS will provide a novel tissue engineered skin substitute for in vitro investigations of skin morphogenesis, wound healing and

  12. Biochemical effects of the flavanol-rich lychee fruit extract on the melanin biosynthesis and reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Kazuya; Okura, Masae; Sumikawa, Yasuyuki; Hida, Tokimasa; Kuno, Atsushi; Horio, Yoshiyuki; Yamashita, Toshiharu

    2016-10-01

    An ingredient of fruit polyphenol, resveratrol, is known to have an inhibitory effect on melanogenesis. In order to examine the functional differences between resveratrol and other fruit polyphenols, we compared biochemical effects of a resveratrol-free polyphenol, flavanol-rich lychee fruit extract (FRLFE), with other phenolic compounds including resveratrol. FRLFE as well as hydroquinone and resveratrol suppressed growth of B16F1 melanoma cells more significantly than rhododendrol or arbutin. Resveratrol suppressed mushroom tyrosinase at the lowest concentration (23.0 μmol/L) among the compounds tested. FRLFE and hydroquinone suppressed tyrosinase at almost the same concentration (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50 ], 83.5 and 94.6 μmol/L, respectively), which was higher than rhododendrol, ascorbic acid and arbutin (IC50 , 245, 345 and 421 μmol/L, respectively). Western blot analysis revealed that although resveratrol decreased expressions of tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein 1, FRLFE did not affect their expressions. Both FRLFE and resveratrol suppressed antimycin A-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in melanocytic cells. Resveratrol-mediated ROS suppression was inhibited by nicotinamide, a SIRT1 inhibitor. However, FRLFE-mediated suppression was not affected by nicotinamide. Moreover, FRLFE directly decreased superoxide in vitro, as detected by superoxide dismutase-like scavenging activity assay. These results suggest that FRLFE can protect melanocytes from cytotoxicity caused by an excess amount of melanin and ROS in a different manner from resveratrol. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  13. LASER BIOLOGY: Visualisation of the distributions of melanin and indocyanine green in biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genina, E. A.; Fedosov, I. V.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Zimnyakov, D. A.; Altshuler, G. B.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2008-03-01

    A double-wavelength laser scanning microphotometer with the high spectral and spatial resolutions is developed for studying the distribution of endogenic and exogenic dyes in biological tissues. Samples of hair and skin biopsy with hair follicles stained with indocyanine green are studied. The spatial distribution of indocyanine green and melanin in the biological tissue is determined from the measured optical transmittance.

  14. Near-infrared autofluorescence imaging of cutaneous melanins and human skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan

    2009-03-01

    In recent years, near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence imaging has been explored as a novel technique for tissue evaluation and diagnosis. We present an NIR fluorescence imaging system optimized for the dermatologic clinical setting, with particular utility for the direct characterization of cutaneous melanins in vivo. A 785-nm diode laser is coupled into a ring light guide to uniformly illuminate the skin. A bandpass filter is used to purify the laser light for fluorescence excitation, while a long-pass filter is used to block the main laser wavelength but pass the spontaneous components for NIR reflectance imaging. A computer-controlled filter holder is used to switch these two filters to select between reflectance and fluorescence imaging modes. Both the reflectance and fluorescence photons are collected by an NIR-sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to form the respective images. Preliminary results show that cutaneous melanin in pigmented skin disorders emits higher NIR autofluorescence than surrounding normal tissue. This confirmed our previous findings from NIR fluorescence spectroscopy study of cutaneous melanins and provides a new approach to directly image the distributions of cutaneous melanins in the skin. In-vivo NIR autofluorescence images may be useful for clinical evaluation and diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions, including melanoma.

  15. Dual-wavelength pump-probe microscopy analysis of melanin composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew; Robles, Francisco E.; Wilson, Jesse W.; Deb, Sanghamitra; Calderbank, Robert; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-11-01

    Pump-probe microscopy is an emerging technique that provides detailed chemical information of absorbers with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. Recent work has shown that the pump-probe signals from melanin in human skin cancers correlate well with clinical concern, but it has been difficult to infer the molecular origins of these differences. Here we develop a mathematical framework to describe the pump-probe dynamics of melanin in human pigmented tissue samples, which treats the ensemble of individual chromophores that make up melanin as Gaussian absorbers with bandwidth related via Frenkel excitons. Thus, observed signals result from an interplay between the spectral bandwidths of the individual underlying chromophores and spectral proximity of the pump and probe wavelengths. The model is tested using a dual-wavelength pump-probe approach and a novel signal processing method based on gnomonic projections. Results show signals can be described by a single linear transition path with different rates of progress for different individual pump-probe wavelength pairs. Moreover, the combined dual-wavelength data shows a nonlinear transition that supports our mathematical framework and the excitonic model to describe the optical properties of melanin. The novel gnomonic projection analysis can also be an attractive generic tool for analyzing mixing paths in biomolecular and analytical chemistry.

  16. Mapping of Id locus for dermal shank melanin in a Chinese ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mapping of Id locus for dermal shank melanin in a Chinese indigenous chicken breed ... Agro-Animal Genomics and Molecular Breeding, and Key Lab of Chicken Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction, Ministry of Agriculture, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, Guangdong, People's Republic of China ...

  17. Inhibition of melanin production by a combination of Siberian larch and pomegranate fruit extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwakar, Ganesh; Rana, Jatinder; Scholten, Jeffrey D

    2012-09-01

    In an effort to find botanicals containing polyphenolic compounds with the capacity to inhibit melanin biosynthesis, we identified a novel combination of Siberian larch (Larix sibirica) extract, standardized to 80% taxifolin, and pomegranate fruit (Punica granatum) extract, containing 20% punicalagins, that demonstrates a synergistic reduction of melanin biosynthesis in Melan-a cells. The combination of Siberian larch and pomegranate extracts (1:1) produced a 2-fold reduction in melanin content compared to Siberian larch or pomegranate extracts alone with no corresponding effect on cell viability. Siberian larch and pomegranate fruit extracts inhibited expression of melanocyte specific genes, tyrosinase (Tyr), microphthalmia transcription factor (Mitf), and melanosome structural proteins (Pmel17 and Mart1) but did not inhibit tyrosinase enzyme activity. These results suggest that the mechanism of inhibition of melanin biosynthesis by Siberian larch and pomegranate extracts, alone and in combination, is through downregulation of melanocyte specific genes and not due to inhibition of tyrosinase enzyme activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Aspergillus fumigatus melanins: Interference with the host endocytosis pathway and impact on virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten eHeinekamp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus produces at least two types of melanin, namely pyomelanin and dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN melanin. Pyomelanin is produced during tyrosine catabolism via accumulation of homogentisic acid. Although pyomelanin protects the fungus against reactive oxygen species and acts as a defense compound in response to cell wall stress, mutants deficient for pyomelanin biosynthesis do not differ in virulence when tested in a murine infection model for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. DHN melanin is responsible for the characteristic grey-greenish color of A. fumigatus conidia. Mutants lacking a functional polyketide synthase PksP, the enzyme responsible for the initial step in DHN-melanin formation, i.e., the synthesis of naphthopyrone, produce white spores and are attenuated in virulence. The activity of PksP was found to be essential not only for inhibition of apoptosis of phagocytes by interfering with the host PI3K/Akt signaling cascade but also for effective inhibition of acidification of conidia-containing phagolysosomes. These features allow A. fumigatus to survive in phagocytes and thereby to escape from human immune effector cells and to become a successful pathogen.

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Map the locus of Id for dermal shank melanin ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-03-24

    Mar 24, 2017 ... Unfortunately, we do not know currently which gene is responsible for the trait of dermal shank melanin. Gushi chicken, a famous indigenous chicken breed in China, has four types of shank skin color (white, yellow, green and slate) (Figure 1). The green and slate shank skin colors are controlled by id locus ...

  20. Tlr2, Tjp1 genes expression during wound healing dynamics – with melanin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dranitsina Alevtina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is the complex and dynamic process of replacing devitalized and missing cellular structures and tissue layers. We have previously shown that melanin, herein, produced by the Antarctic black yeast fungi Pseudonadsoniella brunea (Nadsoniella nigra sp. X-1, has expressed a cyto-protective effect, promoted rapid wound healing of various ethiology and can be offered as a new dermatropic drug. The current study was conducted on a rat model of purulent necrotic wound. In each model, one group was a control, while in the others, wound healing occurred without drug application or with administration of 0,5% carbopol or with both 0,5% carbopol and 0,1% melanin. The pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance in skin gomogenate in dynamics on 3, 6, 9, 14 and day of full epithelization was estimated using the spectrophotometric biochemical method. Moreover, so as to understand the role played by the Tlr2 and Tjp1 in the process of wound healing and scar formation, Tlr2, Tjp1gene expression and genetic mRNA was determined with quantitative RT-PCR. The application of our pharmacological composition stimulated the decrease of Tlr2 and Tjp1 gene expression against the background of suppression of free radical processes (reduction of superoxide anion radical content with epithelization and without scarring. The results of this study have shown the positive effects of melanin on wound healing. The obtained results indicate the advisability of applying melanin for the treatment of inflammatory processes.

  1. Effectiveness of Er:YAG and CO2 lasers in the management of gingival melanin hyperpigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, A; Kathariya, R; Deshmukh, V; Vaze, S; Khalia, N; Dandgaval, R

    2014-06-01

    Although clinical melanin pigmentation does not present itself as a medical problem or a disease entity, "black gums" is a major esthetic complaint for many people, who often requests cosmetic corrections. Gingival depigmentation can be carried out using many procedures; lasers of various types being a new addition. This study was undertaken to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers for the treatment of gingival melanin hyper pigmentation. Twenty young age and gender matched subjects were selected for a randomized split mouth depigmentation procedure using Er:YAG (Group A) and CO2 laser (Group B). Parameters evaluated were: Dummet index, Hedin melanin Index, Gingival and Plaque Index, time taken for the procedure, bleeding during the procedure, VAS scale for pain perception and wound healing and patient preference for the procedure. Wilcoxon signed rank test, Chi-square test, paired t test were used to analyze statistical significance between different variables. CO2 laser treatment caused increased pain and delayed wound healing when compared to Er:YAG laser treatment. Although both treatment modalities are highly effective depigmentation procedures, giving excellent esthetics results; when pain, wound healing and patient preferences were considered Er:YAG outscored CO2 Laser. The effectiveness of the Er:YAG and CO2 laser for the treatment of gingival melanin depigmentation was evaluated clinically and histologically, although both treatment modalities are highly effective, giving excellent esthetics results, however, when pain and wound healing were considered Er:YAG was better than CO2 laser.

  2. Using size exclusion chromatography to monitor the synthesis of melanins from catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Koen P; Clark, Astiney M; Bello, Paola A F; Alhumaidi, Majidah

    2017-09-01

    We have employed size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to the study of the auto- and Cu 2+ -mediated oxidation of the catecholamines, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine, into melanins. We observed that, due to non-size exclusion-mediated effects, the catecholamines and some of the low molecular mass intermediates generated during the oxidation reactions, could be resolved from each other and from the high molecular mass pigment generated. Thus, SEC allowed us to monitor the disappearance of the catecholamine starting compounds, the appearance and subsequent disappearance of the low molecular mass chromophores generated in the initial phase of the reactions and the appearance of the high molecular mass melanins. In the process of this research, we observed that many, mostly anionic polysaccharides (PS), enhanced both the auto- and Cu 2+ -mediated oxidation of all three catecholamines. SEC analyses of reaction mixtures involving PS suggested that very high molecular mass aggregates between PS and melanins can be generated. In addition, SEC analysis allowed us to verify the efficiency of the dialysis purification process employed to obtain pure and dried melanin materials for cell-biological studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Melanin-independent accumulation of turgor pressure in appressoria of Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Science.gov (United States)

    In some plant pathogenic fungi, turgor pressure accumulation in appressoria produces a mechanical force enabling the direct penetration of hyphae through the plant cell epidermis. Melanin has been reported to function as an impermeable barrier to osmolytes, which allow appressoria to accumulate high...

  4. Melanin-related metabolites as markers of the skin pigmentary system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, W.; Pavel, S.; Kammeyer, A.; Beusenberg, F. D.; Cormane, R.

    1987-01-01

    Three different groups of chemical intermediates are known to be formed during the synthesis of melanin in melanocytes: phenolic compounds, phenolic thio-conjugates, and indolic compounds. All these substances and their metabolites can be detected in urine. We measured the urinary excretion of

  5. Combined effects of Cu and UVR on survival and melanin synthesis in Chironomus riparius larvae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baat, M.L.; van Gemert, M.; Verweij, R.A.; Loayza Muro, R.A.; Kraak, M.H.S.

    2012-01-01

    The tropical Andes encompass vast areas with altitudes above 4000 m, where the combination of high UV radiation and metal pollution creates environments that challenge the survival and persistence of aquatic life. Since the pigment melanin counteracts the negative effects of UVR, and has the

  6. Melanin Bleaching With Warm Hydrogen Peroxide and Integrated Immunohistochemical Analysis: An Automated Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Hsing; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Min-Jan; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Tsai, Kun-Bow

    2018-02-01

    Diagnosing melanocytic lesions is among the most challenging problems in the practice of pathology. The difficulty of physically masking melanin pigment and the similarity of its color to commonly used chromogens often complicate examination of the cytomorphology and immunohistochemical staining results for tumor cells. Melanin bleach can be very helpful for histopathological diagnosis of heavily pigmented melanocytic lesions. Although various depigmentation methods have been reported, no standardized methods have been developed. This study developed a fully automated platform that incorporates hydrogen peroxide-based melanin depigmentation in an automated immunohistochemical analysis. The utility of the method was tested in 1 cell block of malignant melanoma cells in pleural effusion, 10 ocular melanoma tissue samples, and 10 cutaneous melanoma tissue samples. Our results demonstrated that the proposed method, which can be performed in only 3 hours, effectively preserves cell cytomorphology and immunoreactivity. The method is particularly effective for removing melanin pigment to facilitate histopathological examination of cytomorphology and for obtaining an unmasked tissue section for immunohistochemical analysis.

  7. Neural Stem Cells and Its Derivatives as a New Material for Melanin Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Insik; Hong, Sunghoi

    2017-12-22

    The pigment molecule, melanin, is produced from melanosomes of melanocytes through melanogenesis, which is a complex process involving a combination of chemical and enzymatically catalyzed reactions. The synthesis of melanin is primarily influenced by tyrosinase (TYR), which has attracted interest as a target molecule for the regulation of pigmentation or depigmentation in skin. Thus, direct inhibitors of TYR activity have been sought from various natural and synthetic materials. However, due to issues with these inhibitors, such as weak or permanent ability for depigmentation, allergy, irritant dermatitis and rapid oxidation, in vitro and in vivo, the development of new materials that inhibit melanin production is essential. A conditioned medium (CM) derived from stem cells contains many cell-secreted factors, such as cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and extracellular vesicles including exosomes. In addition, the secreted factors could negatively regulate melanin production through stimulation of a microenvironment of skin tissue in a paracrine manner, which allows the neural stem cell CM to be explored as a new material for skin depigmentation. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge regulating depigmentation, and discuss the potential of neural stem cells and their derivatives, as a new material for skin depigmentation.

  8. High refractive index of melanin in shiny occipital feathers of a bird of paradise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, Doekele G.; Leertouwer, Heinrich; Osorio, Daniel C.; Wilts, Bodo D.

    Male Lawes's Parotia, a bird of paradise, use the highly directional reflection of the structurally colored, brilliant-silvery occipital feathers in their courtship display. As in other birds, the structural coloration is produced by ordered melanin pigmentation. The barbules of the Parotia's

  9. Technological Desition of Extraction of Melanin from the Waste of Production of Sunflower-Seed Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartushina, Yu N.; Nefedieva, E. E.; Sevriukova, G. A.; Gracheva, N. V.; Zheltobryukhov, V. F.

    2017-05-01

    The research was realized in the field of the technology for re-use of waste of sunflower-seed oil production. A technological scheme of production of melanin from sunflower husk as a waste was developed. Re-cycling will give the opportunity to reduce the amount of waste and to obtain an additional source of income.

  10. Melanin-based color of plumage: role of condition and of feathers' microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alba, Liliana; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Spencer, Karen A.; Heidinger, Britt J.; Gill, Lisa; Evans, Neil P.; Monaghan, Pat; Handel, Colleen M.; Shawkey, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Whether melanin-based colors honestly signal a bird's condition during the growth of feathers is controversial, and it is unclear if or how the physiological processes underlying melanogenesis or color-imparting structural feather microstructure may be adversely affected by condition. Here we report results from two experiments designed to measure the effect of condition on expression of eumelanic and pheomelanic coloration in black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) and zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), respectively. In chickadees, we compared feathers of birds affected and unaffected by avian keratin disorder, while in zebra finches we compared feathers of controls with feathers of those subjected to an unpredictable food supply during development. In both cases we found that control birds had brighter feathers (higher total reflectance) and more barbules, but similar densities of melanosomes. In addition, the microstructure of the feathers explained variation in color more strongly than did melanosome density. Together, these results suggest that melanin-based coloration may in part be condition-dependent, but that this may be driven by changes in keratin and feather development, rather than melanogenesis itself. Researchers should be cautious when assigning variation in melanin-based color to melanin alone and microstructure of the feather should be taken into account.

  11. Mechanistic insights into the bleaching of melanin by alkaline hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R A W; Garrett, B; Naqvi, K R; Fülöp, A; Godfrey, S P; Marsh, J M; Chechik, V

    2017-07-01

    This work aims to determine the roles of reactive oxygen species HO∙ and HO 2 - in the bleaching of melanins by alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Experiments using melanosomes isolated from human hair indicated that the HO∙ radical generated in the outside solution does not contribute significantly to bleaching. However, studies using soluble Sepia melanin demonstrated that both HO 2 - and HO∙ will individually bleach melanin. Additionally, when both oxidants are present, bleaching is increased dramatically in both rate and extent. Careful experimental design enabled the separation of the roles and effects of these key reactive species, HO∙ and HO 2 - . Rationalisation of the results presented, and review of previous literature, allowed the postulation of a simplified general scheme whereby the strong oxidant HO∙ is able to pre-oxidise melanin units to o-quinones enabling more facile ring opening by the more nucleophilic HO 2 - . In this manner the efficiency of the roles of both species is maximised. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mapping of Id locus for dermal shank melanin in a Chinese ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JIGUO XU

    2017-12-08

    Dec 8, 2017 ... yellow shank were obtained from Sangao Agriculture and. Animal Husbandry Limited by Share, Henan, China and were selected to fine-map the Id locus for the dermal shank melanin. At 52 weeks of age, 1 mL blood samples were with- drawn from all the chickens (192 birds) through the wing veins into the ...

  13. Surface structure characterization of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia mutated in the melanin synthesis pathway and their human cellular immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Beaussart, Audrey; Dufrêne, Yves F; Sharma, Meenu; Bansal, Kushagra; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Brakhage, Axel A; Kaveri, Srini V; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Beauvais, Anne

    2014-08-01

    In Aspergillus fumigatus, the conidial surface contains dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin. Six-clustered gene products have been identified that mediate sequential catalysis of DHN-melanin biosynthesis. Melanin thus produced is known to be a virulence factor, protecting the fungus from the host defense mechanisms. In the present study, individual deletion of the genes involved in the initial three steps of melanin biosynthesis resulted in an altered conidial surface with masked surface rodlet layer, leaky cell wall allowing the deposition of proteins on the cell surface and exposing the otherwise-masked cell wall polysaccharides at the surface. Melanin as such was immunologically inert; however, deletion mutant conidia with modified surfaces could activate human dendritic cells and the subsequent cytokine production in contrast to the wild-type conidia. Cell surface defects were rectified in the conidia mutated in downstream melanin biosynthetic pathway, and maximum immune inertness was observed upon synthesis of vermelone onward. These observations suggest that although melanin as such is an immunologically inert material, it confers virulence by facilitating proper formation of the A. fumigatus conidial surface. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Insulin-sensitizing and beneficial lipid-metabolic effects of the water-soluble melanin complex extracted from Inonotus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Han; Hyun, Chang-Kee

    2014-09-01

    Inonotus obliquus has been traditionally used for treatment of metabolic diseases; however, the mechanism remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that the water-soluble melanin complex extracted from I. obliquus improved insulin sensitivity and reduced adiposity in high fat (HF)-fed obese mice. When the melanin complex was treated to 3T3-L1 adipocytes, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was increased significantly, and its phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent action was proven with wortmannin treatment. Additionally, dose-dependent increases in Akt phosphorylation and glucose transporter 4 translocation into the plasma membrane were observed in melanin complex-treated cells. Adiponectin gene expression in 3T3-L1 cells incubated with melanin complex increased which was corroborated by increased AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in HepG2 and C2C12 cells treated with conditioned media from the 3T3-L1 culture. Melanin complex-treated 3T3-L1 cells showed no significant change in expression of several lipogenic genes, whereas enhanced expressions of fatty acid oxidative genes were observed. Similarly, the epididymal adipose tissue of melanin complex-treated HF-fed mice had higher expression of fatty acid oxidative genes without significant change in lipogenic gene expression. Together, these results suggest that the water-soluble melanin complex of I. obliquus exerts antihyperglycemic and beneficial lipid-metabolic effects, making it a candidate for promising antidiabetic agent. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Melanin is required for the formation of the multi-cellular conidia in the endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis microspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xi; Huo, Liang; Liu, Heng; Chen, Longfei; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Xudong

    2015-10-01

    Melanin plays an important role in regulating various biological processes in many fungi. However, its biological role in conidiation remains largely elusive. We report here that conidia production, morphogenesis, integrity, germination and their viability in Pestalotiopsis microspora require the polyketide-derived melanin. A polyketide synthase gene, pks1, was identified and demonstrated responsible for melanin biosynthesis in this fungus. A targeted deletion mutant strain Δpks1 displayed a defect in pigmentation of conidia and had an albino colonial phenotype. Interestingly, Δpks1 produced approximately 6-fold as many conidia as the wild type did, suggesting a negative modulation of melanin on conidia production in this fungus. Moreover, the conidia failed to develop into the normal five-cell morphology, rather the three main-body cells separated via constriction at the original septum position to generate three independent mutant conidia. This result suggests a novel role of melanin in the formation of the multi-cellular conidia. Germ tubes could develop from the three different types of mutant conidia and kept elongating, despite a significantly lower germination rate was observed for them. Still more, the unpigmented conidia became permeable to Calcofluor White and DAPI, suggesting the integrity of the conidia was impaired. Deliberate inhibition of melanin biosynthesis by a specific inhibitor, tricyclazole, led to a similar phenotypes. This work demonstrates a new function of fungal melanin in conidial development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. GAMMA RADIATION INTERACTS WITH MELANIN TO ALTER ITS OXIDATION-REDUCTION POTENTIAL AND RESULTS IN ELECTRIC CURRENT PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C.; Ekechukwu, A.; Milliken, C.

    2011-05-17

    The presence of melanin pigments in organisms is implicated in radioprotection and in some cases, enhanced growth in the presence of high levels of ionizing radiation. An understanding of this phenomenon will be useful in the design of radioprotective materials. However, the protective mechanism of microbial melanin in ionizing radiation fields has not yet been elucidated. Here we demonstrate through the electrochemical techniques of chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and cyclic voltammetry that microbial melanin is continuously oxidized in the presence of gamma radiation. Our findings establish that ionizing radiation interacts with melanin to alter its oxidation-reduction potential. Sustained oxidation resulted in electric current production and was most pronounced in the presence of a reductant, which extended the redox cycling capacity of melanin. This work is the first to establish that gamma radiation alters the oxidation-reduction behavior of melanin, resulting in electric current production. The significance of the work is that it provides the first step in understanding the initial interactions between melanin and ionizing radiation taking place and offers some insight for production of biomimetic radioprotective materials.

  17. An alternative method for the analysis of melanin production in Cryptococcus neoformans sensu lato and Cryptococcus gattii sensu lato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilhante, Raimunda S N; España, Jaime D A; de Alencar, Lucas P; Pereira, Vandbergue S; Castelo-Branco, Débora de S C M; Pereira-Neto, Waldemiro de A; Cordeiro, Rossana de A; Sidrim, José J C; Rocha, Marcos F G

    2017-10-01

    Melanin is an important virulence factor for several microorganisms, including Cryptococcus neoformans sensu lato and Cryptococcus gattii sensu lato, thus, the assessment of melanin production and its quantification may contribute to the understanding of microbial pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to standardise an alternative method for the production and indirect quantification of melanin in C. neoformans sensu lato and C. gattii sensu lato. Eight C. neoformans sensu lato and three C. gattii sensu lato, identified through URA5 methodology, Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019 (negative control) and one Hortaea werneckii (positive control) were inoculated on minimal medium agar with or without L-DOPA, in duplicate, and incubated at 35°C, for 7 days. Pictures were taken from the third to the seventh day, under standardised conditions in a photographic chamber. Then, photographs were analysed using grayscale images. All Cryptococcus spp. strains produced melanin after growth on minimal medium agar containing L-DOPA. C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019 did not produce melanin on medium containing L-DOPA, while H. werneckii presented the strongest pigmentation. This new method allows the indirect analysis of melanin production through pixel quantification in grayscale images, enabling the study of substances that can modulate melanin production. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Dietary modification of UV-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, A O; McCann, V; Black, H S

    1980-11-01

    The effect of several dietary antioxidant supplements upon ultraviolet light-induced ornithine decarboxylase activity was determined. Hairless mice received diets supplemented with either butylated hydroxytoluene, disulfiram, phenobarbital, glutathione (reduced), or a special antioxidant mixture for 2 weeks before irradiation with FS-20 fluorescent sun lamps. Epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity, the induction of which is thought to be a necessary component of skin tumor promotion, was determined at designated post-irradiation periods. Significant inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase induction was found in epidermis from animals receiving diets containing butylated hydroxytoluene, the antioxidant mixture, or disulfiram whereas no significant effects were noted in animals receiving reduced glutathione or phenobarbital. Butylated hydroxytoluene, at physiological concentrations, had no effect upon ornithine decarboxylase activity when added directly to the reaction mixture. Nor did this compound, when provided in the diet of animals, evoke a notable effect upon 12-0-tetra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate induced ornithine decarboxylase. The latter finding suggests that dietary butylated hydroxytoluene inhibition of ultraviolet light-induced ornithine decarboxylase is a response related directly to the degree of irradation insult rather than a general effect upon the processes associated with carcinogenic promotion.

  19. Randomised comparison of thalidomide versus placebo in toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkenstein, P; Latarjet, J; Roujeau, J C; Duguet, C; Boudeau, S; Vaillant, L; Maignan, M; Schuhmacher, M H; Milpied, B; Pilorget, A; Bocquet, H; Brun-Buisson, C; Revuz, J

    1998-11-14

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is associated with a 30% death rate. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of TEN. Thalidomide is a potent inhibitor of TNF-alpha action. We did a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study of thalidomide in TEN. The patients received a 5-day course of thalidomide 400 mg daily or placebo. The main endpoint was the progression of skin detachment after day 7. Secondary endpoints were the severity of the disease, evaluated with the simplified acute physiology score (SAPS), and the mortality. TNF-alpha and interleukin 6 were measured. The study was stopped because there was excess mortality in the thalidomide group--ten of 12 patients died compared with three of ten in the placebo group (Fisher's exact test with Katz's approximation, relative risk=2.78, p=0.03). After adjustment for SAPS, mortality remained significantly higher in the thalidomide group than in the placebo group (exact logistic regression mid-p=0.007; 95% CI for odds ratio 2.7 to infinity). Plasma TNF-alpha concentration was higher in the thalidomide group than the placebo group on day 2, though the difference was not significant (Wilcoxon rank-sum test p=0.07). Even though few patients were included, our data suggest that thalidomide is detrimental in TEN, possibly because of a paradoxical enhancement of TNF-alpha production.

  20. Re-evaluation of melanin bleaching using warm diluted hydrogen peroxide for histopathological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Masanobu; Ota, Hiroyoshi; Hayama, Masayoshi

    2011-06-01

    Excessive amounts of melanin pigments may hamper histopathological assessments of melanocytic lesions by obscuring cellular morphology and hindering antibody-antigen interactions. To determine the optimal melanin-bleaching conditions for histopathological examination, heavily pigmented melanomas were treated with warm hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) diluted with various diluents (1% disodium hydrogen phosphate 12H2O (Na2 HPO4); phosphate buffer 0.05 M, pH 7.4 (PB); and PBS 0.05 M, pH 7.4) at varying temperatures (50°C, 55°C, and 60°C) and for varying incubation times (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 h). The effect of the sequential order of antigen retrieval and bleaching on preserving tissue morphology was then evaluated. Additionally, the effect of melanin bleaching using warm diluted H2O2 on the antigenicity of melanoma-related markers (HMB-45, MART-1, and S-100) and other markers used for histopathology was examined in amelanotic melanomas and tonsil tissue. Optimal and complete bleaching was achieved using warm 3% H2O2 in PB treatment at 55°C for 2 h following antigen retrieval with microwaving or digestion with trypsin. Under these conditions, the tissue morphology and antigenicity of various immunohistochemical markers were also well preserved. Bleaching with warm 3% H2O2 PB is a fast and efficient method of bleaching melanin pigments and performing immunohistochemical examination in heavily melanin-pigmented lesions. © 2011 The Authors. Pathology International © 2011 Japanese Society of Pathology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.