WorldWideScience

Sample records for epidemiology pathophysiology treatment

  1. Poststroke aphasia : epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, Marcelo L

    2005-01-01

    Aphasia, the loss or impairment of language caused by brain damage, is one of the most devastating cognitive impairments of stroke. Aphasia is present in 21-38% of acute stroke patients and is associated with high short- and long-term morbidity, mortality and expenditure. Recovery from aphasia is possible even in severe cases. While speech-language therapy remains the mainstay treatment of aphasia, the effectiveness of conventional therapies has not been conclusively proved. This has motivated attempts to integrate knowledge from several domains in an effort to plan more rational therapies and to introduce other therapeutic strategies, including the use of intensive language therapy and pharmacological agents. Several placebo-controlled trials suggest that piracetam is effective in recovery from aphasia when started soon after the stroke, but its efficacy vanishes in patients with chronic aphasia. Drugs acting on catecholamine systems (bromocriptine, dexamfetamine) have shown varying degrees of efficacy in case series, open-label studies and placebo-controlled trials. Bromocriptine is useful in acute and chronic aphasias, but its beneficial action appears restricted to nonfluent aphasias with reduced initiation of spontaneous verbal messages. Dexamfetamine improves language function in subacute aphasia and the beneficial effect is maintained in the long term, but its use is restricted to highly selected samples. Pharmacological agents operating on the cholinergic system (e.g. donepezil) have shown promise. Data from single-case studies, case series and an open-label study suggest that donepezil may have beneficial effects on chronic poststroke aphasia. Preliminary evidence suggests that donepezil is well tolerated and its efficacy is maintained in the long term. Randomised controlled trials of donepezil and other cholinergic agents in poststroke aphasia are warranted.

  2. Gender Differences in Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Treatment of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giosia, Paolo; Giorgini, Paolo; Stamerra, Cosimo Andrea; Petrarca, Marco; Ferri, Claudio; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2018-02-14

    This review aims to examine gender differences in both the epidemiology and pathophysiology of hypertension and to explore gender peculiarities on the effects of antihypertensive agents in decreasing BP and CV events. Men and women differ in prevalence, awareness, and control rate of hypertension in an age-dependent manner. Studies suggest that sex hormones changes play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of hypertension in postmenopausal women. Estrogens influence the vascular system inducing vasodilatation, inhibiting vascular remodeling processes, and modulating the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system and the sympathetic system. This leads to a protective effect on arterial stiffness during reproductive age that is dramatically reversed after menopause. Data on the efficacy of antihypertensive therapy between genders are conflicting, and the underrepresentation of aged women in large clinical trials could influence the results. Therefore, further clinical research is needed to uncover potential gender differences in hypertension to promote the development of a gender-oriented approach to antihypertensive treatment.

  3. CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE: DEFINITION, EPIDEMIOLOGY, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, CLINICAL PICTURE AND TREATMENT (GOLD 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Vatutin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical picture (GOLD 2013. Vatutin M.T., Smyrnova G.S., Taradin G.G. The represented translation of the new international guidelines (GOLD 2013 reflected the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical picture and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  4. Erectile dysfunction as a manifestation of urogenital autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes: epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment options

    OpenAIRE

    Gagik Radikovich Galstyan; yana Grigor'evna Shwarts; Sergey Anatol'evich Dubsky; Aleksandr Evgen'evich Lepetukhin; Roman Viktorovich Rozhivanov; Dmitry Gennadievich Kurbatov

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction characterized by a significant decline in the quality of life of patients and leading to infertility and problems in social life is diagnosed in more than 40% of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM).Erectile dysfunction is the most common sexual disorder in DM patients. The article describes epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, diagnostic and treatment of erectile dysfunction in T1DM patients.

  5. N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency: an insight into the genetics, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caldovic L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas Ah Mew, Ljubica CaldovicCenter for Genetic Medicine Research, Children’s Research Institute, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington DC, USAAbstract: The conversion of ammonia into urea by the human liver requires the coordinated function of the 6 enzymes and 2 transporters of the urea cycle. The initial and rate-limiting enzyme of the urea cycle, carbamylphosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1, requires an allosteric activator, N-acetylglutamate (NAG. The formation of this unique cofactor from glutamate and acetyl Coenzyme-A is catalyzed by N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS. An absence of NAG as a consequence of NAGS deficiency may compromise flux through CPS1 and result in hyperammonemia. The NAGS gene encodes a 528-amino acid protein, consisting of a C-terminal catalytic domain, a variable segment, and an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signal. Only 22 mutations in the NAGS gene have been reported to date, mostly in the catalytic domain. NAGS is primarily expressed in the liver and intestine. However, it is also surprisingly expressed in testis, stomach and spleen, and during early embryonic development at levels not concordant with the expression of other urea cycle enzymes, CPS1, or ornithine transcarbamylase. The purpose of NAGS expression in these tissues, and its significance to NAGS deficiency is as yet unknown. Inherited NAGS deficiency is the rarest of the urea cycle disorders, and we review the currently reported 34 cases. Treatment of NAGS deficiency with N-carbamyglutamate, a stable analog of NAG, can restore deficient urea cycle function and normalize blood ammonia in affected patients.Keywords: urea cycle, urea cycle disorder, N-acetyl-L-glutamate, N-acetylglutamate synthase, hyperammonemia, N-carbamyl-L-glutamate

  6. Erectile dysfunction as a manifestation of urogenital autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes: epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagik Radikovich Galstyan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dysfunction characterized by a significant decline in the quality of life of patients and leading to infertility and problems in social life is diagnosed in more than 40% of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM.Erectile dysfunction is the most common sexual disorder in DM patients. The article describes epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, diagnostic and treatment of erectile dysfunction in T1DM patients.

  7. Hypophosphatasia - pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, José Luis; Plotkin, Horacio

    2012-09-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is the inborn-error-of-metabolism caused by loss-of-function mutation(s) in the gene that encodes the tissue-nonspecific isozyme of alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). The disease has been classified according to patient age when the first signs and symptoms manifest; i.e., perinatal, infantile, childhood, adult HPP. Other types include odonto HPP and perinatal benign. Babies with the perinatal/infantile forms of HPP often die with severe rickets and respiratory insufficiency and sometimes hypercalcemia and vitamin B 6 -responsive seizures. The primary biochemical defect in HPP is a deficiency of TNAP activity that leads to elevated circulating levels of substrates, in particular inorganic pyrophosphate (PP i ), a potent calcification inhibitor. To-date, the management of HPP has been essentially symptomatic or orthopedic. However, enzyme replacement therapy with mineral-targeting TNAP (sALP-FcD 10 , also known as ENB-0040 or asfotase alfa) has shown promising results in a mouse model of HPP ( Alpl -/- mice). Administration of mineral-targeting TNAP from birth increased survival and prevented the seizures, rickets, as well as all the tooth abnormalities, including dentin, acellular cementum, and enamel defects in this model of severe HPP. Clinical trials using mineral-targeting TNAP in children 3 years of age or younger with life-threatening HPP was associated with healing of the skeletal manifestations of HPP as well as improved respiratory and motor function. Improvement is still being observed in the patients receiving continued asfotase alfa therapy, with more than 3 years of treatment in some children. Enzyme replacement therapy with asfotase alfa has to-date been successful in patients with life-threatening HPP.

  8. Gas embolism: pathophysiology and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, Robert A.; Klein, Jan; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2003-01-01

    Based on a literature search, an overview is presented of the pathophysiology of venous and arterial gas embolism in the experimental and clinical environment, as well as the relevance and aims of diagnostics and treatment of gas embolism. The review starts with a few historical observations and

  9. Lafora disease: epidemiology, pathophysiology and management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monaghan, Thomas S

    2010-07-01

    Lafora disease is a rare, fatal, autosomal recessive, progressive myoclonic epilepsy. It may also be considered as a disorder of carbohydrate metabolism because of the formation of polyglucosan inclusion bodies in neural and other tissues due to abnormalities of the proteins laforin or malin. The condition is characterized by epilepsy, myoclonus and dementia. Diagnostic findings on MRI and neurophysiological testing are not definitive and biopsy or genetic studies may be required. Therapy in Lafora disease is currently limited to symptomatic management of the epilepsy, myoclonus and intercurrent complications. With a greater understanding of the pathophysiological processes involved, there is justified hope for future therapies.

  10. Preeclampsia: from Pathophysiology to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaculini Enton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a multisystem disorder unique to human pregnancy and is its most common glomerular complication. It occurs in 2% to 8% of pregnancies and is a major contributor to maternal mortality worldwide. Although the pathophysiology of this syndrome is not fully understood, many pathogenetic mechanisms are involved in this disorder. The role of the placenta is crucial in the development of this disorder. Some pathogenetic mechanisms involved in this disease comprise defective deep placentation, autoantibodies to type-1 angiotensin II receptor, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, platelet and thrombin activation, intravascular inflammation, and the imbalance between angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors which is thought to be one of the most crucial mechanisms. Further understanding of the full picture could enhance our current knowledge of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and improve its treatment. Thus, based on specific biomarkers the diagnosis and subclassification of preeclampsia might be more accurate in identifying patients at risk, monitoring disease progression and providing effective interventions

  11. Pathophysiology, Evaluation, and Treatment of Bloating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Scott L.; Crowell, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal bloating is commonly reported by men and women of all ages. Bloating occurs in nearly all patients with irritable bowel syndrome, and it also occurs in patients with other functional and organic disorders. Bloating is frequently disturbing to patients and frustrating to clinicians, as effective treatments are limited and are not universally successful. Although the terms bloating and abdominal distention are often used interchangeably, these symptoms likely involve different pathophysiologic processes, both of which are still not completely understood. The goal of this paper is to review the pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of bloating and abdominal distention. PMID:22298969

  12. Retinal vein occlusion: pathophysiology and treatment options

    OpenAIRE

    Karia, Niral

    2010-01-01

    Niral KariaDepartment of Ophthalmology, Southend Hospital, Prittlewell Chase, Westcliff on Sea, Essex, United KingdomAbstract: This paper reviews the current thinking about retinal vein occlusion. It gives an overview of its pathophysiology and discusses the evidence behind the various established and emerging treatment paradigms.Keywords: central, hemispheric, branch, retinal vein occlusion, visual loss

  13. Pathophysiology and Treatment of Alien Hand Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harini Sarva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alien hand syndrome (AHS is a disorder of involuntary, yet purposeful, hand movements that may be accompanied by agnosia, aphasia, weakness, or sensory loss. We herein review the most reported cases, current understanding of the pathophysiology, and treatments.Methods: We performed a PubMed search in July of 2014 using the phrases “alien hand syndrome,” “alien hand syndrome pathophysiology,” “alien hand syndrome treatment,” and “anarchic hand syndrome.” The search yielded 141 papers (reviews, case reports, case series, and clinical studies, of which we reviewed 109. Non‐English reports without English abstracts were excluded.Results: Accumulating evidence indicates that there are three AHS variants: frontal, callosal, and posterior. Patients may demonstrate symptoms of multiple types; there is a lack of correlation between phenomenology and neuroimaging findings. Most pathologic and functional imaging studies suggest network disruption causing loss of inhibition as the likely cause. Successful interventions include botulinum toxin injections, clonazepam, visuospatial coaching techniques, distracting the affected hand, and cognitive behavioral therapy.Discussion: The available literature suggests that overlap between AHS subtypes is common. The evidence for effective treatments remains anecdotal, and, given the rarity of AHS, the possibility of performing randomized, placebo‐controlled trials seems unlikely. As with many other interventions for movement disorders, identifying the specific functional impairments caused by AHS may provide the best guidance towards individualized supportive care.

  14. [Pathophysiology and new treatment of uveitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Ryoji; Takeda, Atsunobu; Yoshimura, Takeru; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2014-01-01

    Uveitis is narrow-defined inflammation of the uvea, also clinically include all inflammatory conditions in the eye. Uveitis may occur as a consequence of various causes and background, such as autoimmune diseases, infections, and hematopoietic malignancy. We have to treat uveitis not only controlling the inflammation but also maintaining up the visual function of the eye because the most uveitis is chronic and relapsing inflammatory disorder. Behçét's disease is a systemic disease and results in loss of vision without adequate treatment. Behçét's disease was a representative of vision loss uveitis because Behçét's patient usually had treatment resistance of conventional treatment, such as colchicine and cyclosporine. However, biological therapy with TNF-α, which started from 2007, has revolutionized the treatment strategy of Behçét's disease. It is not too much to say that Behçét's patient is free from fear of vision loss by the dramatic decrease of ocular attach. Biological therapy is not approved as a treatment of uveitis except Behçét's disease. Some protracted cases of Sarcoidosis and Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease are resistant to corticosteroid therapy and require new treatment. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology of uveitis and report new treatment of Behçét's disease by biological therapy.

  15. [Pathophysiology and treatment of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Noma, Noboru

    "Pain" is one of body defense mechanisms and crucial for the life support. However, orofacial pain such as myofascial pain syndrome, burning mouth syndrome and trigeminal neuralgia plays no part in body defense mechanisms and requires therapeutic intervention. Recent studies have indicated that plastic changes in the activities of trigeminal neurons, satellite glial cells in trigeminal ganglion, secondary neurons, microglia and astrocytes in trigeminal spinal subnucleus following orofacial inflammation and trigeminal nerve injury are responsible for orofacial pain mechanisms. Clinically, it is well known that the etiologic differential diagnosis which consists of careful history-taking and physical examination is essential for therapeutic decision in patients with orofacial pain. This report outlines the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment of orofacial pain.

  16. A Comprehensive Review of Sex Disparities in Symptoms, Pathophysiology, and Epidemiology of Dry Eye Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Yuna; Singer, Jason M; Ling, Jeanie D; Gregory, Anthony; Kohanim, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    The etiology, frequency, manifestation, and treatment of dry eye syndrome are commonly influenced by sex and gender. This study aims to review the differences in epidemiology, pathophysiology, and associated diseases between the sexes. The terms men and male and women and female are used interchangeably throughout the review to refer to biological sex. There are numerous objective and subjective markers of dry eye syndrome but not one diagnostic criterion. There are numerous associated conditions with dry eye syndrome varying from autoimmune to allergic. Large epidemiologic studies reviewed suggest that there does indeed exist a difference between dry eye symptoms between men and women, with women having dry eye signs and reporting dry eye symptoms more often than men. The increased prevalence in women could be correlated to an increased association with certain systemic diseases, specifically autoimmune diseases, and to hormonal variations. Several studies found equivocal data about prevalence of dry eye symptoms between men and women. Interpreting studies that investigate epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of dry-eye conditions is complicated by the lack of universally adapted diagnostic criteria and standardized, specific diagnostic tests, and inter-study variability in the definition of dry eye syndrome.

  17. Epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, and prognostic classifications of cerebral arteriovenous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozpinar, Alp; Mendez, Gustavo; Abla, Adib A

    2017-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are vascular deformities involving fistula formation of arterial to venous structures without an intervening capillary bed. Such anomalies can prove fatal as the high arterial flow can disrupt the integrity of venous walls, thus leading to dangerous sequelae such as hemorrhage. Diagnosis of these lesions in the central nervous system can often prove challenging as intracranial AVMs represent a heterogeneous vascular pathology with various presentations and symptomatology. The literature suggests that most brain AVMs (bAVMs) are identified following evaluation of the etiology of acute cerebral hemorrhage, or incidentally on imaging associated with seizure or headache workup. Given the low incidence of this disease, most of the data accrued on this pathology comes from single-center experiences. This chapter aims to distill the most important information from these studies as well as examine meta-analyses on bAVMs in order to provide a comprehensive introduction into the natural history, classification, genetic underpinnings of disease, and proposed pathophysiology. While there is yet much to be elucidated about AVMs of the central nervous system, we aim to provide an overview of bAVM etiology, classification, genetics, and pathophysiology inherent to the disease process. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Neonatal posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus from prematurity: pathophysiology and current treatment concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Shenandoah

    2013-01-01

    Object Preterm infants are at risk for perinatal complications, including germinal matrix–intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and subsequent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH). This review summarizes the current understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, management, and outcomes of IVH and PHH in preterm infants. Methods The MEDLINE database was systematically searched using terms related to IVH, PHH, and relevant neurosurgical procedures to identify publications in the English medical literature. To complement information from the systematic search, pertinent articles were selected from the references of articles identifed in the initial search. Results This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of IVH and PHH, primarily using evidence-based studies. Advances in obstetrics and neonatology over the past few decades have contributed to a marked improvement in the survival of preterm infants, and neurological morbidity is also starting to decrease. The incidence of IVH is declining, and the incidence of PHH will likely follow. Currently, approximately 15% of preterm infants who suffer severe IVH will require permanent CSF diversion. The clinical presentation and surgical management of symptomatic PHH with temporary ventricular reservoirs (ventricular access devices) and ventriculosubgaleal shunts and permanent ventriculoperitoneal shunts are discussed. Preterm infants who develop PHH that requires surgical treatment remain at high risk for other related neurological problems, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive and behavioral delay. This review highlights numerous opportunities for further study to improve the care of these children. Conclusions A better grasp of the pathophysiology of IVH is beginning to impact the incidence of IVH and PHH. Neonatologists conduct rigorous Class I and II studies to advance the outcomes of preterm infants. The need for well-designed multicenter trials is

  19. Cluster Headache: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Clinical Features, and Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Diana Yi-Ting; Yuan Ong, Jonathan Jia; Goadsby, Peter James

    2018-04-01

    Cluster headache is a primary headache disorder affecting up to 0.1% of the population. Patients suffer from cluster headache attacks lasting from 15 to 180 min up to 8 times a day. The attacks are characterized by the severe unilateral pain mainly in the first division of the trigeminal nerve, with associated prominent unilateral cranial autonomic symptoms and a sense of agitation and restlessness during the attacks. The male-to-female ratio is approximately 2.5:1. Experimental, clinical, and neuroimaging studies have advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of cluster headache. The pathophysiology involves activation of the trigeminovascular complex and the trigeminal-autonomic reflex and accounts for the unilateral severe headache, the prominent ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms. In addition, the circadian and circannual rhythmicity unique to this condition is postulated to involve the hypothalamus and suprachiasmatic nucleus. Although the clinical features are distinct, it may be misdiagnosed, with patients often presenting to the otolaryngologist or dentist with symptoms. The prognosis of cluster headache remains difficult to predict. Patients with episodic cluster headache can shift to chronic cluster headache and vice versa. Longitudinally, cluster headache tends to remit with age with less frequent bouts and more prolonged periods of remission in between bouts.

  20. Nocardia farcinica brain abscess: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V Anil; Augustine, Deepthi; Panikar, Dilip; Nandakumar, Aswathy; Dinesh, Kavitha R; Karim, Shamsul; Philip, Rosamma

    2014-10-01

    Infections caused by Nocardia farcinica are potentially lethal because of the organism's tendency to disseminate and resist antibiotics. Central nervous system involvement has been documented in 30% of infections caused N. farcinica. Case report and review of the literature. A case of primary brain abscess caused by N. farcinica, identified by 16SrRNA sequencing, is presented, and 39 cases reported previously in the literature are reviewed. Our patient underwent a neuronavigation-guided right frontal craniotomy and was treated with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for 12 mo. He showed marginal improvement in his prior left hemiparesis at the last review 14 months later. Cases of N. farcinica infections are being reported increasingly because of recent changes in taxonomy and diagnostic methodology. This change in epidemiology has implications for therapy because of the organism's pathogenicity and natural resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents, including third-generation cephalosporins. Any delay in starting appropriate antibiotic therapy can have adverse consequences.

  1. Postherpetic neuralgia: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and pain management pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallick-Searle T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Theresa Mallick-Searle,1 Brett Snodgrass,2 Jeannine M Brant,3 1Pain Management Center, Stanford Health Care, Redwood City, CA, 2LifeLinc Pain Centers, Cordova, TN, 3Billings Clinic, Billings, MT, USA Abstract: Herpes zoster, also known as shingles, is a distinctive clinical condition caused by the reactivation of latent varicella zoster (chickenpox virus following an initial infection. Approximately 1 million cases of herpes zoster occur annually in the US, and one in every three people develops herpes zoster during their lifetime. Postherpetic neuralgia is a neuropathic pain syndrome characterized by pain that persists for months to years after resolution of the herpes zoster rash. It stems from damage to peripheral and central neurons that may be a byproduct of the immune/inflammatory response accompanying varicella zoster virus reactivation. Patients with postherpetic neuralgia report decreased quality of life and interference with activities of daily living. Approaches to management of postherpetic neuralgia include preventing herpes zoster through vaccination and/or antiviral treatment, and administering specific medications to treat pain. Current guidelines recommend treatment of postherpetic neuralgia in a hierarchical manner, with calcium channel α2-δ ligands (gabapentin and pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline, nortriptyline, or desipramine, or topical lidocaine patches as first-line drugs. The safety and tolerability of pharmacologic therapies for pain are important issues to consider as postherpetic neuralgia affects primarily an older population. Patients should be educated on appropriate dosing, titration if applicable, the importance of adherence to treatment for optimal effectiveness, and possible side effects. Health-care professionals play a key role in helping to ameliorate the pain caused by postherpetic neuralgia through early recognition and diligent assessment of the problem; recommending evidence

  2. Insights into pathophysiology of punding reveal possible treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, A; Petrovic, I

    2010-06-01

    Punding is a stereotyped behavior characterized by an intense fascination with a complex, excessive, nongoal oriented, repetitive activity. Men tend to repetitively tinker with technical equipment such as radio sets, clocks, watches and car engines, the parts of which may be analyzed, arranged, sorted and cataloged but rarely put back together. Women, in contrast, incessantly sort through their handbags, tidy continuously, brush their hair or polish their nails. Punders are normally aware of the inapposite and obtuse nature of the behavior; however, despite the consequent self-injury, they do not stop such behavior. The most common causes of punding are dopaminergic replacement therapy in patients affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) and cocaine and amphetamine use in addicts. The vast majority of information about punding comes from PD cases. A critical review of these cases shows that almost all afflicted patients (90%) were on treatment with drugs acting mainly on dopamine receptors D1 and D2, whereas only three cases were reported in association with selective D2 and D3 agonists. Epidemiological considerations and available data from animal models suggest that punding, drug-induced stereotypies, addiction and dyskinesias all share a common pathophysiological process. Punding may be related to plastic changes in the ventral and dorsal striatal structures, including the nucleus accumbens, and linked to psychomotor stimulation and reward mechanisms. Possible management guidelines are proposed.

  3. Celiac disease: From pathophysiology to treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzanese, Ilaria; Qehajaj, Dorina; Patrinicola, Federica; Aralica, Merica; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Stifter, Sanja; Elli, Luca; Grizzi, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as “celiac sprue”, is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the small intestine, produced by the ingestion of dietary gluten products in susceptible people. It is a multifactorial disease, including genetic and environmental factors. Environmental trigger is represented by gluten while the genetic predisposition has been identified in the major histocompatibility complex region. Celiac disease is not a rare disorder like previously thought, with a global prevalence around 1%. The reason of its under-recognition is mainly referable to the fact that about half of affected people do not have the classic gastrointestinal symptoms, but they present nonspecific manifestations of nutritional deficiency or have no symptoms at all. Here we review the most recent data concerning epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, available diagnostic tests and therapeutic management of celiac disease. PMID:28573065

  4. Vasculitis : Clinical approach, pathophysiology and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, GGM

    2000-01-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of blood vessels. Classification of the disease is mandatory for the assessment of prognosis and the institution of treatment. Secondary forms of vasculitis should be distinguished from primary

  5. The antiphospholipid syndrome: from pathophysiology to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, Simone; Pappalardo, Fabrizio; Murdaca, Giuseppe; Indiveri, Francesco; Puppo, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune acquired thrombophilia characterized by recurrent thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). APS can be primary, if it occurs in the absence of any underlying disease, or secondary, if it is associated with another autoimmune disorder, most commonly systemic lupus erythematosus. The exact pathogenetic mechanism of APS is unknown, but different, not mutually exclusive, models have been proposed to explain how anti-PL autoantibodies might lead to thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity. Diagnosis of APS requires that a patient has both a clinical manifestation (arterial or venous thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity) and persistently positive aPL, but the clinical spectrum of the disease encompasses additional manifestations which may affect every organ and cannot be explained exclusively by a prothrombotic state. Treatment for aPL-positive patients is based on the patient's clinical status, presence of an underlying autoimmune disease, and history of thrombotic events. In case of aPL positivity without previous thrombotic events, the treatment is mainly focused on reduction of additional vascular risk factors, while treatment of patients with definite APS is based on long-term anticoagulation. Pregnancy complications are usually managed with low-dose aspirin in association with low molecular weight heparin. Refractory forms of APS could benefit from adding hydroxychloroquine and/or intravenous immunoglobulin to anticoagulation therapy. Promising novel treatments include anti-B cell monoclonal antibodies, new-generation anticoagulants, and complement cascade inhibitors. The objective of this review paper is to summarize the recent literature on APS from pathogenesis to current therapeutic options.

  6. Portal hypertension in schistosomiasis: pathophysiology and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Caetano da Silva

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available In heavily infected young patients, there is a "non-congestive" phase of the disease with splenomegaly which can improve after chemoterapy. A strong correlation between hepatosplenic form and worm burden in young patients has been repeatedly shown. The pattern of vascular intrhepatic lesions seems to depend on two mechanisms: (a egg embolization, with a partial blocking of the portal vasculature; (b the appearance of small portal collaterals along the intrahepatic portal sistem. The role played by hepatitis B virus (HBV and C virus infections in the pathogenesis of liver lesions is variably considered. Selective arteriography shows a reduced diameter of hepatic artery with thin and arched branches outlining vascular gaps. A rich arterial network , as described in autopsy cases, is usually not seen in vivo, except after splenectomy or shunt surgery. An augmented hepatic arterial flow was demonstrated in infected animals. These facts suggest that the poor intrahepatic arterial vascularization demonstrated by selective arteriography in humans is due to a "functional deviation"of arterial blood to the splenic territory. The best results obtained in treatment of portal hypertension were: esophagogastric desvascularization and splenectomy (EGDS, although risk of rebleeding persists; classical (proximal splenorenal shunt (SRS should be abandoned; distal splenorenal shunt may complicate with hepatic encephalopaty, although later and in a lower percentage than in SRS. Propranolol is currently under investigation. In our Department, schistosomotic patients with esophageal varices bleeding are treated by EGDS and, if rebleeding occurs, by sclerosis of the varices.

  7. Jaundice associated pruritis: a review of pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassari, Ramez; Koea, Jonathan B

    2015-02-07

    To review the underlying pathophysiology and currently available treatments for pruritis associated with jaundice. English language literature was reviewed using MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE and clinicaltrials.gov for papers and trails addressing the pathophysiology and potential treatments for pruritis associated with jaundice. Recent advances in the understanding of the peripheral anatomy of itch transmission have defined a histamine stimulated pathway and a cowhage stimulated pathway with sensation conveyed centrally via the contralateral spinothalamic tract. Centrally, cowhage and histamine stimulated neurons terminate widely within the thalamus and sensorimotor cortex. The causative factors for itch in jaundice have not been clarified although endogenous opioids, serotonin, steroid and lysophosphatidic acid all play a role. Current guidelines for the treatment of itching in jaundice recommend initial management with biliary drainage where possible and medical management with ursodeoxycholic acid, followed by cholestyramine, rifampicin, naltrexone and sertraline. Other than biliary drainage no single treatment has proved universally effective. Pruritis associated with jaundice is a common but poorly understood condition for which biliary drainage is the most effective therapy. Pharmacological therapy has advanced but remains variably effective.

  8. Epidemiological and pathophysiological aspects of abdominal pain predominant functional gastrointestinal disorders in children and adolescents: a Sri Lankan perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devanarayana, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs) are a worldwide pediatric problem with uncertain pathology. Main objectives of this thesis were to assess epidemiology, risk factors and underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of AP-FGIDs. A systematic review and

  9. Glutamate abnormalities in obsessive compulsive disorder: neurobiology, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittenger, Christopher; Bloch, Michael H; Williams, Kyle

    2011-12-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder is prevalent, disabling, incompletely understood, and often resistant to current therapies. Established treatments consist of specialized cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy with medications targeting serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission. However, remission is rare, and more than a quarter of OCD sufferers receive little or no benefit from these approaches, even when they are optimally delivered. New insights into the disorder, and new treatment strategies, are urgently needed. Recent evidence suggests that the ubiquitous excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate is dysregulated in OCD, and that this dysregulation may contribute to the pathophysiology of the disorder. Here we review the current state of this evidence, including neuroimaging studies, genetics, neurochemical investigations, and insights from animal models. Finally, we review recent findings from small clinical trials of glutamate-modulating medications in treatment-refractory OCD. The precise role of glutamate dysregulation in OCD remains unclear, and we lack blinded, well-controlled studies demonstrating therapeutic benefit from glutamate-modulating agents. Nevertheless, the evidence supporting some important perturbation of glutamate in the disorder is increasingly strong. This new perspective on the pathophysiology of OCD, which complements the older focus on monoaminergic neurotransmission, constitutes an important focus of current research and a promising area for the ongoing development of new therapeutics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of canine hip dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.L.; Tomlinson, J.L.; Constantinescu, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    Dogs with hip dysplasia are commonly presented to veterinarians for evaluation. Although many causes of the condition have been proposed, a definitive cause has not been established. The multifactorial nature of canine hip dysplasia can confuse client education and management ofthe disease. The basic concept involved is the biomechanical imbalance between the forces on the coxofemoral joint and the associated muscle mass; the result is joint laxity in young, growing dogs. This laxity leads to incongruity; the eventual result is degenerative joint disease. Canine hip dysplasia can affect any breed but is most often reported in large and giant breeds. Understanding the pathophysiology and biomechanics involved with this developmental disease is important in providing clients with diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic information. The selection of treatment is influenced by the following factors:the age, health, and intended use of the patient; clinical signs; diagnostic findings; the availability of treatment; and the financial constraints of the owner. This article discusses the current concepts concerning the pathophysiology and biomechanics of canine hip dysplasia and outlines diagnostic and therapeutic options. The objective of the article is to provide practitioners with a reference for decision making and client education

  11. Psychiatric manifestations of Graves' hyperthyroidism: pathophysiology and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunevicius, Robertas; Prange, Arthur J

    2006-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Other symptoms associated with the disease are goitre, ophthalmopathy, and psychiatric manifestations such as mood and anxiety disorders and, sometimes, cognitive dysfunction. Graves' hyperthyroidism may result in these latter manifestations via the induction of hyperactivity of the adrenergic nervous system. This review addresses the psychiatric presentations, and their pathophysiology and treatment, in patients with hyperthyroidism, based on literature identified by a PubMed/MEDLINE database search. Although the focus is on mental symptoms associated with Graves' disease, it is not always clear from the literature whether patients had Graves' disease: in some studies, the patients were thought to have Graves' disease based on clinical findings such as diffuse goitre or ophthalmopathy or on measurements of thyroid antibodies in serum; however, in other studies, no distinction was made between Graves' hyperthyroidism and hyperthyroidism from other causes. Antithyroid drugs combined with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are the treatments of choice for hyperthyroidism, as well as for the psychiatric disorders and mental symptoms caused by hyperthyroidism. A substantial proportion of patients have an altered mental state even after successful treatment of hyperthyroidism, suggesting that mechanisms other than hyperthyroidism, including the Graves' autoimmune process per se and ophthalmopathy, may also be involved. When psychiatric disorders remain after restoration of euthyroidism and after treatment with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists, specific treatment for the psychiatric symptoms, especially psychotropic drugs, may be needed.

  12. Dysmotility in Esophageal Atresia: Pathophysiology, Characterization, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Christophe; Righini Grunder, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal dysmotility is almost universal after esophageal atresia (EA) repair and is mainly related to the developmental anomaly of the esophagus. Esophageal dysmotility is involved in the pathophysiology of numerous symptoms and comorbidities associated with EA such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, aspiration and respiratory complications, and symptoms of dysphagia and feeding disorders. High-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) has facilitated the characterization of the dysmotility, but there is an incomplete correlation between symptoms and manometrical patterns. Impedance coupled to HREM should help to predict the clinical outcome and therefore personalize patient management. Nowadays, the management of esophageal dysmotility in patients with EA is essentially based on treatment of associated inflammation related to peptic or eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:28620599

  13. Vitiligo: An Update on Pathophysiology and Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speeckaert, Reinhart; van Geel, Nanja

    2017-12-01

    The pathophysiology of vitiligo is becoming increasingly clarified. In non-segmental vitiligo, early factors include activation of innate immunity, inflammasome activation, oxidative stress, and loss of melanocyte adhesion. Nonetheless, the main mechanism leading to non-segmental vitiligo involves an immune-mediated destruction of melanocytes. Anti-melanocyte-specific cytotoxic T cells exert a central role in the final effector stage. Genetic research revealed a multi-genetic inheritance displaying an overlap with other autoimmune disorders. However, some melanocyte-specific genes were also affected. Segmental vitiligo carries a different pathogenesis with most evidence indicating a mosaic skin disorder. Current management includes topical corticosteroids and immunomodulators. Narrow-band ultraviolet B can be used in patients not responding to topical treatment or in patients with extensive disease. Pigment cell transplantation offers an alternative for the treatment of segmental vitiligo or stable non-segmental lesions. Recent findings have revealed new targets for treatment that could lead to more efficient therapies. Targeted immunotherapy may halt the active immune pathways, although combination therapy may still be required to induce satisfying repigmentation. A recently established core set of outcome measures, new measurement instruments, and biomarker research pave the way for future standardized clinical trials.

  14. Left main coronary artery disease: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Carlos; Capodanno, Davide; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Banning, Adrian; Stone, Gregg W; Taggart, David P; Sabik, Joseph; Serruys, Patrick W

    2018-06-01

    The advent of coronary angiography in the 1960s allowed for the risk stratification of patients with stable angina. Patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease have an increased risk of death related to the large amount of myocardium supplied by this vessel. Although coronary angiography remains the preferred imaging modality for the evaluation of left main coronary artery stenosis, this technique has important limitations. Angiograms of the left main coronary artery segment can be difficult to interpret, and almost one-third of patients can be misclassified when fractional flow reserve is used as the reference. In patients with clinically significant unprotected left main coronary artery disease, surgical revascularization was shown to improve survival compared with medical therapy and has been regarded as the treatment of choice for unprotected left main coronary artery disease. Two large-scale clinical trials published in 2016 support the usefulness of catheter-based revascularization in selected patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease. In this Review, we describe the pathophysiology of unprotected left main coronary artery disease, discuss diagnostic approaches in light of new noninvasive and invasive imaging techniques, and detail risk stratification models to aid the Heart Team in the decision-making process for determining the best revascularization strategy for these patients.

  15. Bipolar Disorder and Immune Dysfunction: Epidemiological Findings, Proposed Pathophysiology and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D. Rosenblat

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD is strongly associated with immune dysfunction. Replicated epidemiological studies have demonstrated that BD has high rates of inflammatory medical comorbidities, including autoimmune disorders, chronic infections, cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders. Cytokine studies have demonstrated that BD is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation with further increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels during mood episodes. Several mechanisms have been identified to explain the bidirectional relationship between BD and immune dysfunction. Key mechanisms include cytokine-induced monoamine changes, increased oxidative stress, pathological microglial over-activation, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis over-activation, alterations of the microbiome-gut-brain axis and sleep-related immune changes. The inflammatory-mood pathway presents several potential novel targets in the treatment of BD. Several proof-of-concept clinical trials have shown a positive effect of anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of BD; however, further research is needed to determine the clinical utility of these treatments. Immune dysfunction is likely to only play a role in a subset of BD patients and as such, future clinical trials should also strive to identify which specific group(s of BD patients may benefit from anti-inflammatory treatments.

  16. Pathophysiology and treatment of psychosis in Parkinson's disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2008-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) are relatively common and, in addition to creating a disturbance in patients' daily lives, have consistently been shown to be associated with poor outcome. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of psychosis in PD has expanded dramatically over the past 15 years, from an initial interpretation of symptoms as dopaminergic drug adverse effects to the current view of a complex interplay of extrinsic and disease-related factors.PD psychosis has unique clinical features, namely that it arises within a context of a clear sensorium and retained insight, there is relative prominence of visual hallucinations and progression occurs over time. PD psychosis tends to emerge later in the disease course, and disease duration represents one risk factor for its development. The use of anti-PD medications (particularly dopamine receptor agonists) has been the most widely identified risk factor for PD psychosis. Other risk factors discussed in the literature include older age, disease severity, sleep disturbance, cognitive impairment, dementia and/or depression.Recent efforts have aimed to explore the complex pathophysiology of PD psychosis, which is now known to involve an interaction between extrinsic, drug-related and intrinsic, disease-related components. The most important extrinsic factor is use of dopaminergic medication, which plays a prominent role in PD psychosis. Intrinsic factors include visual processing deficits (e.g. lower visual acuity, colour and contrast recognition deficits, ocular pathology and functional brain abnormalities identified amongst hallucinating PD patients); sleep dysregulation (e.g. sleep fragmentation and altered dream phenomena); neurochemical (dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, etc.) and structural abnormalities involving site-specific Lewy body deposition; and genetics (e.g. apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele and tau H1H1 genotype). Preliminary reports have also shown a potential relationship

  17. Elucidation of pathophysiology and treatment of neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, Jan H.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system, is relatively common, occurring in about 1% of the population. Studies in animal models describe a number of peripheral and central pathophysiological processes after nerve injury that

  18. Unravelling narcolepsy : from pathophysiology to measuring treatment effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der A.

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a disorder of the regulation of sleep and wakefulness, with as its major features excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis and disturbed nocturnal sleep. The first part of this thesis concernes an overview of the pathophysiology,

  19. Heart failure: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of heart failure in diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Jorsal, Anders; Wiggers, Henrik; McMurray, John J.V.

    2018-01-01

    This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint.

  20. Bone pain induced by metastatic cancer: pathophysiology and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas-Herrera, Isaias; Huertas-Gabert, Luis Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Cancer patients who develop bone metastases are an estimated 60 to 84% . Of these 79% experienced pain syndromes are difficult to manage, of which 50% die without adequate pain relief and with a poor quality of life. Therefore, it is necessary to have accessible and effective medications for the management of this condition. The pathophysiology of pain in bone is reviewed and the drugs used most frequently in the management of this type of cancer pain are described. Furthermore an algorithm of 6 steps is presented and can guide the physician when making a therapeutic decision. (author) [es

  1. [Refeeding syndrome : Pathophysiology, risk factors, prevention, and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, R; Diekmann, R; Janssen, G; Fleiter, O; Fricke, L; Kreilkamp, A; Modreker, M K; Marburger, C; Nels, S; Pourhassan, M; Schaefer, R; Willschrei, H-P; Volkert, D

    2018-04-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a life-threatening complication that may occur after initiation of nutritional therapy in malnourished patients, as well as after periods of fasting and hunger. Refeeding syndrome can be effectively prevented and treated if its risk factors and pathophysiology are known. The initial measurement of thiamine level and serum electrolytes, including phosphate and magnesium, their supplementation if necessary, and a slow increase in nutritional intake along with close monitoring of serum electrolytes play an important role. Since refeeding syndrome is not well known and the symptoms can be extremely heterogeneous, this complication is poorly recognized, especially against the background of severe disease and multimorbidity. This overview aims to summarize the current knowledge and increase awareness about refeeding syndrome.

  2. Scientific Statement on the Diagnostic Criteria, Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Molecular Genetics of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumesic, Daniel A.; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Marshall, John C.; Laven, Joop S.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous and complex disorder that has both adverse reproductive and metabolic implications for affected women. However, there is generally poor understanding of its etiology. Varying expert-based diagnostic criteria utilize some combination of oligo-ovulation, hyperandrogenism, and the presence of polycystic ovaries. Criteria that require hyperandrogenism tend to identify a more severe reproductive and metabolic phenotype. The phenotype can vary by race and ethnicity, is difficult to define in the perimenarchal and perimenopausal period, and is exacerbated by obesity. The pathophysiology involves abnormal gonadotropin secretion from a reduced hypothalamic feedback response to circulating sex steroids, altered ovarian morphology and functional changes, and disordered insulin action in a variety of target tissues. PCOS clusters in families and both female and male relatives can show stigmata of the syndrome, including metabolic abnormalities. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of candidate regions, although their role in contributing to PCOS is still largely unknown. PMID:26426951

  3. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Degeneration: Pathophysiology and Treatment Options

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, Ruth; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Lees, Andrew J.; Morris, Huw R.

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement There are currently no disease-modifying treatments for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) or corticobasal degeneration (CBD), and no approved pharmacological or therapeutic treatments that are effective in controlling their symptoms. The use of most pharmacological treatment options are based on experience in other disorders or from non-randomized historical controls, case series, or expert opinion. Levodopa may provide some improvement in symptoms of Parkinsonism (specif...

  4. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Degeneration: Pathophysiology and Treatment Options

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, R.; Rohrer, J. D.; Lees, A. J.; Morris, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    There are currently no disease-modifying treatments for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) or corticobasal degeneration (CBD), and no approved pharmacological or therapeutic treatments that are effective in controlling their symptoms. The use of most pharmacological treatment options are based on experience in other disorders or from non-randomized historical controls, case series, or expert opinion. Levodopa may provide some improvement in symptoms of Parkinsonism (specifically bradykinesi...

  5. Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder: Epidemiology and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantsoo, Liisa; Epperson, C Neill

    2015-11-01

    Recently designated as a disorder in the DSM-5, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) presents an array of avenues for further research. PMDD's profile, characterized by cognitive-affective symptoms during the premenstruum, is unique from that of other affective disorders in its symptoms and cyclicity. Neurosteroids may be a key contributor to PMDD's clinical presentation and etiology, and represent a potential avenue for drug development. This review will present recent literature on potential contributors to PMDD's pathophysiology, including neurosteroids and stress, and explore potential treatment targets.

  6. Pathophysiology and Nonsurgical Treatment of Chronic Subdural Hematoma: From Past to Present to Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Dana C; Volovici, Victor; Dirven, Clemens M F; Peul, Wilco C; van Kooten, Fop; Jellema, Korné; van der Gaag, Niels A; Miah, Ishita P; Kho, Kuan H; den Hertog, Heleen M; Lingsma, Hester F; Dammers, Ruben

    2018-05-14

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the more frequent pathologic entities in daily neurosurgical practice. Historically, CSDH was considered progressive recurrent bleeding with a traumatic cause. However, recent evidence has suggested a complex intertwined pathway of inflammation, angiogenesis, local coagulopathy, recurrent microbleeds, and exudates. The aim of the present review is to collect existing data on pathophysiology of CSDH to direct further research questions aiming to optimize treatment for the individual patient. We performed a thorough literature search in PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Google scholar, focusing on any aspect of the pathophysiology and nonsurgical treatment of CSDH. After a (minor) traumatic event, the dural border cell layer tears, which leads to the extravasation of cerebrospinal fluid and blood in the subdural space. A cascade of inflammation, impaired coagulation, fibrinolysis, and angiogenesis is set in motion. The most commonly used treatment is surgical drainage. However, because of the pathophysiologic mechanisms, the mortality and high morbidity associated with surgical drainage, drug therapy (dexamethasone, atorvastatin, tranexamic acid, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors) might be a beneficial alternative in many patients with CSDH. Based on pathophysiologic mechanisms, animal experiments, and small patient studies, medical treatment may play a role in the treatment of CSDH. There is a lack of level I evidence in the nonsurgical treatment of CSDH. Therefore, randomized controlled trials, currently lacking, are needed to assess which treatment is most effective in each individual patient. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Relapses in Multiple Sclerosis: Definition, Pathophysiology, Features, Imitators, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhan Sevim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Relapse in multiple sclerosis (MS is defined as a neurologic deficit associated with an acute inflammatory demyelinating event that lasts at least 24 hours in the absence of fever and infection. Myelinoclasis and axonal transection occur in relapses. Diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and many other features of the disease are directly related to the relapses. MS starts as the relapsing-remitting (RRMS form in 85% of patients. A large number of relapses in the first years, polysymptomatic relapses, and pyramidal system, brain stem, and spinal cord involvement are signs of a poor outcome. The average frequency of relapses is approximately one per year during the first years of RRMS. The frequency of relapses increases during systemic infections, psychological stress, and in the postpartum first 3 months. Seventy-five percent of relapses are monosymptomatic. Pseudo-relapses and paroxysmal symptoms are distinguished from relapses by their sudden onset, sudden termination, and shorter duration. Contrast enhancement is valuable in imaging, but undetectable in most relapses. The regression in the first few weeks of relapses is explained by reduction of the edema, and by remyelination in the following months. Relapses and their features are also among the main determinants of treatment. High-dose methylprednisolone and early treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone reduce post-relapse disability and shorten the duration of relapses. Plasmapheresis is a good option for patients who do not respond to steroid treatment. Identification of relapses by patients and physicians, distinguishing them from imitators, proper evaluation, treatment when necessary, and monitoring the results are of great importance for patients with MS. The educational levels of patients and physicians regarding these parameters should be increased. Well-designed studies that evaluate the long-term effect of relapse treatment on disability are needed.

  8. Mycobacterium marinum infection in fish and man: epidemiology, pathophysiology and management; a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashish, Emad; Merwad, Abdallah; Elgaml, Shimaa; Amer, Ali; Kamal, Huda; Elsadek, Ahmed; Marei, Ayman; Sitohy, Mahmoud

    2018-12-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is an opportunistic pathogen inducing infection in fresh and marine water fish. This pathogen causes necrotizing granuloma like tuberculosis, morbidity and mortality in fish. The cell wall-associated lipid phthiocerol dimycocerosates, phenolic glycolipids and ESAT-6 secretion system 1 (ESX-1) are the conserved virulence determinant of the organism. Human infections with Mycobacterium marinum hypothetically are classified into four clinical categories (type I-type IV) and have been associated with the exposure of damaged skin to polluted water from fish pools or contacting objects contaminated with infected fish. Fish mycobacteriosis is clinically manifested and characterized in man by purple painless nodules, liable to develop into superficial crusting ulceration with scar formation. Early laboratory diagnosis of M. marinum including histopathology, culture and PCR is essential and critical as the clinical response to antibiotics requires months to be attained. The pathogenicity and virulence determinants of M. marinum need to be thoroughly and comprehensively investigated and understood. In spite of accumulating information on this pathogen, the different relevant data should be compared, connected and globally compiled. This article is reviewing the epidemiology, virulence factors, diagnosis and disease management in fish while casting light on the potential associated public health hazards.

  9. Understanding Exercise-Associated Hyponatraemia: From Pathophysiology to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidonie Hubert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The practice of extreme sports is becoming more and more common. Despite physiological adaptation, people who intensively exercise are exposed to exercise-associated complications, including hyponatraemia. Exercise-associated hyponatraemia seems to be a consequence of alteration of water regulation, particularly by excessive expression of vasopressin, sodium mobilisation, and interleukin-6 production by muscular cells. Preventing overhydration, both before and during effort, and prohibiting hypotonic solutes during treatment are the leading interventions to correct hyponatraemia.

  10. Pathophysiology and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Oswaldo L.; Machado, Roberto F.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension affects ∼10% of adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), particularly those with the homozygous genotype. An increase in pulmonary artery systolic pressure, estimated noninvasively by echocardiography, helps identify SCD patients at risk for pulmonary hypertension, but definitive diagnosis requires right-heart catheterization. About half of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension patients have precapillary pulmonary hypertension with potential etiologies of (1) a nitric oxide deficiency state and vasculopathy consequent to intravascular hemolysis, (2) chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, or (3) upregulated hypoxic responses secondary to anemia, low O2 saturation, and microvascular obstruction. The remainder have postcapillary pulmonary hypertension secondary to left ventricular dysfunction. Although the pulmonary artery pressure in SCD patients with pulmonary hypertension is only moderately elevated, they have a markedly higher risk of death than patients without pulmonary hypertension. Guidelines for diagnosis and management of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension were published recently by the American Thoracic Society. Management of adults with sickle-related pulmonary hypertension is based on anticoagulation for those with thromboembolism; oxygen therapy for those with low oxygen saturation; treatment of left ventricular failure in those with postcapillary pulmonary hypertension; and hydroxyurea or transfusions to raise the hemoglobin concentration, reduce hemolysis, and prevent vaso-occlusive events that cause additional increases in pulmonary pressure. Randomized trials have not identified drugs to lower pulmonary pressure in SCD patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension. Patients with hemodynamics of pulmonary arterial hypertension should be referred to specialized centers and considered for treatments known to be effective in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. There have been reports that some of these treatments

  11. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Corticobasal Degeneration: Pathophysiology and Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Ruth; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Lees, Andrew J; Morris, Huw R

    2016-09-01

    There are currently no disease-modifying treatments for progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) or corticobasal degeneration (CBD), and no approved pharmacological or therapeutic treatments that are effective in controlling their symptoms. The use of most pharmacological treatment options are based on experience in other disorders or from non-randomized historical controls, case series, or expert opinion. Levodopa may provide some improvement in symptoms of Parkinsonism (specifically bradykinesia and rigidity) in PSP and CBD; however, evidence is conflicting and where present, benefits are often negligible and short lived. In fact, "poor" response to levodopa forms part of the NINDS-SPSP criteria for the diagnosis of PSP and consensus criteria for the diagnosis of CBD (Lang Mov Disord. 20 Suppl 1:S83-91, 2005; Litvan et al. Neurology. 48:119-25, 1997; Armstrong et al. Neurology. 80(5):496-503, 2013). There is some evidence that intrasalivery gland botulinum toxin is useful in managing problematic sialorrhea and that intramuscular botulinum toxin and baclofen are helpful in reducing dystonia, including blepharospasm. Benzodiazepines may also be useful in managing dystonia. Myoclonus may be managed using levetiracetam and benzodiazepines. Pharmacological agents licensed for Alzheimer's disease (such as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists) have been used off-label in PSP, CBD, and other tauopathies with the aim of improving cognition; however, there is limited evidence that they are effective and risk of adverse effects may outweigh benefits. The use of atypical antipsychotics for behavioural symptoms is not recommended in the elderly or those with demetia associated conditions and most antipsychotics will worsen Parkinsonism. Antidepressants may be useful for behavioral symptoms and depression but are often poorly tolerated due to adverse effects. In the absence of an effective drug treatment to target the underlying cause of

  12. Hydroxychloroquine-induced cardiomyopathy: case report, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogasundaram, Haran; Putko, Brendan N; Tien, Julia; Paterson, D Ian; Cujec, Bibiana; Ringrose, Jennifer; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2014-12-01

    Drug-induced heart and vascular disease remains an important health burden. Hydroxychloroquine and its predecessor chloroquine are medications commonly used in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and other connective tissue disorders. Hydroxychloroquine interferes with malarial metabolites, confers immunomodulatory effects, and also affects lysosomal function. Clinical monitoring and early recognition of toxicity is an important management strategy in patients who undergo long-term treatment with hydroxychloroquine. Retinal toxicity, neuromyopathy, and cardiac disease are recognized adverse effects of hydroxychloroquine. Immediate withdrawal of hydroxychloroquine is essential if toxicity is suspected because of the early reversibility of cardiomyopathy. In addition to recommended ophthalmological screening, regular screening with 12-lead electrocardiogram and transthoracic echocardiography to detect conduction system disease and/or biventricular morphological or functional changes should be considered in hydroxychloroquine-treated patients. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsy are valuable tools to provide prognostic insights and confirm the diagnosis of hydroxychloroquine-induced cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, chronic use of hydroxychloroquine can result in an acquired lysosomal storage disorder, leading to a drug-induced cardiomyopathy characterized by concentric hypertrophy and conduction abnormalities associated with increased adverse clinical outcomes and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Osteoarthritis: detection, pathophysiology, and current/future treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovani, Sujata; Grogan, Shawn P

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease of the joint, and age is the major risk factor for its development. Clinical manifestation of OA includes joint pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility. Currently, no pharmacological treatments are available to treat this specific joint disease; only symptom-modifying drugs are available. Improvement in imaging technology, identification of biomarkers, and increased understanding of the molecular basis of OA will aid in detecting the early stages of disease. Yet the development of interventional strategies remains elusive and will be critical for effective prevention of OA-associated joint destruction. The potential of cell-based therapies may be applicable in improving joint function in mild to more advanced cases of OA. Ongoing studies to understand the basis of this disease will eventually lead to prevention and treatment strategies and will also be a key in reducing the social and economic burden of this disease. Nurses are advised to provide an integrative approach of disease assessment and management in OA patients' care with a focus on education and implementation. Knowledge and understanding of OA and how this affects the individual patient form the basis for such an integrative approach to all-round patient care and disease management.

  14. Chronic perineal pain: current pathophysiological aspects, diagnostic approaches and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andromanakos, Nikolaos P; Kouraklis, Grigorios; Alkiviadis, Kostakis

    2011-01-01

    Chronic perineal pain is the anorectal and perineal pain without underlying organic disease, anorectal or endopelvic, which has been excluded by careful physical examination, radiological and endoscopic investigations. A variety of neuromuscular disorders of the pelvic floor lead to the different pathological conditions such as anorectal incontinence, urinary incontinence and constipation of obstructed defecation, sexual dysfunction and pain syndromes. The most common functional disorders of the pelvic floor muscles, accompanied by perineal pain are levator ani syndrome, proctalgia fugax, myofascial syndrome and coccygodynia. In the diagnosis of these syndromes, contributing to a thorough history, physical examination, selected specialized investigations and the exclusion of organic disease with proctalgia is carried out. Accurate diagnosis of the syndromes helps in choosing an appropriate treatment and in avoiding unnecessary and ineffective surgical procedures, which often are performed in an attempt to alleviate the patient's symptoms.

  15. Schizophrenia and the immune system: pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Michelle D; Brahm, Nancy C

    2012-05-01

    Published evidence on established and theoretical connections between immune system dysfunction and schizophrenia is reviewed, with a discussion of developments in the search for immunologically-targeted treatments. A growing body of evidence indicates that immunologic influences may play an important role in the etiology and course of schizophrenia. A literature search identified more than 100 articles pertaining to suspected immunologic influences on schizophrenia published over the past 15 years. Schizophrenia researchers have explored a wide range of potential immune system-related causal or contributory factors, including neurobiological and neuroanatomical disorders, genetic abnormalities, and environmental influences such as maternal perinatal infection. Efforts to establish an immunologic basis for schizophrenia and identify reliable immune markers continue to be hindered by sampling challenges and methodological problems. In aggregate, the available evidence indicates that at least some cases of schizophrenia have an immunologic component, suggesting that immune-focused prevention strategies (e.g., counseling of pregnant women to avoid immune stressors) and close monitoring of at-risk children are appropriate. While antipsychotics remain the standard treatments for schizophrenia, a variety of drugs with immunologic effects have been investigated as adjunctive therapies, with variable and sometimes conflicting results; these include the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib, immune-modulating agents (e.g., azathioprine and various anticytokine agents such as atlizumab, anakinra, and tumor necrosis factor-α blockers), and an investigational anti-interferon-γ agent. The published evidence indicates that immune system dysfunction related to genetic, environmental, and neurobiological influences may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia in a subset of patients.

  16. Management of cases suffering from atypical myopathy: interpretations of descriptive, epidemiological and pathophysiological findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Galen Verwilghen, Gaby; Votion, D.-M.

    2013-01-01

    Atypical myopathy is highly fatal, but about a quarter of affected horses survive. This highlights the need for provision of supportive treatment for these cases. This review is a practical guideline for equine practitioners and includes suggestions for close monitoring of involved organ systems ...

  17. Management of cases suffering from atypical myopathy: interpretations of descriptive, epidemiological and pathophysiological findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Galen Verwilghen, Gaby; Votion, D.-M.

    2013-01-01

    Atypical myopathy is highly fatal, but about a quarter of affected horses survive. This highlights the need for provision of supportive treatment for these patients. This review is a practical guideline for equine practitioners and includes suggestions for close monitoring of involved organ systems...

  18. A Review of Gaucher Disease Pathophysiology, Clinical Presentation and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnemann, Jérôme; Belmatoug, Nadia; Camou, Fabrice; Serratrice, Christine; Froissart, Roseline; Caillaud, Catherine; Levade, Thierry; Astudillo, Leonardo; Serratrice, Jacques; Brassier, Anaïs; Rose, Christian; Billette de Villemeur, Thierry; Berger, Marc G

    2017-02-17

    Gaucher disease (GD, ORPHA355) is a rare, autosomal recessive genetic disorder. It is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, glucocerebrosidase, which leads to an accumulation of its substrate, glucosylceramide, in macrophages. In the general population, its incidence is approximately 1/40,000 to 1/60,000 births, rising to 1/800 in Ashkenazi Jews. The main cause of the cytopenia, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, and bone lesions associated with the disease is considered to be the infiltration of the bone marrow, spleen, and liver by Gaucher cells. Type-1 Gaucher disease, which affects the majority of patients (90% in Europe and USA, but less in other regions), is characterized by effects on the viscera, whereas types 2 and 3 are also associated with neurological impairment, either severe in type 2 or variable in type 3. A diagnosis of GD can be confirmed by demonstrating the deficiency of acid glucocerebrosidase activity in leukocytes. Mutations in the GBA1 gene should be identified as they may be of prognostic value in some cases. Patients with type-1 GD-but also carriers of GBA1 mutation-have been found to be predisposed to developing Parkinson's disease, and the risk of neoplasia associated with the disease is still subject to discussion. Disease-specific treatment consists of intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using one of the currently available molecules (imiglucerase, velaglucerase, or taliglucerase). Orally administered inhibitors of glucosylceramide biosynthesis can also be used (miglustat or eliglustat).

  19. A Review of Gaucher Disease Pathophysiology, Clinical Presentation and Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Stirnemann

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease (GD, ORPHA355 is a rare, autosomal recessive genetic disorder. It is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, glucocerebrosidase, which leads to an accumulation of its substrate, glucosylceramide, in macrophages. In the general population, its incidence is approximately 1/40,000 to 1/60,000 births, rising to 1/800 in Ashkenazi Jews. The main cause of the cytopenia, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, and bone lesions associated with the disease is considered to be the infiltration of the bone marrow, spleen, and liver by Gaucher cells. Type-1 Gaucher disease, which affects the majority of patients (90% in Europe and USA, but less in other regions, is characterized by effects on the viscera, whereas types 2 and 3 are also associated with neurological impairment, either severe in type 2 or variable in type 3. A diagnosis of GD can be confirmed by demonstrating the deficiency of acid glucocerebrosidase activity in leukocytes. Mutations in the GBA1 gene should be identified as they may be of prognostic value in some cases. Patients with type-1 GD—but also carriers of GBA1 mutation—have been found to be predisposed to developing Parkinson’s disease, and the risk of neoplasia associated with the disease is still subject to discussion. Disease-specific treatment consists of intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT using one of the currently available molecules (imiglucerase, velaglucerase, or taliglucerase. Orally administered inhibitors of glucosylceramide biosynthesis can also be used (miglustat or eliglustat.

  20. [Understanding the pathophysiology of malnutrition for better treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bandt, J-P

    2015-09-01

    Malnutrition results from an imbalance between intake and protein-energy requirements resulting in tissue losses with adverse functional consequences. However, it would be better to speak of "states of malnutrition" rather than "malnutrition". Indeed, the mechanisms involved associate, with varying degrees, intake deficiency and increased needs with different clinical consequences. Adaptation to nutrient deficiency aims at establishing lasting saving conditions by promoting optimization of energy reserve utilization while preserving protein pool. This is achieved by reducing basal metabolism (low T3), by decreasing the secretion of anabolic factors and moderately increasing catabolic hormones. Unlike the previous process, the metabolic response to injury or stress, which will sometime induce major increase in requirements, will have as immediate purpose the defense of the organism. The body will draw sometime substantially in its protein pool to produce the glucose required for example by the immune cells. Stress response stems from both an endocrine response, and an immuno-inflammatory one with the important role of pro-inflammatory cytokines released in response to pathogens and more recently alarmins in response to endogenous stress in the inflammatory phenomena of the stress response and in the resulting malnutrition state. Treatment of these malnutrition conditions will thus differ: promoting anabolism in one case and fighting resistance to anabolism and hypercatabolism in the other. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Epidemiology, pathophysiology and putative genetic basis of carbamazepine- and oxcarbazepine-induced hyponatremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghuis, B; de Haan, G-J; van den Broek, M P H; Sander, J W; Lindhout, D; Koeleman, B P C

    2016-09-01

    The use of carbamazepine (CBZ) and oxcarbazepine (OXC) as first-line antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of focal epilepsy is limited by hyponatremia, a known adverse effect. Hyponatremia occurs in up to half of people taking CBZ or OXC and, although often assumed to be asymptomatic, it can lead to symptoms ranging from unsteadiness and mild confusion to seizures and coma. Hyponatremia is probably due to the antidiuretic properties of CBZ and OXC that are, at least partly, explained by stimulation of the vasopressin 2 receptor/aquaporin 2 pathway. No known genetic risk variants for CBZ- and OXC-induced hyponatremia exist, but likely candidate genes are part of the vasopressin water reabsorption pathway. © 2016 EAN.

  2. Gastric cancer: epidemiology, prevention, classification, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitarz R

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Robert Sitarz,1–3 Małgorzata Skierucha,1,2 Jerzy Mielko,1 G Johan A Offerhaus,3 Ryszard Maciejewski,2 Wojciech P Polkowski1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 2Department of Human Anatomy, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 3Department of Pathology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract: Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world, the epidemiology of which has changed within last decades. A trend of steady decline in gastric cancer incidence rates is the effect of the increased standards of hygiene, conscious nutrition, and Helicobacter pylori eradication, which together constitute primary prevention. Avoidance of gastric cancer remains a priority. However, patients with higher risk should be screened for early detection and chemoprevention. Surgical resection enhanced by standardized lymphadenectomy remains the gold standard in gastric cancer therapy. This review briefly summarizes the most important aspects of gastric cancers, which include epidemiology, risk factors, classification, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. The paper is mostly addressed to physicians who are interested in updating the state of art concerning gastric carcinoma from easily accessible and credible source. Keywords: gastric cancer, epidemiology, classification, risk factors, treatment

  3. Postamputation pain: epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu E

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Eugene Hsu,1 Steven P Cohen21Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Uniformed Services, University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Postamputation pain (PAP is highly prevalent after limb amputation but remains an extremely challenging pain condition to treat. A large part of its intractability stems from the myriad pathophysiological mechanisms. A state-of-art understanding of the pathophysiologic basis underlying postamputation phenomena can be broadly categorized in terms of supraspinal, spinal, and peripheral mechanisms. Supraspinal mechanisms involve somatosensory cortical reorganization of the area representing the deafferentated limb and are predominant in phantom limb pain and phantom sensations. Spinal reorganization in the dorsal horn occurs after deafferentation from a peripheral nerve injury. Peripherally, axonal nerve damage initiates inflammation, regenerative sprouting, and increased "ectopic" afferent input which is thought by many to be the predominant mechanism involved in residual limb pain or neuroma pain, but may also contribute to phantom phenomena. To optimize treatment outcomes, therapy should be individually tailored and mechanism based. Treatment modalities include injection therapy, pharmacotherapy, complementary and alternative therapy, surgical therapy, and interventions aimed at prevention. Unfortunately, there is a lack of high quality clinical trials to support most of these treatments. Most of the randomized controlled trials in PAP have evaluated medications, with a trend for short-term efficacy noted for ketamine and opioids. Evidence for peripheral injection therapy with botulinum toxin and pulsed radiofrequency for residual limb pain is limited to very small trials and case series. Mirror therapy is a safe and cost-effective alternative treatment modality for PAP. Neuromodulation using implanted motor cortex stimulation has shown a trend

  4. Venom ophthalmia caused by venoms of spitting elapid and other snakes: Report of ten cases with review of epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Edward R; Weinstein, Scott A; White, Julian; Warrell, David A

    2010-09-01

    Venom ophthalmia caused by venoms of spitting elapid and other snakes: report of ten cases with review of epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiology and management. Chu, ER, Weinstein, SA, White, J and Warrell, DA. Toxicon XX:xxx-xxx. We present ten cases of ocular injury following instillation into the eye of snake venoms or toxins by spitting elapids and other snakes. The natural history of spitting elapids and the toxinology of their venoms are reviewed together with the medical effects and management of venom ophthalmia in humans and domestic animals including both direct and allergic effects of venoms. Although the clinical features and management of envenoming following bites by spitting elapids (genera Naja and Hemachatus) are well documented, these snakes are also capable of "spraying" venom towards the eyes of predators, a defensive strategy that causes painful and potentially blinding ocular envenoming (venom ophthalmia). Little attention has been given to the detailed clinical description, clinical evolution and efficacy of treatment of venom ophthalmia and no clear management guidelines have been formulated. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of ocular envenoming is based largely on animal studies and a limited body of clinical information. A few cases of ocular exposure to venoms from crotaline viperids have also been described. Venom ophthalmia often presents with pain, hyperemia, blepharitis, blepharospasm and corneal erosions. Delay or lack of treatment may result in corneal opacity, hypopyon and/or blindness. When venom is "spat" into the eye, cranial nerve VII may be affected by local spread of venom but systemic envenoming has not been documented in human patients. Management of venom ophthalmia consists of: 1) urgent decontamination by copious irrigation 2) analgesia by vasoconstrictors with weak mydriatic activity (e.g. epinephrine) and limited topical administration of local anesthetics (e.g. tetracaine) 3) exclusion of corneal abrasions

  5. A review of the pathophysiology, etiology, and treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok; Couture, Justin

    2014-02-01

    To review the pathophysiology, etiology, and treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A literature search was conducted in PubMed and EMBASE using the terms attention deficit hyperactive disorder, ADHD, pathophysiology, etiology, and neurobiology. Limits applied were the following: published in the past 10 years (January 2003 to August 2013), humans, review, meta-analysis, and English language. These yielded 63 articles in PubMed and 74 in EMBASE. After removing duplicate/irrelevant articles, 86 articles and their relevant reference citations were reviewed. ADHD is a neurological disorder that affects children, but symptoms may persist into adulthood. Individuals suffering from this disorder exhibit hyperactivity, inattention, impulsivity, and problems in social interaction and academic performance. Medications used to treat ADHD such as methylphenidate, amphetamine, and atomoxetine indicate a dopamine/norepinephrine deficit as the neurochemical basis of ADHD, but the etiology is more complex. Moreover, these agents have poor adverse effect profiles and a multitude of drug interactions. Because these drugs are also dispensed to adults who may have concomitant conditions or medications, a pharmacist needs to be aware of these adverse events and drug interactions. This review, therefore, focuses on the pathophysiology, etiology, and treatment of ADHD and details the adverse effects and drug interaction profiles of the drugs used to treat it. Published research shows the benefit of drug therapy for ADHD in children, but given the poor adverse effect and drug interaction profiles, these must be dispensed with caution.

  6. Gerbode defect: A comprehensive review of its history, anatomy, embryology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erfanul Saker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to survey the literature on Gerbode defect and provide an overview of its history, anatomy, development, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment options. The available literature on this topic, including case reports, was thoroughly reviewed. Gerbode defect is defined as abnormal shunting between the left ventricle and right atrium resulting from either a congenital defect or prior cardiac insults. The pathophysiology underlying the development of Gerbode defect is a disease process that injures the atrioventricular septum and leads to the abnormal shunting of blood. Although the most prevalent cause of Gerbode defect has historically been congenital, an increasing trend towards acquired cases has recently been reported owing to improved diagnostic capabilities and a greater number of invasive cardiac procedures. In conclusion, Gerbode defect is an increasingly recognized condition that warrants further study.

  7. Childhood Tuberculosis: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Sheng Tsai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the existence of a government-run tuberculosis (TB control program, the current nationwide burden of TB continues to be a public health problem in Taiwan. Intense current and previous efforts into diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive interventions have focused on TB in adults, but childhood TB has been relatively neglected. Children are particularly vulnerable to severe disease and death following infection, and children with latent infections become reservoirs for future transmission following disease reactivation in adulthood, thus fueling future epidemics. Additional research, understanding, and prevention of childhood TB are urgently needed. This review assesses the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and relevant principles of TB vaccine development and presents efficacy data for the currently licensed vaccines.

  8. Epidemiological Characteristics of Dementia Treatment in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasović, Sanja; Sremec, Josip; Košćak, Jelena; Klepac, Nataša; Draganić, Pero; Bielen, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    In spite of the increase in the number of patients with dementia in countries with older population, basic epidemiologic data are still scarce. The objective of this paper is to investigate pharmacoepidemiological characteristics of treatment of dementia in Croatia, and to present them in the context of certain epidemiological characteristics that illustrate the growing pressure this disease exerts on the healthcare system. Data on medication utilization were taken from Croatian Health Insurance Fund (HZZO) and Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices of Croatia (HALMED). Data on the number of hospital stays were supplied by Croatian Institute of Public Health (HZJZ). Internal data on the number of outpatient examinations from the Clinical hospital "Sveti Duh" were used as well. In the observed period (2012-2014), 4568 patients were treated with anti-dementia medications, of which 1275 (32%) with donepezil, and 2753 (68%) with memantine. According to HALMED, the utilization of those medications is constantly increasing, and has increased manifold from 2005 to 2014. The estimate of the proportion of treated patients with dementia aged 60 years and over is around 9.2%. The number of dementia-related hospital stays is also increasing, and has increased by 9.6% in the last 5-year period, compared to the preceding 5-year period. The number of outpatient examinations in Clinical Hospital "Sveti Duh" grew from 351 in 2007 to 1151 in 2015 (January 1(st) - October 26(th)). The strain this condition exerts on the healthcare system is increasing yearly. In spite of the large increase in the medication utilization over the previous years, the proportion of treated patients is still small, and further increase in their use is to be expected. It is necessary to monitor this in the years ahead.

  9. [Pathophysiology, prophylaxis and treatment of reperfusion syndrome in the surgery of abdominal aorta aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukharev, I I; Guch, A A; Medvedskyĭ, E B; Kostylev, M V; Kornitskaia, A I; Gindich, L A; Dominiak, A B; Vlaĭkov, G G

    1999-01-01

    The peroxidal oxidation of the lipids state was studied up, as well as of the whole blood neutrophils functional activity, hemodynamics and microcirculation of lower extremities in surgical treatment of the abdominal aorta aneurysm. The main significance in the reperfusional syndrome pathophysiology, caused by temporary overcompression of aorta, has the neutrophils activation, their interrelationship with the endothelium cells and the activity lowering of the tissue antioxidant system, manifestated by vascular spasm, which is mostly expressed in the patients with stenotic affection of the lower extremities arteries. Positive effect was noted in application of preparation corvitin, which has antioxidant action.

  10. The rumination syndrome in adults: A review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadopoulos V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rumination in adults is considered to be the effortless regurgitation of recently ingested food into the mouth, followed by either rechewing and reswallowing or expulsion of the regurgitate. On the basis of the definition of rumination as a unique category of functional gastroduodenal disorders, according to the newly established Rome III classification, a review of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of the rumination syndrome in adults is presented after systematic and critical approach of all articles that could be retrieved through PubMed using the term "rumination".

  11. Pediatric femur fractures, epidemiology and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petković Lazar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Femur fractures in children most often occur as a consequence of traffic accidents, during play and sport activities, and due to different pathological states. Diagnosis is rather simple and it includes physical and radiographycal examination. Femur fractures treatment in children can be operative and unoperative, depending on several facts: age, localisation and type of fracture, joint injuries of soft tissues, the presence of other injuries (in polytrauma, economical and social aspects, ect. The aim of this study was to present epidemiological characteristics of pediatric femur fractures, that is in the stage of development, including a special analysis of the used treatment techniques, as well as the comparison of the obtained data with those from the literature. Methods. The evaluation included following parameters: age, gender, cause, localisation and type of femur fracture, applied treatment and hospitalisation duration. Results. Among the presented 143 patients with femur fracture, 109 were boys and 34 were girls (3.2 : 1 ratio; p = 0.0001. Average age for both genders was 8.6 years, and no difference between boys and girls were found for the age (p = 0.758. In total, the most common fracture was diaphyseal fracture of femur in 93 (65.03% patients. The second was proximal fracture in 30 (20.98% patients, and the last distal fracture of the femur in 20 (13.99% patients (p = 0.0001. Three main causes of femur fracture can be distinguished: during play and sport activities in 67 (46.8% children, in traffic accidents in 64 (44.8% children, and pathological fractures in 12 (8.4% children. Inoperative treatment was applied in 82 (57.3% patients, and operative one in 61 (42.7% patients. The most common tretament was traction, in 71 (49.6% patients, followed by immobilization by hip spica cast mostly in young children. Intramedullar elastic nailing was applied in 16 (11.2% cases, and intramedullar rigid nailing (Küntscher in 19

  12. Depression in dementia: epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, Daniela; Winblad, Bengt; Aarsland, Dag

    2011-11-01

    Depression in people with dementia has important implications, such as reduced quality of life of patients and carers, and is associated with increased costs and reduced cognition. Here, we review recent studies of the epidemiology, course, mechanisms and treatment of depression in people with dementia. Depression is both a risk factor and a prodrome of Alzheimer's disease. Depression is a common occurrence in all types of dementias and at all disease stages, including in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Many studies have explored whether depression in MCI increased the conversion rate to dementia, but findings are inconsistent. Studies of the mechanisms are relatively few and findings inconsistent, but inflammatory, trophic and cerebrovascular factors may contribute, in addition to monoamine deficiency and severity of plaques and tangle pathology. Studies of antidepressants for depression in dementia are inconclusive, with several negative findings reported in recent large studies, suggesting that antidepressant may not confer benefit over placebo. Depression is a common risk factor, prodrome, and accompanying symptom of people with Alzheimer's dementia. The mechanisms are unknown, and there is little evidence of effective therapies.

  13. Pathophysiology of visual disorders induced by phosphodiesterase inhibitors in the treatment of erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moschos MM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marilita M Moschos, Eirini Nitoda 1st Department of Ophthalmology, Medical School, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece Aim: The aim of this review was to summarize the ocular action of the most common phosphodiesterase (PDE inhibitors used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and the subsequent visual disorders.Method: This is a literature review of several important articles focusing on the pathophysiology of visual disorders induced by PDE inhibitors.Results: PDE inhibitors have been associated with ocular side effects, including changes in color vision and light perception, blurred vision, transient alterations in electroretinogram (ERG, conjunctival hyperemia, ocular pain, and photophobia. Sildenafil and tadalafil may induce reversible increase in intraocular pressure and be involved in the development of nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy. Reversible idiopathic serous macular detachment, central serous chorioretinopathy, and ERG disturbances have been related to the significant impact of sildenafil and tadalafil on retinal perfusion.Discussion: So far, PDE inhibitors do not seem to cause permanent toxic effects on chorioretinal tissue and photoreceptors. However, physicians should write down any visual symptom observed during PDE treatment and refer the patients to ophthalmologists. Keywords: erectile dysfunction, pathophysiological mechanisms, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, PDE5, visual disorders

  14. Epidemiologic methods in mastitis treatment and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurmond, M C

    1993-11-01

    Methods and concepts of epidemiology offer means whereby udder health can be monitored and evaluated. Prerequisite to a sound epidemiologic approach is development of measures of mastitis that minimize biases and that account for sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests. Mastitis surveillance offers an ongoing and passive system for evaluation of udder health, whereas clinical and observational trials offer a more proactive and developmental approach to improving udder health.

  15. An International Consortium Update: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Lourdes; Oberfield, Sharon E; Witchel, Selma; Auchus, Richard J; Chang, R Jeffrey; Codner, Ethel; Dabadghao, Preeti; Darendeliler, Feyza; Elbarbary, Nancy Samir; Gambineri, Alessandra; Garcia Rudaz, Cecilia; Hoeger, Kathleen M; López-Bermejo, Abel; Ong, Ken; Peña, Alexia S; Reinehr, Thomas; Santoro, Nicola; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Tao, Rachel; Yildiz, Bulent O; Alkhayyat, Haya; Deeb, Asma; Joel, Dipesalema; Horikawa, Reiko; de Zegher, Francis; Lee, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    This paper represents an international collaboration of paediatric endocrine and other societies (listed in the Appendix) under the International Consortium of Paediatric Endocrinology (ICPE) aiming to improve worldwide care of adolescent girls with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)1. The manuscript examines pathophysiology and guidelines for the diagnosis and management of PCOS during adolescence. The complex pathophysiology of PCOS involves the interaction of genetic and epigenetic changes, primary ovarian abnormalities, neuroendocrine alterations, and endocrine and metabolic modifiers such as anti-Müllerian hormone, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, adiposity, and adiponectin levels. Appropriate diagnosis of adolescent PCOS should include adequate and careful evaluation of symptoms, such as hirsutism, severe acne, and menstrual irregularities 2 years beyond menarche, and elevated androgen levels. Polycystic ovarian morphology on ultrasound without hyperandrogenism or menstrual irregularities should not be used to diagnose adolescent PCOS. Hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and obesity may be present in adolescents with PCOS, but are not considered to be diagnostic criteria. Treatment of adolescent PCOS should include lifestyle intervention, local therapies, and medications. Insulin sensitizers like metformin and oral contraceptive pills provide short-term benefits on PCOS symptoms. There are limited data on anti-androgens and combined therapies showing additive/synergistic actions for adolescents. Reproductive aspects and transition should be taken into account when managing adolescents. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Chemotherapy-Induced Constipation and Diarrhea: Pathophysiology, Current and Emerging Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, Rachel M.; Stojanovska, Vanesa; Abalo, Raquel; Bornstein, Joel C.; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) side-effects of chemotherapy are a debilitating and often overlooked clinical hurdle in cancer management. Chemotherapy-induced constipation (CIC) and Diarrhea (CID) present a constant challenge in the efficient and tolerable treatment of cancer and are amongst the primary contributors to dose reductions, delays and cessation of treatment. Although prevalence of CIC is hard to estimate, it is believed to affect approximately 16% of cancer patients, whilst incidence of CID has been estimated to be as high as 80%. Despite this, the underlying mechanisms of both CID and CIC remain unclear, but are believed to result from a combination of intersecting mechanisms including inflammation, secretory dysfunctions, GI dysmotility and alterations in GI innervation. Current treatments for CIC and CID aim to reduce the severity of symptoms rather than combating the pathophysiological mechanisms of dysfunction, and often result in worsening of already chronic GI symptoms or trigger the onset of a plethora of other side-effects including respiratory depression, uneven heartbeat, seizures, and neurotoxicity. Emerging treatments including those targeting the enteric nervous system present promising avenues to alleviate CID and CIC. Identification of potential targets for novel therapies to alleviate chemotherapy-induced toxicity is essential to improve clinical outcomes and quality of life amongst cancer sufferers. PMID:27857691

  17. Esophageal achalasia in the Veneto region: epidemiology and treatment. Epidemiology and treatment of achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, Nicola; Portale, Giuseppe; Gallo, Costantino; Rocchietto, Stefano; Caruso, Valentina; Costantini, Mario; Salvador, Renato; Ruol, Alberto; Zaninotto, Giovanni

    2011-03-01

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder, incurable but amenable to palliative treatments to relieve dysphagia. Given the rarity of the disease, there is a paucity of data from population-based studies on incidence and outcome of the two treatments most commonly used in clinical practice, i.e., endoscopic pneumatic dilation (PD) and surgical myotomy (SM). A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted on the Veneto region, in north-eastern Italy. All patients with achalasia as their primary diagnosis between 2001 and 2005 were identified and their demographics and treatment details obtained. The overall incidence of achalasia was 1.59 cases/100,000/year. Achalasia patients were mainly seen at University Hospitals. Fifty-five percent of the patients received treatment, 23.3% SM and 31.8% PD. The cumulative risk of any subsequent intervention for achalasia was 20% in treated patients (29.7% in patients treated primarily with PD and 4% in patients treated with SM first). The epidemiology of achalasia in the Veneto Region is in line with the situation reported elsewhere and did not change between 2001 and 2005. Achalasia patients are mostly seen at University Hospitals. We observed a greater risk of subsequent intervention for patients previously treated with PD compared with SM.

  18. Endometriosis-associated infertility: aspects of pathophysiological mechanisms and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanbo, Tom; Fedorcsak, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Endometriosis is a common condition in women of reproductive age. In addition to pain, endometriosis may also reduce fertility. The causes of infertility in women with endometriosis may range from anatomical distortions due to adhesions and fibrosis to endocrine abnormalities and immunological disturbances. In some cases, the various pathophysiological disturbances seem to interact through mechanisms so far not fully understood. Whether surgery should be offered as a treatment option in endometriosis-associated infertility has become controversial, partly due to its modest or undocumented effect. Medical or hormonal treatment alone has little or no effect and should only be used in conjunction with assisted reproductive technology (ART). Of the various methods of ART, intrauterine insemination, due to its simplicity, can be recommended in women with minimal or mild peritoneal endometriosis, even though insemination may yield a lower success rate than in women without endometriosis. In vitro fertilization (IVF) is an effective treatment option in less-advanced disease stages, and the success rates are similar to the results in other causes of infertility. However, women with more advanced stages of endometriosis have lower success rates with IVF. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. Stress urinary incontinence in pregnant women: a review of prevalence, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangsawang, Bussara; Sangsawang, Nucharee

    2013-06-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is the most common type of urinary incontinence (UI) in pregnant women and is known to have detrimental effects on the quality of life in approximately 54.3 %. Pregnancy is the main risk factor for the development of SUI. This review provides details of the pathophysiology leading to SUI in pregnant women and SUI prevalence and treatment during pregnancy. We conducted a PubMed search for English-language and human-study articles registered from January 1990 to September 2012. This search was performed for articles dealing with prevalence and treatment of SUI during pregnancy. In the intervention studies, we included studies that used a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design or studies comparing a treatment intervention to no treatment. A total of 534 articles were identified; 174 full-text articles were reviewed, and 28 of them met eligibility criteria and are reported on here. The mean prevalence of SUI during pregnancy was 41 % (18.6-60 %) and increased with gestational age. The increasing pressure of the growing uterus and fetal weight on pelvic-floor muscles (PFM) throughout pregnancy, together with pregnancy-related hormonal changes, may lead to reduced PFM strength as well as their supportive and sphincteric function. These cause mobility of the bladder neck and urethra, leading to urethral sphincter incompetence. Pelvic floor muscle exercise (PFME) is a safe and effective treatment for SUI during pregnancy, without significant adverse effects. Understanding these issues can be useful for health-care professionals when informing and counseling pregnant women to help prevent SUI during pregnancy and the postpartum period.

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux disease-related and functional heartburn: pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Hiroto; Kondo, Takashi; Oshima, Tadayuki

    2016-07-01

    Patients who continue to experience heartburn symptoms despite adequate-dose proton pump inhibitor therapy have unmet clinical needs. In this review, we focus on the most recent findings related to the mechanism of heartburn symptom generation, and on the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease-related and functional heartburn. The immunological mechanism in the esophageal mucosa has been addressed as a potential mechanism of the onset of esophageal mucosa damage and the generation of heartburn symptoms. Peripheral or central hypersensitivity in viscera is a potentially unifying pathophysiological concept in functional heartburn. Vonoprazan, a novel and potent first-in-class potassium-competitive acid blocker, is expected to prove useful in the treatment of reflux disease. New findings in the mechanisms of heartburn symptom generation are emerging, including the immunological mediation of esophageal mucosal damage and the development of visceral hypersensitivity in functional heartburn. In the future, we anticipate the emergence of new and specific therapeutic options based on these mechanisms, with less dependence on acid-suppressing agents.

  1. Chronic Pruritus in the Absence of Skin Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Manuel P; Kremer, Andreas E; Mettang, Thomas; Ständer, Sonja

    2016-08-01

    Chronic pruritus arises not only from dermatoses, but also, in up to half of cases, from extracutaneous origins. A multitude of systemic, neurological, psychiatric, and somatoform conditions are associated with pruritus in the absence of skin disease. Moreover, pruritus is a frequently observed side effect of many drugs. It is therefore difficult for physicians to make a correct diagnosis. Chronic pruritus patients frequently present to the dermatologist with skin lesions secondary to a long-lasting scratching behavior, such as lichenification and prurigo nodularis. A structured clinical history and physical examination are essential in order to evaluate the pruritus, along with systematic, medical history-adapted laboratory and radiological tests carried out according to the differential diagnosis. For therapeutic reasons, a symptomatic therapy should be promptly initiated parallel to the diagnostic procedures. Once the underlying factor(s) leading to the pruritus are identified, a targeted therapy should be implemented. Importantly, the treatment of accompanying disorders such as sleep disturbances or mental symptoms should be taken into consideration. Even after successful treatment of the underlying cause, pruritus may persist, likely due to chronicity processes including peripheral and central sensitization or impaired inhibition at spinal level. A vast arsenal of topical and systemic agents targeting these pathophysiological mechanisms has been used to deter further chronicity. The therapeutic options currently available are, however, still insufficient for many patients. Thus, future studies aiming to unveil the complex mechanisms underlying chronic pruritus and develop new therapeutic agents are urgently needed.

  2. Oropharyngeal and laryngeal sensory innervation in the pathophysiology of swallowing disorders and sensory stimulation treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Berdugo, Daniel; Rofes, Laia; Casamitjana, J Francesc; Padrón, Andreína; Quer, Miquel; Clavé, Pere

    2016-09-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) affects older and neurological patients, causing malnutrition and dehydration and increasing the risk for aspiration pneumonia. There is evidence that sensory deficits in those populations are closely related to swallowing disorders, and several research groups are developing new therapies based on sensory stimulation of this area. More information on the sensory innervation participating in the swallow response is needed to better understand the pathophysiology of OD and to develop new treatments. This review focuses on the sensory innervation of the human oropharynx and larynx in healthy people compared with patients with swallowing disorders in order to unravel the abnormalities that may lead to the loss of sensitivity in patients with OD. We also hypothesize the pathway through which active sensory-enhancement treatments may elicit their therapeutic effect on patients with swallowing dysfunctions. As far as we know, this is the first time a review covers the anatomy, histology, ultrastructure, and molecular biology of the sensory innervation of the swallowing function. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial.

  4. Headache attributed to airplane travel: diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Sebastian Bao Dinh; Gazerani, Parisa

    2017-08-16

    Headache attributed to airplane travel, also named "airplane headache" (AH) is a headache that occurs during take-off and landing. Today, there are still uncertainties about the pathophysiology and treatment of AH. This systematic review was performed to facilitate identification of the existing literature on AH in order to discuss the current evidence and areas that remain to be investigated in AH. The systematic literature search was performed in 3 relevant medical databases; PubMed, Scopus, and Embase. The search yielded 220 papers and the papers were sorted based on inclusion and exclusion criteria established for this study. This systematic review included 39 papers. Main findings revealed that AH attacks are clinically stereotyped and appear mostly during landing phases. The headache presents as a severe painful headache that often disappears within 30 min. The pain is unilateral and localized in the fronto-orbital region. Sinus barotrauma has been considered as the main cause of AH. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and triptans have been taken by passengers with AH, to relieve the headache. Based on this systematic review, further studies seem required to investigate underlying mechanisms in AH and also to investigate the biological effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and triptans for alleviating of AH. These studies would advance our understanding of AH pathogenesis and potential use of treatments that are not yet established.

  5. Gastric cancer: epidemiology, prevention, classification, and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sitarz, Robert; Skierucha, Małgorzata; Mielko, Jerzy; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Polkowski, Wojciech P

    2018-01-01

    Robert Sitarz,1–3 Małgorzata Skierucha,1,2 Jerzy Mielko,1 G Johan A Offerhaus,3 Ryszard Maciejewski,2 Wojciech P Polkowski1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 2Department of Human Anatomy, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; 3Department of Pathology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands Abstract: Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world, the epidemiology of which has ch...

  6. High fructose diet-induced metabolic syndrome: Pathophysiological mechanism and treatment by traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ying; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2018-04-01

    Fructose is a natural monosaccharide broadly used in modern society. Over the past few decades, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that high fructose intake is an etiological factor of metabolic syndrome (MetS). This review highlights research advances on fructose-induced MetS, especially the underlying pathophysiological mechanism as well as pharmacotherapy by traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), using the PubMed, Web of science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Science and Technology Journal and Wanfang Data. This review focuses on de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and uric acid (UA) production, two unique features of fructolysis different from glucose glycolysis. High level of DNL and UA production can result in insulin resistance, the key pathological event in developing MetS, mostly through oxidative stress and inflammation. Some other pathologies like the disturbance in brain and gut microbiota in the development of fructose-induced MetS in the past years, are also discussed. In management of MetS, TCM is an excellent representative in alternative and complementary medicine with a complete theory system and substantial herbal remedies. TCMs against MetS or MetS components, including Chinese patent medicines, TCM compound formulas, single TCM herbs and active compounds of TCM herbs, are reviewed on their effects and molecular mechanisms. TCMs with hypouricemic activity, which specially target fructose-induced MetS, are highlighted. And new technologies and strategies (such as high-throughput assay and systems biology) in this field are further discussed. In summary, fructose-induced MetS is a multifactorial disorder with the underlying complex mechanisms. Current clinical and pre-clinical evidence supports the potential of TCMs in management of MetS. Additionally, TCMs may show some advantages against complex MetS as their holistic feature through multiple target actions. However, further work is needed to confirm the effectivity and safety of TCMs

  7. Diabetic Cataract—Pathogenesis, Epidemiology and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Pollreisz

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the pathogenesis of diabetic cataract, clinical studies investigating the association between diabetes and cataract development, and current treatment of cataract in diabetics.

  8. The epidemiology and treatment of gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGill NW

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Neil W McGillInstitute of Rheumatology and Orthopaedics, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, Sydney, AustraliaAbstract: The development and expression of gout depends on three key steps: (1 chronic hyperuricemia, (2 the growth of monosodium urate (MSU crystals, and (3 interaction between MSU crystals and the inflammatory system. Epidemiological studies have continued to improve our understanding of the environmental and genetic factors which influence chronic hyperuricemia and gout. The influence of obesity, alcohol, race, sex, age, and specific dietary components will be discussed below. The primary mechanism of hyperuricemia is insufficient renal clearance of uric acid which in turn is dependent on transport of uric acid in the proximal renal tubule. Knowledge of the transport mechanisms has improved understanding of the genetic influences on gout and is relevant to understanding of the effects of drugs which can increase or decrease renal uric acid clearance. The application of established principles of management including diagnosis through crystal identification, the gradual introduction of hypouricemic therapy with the use of prophylaxis to reduce the risk of flares, identification of a suitably low target of plasma urate, a progressive increase in therapy to achieve the target and taking steps to encourage good compliance, has the potential to improve outcomes for patients with this very common affliction. The potential role for new therapies will also be discussed.Keywords: gout, hyperuricemia, allopurinol, febuxostat, lesinurad, pegloticase

  9. Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction – Concept, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Challenges for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Veterovska Miljkovik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF with preserved left ventricular (LV ejection fraction (HFpEF occurs in 40 to 60% of the patients with HF, with a prognosis which is similar to HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF. HFpEF pathophysiology is different from that of HFrEF, and has been characterized with diastolic dysfunction. Diastolic dysfunction has been defined with elevated left ventricular stiffness, prolonged iso-volumetric LV relaxation, slow LV filing and elevated LV end-diastolic pressure. Arterial hypertension occurs in majority cases with HFpEF worldwide. Patients are mostly older and obese. Diabetes mellitus and atrial fibrillation appear proportionally in a high frequency of patients with HFpEF. The HFpEF diagnosis is based on existence of symptoms and signs of heart failure, normal or approximately normal ejection and diagnosing of LV diastolic dysfunction by means of heart catheterization or Doppler echocardiography and/or elevated concentration of plasma natriuretic peptide. The present recommendations for HFpEF treatment include blood pressure control, heart chamber frequency control when atrial fibrillation exists, in some situations even coronary revascularization and an attempt for sinus rhythm reestablishment. Up to now, it is considered that no medication or a group of medications improve the survival of HFpEF patients. Due to these causes and the bad prognosis of the disorder, rigorous control is recommended of the previously mentioned precipitating factors for this disorder. This paper presents a universal review of the most important parameters which determine this disorder.

  10. Military-Relevant Infectious Diseases Endemic to Kenya: Epidemiology, Immunology, Pathophysiology, Treatment, and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    3 80573 Phelecia O. Omondi Auxillary Staff I CTS 77 3 80599 Elly Owuor Akoyo Auxillary Staff I CTS 78 3 80563 Thomas Omaset Omedo Auxillary Staff I...CTS 79 3 80564 Teresa Ongego Odundo Auxillary Staff I CTS 80 3 80586 Michael Ochieng Oleche Auxilliary Staff I CTS 81 3 80592 Charles Osuo

  11. The systemic immune response to trauma: an overview of pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Janet M; Midwinter, Mark J; Chen, Yen-Fu; Belli, Antonio; Brohi, Karim; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Koenderman, Leo; Kubes, Paul; Lilford, Richard J

    2014-10-18

    Improvements in the control of haemorrhage after trauma have resulted in the survival of many people who would otherwise have died from the initial loss of blood. However, the danger is not over once bleeding has been arrested and blood pressure restored. Two-thirds of patients who die following major trauma now do so as a result of causes other than exsanguination. Trauma evokes a systemic reaction that includes an acute, non-specific, immune response associated, paradoxically, with reduced resistance to infection. The result is damage to multiple organs caused by the initial cascade of inflammation aggravated by subsequent sepsis to which the body has become susceptible. This Series examines the biological mechanisms and clinical implications of the cascade of events caused by large-scale trauma that leads to multiorgan failure and death, despite the stemming of blood loss. Furthermore, the stark and robust epidemiological finding--namely, that age has a profound influence on the chances of surviving trauma irrespective of the nature and severity of the injury--will be explored. Advances in our understanding of the inflammatory response to trauma, the impact of ageing on this response, and how this information has led to new and emerging treatments aimed at combating immune dysregulation and reduced immunity after injury will also be discussed.

  12. Urinary tract infections: epidemiology, mechanisms of infection and treatment options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Mireles, Ana L.; Walker, Jennifer N.; Caparon, Michael; Hultgren, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a severe public health problem and are caused by a range of pathogens, but most commonly by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. High recurrence rates and increasing antimicrobial resistance among uropathogens threaten to greatly increase the economic burden of these infections. In this Review, we discuss how basic science studies are elucidating the molecular details of the crosstalk that occurs at the host–pathogen interface, as well as the consequences of these interactions for the pathophysiology of UTIs. We also describe current efforts to translate this knowledge into new clinical treatments for UTIs. PMID:25853778

  13. PPoma Review: Epidemiology, Aetiopathogenesis, Prognosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Ligiero Braga

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally, pancreatic polypeptide-secreting tumor of the distal pancreas (PPoma is classified as a rare tumor, and may occur sporadically or be associated in families or with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (NEM 1. It grows slowly, reaching large dimensions at the time of diagnosis and the symptomatology is fundamentally due to the mass effect, causing either non-specific abdominal pain or symptoms suggestive of obstruction of the pancreatic or biliary duct. Therefore, when detected, they are usually malignant, with metastases mainly in the liver. The combination of serum analysis of increased levels of chromogranin A and pancreatic polypeptide and pancreastatin is very useful with a sensitivity of up to 95%. However, in addition, scintigraphicexams with somatostatin analogues should be performed to better clarify the diagnosis. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice, despite surgical difficulty and because they are generally palliative due to the metastases. Surgeries for tumor volume reduction are also performed to relieve symptoms. Chemotherapy commonly uses streptozotocin and somatostatin analogues to treat residual disease. Unfortunately, the survival rates are still very low, less than 10%, and if metastases already exist, this percentage drops to 3%.

  14. New developments in epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of fascioliasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabada, Miguel M; White, A Clinton

    2012-10-01

    This review focuses on the recent developments in the epidemiology, burden of disease, diagnostic tests, and treatment of fascioliasis. Recent epidemiologic data suggest that either the endemic areas are expanding or disease is being recognized in areas where it was not previously observed. In addition, recent data highlight the effects of fascioliasis on childhood anemia and nutrition. Diagnosis remains problematic, but newer diagnostic tests including antibody, antigen, and DNA detection tests may facilitate earlier diagnosis. Recent studies suggest that point-of-care testing may soon be possible. Treatment with triclabendazole is effective, but resistance is emerging in livestock and may pose a threat for patients. Fascioliasis continues to emerge as an important neglected disease, with new studies highlighting the under-recognized burden of disease. Further studies are needed on burden of disease, improved diagnosis, and alternative to triclabendazole treatment.

  15. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, and in-hospital management of pulmonary edema: data from the Romanian Acute Heart Failure Syndromes registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chioncel, Ovidiu; Ambrosy, Andrew P; Bubenek, Serban; Filipescu, Daniela; Vinereanu, Dragos; Petris, Antoniu; Christodorescu, Ruxandra; Macarie, Cezar; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Collins, Sean P

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical presentation, inpatient management, and in-hospital outcome of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS) and classified as pulmonary edema (PE). The Romanian Acute Heart Failure Syndromes (RO-AHFS) study was a prospective, national, multicenter registry of all consecutive patients admitted with AHFS over a 12-month period. Patients were classified at initial presentation by clinician-investigators into the following clinical profiles: acute decompensated HF, cardiogenic shock, PE, right HF, or hypertensive HF. RO-AHFS enrolled 3224 patients and 28.7% (n = 924) were classified as PE. PE patients were more likely to present with pulmonary congestion, tachypnea, tachycardia, and elevated systolic blood pressure and less likely to have peripheral congestion and body weight increases. Mechanical ventilation was required in 8.8% of PE patients. PE patients received higher doses (i.e. 101.4 ± 27.1 mg) of IV furosemide for a shorter duration (i.e. 69.3 ± 22.3 hours). Vasodilators were given to 73.6% of PE patients. In-hospital all-cause mortality (ACM) in PE patients was 7.4%, and 57% of deaths occurred on day one. Increasing age, concurrent acute coronary syndromes, life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, elevated BUN, left bundle branch block, inotrope therapy, and requirement for invasive mechanical ventilation were independent risk factors for ACM. In this national registry, the PE profile was found to be a high-acuity clinical presentation with distinctive treatment patterns and a poor short-term prognosis. Advances in the management of PE may necessitate both the development of novel targeted therapies as well as systems-based strategies to identify high-risk patients early in their course.

  16. The small, dense LDL phenotype and the risk of coronary heart disease: epidemiology, patho-physiology and therapeutic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, B; Lemieux, I; Després, J P

    1999-09-01

    More than decade ago, several cross-sectional studies have reported differences in LDL particle size, density and composition between coronary heart disease (CHD) patients and healthy controls. Three recent prospective, nested case-control studies have since confirmed that the presence of small, dense LDL particles was associated with more than a three-fold increase in the risk of CHD. The small, dense LDL phenotype rarely occurs as an isolated disorder. It is most frequently accompanied by hypertriglyceridemia, reduced HDL cholesterol levels, abdominal obesity, insulin resistance and by a series of other metabolic alterations predictive of an impaired endothelial function and increased susceptibility to thrombosis. Whether or not the small, dense LDL phenotype should be considered an independent CHD risk factor remains to be clearly established. The cluster of metabolic abnormalities associated with small, dense LDL particles has been referred to as the insulin resistance-dyslipidemic phenotype of abdominal obesity. Results from the Québec Cardiovascular Study have indicated that individuals displaying three of the numerous features of insulin resistance (elevated plasma insulin and apolipoprotein B concentrations and small, dense LDL particles) showed a remarkable increase in CHD risk. Our data suggest that the increased risk of CHD associated with having small, dense LDL particles may be modulated to a significant extent by the presence/absence of insulin resistance, abdominal obesity and increased LDL particle concentration. We suggest that the complex interactions among the metabolic alterations of the insulin resistance syndrome should be considered when evaluating the risk of CHD associated with the small, dense LDL phenotype. From a therapeutic standpoint, the treatment of this condition should not only aim at reducing plasma triglyceride levels, but also at improving all features of the insulin resistance syndrome, for which body weight loss and

  17. Pathogenesis and treatment of psoriasis: exploiting pathophysiological pathways for precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwan, Wisam; Nestle, Frank O

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic inflammatory skin disease associated with multi-system manifestations including arthritis and obesity. Our knowledge of the aetiology of the condition, including the key genomic, immune and environmental factors, has led to the development of targeted, precision therapies that alleviate patient morbidity. This article reviews the key pathophysiological pathways and therapeutic targets and highlights future areas of interest in psoriasis research.

  18. Kidney disease and obesity: epidemiology, mechanisms and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Kramer, Holly; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Sharma, Kumar

    2017-03-01

    The theme of World Kidney Day 2017 is 'kidney disease and obesity: healthy lifestyle for healthy kidneys'. To mark this event, Nature Reviews Nephrology invited five leading researchers to describe changes in the epidemiology of obesity-related kidney disease, advances in current understanding of the mechanisms and current approaches to the management of affected patients. The researchers also highlight new advances that could lead to the development of novel treatments and identify areas in which further basic and clinical studies are needed.

  19. Epidemiology and treatment of psoriasis: a Chinese perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan R

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ran Pan, Jianzhong Zhang Department of Dermatology, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China Background: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that has a negative impact on quality of life. Prevalence and management of psoriasis varies among different ethnic groups. Objectives: To evaluate the epidemiology and treatment of psoriasis from a Chinese perspective. Methods: A systematic search was performed on PubMed and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure using the following MeSH terms: "psoriasis" and ("prevalence" or "epidemiology" and "risk factor" and ("management" or "treatment". The search included all citations from 1975 to 2013. Data were sorted by prevalence, age of onset, sex distribution, type, severity, risk factors, and management and treatment. Severity of psoriasis was classified as mild, moderate, or severe. The studies cited in this review involved Chinese subjects. Results: The prevalence of psoriasis in the People's Republic of China ranged from 0.11% to 0.47%. Genetic and environmental factors played an important role in initiation and exacerbation of psoriasis. Results showed that psoriasis can occur at any age but is more common in young and middle-aged individuals and occurs more often in men and earlier in women. Psoriasis vulgaris accounted for 82.6%–97.1% of psoriasis patients. More than 90% of patients with psoriasis were classified as mild or moderately severe. Risk factors are numerous. Management and treatment was based on classification level. Conclusion: The prevalence of psoriasis in Chinese patients is lower than that in Caucasians. A cold and dry climate, bacterial infection, diet, and stress are important risk factors for developing psoriasis. There are a variety of management and treatment options available. As such, Chinese patients with psoriasis can receive effective, safe, and individualized treatment. Keywords: psoriasis, epidemiology, risk factors

  20. Ophthalmologic Disease in HIV Infection: Recent Changes in Pathophysiology and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Michael W

    2017-10-19

    Ophthalmologic conditions were among the earliest described findings in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this review is to highlight recent changes in the pathophysiology and management of ophthalmologic conditions in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in 1996 changed ophthalmologic findings from predominantly acute infectious diseases to chronic, slowly progressive, debilitating conditions. HIV-associated neuroretinal disorder infrequently leads to blindness, but it causes visual disability in a large percentage of patients. Cytomegalovirus retinitis is now seen less commonly in the USA, but it remains an important cause of blindness in HIV-infected patients from developing countries. Immune recovery uveitis has emerged as a major cause of visual disability in the USA. As HIV has become a chronic disease, visual disability due to chronic noninfectious diseases have become increasingly important.

  1. New insights into the pathophysiology of achalasia and implications for future treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Torres-Landa, Samuel; Valdovinos, Miguel Ángel; Coss-Adame, Enrique; Martín Del Campo, Luis A; Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo

    2016-09-21

    Idiopathic achalasia is an archetype esophageal motor disorder, causing significant impairment of eating ability and reducing quality of life. The pathophysiological underpinnings of this condition are loss of esophageal peristalsis and insufficient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The clinical manifestations include dysphagia for both solids and liquids, regurgitation of esophageal contents, retrosternal chest pain, cough, aspiration, weight loss and heartburn. Even though idiopathic achalasia was first described more than 300 years ago, researchers are only now beginning to unravel its complex etiology and molecular pathology. The most recent findings indicate an autoimmune component, as suggested by the presence of circulating anti-myenteric plexus autoantibodies, and a genetic predisposition, as suggested by observed correlations with other well-defined genetic syndromes such as Allgrove syndrome and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 B syndrome. Viral agents (herpes, varicella zoster) have also been proposed as causative and promoting factors. Unfortunately, the therapeutic approaches available today do not resolve the causes of the disease, and only target the consequential changes to the involved tissues, such as destruction of the LES, rather than restoring or modifying the underlying pathology. New therapies should aim to stop the disease at early stages, thereby preventing the consequential changes from developing and inhibiting permanent damage. This review focuses on the known characteristics of idiopathic achalasia that will help promote understanding its pathogenesis and improve therapeutic management to positively impact the patient's quality of life.

  2. Diabetic foot ulcers in conjunction with lower limb lymphedema: pathophysiology and treatment procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanapathy M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Muholan Kanapathy,1 Mark J Portou,1,2 Janice Tsui,1,2 Toby Richards1,21Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, 2Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs are complex, chronic, and progressive wounds, and have a significant impact on morbidity, mortality, and quality of life. A particular aspect of DFU that has not been reviewed extensively thus far is its management in conjunction with peripheral limb edema. Peripheral limb edema is a feature of diabetes that has been identified as a significant risk factor for amputation in patients with DFU. Three major etiological factors in development of lymphedema with concurrent DFU are diabetic microangiopathy, failure of autonomic regulation, and recurrent infection. This review outlines the pathophysiology of lymphedema formation in patients with DFU and highlights the cellular and immune components of impaired wound healing in lymphedematous DFU. We then discuss the principles of management of DFU in conjunction with lymphedema.Keywords: diabetic foot ulcer, lymphedema, chronic wound, wound management

  3. Tuberculous spondylodiscitis: epidemiology, clinical features, treatment, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trecarichi, E M; Di Meco, E; Mazzotta, V; Fantoni, M

    2012-04-01

    Tuberculous spondylodiscitis (TS) is a rare but serious clinical condition which may lead to severe deformity and early or late neurological complications. To discuss certain aspects of the approach to TSs, focusing upon epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment outcome. For the purpose of this review, a literature search was performed using the Pubmed database through to 19th October 2011 to identify studies published in the last 20 years, concerned in epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutical aspects of TS in adults. Only studies drafted in English language and reporting case series of more than 20 patients have been included. TS has been reported to accounts for 1-5% of all TB cases, and for about 50% of the cases of articulo-skeletal TB infections. Despite the actual availability of more effective diagnostic tools, early recognition of TS remains difficult and a high index of suspicion is needed due to the chronic nature of the disease and its insidious and variable clinical presentation. A prompt diagnosis is required to improve long term outcome, and a microbiological confirmation is recommended to enable appropriate choice of anti-mycobacterial agents. Surgery has an important role in alleviating pain, correcting deformities and neurological impairment, and restoring function. Further studies are required to assess the appropriate duration of anti-microbial treatment, also in regarding of a combined surgical approach.

  4. Epidemiology and treatment of psoriasis: a Brazilian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte GV

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gleison V Duarte,1 Larissa Porto-Silva,2 Maria de Fátima Paim de Oliveira1 1Dermatology Department, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, 2Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública, Salvador, BA, Brazil Abstract: Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated systemic disease that is influenced by genetic and environmental factors, is associated with comorbidities, and has a negative impact on the quality of life of affected individuals. The prevalence of psoriasis varies among different ethnic groups, but this topic has not been studied in Brazil to date. In this review, we evaluate the epidemiology and treatment of psoriasis from a Brazilian perspective. We focused on studies that involved Brazilian subjects. The prevalence of psoriasis in Brazil is estimated to be 2.5%, but no population study has been performed previously. Environmental factors, such as tropical climate, in association with genetic factors, such as miscegenation, may exert a beneficial impact on the course and frequency of psoriasis in Brazil. A number of studies have advanced our understanding of the cardiovascular, ophthalmic, and oral comorbidities that are associated with psoriasis. Concerns about biological therapy, such as endemic leprosy, human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV, and tuberculosis infections, are discussed. The nonavailability of treatment options for psoriasis in the public health system contradicts the Brazilian Society of Dermatology guidelines, stimulating the judicialization of access to medicines in psoriasis care. Keywords: psoriasis, epidemiology, comorbidities, health services accessibility, health care disparities, insurance, health care costs

  5. Status epilepticus in the elderly: epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis, Telma M.R.; Costa, Gersonita; Bacellar, Aroldo; Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to review the epidemiology, clinical profile and discuss the etiology, prognosis and treatment options in patients aged 60 years or older presenting with status epilepticus. We performed a systematic review involving studies published from 1996 to 2010, in Medline/PubMed, Scientific Electronic Library on line (Scielo), Latin-American and Caribbean Center of Health Sciences Information (Lilacs) databases and textbooks. Related articles published before 1996, when relevant for discussing epilepsy in older people, were also included. Several population studies had shown an increased incidence of status epilepticus after the age of 60 years. Status epilepticus is a medical and neurological emergency that is associated with high morbidity and mortality, and is a major concern in the elderly compared to the general population. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment of convulsive status epilepticus are crucial to avoid brain injury and reduce the fatality rate in this age group. PMID:23355930

  6. Amblyaudia: Review of Pathophysiology, Clinical Presentation, and Treatment of a New Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alyson B; Kozin, Elliott D; Remenschneider, Aaron; Eftekhari, Kian; Jung, David H; Polley, Daniel B; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    Similar to amblyopia in the visual system, "amblyaudia" is a term used to describe persistent hearing difficulty experienced by individuals with a history of asymmetric hearing loss (AHL) during a critical window of brain development. Few clinical reports have described this phenomenon and its consequent effects on central auditory processing. We aim to (1) define the concept of amblyaudia and (2) review contemporary research on its pathophysiology and emerging clinical relevance. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. A systematic literature search was performed with combinations of search terms: "amblyaudia," "conductive hearing loss," "sensorineural hearing loss," "asymmetric," "pediatric," "auditory deprivation," and "auditory development." Relevant articles were considered for inclusion, including basic and clinical studies, case series, and major reviews. During critical periods of infant brain development, imbalanced auditory input associated with AHL may lead to abnormalities in binaural processing. Patients with amblyaudia can demonstrate long-term deficits in auditory perception even with correction or resolution of AHL. The greatest impact is in sound localization and hearing in noisy environments, both of which rely on bilateral auditory cues. Diagnosis and quantification of amblyaudia remain controversial and poorly defined. Prevention of amblyaudia may be possible through early identification and timely management of reversible causes of AHL. Otolaryngologists, audiologists, and pediatricians should be aware of emerging data supporting amblyaudia as a diagnostic entity and be cognizant of the potential for lasting consequences of AHL. Prevention of long-term auditory deficits may be possible through rapid identification and correction. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  7. The Pathophysiology of Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Jessica C.; Kay, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Insomnia disorder is characterized by chronic dissatisfaction with sleep quantity or quality that is associated with difficulty falling asleep, frequent nighttime awakenings with difficulty returning to sleep, and/or awakening earlier in the morning than desired. Although progress has been made in our understanding of the nature, etiology, and pathophysiology of insomnia, there is still no universally accepted model. Greater understanding of the pathophysiology of insomnia may provide important information regarding how, and under what conditions, the disorder develops and is maintained as well as potential targets for prevention and treatment. The aims of this report are (1) to summarize current knowledge on the pathophysiology of insomnia and (2) to present a model of the pathophysiology of insomnia that considers evidence from various domains of research. Working within several models of insomnia, evidence for the pathophysiology of the disorder is presented across levels of analysis, from genetic to molecular and cellular mechanisms, neural circuitry, physiologic mechanisms, sleep behavior, and self-report. We discuss the role of hyperarousal as an overarching theme that guides our conceptualization of insomnia. Finally, we propose a model of the pathophysiology of insomnia that integrates the various types of evidence presented. PMID:25846534

  8. Role of Anti-Müllerian Hormone in pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Agathe; Robin, Geoffroy; Catteau-Jonard, Sophie; Dewailly, Didier

    2015-12-21

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenism in young women. Excessive ovarian production of Anti-Müllerian Hormone, secreted by growing follicles in excess, is now considered as an important feature of PCOS. The aim of this review is first to update the current knowledge about the role of AMH in the pathophysiology of PCOS. Then, this review will discuss the improvement that serum AMH assay brings in the diagnosis of PCOS. Last, this review will explain the utility of serum AMH assay in the management of infertility in women with PCOS and its utility as a marker of treatment efficiency on PCOS symptoms. It must be emphasized however that the lack of an international standard for the serum AMH assay, mainly because of technical issues, makes it difficult to define consensual thresholds, and thus impairs the widespread use of this new ovarian marker. Hopefully, this should soon improve.

  9. Epidemiology of drug abuse treatment in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shandir Ramlagan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of the study was to explore the epidemiology of drug abuse treatment in South Africa. Methods. Treatment demand statistics were analysed from South African National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use records, and a rapid situation assessment was conducted. Twenty-one key informant interviews were conducted in all 9 provinces among provincial substance abuse co-ordinators, and one manager per treatment centre from a sample of treatment centres. Three focus groups were conducted and 46 self-administered questionnaires were distributed among inpatients at 2 selected treatment centres in Free State and North West provinces. Qualitative data were analysed using grounded theory, and quantitative data analysed using SPSS. Results. Treatment records show that the most frequent substance of abuse was alcohol (51%, followed by cannabis (21%, crack/cocaine (9.6%, heroin/opiates (7.9%, methamphetamine (Tik (4.5%, prescription/over-the-counter drugs (2.0%, and cannabis/mandrax (1.7%. More substance abusers were male, of lower education, white or black, than were female, more highly educated, coloured and Indian/Asian. Key informant interviews showed that females are the ‘hidden’ substance abusers and tend not to be identified in research statistics and at treatment centres. Poverty, unemployment, lack of recreational facilities, being surrounded by substance abusers, and long work shifts were also mentioned as factors contributing to substance abuse. The age of initiation of substance abuse using non-drugs such as glue was 9 years old, alcohol 10 - 12 years old, dagga 11 - 12 years old, poly-drug use (alcohol, tobacco and dagga 14 years old, and harder drugs such as cocaine and heroin at 16 - 17 years old, as reported by key informants. Family care and support, improved socio-economic conditions and increased law enforcement would help to discourage substance

  10. Update on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibel, F; Cambau, E; Aubry, A

    2015-09-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease that has now been reported for more than 2000 years. The leprosy elimination goal set by the World Health Organization (WHO), i.e. a global prevalence rate Leprosy is a specific infection: (i) it is a chronic infection primarily affecting the skin and peripheral nerves, (ii) Mycobacterium leprae is one of the last bacterial species of medical interest that cannot be cultured in vitro (mainly because of its reductive genome evolution), and (iii) transmission and pathophysiological data is still limited. The various presentations of the disease (Ridley-Jopling and WHO classifications) are correlated with the patient's immune response, bacillary load, and by the delay before diagnosis. Multidrug therapy (dapsone, rifampicin, with or without clofazimine) has been recommended since 1982 as the standard treatment of leprosy; 6 months for patients presenting with paucibacillary leprosy and 12 months for patients presenting with multibacillary leprosy. The worldwide use of leprosy drugs started in the 1980s and their free access since 1995 contributed to the drastic decline in the number of new case patients. Resistant strains are however emerging despite the use of multidrug therapy; identifying and monitoring resistance is still necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. [Current treatment and epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, A; Bouchand, F; Le Monnier, A

    2015-09-01

    During the past 10years, Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have become a major public health challenge. Their epidemiology has changed with a rise in the number of cases and an increase in severe episodes. Recurrence and failure of conventional treatments have become more common. Furthermore, a spread of CDI has been observed in the general population-involving subjects without the usual risk factors (unexposed to antibiotic treatment, young people, pregnant women, etc.). All these change are partially due to the emergence of the hypervirulent and hyperepidemic clone NAP1/B1/027. New therapeutic strategies (antimicrobial treatment, immunoglobulins, toxin chelation, fecal microbiota transplantation) are now available and conventional treatments (metronidazole and vancomycin) have been reevaluated with new recommendations. Recent studies show a better efficacy of vancomycin compared to metronidazole for severe episodes. Fidaxomicin is a novel antibiotic drug with interesting features, including an efficacy not inferior to vancomycin and a lower risk of recurrence. Finally, for multi-recurrent forms, fecal microbiota transplantation seems to be the best option. We present the available data in this review. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury Pathophysiology and Treatments: Early, Intermediate, and Late Phases Post-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algattas, Hanna; Huang, Jason H.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) affects a large proportion and extensive array of individuals in the population. While precise pathological mechanisms are lacking, the growing base of knowledge concerning TBI has put increased emphasis on its understanding and treatment. Most treatments of TBI are aimed at ameliorating secondary insults arising from the injury; these insults can be characterized with respect to time post-injury, including early, intermediate, and late pathological changes. Early pathological responses are due to energy depletion and cell death secondary to excitotoxicity, the intermediate phase is characterized by neuroinflammation and the late stage by increased susceptibility to seizures and epilepsy. Current treatments of TBI have been tailored to these distinct pathological stages with some overlap. Many prophylactic, pharmacologic, and surgical treatments are used post-TBI to halt the progression of these pathologic reactions. In the present review, we discuss the mechanisms of the pathological hallmarks of TBI and both current and novel treatments which target the respective pathways. PMID:24381049

  13. An update on the pathophysiology, treatment and genetics of Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jessurun, Charissa A. C.; Bom, Debby A. M.; Franken, Romy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the connective tissue with manifestations in skeletal, cardiovascular and ocular systems. Areas covered: This paper reviews the effect of FBN1 mutation on phenotype, novel surgical techniques and losartan treatment in MFS.

  14. An Experimental Brain Missile Wound: Ascertaining Pathophysiology and Evaluating Treatments to Lower Mortality and Morbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-26

    cerebral arteries may be from an enhanced sympathetic tonus modulated by endothelial prostacyclin synthesis (47) Prostacyclin, a potent vasodilator...right rear leg after treatment of the incision area with topical anesthetic (2% lidocaine ). An 78 endotracheal tube, smeared with topical anesthetic (2...influence the firing rate of 5-HT neurons and inhibit 5-HT synthesis (7,100,114). Adrenergic nerve endings have been localized in the Bl-B3, B7 and B9 cell

  15. MDMA and PTSD treatment: "PTSD: From novel pathophysiology to innovative therapeutics".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Ben

    2017-05-10

    There is a range of therapies to treat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) but treatment resistance remains high, with many sufferers experiencing the chronic condition. Engagement in trauma-focused psychotherapy is difficult for some patients with PTSD, especially those with extreme affect dysregulation associated with recall of traumatic memories. In recent years there have been a number of neuroscientific and clinical studies examining the potential role for adjunctive drug-assisted psychotherapy using 3,4,-methylenedioxmethamphetamine (MDMA) as a treatment for PTSD. re-visiting of a novel approach to trauma-focused psychotherapy with Used just two or three times, under careful medical supervision and specialised psychotherapy support MDMA appears to facilitate the recall of traumatic memories without the user feeling overwhelmed by the negative affect that usually accompanies such memories. This therapeutic approach began in the 1980s and was subsequently shelved in the midst of public health concerns surrounding the recreational use of the drug ecstasy. When pharmaceutical grade MDMA is used in a clinical setting it does not share the same risk profiles as ecstasy. Recent phase one neurophysiological studies and phase two clinical studies are showing promise as a potential new approach to managing treatment-resistant PTSD. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation: a review of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miae; Martin, Spencer T; Townsend, Keri R; Gabardi, Steven

    2014-07-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), also known as B-cell-mediated or humoral rejection, is a significant complication after kidney transplantation that carries a poor prognosis. Although fewer than 10% of kidney transplant patients experience AMR, as many as 30% of these patients experience graft loss as a consequence. Although AMR is mediated by antibodies against an allograft and results in histologic changes in allograft vasculature that differ from cellular rejection, it has not been recognized as a separate disease process until recently. With an improved understanding about the importance of the development of antibodies against allografts as well as complement activation, significant advances have occurred in the treatment of AMR. The standard of care for AMR includes plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin that remove and neutralize antibodies, respectively. Agents targeting B cells (rituximab and alemtuzumab), plasma cells (bortezomib), and the complement system (eculizumab) have also been used successfully to treat AMR in kidney transplant recipients. However, the high cost of these medications, their use for unlabeled indications, and a lack of prospective studies evaluating their efficacy and safety limit the routine use of these agents in the treatment of AMR in kidney transplant recipients. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  17. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Induced Thyroid Dysfunction: A Review of Its Incidence, Pathophysiology, Clinical Relevance, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Ahmadieh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI belong to a new class of molecular multitargeted anticancer therapy which targets different growth factor receptors and hence attenuates cancer cell survival and growth. Since their introduction as adjunct treatment for renal cell carcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST, a number of reports have demonstrated that TKI can induce thyroid dysfunction which was especially more common with sunitinib maleate. Many mechanisms with respect to this adverse effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been proposed including their induction of thyroiditis, capillary regression in the thyroid gland, antithyroid peroxidase antibody production, and their ability to decrease iodine uptake by the thyroid gland. Of interest is the observation that TKI-induced thyroid dysfunction may actually be protective as it was shown to improve overall survival, and it was suggested that it may have a prognostic value. Followup on thyroid function tests while patients are maintained on tyrosine kinase inhibitor is strongly recommended. When thyroid dysfunction occurs, appropriate treatment should be individualized depending on patients symptoms and thyroid stimulating hormone level.

  18. Epidemiology and treatment of extramammary Paget disease in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siesling, S; Elferink, M A G; van Dijck, J A A M; Pierie, J P E N; Blokx, W A M

    2007-10-01

    To determine the incidence of EMPD and to describe its epidemiology, treatment, survival and the risk of developing other malignancies. All cases of EMPD, diagnosed between 1989 and 2001, were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. In total, 178 cases of invasive and 48 cases of in situ EMPD had been registered. The overall relative 5-year survival for invasive tumours was 72%. Most patients with invasive as well as in situ cancer underwent surgery. Other malignancies were found in 32% of patients with invasive EMPD and 35% of patients with in situ EMPD. Patients had an increased risk of developing a second primary cancer (standardized incidence ratio: 1.7; 95% confidence interval 1.2-2.4). The most frequent localizations of the other cancers were the colorectum, the prostate, the breast and the extragenital skin. For EMPD, which is a rare disease in the Netherlands, there are no clear diagnostic and treatment guidelines. The prognosis is fairly good. A thorough search for other tumours is recommended for these patients.

  19. Epidemiology and treatment of osteoporosis in women: an Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadilkar, Anuradha V; Mandlik, Rubina M

    2015-01-01

    The number of women with osteoporosis, ie, with reduced bone mass and the disruption of bone architecture, is increasing in India. While data on prevalence of osteoporosis among women in India come from studies conducted in small groups spread across the country, estimates suggest that of the 230 million Indians expected to be over the age of 50 years in 2015, 20%, ie, ~46 million, are women with osteoporosis. Thus, osteoporosis is a major public health problem in Indian women. Low calcium intakes with extensive prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, increasing longevity, sex inequality, early menopause, genetic predisposition, lack of diagnostic facilities, and poor knowledge of bone health have contributed toward the high prevalence of osteoporosis. Bone health may be optimized by creating an environment to achieve peak bone mass during adolescence, maintenance of healthy bone throughout the life cycle, and prevention of bone loss postmenopausal. In Indian women, calcium, vitamin D, and bisphosphonates are the commonest first-line therapies used. The use of other drugs such as hormone replacement therapy, estrogen agonists, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone, and denosumab is decided as per the affordability and availability of treatment options. Major gaps still remain in the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis, thus highlighting the need for more structured research in this area. This review focuses on the epidemiology of osteoporosis in Indian women and available treatments.

  20. [Acute lithium poisoning: epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguera Vion, Víctor; Montes, José Manuel; Del Rey, José Manuel; Rivera-Gorrín, Maite; Rodao, José María; Tenorio, Maite; Saiz-Ruiz, Jerónimo; Liaño, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Lithium continues to be the treatment of choice for bipolar disorder. Acute lithium poisoning is a potentially serious event. We present a retrospective observational significative study of episodes of acute lithium poisoning during a 52- month period. Poisoning was defined by a blood lithium concentration of 1.5 mEq/L or higher. We analyzed treatment and epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of 70 episodes were identified (incidence density among treated patients, 1.76 per 100 patient-years). The most frequent cause of lithium poisoning was a concurrent medical condition (46%). Most poisonings were mild (74.2%), but neurologic involvement was identified in 40.3%. Electrocardiographic abnormalities were found in 8 cases. Acute renal failure, found in 23 patients (37.1%), was mild in most cases, although 11 patients required hemodialysis. We concluded that acute lithium poisoning is an uncommon complication, but risk needs to be lowered. Patients should be warned to avoid dosage errors and to take special care during concurrent illnesses and while taking other medications.

  1. Epidemiology and treatment of psoriasis: a Brazilian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Gleison V; Porto-Silva, Larissa; de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Paim

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated systemic disease that is influenced by genetic and environmental factors, is associated with comorbidities, and has a negative impact on the quality of life of affected individuals. The prevalence of psoriasis varies among different ethnic groups, but this topic has not been studied in Brazil to date. In this review, we evaluate the epidemiology and treatment of psoriasis from a Brazilian perspective. We focused on studies that involved Brazilian subjects. The prevalence of psoriasis in Brazil is estimated to be 2.5%, but no population study has been performed previously. Environmental factors, such as tropical climate, in association with genetic factors, such as miscegenation, may exert a beneficial impact on the course and frequency of psoriasis in Brazil. A number of studies have advanced our understanding of the cardiovascular, ophthalmic, and oral comorbidities that are associated with psoriasis. Concerns about biological therapy, such as endemic leprosy, human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV), and tuberculosis infections, are discussed. The nonavailability of treatment options for psoriasis in the public health system contradicts the Brazilian Society of Dermatology guidelines, stimulating the judicialization of access to medicines in psoriasis care.

  2. [Calcium and bone metabolism across women's life stages. Pathophysiology, adiagnosis and treatment of post-pregnancy osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabayashi, Takumi

    Post-pregnancy osteoporosis is a rare condition with little known pathophysiology. Most cases are diagnosed in the late stage of pregnancy or in the post-partum while breastfeeding, particularly in first pregnancy. Vertebral fractures are most commonly observed and characterized by prolonged severe pain and functional limitations. Measurements of bone mineral density(BMD)of the lumbar spine and proximal femur with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry(DXA)are the clinical methods most commonly used for no fracture women. Conventional radiography will confirm the fracture in most cases, and magnetic resonance(MR), which can be safely used during pregnancy, is effective in detecting vertebral fractures and bone marrow edema. Although the bone resorption increased at the end of pregnancy and lactation, the bone formation increases and the bone structure is almost recovered after cessation of lactating in postpartum. There is much uncertainty about whether pharmacological treatments should be used for osteoporosis that presents during pregnancy and lactation. This is partly because of the lack of a firm evidence base for treatment and also because there is a spontaneous recovery of bone mass and strength after pregnancy or weaning.

  3. Emerging Roles of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Stimulated Gene-6 in the Pathophysiology and Treatment of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rena Watanabe

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6 is a 35-kDa glycoprotein that has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects in experimental models of arthritis, acute myocardial infarction, and acute cerebral infarction. Several lines of evidence have shed light on the pathophysiological roles of TSG-6 in atherosclerosis. TSG-6 suppresses inflammatory responses of endothelial cells, neutrophils, and macrophages as well as macrophage foam cell formation and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration and proliferation. Exogenous TSG-6 infusion and endogenous TSG-6 attenuation with a neutralizing antibody for four weeks retards and accelerates, respectively, the development of aortic atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice. TSG-6 also decreases the macrophage/VSMC ratio (a marker of plaque instability and promotes collagen fibers in atheromatous plaques. In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, plasma TSG-6 levels are increased and TSG-6 is abundantly expressed in the fibrous cap within coronary atheromatous plaques, indicating that TSG-6 increases to counteract the progression of atherosclerosis and stabilize the plaque. These findings indicate that endogenous TSG-6 enhancement and exogenous TSG-6 replacement treatments are expected to emerge as new lines of therapy against atherosclerosis and related CAD. Therefore, this review provides support for the clinical utility of TSG-6 in the diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Chronic inflammation in the pancreas and salivary glands--lessons from similarities and differences in pathophysiology and treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakonczay, Zoltán; Vág, János; Földes, Anna; Nagy, Krisztina; Nagy, Ákos; Hegyi, Péter; Varga, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas and salivary glands have similar anatomical structures and physiological functions producing bicarbonate-rich fluid containing digestive enzymes and other components to be delivered into the gut. Despite these similarities, the two organs are also different in numerous respects, especially regarding the inflammatory diseases affecting them. This article will summarize the pathophysiology and current and potential pharmacological treatments of chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic pancreatitis, autoimmune pancreatitis, Sjögren's syndrome and irradiation-induced salivary gland atrophy. Despite the differences, in both organs the inflammatory process is accompanied by epithelial tissue destruction and fibrosis. Both in pancreatic and in salivary research, an important task is to stop or even reverse this process. The utilization of stem/progenitor cell populations previously identified in these organs and the application of mesenchymal stem cells are very promising for such regenerative purposes. In addition, gene therapy and tissue engineering research progressively advance and have already yielded clinically beneficial preliminary results for salivary gland diseases. For the hard-to-access, hard-to-regenerate pancreas these developments may also offer new solutions, especially since salivary and pancreatic progenitors are very similar in characteristics and may be mutually useful to regenerate the respective other organ as well. These novel developments could be of great significance and may bring new hope for patients since currently used therapeutic protocols in salivary and in pancreatic chronic inflammatory diseases offer primarily symptomatic treatments and limited beneficial outcome.

  5. Ravages of Diabetes on Gastrointestinal Sensory-Motor Function: Implications for Pathophysiology and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Hans; Liao, Donghua; Drewes, Anne Mohr; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Zhao, Jingbo

    2016-02-01

    Symptoms related to functional and sensory abnormalities are frequently encountered in patients with diabetes mellitus. Most symptoms are associated with impaired gastric and intestinal function. In this review, we discuss basic concepts of sensory-motor dysfunction and how they relate to clinical findings and gastrointestinal abnormalities that are commonly seen in diabetes. In addition, we review techniques that are available for investigating the autonomic nervous system, neuroimaging and neurophysiology of sensory-motor function. Such technological advances, while not readily available in the clinical setting, may facilitate stratification and individualization of therapy in diabetic patients in the future. Unraveling the structural, mechanical, and sensory remodeling in diabetes disease is based on a multidisciplinary approach that can bridge the knowledge from a variety of scientific disciplines. The final goal is to increase the understanding of the damage to GI structures and to sensory processing of symptoms, in order to assist clinicians with developing an optimal mechanics based treatment.

  6. Role of pathophysiology of patellofemoral instability in the treatment of spontaneous medial patellofemoral subluxation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doğruyol Dağhan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Medial patellar subluxation is usually seen after lateral retinacular release. Spontaneous medial subluxation of the patella is a very rare condition. There are few reports in the literature on the pathophysiology of iatrogenic medial patellar subluxation. To our knowledge, there are no reports of the pathophysiology of non-iatrogenic medial patellar subluxation in the English literature. In this study we present a case of spontaneous medial patellar instability that is more prominent in extension during weight bearing. We also try to define the treatment protocol based on pathophsiology. Case presentation We report the case of a 21-year-old Turkish man with spontaneous medial patellar instability. He had suffered right knee pain, clicking and popping sensation in the affected knee for three months prior to presentation. Clinical examination demonstrated medial patellar subluxation that is more prominent in extension during the weight bearing phase of gait and while standing. Increased medial tilt was observed when the patella was stressed medially. Conventional anterior to posterior, lateral and Merchant radiographs did not reveal any abnormalities. After three months of physical therapy, our patient was still suffering from right knee pain which disturbed his gait pattern. Throughout the surgery, medial patellar translation was tested following the imbrication of lateral structures. He still had a medial patellar translation that was more than 50% of his patellar width. Patellotibial ligament augmentation using an iliotibial band flap was added. When examined after surgery, the alignment of the patella was effectively corrected. Conclusions Chronic imbalance between the strengths of vastus lateralis and vastus medialis results in secondary changes in passive ligamentous structures and causes additional instability. Physical therapy modalities that aim to strengthen the vastus lateralis might be sufficient for the

  7. Humanized mouse models to study pathophysiology and treatment of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse-Ranson, Guillemette; Mouquet, Hugo; Di Santo, James P

    2018-03-01

    Immunodeficient mice that lack all lymphocyte subsets and have phagocytic cells that are tolerant of human cells can be stably xenografted with human hematopoietic stem cell as well as other human tissues (fetal liver and thymus) creating 'human immune system' (HIS) mice. HIS mice develop all major human lymphocyte classes (B, T, natural killer, and innate lymphoid cell) and their specialized subsets as well as a variety of myeloid cells (dendritic cell, monocytes, and macrophages) thereby providing a small animal model in which to interrogate human immune responses to infection. HIS mouse models have been successfully used to study several aspects of HIV-1 biology, including viral life cycle (entry, restriction, replication, and spread) as well as virus-induced immunopathology (CD4 T-cell depletion, immune activation, and mucosal inflammation). Recent work has shown that HIV reservoirs can be established in HIV-infected HIS mice after treatment with combinations of antiretroviral drugs thereby providing a model to test new approaches to eliminate latently infected cells. HIS mice provide cost-effective preclinical platform to assess combination immunotherapies that can target HIV reservoirs. Therapeutic strategies validated in HIS mice should be considered in designing the roadmap toward HIV 'cure'.

  8. The Future of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: Emerging Pathophysiological Concepts and Potential New Avenues of Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. P. Collins

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yearly more than 15 million babies are born premature (<37 weeks gestational age, accounting for more than 1 in 10 births worldwide. Lung injury caused by maternal chorioamnionitis or preeclampsia, postnatal ventilation, hyperoxia, or inflammation can lead to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, one of the most common adverse outcomes in these preterm neonates. BPD patients have an arrest in alveolar and microvascular development and more frequently develop asthma and early-onset emphysema as they age. Understanding how the alveoli develop, and repair, and regenerate after injury is critical for the development of therapies, as unfortunately there is still no cure for BPD. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of emerging new concepts in the understanding of perinatal lung development and injury from a molecular and cellular point of view and how this is paving the way for new therapeutic options to prevent or treat BPD, as well as a reflection on current treatment procedures.

  9. [50 years of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, M M; Mayerle, J

    2013-04-01

    The German Journal of Gastroenterology celebrates its fifties anniversary in 2013. Over half a century original studies, reviews and guidelines covering the topics of acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as pancreatic cancer have assumed a prominent role on its pages. Already in the first edition of the Journal Haemmerli and Hefti have summarized the Zurich experience with chronic pancreatitis and provided a detailed state-of-the-art review for the year 1963. 50 years later the current guidelines of the German Society of Digestive and Metabolic Diseases (DGVS) have been published in the same Journal and allow to summarize the scientific progress over this period. Back then chronic pancreatitis was regarded as a rare disorder (tenfold less common than e. g. acute pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer). This misconception had little to do with actual prevalence but with highly insensitive diagnostic tests, particularly in the area of diagnostic imaging. While pathogenetic factors for chronic pancreatitis, including a possible genetic disposition, were largely known in 1963, our understanding of their cellular mechanisms has very much improved. The greatest progress in diagnostic options was achieved by the introduction of novel imaging techniques such as ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound, ERCP, CT and MRCP. In terms of therapy the notion that a blockage of pancreatitic secretion is an effective pharmacological option has been abandoned and endoscopic intervention and surgical treatment have been newly developed as alternatives. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Feline hyperparathyroidism: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of primary and secondary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Valerie J; Gilor, Chen; Chew, Dennis J

    2015-05-01

    Hyperparathyroidism exists in primary and secondary forms. Primary hyperparathyroidism has typically been considered a disease that uncommonly affects cats, but this condition is more prevalent than previous diagnoses would suggest. Secondary hyperparathyroidism may be caused by either nutritional influences (ie, nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism) or chronic kidney disease (ie, renal secondary hyperparathyroidism). Tertiary hyperparathyroidism has yet to be documented in veterinary medicine, but it is possible that this condition occurs in some cats following longstanding renal secondary hyperparathyroidism. Diagnosis of this group of calcium metabolic disorders presents a number of challenges for the clinician. For example, clinical signs can be non-specific and, especially in the case of primary hyperparathyroidism, there is often a low index of suspicion for the disease; careful sample handling is required for testing of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and ionized calcium levels; and there is currently no feline-specific assay for PTH, which has implications for test sensitivity and interpretation of results. This article briefly outlines PTH and calcium physiology by way of introduction to a review of PTH measurement and interpretation. Various forms of feline hyperparathyroidism are then described, encompassing diagnosis and treatment options. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  11. Stress and the gut: pathophysiology, clinical consequences, diagnostic approach and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, Peter C; Brzozowski, T; Konturek, S J

    2011-12-01

    Stress, which is defined as an acute threat to homeostasis, shows both short- and long-term effects on the functions of the gastrointestinal tract. Exposure to stress results in alterations of the brain-gut interactions ("brain-gut axis") ultimately leading to the development of a broad array of gastrointestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other functional gastrointestinal diseases, food antigen-related adverse responses, peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The major effects of stress on gut physiology include: 1) alterations in gastrointestinal motility; 2) increase in visceral perception; 3) changes in gastrointestinal secretion; 4) increase in intestinal permeability; 5) negative effects on regenerative capacity of gastrointestinal mucosa and mucosal blood flow; and 6) negative effects on intestinal microbiota. Mast cells (MC) are important effectors of brain-gut axis that translate the stress signals into the release of a wide range of neurotransmitters and proinflammatory cytokines, which may profoundly affect the gastrointestinal physiology. IBS represents the most important gastrointestinal disorder in humans, and is characterized by chronic or recurrent pain associated with altered bowel motility. The diagnostic testing for IBS patients include routine blood tests, stool tests, celiac disease serology, abdominal sonography, breath testing to rule out carbohydrate (lactose, fructose, etc.) intolerance and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Colonoscopy is recommended if alarming symptoms are present or to obtain colonic biopsies especially in patients with diarrhoea predominant IBS. The management of IBS is based on a multifactorial approach and includes pharmacotherapy targeted against the predominant symptom, behavioural and psychological treatment, dietary alterations, education, reassurance and effective patient-physician relationship. When evaluating for the stress

  12. Disordered gambling in adolescents : epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Robert H; Ladd, George T; Petry, Nancy M

    2003-01-01

    Rapid expansion of legalized gambling has been associated with increased rates of gambling disorders among adults and adolescents worldwide. Epidemiologic studies suggest that, in North America, up to 6% of adults and 20% of adolescents have a gambling problem. Despite increasing prevalence rates of gambling disorders, little research is available on how to treat such disorders in adolescents. Much of what is known about how to treat adolescent problem and pathological gambling comes from research on psychosocial and psychopharmacologic treatments for adult pathological gambling. Risk factors for adolescent gambling disorders include male gender, alcohol and drug use, deviant peers, family history of gambling, and impulsive behavior. While several risk factors characterize disordered gambling among adolescents, the extent to which these characteristics are related remains to be determined. In terms of screening for adolescent problem and pathological gambling, several instruments designed to reflect the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders diagnostic criteria for pathological gambling are available. Psychosocial approaches used to treat adult pathological gambling include Gamblers Anonymous, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and motivational enhancement therapy (MET). Among adolescents, CBT as well as an eclectic therapy have been helpful in reducing problematic gambling behavior. In terms of pharmacotherapy, three classes of psychotropic drugs have been used to treat adult pathological gambling - serotonin reuptake inhibitors, opioid antagonists, and mood stabilizers. While some of these pharmacotherapies have been efficacious in treating adult pathological gambling, additional double-blind, placebo-controlled studies are needed to determine the long-term effectiveness of these treatments. No known study has evaluated the use of psychopharmacologic agents in treating adolescent pathological gambling. Possible reasons for the lack of research on

  13. Epidemiology, Etiology, and Treatment of Isolated Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Madeleine L.; Chai, Yang; Yao, Caroline A.; Magee, William; Figueiredo, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cleft palate (CPO) is the rarest form of oral clefting. The incidence of CPO varies substantially by geography from 1.3 to 25.3 per 10,000 live births, with the highest rates in British Columbia, Canada and the lowest rates in Nigeria, Africa. Stratified by ethnicity/race, the highest rates of CPO are observed in non-Hispanic Whites and the lowest in Africans; nevertheless, rates of CPO are consistently higher in females compared to males. Approximately fifty percent of cases born with cleft palate occur as part of a known genetic syndrome or with another malformation (e.g., congenital heart defects) and the other half occur as solitary defects, referred to often as non-syndromic clefts. The etiology of CPO is multifactorial involving genetic and environmental risk factors. Several animal models have yielded insight into the molecular pathways responsible for proper closure of the palate, including the BMP, TGF-β, and SHH signaling pathways. In terms of environmental exposures, only maternal tobacco smoke has been found to be strongly associated with CPO. Some studies have suggested that maternal glucocorticoid exposure may also be important. Clearly, there is a need for larger epidemiologic studies to further investigate both genetic and environmental risk factors and gene-environment interactions. In terms of treatment, there is a need for long-term comprehensive care including surgical, dental and speech pathology. Overall, five main themes emerge as critical in advancing research: (1) monitoring of the occurrence of CPO (capacity building); (2) detailed phenotyping of the severity (biology); (3) understanding of the genetic and environmental risk factors (primary prevention); (4) access to early detection and multidisciplinary treatment (clinical services); and (5) understanding predictors of recurrence and possible interventions among families with a child with CPO (secondary prevention). PMID:26973535

  14. Serratia marcescens meningitis: epidemiology, prognostic factors and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yen-Mu; Hsu, Po-Chang; Yang, Chien-Chang; Chang, Hong-Jyun; Ye, Jung-Jr; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lee, Ming-Hsun

    2013-08-01

    Serratia marcescens is a rare pathogen of central nervous system infections. This study was to investigate the epidemiology, prognostic factors, and treatment outcomes of S. marcescens meningitis. This retrospective analysis included 33 patients with culture-proven S. marcescens meningitis hospitalized between January 2000 and June 2011. Of the 33 patients enrolled, only one did not receive neurosurgery before the onset of S. marcescens meningitis. Patients with S. marcescens meningitis had higher ratios of brain solid tumors (54.5%) and neurosurgery (97.0%) with a mortality rate of 15.2%. The mean interval between the first neurosurgical procedure and the diagnosis of meningitis was 17.1 days (range, 4-51 days). Only one third-generation cephalosporin-resistant S. marcescens isolate was recovered from the patients' cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens. Compared with the favorable outcome group (n = 20), the unfavorable outcome group (n = 13) had a higher percentage of brain solid tumors, more intensive care unit stays, and higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, CSF lactate and serum C-reactive protein concentrations at diagnosis of meningitis. Under the multiple regression analysis, CSF lactate concentration ≥2-fold the upper limit of normal (ULN) was independently associated with unfavorable outcomes (odds ratio, 7.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-47.96; p = 0.041). S. marcescens meningitis is highly associated with neurosurgical procedures for brain solid tumors. CSF lactate concentration ≥2x ULN may predict an unfavorable outcome. Its mortality is not high and empiric treatment with parenteral third-generation cephalosporins may have a satisfactory clinical response. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. From COPD epidemiology to studies of pathophysiological disease mechanisms: challenges with regard to study design and recruitment process: Respiratory and Cardiovascular Effects in COPD (KOLIN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Anne; Linder, Robert; Backman, Helena; Eriksson Ström, Jonas; Frølich, Andreas; Nilsson, Ulf; Rönmark, Eva; Johansson Strandkvist, Viktor; Behndig, Annelie F; Blomberg, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Background : Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a largely underdiagnosed disease including several phenotypes. In this report, the design of a study intending to evaluate the pathophysiological mechanism in COPD in relation to the specific phenotypes non-rapid and rapid decline in lung function is described together with the recruitment process of the study population derived from a population based study. Method : The OLIN COPD study includes a population-based COPD cohort and referents without COPD identified in 2002-04 ( n  = 1986), and thereafter followed annually since 2005. Lung function decline was estimated from baseline in 2002-2004 to 2010 (first recruitment phase) or to 2012/2013 (second recruitment phase). Individuals who met the predefined criteria for the following four groups were identified; group A) COPD grade 2-3 with rapid decline in FEV 1 and group B) COPD grade 2-3 without rapid decline in FEV 1 (≥60 and ≤30 ml/year, respectively), group C) ever-smokers, and group D) non-smokers with normal lung function. Groups A-C included ever-smokers with >10 pack years. The intention was to recruit 15 subjects in each of the groups A-D. Results : From the database groups A-D were identified; group A n  = 37, group B n  = 29, group C n  = 41, and group D n  = 55. Fifteen subjects were recruited from groups C and D, while this goal was not reached in the groups A ( n  = 12) and B ( n  = 10). The most common reasons for excluding individuals identified as A or B were comorbidities contraindicating bronchoscopy, or inflammatory diseases/immune suppressive medication expected to affect the outcome. Conclusion : The study is expected to generate important results regarding pathophysiological mechanisms associated with rate of decline in lung function among subjects with COPD and the in-detail described recruitment process, including reasons for non-participation, is a strength when interpreting the results in forthcoming studies.

  16. Obesity: Pathophysiology and Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity presents a major health hazard of the 21st century. It promotes co-morbid diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, certain types of cancer, and osteoarthritis. Excessive energy intake, physical inactivity, and genetic susceptibility are main causal factors for obesity, while gene mutations, endocrine disorders, medication, or psychiatric illnesses may be underlying causes in some cases. The development and maintenance of obesity may involve central pathophysiological mechanisms such as impaired brain circuit regulation and neuroendocrine hormone dysfunction. Dieting and physical exercise offer the mainstays of obesity treatment, and anti-obesity drugs may be taken in conjunction to reduce appetite or fat absorption. Bariatric surgeries may be performed in overtly obese patients to lessen stomach volume and nutrient absorption, and induce faster satiety. This review provides a summary of literature on the pathophysiological studies of obesity and discusses relevant therapeutic strategies for managing obesity.

  17. Fragile X-Associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome: The Expanding Clinical Picture, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology, and Update on Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Hall

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS is a progressive degenerative movement disorder characterized by kinetic tremor, cerebellar gait ataxia, parkinsonism, and cognitive decline. This disorder occurs in both males and females, frequently in families with children who have fragile X syndrome. The clinical features of this disorder, both classic and newly described, are summarized in this paper. In screening studies, fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 gene premutation (55–200 CGG expansions are most frequently seen in men with ataxia who have tested negative for spinocerebellar ataxias. Since the original description, the classic FXTAS phenotype has now been reported in females and in carriers of smaller (45–54 CGG and larger (>200 CGG expansions in FMR1. Premutation carriers may present with a Parkinson disease phenotype or hypotension, rather than with tremor and/or ataxia. Parkinsonism and gait ataxia may also be seen in individuals with gray zone (41–54 CGG expansions. Studies regarding medication to treat the symptoms in FXTAS are few in number and suggest that medications targeted to specific symptoms, such as kinetic tremor or gait ataxia, may be most beneficial. Great progress has been made in regards to FXTAS research, likely given the readily available gene test and the screening of multiple family members, including parents and grandparents, of fragile X syndrome children. Expansion of genotypes and phenotypes in the disorder may suggest that a broader disease definition might be necessary in the future.

  18. Pathophysiology and aetiology of impaired fasting glycaemia and impaired glucose tolerance: does it matter for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faerch, K; Borch-Johnsen, K; Holst, Jens Juul

    2009-01-01

    Prior to the development of type 2 diabetes, glucose levels increase into the prediabetic states of isolated impaired fasting glycaemia (i-IFG), isolated impaired glucose tolerance (i-IGT), or combined IFG/IGT. A better understanding of the aetiology and pathophysiology of the prediabetic states...... might give a basis for the development of individualised prevention and treatment strategies for type 2 diabetes. Several studies have examined mechanisms and potential aetiological factors leading to the development of the different prediabetic states. The pathophysiology of i-IFG seems to include...... the following key defects: reduced hepatic insulin sensitivity, stationary beta cell dysfunction and/or chronic low beta cell mass, altered glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion and inappropriately elevated glucagon secretion. Conversely, the prediabetic state i-IGT is characterised by reduced peripheral insulin...

  19. Role of hepcidin-ferroportin axis in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of anemia of chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Arielle L; Ginzburg, Yelena Z

    2017-06-01

    Anemia of chronic inflammation (ACI) is a frequently diagnosed anemia and portends an independently increased morbidity and poor outcome associated with multiple underlying diseases. The pathophysiology of ACI is multifactorial, resulting from the effects of inflammatory cytokines which both directly and indirectly suppress erythropoiesis. Recent advances in molecular understanding of iron metabolism provide strong evidence that immune mediators, such as IL-6, lead to hepcidin-induced hypoferremia, iron sequestration, and decreased iron availability for erythropoiesis. The role of hepcidin-ferroportin axis in the pathophysiology of ACI is stimulating the development of new diagnostics and targeted therapies. In this review, we present an overview of and rationale for inflammation-, iron-, and erythropoiesis-related strategies currently in development. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  20. Pathophysiology of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Starobova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy is a common, dose-dependent adverse effect of several antineoplastics. It can lead to detrimental dose reductions and discontinuation of treatment, and severely affects the quality of life of cancer survivors. Clinically, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy presents as deficits in sensory, motor, and autonomic function which develop in a glove and stocking distribution due to preferential effects on longer axons. The pathophysiological processes are multi-factorial and involve oxidative stress, apoptotic mechanisms, altered calcium homeostasis, axon degeneration and membrane remodeling as well as immune processes and neuroinflammation. This review focusses on the commonly used antineoplastic substances oxaliplatin, cisplatin, vincristine, docetaxel, and paclitaxel which interfere with the cancer cell cycle—leading to cell death and tumor degradation—and cause severe acute and chronic peripheral neuropathies. We discuss drug mechanism of action and pharmacokinetic disposition relevant to the development of peripheral neuropathy, the epidemiology and clinical presentation of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, emerging insight into genetic susceptibilities as well as current understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment approaches.

  1. Atopic dermatitis in diverse racial and ethnic groups-Variations in epidemiology, genetics, clinical presentation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Bridget P; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Alexis, Andrew F

    2018-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects diverse ethnic groups with varying prevalence. Despite a predominance of studies in individuals of European ancestry, AD has been found to occur more frequently in Asian and Black individuals than Whites. Therefore, an understanding of the unique clinical features of AD in diverse ethnic groups, as well as the differences in genetic polymorphisms that influence susceptibility to AD and response to current therapies, is paramount for management of an increasingly diverse patient population. In this article, we review key nuances in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation and treatment of AD in non-White ethnic groups, which are largely underappreciated in the literature. We highlight the need for studies evaluating the tissue molecular and cellular phenotypes of AD in non-White patients, as well as greater inclusion of minority groups in clinical trials, to develop targeted treatments for a multi-ethnic population. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Epidemiology, morbidity, and treatment of overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronne, L J

    2001-01-01

    Although still considered more of a cosmetic problem by both the general public and some areas of the medical community, overweight and obesity have reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Overweight and obesity have not only a significant psychological impact but also result in an increased risk for development of numerous chronic and sometimes fatal diseases. The morbidity from obesity-associated disorders increases with higher body mass index and begins within the normal weight range. The costs (direct and indirect) associated with treating obesity and its comorbid conditions are notable and increasing. Obesity rates in patients with schizophrenia are at least as high, if not higher, than in the general population. This article reviews the epidemiology and burden of obesity and its associated comorbid disorders. The guidelines from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health for diagnosing and treating obesity are also discussed.

  3. Contribution of TMS and rTMS in the Understanding of the Pathophysiology and in the Treatment of Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Poujois, Aurélia; Richard, Alexandra; Masmoudi, Sana; Meppiel, Elodie; Woimant, France; Kubis, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Dystonias represent a heterogeneous group of movement disorders responsible for sustained muscle contraction, abnormal postures, and muscle twists. It can affect focal or segmental body parts or be generalized. Primary dystonia is the most common form of dystonia but it can also be secondary to metabolic or structural dysfunction, the consequence of a drug's side-effect or of genetic origin. The pathophysiology is still not elucidated. Based on lesion studies, dystonia has been regarded as a pure motor dysfunction of the basal ganglia loop. However, basal ganglia lesions do not consistently produce dystonia and lesions outside basal ganglia can lead to dystonia; mild sensory abnormalities have been reported in the dystonic limb and imaging studies have shown involvement of multiple other brain regions including the cerebellum and the cerebral motor, premotor and sensorimotor cortices. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique of brain stimulation with a magnetic field applied over the cortex allowing investigation of cortical excitability. Hyperexcitability of contralateral motor cortex has been suggested to be the trigger of focal dystonia. High or low frequency repetitive TMS (rTMS) can induce excitatory or inhibitory lasting effects beyond the time of stimulation and protocols have been developed having either a positive or a negative effect on cortical excitability and associated with prevention of cell death, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) interneurons mediated inhibition and brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulation. rTMS studies as a therapeutic strategy of dystonia have been conducted to modulate the cerebral areas involved in the disease. Especially, when applied on the contralateral (pre)-motor cortex or supplementary motor area of brains of small cohorts of dystonic patients, rTMS has shown a beneficial transient clinical effect in association with restrained motor cortex excitability. TMS is currently a valuable tool to improve

  4. Contribution of TMS and rTMS in the understanding of the pathophysiology and in the treatment of dystonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Lozeron

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dystonias represent a heterogeneous group of movement disorders responsible for sustained muscle contraction, abnormal postures and muscle twists. It can affect focal or segmental body parts or be generalized. Primary dystonia is the most common form of dystonia but it can also be secondary to metabolic or structural dysfunction, the consequence of a drug’s side-effect or of genetic origin. The pathophysiology is still not elucidated. Based on lesion studies, dystonia has been regarded as a pure motor dysfunction of the basal ganglia loop. However, basal ganglia lesions do not consistently produce dystonia and lesions outside basal ganglia can lead to dystonia; mild sensory abnormalities have been reported in the dystonic limb and imaging studies have shown involvement of multiple other brain regions including the cerebellum and the cerebral motor, premotor and sensorimotor cortices. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a non-invasive technique of brain stimulation with a magnetic field applied over the cortex allowing investigation of cortical excitability. Hyperexcitability of contralateral motor cortex has been suggested to be the trigger of focal dystonia. High or low frequency repetitive TMS (rTMS can induce excitatory or inhibitory lasting effects beyond the time of stimulation and protocols have been developed having either a positive or a negative effect on cortical excitability and associated with prevention of cell death, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA interneurons mediated inhibition and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF modulation. rTMS studies as a therapeutic strategy of dystonia have been conducted to modulate the cerebral areas involved in the disease. Especially, when applied on the contralateral (pre-motor cortex or supplementary motor area of brains of small cohorts of dystonic patients, rTMS has shown a beneficial transient clinical effect in association with restrained motor cortex excitability. TMS is currently a

  5. Bleeding Peptic Ulcer - Tertiary Center Experience: Epidemiology, Treatment and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budimir, Ivan; Stojsavljević, Sanja; Hrabar, Davor; Kralj, Dominik; Bišćanin, Alen; Kirigin, Lora Stanka; Zovak, Mario; Babić, Žarko; Bohnec, Sven; Budimir, Ivan

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate epidemiological, clinical and endoscopic characteristics of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) with special reference to peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). The study included 2198 consecutive patients referred to our emergency department due to acute UGIB from January 2008 to December 2012. All patients underwent urgent upper GI endoscopy within 24 hours of admission, and 842 patients diagnosed with PUB were enrolled and prospectively followed-up. The cumulative incidence of UGIB was 126/100,000 in the 5-year period. Two out of five patients had a bleeding peptic ulcer; in total, 440 (52.3%) had bleeding gastric ulcer, 356 (42.3%) had bleeding duodenal ulcer, 17 (2%) had both bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcers, and 29 (3.5%) patients had bleeding ulcers on gastroenteric anastomoses. PUB was more common in men. The mean patient age was 65.9 years. The majority of patients (57%) with PUB were taking agents that attenuate the cytoprotective function of gastric and duodenal mucosa. Rebleeding occurred in 77 (9.7%) patients and 47 (5.9%) patients required surgical intervention. The 30-day morality was 5.2% and 10% of patients died from uncontrolled bleeding and concomitant diseases. In conclusion, PUB is the main cause of UGIB, characterized by a significant rebleeding rate and mortality.

  6. Evolution in the understanding of the pathophysiological basis of portal hypertension: How changes in paradigm are leading to successful new treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Jaume; Groszmann, Roberto J.; Shah, Vijay H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Among the common complication of cirrhosis portal hypertension witnessed a major improvement of prognosis during the past decades. Principally due to the introduction of rational treatments based on new pathophysiological paradigms (concepts of thought) developed in the 1980s. The best example being the use of non-selective beta-blockers and of vasopressin analogs, somatostatin, and its analogs. Further refinement in the knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of both the splanchnic and hepatic circulation has led to the emergence of new treatments, which are based on evidence that show not only structural but also vasoactive components increase the hepatic vascular resistance, as well as of angiogenesis. This knowledge and future improvements will most likely result in more effective treatment of portal hypertension and effective prevention of its complications in early stages. PMID:25920081

  7. Understanding MIH: definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and new treatment guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, P; Rodrigueztapia, M T; Daeniker, L; Krejci, I

    2013-09-01

    Molar-Incisor Hypomineralisation (MIH) is a congenital disease which increases in prevalence. It affects permanent first molars and, often to a lesser degree, permanent incisors with variable severity. The aetiology is unknown, but different hypotheses have been advanced. Differential diagnosis is mandatory not to confound MIH with other diseases. Treatment consists in a minimally invasive approach by reinforcing and protecting the existing dental structure. In more severe cases, restorative treatment may be indicated.

  8. Burns at KCMC: epidemiology, presentation, management and treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringo, Y; Chilonga, K

    2014-08-01

    About 90% of the global burden of burns occurs in the low and middle income countries. In Africa it is estimated that between 17,000 and 30,000 children under five die each year due to burns. In Tanzania there are no specialized burn centers. Burn patients are often managed in the general surgical wards in most hospitals. Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre is one of the four tertiary referral hospitals in Tanzania. This study aimed to review the epidemiology presentation management and outcome of burn patients in this challenging environment. A cross-sectional prospective study involving 41 patients was undertaken from October 2011 to April 2012. 65.9% were males. The largest age group was below 5 years (36.6%). 19.5% were epileptic. More than half of the burns were due to open flame. 80.5% had second degree burns. 56.1% had a BSA of 15% or less and 56.1% had an APACHE score of 10 or less. It was found that 73.2% of burns occurred at home. The commonest prehospital first aid applied was honey. Only 41.5% arrived in hospital within the first 24h after burn. Among the 14.6% who had skin grafting, none had early excision of burn wound. 53.7% developed wound sepsis while 24.4% developed contractures. The mortality rate was 26.8%. Children under five are the worst affected by burns. Most patients had second degree burn wounds. Inappropriate management of the burn wound started just after injury and continued even in hospital. Mortality and complication rates are high. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  9. The epidemiology of outpatient pain treatment in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldridge S

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Stacy Baldridge, Laura Wallace, Aditi Kadakia Purdue Pharma L.P., Stamford, CT, USA Background: There is limited real-world, population-level data on the prevalence and treatment of pain in children. An understanding of pediatric pain conditions and its management can help inform provider education, treatment guidelines, and design of pediatric pain studies. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to describe the prevalence of conditions associated with acute and chronic pain in pediatric patients and to characterize pediatric pain treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitors, opioids (immediate release or extended release, antidepressants, topical analgesics, anticonvulsants, and other therapies based on a large, real-world sample. Materials and methods: In this cohort study, we used administrative claims data from the Truven Health MarketScan® Research Databases, which contain data regarding demography, prescription, diagnosis, and procedure performed. Descriptive statistics were used to assess the prevalence of various conditions associated with pediatric pain and to estimate the proportion of patients who received various analgesic and nonanalgesic treatments. All analyses were stratified according to demographics. Results: This study included data on more than 30 million pediatric patients from throughout the US. Overall, among patients with commercial insurance, surgery was the most common pain-related diagnosis, followed by orthopedic conditions, malignancies, trauma, and genetic conditions. For patients with Medicaid, surgery was also the most common diagnosis, followed by traumatic injury, orthopedic conditions, malignancies, and genetic conditions. These diagnoses varied by age, with most showing higher prevalence in older children. Treatment varied substantially by condition, and many children (more than 50% for most of the conditions evaluated did not receive any prescription pain treatments

  10. Age-related macular degeneration: epidemiology and optimal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common macular disease affecting elderly people in the Western world. It is characterised by the appearance of drusen in the macula, accompanied by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) or geographic atrophy. The disease is more common in Caucasian....... Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...

  11. Epidemiology of drug abuse treatment in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Texas, USA, where alcohol was found to be the primary drug of abuse in ... distributed among inpatients at 2 selected treatment centres ... group participants attributed their reasons for drug use to family ... NW provinces, where one currently finds limited data. .... full-time, 26% were unemployed, and 25% were students.

  12. Towards personalized treatment in cardiovascular disease : a molecular epidemiological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regieli, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients who have experienced cardiovascular disease each differ in terms of their future risk, yet currently we have no ways to predict individual prognosis. Mass preventive treatment is therefore currently recommended for the group as a whole whereas in fact this group is highly heterogeneous and

  13. Falls: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Relationship to Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Sarah D.; Miller, Ram

    2008-01-01

    Falls are common in the elderly, and frequently result in injury, disability, and institutionalization. Although the causes of falls are complex, most falls result from an interaction between individual characteristics that increase an individual's propensity to fall and acute mediating risk factors that provide the opportunity to fall. Predisposing risk factors include age-associated changes in strength and balance, age-associated comorbidities such as osteoarthritis, visual impairment and d...

  14. Falls: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and relationship to fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Sarah D; Miller, Ram R

    2008-12-01

    Falls are common in the elderly, and frequently result in injury and disability. Most falls result from an interaction between individual characteristics that increase an individual's propensity to fall and acute mediating risk factors that provide the opportunity to fall. Predisposing risk factors include age-associated changes in strength and balance, comorbidities such as osteoarthritis, visual impairment and dementia, psychotropic medications, and certain types of footwear. Fewer studies have focused on acute precipitating factors, but environmental and situational factors are clearly important to fall risk. Approximately 30% of falls result in an injury that requires medical attention, with fractures occurring in approximately 10%. In addition to the risk factors for falls, the fall descent, fall impact, and bone strength are all important determinants of whether a fall will result in a fracture. In recent years, numerous studies have been directed toward the development of effective fall and fall-related fracture prevention interventions.

  15. The Co-Occurrence of Reading Disorder and ADHD: Epidemiology, Treatment, Psychosocial Impact, and Economic Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Chris C.; Gelhorn, Heather L.; Bell, Jill A.; Classi, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The co-occurrence of reading disorder (RD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has received increasing attention. This review summarizes the epidemiology, treatment strategies, psychosocial impact, and economic burden associated with the co-occurrence of these conditions. Common genetic and neuropsychological deficits may partially…

  16. Epidemiology and treatment of eating disorders in men and women of middle and older age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangweth-Matzek, Barbara; Hoek, Hans W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review We summarized recent literature on the epidemiology and treatment of eating disorders in middle-aged and older women and men. Recent findings The prevalence of eating disorders according to DSM-5 criteria is around 3.5% in older (>40 years) women and around 1-2% in older men. The

  17. Pathophysiology and treatment of patients with beta-thalassemia – an update [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitan Fibach

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia (thal is an autosomal recessive, hereditary, chronic hemolytic anemia due to a partial or complete deficiency in the synthesis of α-globin chains (α-thal or β-globin chains (β-thal that compose the major adult hemoglobin (α2β2. It is caused by one or more mutations in the corresponding genes. The unpaired globin chains are unstable; they precipitate intracellularly, resulting in hemolysis, premature destruction of red blood cell [RBC] precursors in the bone marrow, and a short life-span of mature RBCs in the circulation. The state of anemia is treated by frequent RBC transfusions. This therapy results in the accumulation of iron (iron overload, a condition that is exacerbated by the breakdown products of hemoglobin (heme and iron and the increased iron uptake for the chronic accelerated, but ineffective, RBC production. Iron catalyzes the generation of reactive oxygen species, which in excess are toxic, causing damage to vital organs such as the heart and liver and the endocrine system. Herein, we review recent findings regarding the pathophysiology underlying the major symptoms of β-thal and potential therapeutic modalities for the amelioration of its complications, as well as new modalities that may provide a cure for the disease.

  18. Borderline personality disorder and comorbid addiction: epidemiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienast, Thorsten; Stoffers, Jutta; Bermpohl, Felix; Lieb, Klaus

    2014-04-18

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) affects 2.7% of adults. About 78% of adults with BPD also develop a substance-related disorder or addiction at some time in their lives. These persons are more impulsive and clinically less stable than BPD patients without substance dependency. They display suicidal behavior to a greater extent, drop out of treatment more often, and have shorter abstinence phases. The combination of borderline personality disorder with addiction requires a special therapeutic approach. This review is based on a selective literature search about the treatment of patients with BPD and addiction, with particular attention to Cochrane Reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCT). The available evidence is scant. In two RCTs, Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Substance Use Disorders (DBT-SUD) was found to improve patients' overall functional level (standardized mean difference, 1.07-1.78) and to increase the number of abstinence days (effect strength [ES], 1.03) and negative urine samples (ES, 0.75). Dual focus schema therapy (DFST) was evaluated in three RCTs. Because of methodological problems, however, no useful quantitative comparison across trials is possible. In one RCT, dynamic deconstructive psychotherapy (DDP) was found to have only a moderate, statistically insignificant effect. Only a single study provides data about potentially helpful drug therapy over the intermediate term. Patients with borderline personality disorder and comorbid addiction should be treated as early as possible for both conditions in a thematically hierarchical manner. There is no evidence for any restriction on drug therapy to prevent recurrent addiction in these patients. The psychotherapeutic techniques that can be used (despite the currently inadequate evidence base) include DBT-SUD, DFST, and DDP. These patients need qualified expert counseling in choosing a suitable type of psychotherapy. Specific treatment is available in only a few places, and the relevant

  19. [Important epidemiological features of the treatment of type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguí Díaz, M

    2014-07-01

    According to the various clinical practice guidelines, the recommendations for the treatment of type 2 diabetes are well-established, thus leading to homogenization of clinical practice and avoiding variability. However, it is well known that, depending on factors such as effectiveness, physiopathology, cost, adverse effects, preferences, and comorbidities, each patient will, in the long-term, receive different treatment of type 2 diabetes. The consensus document published last year and approved by the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes recommends distinct targets for each patient with type 2 diabetes and argues for the individualization of the management and treatment of this disease. In other words, the document advocates a patient-centered approach, in which the various therapeutic alternatives are related mainly to distinct physiopathological factors, adverse effects, and the patient's comorbidities, as well as the patient's preferences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Rural y Generalista (SEMERGEN). All rights reserved.

  20. Pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we studied pathophysiological mechanisms of insulin resistance in different conditions in humans, i.e. in obesity, during lipid infusions, after hypercaloric feeding, and glucocorticoid treatment. We focused on 3 important hypotheses that are suggested to be implicated in the

  1. Sleep-disordered breathing in epilepsy: epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivathamboo, Shobi; Perucca, Piero; Velakoulis, Dennis; Jones, Nigel C; Goldin, Jeremy; Kwan, Patrick; O'Brien, Terence J

    2018-04-01

    Epilepsy is a group of neurological conditions in which there is a pathological and enduring predisposition to generate recurrent seizures. Evidence over the last few decades suggests that epilepsy may be associated with increased sleep-disordered breathing, which may contribute towards sleep fragmentation, daytime somnolence, reduced seizure control, and cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality. Chronic sleep-disordered breathing can result in loss of gray matter and cause deficits to memory and global cognitive function. Sleep-disordered breathing is a novel and independent predictor of sudden cardiac death and, as such, may be involved in the mechanisms leading to sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. Despite this, the long-term consequences of sleep-disordered breathing in epilepsy remain unknown, and there are no guidelines for screening or treating this population. There is currently insufficient evidence to indicate continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for the primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, and recent evidence has failed to show any reduction of fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular endpoints. Treatment of sleep-disordered breathing may potentially improve seizure control, daytime somnolence, and neurocognitive outcomes, but few studies have examined this relationship. In this review, we examine sleep-disordered breathing in epilepsy, and discuss the potential effect of epilepsy treatments. We consider the role of CPAP and other interventions for sleep-disordered breathing and discuss their implications for epilepsy management.

  2. Epidemiology, treatment and prevention of herpes zoster: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, Elsam; Mengting, Lu; Kumar, Hanasha; Jianbo, Wu

    2018-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a major health burden that can affect individuals of any age. It is seen more commonly among individuals aged ≥50 years, those with immunocompromised status, and those on immunosuppressant drugs. It is caused by a reactivation of varicella zoster virus infection. Cell-mediated immunity plays a role in this reactivation. Fever, pain, and itch are common symptoms before the onset of rash. Post-herpetic neuralgia is the most common complication associated with herpes zoster. Risk factors and complications associated with herpes zoster depend on the age, immune status, and the time of initializing treatment. Routine vaccination for individuals over 60 years has shown considerable effect in terms of reducing the incidence of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia. Treatment with antiviral drugs and analgesics within 72 hours of rash onset has been shown to reduce severity and complications associated with herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia. This study mainly focuses on herpes zoster using articles and reviews from PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, and a manual search from Google Scholar. We cover the incidence of herpes zoster, gender distribution, seasonal and regional distribution of herpes zoster, incidence of herpes zoster among immunocompromised individuals, incidence of post-herpetic neuralgia following a zoster infection, complications, management, and prevention of herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia.

  3. Hemorrhoids: From basic pathophysiology to clinical management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the pathophysiology, epidemiology, risk factors, classification, clinical evaluation, and current non-operative and operative treatment of hemorrhoids. Hemorrhoids are defined as the symptomatic enlargement and distal displacement of the normal anal cushions. The most common symptom of hemorrhoids is rectal bleeding associated with bowel movement. The abnormal dilatation and distortion of the vascular channel, together with destructive changes in the supporting connective tissue within the anal cushion, is a paramount finding of hemorrhoids. It appears that the dysregulation of the vascular tone and vascular hyperplasia might play an important role in hemorrhoidal development, and could be a potential target for medical treatment. In most instances, hemorrhoids are treated conservatively, using many methods such as lifestyle modification, fiber supplement, suppository-delivered anti-inflammatory drugs, and administration of venotonic drugs. Non-operative approaches include sclerotherapy and, preferably, rubber band ligation. An operation is indicated when non-operative approaches have failed or complications have occurred. Several surgical approaches for treating hemorrhoids have been introduced including hemorrhoidectomy and stapled hemorrhoidopexy, but postoperative pain is invariable. Some of the surgical treatments potentially cause appreciable morbidity such as anal stricture and incontinence. The applications and outcomes of each treatment are thoroughly discussed. PMID:22563187

  4. Osteoporosis in men: epidemiology and treatment with denosumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidlauskas KM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Kristel M Sidlauskas, Emily E Sutton, Michael A Biddle Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences-Vermont Campus, Colchester, VT, USA Abstract: Osteoporosis is a major public health care concern. Although often described as a disease affecting postmenopausal women, researchers and clinicians have emphasized its prevalence in men in recent years. The National Osteoporosis Foundation has stated that up to 25% of men over the age of 50 years will experience a fracture due to osteoporosis. Men who suffer from a major fracture have higher mortality rates than women. Pharmacologic therapy options for treating osteoporosis are limited for men as compared with women, so each medication approved for use in this population represents an important clinical option. In September 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a new indication for denosumab to increase bone mass in men with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody and novel antiresorptive agent that works by binding receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-β ligand (RANKL and inhibiting the signaling cascade that causes osteoclast maturation, activity, and survival. Ultimately, denosumab suppresses bone turnover and increases bone mineral density in both trabecular and cortical bone. Approval for treating osteoporosis in men was based on data from the ADAMO trial which displayed efficacy in increasing bone mineral density at the lumbar spine, total hip, femoral neck, hip trochanter, and one-third radius. Studies indicate that denosumab is effective and safe, and has superior adherence rates and patient satisfaction. Although long-term data and further research on fracture reduction rates in men should be explored, at this time denosumab is one of several appropriate first-line treatment options for men with osteoporosis. Keywords: denosumab, osteoporosis, men, treatment

  5. Pediatric Crohn's disease: epidemiology and emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kansal S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Shivani Kansal,1–3 Anthony G Catto-Smith1,2 1Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, 2Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, 3Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of Crohn's disease over the last two to three decades worldwide, which has affected both the developed world and increasingly also the developing world. Crohn's disease is a disease of youth and can have a profound effect on the growing child, both in terms of growth and skeletal health as well psychosocial maturation. Environmental risk factors appear to be crucially important, but it is not clear at present whether improved hygiene, especially in childhood, influences immunological conditioning, or whether there is a direct impact on the gut from a disturbed gut microbiota. Genetic variation appears to relate to how the host interacts with its microbiota, determining susceptibility rather than causation. The outcome is a sustained immune response, clinically presenting as a relapsing/remitting disease process. There is no current cure for Crohn's disease; treatments are designed to reduce symptoms and control inflammation, initially by inducing a remission, then trying to maintain it. Historical therapies have included 5-aminosalicylic acid-based drugs, corticosteroids, and immunomodulators. Two approaches which are gaining increasing interest are the use of exclusive enteral nutrition and biologicals. Enteral nutrition is a remarkably effective approach, though there is a limited understanding of its mechanism and difficulties in acceptance among the medical community. Biologicals are a class of drugs which specifically target molecules and pathways central to the inflammatory process; they are also very effective, but patients can develop a secondary loss of response as a result of antibodies to the biological agent. Infection and the development

  6. Clinical Update on Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Nonpharmacological Treatment of Insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kahriman

    2006-04-01

    30% of patients become completely symptom free and can be called as "good sleepers". The clinical studies showed that sleep improvements are well maintained up to 2 years after treatment completion. C o n c l u s i o n: Despite evidence showing psychological and behavioral approaches to be efficacious in the treatment of insomnia, in today’s clinical practice, such therapies are not readily available and are not widely used by doctors

  7. Hemophilia A in Brazil – epidemiology and treatment developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira AA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Adriana Aparecida Ferreira,1 Isabel Cristina Gonçalves Leite,2 Maria Teresa Bustamante-Teixeira,2 Maximiliano Ribeiro Guerra2 1Foundation and Center for Hematology and Hemotherapy of Minas Gerais (Hemominas, 2Department of Collective Health, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, BrazilAbstract: Hemophilia A is an inherited disorder characterized by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII, which predisposes patients to bleeding events. Treatment is based on replacement of the deficient factor, in a therapeutic or prophylactic manner. Brazil is the country with the third largest population of people with hemophilia, for which the public health system provides free comprehensive care. Maintaining an updated registry of patients, documenting the prevalence of complications, and assessing the effectiveness of resource use are indispensable elements in the design of a well-coordinated national program. According to sociodemographic, clinical, and laboratory data collected by the computerized Brazilian system on coagulopathies, in June 2013, there were 9,122 registered patients with hemophilia A in Brazil, of which 36.1% had a severe form of the disease. Clotting factor inhibitors were present in 7.5%, but 25.7% of records did not provide this type of data. Around 70% of the patients belonged to the economically active population, being between 15 and 59 years old. Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus was present in 23.4% of the patients tested and infection by hepatitis C virus antibodies in 59.3%. Infection by the hepatitis B virus and human T-lymphotropic virus was also reported. The high percentage of incomplete records regarding serological data shows the fragility of the information system to date. There was also no information available on the prevalence of permanent or disabling joint damage. Although few hemophiliacs receive adequate care in developing countries, and despite Brazil exhibiting great social

  8. Epidemiology, imaging, and treatment of Lisfranc fracture-dislocations revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalia, Vivek; Fishman, Elliot K.; Carrino, John A.; Fayad, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the features of Lisfranc injuries and identify their typical imaging findings on radiographs, CT, and MR imaging. Lisfranc injuries are most often caused by hyperplantarflexion of the foot, often during a sporting injury or in high-speed motor vehicle collisions. The most common radiographic findings include diastasis of the base of the first and second metatarsals and the ''fleck'' sign, though neither is necessarily present in every Lisfranc fracture-dislocation. Owing to their often subtle radiographic presentation, clinically suspected Lisfranc injuries warrant imaging with a more sensitive test for the detection of osseous and ligamentous Lisfranc injuries. 3D CT imaging provides a comprehensive evaluation of the injury for optimal treatment planning, with resultant decreased long-term patient morbidity. Furthermore, 3D volume-rendered CT and CT multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) provide osseous and neurovascular anatomic detail that may be a considerable help with surgical planning for operative cases of Lisfranc injuries. Also, with 3D CT and MPRs, other occult fractures, which are common in patients with high-energy injury and multiple trauma, may become evident. (orig.)

  9. Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in Children: Epidemiology and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulgaron, Elizabeth R.; Delamater, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of overweight and obesity among children has increased dramatically in recent decades, with about one-third of children in the U.S. currently being either overweight or obese. Being overweight in early childhood increases risk for later obesity. There is evidence for the efficacy of family-based behavioral treatment to control weight and improve health outcomes. Obesity-related health risks have been documented, including metabolic syndrome. There is also increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among youth in recent years, with obesity and family history of T2D generally present. Lower income and ethnic minority status are associated with both obesity and T2D in youth. Most youth with T2D do not achieve optimal glycemic control, and are at high risk for later health complications. Obesity and T2D represent significant public health issues with potentially great personal and societal cost. Research addressing the prevention of obesity and T2D among youth is urgently needed. PMID:24919749

  10. Osteoporosis in men: epidemiology and treatment with denosumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidlauskas, Kristel M; Sutton, Emily E; Biddle, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health care concern. Although often described as a disease affecting postmenopausal women, researchers and clinicians have emphasized its prevalence in men in recent years. The National Osteoporosis Foundation has stated that up to 25% of men over the age of 50 years will experience a fracture due to osteoporosis. Men who suffer from a major fracture have higher mortality rates than women. Pharmacologic therapy options for treating osteoporosis are limited for men as compared with women, so each medication approved for use in this population represents an important clinical option. In September 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a new indication for denosumab to increase bone mass in men with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody and novel antiresorptive agent that works by binding receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-β ligand (RANKL) and inhibiting the signaling cascade that causes osteoclast maturation, activity, and survival. Ultimately, denosumab suppresses bone turnover and increases bone mineral density in both trabecular and cortical bone. Approval for treating osteoporosis in men was based on data from the ADAMO trial which displayed efficacy in increasing bone mineral density at the lumbar spine, total hip, femoral neck, hip trochanter, and one-third radius. Studies indicate that denosumab is effective and safe, and has superior adherence rates and patient satisfaction. Although long-term data and further research on fracture reduction rates in men should be explored, at this time denosumab is one of several appropriate first-line treatment options for men with osteoporosis.

  11. Hospital-based ocular emergencies: epidemiology, treatment, and visual outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Cindy A; Rogers-Martel, Melanie; Golas, Liliya; Chepurny, Anna; Martel, James B; Martel, Joseph R

    2014-03-01

    Ocular trauma is recognized as the leading cause of unilateral blindness. However, few studies to date have focused on the clinical features of hospital-based ocular emergencies. Effectiveness of trauma centers in treating ocular emergencies was compared with treatment in traditional community hospital emergency departments. Demographics, causes, and nature of ocular emergencies, as well as visual outcome in community hospitals emergency departments and trauma centers, were also examined. Records of 1027 patients with ocular emergencies seen between July 2007 and November 2010 at 3 community hospitals emergency departments and 2 hospitals with level II trauma centers were retrospectively examined. Unpaired t test and Pearson χ(2) test were used to determine statistical significance. The incidence of patients requiring ophthalmic intervention was 77.2 per 100 000 in the community hospitals and 208.9 per 100 000 in the trauma centers. Rates of ocular emergencies were higher in middle-aged, white men. Orbital fractures were found in 86% of all orbital contusion cases in trauma centers, whereas 66.7% of patients with fall injuries and open globe diagnoses resulted in legal blindness. The middle-aged, white men are more vulnerable to ocular injuries caused mainly by motor vehicle accidents. The ability of trauma centers to provide comparable increases in vision outcomes, despite treating more severe ocular emergencies, demonstrates the effectiveness of trauma centers. Patients diagnosed as having orbital contusions or who have fall injuries deserve careful evaluation because they are more likely to have more severe sight-threatening injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A global epidemiological survey and strategy of treatment of military ocular injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-nian ZHANG

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the current global status of military ocular injury for the purpose of improving the level of domestic epidemiological investigation,in order to improve treatment strategies,and to prevent and reduce the incidence of military ocular injury in Chinese PLA.Methods The epidemiological literature concerning military ocular injury occurring in our country and abroad in recent five years was retrieved by information research;the problems and experiences in the aspects of epidemiological survey,registry,data collection,systematic treatment and prevention of military ocular injury existed in PLA were also summarized and analyzed.Results There were currently no systematic epidemiological data about ocular injury in PLA.A few articles about epidemiological study on ocular injury showed that servicemen were the high risk population of ocular injury.Both in peacetime or wartime the ocular injury was the primary cause leading to monocular blindness of soldiers.As to the ocular injury,in 51.55% of the patients,it occurred in the military operations and work,and 30.31% in military training.The incidence of ocular injury was different in various services,for example,the incidence in the internal security forces of armed police could be as high as 78.85% due to training of martial arts and boxing and wrestling.The deficiency of microsurgery equipments and untimely evacuation were the main causes affecting prognosis during treatment course in primary military hospitals.Conclusions Military affairs,physical training,military maneuver and defense constructions are the main causes of ocular injury in servicemen,and young male soldiers are the main group for prevention and treatment for military ocular injury.More attention should be paid to the epidemiological survey of military ocular injury to find out the causes leading to ocular injury,to improve treatment strategies,to formulate feasible protective measures and then military ocular

  13. Pathophysiology and treatment of patients with globus sensation ―from the viewpoint of esophageal motility dysfunction―

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Noriaki; Tsutsui, Hideaki; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken

    2014-01-01

    "Globus sensation" is often described as the sensation of a lump in the throat associated with dry swallowing or the need for dry swallowing, which disappears completely during eating or drinking and for which no organic cause can be established. Due to the uncertain etiology of "globus sensation", it remains difficult to establish standard treatment strategies for affected patients. Lately most attention has been focused on gastroesophageal reflux disease and several reports have indicated that there is a close relationship between esophageal acid reflux and globus sensation. Nowadays, empirical therapy with a high dose of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is considered to be indicated for patients with globus sensation, after excluding organic diseases such as pharyngeal cancer, Zenker's diverticulum, or thyroid enlargement. If patients are nonresponsive to PPI therapy, evaluation of esophageal motility should be done. In our recent study, 47.9% had abnormal esophageal motility, with the most common esophageal motility abnormality being an ineffective esophageal motility in PPI-resistant patients with globus sensation. This suggests that prokinetics alone or adding prokinetics to PPI should be the treatment to be considered, although few studies have investigated the efficacy of prokinetics in the treatment of patients with globus sensation. If patients without any esophageal motility dysfunctions are nonresponsive to PPI therapy, either cognitive-behavioral therapy, anti-depressants, or gabapentin could be helpful, although further well-designed, randomized controlled large-scale studies will be necessary to determine the effectiveness of each treatment strategy on patients with globus sensation. PMID:26081369

  14. Electroconvulsive therapy in the treatment of neuropsychiatric conditions and transcranial magnetic stimulation as a pathophysiological probe in neuropsychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, W M; Greenberg, B D

    2000-01-01

    It is a challenging task to review transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies in neuropsychiatric disorders alongside assessments of longstanding clinical applications of ECT as an empirical treatment. The task is challenging because TMS was developed as a probe of neural mechanisms, whereas, in marked contrast, ECT has been a clinical technique from its inception. Since the onset of modern psychopharmacology, the understanding of the potential applications of ECT to neuropsychiatric disorders is generally restricted to case reports of patients with intractable disease that have had at least a partial response to ECT. Studies of the possible efficacy of TMS in neuropsychiatric conditions have a significant advantage over ECT as the treatments are associated with less morbidity. The only serious known complication in TMS is a risk of seizures that may increase in patients with neuropsychiatric conditions such as course brain disease. Only cortical structures are themselves accessible to TMS using current technology. Present TMS techniques, however, seem capable of affecting activity in deeper brain structures that are functionally linked to cortical brain regions. TMS permits novel explorations of relationships between regional brain activity and symptoms of a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, as well as in research relating activity in functionally related brain regions to modulation of cognition and affective states in healthy individuals. This is particularly true at present because TMS and powerful neuroimaging and neuropsychological tools are all making rapid advances simultaneously.

  15. Fisiopatología, tratamiento y modelos experimentales de artritis reumatoide Pathophysiology, treatment and experimental models of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Noa Puig

    2011-06-01

    world population, more predominant in women than men and more frequent in those aged 30 and 50 and entails a high level of inability of patient. It is characterized by a symmetrical erosive synovitis with proliferation of conjunctival tissue (pannus, invading and eroding the cartilage and joint bones, and sometimes, by a multisystem affection. In most patients the disease follows a fluctuating chronic course, which it is not treated, provoke a progressive destruction, deformity and inability of involved joints. The disease evolves with high figures of rheumatoid factor and/or anti- citrulline antibodies. These are essential features of an optimal treatment of this entity include: early differential diagnosis, initial treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, the use of disease course modifying drugs, the potential use of oral low-dose glucocorticoid agents or intra-articular injections, and a periodical assessment of treatment fitting (radiological serum and functional monitoring of disease progression and of treatment-associated toxicity and the educational and rehabilitations interventions of patient. To assess the new therapies for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, the more uses models are: that of the arthritis induced by adjuvant drugs in rats and the arthritis induced by collagen in rats and mice. Other new models show limited data. Effectiveness of several compounds reveals that its therapeutic effect is more predictive of the clinical effect in the human being when models of arthritis due to adjuvant drugs and collagen than data from an only one model.

  16. Advances in hepatitis E - II: Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Amit; Aggarwal, Rakesh

    2016-09-01

    Infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the commonest cause of acute hepatitis worldwide. This infection, with fecal-oral transmission, was previously thought to be limited to humans residing in developing countries with poor sanitation, spreading via contaminated drinking water. In recent years, our understanding of epidemiology and clinical spectrum of this infection have changed markedly. This article reviews the epidemiology, including routes of transmission, and clinical manifestations of HEV infection around the world. In addition, recent findings on transmission-associated HEV infection, extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E and chronic infection with HEV, and treatment and prevention of this infection are discussed. Expert commentary: HEV infection has two distinct epidemiologic forms and clinical patterns of disease: (i) acute epidemic or sporadic hepatitis caused by fecal-oral (usually water-borne) transmission of genotype 1 and 2 HEV from a human reservoir in areas with poor hygiene and frequent water contamination, and (ii) infrequent sporadic hepatitis E caused by zoonotic infection, possibly from an animal source through ingestion of undercooked animal meal, of genotype 3 or 4 virus. In disease-endemic areas, pregnant women are at a particular risk of serious disease and high mortality. In less-endemic areas, chronic infection with HEV among immunosuppressed persons is observed. HEV can also be transmitted through Transfusion of blood and blood products. Ribivirin treatment is effective in chronic hepatitis E. Two efficacious vaccines have been tried in humans; one of these has received marketing approval in its country of origin.

  17. Epidemiological profile of patients with nephropathy and the difficulties in access to treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Maria Monteiro Sampaio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the epidemiological profile of patients undergoing treatment for renal replacement therapy in dialysis modality, and to identify the difficulties in its realization. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted in Itapipoca-CE, comprising 35 patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. The general data was analyzed descriptively using absolute and percentage frequencies. Results: The epidemiological profile of patients shows a higher frequency of: males (19 - 54.3% aged between 31 and 60 (24 - 68.6%, low education (29 - 82.8%, family incomes of 1 to 2 minimum wages (25 - 71.4%, living in houses of masonry (30 - 85.7% with treated water provided in their homes (17 - 48.6%. The main signs and symptoms that led to seeking medical consultation were: general weakness (21 - 60.0%, nausea (19 - 54.3%, edema (18 - 51.4% and lack of appetite (14 - 40.0%. The features most frequently mentioned by the patients as probable causes to CRF were: association of hypertension with diabetes mellitus (11 - 31.4%, hypertension (9 - 25.7% and glomerulonephritis (5 - 14.3%. Most patients reported difficulty in obtaining medical appointment (25 - 71.4% and scheduling/receiving exams (20 - 57.1%. Conclusion: The epidemiological profile of patients studied is marked by a low socioeconomic status. As aggravating factors to this situation, there was the difficulty in getting appointments, scheduling and performing diagnostic tests, which undermines the treatment.

  18. Modelling the epidemiological impact of intermittent preventive treatment against malaria in infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Ross

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trials of intermittent preventive treatment against malaria in infants (IPTi using sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP have shown a positive, albeit variable, protective efficacy against clinical malaria episodes. The impact of IPTi in different epidemiological settings and over time is unknown and predictions are hampered by the lack of knowledge about how IPTi works. We investigated mechanisms proposed for the action of IPTi and made predictions of the likely impact on morbidity and mortality. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a comprehensive, individual-based, stochastic model of malaria epidemiology to simulate recently published trials of IPTi using SP with site-specific characteristics as inputs. This baseline model was then modified to represent hypotheses concerning the duration of action of SP, the temporal pattern of fevers caused by individual infections, potential benefits of avoiding fevers on immunity and the effect of sub-therapeutic levels of SP on parasite dynamics. The baseline model reproduced the pattern of results reasonably well. None of the models based on alternative hypotheses improved the fit between the model predictions and observed data. Predictions suggest that IPTi would have a beneficial effect across a range of transmission intensities. IPTi was predicted to avert a greater number of episodes where IPTi coverage was higher, the health system treatment coverage lower, and for drugs which were more efficacious and had longer prophylactic periods. The predicted cumulative benefits were proportionately slightly greater for severe malaria episodes and malaria-attributable mortality than for acute episodes in the settings modelled. Modest increased susceptibility was predicted between doses and following the last dose, but these were outweighed by the cumulative benefits. The impact on transmission intensity was negligible. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of trial results can be accounted for by differences between

  19. Veno-venous extracorporeal CO2 removal for the treatment of severe respiratory acidosis: pathophysiological and technical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannidis, Christian; Kampe, Kristin Aufm; Sipmann, Fernando Suarez; Larsson, Anders; Hedenstierna, Goran; Windisch, Wolfram; Mueller, Thomas

    2014-06-17

    While non-invasive ventilation aimed at avoiding intubation has become the modality of choice to treat mild to moderate acute respiratory acidosis, many severely acidotic patients (pH respiratory acidosis was only feasible when blood flow rates of 750 to 1000 mL/minute (19Fr catheter) were used. Maximal CO2-elimination was 146.1 ± 22.6 mL/minute, while pH increased from 7.13 ± 0.08 to 7.41 ± 0.07 (blood flow of 1000 mL/minute; sweep gas flow 16 L/minute). Accordingly, a sweep gas flow of 8 L/minute resulted in a maximal CO2-elimination rate of 138.0 ± 16.9 mL/minute. The 14.5Fr catheter allowed a maximum CO2 elimination rate of 77.9 mL/minute, which did not result in the normalization of pH. Veno-venous ECCO2R may serve as a treatment option for severe respiratory acidosis. In this porcine model, ECCO2R was most effective when using blood flow rates ranging between 750 and 1000 mL/minute, while an increase in sweep gas flow from 8 to 16 L/minute had less impact on ECCO2R in this setting.

  20. Epidemiology and treatment of eating disorders in men and women of middle and older age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangweth-Matzek, Barbara; Hoek, Hans W

    2017-11-01

    We summarized recent literature on the epidemiology and treatment of eating disorders in middle-aged and older women and men. The prevalence of eating disorders according to DSM-5 criteria is around 3.5% in older (>40 years) women and around 1-2% in older men. The majority of those eating disordered persons are not in treatment. There are new terms like 'perimenopausal eating disorders' and 'muscularity-oriented eating disorders' indicating the impact of the aging process and sex-specific differences. Disordered eating and eating disorders occur in both women and men of all ages. Medical complications because of age, the stigma of eating disorders in a still 'untypical' age, and the glorification of sports activity often hinder the recognition of eating disorders in midlife and older persons. Treatment approaches should consider treatment strategies tailored for older women and men, addressing the context of midlife and aging.

  1. Vestibular schwannomas in the modern era: epidemiology, treatment trends, and disparities in management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ranjith; Sharma, Richa; Bagley, Jacob H; Hatef, Jeffrey; Friedman, Allan H; Adamson, Cory

    2013-07-01

    There are a variety of treatment options for the management of vestibular schwannomas (VSs), including microsurgical resection, radiotherapy, and observation. Although the choice of treatment is dependent on various patient factors, physician bias has been shown to significantly affect treatment choice for VS. In this study the authors describe the current epidemiology of VS and treatment trends in the US in the modern era. They also illustrate patient and tumor characteristics and elucidate their effect on tumor management. Patients diagnosed with VS were identified through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database, spanning the years 2004-2009. Age-adjusted incidence rates were calculated and adjusted using the 2000 US standard population. The chi-square and Student t-tests were used to evaluate differences between patient and tumor characteristics. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the effects of various patient and tumor characteristics on the choice of tumor treatment. A total of 6225 patients with VSs treated between 2004 and 2009 were identified. The overall incidence rate was 1.2 per 100,000 population per year. The median age of patients with VS was 55 years, with the majority of patients being Caucasian (83.16%). Of all patients, 3053 (49.04%) received surgery only, with 1466 (23.55%) receiving radiotherapy alone. Both surgery and radiation were only used in 123 patients (1.98%), with 1504 patients not undergoing any treatment (24.16%). Increasing age correlated with decreased use of surgery (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.95-0.96; pmanagement (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.04-1.05; pmanaged conservatively despite presenting with larger tumors. Further studies are needed to elucidate the reasons for treatment disparities and investigate the nationwide trend of resection for the treatment of small VSs.

  2. SIS epidemiological model for adaptive RT: Forecasting the parotid glands shrinkage during tomotherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffei, Nicola; Guidi, Gabriele, E-mail: guidi.gabriele@policlinico.mo.it; Ciarmatori, Alberto [Medical Physics Department, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Modena 41124, Italy and Physics Department, University of Bologna, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Vecchi, Claudio; Baldazzi, Giuseppe [Physics Department, University of Bologna, Bologna 40126 (Italy); Gottardi, Giovanni; Costi, Tiziana [Medical Physics Department, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Modena 41124 (Italy); Meduri, Bruno; D’Angelo, Elisa; Bruni, Alessio; Mazzeo, Ercole; Pratissoli, Silvia; Giacobazzi, Patrizia; Lohr, Frank [Radiation Oncology Department, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Modena 41124 (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: A susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic model was applied to radiation therapy (RT) treatments to predict morphological variations in head and neck (H&N) anatomy. Methods: 360 daily MVCT images of 12 H&N patients treated by tomotherapy were analyzed in this retrospective study. Deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms, mesh grids, and structure recontouring, implemented in the RayStation treatment planning system (TPS), were applied to assess the daily organ warping. The parotid’s warping was evaluated using the epidemiological approach considering each vertex as a single subject and its deformed vector field (DVF) as an infection. Dedicated IronPython scripts were developed to export daily coordinates and displacements of the region of interest (ROI) from the TPS. MATLAB tools were implemented to simulate the SIS modeling. Finally, the fully trained model was applied to a new patient. Results: A QUASAR phantom was used to validate the model. The patients’ validation was obtained setting 0.4 cm of vertex displacement as threshold and splitting susceptible (S) and infectious (I) cases. The correlation between the epidemiological model and the parotids’ trend for further optimization of alpha and beta was carried out by Euclidean and dynamic time warping (DTW) distances. The best fit with experimental conditions across all patients (Euclidean distance of 4.09 ± 1.12 and DTW distance of 2.39 ± 0.66) was obtained setting the contact rate at 7.55 ± 0.69 and the recovery rate at 2.45 ± 0.26; birth rate was disregarded in this constant population. Conclusions: Combining an epidemiological model with adaptive RT (ART), the authors’ novel approach could support image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) to validate daily setup and to forecast anatomical variations. The SIS-ART model developed could support clinical decisions in order to optimize timing of replanning achieving personalized treatments.

  3. SIS epidemiological model for adaptive RT: Forecasting the parotid glands shrinkage during tomotherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maffei, Nicola; Guidi, Gabriele; Ciarmatori, Alberto; Vecchi, Claudio; Baldazzi, Giuseppe; Gottardi, Giovanni; Costi, Tiziana; Meduri, Bruno; D’Angelo, Elisa; Bruni, Alessio; Mazzeo, Ercole; Pratissoli, Silvia; Giacobazzi, Patrizia; Lohr, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic model was applied to radiation therapy (RT) treatments to predict morphological variations in head and neck (H&N) anatomy. Methods: 360 daily MVCT images of 12 H&N patients treated by tomotherapy were analyzed in this retrospective study. Deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms, mesh grids, and structure recontouring, implemented in the RayStation treatment planning system (TPS), were applied to assess the daily organ warping. The parotid’s warping was evaluated using the epidemiological approach considering each vertex as a single subject and its deformed vector field (DVF) as an infection. Dedicated IronPython scripts were developed to export daily coordinates and displacements of the region of interest (ROI) from the TPS. MATLAB tools were implemented to simulate the SIS modeling. Finally, the fully trained model was applied to a new patient. Results: A QUASAR phantom was used to validate the model. The patients’ validation was obtained setting 0.4 cm of vertex displacement as threshold and splitting susceptible (S) and infectious (I) cases. The correlation between the epidemiological model and the parotids’ trend for further optimization of alpha and beta was carried out by Euclidean and dynamic time warping (DTW) distances. The best fit with experimental conditions across all patients (Euclidean distance of 4.09 ± 1.12 and DTW distance of 2.39 ± 0.66) was obtained setting the contact rate at 7.55 ± 0.69 and the recovery rate at 2.45 ± 0.26; birth rate was disregarded in this constant population. Conclusions: Combining an epidemiological model with adaptive RT (ART), the authors’ novel approach could support image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) to validate daily setup and to forecast anatomical variations. The SIS-ART model developed could support clinical decisions in order to optimize timing of replanning achieving personalized treatments.

  4. Review of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of common primary psychiatric causes of cutaneous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krooks, J A; Weatherall, A G; Holland, P J

    2018-06-01

    Approximately half of all patients presenting to dermatologists exhibit signs and symptoms of psychiatric conditions that are either primary or secondary to cutaneous disease. Because patients typically resist psychiatric consult, dermatologists often are on the front line in evaluating and treating these patients. Accordingly, distinguishing the specific underlying or resulting psychiatric condition is essential for effective treatment. The etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and first-line treatment of specific primary psychiatric causes of dermatologic conditions, including delusional infestation, Morgellons syndrome, olfactory reference syndrome, body dysmorphic disorder, excoriation disorder, trichotillomania, and dermatitis artefacta are discussed here, followed by a discussion of the recommended treatment approach with an overview of the different first-line therapies discussed in this review, specifically cognitive behavioral therapy, atypical antipsychotics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants. Included is a guide for dermatologists to use while prescribing these medications.

  5. Epidemiology, causes, and treatment of epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba-Diop, Awa; Marin, Benoît; Druet-Cabanac, Michel; Ngoungou, Edgard B; Newton, Charles R; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disease in tropical countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Previous work on epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa has shown that many cases are severe, partly a result of some specific causes, that it carries a stigma, and that it is not adequately treated in many cases. Many studies on the epidemiology, aetiology, and management of epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa have been reported in the past 10 years. The prevalence estimated from door-to-door studies is almost double that in Asia, Europe, and North America. The most commonly implicated risk factors are birth trauma, CNS infections, and traumatic brain injury. About 60% of patients with epilepsy receive no antiepileptic treatment, largely for economic and social reasons. Further epidemiological studies should be a priority to improve understanding of possible risk factors and thereby the prevention of epilepsy in Africa, and action should be taken to improve access to treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Incidence, epidemiology, and treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in 12 midwest communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba-Davis, Mary; Bohnstedt, Bradley N; Payner, Troy D; Leipzig, Thomas J; Palmer, Erin; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-01-01

    Only 8 studies have investigated the incidence and epidemiology of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) in the United States. This is the first investigation in Indiana, which has some of the highest rates of tobacco smoking and obesity in the nation. The authors prospectively identified 441 consecutive patients with aSAH from 2005 to 2010 at 2 hospitals where the majority of cases are treated. Incidence calculations were based on US Census populations. Epidemiologic variables included demography; risk factors; Hunt and Hess scale; Fisher grade; number, location, and size of aneurysms; treatment type; and complications. Overall incidence was 21.8 per 100,000 population. Incidence was higher in women, increased with age, and did not vary by race. One third to half of patients were hypertensive and/or smoked cigarettes at the time of ictus. Variations by count were partially explained by Health Factor and Morbidity Rankings. Complications varied by treatment. These findings deviate from estimates that 6-16 per 100,000 people in the United States will develop aSAH and are double the incidence in a Minnesota population between 1945 and 1974. The results also deviate from the worldwide estimate of 9.0 aSAHs per 100,000 person-years. The predictive value of variations in Health Factor and Morbidity Rankings implicates the importance of future research on multivariate biopsychosocial causation of aSAH. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [A new possible strategy for prevention and preventive treatment of age-related macular degeneration resting on recent clinical and pathophysiological observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tamás

    2009-03-15

    The beneficial effect achieved by the treatment of endothelial dysfunction in chronic cardiovascular diseases is already an evidence belonging to the basic treatment of the disease. Given the fact that the vascular system is uniform and consubstantial both physiologically, pathophysiologically and in terms of therapy, and that it plays a key role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a disease leading to tragic loss of vision with its etiology and therapy being unknown--endothelial dysfunction should be treated. The pleiotropic effects of ACE-inhibitors, AR-blockers and statins and third generation beta blockers help to restitute the balance between vasodilators and vasoconstrictors in endothelial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress, the balance of growth factors and their inhibitors, pro- and anti-inflammatory substances and prothrombotic and fibrinolytic factors, inhibit the formation of oxidative stress and its harmful effects; while aspirin with its pleiotropic effects acting as an antiaggregation substance on platelets helps to set the endothelial layer back to its normal balance regarding its vasodilating, antithrombotic, antiadhesive and anti-inflammatory functions; trimetazidine as an adjuvant agent helps to normalize, to restore the disturbed metabolism of the retinal tissue functioning insufficiently, in the end. The angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan with its peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) agonist effect inhibits the development of choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) and improves it clinically favourably. The third generation beta adrenergic receptor blocker carvedilol and nebivolol as well as the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist pioglitazone elicit their antioxidant vascular protective effects mitochondrially. For the above reasons it is suggested that, as a part of long term primary and/or secondary prevention, the following groups of patients with AMD receive--taking into

  8. Female Pattern Hair Loss: a clinical and pathophysiological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Paulo Müller; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2015-01-01

    Female Pattern Hair Loss or female androgenetic alopecia is the main cause of hair loss in adult women and has a major impact on patients' quality of life. It evolves from the progressive miniaturization of follicles that lead to a subsequent decrease of the hair density, leading to a non-scarring diffuse alopecia, with characteristic clinical, dermoscopic and histological patterns. In spite of the high frequency of the disease and the relevance of its psychological impact, its pathogenesis is not yet fully understood, being influenced by genetic, hormonal and environmental factors. In addition, response to treatment is variable. In this article, authors discuss the main clinical, epidemiological and pathophysiological aspects of female pattern hair loss.

  9. [Operative treatment of traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spinal column. Part I: epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, M; Knop, C; Beisse, R; Audigé, L; Kandziora, F; Pizanis, A; Pranzl, R; Gercek, E; Schultheiss, M; Weckbach, A; Bühren, V; Blauth, M

    2009-01-01

    The Spine Study Group (AG WS) of the German Trauma Association (DGU) has now been in existence for more than a decade. Its main objective is the evaluation and optimization of the operative treatment for traumatic spinal injuries. The authors present the results of the second prospective internet-based multicenter study (MCS II) of the AG WS in three consecutive parts: epidemiology, surgical treatment and radiologic findings and follow-up results. The aim of the study was to update and review the state-of-the art for treatment of spinal fractures for thoracic and lumbar spine (T1-L5) injuries in German-speaking countries: which lesions will be treated with which procedure and what differences can be found in the course of treatment and the clinical and radiological outcome? This present first part of the study outlines the new study design and concept of an internet-based data collection system. The epidemiologic findings and characteristics of the three major treatment subgroups of the study collective will be presented: operative treatment (OP), non-operative treatment (KONS), and patients receiving a kyphoplasty and/or vertebroplasty without additional instrumentation (PLASTIE). A total of 865 patients (OP n=733, KONS n=52, PLASTIE n=69, other n=7) from 8 German and Austrian trauma centers were included. The main causes of accidents in the OP subgroup were motor vehicle accidents 27.1% and trivial falls 15.8% (KONS 55.8%, PLASTIE 66.7%). The Magerl/AO classification scheme was used and 548 (63.3%) compression fractures (type A), 181 (20.9%) distraction injuries (type B), and 136 (15.7%) rotational injuries (type C) were diagnosed. Of the fractures 68.8% were located at the thoracolumbar junction (T11-L2). Type B and type C injuries carried a higher risk for concomitant injuries, neurological deficits and additional vertebral fractures. The average initial VAS spine score, representing the status before the trauma, varied between treatment subgroups (OP 80, KONS

  10. Combining epidemiological and genetic networks signifies the importance of early treatment in HIV-1 transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Narges; Prosperi, Mattia; Belleman, Robert G; Colafigli, Manuela; De Luca, Andrea; Sloot, Peter M A

    2012-01-01

    Inferring disease transmission networks is important in epidemiology in order to understand and prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Reconstruction of the infection transmission networks requires insight into viral genome data as well as social interactions. For the HIV-1 epidemic, current research either uses genetic information of patients' virus to infer the past infection events or uses statistics of sexual interactions to model the network structure of viral spreading. Methods for a reliable reconstruction of HIV-1 transmission dynamics, taking into account both molecular and societal data are still lacking. The aim of this study is to combine information from both genetic and epidemiological scales to characterize and analyse a transmission network of the HIV-1 epidemic in central Italy.We introduce a novel filter-reduction method to build a network of HIV infected patients based on their social and treatment information. The network is then combined with a genetic network, to infer a hypothetical infection transmission network. We apply this method to a cohort study of HIV-1 infected patients in central Italy and find that patients who are highly connected in the network have longer untreated infection periods. We also find that the network structures for homosexual males and heterosexual populations are heterogeneous, consisting of a majority of 'peripheral nodes' that have only a few sexual interactions and a minority of 'hub nodes' that have many sexual interactions. Inferring HIV-1 transmission networks using this novel combined approach reveals remarkable correlations between high out-degree individuals and longer untreated infection periods. These findings signify the importance of early treatment and support the potential benefit of wide population screening, management of early diagnoses and anticipated antiretroviral treatment to prevent viral transmission and spread. The approach presented here for reconstructing HIV-1 transmission networks

  11. [The clinico-epidemiological premises for antioxidant prevention and treatment in chronic myocardial infarct].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoicăi, D; Mitu, F; Iacobovici, A; Pavel, M; Jerca, L; Ungureanu, D; Popovici, I; Cojocaru, M; Ivan, A; Gheorghiţă, N

    1996-01-01

    The improvement of therapeutic and recoverable proceeding to chronic myocardial infarction (IMC) imposes a complex epidemiological estimation of the global cardiovascular risk, of their clinical and biological status. The retrospective evaluation of the risk factors (RF) by epidemiological methods, in 38 hospitalized prevalence of both constitutional and behavioral factors, and the quantification of the risk state, according to graph Euro 194, has pointed on the fact that 50% of IMC cases have presented a global risk of 10-20%. That justified the application of a preventive conduct in order to continually neutralize the associates FR. The biochemical determinations have allowed to frame the dyslipidemic patients, according to the ARCOL classification in the classes D (29.2%), E (25.0%) and B (20.8%) with direct implication in the adopted therapy. The colorimetric dozing with thyo-barbituric acid of the malonly dialdehyde (MAD) each is a product of the lipidic peroxidation, as well as the interpreting or correlation of the registered values with an evolutive clinic stage, and with the existence of some existing diseases (diabetes, chronic hepatitis etc.) along with signification of other dismethabolical parameters (cholesterol, triglycerides, LDLc, apoB) have confirmed the necessity of a complex therapy, including an antioxidative treatment, having the role to directly inhibit or exclude the free radicals resulted after the oxidative stress of the infarct.

  12. [Latest trends and recommendations on epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabuev, A; Oelke, M

    2011-05-01

    A re-evaluation of established tests and treatments has become necessary after publication of several new guidelines on BPH during the past two years. This article describes the latest developments concerning epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of BPH. Diagnostic and treatment guidelines on BPH of the German, European, or North American urologists as well as UK doctors were reviewed according to key articles and latest modifications. The only German epidemiological trial on BPH demonstrated that all components of the BPH disease (symptoms - prostate enlargement - bladder outlet obstruction) increase with ageing. 27 % of German men will have disease progression within the next 5 years. Risk factors for disease progression are: age, symptoms, prostate size, PSA, urinary flow rate, and postvoiding residual urine. Diagnosis aims to distinguish BPH from other diseases with similar symptoms, quantify the BPH components, and estimate the individual risk of disease progression. BPH is an exclusion diagnosis. Ultrasonic measurement of detrusor wall thickness at the anterior wall of bladders filled with ≥ 250 mL can securely detect bladder outlet obstruction if the value is ≥ 2 mm. Watchful waiting and lifestyle modifications are suitable for men with mild symptoms and low disease progression risk. All drugs used in BPH treatment reduce symptoms but have no influence on bladder outlet obstruction. α-blockers are first-line drugs and may be combined with muscarinic receptor antagonists or 5α-reductase inhibitors to further increase efficacy. Prostate surgery is indicated when drug treatment is insufficient, the patient develops complications in the upper or lower urinary tract (absolute indications), or has severe bladder outlet obstruction. Standard operations are TURP in small (≤ 80 mL) or open prostatectomy in large prostates (> 80 mL). Minimally invasive, alter-native surgeries may be considered in selected men and -offer advantages with regard to the risk of

  13. Chronic Meningitis: A study on epidemiological and clinical findings, treatment results and prognosis of 97 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Ahmadinejad Z

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system’s disorders including chronic meningitis (CM have considerable mortality and irreversible complications, and diagnosis and treatment of CM is difficult. In this retrospective study we reviwed epidemiological and clinical findings, treatment results and prognostic factors of 97 patients with CM admitted in Imam Khomeini hospital for the last 10 years. Important etiological factors in this study included: Mycobacterium Tuberculousis (8.2% Brucellae SP (5.2%, malignancies (1% and unknown (85.5%; the sexual ratio was 2:1 (Male/Female and the most common clinical manifestations were: fever, headache, cranial and motor neuron involvement, seizure and ataxia. Treatment regimens used included antituberculosis agents with or witout corticosteroids, in which the prognosis was better in patients who had been treated with antituberculosis agents alone. The mortality rate was 22.7%, which was in accordance with other studies. We suggest using of antituberculosis treatment alone in comparison with antituberculosis and corticosteroid. Last but not least a double blind randomized clinical trial for a longer period is needed to further substantiate the results of this study.

  14. Comparative review of human and canine osteosarcoma: morphology, epidemiology, prognosis, treatment and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Siobhan; Dunning, Mark David; de Brot, Simone; Grau-Roma, Llorenç; Mongan, Nigel Patrick; Rutland, Catrin Sian

    2017-10-24

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is a rare cancer in people. However OSA incidence rates in dogs are 27 times higher than in people. Prognosis in both species is relatively poor, with 5 year OSA survival rates in people not having improved in decades. For dogs, 1 year survival rates are only around ~ 45%. Improved and novel treatment regimens are urgently required to improve survival in both humans and dogs with OSA. Utilising information from genetic studies could assist in this in both species, with the higher incidence rates in dogs contributing to the dog population being a good model of human disease. This review compares the clinical characteristics, gross morphology and histopathology, aetiology, epidemiology, and genetics of canine and human OSA. Finally, the current position of canine OSA genetic research is discussed and areas for additional work within the canine population are identified.

  15. Epidemiological characteristics and response to peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulot, D; Bourcier, V; Grando, V; Deny, P; Baazia, Y; Fontaine, H; Bailly, F; Castera, L; De Ledinghen, V; Marcellin, P; Poupon, R; Bourlière, M; Zarski, J P; Roudot-Thoraval, F

    2007-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus genotype 4 (HCV-4) infection is progressing in Europe, where epidemiology and sustained virological response (SVR) seem to be different than in the Middle East. We analysed epidemiological features and SVR rates in a retrospective study of 1532 HCV-4-infected patients, including 1056 patients infected in France, 227 immigrants infected in Egypt and 249 in sub-Saharan Africa. SVR rates were assessed in 242 naive patients of the 1532, who received peginterferon plus ribavirin for 48 weeks. HCV subtype 4a or 4d was the most common among patients infected in France, where the predominant route of transmission was intravenous drug abuse. The 4a subtype was largely predominant (93%) among patients infected in Egypt, where transmission was mostly because of parenteral treatment for schistosomiasis. More than seven different subtypes and no predominant route of infection were found in patients infected in sub-Saharan Africa. Liver fibrosis was significantly less severe in patients infected in France and Africa than in patients infected in Egypt. SVR rates were higher in patients infected in Egypt, compared with those infected in France or Africa (54.9%, 40.3% and 32.4%, respectively, P < 0.05). An overall better response was observed in patients infected with the 4a subtype. In multivariate analysis, two factors were associated independently with SVR: the Egyptian origin of transmission and the absence of severe fibrosis. In conclusion, the distribution of HCV-4 subtypes varies with the geographical origin of transmission and affects the SVR following antiviral treatment.

  16. Pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of pain in most common locations in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, W; Zajaczkowska, R; Wordliczek, J; Dobrogowski, J; Woron, J; Krzakowski, M

    2016-12-01

    Pain is one of the most common symptoms in cancer patients, especially in advanced disease. However, pain also accompanies a significant percentage of patients during diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In some patients pain may be the first symptom of the disease. The causes of pain in cancer patients are often multifactorial including direct and indirect cancer effects, anticancer therapy and co-morbidities. Moreover, pain in cancer patients often has mixed pathophysiology including both nociceptive and neuropathic components, especially in patients with bone metastases. In this article, basic knowledge regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical features of pain in cancer patients with a primary tumour localised in lung, gastrointestinal tract (stomach, colon and pancreas), breast in women and prostate in men are presented. Pain is a common symptom in cancer patients and its appropriate assessment and treatment may significantly improve in patients' and families' quality of life.

  17. Pathophysiology of cervical myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, Darryl C; Fehlings, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy is a group of closely related disorders usually caused by spondylosis or by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and is characterized by compression of the cervical spinal cord or nerve roots by varying degrees and number of levels. The decrease in diameter of the vertebral canal secondary to disc degeneration and osteophytic spurs compresses the spinal cord and nerve roots at one or several levels, producing direct damage and often secondary ischemic changes. Clinicians who treat cervical myelopathy cord injuries should have a basic understanding of the pathophysiology and the processes that are initiated after the spinal cord has been injured. Literature review. Literature review of human cervical myelopathy and clinically relevant animal models to further our understanding of the pathological mechanisms involved. The pathophysiology of cervical myelopathy involves static factors, which result in acquired or developmental stenosis of the cervical canal and dynamic factors, which involve repetitive injury to the cervical cord. These mechanical factors in turn result in direct injury to neurons and glia as well as a secondary cascade of events including ischemia, excitotoxicity, and apoptosis; a pathobiology similar to that occurring in traumatic spinal cord injury. This review summarizes some of the significant pathophysiological processes involved in cervical myelopathy.

  18. Epidemiology and treatment outcome of surgically treated mandibular condyle fractures. A five years retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrounba, Hugues; Lutz, Jean-Christophe; Zink, Simone; Wilk, Astrid

    2014-09-01

    Surgical management of mandibular condyle fractures is still controversial. Although it provides better outcome than closed treatment questions still remain about the surgical approach and the osteosynthesis devices to be used. Between 2005 and 2010, we managed 168 mandibular condyle fractures with open treatment. Two surgical approaches were used in this study, a pre-auricular and a high submandibular approach (one or the other or as a combined approach). Internal fixation was performed using TCP(®) plates (Medartis, Basel, Switzerland) or with two lag screws (15 and 17 mm). Delta plates were used in 15 cases (8.9%). We report the epidemiology of these fractures and the outcomes of the surgical treatment. We assessed the complications related to the surgical procedure and those related to the osteosynthesis material. The facial nerve related complication rate was very low and the osteosynthesis materials used proved to be strong enough to realize a stable fixation. The two approaches used in this study appeared to be safe with good aesthetic results. Most of the surgical procedure failures occurred in high subcondylar fractures especially when bilateral. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Epidemiology and Management of Otitis Media in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebink, G. Scott; Daly, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    This article focuses on definitions of middle ear inflammation (otitis media), the epidemiology of this disorder, brief considerations of pathophysiology and management, and possible future therapies. (DB))

  20. Childfood leukemia. Epidemiological investigation and effectiveness of treatment in Nagasaki over the past 12 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusuyama, Misako; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Tsuji, Yoshiro

    1997-01-01

    An epidemiological investigation of childhood leukemia was performed in Nagasaki Prefecture. The objective of this investigation was to analyze the disease as a whole by studying the incidence classified by year, sex, area and disease type, age of onset, effectiveness of treatment, prognosis, and possible association with the atomic bombing in 1945. The annual incidence was 3.0 per 100000 children under 15 years of age, lower than the national average. There was no significant change in the annual incidence for 12 years. No increase in incidence was observed in Nagasaki City and its surrounding areas. There was no obvious difference in age of onset and incidence by sex from those previously reported. Acute lymphocytic leukemia accounted for a large part of childhood leukemia. There was no increase in the incidence of acute non-lymphocytic leukemia, but its familial occurrence and accumulation were observed. The rate of first complete remission and the number of long-term survivors increased with the improvement of treatment for acute leukemia. The influence of the atomic bomb was not clear when the incidence of disease types was compared between areas. The comparison of the disease type ratio in patients of the second and third generations of atomic bomb victims with that of patients without a family history of atomic bomb exposure also did not show an obvious influence of the bomb. (author)

  1. Fascioliasis and Intestinal Parasitoses Affecting Schoolchildren in Atlixco, Puebla State, Mexico: Epidemiology and Treatment with Nitazoxanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumaquero-Ríos, José Lino; Sarracent-Pérez, Jorge; Rojas-García, Raúl; Rojas-Rivero, Lázara; Martínez-Tovilla, Yaneth; Valero, María Adela; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Background The Atlixco municipality, Puebla State, at a mean altitude of 1840 m, was selected for a study of Fasciola hepatica infection in schoolchildren in Mexico. This area presents permanent water collections continuously receiving thaw water from Popocatepetl volcano (5426 m altitude) through the community supply channels, conforming an epidemiological scenario similar to those known in hyperendemic areas of Andean countries. Methodology and Findings A total of 865 6–14 year-old schoolchildren were analyzed with FasciDIG coproantigen test and Lumbreras rapid sedimentation technique, and quantitatively assessed with Kato-Katz. Fascioliasis prevalences ranged 2.94–13.33% according to localities (mean 5.78%). Intensities were however low (24–384 epg). The association between fascioliasis and the habit of eating raw vegetables was identified, including watercress and radish with pronouncedly higher relative risk than lettuce, corncob, spinach, alfalfa juice, and broccoli. Many F. hepatica-infected children were coinfected by other parasites. Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia intestinalis, Blastocystis hominis, Hymenolepis nana and Ascaris lumbricoides infection resulted in risk factors for F. hepatica infection. Nitazoxanide efficacy against fascioliasis was 94.0% and 100% after first and second treatment courses, respectively. The few children, for whom a second treatment course was needed, were concomitantly infected by moderate ascariasis burdens. Its efficacy was also very high in the treatment of E. histolytica/E. dispar, G. intestinalis, B. hominis, H. nana, A. lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and Enterobius vermicularis. A second treatment course was needed for all children affected by ancylostomatids. Conclusions Fascioliasis prevalences indicate this area to be mesoendemic, with isolated hyperendemic foci. This is the first time that a human fascioliasis endemic area is described in North America. Nitazoxanide appears as an appropriate

  2. Fascioliasis and intestinal parasitoses affecting schoolchildren in Atlixco, Puebla State, Mexico: epidemiology and treatment with nitazoxanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumaquero-Ríos, José Lino; Sarracent-Pérez, Jorge; Rojas-García, Raúl; Rojas-Rivero, Lázara; Martínez-Tovilla, Yaneth; Valero, María Adela; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2013-11-01

    The Atlixco municipality, Puebla State, at a mean altitude of 1840 m, was selected for a study of Fasciola hepatica infection in schoolchildren in Mexico. This area presents permanent water collections continuously receiving thaw water from Popocatepetl volcano (5426 m altitude) through the community supply channels, conforming an epidemiological scenario similar to those known in hyperendemic areas of Andean countries. A total of 865 6-14 year-old schoolchildren were analyzed with FasciDIG coproantigen test and Lumbreras rapid sedimentation technique, and quantitatively assessed with Kato-Katz. Fascioliasis prevalences ranged 2.94-13.33% according to localities (mean 5.78%). Intensities were however low (24-384 epg). The association between fascioliasis and the habit of eating raw vegetables was identified, including watercress and radish with pronouncedly higher relative risk than lettuce, corncob, spinach, alfalfa juice, and broccoli. Many F. hepatica-infected children were coinfected by other parasites. Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia intestinalis, Blastocystis hominis, Hymenolepis nana and Ascaris lumbricoides infection resulted in risk factors for F. hepatica infection. Nitazoxanide efficacy against fascioliasis was 94.0% and 100% after first and second treatment courses, respectively. The few children, for whom a second treatment course was needed, were concomitantly infected by moderate ascariasis burdens. Its efficacy was also very high in the treatment of E. histolytica/E. dispar, G. intestinalis, B. hominis, H. nana, A. lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and Enterobius vermicularis. A second treatment course was needed for all children affected by ancylostomatids. Fascioliasis prevalences indicate this area to be mesoendemic, with isolated hyperendemic foci. This is the first time that a human fascioliasis endemic area is described in North America. Nitazoxanide appears as an appropriate alternative to triclabendazole, the present drug of choice

  3. Fascioliasis and intestinal parasitoses affecting schoolchildren in Atlixco, Puebla State, Mexico: epidemiology and treatment with nitazoxanide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Lino Zumaquero-Ríos

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Atlixco municipality, Puebla State, at a mean altitude of 1840 m, was selected for a study of Fasciola hepatica infection in schoolchildren in Mexico. This area presents permanent water collections continuously receiving thaw water from Popocatepetl volcano (5426 m altitude through the community supply channels, conforming an epidemiological scenario similar to those known in hyperendemic areas of Andean countries.A total of 865 6-14 year-old schoolchildren were analyzed with FasciDIG coproantigen test and Lumbreras rapid sedimentation technique, and quantitatively assessed with Kato-Katz. Fascioliasis prevalences ranged 2.94-13.33% according to localities (mean 5.78%. Intensities were however low (24-384 epg. The association between fascioliasis and the habit of eating raw vegetables was identified, including watercress and radish with pronouncedly higher relative risk than lettuce, corncob, spinach, alfalfa juice, and broccoli. Many F. hepatica-infected children were coinfected by other parasites. Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia intestinalis, Blastocystis hominis, Hymenolepis nana and Ascaris lumbricoides infection resulted in risk factors for F. hepatica infection. Nitazoxanide efficacy against fascioliasis was 94.0% and 100% after first and second treatment courses, respectively. The few children, for whom a second treatment course was needed, were concomitantly infected by moderate ascariasis burdens. Its efficacy was also very high in the treatment of E. histolytica/E. dispar, G. intestinalis, B. hominis, H. nana, A. lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and Enterobius vermicularis. A second treatment course was needed for all children affected by ancylostomatids.Fascioliasis prevalences indicate this area to be mesoendemic, with isolated hyperendemic foci. This is the first time that a human fascioliasis endemic area is described in North America. Nitazoxanide appears as an appropriate alternative to triclabendazole, the present

  4. The pathophysiology of bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T King

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Paul T KingDepartment of Medicine, Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Monash University, Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Bronchiectasis is defined by permanent and abnormal widening of the bronchi. This process occurs in the context of chronic airway infection and inflammation. It is usually diagnosed using computed tomography scanning to visualize the larger bronchi. Bronchiectasis is also characterized by mild to moderate airflow obstruction. This review will describe the pathophysiology of noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Studies have demonstrated that the small airways in bronchiectasis are obstructed from an inflammatory infiltrate in the wall. As most of the bronchial tree is composed of small airways, the net effect is obstruction. The bronchial wall is typically thickened by an inflammatory infiltrate of lymphocytes and macrophages which may form lymphoid follicles. It has recently been demonstrated that patients with bronchiectasis have a progressive decline in lung function. There are a large number of etiologic risk factors associated with bronchiectasis. As there is generally a long-term retrospective history, it may be difficult to determine the exact role of such factors in the pathogenesis. Extremes of age and smoking/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be important considerations. There are a variety of different pathogens involved in bronchiectasis, but a common finding despite the presence of purulent sputum is failure to identify any pathogenic microorganisms. The bacterial flora appears to change with progression of disease. Keywords: bronchiectasis, inflammation, obstructive lung disease, pathophysiology, pathology

  5. Pathophysiological changes that affect drug disposition in protein-energy malnourished children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshikoya Kazeem A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM is a major public health problem affecting a high proportion of infants and older children world-wide and accounts for a high childhood morbidity and mortality in the developing countries. The epidemiology of PEM has been extensively studied globally and management guidelines formulated by the World Health Organization (WHO. A wide spectrum of infections such as measles, malaria, acute respiratory tract infection, intestinal parasitosis, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS may complicate PEM with two or more infections co-existing. Thus, numerous drugs may be required to treat the patients. In-spite of abundant literature on the epidemiology and management of PEM, focus on metabolism and therapeutic drug monitoring is lacking. A sound knowledge of pathophysiology of PEM and pharmacology of the drugs frequently used for their treatment is required for safe and rational treatment. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiological changes in children with PEM that may affect the disposition of drugs frequently used for their treatment. This review has established abnormal disposition of drugs in children with PEM that may require dosage modification. However, the relevance of these abnormalities to the clinical management of PEM remains inconclusive. At present, there are no good indications for drug dosage modification in PEM; but for drug safety purposes, further studies are required to accurately determine dosages of drugs frequently used for children with PEM.

  6. Pathophysiology of diurnal drooling in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalf, J.G.; Munneke, M.; Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Swart, B.J.M. de; Borm, G.F.; Bloem, B.R.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Drooling is an incapacitating feature of Parkinson's disease. Better pathophysiological insights are needed to improve treatment. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the cause of drooling is multifactorial. We examined 15 patients with Parkinson's disease with distinct diurnal saliva loss

  7. Incidence, treatment and survival of patients with craniopharyngioma in the surveillance, epidemiology and end results program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharia, Brad E.; Bruce, Samuel S.; Goldstein, Hannah; Malone, Hani R.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.

    2012-01-01

    Craniopharyngioma is a rare primary central nervous system neoplasm. Our objective was to determine factors associated with incidence, treatment, and survival of craniopharyngiomas in the United States. We used the surveillance, epidemiology and end results program (SEER) database to identify patients who received a diagnosis of craniopharyngioma during 2004–2008. We analyzed clinical and demographic information, including age, race, sex, tumor histology, and treatment. Age-adjusted incidence rates and age, sex, and race-adjusted expected survival rates were calculated. We used Cox proportional hazards models to determine the association between covariates and overall survival. We identified 644 patients with a diagnosis of craniopharyngioma. Black race was associated with an age-adjusted relative risk for craniopharyngioma of 1.26 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98–1.59), compared with white race. One- and 3-year survival rates of 91.5% (95% CI, 88.9%–93.5%), and 86.2% (95% CI, 82.7%–89.0%) were observed for the cohort; relative survival rates were 92.1% (95% CI, 89.5%–94.0%) and 87.6% (95% CI, 84.1%–90.4%) for 1- and 3-years, respectively. In the multivariable model, factors associated with prolonged survival included younger age, smaller tumor size, subtotal resection, and radiation therapy. Black race, on the other hand, was associated with worse overall survival in the final model. We demonstrated that >85% of patients survived 3 years after diagnosis and that subtotal resection and radiation therapy were associated with prolonged survival. We also noted a higher incidence rate and worse 1- and 3-year survival rates in the black population. Future investigations should examine these racial disparities and focus on evaluating the efficacy of emerging treatment paradigms. PMID:22735773

  8. Obsessive-compulsive disorder in the perinatal period: epidemiology, phenomenology, pathogenesis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Frías

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to describe the main theoretical findings and research conclusions about obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD in the perinatal period. On one hand, epidemiological studies show that the risk of OCD onset and/or exacerbation could increase in this period, particularly in the puerperium. Phenomenologically, in this stage aggressive and contamination obsessions are very common and are related to the fetus or newborn. On the other hand, regarding OCD pathogenesis in this period, there is indirect evidence to suggest the participation of neuroendocrine (e.g. female gonadal steroids and oxytocin and cognitive behavioural variables (e.g. hyper-responsibility, threat overestimation, and mental control. In terms of research, more empirical studies are needed to contrast these specific vulnerability factors. Moreover, no empirically validated psychotherapeutic treatments (controlled trials adapted to this OCD sub-group were found, although some studies highlight the role of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT as an effective intervention in the context of selective primary prevention.

  9. Methamphetamine: An Update on Epidemiology, Pharmacology, Clinical Phenomenology, and Treatment Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Kelly E.; Ray, Lara A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite initial reports of a decline in use in the early 2000s, methamphetamine remains a significant public health concern with known neurotoxic and neurocognitive effects to the user. The goal of this review is to update the literature on methamphetamine use and addiction since its assent to peak popularity in 1990s. Methods Specifically, we first review recent epidemiological reports with a focus on methamphetamine accessibility, changes in use and disorder prevalence rates over time, and accurate estimates of the associated burden of care to the individual and society. Second, we review methamphetamine pharmacology literature with emphasis on the structural and functional neurotoxic effects associated with repeated use of the drug. Third, we briefly outline the findings on methamphetamine-related neurocognitive deficits as assessed via behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms. Lastly, we review the clinical presentation of methamphetamine addiction and the evidence supporting the available psychosocial and pharmacological treatments within the context of an addiction biology framework. Conclusion Taken together, this review provides a broad-based update of the available literature covering methamphetamine research over the past two decades and concludes with recommendations for future research. PMID:25176528

  10. Chronic Pain and Mental Health Disorders: Shared Neural Mechanisms, Epidemiology, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, W Michael

    2016-07-01

    Chronic pain and mental health disorders are common in the general population, and epidemiological studies suggest that a bidirectional relationship exists between these 2 conditions. The observations from functional imaging studies suggest that this bidirectional relationship is due in part to shared neural mechanisms. In addition to depression, anxiety, and substance use disorders, individuals with chronic pain are at risk of other mental health problems including suicide and cigarette smoking and many have sustained sexual violence. Within the broader biopsychosocial model of pain, the fear-avoidance model explains how behavioral factors affect the temporal course of chronic pain and provides the framework for an array of efficacious behavioral interventions including cognitive-behavioral therapy, acceptance-based therapies, and multidisciplinary pain rehabilitation. Concomitant pain and mental health disorders often complicate pharmacological management, but several drug classes, including serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, and anticonvulsants, have efficacy for both conditions and should be considered first-line treatment agents. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pathophysiology of glucagon secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettger, J.; Pabst, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    Pathophysiology of glucagon secretion is reviewed in brief separating hyperglucagonemic from hypoclucagonemic states. Many questions concerning the role of glucagon in diabetes mellitus and in other diseases are still unresolved. The clucagon RIA is of clinical significance in a few diseases like glucagonoma, which may present without symptoms of the 'glucagonoma syndrome', the probably very rare hyperglucagonemia and some of the spontaneous hypoglycemias. Glucagon secretion may be evaluated by the determination of fasting immunoreactive glucagon (IRG) and by appropriate function tests as stimulation with i.v. arginine and suppression with oral glucose. However, the glucagon RIA at present is not a routine method, although commercial kits are available. Many pitfalls of radioimmunological glucagon determination still exist. (orig.) [de

  12. Pathophysiology of nocturnal enuresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittig, Søren; Kamperis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    The perception of the pathogenesis of enuresis has undergone marked changes over the past 30 years from a psychiatric/psychological background to a more somatic model where nighttime urine production and bladder capacity are main components together with an arousal dysfunction that prevents...... that dysfunction of the intrinsic circadian regulation located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus results in dysfunction of one or more of the brainstem centers involved in AVP secretion, arousal function, bladder control, and blood pressure regulation. Furthermore, nocturnal enuresis has a strong genetic influence...... that in some families present as autosomal dominant inheritance with high degree of penetrance. Linkage to several chromosomal areas have been confirmed in such families although a specific causative enuresis gene has not yet been identified. In conclusion, our understanding of enuresis pathophysiology has...

  13. Endemic pemphigus in the Peruvian Amazon: epidemiology and risk factors for the development of complications during treatment*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Willy; Chacon, Gina Rocio; Galarza, Carlos; Gutierrez, Ericson Leonardo; Smith, Maria Eugenia; Ortega-Loayza, Alex Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pemphigus is an autoimmune blistering disease. According to a report, in areas of endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF) in Peru there are cases of pemphigus vulgaris with epidemiologic, clinical and histopathologic characteristics similar to those of "endemic pemphigus vulgaris" (EPV) in Brazil. OBJECTIVES To determine the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of endemic pemphigus and the risk factors of patients for developing complications during treatment. METHODS A study was carried out from July 2003 to March 2008. The study population was 60 patients with EPF and 7 patients with EPV evaluated in hospitals and clinics in the Peruvian Amazon and Lima. A multivariate analysis was carried out using binary logistic regression. RESULTS The average age of EPF patients was 31.4 years; 55% were men; 60% presented the generalized clinical variant. Non-compliance with the treatment was seen in 57.1% of the patients. Thirty-five percent presented complications (e.g. pyodermitis and pyelonephritis) during treatment. The risk factors for developing complications during treatment were non-compliance with the treatment and having the generalized clinical form. In the EPV group, the average age was 21.7 years; 71.4% were men. All patients presented with the mucocutaneous clinical variant and the initial presentation consisted of oral mucosa lesions; 71.4% presented complications during treatment, pyodermitis being the most frequent. CONCLUSIONS Non-compliance with the treatment and the generalized clinical form are risk factors for the development of complications during treatment of patients with EPF. Peru indeed has EPV cases with epidemiologic characteristics similar to EPF. Living in a rural area may represent a risk factor for the development of complications during treatment of patients with EPV. PMID:23197201

  14. Tics and Tourette: a clinical, pathophysiological and etiological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Russell C

    2017-12-01

    Describe developments in the etiological understanding of Tourette syndrome. Tourette syndrome is a complex heterogenous clinical syndrome, which is not a unitary entity. Pathophysiological models describe gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic-associated disinhibition of cortico-basal ganglia motor, sensory and limbic loops. MRI studies support basal ganglia volume loss, with additional white matter and cerebellar changes. Tourette syndrome cause likely involves multiple vulnerability genes and environmental factors. Only recently have some vulnerability gene findings been replicated, including histidine decarboxylase and neurexin 1, yet these rare variants only explain a small proportion of patients. Planned large genetic studies will improve genetic understanding. The role of inflammation as a contributor to disease expression is now supported by large epidemiological studies showing an association with maternal autoimmunity and childhood infection. Investigation of blood cytokines, blood mRNA and brain mRNA expression support the role of a persistent immune activation, and there are similarities with the immune literature of autistic spectrum disorder. Current treatment is symptomatic, although there is a better appreciation of factors that influence treatment response. At present, therapeutics is focused on symptom-based treatments, yet with improved etiological understanding, we will move toward disease-modifying therapies in the future.

  15. Epidemiology and pathophysiology of adulthood-onset thrombotic microangiopathy with severe ADAMTS13 deficiency (thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura): a cross-sectional analysis of the French national registry for thrombotic microangiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotte, Eric; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Rondeau, Eric; Zouiti, Fouzia; Boisseau, Pierre; Poullin, Pascale; de Maistre, Emmanuel; Provôt, François; Delmas, Yahsou; Perez, Pierre; Benhamou, Ygal; Stepanian, Alain; Coppo, Paul; Veyradier, Agnès

    2016-05-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a thrombotic microangiopathy related to a severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 repeats, member 13; activity purpura at initial presentation. Between Jan 1, 1999, and Dec 31, 2013, we did a cross-sectional analysis of the French national registry for thrombotic microangiopathy to identify all patients with adult-onset thrombotic microangiopathy (first episode after age 18 years) who had severe ADAMTS13 deficiency at presentation. ADAMTS13 activity, anti-ADAMTS13 IgG, and ADAMTS13 gene mutations were investigated by a central laboratory. We collected patients' clinical data for correlation with their ADAMTS13 phenotype and genotype. We used logistic regression analysis to identify variables significantly associated with idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, as measured by estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00426686. We enrolled 939 patients with adult-onset thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, of whom 772 (82%) patients had available data and samples at presentation and comprised the cohort of interest. The prevalence of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in France was 13 cases per million people. At presentation, 378 (49%) patients had idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, whereas 394 (51%) patients had disease associated with miscellaneous clinical situations (infections, autoimmunity, pregnancy, cancer, organ transplantation, and drugs). Pathophysiologically, three distinct forms of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura were observed: 585 (75%) patients had autoimmune disease with anti-ADAMTS13 IgG, 166 (22%) patients had acquired disease of unknown cause and 21 (3%) patients had inherited disease (Upshaw-Schulman syndrome) with mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene. Idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura were mainly autoimmune (345 [91%] cases), whereas non-idiopathic diseases were

  16. Living with epilepsy in Lubumbashi (Democratic Republic of Congo): epidemiology, risk factors and treatment gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koba Bora, Béatrice; Lez, Didier Malamba; Luwa, Daniel Okitundu; Baguma, Marcellin Bugeme; Katumbay, Désiré Tshala; Kalula, Tharcisse Kayembe; Mesu'a Kabwa, Pierre Luabeya

    2015-01-01

    almost no insight and could not provide any description. This first epidemiological study shows a high prevalence of epilepsy among patients presenting to the clinic in Lubumbashi, DRC, and reveals a significant treatment gap.

  17. Pathophysiology of Glucocorticoid Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitellius, Géraldine; Trabado, Séverine; Bouligand, Jérôme; Delemer, Brigitte; Lombès, Marc

    2018-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC), such as cortisol or dexamethasone, control various physiological functions, notably those involved in development, metabolism, inflammatory processes and stress, and exert most of their effects upon binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by NR3C1 gene). GC signaling follows several consecutive steps leading to target gene transactivation, including ligand binding, nuclear translocation of ligand-activated GR complexes, DNA binding, coactivator interaction and recruitment of functional transcriptional machinery. Any step may be impaired and may account for altered GC signaling. Partial or generalized glucocorticoid resistance syndrome may result in a reduced level of functional GR, a decreased hormone affinity and binding, a defect in nuclear GR translocation, a decrease or lack of DNA binding and/or post-transcriptional GR modifications. To date, 26 loss-of-function NR3C1 mutations have been reported in the context of hypertension, hirsutism, adrenal hyperplasia or metabolic disorders. These clinical signs are generally associated with biological features including hypercortisolism without negative regulatory feedback loop on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Patients had often low plasma aldosterone and renin levels despite hypertension. Only one GR gain-of-function mutation has been described associating Cushing's syndrome phenotype with normal urinary-free cortisol. Some GR polymorphisms (ER22/23EK, GR-9β) have been linked to glucocorticoid resistance and a healthier metabolic profile whereas some others seemed to be associated with GC hypersensitivity (N363S, BclI), increasing cardiovascular risk (diabetes type 2, visceral obesity). This review focuses on the earlier findings on the pathophysiology of GR signaling and presents criteria facilitating identification of novel NR3C1 mutations in selected patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Insulin treatment and breast cancer risk; A systematic review of in vitro, animal and epidemiological evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronsveld, Heleen K.; Ter Braak, Bas; Karlstad, Øystein; Vestergaard, Peter; Starup-Linde, Jakob; Bazelier, Marloes T.; de Bruin, Marieke; De Boer, Anthonius; Siezen, Christine L.E.; Van De Water, Bob; Van Der Laan, Jan Willem; Schmidt, Marjanka K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In 2009, the concern has been raised that insulin analogues, especially insulin glargine, might increase risk of (breast) cancer. Many in vitro and epidemiological and some animal studies have been performed, but there is still no clarity on this issue. Objectives: The aim of this study

  19. Combining epidemiological and genetic networks signifies the importance of early treatment in HIV-1 transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarrabi, N.; Prosperi, M.; Belleman, R.G.; Colafigli, M.; De Luca, A.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Inferring disease transmission networks is important in epidemiology in order to understand and prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Reconstruction of the infection transmission networks requires insight into viral genome data as well as social interactions. For the HIV-1 epidemic, current

  20. Pathophysiology of Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehm, H L; Voigt, K H

    1979-01-01

    The term Cushing's disease is applied to those cases of Cushing's syndrome in which hypercortisolism is secondary to inappropriate secretion of ACTH by the pituitary. Studies on control of ACTH secretion in these patients reveal: (a) that the episodic secretion of ACTH is similar to the normal; however, frequency and amplitude of the secretory episodes lack the normal circadian rhythm; (b) that ACTH release can be stimulated by vasopressin and metyrapone in a normal or above-normal manner; and (c) that it can be suppressed by large doses of corticosteroids. When the dynamic aspects of the ACTH response to corticosteroid administration are studied, it appears that the normally negative differential feedback mechanism is converted into a positive one, whereas the delayed, integral mechanism is undisturbed. Patients with Cushing's disease in the presence of obvious pituitary tumors cannot be distinguished from those without pituitary tumors by studying only the pituitary function. All these and other well-known facts would favor the concept that ACTH secretion in Cushing's disease is under hypothalamic control whether or not a pituitary tumor is present. Moreover, there are observations that suggest that brain centers superior to the hypophysiotropic area of the hypothalamus are involved in the pathophysiology of Cushing's disease. This concept has led to the discovery of neurotropic drugs that are able to induce complete remission of Cushing's syndrome in a cerain percentage of patients. In some patients with severe psychiatric diseases, neuroendocrine abnormalities are present that resemble closely those characteristic for Cushing's disease. With the most refined neuroradiological methods, pituitary microadenomas are demonstrable in approximately 70% of patients with Cushing's disease, and this number compares well with those of earlier autopsy findings (70 to 80%). In a small number of patients (4 to 10%), these tumors are large and can easily be detected by

  1. The epidemiology of premature ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitz, Theodore Robert; Serefoglu, Ege Can

    2016-08-01

    Vast advances have occurred over the past decade with regards to understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology and management of premature ejaculation (PE); however, we still have much to learn about this common sexual problem. As a standardized evidence-based definition of PE has only recently been established, the reported prevalence rates of PE prior to this definition have been difficult to interpret. As a result, a large range of conflicting prevalence rates have been reported. In addition to the lack of a standardized definition and operational criteria, the method of recruitment for study participation and method of data collection have obviously contributed to the broad range of reported prevalence rates. The new criteria and classification of PE will allow for continued research into the diverse phenomenology, etiology and pathogenesis of the disease to be conducted. While the absolute pathophysiology and true prevalence of PE remains unclear, developing a better understanding of the true prevalence of the disease will allow for the completion of more accurate analysis and treatment of the disease.

  2. Activation and Inhibition of Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger Is a Mechanism That Links the Pathophysiology and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus With That of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Milton

    2017-10-17

    The mechanisms underlying the progression of diabetes mellitus and heart failure are closely intertwined, such that worsening of one condition is frequently accompanied by worsening of the other; the degree of clinical acceleration is marked when the 2 coexist. Activation of the sodium-hydrogen exchanger in the heart and vasculature (NHE1 isoform) and the kidneys (NHE3 isoform) may serve as a common mechanism that links both disorders and may underlie their interplay. Insulin insensitivity and adipokine abnormalities (the hallmarks of type 2 diabetes mellitus) are characteristic features of heart failure; conversely, neurohormonal systems activated in heart failure (norepinephrine, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and neprilysin) impair insulin sensitivity and contribute to microvascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Each of these neurohormonal derangements may act through increased activity of both NHE1 and NHE3. Drugs used to treat diabetes mellitus may favorably affect the pathophysiological mechanisms of heart failure by inhibiting either or both NHE isoforms, and drugs used to treat heart failure may have beneficial effects on glucose tolerance and the complications of diabetes mellitus by interfering with the actions of NHE1 and NHE3. The efficacy of NHE inhibitors on the risk of cardiovascular events may be enhanced when heart failure and glucose intolerance coexist and may be attenuated when drugs with NHE inhibitory actions are given concomitantly. Therefore, the sodium-hydrogen exchanger may play a central role in the interplay of diabetes mellitus and heart failure, contribute to the physiological and clinical progression of both diseases, and explain certain drug-drug and drug-disease interactions that have been reported in large-scale randomized clinical trials. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. [Functional pathophysiology of consciousness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinger, Kurt A

    2009-01-01

    from important somatic and sensory pathways and acts as a control system of neuronal activities of the cerebral cortex. The principal function of the ARAS is to focus our alertness on specific stimuli or internal processes, which run via complex neuronal cell groups and numerous neurotransmitters that influence various aspects of consciousness and wakefulness. Stimulation of the ARAS produces an arousal reaction as the electric correlate of consciousness; its destruction causes coma and related states. The highest level are cortical (prefrontal and association) networks for recognition, motor activity, longterm memory and attention, the left hemisphere being considered as the dominant one. Different levels of consciousness are distinguished: 1. hyperalertness, 2. alertness (normal state of wakefulness), 3. somnolence or lethargy, 4. obtundation with tendency to fall asleep, 5. stupor, 6. coma and its subtypes, like akinetic mutism, apallic syndrome or persistent vegative state, locked-in syndrome, delirium, and catatonia. They are caused by damages in various functional levels of the brain, by psychogenic factors or experimentally, and are accompanied by characteristic neurological and psychiatric disorders. The relevant morphological lesions can be detected by electrophysiological and imaging studies. The bases of functional anatomy and pathophysiology of consciousness, its cognitive aspects and its major disorders, their causes and functional substrates with reference to sleep and both spontaneous and iatrogenic disorders of consciousness are critically summarized.

  4. Portadores asintomáticos de hidatidosis: epidemiología, diagnóstico y tratamiento Asymptomatic carriers of hydatidosis: epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmundo Larrieu

    2000-10-01

    (tipos IV y V.Until a short time ago, hydatidosis was considered a pathology that could only be resolved surgically. However, in recent years progress has been made with the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease, and new information on the natural history of hydatidosis has helped define new criteria for its treatment. It is now known that as many as 67% of the carriers of liver cysts who are asymptomatic remain so throughout their lives. This situation produces special results in immunologic testing. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA has a sensitivity of 63% and a specificity of 97% with asymptomatic carriers, while the double diffusion arc 5 test (DD5 achieves a sensitivity of only 31% with the same population. On the other hand, imaging studies based on ultrasonography have become the method of choice to detect asymptomatic carriers. Ultrasonography studies are 49% to 73% more sensitive than serological tests, and they can even be used as a part of epidemiological surveillance systems and to monitor control programs. Treatment schemes have also been modernized. Treating asymptomatic carriers chemotherapeutically with albendazole produces favorable results in as many as 69% of cases, while such minimally invasive surgical treatments as puncture-aspiration-injection-reaspiration (PAIR reduce average cyst volume by as much as 66%. These factors have made it possible for hospital services in the province of Río Negro, Argentina, to establish a treatment scheme for asymptomatic carriers. It is based on the monitoring of small cysts (type Ia on the modified Gharbi scale; initial treatment with albendazole, followed by PAIR if there is no response, in larger or more complex cysts (types Ib, II, and III; and follow-up of inviable or dead cysts (types IV and V.

  5. [Sarcoptic mange of dogs: biology of the organism, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical aspect, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraiss, A; Kraft, W; Gothe, R

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented on the biology of the causative agent, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and therapy of canine Sarcoptes scabiei infestation. This survey includes also clinical data of the period 1978-1986 in the Small Animal Hospital, Munich Veterinary Faculty. Several skin scrapings are usually necessary for diagnosis. For therapy application of acaricides once a week, altogether at least three times is sufficient. Simultaneously a decontamination of the dog's surroundings should be carried out.

  6. Migraine aura pathophysiology: the role of blood vessels and microembolisation

    OpenAIRE

    Dalkara, Turgay; Nozari, Ala; Moskowitz, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Migraine attacks with auras are sometimes associated with underlying hereditary or acquired cerebrovascular disorders. A unifying pathophysiological explanation linking migraine to these conditions has been diffcult to identify. On the basis of genetic and epidemiological evidence, we suggest that changes in blood vessels, hypoperfusion disorders, and microembolisation can cause neurovascular dysfunction and evoke cortical spreading depression, an event that is widely thought to underlie aura...

  7. Proposed Pathophysiologic Framework to Explain Some Excess Cardiovascular Death Associated with Ambient Air Particle Pollution: Insights for Public Health Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper proposes a pathophysiologic framework to explain the well-established epidemiological association between exposure to ambient air particle pollution and premature cardiovascular mortality, and offers insights into public health solutions that extend beyond regularory en...

  8. Sepsis: Current Definition, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taeb, Abdalsamih M; Hooper, Michael H; Marik, Paul E

    2017-06-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome that results from the dysregulated inflammatory response to infection that leads to organ dysfunction. The resulting losses to society in terms of financial burden, morbidity, and mortality are enormous. We provide a review of sepsis, its underlying pathophysiology, and guidance for diagnosis and management of this common disease. Current established treatments include appropriate antimicrobial agents to target the underlying infection, optimization of intravascular volume to improve stroke volume, vasopressors to counteract vasoplegic shock, and high-quality supportive care. Appropriate implementation of established treatments combined with novel therapeutic approaches promises to continue to decrease the impact of this disease.

  9. Epidemiology, causes, and treatment of epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Ba-Diop, Awa; Marin, Beno?t; Druet-Cabanac, Michel; Ngoungou, Edgard B; Newton, Charles R; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disease in tropical countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Previous work on epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa has shown that many cases are severe, partly a result of some specific causes, that it carries a stigma, and that it is not adequately treated in many cases. Many studies on the epidemiology, aetiology, and management of epilepsy in sub-Saharan Africa have been reported in the past 10 years. The prevalence estimated from door-to-door studies is a...

  10. The pathophysiology of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Clinton D; Conte, John V

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that results when the heart is unable to provide sufficient blood flow to meet metabolic requirements or accommodate systemic venous return. This common condition affects over 5 million people in the United States at a cost of $10-38 billion per year. Heart failure results from injury to the myocardium from a variety of causes including ischemic heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Less common etiologies include cardiomyopathies, valvular disease, myocarditis, infections, systemic toxins, and cardiotoxic drugs. As the heart fails, patients develop symptoms which include dyspnea from pulmonary congestion, and peripheral edema and ascites from impaired venous return. Constitutional symptoms such as nausea, lack of appetite, and fatigue are also common. There are several compensatory mechanisms that occur as the failing heart attempts to maintain adequate function. These include increasing cardiac output via the Frank-Starling mechanism, increasing ventricular volume and wall thickness through ventricular remodeling, and maintaining tissue perfusion with augmented mean arterial pressure through activation of neurohormonal systems. Although initially beneficial in the early stages of heart failure, all of these compensatory mechanisms eventually lead to a vicious cycle of worsening heart failure. Treatment strategies have been developed based upon the understanding of these compensatory mechanisms. Medical therapy includes diuresis, suppression of the overactive neurohormonal systems, and augmentation of contractility. Surgical options include ventricular resynchronization therapy, surgical ventricular remodeling, ventricular assist device implantation, and heart transplantation. Despite significant understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in heart failure, this disease causes significant morbidity and carries a 50% 5-year mortality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Molecular markers: an important tool in the diagnosis, treatment and epidemiology of invasive aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías-de León, María Guadalupe; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Duarte-Escalante, Esperanza; Martínez-Hernández, José Enrique; Martínez-Rivera, María de Los Ángeles; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío

    2014-01-01

    Increase in the incidence of invasive aspergillosis has represented a difficult problem for management of patients with this infection due to its high rate of mortality, limited knowledge concerning its diagnosis, and therapeutic practice. The difficulty in management of patients with aspergillosis initiates with detection of the fungus in the specimens of immunosuppressed patients infected with Aspergillus fumigatus; in addition, difficulty exists in terms of the development of resistance to antifungals as a consequence of their indiscriminate use in prophylactic and therapeutic practice and to ignorance concerning the epidemiological data of aspergillosis. With the aim of resolving these problems, molecular markers is employed at present with specific and accurate results. However, in Mexico, the use of molecular markers has not yet been implemented in the routine of intrahospital laboratories; despite the fact that these molecular markers has been widely referred in the literature, it is necessary for it to validated and standardized to ensure that the results obtained in any laboratory would be reliable and comparable. In the present review, we present an update on the usefulness of molecular markers in accurate identification of A. fumigatus, detection of resistance to antifugal triazoles, and epidemiological studies for establishing the necessary measures for prevention and control of aspergillosis.

  12. Epidemiology and pathophysiology of falls in facioscapulohumeral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, C. G. C.; Munneke, M.; Bickerstaffe, A.; Laverman, L.; Allum, J. H. J.; Padberg, G. W. A. M.; Bloem, B. R.; van Engelen, B. G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Muscle weakness is a potentially important, yet poorly studied, risk factor for falls. Detailed studies of patients with specific myopathies may shed new light on the relation between muscle weakness and falls. Here falls in patients with facioscapulohumeral disease (FSHD) who suffered from lower

  13. Epidemiology and pathophysiology of falls in facioscapulohumeral disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, G.C.; Munneke, M.; Bickerstaffe, A.; Laverman, L.; Allum, J.H.J.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Bloem, B.R.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Muscle weakness is a potentially important, yet poorly studied, risk factor for falls. Detailed studies of patients with specific myopathies may shed new light on the relation between muscle weakness and falls. Here falls in patients with facioscapulohumeral disease (FSHD) who

  14. Secondary Damage after Traumatic Brain Injury: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology and Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Engel (Doortje Caroline)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a microscopic or macroscopic injury to the brain caused by external physical forces. Road traffic accidents, falls, sports injuries (i.e. boxing), recreational accidents (i.e. parachute jumping), the use of firearms, assault, child abuse,

  15. Urinary Tract Infections in Pregnancy - Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, A; Gomes, G; Campos, A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Literature review of classification, epidemiology, pathophysiology, microbiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, complications, treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections (UTI) in pregnancy. Data Sources and Review Methods: Bibliographic research in Medline, through PubMed and Medscape, of systematic reviews, observational studies, clinical guidelines, meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials published between January 1992 and December 2010. Results: Asymp...

  16. Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Christina; Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Lelic, Dina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2013-11-14

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of the pancreatic secretory parenchyma. Despite the heterogeneity in pathogenesis and involved risk factors, processes such as necrosis/apoptosis, inflammation or duct obstruction are involved. This fibrosing process ultimately leads to progressive loss of the lobular morphology and structure of the pancreas, deformation of the large ducts and severe changes in the arrangement and composition of the islets. These conditions lead to irreversible morphological and structural changes resulting in impairment of both exocrine and endocrine functions. The prevalence of the disease is largely dependent on culture and geography. The etiological risk-factors associated with CP are multiple and involve both genetic and environmental factors. Throughout this review the M-ANNHEIM classification system will be used, comprising a detailed description of risk factors such as: alcohol-consumption, nicotine-consumption, nutritional factors, hereditary factors, efferent duct factors, immunological factors and miscellaneous and rare metabolic factors. Increased knowledge of the different etiological factors may encourage the use of further advanced diagnostic tools, which potentially will help clinicians to diagnose CP at an earlier stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical picture, it is not surprising that treatment of patients with CP is challenging and often unsuccessful.

  17. Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Christina; Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Lelic, Dina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of the pancreatic secretory parenchyma. Despite the heterogeneity in pathogenesis and involved risk factors, processes such as necrosis/apoptosis, inflammation or duct obstruction are involved. This fibrosing process ultimately leads to progressive loss of the lobular morphology and structure of the pancreas, deformation of the large ducts and severe changes in the arrangement and composition of the islets. These conditions lead to irreversible morphological and structural changes resulting in impairment of both exocrine and endocrine functions. The prevalence of the disease is largely dependent on culture and geography. The etiological risk-factors associated with CP are multiple and involve both genetic and environmental factors. Throughout this review the M-ANNHEIM classification system will be used, comprising a detailed description of risk factors such as: alcohol-consumption, nicotine-consumption, nutritional factors, hereditary factors, efferent duct factors, immunological factors and miscellaneous and rare metabolic factors. Increased knowledge of the different etiological factors may encourage the use of further advanced diagnostic tools, which potentially will help clinicians to diagnose CP at an earlier stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical picture, it is not surprising that treatment of patients with CP is challenging and often unsuccessful. PMID:24259953

  18. European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus recommendations for the treatment of mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trautinger, Franz; Eder, Johanna; Assaf, Chalid

    2017-01-01

    of management options for these neoplasms. Since then, the understanding of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of MF/SS has advanced, the staging system has been revised, new outcome data have been published and novel treatment options have been introduced. The purpose of the present document is to update...

  19. [Epidemiology, diagnostics, and treatment of complications after neuroinfections: chronic fatigue syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verner, O M; Murashko, N K

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiology information which testify to prevalence syndrome of chronic ustalostti (SV) is resulted in the article, and from some data this diagnosis is covered at more than 20% patients which carried neyroinfection. SV meets more frequent only in age 40-59, thus for women a disease is marked in 4 times more frequent, than for men. Today etiology of disease remains unknown, but the value of genetic, immunological factors, pathogens, neurogenic violations and features of feed is examined. Possibility of infectious etiology SV causes considerable interest of researchers, but at first this syndrome was examined as a sharp viral infection, where the most reliable exciter is consider the virus of Epshteyna-barr. Using of intravenous introduction of globulin for SV carries experimental character and grounded on a hypothesis about immunological or infectious etiology of this disease.

  20. Epidemiological and partial budget analysis for treatment of subclinical Staphylococcus aureus intramammary infections considering microbiological and cytological scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzer, Inge-Marié; Etter, Eric M C; Donkin, Edward F; Webb, Edward C; Karzis, Joanne

    2017-12-01

    An innovative method was investigated to aid in the elimination of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) intramammary infections (IMI) from dairy herds. A stochastic model explore the economic benefit of three-day or eight-day treatment of subclinical IMI in all S. aureus infected cows or in only those with a somatic cell count (SCC) exceeding 200,000 cells/ml. An epidemiological model was developed to run parallel to the economic model that would predict the S. aureus IMI likely to persist, develop new infections and clinical mastitis. In the economic model a first algorithm was used to consider the low prevalence (LP) scenario and made use of S. aureus prevalence information provided by retrospective analysis of microbiological and cytological results in South Africa (2008-2012). The data used considered Staphylococcus aureus prevalence from [1.495; 1.595] 95% to [6.72; 6.95] 95% for SCC≤200,000 and SCC>200,000 cells/ml respectively. A second algorithm considered the high prevalence (HP) scenario to evaluate a simulated situation with a 5[U1] [R12] to 25% prevalence. Scenarios of low or high transmission ratio (TR) were included in the model according to the hygiene management on the farm. Probabilities and costs were calculated over 255days. The economic models predicted average cost indices for low S. aureus IMI and low TR to vary from -3179 ZAR (South African Rands) when subclinical cases with SCC higher than 200,000 cell/ml were treated for eight days, to -3663 ZAR when all subclinical S. aureus IMI were treated for three days. With a HP and high TR of S. aureus the average cost indices changed from -18,042 ZAR when none to -5433 ZAR per 255days when all S. aureus IMI were treated for eight days. The epidemiological model in this study predicted substantial benefit of treatment mainly in high TR scenarios. New IMI decreased up to77% in the three-day and up to 91% in the eight-day treatment scenarios. In the HP scenarios, persistent IMI were reduced by 94%. The

  1. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Rohof, Wout O.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common digestive diseases in the Western world, with typical symptoms, such as heartburn, regurgitation, or retrosternal pain, reported by 15% to 20% of the general population. The pathophysiology of GERD is multifactorial. Our understanding

  2. Diagnosing the pathophysiologic mechanisms of nocturnal polyuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessaert, An-Sofie; Krott, Louise; Hoebeke, Piet; Vande Walle, Johan; Everaert, Karel

    2015-02-01

    Diagnosis of nocturnal polyuria (NP) is based on a bladder diary. Addition of a renal function profile (RFP) for analysis of concentrating and solute-conserving capacity allows differentiation of NP pathophysiology and could facilitate individualized treatment. To map circadian rhythms of water and solute diuresis by comparing participants with and without NP. This prospective observational study was carried out in Ghent University Hospital between 2011 and 2013. Participants with and without NP completed a 72-h bladder dairy. RFP, free water clearance (FWC), and creatinine, solute, sodium, and urea clearance were measured for all participants. The study participants were divided into those with (n=77) and those without (n=35) NP. The mean age was 57 yr (SD 16 yr) and 41% of the participants were female. Compared to participants without NP, the NP group exhibited a higher diuresis rate throughout the night (p=0.015); higher FWC (p=0.013) and lower osmolality (p=0.030) at the start of the night; and persistently higher sodium clearance during the night (p<0.001). The pathophysiologic mechanism of NP was identified as water diuresis alone in 22%, sodium diuresis alone in 19%, and a combination of water and sodium diuresis in 47% of the NP group. RFP measurement in first-line NP screening to discriminate between water and solute diuresis as pathophysiologic mechanisms complements the bladder diary and could facilitate optimal individualized treatment of patients with NP. We evaluated eight urine samples collected over 24h to detect the underlying problem in NP. We found that NP can be attributed to water or sodium diuresis or a combination of both. This urinalysis can be used to adapt treatment according to the underlying mechanism in patients with bothersome consequences of NP, such as nocturia and urinary incontinence. Copyright © 2014 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Correlation of the microbiota and intestinal mucosa in the pathophysiology and treatment of irritable bowel, irritable eye, and irritable mind syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, János; Kovács, Illés; Pacella, Elena; Radák, Zsolt

    2014-09-14

    Accumulating clinical evidence supports co-morbidity of irritable bowel, irritable eye and irritable mind symptoms. Furthermore, perturbation of the microbiota-host symbiosis (dysbiosis) is considered a common pathogenic mechanism connecting gastrointestinal, ocular and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Consequently, maintaining or restoring microbiota-host symbiosis represents a new approach to treat these symptoms or to prevent their relapses. Current treatment approach assigned a primary role to live probiotics alone or in combination with prebiotics to enhance colonization of beneficial bacteria and to strengthen the symbiosis. However, several papers showed major benefits of heat-killed probiotics as compared to their live counterparts on both intestinal and systemic symptoms. Recently, in addition to killing probiotics, in a proof of concept study lysates (fragments) of probiotics in combination with vitamins A, B, D and omega 3 fatty acids were successfully tested. These findings suggested a conceptual change in the approach addressed to both the microbiota and host as targets for intervention.

  4. Pathophysiology of osteoporosis: new mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Laura A G; Recker, Robert R

    2012-09-01

    Understanding of the pathophysiology of osteoporosis has evolved to include compromised bone strength and skeletal fragility caused by several factors: (1) defects in microarchitecture of trabeculae, (2) defective intrinsic material properties of bone tissue, (3) defective repair of microdamage from normal daily activities, and (4) excessive bone remodeling rates. These factors occur in the context of age-related bone loss. Clinical studies of estrogen deprivation, antiresorptives, mechanical loading, and disuse have helped further knowledge of the factors affecting bone quality and the mechanisms that underlie them. This progress has led to several new drug targets in the treatment of osteoporosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pathophysiology of muscle contractures in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Margie A; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy present with a variety of adaptations to muscle structure and function. These pathophysiologic symptoms include functional deficits such as decreased force production and range of motion, in addition to changes in muscle structure such as decreased muscle belly size, increased sarcomere length, and altered extracellular matrix structure and composition. On a cellular level, patients with cerebral palsy have fewer muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, and altered gene expression. Understanding the nature of these changes may present opportunities for the development of new muscle treatment therapies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. 95th Anniversary of Pathophysiology in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovač, Zdenko

    2017-12-01

    lasting legacy on generations to come. Professor Stjepan Gamulin made molecular medicine the working reality at Rebro. Both in clinical research, and in health system as diagnostic service and tool for all centers in Croatia, molecular measurement in tissue samples came into usage in daily physicians reasoning and therapy prescriptions. Macromolecular aspects of disease have come of age and became clinimetric signs of patients' condition. Professor Gamulin with his group and associated authors wrote the textbook of pathophysiology, which in upcoming 30 years had 7 editions, has become the bestseller in medicine. The textbook was translated and published in English and Albanian. In the most recent book professor Gamulin turned the focus of medical community to clinical epidemiology and a need for retrospective insights into medical efficiency. Medical performance can be improved with the improvement of understanding of underlying etiopathogenetic relations as the foundation of therapy-is the main message. Following the academic legacy and spirit of three charismatic authorities we established two methods of teaching/learning in medicine. The two methods opened up a new avenue, so important for the era of postgenomic plethora of information and demands of precision/personalized medicine. Methodology has been introduced timely. It is student-friendly and usable for advanced types of education. Problem based algorhytmic matrices stimulate analysis and resynthesis of etiopathogenetic pathways. Graphic presentation of the solution integrates horizontal, vertical and longitudinal aspects of the problem. The companion textbook in the form of problem solver has been published in 3 editions, and contains 128 study solved cases. It was published in English, as well. Out of algorhythmic analysis the etiopathogenetic clusters (EPCs) are composed of etiopathogenetic pathway analysis. EPCs are natural units of disease development, the crossing points of processes. They are integrative

  7. Profesi Epidemiologi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchari Lapau

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Makalah ini pertama kali menjelaskan perlu adanya profesi kesehatan masyarakat dalam rangka pembangunan kesehatan. Lalu dijelaskan apa profesi itu dan standar keberadaan profesi, atas dasar mana dapat ditetapkan bahwa pelayanan epidemiologi merupakan salah satu profesi. Dalam rangka pembinaan profesi kesehatan masyarakat, IAKMI dan APTKMI telah membentuk Majelis Kolegium Kesehatan Masyarakat Indonesia (MKKMI yang terdiri atas 8 kolegium antara lain Kolegium Epidemiologi, yang telah menyusun Standar Profesi Epidemiologi yang terdiri atas beberapa standar. Masing-masing standar dijelaskan mulai dari kurikulum, standar pelayanan epidmiologi, profil epidemiolog kesehatan, peran epidemiolog kesehatan, fungsi epidemiolog kesehatan, standar kompetensi epidemiologi, dan standar pendidikan profesi epidemiologi.

  8. Ketamine facilitates extinction of avoidance behavior and enhances synaptic plasticity in a rat model of anxiety vulnerability: Implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortress, Ashley M; Smith, Ian M; Pang, Kevin C H

    2018-05-08

    Anxiety disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) share a common feature of pathological avoidance behavior. The Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat has been used as a model of anxiety vulnerability, expressing a behaviorally inhibited temperament, acquiring avoidance behavior more rapidly and displaying extinction-resistant avoidance compared to Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Subanesthetic levels of ketamine have gained attention as a rapid antidepressant in treatment-resistant depression. While traditional antidepressants are commonly used to treat anxiety disorders and PTSD, the therapeutic utility of ketamine for these disorders is much less understood. The hippocampus is critical for the actions of antidepressants, is a structure of implicated in anxiety disorders and PTSD, and is necessary for extinction of avoidance in SD rats. WKY rats have impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), suggesting that persistent avoidance in WKY rats may be due to deficient hippocampal synaptic plasticity. In the present study, we hypothesized that ketamine would facilitate extinction of avoidance learning in WKY rats, and do so by enhancing hippocampal synaptic plasticity. As predicted, ketamine facilitated extinction of avoidance behavior in a subset of WKY rats (responders), with effects lasting at least three weeks. Additionally, LTP in these rats was enhanced by ketamine. Ketamine was not effective in facilitating avoidance extinction or in modifying LTP in WKY non-responders. The results suggest that subanesthetic levels of ketamine may be useful for treating anxiety disorders by reducing avoidance behaviors when combined with extinction conditions. Moreover, ketamine may have its long-lasting behavioral effects through enhancing hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Acute Kidney Injury: Definition, Pathophysiology and Clinical Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos; Spanou, Loukia

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome that complicates the course and worsens the outcome in a significant number of hospitalised patients. Recent advances in clinical and basic research will help with a more accurate definition of this syndrome and in the elucidation of its pathogenesis. With this knowledge we will be able to conduct more accurate epidemiologic studies in an effort to gain a better understanding of the impact of this syndrome. AKI is a syndrome that rarely has a sole and distinct pathophysiology. Recent evidence, in both basic science and clinical research, is beginning to change our view for AKI from a single organ failure syndrome to a syndrome where the kidney plays an active role in the progress of multi-organ dysfunction. Accurate and prompt recognition of AKI and better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the various clinical phenotypes are of great importance to research for effective therapeutic interventions. In this review we provide the most recent updates in the definition, epidemiology and pathophysiology of AKI.

  10. Niewydolność serca - definicja, klasyfikacja, epidemiologia, objawy i leczenie = Heart failure - definition, classification, epidemiology, symptoms and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Kowalczyk

    2017-02-01

    , classification, epidemiology, symptoms and treatment of heart failure.   Key words: heart failure, definition, classification, epidemiology, treatment.

  11. Pathophysiology, Clinical, and Therapeutic Aspects of Narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Guzel Ozdemir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucination, and sleep paralysis. The exact cause remains unknown, but there is significant evidence that hypocretin deficiency plays an integral role. There have been advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of narcolepsy. It has a negative effect on the quality of life and can restrict the patients from certain careers and activities. Diagnosis relies on patient history and objective data gathered from polysomnography and multiple sleep latency testing. Treatment focuses on symptom relief through medication, education, and behavioral modification. Both classic pharmacological treatments as well as newer options have significant problems, especially because of side effects and abuse potential. Some novel modalities are being examined to expand options for treatment. In this review, the pathophysiological, clinical, and pharmacotherapeutic aspects of narcolepsy are discussed. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(3.000: 271-283

  12. WHO Multidrug Therapy for Leprosy: Epidemiology of Default in Treatment in Agra District, Uttar Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Girdhar, Anita; Chakma, Joy Kumar; Girdhar, Bhuwneswar Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To study the magnitude of default, time of default, its causes, and final clinical outcome. Methods. Data collected in active surveys in Agra is analyzed. Patients were given treatment after medical confirmation and were followed up. The treatment default and other clinical outcomes were recorded. Results. Patients who defaulted have comparable demographic characteristics. However, among defaulters more women (62.7% in PB, 42.6% in MB) were seen than those in treatment completers (PB 52.7% and MB 35.9%). Nerve involvement was high in treatment completers: 45.7% in PB and 91.3% in MB leprosy. Overall default rate was lower (14.8%) in ROM than (28.8%) in standard MDT for PB leprosy (χ 1 2 = 11.6, P = 0.001) and also for MB leprosy: 9.1% in ROM compared to 34.5% in MDT (χ 1 2 = 6.0, P = 0.015). Default rate was not different (28.8% versus 34.5%, P > 0.05) in both types of leprosy given MDT. Most patients defaulted at early stage of treatment and mainly due to manageable side effects. Conclusion. The default in standard MDT both for PB and MB leprosy was observed to be significantly higher than in ROM treatment. Most defaults occurred at early stage of treatment and major contribution of default is due to side effects like drowsiness, weakness, vomiting, diarrhea, and so forth, related to poor general health. Although about half of the defaulters were observed to be cured 2.2% in PB-MDT and 10.9% of MB-MDT developed disability. This is an issue due to default. Attempts are needed to increase treatment compliance. The use of specially designed disease related health education along with easily administered drug regimens may help to reduce default. PMID:25705679

  13. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome in Australian children and adults: Epidemiological, clinical and treatment characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Sam; Allen, Roger; Boros, Christina; Adib, Navid; Kakakios, Alyson; Turner, Paul J; Rogers, Maureen; Zurynski, Yvonne; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2016-09-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) encapsulate three auto-inflammatory conditions, ranging in severity from mild (familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome: FCAS), moderate (Muckle-Wells syndrome: MWS) and severe (neonatal onset multi-inflammatory disorder: NOMID). We aimed to describe the epidemiology, clinical features and outcomes of Australian children and adults with CAPS. Patients were identified and clinical data collected through a questionnaire sent during 2012-2013 to clinicians reporting to the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit and subscribing to the Australasian Societies for Allergy/Immunology, Rheumatology and Dermatology. Eighteen cases of CAPS were identified (8 NOMID; 8 MWS, 2 FCAS); 12 in children <18 years of age. The estimated population prevalence of CAPS was 1 per million persons. Diagnostic delay was frequent, particularly in those with milder phenotypes (median diagnostic delay in MWS/FCAS 20.6 years compared with NOMID 2.1 years; P = 0.04). Common presenting features included urticaria (100%), periodic fever (78%), arthralgia (72%) and sensorineural hearing loss (61%). Almost all (90%) MWS patients had a family member similarly affected compared with none in the NOMID group (P = 0.004). A significant proportion of patients on anti-interleukin (IL)-1 therapy (n = 13) no longer had systemic inflammation. Only 50% with sensorineural hearing loss had hearing restored on anti-IL-1 therapy. Although CAPS are rare, patients often endured prolonged periods of systemic inflammation. This is despite almost all MWS patients having family members with similar symptoms and children with NOMID presenting with chronic infantile urticaria associated with multi-system inflammation. Hearing loss in NOMID/MWS was frequent, and reversible in only 50% of cases. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  14. Assessing pathophysiology of cancer anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviano, Alessandro; Koverech, Angela; Seelaender, Marilia

    2017-09-01

    Cancer anorexia is a negative prognostic factor and is broadly defined as the loss of the interest in food. However, multiple clinical domains contribute to the phenotype of cancer anorexia. The characterization of the clinical and molecular pathophysiology of cancer anorexia may enhance the efficacy of preventive and therapeutic strategies. Clinical trials showed that cancer anorexia should be considered as an umbrella encompassing different signs and symptoms contributing to appetite disruption in cancer patients. Loss of appetite, early satiety, changes in taste and smell are determinants of cancer anorexia, whose presence should be assessed in cancer patients. Interestingly, neuronal correlates of cancer anorexia-related symptoms have been revealed by brain imaging techniques. The pathophysiology of cancer anorexia is complex and involves different domains influencing eating behavior. Limiting the assessment of cancer anorexia to questions investigating changes in appetite may impede correct identification of the targets to address.

  15. Epidemiology and treatment of relative anemia in children with sickle cell disease in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Manga, Halima; DeBaun, Michael R; Kassim, Adetola A

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hemoglobinopathy in the world, with the majority of cases in sub-Saharan Africa. Concomitant nutritional deficiencies, infections or exposure to environmental toxins exacerbate chronic anemia in children with SCD. The resulting relative anemia is associated with increased risk of strokes, poor cognitive function and impaired growth. It may also attenuate optimal response to hydroxyurea therapy, the only effective and practical treatment option for SCD in sub-Saharan Africa. This review will focus on the epidemiology, clinical sequelae, and treatment of relative anemia in children with SCD living in low and middle-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Areas covered: The causes and treatment of relative anemia in children with SCD in sub-Saharan Africa. The MEDLINE database was searched using medical subject headings (MeSH) and keywords for articles regarding relative anemia in children with SCD in sub-Saharan Africa. Expert commentary: Anemia due to nutritional deficiencies and infectious diseases such as helminthiasis and malaria are prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa. Their co-existence in children with SCD increases morbidity and mortality. Therefore, preventing, diagnosing and treating the underlying cause of this relative anemia will improve SCD-related outcomes in children in sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. An update on pancreatic pathophysiology (do we have to rewrite pancreatic pathophysiology?).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Heinz F

    2014-02-01

    This review focuses on seven aspects of physiology and pathophysiology of the exocrine pancreas that have been intensively discussed and studied within the past few years: (1) the role of neurohormonal mechanisms like melatonin, leptin, or ghrelin in the stimulation of pancreatic enzyme secretion; (2) the initiation processes of acute pancreatitis, like fusion of zymogen granules with lysosomes leading to intracellular activation of trypsinogen by the lysosomal enzyme cathepsin B, or autoactivation of trypsinogen; (3) the role of genes in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis; (4) the role of alcohol and constituents of alcoholic beverages in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis; (5) the role of pancreatic hypertension, neuropathy, and central mechanisms for the pathogenesis of pain in chronic pancreatitis; (6) the relation between exocrine pancreatic function and diabetes mellitus; and (7) pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea.

  17. The pathophysiology of Peyronie's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sakka, Ahmed I; Salabas, Emre; Dinçer, Murat; Kadioglu, Ates

    2013-09-01

    To review the contemporary knowledge of the pathophysiology of Peyronie's disease (PD). Medline was searched for papers published in English from 2000 to March 2013, using the keywords 'Peyronie's disease' and 'pathophysiology'. More than 300 relevant articles were identified for the purpose of this review. Unfortunately only a few studies had a high level of evidence, and the remaining studies were not controlled in their design. Many theories have been proposed to explain the cause of PD, but the true pathogenesis of PD remains an enigma. Identifying particular growth factors and the specific genes responsible for the induction of PD have been the ultimate goal of research over the past several decades. This would provide the means to devise a possible gene therapy for this devastating condition. We discuss present controversies and new discoveries related to the pathophysiology of this condition. PD is one of the most puzzling diseases in urology. The pathogenesis remains uncertain and there is still controversy about the best management. The pathogenesis of PD has been explored in animal models, cell cultures and clinical trials, but the results have led to further questions. New research on the aetiology and pathogenesis of PD is needed, and which will hopefully improve the understanding and management for patients with this frustrating disease.

  18. Post-traumatic stress disorder in children and adolescents: epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Craig L; Amaya-Jackson, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common psychiatric condition in childhood and adolescence. Rates vary widely depending upon the type of trauma exposure. Interpersonal traumas, such as rape or physical abuse, are more likely to result in PTSD than exposure to natural or technological disaster. Clinical presentations are exceedingly complex and children with PTSD are at increased risk of having comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. Because of its complexity and frequent occurrence with other disorders, assessment of PTSD necessitates a broad-based evaluation utilizing multiple informations and structured instruments specific to the symptoms of PTSD in youth. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the treatment of first choice. Pharmacological agents for PTSD treatment have received little empirical investigation in childhood. Pharmacological treatment is used to target disabling symptoms of the disorder, which limit psychotherapy or life functioning, by helping children to tolerate working through distressful material in therapy and life. Pharmacological treatment should be based on a stepwise approach utilizing broad spectrum medications such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as first-line agents. Comorbid conditions should be identified and treated with appropriate medication or psychosocial interventions. Treatment algorithms are provided to guide rational medication strategies for children and adolescents with PTSD, subsyndromal PTSD, and in PTSD that is comorbid with other psychiatric conditions of childhood. Reduction in even one debilitating symptom of PTSD can improve a child's overall functioning across multiple domains.

  19. Epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of Haemophilus ducreyi - a disappearing pathogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David A

    2014-06-01

    Chancroid, caused by Haemophilus ducreyi, has declined in importance as a sexually transmitted pathogen in most countries where it was previously endemic. The global prevalence of chancroid is unknown as most countries lack the required laboratory diagnostic capacity and surveillance systems to determine this. H. ducreyi has recently emerged as a cause of chronic skin ulceration in some South Pacific islands. Although no antimicrobial susceptibility data for H. ducreyi have been published for two decades, it is still assumed that the infection will respond successfully to treatment with recommended cephalosporin, macrolide or fluoroquinolone-based regimens. HIV-1-infected patients require careful follow-up due to reports of treatment failure with single dose regimens. Buboes may need additional treatment with either aspiration or excision and drainage.

  20. Persistent and recurrent Trichomonas vaginalis infections: epidemiology, treatment and management considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seña, Arlene C; Bachmann, Laura H; Hobbs, Marcia M

    2014-06-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) is a common sexually transmitted infection that can cause vaginitis, cervicitis and urethritis. Persistent and recurrent TV infections are frequent in women, potentially due to the lack of routine screening recommendations for this pathogen, the chronic nature of some infections, and drug resistance. Metronidazole and tinidazole are two oral drugs that are effective against trichomoniasis. There are few alternative treatment options for persons with a metronidazole allergy or treatment failure. Most TV isolates from women with treatment failures that have been analyzed for susceptibility testing in the United States have exhibited low-level metronidazole resistance, supporting the initial use of tinidazole for patients who fail metronidazole therapy. Several non-nitroimidazole drugs and other agents have demonstrated acceptable in vitro activity or cure rates in case reports for metronidazole-resistant trichomoniasis; however, clinical trials are imperative to evaluate their efficacy as alternative therapeutic regimens for this highly prevalent infection.

  1. Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of Hymenoptera venom allergy in mastocytosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedoszytko, Marek; Bonadonna, Patrizia; Oude Elberink, Joanne N G; Golden, David B K

    2014-05-01

    Hymenoptera venom allergy is a typical IgE-mediated reaction caused by sensitization to 1 or more allergens of the venom, and accounts for 1.5% to 34% of all cases of anaphylaxis. Patients suffering from mastocytosis are more susceptible to the anaphylactic reactions to an insect sting. This article aims to answer the most important clinical questions raised by the diagnosis and treatment of insect venom allergy in mastocytosis patients. Total avoidance of Hymenoptera is not feasible, and there is no preventive pharmacologic treatment available, although venom immunotherapy reduces the risk of subsequent systemic reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Unraveling childhood constipation: Pathophysiology, diagnostics and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugie, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Constipation represents a common worldwide problem in children. In > 90% of children presenting with constipation, no obvious organic cause is found and a diagnosis of functional constipation (FC) is made. Most common symptoms of FC include infrequent bowel movements, painful and hard stools, fecal

  3. Pathophysiology and surgical treatment for radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Hisashi; Park, Tae Bun; Hasegawa, Masato

    1993-01-01

    We analyzed 23 patients (5 males and 18 females, mean age 60) who had been operated on in our department for radiation enteritis. 1) These patients were divided into two types according to the time of surgery. Sixteen of 23 (79%) patients were operated on a median of 12 months after radiotherapy, while 7 (30%) underwent surgery more than 10 years later. 2) They were also divided according to the dominant symptoms. Fourteen of 23 (60%) complained of nausea and abdominal distension suggestive of small bowel injury, whereas 7 (30%) had tenesmus and anal bleeding indicating proctitis. Two patients developed perforative peritonitis. 3) The operations performed were as follows: extensive intestinal resection and anastomosis (13), pull-through procedure (3), rectal excision (2), ileostomy (3), by-pass operation (2). Two patients with peritonitis died despite open drainage. Nineteen intestinal anastomoses were all successfully performed. Patients who underwent extensive small bowel resection could resume ordinary daily life without symptoms. Our analysis showed that small bowel injury should be treated by generous resection of the affected bowels followed by anastomosis of the disease-free ends, while rectal lesions are best dealt with by restorative proctectomy. This may provide a good quality of life and minimize major postoperative complications such as leakage. (author)

  4. Pathophysiology and surgical treatment for radiation enteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Hisashi; Park, Tae Bun; Hasegawa, Masato (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine) (and others)

    1993-12-01

    We analyzed 23 patients (5 males and 18 females, mean age 60) who had been operated on in our department for radiation enteritis. (1) These patients were divided into two types according to the time of surgery. Sixteen of 23 (79%) patients were operated on a median of 12 months after radiotherapy, while 7 (30%) underwent surgery more than 10 years later. (2) They were also divided according to the dominant symptoms. Fourteen of 23 (60%) complained of nausea and abdominal distension suggestive of small bowel injury, whereas 7 (30%) had tenesmus and anal bleeding indicating proctitis. Two patients developed perforative peritonitis. (3) The operations performed were as follows: extensive intestinal resection and anastomosis (13), pull-through procedure (3), rectal excision (2), ileostomy (3), by-pass operation (2). Two patients with peritonitis died despite open drainage. Nineteen intestinal anastomoses were all successfully performed. Patients who underwent extensive small bowel resection could resume ordinary daily life without symptoms. Our analysis showed that small bowel injury should be treated by generous resection of the affected bowels followed by anastomosis of the disease-free ends, while rectal lesions are best dealt with by restorative proctectomy. This may provide a good quality of life and minimize major postoperative complications such as leakage. (author).

  5. Driving forces behind the increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity.A dynamic epidemiologic model of trends in Danish cardiovascular drug utilization.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    . Objectives: To investigate the driving forces behind the increasing treatment prevalence of cardiovascular drugs, in particular statins, by means of a dynamic epidemiologic drug utilization model. Methods: Material: All Danish residents older than 20 years by January 1, 1996 (4.0 million inhabitants), were...

  6. Driving forces behind the increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity.A dynamic epidemiologic model of trends in Danish cardiovascular drug utilization.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    . Objectives: To investigate the driving forces behind the increasing treatment prevalence of cardiovascular drugs, in particular statins, by means of a dynamic epidemiologic drug utilization model. Methods: Material: All Danish residents older than 20 years by January 1, 1996 (4.0 million inhabitants), were...

  7. Deviation from intention to treat analysis in randomised trials and treatment effect estimates: meta-epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraha, Iosief; Cherubini, Antonio; Cozzolino, Francesco; De Florio, Rita; Luchetta, Maria Laura; Rimland, Joseph M; Folletti, Ilenia; Marchesi, Mauro; Germani, Antonella; Orso, Massimiliano; Eusebi, Paolo; Montedori, Alessandro

    2015-05-27

    To examine whether deviation from the standard intention to treat analysis has an influence on treatment effect estimates of randomised trials. Meta-epidemiological study. Medline, via PubMed, searched between 2006 and 2010; 43 systematic reviews of interventions and 310 randomised trials were included. From each year searched, random selection of 5% of intervention reviews with a meta-analysis that included at least one trial that deviated from the standard intention to treat approach. Basic characteristics of the systematic reviews and randomised trials were extracted. Information on the reporting of intention to treat analysis, outcome data, risk of bias items, post-randomisation exclusions, and funding were extracted from each trial. Trials were classified as: ITT (reporting the standard intention to treat approach), mITT (reporting a deviation from the standard approach), and no ITT (reporting no approach). Within each meta-analysis, treatment effects were compared between mITT and ITT trials, and between mITT and no ITT trials. The ratio of odds ratios was calculated (value deviated from the intention to treat analysis showed larger intervention effects than trials that reported the standard approach. Where an intention to treat analysis is impossible to perform, authors should clearly report who is included in the analysis and attempt to perform multiple imputations. © Abraha et al 2015.

  8. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Resource-Limited Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Ulrickson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoma was a common complication of HIV infection in the pre-antiretroviral era, and the incidence of HIV-associated lymphoma has dropped dramatically since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART in resource-rich regions. Conversely, lymphoma is an increasingly common complication of HIV infection in resource-limited settings where the prevalence of HIV infection is high. Relatively little is known, however, about the true incidence and optimal treatment regimens for HIV-associated lymphoma in resource-poor regions. We review the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma in developing nations and highlight areas for further research that may benefit care in both settings. Examples include risk modification and dose modification of chemotherapy based on HIV risk factors, improving our understanding of the current burden of disease through national cancer registries, and developing cost-effective hematopathological diagnostic strategies to optimize care delivery and maximize use of available chemotherapy.

  9. Mental Health Comorbidities in Pediatric Chronic Pain: A Narrative Review of Epidemiology, Models, Neurobiological Mechanisms and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian Vinall

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain during childhood and adolescence can lead to persistent pain problems and mental health disorders into adulthood. Posttraumatic stress disorders and depressive and anxiety disorders are mental health conditions that co-occur at high rates in both adolescent and adult samples, and are linked to heightened impairment and disability. Comorbid chronic pain and psychopathology has been explained by the presence of shared neurobiology and mutually maintaining cognitive-affective and behavioral factors that lead to the development and/or maintenance of both conditions. Particularly within the pediatric chronic pain population, these factors are embedded within the broader context of the parent–child relationship. In this review, we will explore the epidemiology of, and current working models explaining, these comorbidities. Particular emphasis will be made on shared neurobiological mechanisms, given that the majority of previous research to date has centered on cognitive, affective, and behavioral mechanisms. Parental contributions to co-occurring chronic pain and psychopathology in childhood and adolescence will be discussed. Moreover, we will review current treatment recommendations and future directions for both research and practice. We argue that the integration of biological and behavioral approaches will be critical to sufficiently address why these comorbidities exist and how they can best be targeted in treatment.

  10. Comparative review of human and canine osteosarcoma: morphology, epidemiology, prognosis, treatment and genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Siobhan; Dunning, Mark D.; de Brot, Simone; Grau-Roma, Llorenc; Mongan, Nigel P.; Rutland, Catrin S.

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is a rare cancer in people. However OSA incidence rates in dogs are 27 times higher than in people. Prognosis in both species is poor, with five year osteosarcoma survival rates in people not having improved in decades. For dogs, one year survival rates are only around ~45%. Improved and novel treatment regimens are urgently required to improve survival in both humans and dogs with OSA. Utilising information from genetic studies could assist in this in both species, with th...

  11. Post-traumatic stress disorder in women: epidemiological and treatment issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedat, Soraya; Stein, Dan J; Carey, Paul D

    2005-01-01

    Although women are exposed to proportionately fewer traumatic events in their lifetime than men, they have a higher lifetime risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In addition to gender-differential rates of rape and sexual assault, including greater exposure to intimate partner violence, the preponderance of PTSD in women may be attributable to factors other than trauma type, such as sensitisation of stress hormone systems in response to early adverse experiences, inherent neuroendocrine factors, subjective interpretation of the event, and peritraumatic dissociation. Women with PTSD arguably experience a greater symptom burden, longer course of illness and have worse quality-of-life outcomes than men. An expanding knowledge base of the psychobiological alterations in PTSD is providing stimulus for the development of improved pharmacological and psychosocial treatment options. Recent randomised controlled studies conducted in large samples of women with chronic PTSD indicate that: (i) SSRIs have efficacy on all three symptom clusters of PTSD and should be used as first-line pharmacotherapy; and (ii) cognitive behavioural strategies (e.g. prolonged exposure treatment and cognitive processing) are effective in sexually and non-sexually assaulted women. Studies also suggest that female gender may be associated with better response rates to pharmacotherapy. Emerging empirical data on the potential usefulness of antiadrenergic agents and preventive cognitive behavioural treatments in managing acute trauma reactions and stemming the emergence of PTSD are paving the way for further work in this area. However, additional innovative treatments are needed for traumatised women and for female children/adolescents presenting with acute stress reactions and PTSD.

  12. PULMONARY EMBOLISM: SOME ISSUES OF EPIDEMIOLOGY AND TREATMENT IN CANCER PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Rozanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of pulmonary embolism (PE in cancer patients  is 4–7-fold, compared to other  patient  categories. PE is the  second  most frequent  cause of death  in the first year after cancer diagnosis. PE is diagnosed in 7.5% of patients with malignant brain tumors, in 1 to 25% of those  with gastrointestinal tumors, in 4.5 to 17.5% of those with breast cancer and in 4 to 10% of lung cancer patients. The risk of PE is higher with surgical interventions and chemotherapy, as well as in metastatic tumors. In 13% of cases, PE may be the first symptom of cancer manifestation. For prevention and treatment of PE low molecular weight heparin (LMWH and warfarin are   used. The risk of recurrent  PE is 2-fold lower with LMWH. The frequency of bleeding with LMWH and warfarin treatment is from 14 to 19%. Placement of a cava filter is indicated  only if anticoagulation is inefficient.  New oral anticoagulants,  which act as selective thrombin  or Factor Xa inhibitors, are not used in cancer patients. Thus, diagnostics and treatment of PE is a very urgent  problem in oncology that requires new approaches to be looked for.

  13. Advanced Mucinous Colorectal Cancer: Epidemiology, Prognosis and Efficacy of Chemotherapeutic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Claudia; Gerken, Michael; Hirsch, Daniela; Fest, Petra; Fichtner-Feigl, Stefan; Munker, Stefan; Schnoy, Elisabeth; Stroszczynski, Christian; Vogelhuber, Martin; Herr, Wolfgang; Evert, Matthias; Reng, Michael; Schlitt, Hans Jürgen; Klinkhammer-Schalke, Monika; Teufel, Andreas

    2018-06-05

    The clinicopathological significance of the mucinous subtype of colorectal cancer (CRC) remains controversial. As of today, none of the current guidelines differentiate treatment with respect to mucinous or nonmucinous cancer. Due to the lack of substantiated data, best treatment remains unclear and the mucinous subtype of CRC is usually treated along the lines of recommendations for adenocarcinoma of the colon. We investigated an East-Bavarian cohort of 8,758 patients with CRC. These included 613 (7.0%) patients with a mucinous subtype, who were analyzed for assessing their characteristics in clinical course and for evaluating the efficacy of common chemotherapy protocols. Mucinous CRC was predominantly located in the right hemicolon; it was diagnosed at more advanced stages and occurred with preponderance in women. A higher rate of G3/4 grading was observed at diagnosis (all p < 0.001). An association of mucinous CRC with younger age at initial diagnosis, previously reported by other groups, could not be confirmed. Patients with mucinous stage IV colon cancer demonstrated poorer survival (p = 0.006). In contrast, no differences in survival were observed for specific stages I-III colon cancer. Stage-dependent analysis of rectal cancer stages I-IV also showed no differences in survival. However, univariable overall analysis resulted in significant poorer survival of mucinous compared to nonmucinous rectal cancer (p = 0.029). Also, combined analysis of all patients with mucinous CRC revealed poorer overall survival (OS) of these patients compared to nonmucinous CRC patients (median 48.4 vs. 60.2 months, p = 0.049) but not in multivariable analysis (p = 0.089). Chemotherapeutic treatment showed comparable efficacy regarding OS for mucinous and nonmucinous cancers in both an adjuvant and palliative setting for colon cancer patients (p values comparing mucinous and nonmucinous cancers < 0.001-0.005). © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Epidemiology, natural history, and indications for treatment of rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashjian, Robert Z

    2012-10-01

    The etiology of rotator cuff disease is likely multifactorial, including age-related degeneration and microtrauma and macrotrauma. The incidence of rotator cuff tears increases with aging with more than half of individuals in their 80s having a rotator cuff tear. Smoking, hypercholesterolemia, and genetics have all been shown to influence the development of rotator cuff tearing. Substantial full-thickness rotator cuff tears, in general, progress and enlarge with time. Pain, or worsening pain, usually signals tear progression in both asymptomatic and symptomatic tears and should warrant further investigation if the tear is treated conservatively. Larger (>1-1.5 cm) symptomatic full-thickness cuff tears have a high rate of tear progression and, therefore, should be considered for earlier surgical repair in younger patients if the tear is reparable and there is limited muscle degeneration to avoid irreversible changes to the cuff, including tear enlargement and degenerative muscle changes. Smaller symptomatic full-thickness tears have been shown to have a slower rate of progression, similar to partial-thickness tears, and can be considered for initial nonoperative treatment due to the limited risk for rapid tear progression. In both small full-thickness tears and partial-thickness tears, increasing pain should alert physicians to obtain further imaging as it can signal tear progression. Natural history data, along with information on factors affecting healing after rotator cuff repair, can help guide surgeons in making appropriate decisions regarding the treatment of rotator cuff tears. The management of rotator cuff tears should be considered in the context of the risks and benefits of operative versus nonoperative treatment. Tear size and acuity, the presence of irreparable changes to the rotator cuff or glenohumeral joint, and patient age should all be considered in making this decision. Initial nonoperative care can be safely undertaken in older patients (>70

  15. Does infertility cause marital benefit? An epidemiological study of 2250 women and men in fertility treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lone; Holstein, Bjørn; Christensen, Ulla

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate (i) marital benefit, e.g., that infertility has strengthen the marriage and brought the partners closer together among people beginning fertility treatment and (ii) communication and coping strategies as predictors of marital benefit 12 months later. METHODS: A prospective...... the infertility as a secret, difficult marital communication, and using active-avoidance coping (e.g., avoid being with pregnant women or children, turning to work to take mind off things) were among men significant predictors for low marital benefit. No significant predictors were identified among women...

  16. Pathophysiology and management of pediatric ascites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Mahmoud; Saps, Miguel; Peters, John M

    2003-06-01

    Ascites accumulation is the product of a complex process involving hepatic, renal, systemic, hemodynamic, and neurohormonal factors. The main pathophysiologic theories of ascites formation include the "underfill," "overflow," and peripheral arterial vasodilation hypotheses. These theories are not necessarily mutually exclusive and are linked at some level by a common pathophysiologic thread: The body senses a decreased effective arterial blood volume, leading to stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system, arginine-vasopressin feedback loops, and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Cornerstones of ascites management include dietary sodium restriction and diuretics. Spironolactone is generally tried initially, with furosemide added if clinical response is suboptimal. More refractory patients require large-volume paracentesis (LVP) accompanied by volume expansion with albumin. Placement of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is reserved for individuals with compensated liver function who require very frequent sessions of LVP. Peritoneovenous shunts are not used in contemporary ascites management. Liver transplantation remains the definitive therapy for refractory ascites. Although treatment of ascites fails to improve survival, it benefits quality of life and limits the development of such complications as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

  17. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  18. Tuberculosis lymphadenitis in a southeastern region in Tunisia: Epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaoui, Salma; Mezghanni, Mohamed Amine; Hammami, Bousaima; Zalila, Neila; Marouane, Chema; Kammoun, Sana; Ghorbel, Abdelmonoom; Ben Jemaa, Mounir; Messadi-Akrout, Férièle

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate patients' profiles, demographics, clinical and therapeutic approaches and strategies in patients with tuberculous lymphadenitis (TBG). A retrospective study of all TBG-confirmed cases admitted in a tuberculosis-specific health care facility between 1 January 2009 and 16 June 2013. A total of 181 clinical files were examined. Mean age was 32years old; the female/male ratio was 1.78 to 1. Raw milk consumption was noted in 1/3 of patients. Most cases involved the head and neck region (83.4%), nodes involvement, including axillary (12 cases), and mediastinal (9 cases). Clinical symptoms were present in only 55.2%. Tuberculin skin test (TST) was conducted with 82.6% positive responses. Diagnostics confirmation was done with anatomical pathology in most of the patients; only 56 of them had any microbiology analysis done. Demonstration of acid-fast bacilli in microscopy from either fine-needle aspirates or biopsies was done in 17.5% of cases, and cultures yielded positive results in 27%. Treatment duration was varied. Paradoxical reactions were noted in 12% and persistent lymphadenopathy after treatment completion was noted in 10% of cases. TBG remains a disease of interest. Today, its diagnosis and management is still a problem despite its increasing worldwide incidence, and especially in this study area. Disease control should be strengthened in this country. Copyright © 2015 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tuberculosis lymphadenitis in a southeastern region in Tunisia: Epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Smaoui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate patients’ profiles, demographics, clinical and therapeutic approaches and strategies in patients with tuberculous lymphadenitis (TBG. Patients and methods: A retrospective study of all TBG-confirmed cases admitted in a tuberculosis-specific health care facility between 1 January 2009 and 16 June 2013. Results: A total of 181 clinical files were examined. Mean age was 32 years old; the female/male ratio was 1.78 to 1. Raw milk consumption was noted in 1/3 of patients. Most cases involved the head and neck region (83.4%, nodes involvement, including axillary (12 cases, and mediastinal (9 cases. Clinical symptoms were present in only 55.2%. Tuberculin skin test (TST was conducted with 82.6% positive responses. Diagnostics confirmation was done with anatomical pathology in most of the patients; only 56 of them had any microbiology analysis done. Demonstration of acid-fast bacilli in microscopy from either fine-needle aspirates or biopsies was done in 17.5% of cases, and cultures yielded positive results in 27%. Treatment duration was varied. Paradoxical reactions were noted in 12% and persistent lymphadenopathy after treatment completion was noted in 10% of cases. Conclusions: TBG remains a disease of interest. Today, its diagnosis and management is still a problem despite its increasing worldwide incidence, and especially in this study area. Disease control should be strengthened in this country.

  20. [School accidents--an epidemiological assessment of injury types and treatment effort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, R; Heiss, C; Alt, V; Schnettler, R

    2006-10-01

    Children and adolescents spend up to 50% of their time at school. The purpose of this study was to assess injury patterns with their treatment of school accidents in a Trauma Service of a German University Hospital and to compare these data to the literature. All school accidents from 01.07.1999 to 30.06.2004 were statistically analysed in a retrospective manner by chart review. There were 1399 school accidents treated in our department. Average age of the injured children was 11.8 years with a boy:girl ratio of 3:2. Almost 40% of the injuries occurred during school sport. The most frequently injured region was the upper extremity including the hand (36.8%). Distortion and contusion were the most frequent diagnoses of all injuries. 16% of the cases had to be treated surgically and/or under general anaesthesia and also a total of 16% of the patients had to be admitted to the hospital. It can be concluded for school facilities that special attention has to be paid during school sports activity and breaks because they account for most accidents. Traffic education may reduce severe injuries. For diagnosis and treatment of school accidents specific knowledge of the growing longbones of the upper extremity and the hand is important.

  1. Drug treatment at the end of life: an epidemiologic study in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Kristian; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Ruths, Sabine

    2014-12-01

    To examine drug treatment in nursing home patients at the end of life, and identify predictors of palliative drug therapy. A historical cohort study. Three urban nursing homes in Norway. All patients admitted from January 2008 and deceased before February 2013. Drug prescriptions, diagnoses, and demographic data were collected from electronic patient records. Palliative end-of-life drug treatment was defined on the basis of indication, drug, and formulation. 524 patients were included, median (range) age at death 86 (19-104) years, 59% women. On the day of death, 99.4% of the study population had active prescriptions; 74.2% had palliative drugs either alone (26.9%) or concomitantly with curative/preventive drugs (47.3%). Palliative drugs were associated with nursing home, length of stay > 16 months (AOR 2.10, 95% CI 1.12-3.94), age (1.03, 1.005-1.05), and a diagnosis of cancer (2.12, 1.19-3.76). Most initiations of palliative drugs and withdrawals of curative/preventive drugs took place on the day of death. Palliative drug therapy and drug therapy changes are common for nursing home patients on the last day of life. Improvements in end-of-life care in nursing homes imply addressing prognostication and earlier response to palliative needs.

  2. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  3. Narcolepsy: Pathophysiology and Neuropsychological Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Naumann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is now recognized as a distinctive disorder with specific pathophysiology and neurochemical abnormalities. Findings on the role of the neuropeptide hypocretin are opening new avenues of research and new strategies for therapy. Recently, neuropsychological and electrophysiological studies have provided evidence for reduced memory performance on standard memory tests in addition to subjective complaints of forgetfulness which may be related to changes in attentional processing. Further studies are, however, necessary to clarify the neuropsychological profile in narcolepsy. This review focuses on the recent advances in understanding narcolepsy.

  4. The epidemiology of acne vulgaris in late adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Darren D; Umari, Tamara; Dunnick, Cory A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common skin condition affecting late adolescents across the globe. Although prior studies have evaluated epidemiologic patterns of acne vulgaris in various ethnicities and regions, adequate understanding of the worldwide burden of the disease associated with patients in their late adolescence (15-19-year olds) remains lacking. To assess the global burden of the disease associated with acne vulgaris for late adolescents (15-19-year olds) and provide an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options for acne in this population. Database summary study. Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 database. Global Burden of Disease regions comprised countries with prevalence of acne vulgaris between the ages of 15 and 19 years. Geographic region-level disability-adjusted life year rates (per 100,000 persons) associated with acne vulgaris in years 1990 through 2010. Median percentage change in disability-adjusted life year rates was estimated for each region across the specified study period. Acne vulgaris-associated disease burden exhibits global distribution and has continued to grow in prevalence over time within this population. This continued growth suggests an unmet dermatologic need worldwide for this disorder and potential opportunities for improved access and delivery of dermatologic care. Our analysis of the literature reveals numerous opportunities for enhanced patient care. To that end, we highlight some of the effective and promising treatments currently available and address important factors, such as sex, nationality, genetics, pathophysiology, and diet, as they relate to acne vulgaris in late adolescence.

  5. Type 2 diabetes across generations: from pathophysiology to prevention and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nolan, Christopher J; Damm, Peter; Prentki, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is now a pandemic and shows no signs of abatement. In this Seminar we review the pathophysiology of this disorder, with particular attention to epidemiology, genetics, epigenetics, and molecular cell biology. Evidence is emerging that a substantial part of diabetes susceptibility ...

  6. [Helicobacter pylori 25 years after (1983 -2008): epidemiology, microbiology, pathogenics, diagnostics and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Ramos, Alberto; Sánchez Sánchez, Rolando

    2009-01-01

    People have been infected by this bacteria 58,000 years ago. Prevalence of infection varies in different nation. In developing countries infection is acquired in early childhood. The forms of infection are/fecal-oral, oral-oral an gastro oral. In Perú we found same prevalence in the coast, jungle and sierra and described that water is one of the ways of infection.MICROBIOLOGY: Three strains predominant in Spanish, Asiatic and people from India have been identified. DNA has 1.65 million bases. Different factors of virulence, enzymes and toxins have also been described. Inflamatory response; neutrophiles, lymphocytes T and B, plasma cells, macrophages.METHODS OF DIAGNOSIS: Invasive and non invasive procedures. Different treatment schemes are described: 1st, 2nd, 3rd lines, rescue therapies. Secondary reactions, alternative schemes, recurrence, reinfection and experience in Perú are also described.

  7. The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Avi Lemberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE is an emerging disease characterised by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf, lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with TGF-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE.

  8. Intracranial bleeding: epidemiology and relationships with antithrombotic treatment in 241 cerebral hemorrhages in Reggio Emilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Alberto; Ghirarduzzi, Angelo; Iorio, Alfonso; Silingardi, Mauro; Malferrari, Giovanni; Baldi, Giovanni

    2002-09-01

    Anticoagulant (AC) and antiplatelet (AP) drugs are effectively used in the prevention of thromboembolic events, with the trade-off of bleeding side effects, particularly intracranial. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of intracranial bleeding in the population of Reggio Emilia and to investigate the potential effect of AC and AP drugs. We reviewed all the patients admitted for cerebral hemorrhages to our hospital between April 1998 and September 2000. Data were collected with a standardized form. All the patients were followed-up to estimate long-term mortality. Chi(2) and t-tests were used as appropriate. Logistic regression analysis was performed to test predictors of mortality. Pharmaceutical department data were employed to estimate the total number of patients receiving AC and AP drugs. We found 241 cases (107/134 female/male, mean age 61 years, 133/107 spontaneous/traumatic events, 0.32/1,000/year overall). Twenty-nine and 47 of these patients were being given AC or AP drugs, respectively (4.9/1,000/year and 3.7/1,000/year). The relative risk of intracranial bleeding was 11.5 in AP and 15.3 in AC treated patients. Two patients (one underwent neurosurgery and one thrombolytic treatment) were excluded from mortality and risk factors analysis. Six patients were lost from follow-up and excluded from mortality analysis. Overall mortality was 100/233 (42.9%); mortality in traumatic events was 25/103 (24.2%) versus 75/130 (57.7%) in spontaneous events. Mortality was 19/29 (65.5%), 26/47 (55.3%) and 55/157 (35%) in AC recipients, AP recipients, and untreated patients, respectively. This increased risk was mainly confined to traumatic events (p = 0.06), without difference between AC and AP recipients. At the time of the event, the mean duration of oral AC treatment was 26.3 months (range 1-120). Mean INR was = 3.1 (range 1.6-8.8). Mortality was significantly predicted by the Glasgow Coma Scale Score (GCS) at admission (p < 0.0001), by the type of

  9. Epidemiology, pathology and treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis in taif region of saudi arabia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajihullah Khan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an annoying and disfiguring disease affecting around 1,500,000 individuals globally. There are endemic pockets of this disease in Taif region. In some patients, lesion often weeps and leads to scar formation. The study was conducted to see the efficacy of fluconazole and itraconazole in the patients of cutaneous leishmaniasis and the effect of these drugs on liver enzymes and kidney markers.Positivity of Leishmania was recorded by microscopic examinations of smears. Specific diagnosis for Leishmania major and L. tropica was made with the help of nested polymerase chain reaction. Fluconazole was given at the rate of 200mg/day while itraconazole was given at 150mg/day for six weeks. AST, ALT, creatinine and urea were estimated during medication.Leishmania major and L. tropica were the species responsible for cutaneous leishmaniasis in Taif region. 81% patients had single lesions, mostly on face followed by hands and legs. 15% of the lesions had bacterial contamination. In terms of efficacy, fluconazole gave slightly better results compared to itraconazole. After 6 weeks of medications, slightly elevated values were recorded for liver enzymes and creatinine.Transmission of leishmaniasis in Taif region is probably because of poor coverage of residual insecticides spraying at hiding places in pile-ups of rocks and abandoned houses from where sand flies visit nearby houses and cattle sheds during night. Fluconazole and itraconazole may be used for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis with good recovery rate and fewer side effects.

  10. [Malignant melanoma of the skin in Denmark--epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Maase, H; Osterlind, A; Drzewiecki, K T; Dahlstrøm, K K; Geertsen, P F; Gjedde, S B; Hastrup, N C; Holmberg, S B; Krag, C; Lock-Andersen, J

    1992-07-06

    About 700 new cases of malignant melanoma of the skin are registered annually in Denmark. The incidence is increasing rapidly and the number of new cases increases by more than 5% per annum. The most important phenotypical risk factors are the number of acquired pigmented naevi and exposure to sunlight is the most important risk factor in the external environment so that severe sunburn in children and intermittent intense exposure to sunlight increase the risk of melanoma. The thickness of the tumour at the time of the diagnosis is the most important prognostic factor. The prognosis deteriorates with increasing thickness. Treatment is primarily surgical. In cases of inoperable local melanoma and regional recurrences, irradiation may be administered. Chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy are of experimental character. In the light of the rapidly increasing incidence, it is important that knowledge of risk factors for development of the disease and the clinical characteristics of early melanoma is spread to not only the medical profession but also to the general public.

  11. Pathophysiology of diurnal drooling in Parkinson’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenie van den Engel-Hoek; Johanna Kalf; Bastiaan Bloem; George Borm; Machiel Zwarts; Bert de Swart; Marten Munneke

    2011-01-01

    Drooling is an incapacitating feature of Parkinson's disease. Better pathophysiological insights are needed to improve treatment. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the cause of drooling is multifactorial. We examined 15 patients with Parkinson's disease with distinct diurnal saliva loss

  12. [Headache in children and adolescents. Epidemiology, biopsychosocial correlates, and psychological treatment approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröner-Herwig, B

    2014-08-01

    An abundance of studies have consistently shown that headache is the most prevalent pain in children and adolescents. Weekly headache is experienced by more than 10 % and is distinctly more frequent in girls. The number of headache-affected youths with high disability is lower than expected (~ 4 %). Headache is associated with pain in other body sites, thus multiple pain is experienced more often than isolated headache. Various somatic symptoms and even chronic diseases are also correlated with headache. Headache in parents carries a high risk of also occurring in their children. Various other psychosocial factors such as dysfunctional psychological traits are closely linked with headache, the most prominent being internalizing symptoms. However, externalizing symptoms also correlate with headache. Pain catastrophizing, as well as somatosensory amplification and anxiety sensitivity, have been shown to characterize individuals with headache. Features of the social environment, such as life events, school, as well as family stressors and socioeconomic parameters, are among the risk factors. Psychological interventions such as biofeedback, relaxation, and cognitive-behavioral training have proved their efficacy in headache treatment according to several meta-analyses. The latter has also been conducted in group settings and more recently in self-management focused trainings using electronic media. They mainly aim at the prevention of further headache episodes. The goal of this training is the strengthening of self-efficacy beliefs and active coping strategies. It is proposed that these competencies could contribute to the successful long-term prevention of an adverse course of headache into adulthood.

  13. A review of the epidemiology, prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.E. Entonu

    Full Text Available In order to amalgamate research findings on HIV/AIDS in Nigeria as well as the trend of the infection in a concise manner, we reviewed published articles on the HIV/AIDS situation in Nigeria. We categorized this review into several subheadings. The HIV prevalence rate has continued to rise steadily from less than 0.1% in 1987, to 5.8% in 2001, with a slight decrease in 2003 to 5.0%. Although the knowledge about HIV and its mode of transmission is widespread, it is however disheartening to note that this did not result into appreciable attitudinal change and behavior modification among Nigerians. Both HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been identified in Nigeria, with HIV-1 being the predominant type. Furthermore, several subtypes like subtypes A, B, C, G and J have been identified in Nigeria, with several recombinant forms like the CRF02_AG; the major ones being A, G and CRF02_AG. HIV-infected patients in Nigeria are also co-infected with other viral and bacterial infections, the commonly reported ones being co infections with hepatitis B and C. Although treatment of infected patients has increased recently, more effort is needed, especially in the area of patients monitoring, to maximize the benefits of ART in Nigeria. Finally, Nigeria has made appreciable efforts in vaccine development and candidate HIV DNA vaccines have been developed utilizing the sequences from predominant subtypes, and these candidates have been shown to be immunogenic in animal models. It is therefore clear that only the integration of prevention and antiretroviral research programmes into a coherent programme that is needed to address the public health needs that HIV/AIDS crisis represents for Nigeria.

  14. Epidemiology of psychotropic drug use in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: gaps in mental illness treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ines Quintana

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Estimate the prevalence of psychotropic drugs use in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and establish its relationship with the presence of mental disorders. METHODS: A probabilistic sample of non-institutionalized individuals, from the general population of Rio de Janeiro (n = 1208;turn out:81%, 15 years or older, who were interviewed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 2.1 (depression, anxiety-phobia, OCD\\PTSD, alcoholism sections, and asked about their psychotropic use during a 12 and one-month period before the interview. Data were collected between June/2007-February/2008.The prevalence was estimated with a confidence interval of 95%. The associations between psychotropics use and mental disorders were analyzed through a logistic regression model (Odds Ration - OR. RESULTS: The one-month prevalence of psychotropic drug use was 6.55%, 3.19% for men and 9.13% for women. Antidepressants were the most frequently used drug (2.78%, followed by anorectics (1.65%, tranquilizers (1.61% and mood stabilizers (1.23%. General practitioners issued the highest number of prescriptions (46.3%, followed by psychiatrists (29.3%; 86.6% of the psychotropic drugs used were paid for by the patient himself. Individuals with increased likelihood of using psychotropic drugs were those that had received a psychiatric diagnosis during a one-month period before the study (OR:3.93, females (OR:1.82, separated/divorced (OR:2.23, of increased age (OR:1.03, with higher income (OR:2.96, and family history of mental disorder (OR:2.59; only 16% of the individuals with a current DSM IV diagnosis were using a psychotropic drug; 17% among individuals with a depression-related diagnosis and 8% with Phobic Anxiety Disorders-related diagnosis used psychotropics. CONCLUSION: Approximately 84% of individuals displaying some mental disorder did not use psychotropic drugs, which indicates an important gap between demand and access to treatment. A

  15. A Unified Pathophysiological Construct of Diabetes and its Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Stanley S; Epstein, Solomon; Corkey, Barbara E; Grant, Struan F A; Gavin Iii, James R; Aguilar, Richard B; Herman, Mary E

    2017-09-01

    Advances in understanding diabetes mellitus (DM) through basic and clinical research have helped clarify and reunify a disease state fragmented into numerous etiologies and subtypes. It is now understood that a common pathophysiology drives the diabetic state throughout its natural history and across its varied clinical presentations, a pathophysiology involving metabolic insults, oxidative damage, and vicious cycles that aggravate and intensify organ dysfunction and damage. This new understanding of the disease requires that we revisit existing diagnostics and treatment approaches, which were built upon outmoded assumptions. 'The Common Pathophysiologic Origins of Diabetes Mellitus and its Complications Construct' is presented as a more accurate, foundational, and translatable construct of DM that helps make sense of the hitherto ambiguous findings of long-term outcome studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Epidemiologic Overview of Synkinesis in 353 Patients with Longstanding Facial Paralysis under Treatment with Botulinum Toxin for 11 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Alessandra Grassi; da Costa, Eduardo Fernandes; Ferreira, Marcus Castro; Remigio, Adelina Fatima do Nascimento; Moraes, Luciana Borsoi; Gemperli, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    Patients with longstanding facial paralysis often exhibit synkinesis. Few reports describe the prevalence and factors related to the development of synkinesis after facial paralysis. Botulinum toxin type A injection is an important adjunct treatment for facial paralysis-induced asymmetry and synkinesis. The authors assessed the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of patients with sequelae of facial paralysis treated with botulinum toxin type A injections to evaluate the prevalence of synkinesis and related factors. A total of 353 patients (age, 4 to 84 years; 245 female patients) with longstanding facial paralysis underwent 2312 botulinum toxin type A injections during an 11-year follow-up. Doses used over the years, previous treatments (electrical stimulation, operations), and how they correlated to postparalysis and postreanimation synkinesis were analyzed. There was a significant association between cause and surgery. Most patients with facial paralysis caused by a congenital defect, trauma, or a tumor underwent reanimation. There were no sex- or synkinesis-related differences in the doses used, but the doses were higher in the reanimation group than in the no-surgery group. Synkinesis was found in 196 patients; 148 (41.9 percent) presented with postparalysis synkinesis (oro-ocular, oculo-oral) and 58 (16.4 percent) presented with postreanimation synkinesis. Ten patients presented with both types. This study determined the high prevalence (55.5 percent) of synkinesis in patients with longstanding facial paralysis. Postparalysis synkinesis was positively associated with infectious and idiopathic causes, electrical stimulation, facial nerve decompression, and no requirement for surgery. Postreanimation synkinesis was present in 28.2 percent of reanimated patients and was significantly associated with microsurgical flaps, transfacial nerve grafting, masseteric-facial anastomosis, and temporalis muscle transfers.

  17. [Epidemiology, treatment and results of proximal humeral fractures: experience of a district hospital in a sports- and tourism area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonderegger, J; Simmen, H-P

    2003-02-01

    The epidemiology, therapy and results of proximal humeral fractures in a touristic area were investigated and our concept for treatment presented. Between 1.1.1999 and 30.04.2000 adult patients with proximal humeral fractures were included, the fractures classified (Codman/Neer and AO) and results determined after an average of 9 months. 62 adults were treated. 59 (95 %) had an accident during leisure time, mainly skiing accidents (52 %). 7 patients (11 %) had an associated luxation of the shoulder. 51 (82 %) were treated conservatively, 11 (18 %) operatively with a T-plate. The conservatively treated had to wear a Gilchrist-cast for an average of 29 (operatively 13) days, started passive movement after 20 (operatively 9) days, and active movement after 44 (operatively 45) days. The 32 employed (52 %) were not able to work for 46 days on average. Overall, 52 patients (84 %) were totally or mostly satisfied with the result. 5 among the 13 patients (38.5 %) with 3- or 4-part-fractures, and 4 among the 11 operated patients (36.4 %) were not satisfied with the result. Proximal humeral fractures are common skiing injuries, they need a long and intensive treatment and are economically expensive. The Codman/Neer and AO-classifications are equal. The results for simple, mainly conservatively treated fractures (Codman/Neer 1, 2A, 2-part) are good. Complex, mainly operatively treated fractures (Codman/Neer 3- and 4-part) have a much poorer prognosis. Diagnostically the computed tomography with 3-D-reconstruction is recommended for a better representation of the fracture and a safer choice of the therapeutical strategy.

  18. The role of ADAMs in disease pathophysiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    The ADAMs are a family of multidomain transmembrane and secreted proteins involved in both proteolysis and cell adhesion. Altered expression of specific ADAMs is implicated in the pathophysiology of several diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer\\'s disease, cardiac hypertrophy, asthma and cancer. Of these different diseases, it is in cancer where most research has been carried out. Multiple ADAMs, including ADAM-9, ADAM-10, ADAM-12, ADAM-15 and ADAM-17, have been shown to play a role in either cancer formation or progression. Consistent with these findings, increased expression of specific ADAMs in several cancer types was found to correlate with features of aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Currently, selective ADAM inhibitors against ADAM-10 and ADAM-17 are undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Further work is required in order to establish a causative role for ADAMs in rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer\\'s disease, cardiac hypertrophy and asthma.

  19. Fisiopatologia da enxaqueca Migraine pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAURICE B. VINCENT

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available A fisiopatologia da enxaqueca ainda não foi completamente elucidada. As principais estruturas envolvidas parecem ser o sistema nervoso central (córtex e tronco cerebral, o sistema trigeminovascular e os vasos correspondentes, outras fibras autonômicas que inervam estes vasos, e os vários agentes vasoativos locais, como a SP, CGRP, NO, VIP, NPY, ACh, NA, NKA, entre outros. A depressão alastrante é o fenômeno neurológico que provavelmente justifica achados experimenais e clínicos na enxaqueca. Ela tem velocidade de propagação semelhante à aura, ativa o núcleo espinhal do trigêmeo e está relacionada à liberação de CGRP e NO. Alterações circulatórias detectadas por métodos complementares reforçam o papel da depressão alastrante. A identificação de anormalidades em pelo menos três loci (cromossomas 19 e 1 na enxaqueca hemiplégica familiar ocorreu recentemente. Elas estão relacionadas a anormalidades nos canais de cálcio voltagem dependentes tipo P/Q, específicos do sistema nervoso central, que regulam a liberação de vários neurotransmissores, incluindo possivelmente a serotonina. A exemplo de outras anormalidades neurológicas paroxísticas que resultam da hiperexcitabilidade da membrana plasmática, é possível que a enxaqueca ocorra devido a uma desordem de canais iônicos.The pathophysiology of migraine is not yet fully understood. The most important structures involved seem to be the central nervous system (cortex and brain stem, the trigeminovascular system and related cranial arteries, other autonomic fibres innervating such vessels, and various local vasoactive agents, including SP, CGRP, NO, VIP, NPY, ACh, NA, NKA, among others. The spreading depression phenomenon may explain clinical as well experimental findings in migraine. Its propagation velocity mirrors what is found in clinical aura, it may activate the spinal trigeminal nucleus and may induce CGRP and NO release. Circulatory changes detected with

  20. Capillary leak syndrome: etiologies, pathophysiology, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddall, Eric; Khatri, Minesh; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2017-07-01

    In various human diseases, an increase in capillary permeability to proteins leads to the loss of protein-rich fluid from the intravascular to the interstitial space. Although sepsis is the disease most commonly associated with this phenomenon, many other diseases can lead to a "sepsis-like" syndrome with manifestations of diffuse pitting edema, exudative serous cavity effusions, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, hypotension, and, in some cases, hypovolemic shock with multiple-organ failure. The term capillary leak syndrome has been used to describe this constellation of disease manifestations associated with an increased capillary permeability to proteins. Diseases other than sepsis that can result in capillary leak syndrome include the idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome or Clarkson's disease, engraftment syndrome, differentiation syndrome, the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, viral hemorrhagic fevers, autoimmune diseases, snakebite envenomation, and ricin poisoning. Drugs including some interleukins, some monoclonal antibodies, and gemcitabine can also cause capillary leak syndrome. Acute kidney injury is commonly seen in all of these diseases. In addition to hypotension, cytokines are likely to be important in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury in capillary leak syndrome. Fluid management is a critical part of the treatment of capillary leak syndrome; hypovolemia and hypotension can cause organ injury, whereas capillary leakage of administered fluid can worsen organ edema leading to progressive organ injury. The purpose of this article is to discuss the diseases other than sepsis that produce capillary leak and review their collective pathophysiology and treatment. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pathophysiology of Post Amputation Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Short Form (MPQ), Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D 10), Pain and Anxiety Symptoms Scale, short version (PASS-20), and the...analyzed by independent samples t-test comparing McGill Pain Questionnaire – Short Form (MPQ), VAS, Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale (PASS), Center for...Systemic alpha- adrenergic blockade with phentolamine: a diagnostic test for sympathetically maintained pain. Anesthesiology 1991;74:691-8. 71

  2. Epidemiological composition, clinical and treatment characteristics of the patient cohort of the german competence network for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen K

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective As its central basis for research, the Competence Network for HIV/AIDS (KompNet established a nationwide cohort study on HIV-positive patients being in medical care in Germany. In this paper, we describe the epidemiological composition, and clinical as well as treatment characteristics of the KompNet cohort over time. Methods The KompNet cohort is an open, retrospective and prospective, multi-center, disease-specific and nationwide cohort study that started gathering data in June 2004. Semiannually, follow up visits of the patients are documented, covering a wide range of clinical and sociodemographic data. At enrolment and three years afterwards, an EDTA-sample is taken; a serum-sample is taken at every follow up. Results As of 20.10.2008, a total of 15,541 patients were enrolled by 44 documenting sites. In September 2007, the cohort size was reduced to ten outpatient clinics and fifteen private practitioners, covering a total of 9,410 patients. The documentation of these patients comprised 24,117 years of follow up-time since enrolment (mean: 2.6 years, 62,862 person years inclusive data documented retrospectively on course of HIV-infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART, mean: 6.7 years. Due to the short period of recruitment till now, rates of death (0.3%-0.8% and losses to follow up (1.1%-5.5% were low. 84.9% of patients were men. Main risk of transmission was sex between men (MSM: 62.9%. Mean age was 45 years. About two third of patients were classified as CDC-stage B or C. Therapy regimens of currently treated patients complied with recent guidelines. Trends of mean CD4 cell count/μl regarding the initial therapy and concerning the population under treatment reflected the developments and the changing standards of antiretroviral therapy over time. Conclusion The KompNet cohort covers about a quarter of all patients estimated as being under treatment in Germany. Its composition can be accounted approximately

  3. Understanding changes in cardiovascular pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chummun, Harry

    Cardiovascular pathophysiological changes, such as hypertension and enlarged ventricles, reflect the altered functions of the heart and its circulation during ill-health. This article examines the normal and altered anatomy of the cardiac valves, the contractile elements and enzymes of the myocardium, the significance of the different factors associated with cardiac output, and the role of the autonomic nervous system in the heart beat. It also explores how certain diseases alter these functions and result in cardiac symptoms. Nurses can benefit from knowledge of these specific changes, for example, by being able to ask relevant questions in order to ascertain the nature of a patients condition, by being able to take an effective patient history and by being able to read diagnostic results, such as electrocardiograms and cardiac enzyme results. All this will help nurses to promote sound cardiac care based on a physiological rationale.

  4. Pathophysiology of MDS: genomic aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Motoshi

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by clonal proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and their apoptosis, and show a propensity to progress to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Although MDS are recognized as neoplastic diseases caused by genomic aberrations of hematopoietic cells, the details of the genetic abnormalities underlying disease development have not as yet been fully elucidated due to difficulties in analyzing chromosomal abnormalities. Recent advances in comprehensive analyses of disease genomes including whole-genome sequencing technologies have revealed the genomic abnormalities in MDS. Surprisingly, gene mutations were found in approximately 80-90% of cases with MDS, and the novel mutations discovered with these technologies included previously unknown, MDS-specific, mutations such as those of the genes in the RNA-splicing machinery. It is anticipated that these recent studies will shed new light on the pathophysiology of MDS due to genomic aberrations.

  5. Secondary hypertension, issues in diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullalarevu, Raghavesh; Akbar, Ghulam; Teehan, Geoffrey

    2014-12-01

    Secondary hypertension (SH) often implies a correctable form of nonessential hypertension. Often certain clinical clues prompt a more extensive evaluation of the causes of the hypertension. Renovascular disease, intrinsic renal disease, primary hyperaldosteronism, and obstructive sleep apnea represent the most common causes of SH. This article defines the disorder and details its epidemiology, prevalence, pathophysiology, physical findings, and treatment strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Epidemiology and treatment of mood disorders in a day hospital setting from 1996 to 2007: an Italian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca M

    2013-02-01

    utilization of noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants, which remained basically low. There was no significant difference in prescribing of first-generation antipsychotic agents, although a reduction was found. There was a significant increase in utilization of second-generation antipsychotics and mood stabilizers.Conclusion: Our epidemiological findings are consistent with data reported in the literature regarding the high prevalence of major depression among the mood disorders, as well as the impact of familiality and comorbidity. Analysis of prescribing patterns for antidepressants, antipsychotics, and mood stabilizers in the treatment of mood disorders shows a shift from older to newer drugs, and wider use of mood stabilizers.Keywords: antidepressants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, prescribing patterns, mood disorders, treatment

  7. Epidemiological analysis of demographic characteristics and type of injuries in patients with multiple trauma with respect to conclusive treatment outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagorac Slaviša

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Multiple trauma is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the population of people under 45 years of age. The consequences of multiple trauma have huge epidemiological, social and economic significance. Objective The aim of the paper was to analyze the conclusive treatment outcome of multiply traumatized patients with respect to their sex, age, injury mechanism and type. METHOD This retrospective study included 100 patients with multiple injuries (ISS>16 treated in the Emergency Room of the Clinical Centre of Serbia in the course of 2004. Clinical, X-ray, laboratory and numerical presentation methods - scores (ISS and GCS were used to show the injury severity. Results Most of the injured were males (80%, and the average age was 40±20 (5-83. Out of the total number of patients who died, 23 (82% were males, and 5 (18% were females. The average age of the patients with fatal outcomes was 48±21 (8-86. Traffic accidents were the leading cause of injury (59%. The median GCS was 10±3 (3-15. The average ISS was 30 (20-66 in the surviving patients, and 53 (27-77 in those who died. Conclusion With respect to sex, in most cases multiple trauma affects males (p<0.01, with the average age of about 40. With respect to injury mechanism, the main cause of the occurrence of multiple trauma is traffic accidents (p<0.01. There is a statistically significant difference in the values of GCS and ISS relative to the definitive outcome (p<0.01. Statistical data processing indicated that there was a statistically significant correlation between mortality and type of injury in a given organic system (p<0.01, but that there was no statistically significant correlation between mortality and age. .

  8. Chordomas of the Skull Base, Mobile Spine, and Sacrum: An Epidemiologic Investigation of Presentation, Treatment, and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Bilsky, Mark H; Laufer, Ilya

    2018-05-01

    Chordomas are rare primary bone tumors that arise from the axial skeleton. Our objective was to analyze trends in radiation and surgery over time and determine location-based survival predictors for chordomas of the skull base, mobile spine, and sacrum. A retrospective cohort study of the SEER (Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results) database from 1973 to 2013 was conducted. All patients had histologically confirmed chordomas. The principal outcome measure was overall survival (OS). The cohort included 1616 patients: skull base (664), mobile spine (444), and sacrum (508). Skull base tumors presented earliest in life (47.4 years) and sacral tumors presented latest (62.7 years). Rates of radiation remained stable for skull base and mobile spine tumors but declined for sacral tumors (P = 0.006). Rates of surgical resection remained stable for skull base and sacral tumors but declined for mobile spine tumors (P = 0.046). Skull base chordomas had the longest median survival (162 months) compared with mobile spine (94 months) and sacral tumors (87 months). Being married was independently associated with improved OS for skull base tumors (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.53-0.99; P = 0.044). Surgical resection was independently associated with improved OS for sacral chordomas (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.34-0.69; P mobile spine chordomas and radiation for sacral chordomas decreased over time. Patients with skull base tumors survived longer than did patients with mobile spine and sacral chordomas, and surgical resection was associated with improved survival in sacral chordomas only. Understanding the behavior of these tumors can help cranial and spinal surgeons improve treatment in this patient population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Review and International Recommendation of Methods for Typing Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates and Their Implications for Improved Knowledge of Gonococcal Epidemiology, Treatment, and Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unemo, Magnus; Dillon, Jo-Anne R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Gonorrhea, which may become untreatable due to multiple resistance to available antibiotics, remains a public health problem worldwide. Precise methods for typing Neisseria gonorrhoeae, together with epidemiological information, are crucial for an enhanced understanding regarding issues involving epidemiology, test of cure and contact tracing, identifying core groups and risk behaviors, and recommending effective antimicrobial treatment, control, and preventive measures. This review evaluates methods for typing N. gonorrhoeae isolates and recommends various methods for different situations. Phenotypic typing methods, as well as some now-outdated DNA-based methods, have limited usefulness in differentiating between strains of N. gonorrhoeae. Genotypic methods based on DNA sequencing are preferred, and the selection of the appropriate genotypic method should be guided by its performance characteristics and whether short-term epidemiology (microepidemiology) or long-term and/or global epidemiology (macroepidemiology) matters are being investigated. Currently, for microepidemiological questions, the best methods for fast, objective, portable, highly discriminatory, reproducible, typeable, and high-throughput characterization are N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) or full- or extended-length porB gene sequencing. However, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Opa typing can be valuable in specific situations, i.e., extreme microepidemiology, despite their limitations. For macroepidemiological studies and phylogenetic studies, DNA sequencing of chromosomal housekeeping genes, such as multilocus sequence typing (MLST), provides a more nuanced understanding. PMID:21734242

  10. WHO - IPHECA: Epidemiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souchkevitch, G.

    1996-01-01

    In May 1991 the World Health Assembly endorsed the establishment of the International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA) under the auspices of WHO. Five pilot projects have been carried out within IPHECA in the study territories of Belarus, Russian Federation and Ukraine in a period from 1991 to 1994. This pilot projects dealt with the detection and treatment of leukaemia and related diseases (Haematology Project), thyroid disorders (Thyroid project), brain damage during exposure 'in-utero' (Brain Damage 'in-Utero' project) and with the development of the Chernobyl registries (Epidemiological Registry Project). A fifth pilot project on oral health was performed only in Belarus. Epidemiological investigations have been an important component of all IPHECA pilot projects. Within 'Epidemiological Registry' Project such investigations have been the principal activity. But with respect to other IPHECA projects it was carried out in addition to main objectives relating to medical monitoring, early diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases included in project protocols. To support the epidemiological investigations within IPHECA, WHO supplied 41 computers in Belarus, Russian Federation and Ukraine and provided training for specialists from these countries in internationally recognized centres. The training programmes and host countries were as follows: standardization of epidemiological investigations (United Kingdom), radiation epidemiology (Russia), development of software (United Kingdom), principles of epidemiological investigations (The Czech Republic), cohort investigations (Japan)

  11. WHO - IPHECA: Epidemiological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchkevitch, G [World Health Organization, Geneva (Swaziland)

    1996-07-01

    In May 1991 the World Health Assembly endorsed the establishment of the International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA) under the auspices of WHO. Five pilot projects have been carried out within IPHECA in the study territories of Belarus, Russian Federation and Ukraine in a period from 1991 to 1994. This pilot projects dealt with the detection and treatment of leukaemia and related diseases (Haematology Project), thyroid disorders (Thyroid project), brain damage during exposure 'in-utero' (Brain Damage 'in-Utero' project) and with the development of the Chernobyl registries (Epidemiological Registry Project). A fifth pilot project on oral health was performed only in Belarus. Epidemiological investigations have been an important component of all IPHECA pilot projects. Within 'Epidemiological Registry' Project such investigations have been the principal activity. But with respect to other IPHECA projects it was carried out in addition to main objectives relating to medical monitoring, early diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases included in project protocols. To support the epidemiological investigations within IPHECA, WHO supplied 41 computers in Belarus, Russian Federation and Ukraine and provided training for specialists from these countries in internationally recognized centres. The training programmes and host countries were as follows: standardization of epidemiological investigations (United Kingdom), radiation epidemiology (Russia), development of software (United Kingdom), principles of epidemiological investigations (The Czech Republic), cohort investigations (Japan)

  12. Síndrome dolorosa complexa regional: epidemiologia, fisiopatologia, manifestações clínicas, testes diagnósticos e propostas terapêuticas Síndrome dolorosa compleja regional: epidemiología, fisiopatología, manifestaciones clínicas, tests diagnósticos y propuestas terapéuticas Complex regional pain syndrome: epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic tests and therapeutic proposals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Obata Cordon

    2002-09-01

    informaciones con la intuición de la mejor comprensión de esta importante síndrome dolorosa. CONTENIDO: Este es un trabajo de revisión de la literatura en los diversos aspectos de la SDCR, con énfasis en sus causas, definición y taxonomía, fisiopatología, características clínicas, tests diagnósticos y propuestas de tratamientos más recientes. CONCLUSIONES: Pocos son los estudios controlados adecuadamente, encubiertos y aleatorios, publicados con grandes muestras, habiendo muchas dudas sobre esta enfermedad. De esta forma, aun hay enorme empirismo en su terapéutica, y los resultados obtenidos son insatisfactorios.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The term Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS was adopted as from 1994 by the International Association for Study of Pain (IASP Consensus. It previously referred to by several other names, such as Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, Causalgia, Algodystrophy or Sudeck’s Atrophy, and is a disease where the understanding of clinical limits, pathophysiology and pathogenic implications is still very poor. Thus resulting in disappointment both for patients and for health professionals with regard to currently available therapies. This study aimed at reviewing the literature and updating information to improve the understanding of this severe painful syndrome. CONTENTS: This study is a literature review of several CRPS aspects, with emphasis in its causes, definition and taxonomy, pathophysiology, clinical characteristics, diagnostic tests and most recent therapies. CONCLUSIONS: There are few well controlled, double blind and randomized CRPS studies with large samples, and there are still several questions about this disease. The treatment is usually empirical and the patient outcome is poor.

  13. Tuberculosis 2: Pathophysiology and microbiology of pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-08-01

    Aug 1, 2005 ... February 2013 Downloaded from www.southsudanmedicaljournal.com. MaIN arTIClES. 10. Tuberculosis 2: Pathophysiology and microbiology of pulmonary tuberculosis. Robert L. Serafino Wania MBBS, MrCP, MSc (Trop Med). Pathophysiology. Inhalation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis leads to one of.

  14. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of biomedical nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liming, E-mail: wangliming@ihep.ac.cn; Chen, Chunying, E-mail: chenchy@nanoctr.cn

    2016-05-15

    Nanomaterials (NMs) have been widespread used in biomedical fields, daily consuming, and even food industry. It is crucial to understand the safety and biomedical efficacy of NMs. In this review, we summarized the recent progress about the physiological and pathological effects of NMs from several levels: protein-nano interface, NM-subcellular structures, and cell–cell interaction. We focused on the detailed information of nano-bio interaction, especially about protein adsorption, intracellular trafficking, biological barriers, and signaling pathways as well as the associated mechanism mediated by nanomaterials. We also introduced related analytical methods that are meaningful and helpful for biomedical effect studies in the future. We believe that knowledge about pathophysiologic effects of NMs is not only significant for rational design of medical NMs but also helps predict their safety and further improve their applications in the future. - Highlights: • Rapid protein adsorption onto nanomaterials that affects biomedical effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological membrane, intracellular trafficking and specific cellular effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological barriers • The signaling pathways mediated by nanomaterials and related biomedical effects • Novel techniques for studying translocation and biomedical effects of NMs.

  15. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of biomedical nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liming; Chen, Chunying

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) have been widespread used in biomedical fields, daily consuming, and even food industry. It is crucial to understand the safety and biomedical efficacy of NMs. In this review, we summarized the recent progress about the physiological and pathological effects of NMs from several levels: protein-nano interface, NM-subcellular structures, and cell–cell interaction. We focused on the detailed information of nano-bio interaction, especially about protein adsorption, intracellular trafficking, biological barriers, and signaling pathways as well as the associated mechanism mediated by nanomaterials. We also introduced related analytical methods that are meaningful and helpful for biomedical effect studies in the future. We believe that knowledge about pathophysiologic effects of NMs is not only significant for rational design of medical NMs but also helps predict their safety and further improve their applications in the future. - Highlights: • Rapid protein adsorption onto nanomaterials that affects biomedical effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological membrane, intracellular trafficking and specific cellular effects • Nanomaterials and their interaction with biological barriers • The signaling pathways mediated by nanomaterials and related biomedical effects • Novel techniques for studying translocation and biomedical effects of NMs

  16. TFOS DEWS II pathophysiology report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Anthony J; de Paiva, Cintia S; Chauhan, Sunil K; Bonini, Stefano; Gabison, Eric E; Jain, Sandeep; Knop, Erich; Markoulli, Maria; Ogawa, Yoko; Perez, Victor; Uchino, Yuichi; Yokoi, Norihiko; Zoukhri, Driss; Sullivan, David A

    2017-07-01

    The TFOS DEWS II Pathophysiology Subcommittee reviewed the mechanisms involved in the initiation and perpetuation of dry eye disease. Its central mechanism is evaporative water loss leading to hyperosmolar tissue damage. Research in human disease and in animal models has shown that this, either directly or by inducing inflammation, causes a loss of both epithelial and goblet cells. The consequent decrease in surface wettability leads to early tear film breakup and amplifies hyperosmolarity via a Vicious Circle. Pain in dry eye is caused by tear hyperosmolarity, loss of lubrication, inflammatory mediators and neurosensory factors, while visual symptoms arise from tear and ocular surface irregularity. Increased friction targets damage to the lids and ocular surface, resulting in characteristic punctate epithelial keratitis, superior limbic keratoconjunctivitis, filamentary keratitis, lid parallel conjunctival folds, and lid wiper epitheliopathy. Hybrid dry eye disease, with features of both aqueous deficiency and increased evaporation, is common and efforts should be made to determine the relative contribution of each form to the total picture. To this end, practical methods are needed to measure tear evaporation in the clinic, and similarly, methods are needed to measure osmolarity at the tissue level across the ocular surface, to better determine the severity of dry eye. Areas for future research include the role of genetic mechanisms in non-Sjögren syndrome dry eye, the targeting of the terminal duct in meibomian gland disease and the influence of gaze dynamics and the closed eye state on tear stability and ocular surface inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Empirical evidence of bias in treatment effect estimates in controlled trials with different interventions and outcomes: meta-epidemiological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, L.; Egger, M.; Gluud, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the association of inadequate or unclear allocation concealment and lack of blinding with biased estimates of intervention effects varies with the nature of the intervention or outcome. DESIGN: Combined analysis of data from three meta-epidemiological studies based o...

  18. Restless Legs Syndrome: From Pathophysiology to Clinical Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyi Guo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS, a common neurological sensorimotor disorder in western countries, has gained more and more attention in Asian countries. The prevalence of RLS is higher in older people and females. RLS is most commonly related to iron deficiency, pregnancy and uremia. The RLS symptoms show a significant circadian rhythm and a close relationship to periodic limb movements (PLMs in clinical observations, while the pathophysiological pathways are still unknown. The diagnostic criteria have been revised in 2012 to improve the validity of RLS diagnosis. Recent studies have suggested an important role of iron decrease of brain in RLS pathophysiology. Dopaminergic (DA system dysfunction in A11 cell groups has been recognized long ago from clinical treatment and autopsy. Nowadays, it is believed that iron dysfunction can affect DA system from different pathways and opioids have a protective effect on DA system. Several susceptible single nucleotide polymorphisms such as BTBD9 and MEIS1, which are thought to be involved in embryonic neuronal development, have been reported to be associated with RLS. Several pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment are discussed in this review. First-line treatments of RLS include DA agents and α2δ agonists. Augmentation is very common in long-term treatment of RLS which makes prevention and management of augmentation very important for RLS patients. A combination of different types of medication is effective in preventing and treating augmentation. The knowledge on RLS is still limited, the pathophysiology and better management of RLS remain to be discovered.

  19. An update on the pathophysiology and management of polycystic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, May Yw; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Strasser, Simone I

    2017-06-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is characterized by the presence of multiple cholangiocyte-derived hepatic cysts that progressively replace liver tissue. They are classified as an inherited ciliopathy /cholangiopathy as pathology exists at the level of the primary cilia of cholangiocytes. Aberrant expression of the proteins in primary cilia can impair their structures and functions, thereby promoting cystogenesis. Areas covered: This review begins by looking at the epidemiology of PLD and its natural history. It then describes the pathophysiology and corresponding potential treatment strategies for PLD. Expert commentary: Traditionally, therapies for symptomatic PLD have been limited to symptomatic management and surgical interventions. Such techniques are not completely effective, do not alter the natural history of the disease, and are linked with high rate of re-accumulation of cysts. As a result, there has been a push for drugs targeted at abnormal cellular signaling cascades to address deregulated proliferation, cell dedifferentiation, apoptosis and fluid secretion. Currently, the only available drug treatments that halt disease progression and improve quality of life in PLD patients are somatostatin analogues. Numerous preclinical studies suggest that targeting components of the signaling pathways that influence cyst development can ameliorate growth of hepatic cysts.

  20. Stroke MRI: pathophysiology, potential and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiehler, J.; Kucinski, T.; Zeumer, H.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRT) is increasingly utilized as the primary imaging modality in major stroke centers. The ability to depict several aspects of individual pathophysiology makes the use of MRI in stroke both attractive and complex. Profound knowledge of the pathophysiology of the imaging findings is crucial for a rational diagnostic workup. The pathophysiology of MRI in stroke will be reviewed considering recent experiences in clinical application, and the potential of stroke MRI will be assessed. Further perspectives like application of 'blood oxygen level dependent' (BOLD) and the use of multiparametric prediction maps will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  1. Rhabdomyolysis: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Patrick A.; Helmstetter, John A.; Kaye, Adam M.; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyolysis is a complex medical condition involving the rapid dissolution of damaged or injured skeletal muscle. Methods This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, causes, presentation, diagnosis, complications, management, and anesthetic considerations related to rhabdomyolysis. Results Any form of muscle damage––and by extension any entity that causes muscle damage––can initiate rhabdomyolysis. One of the most important treatment goals when rhabdomyolysis is suspected is avoiding acute kidney injury. Conclusion All clinicians should be aware of common causes, diagnosis, and treatment options. PMID:25829882

  2. Chemical sensitivity: pathophysiology or pathopsychology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuis, Stephen J

    2013-05-01

    symptoms in some cases. Sustained resolution of the CS state occurs after successful elimination of the accrued body burden of toxicants through natural mechanisms of toxicant bioelimination and/or interventions of clinical detoxification. Despite extensive clinical evidence to support the veracity of this clinical state, many members of the medical community are reluctant to accept this condition as a pathophysiologic disorder. The emerging problem of ubiquitous adverse toxicant exposures in modern society has resulted in escalating numbers of individuals developing a CS disorder. As usual in medical history, iconoclastic ideas and emerging evidence regarding novel disease mechanisms, such as the pathogenesis of CS, have been met with controversy, resistance, and sluggish knowledge translation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pathophysiology of pediatric fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Benninga, Marc A.

    2004-01-01

    This article addresses the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric fecal incontinence in 4 main categories: (1) Functional fecal retention, the withholding of feces because of fear of painful defecation, results in constipation and overflow soiling. Treatment includes dietary changes, use of laxatives,

  4. Clinical manifestations and pathophysiology of lissencephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Shizuo; Sasaki, Koji; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ando, Shoko; Tamura, Yasunori; Fukuda, Kuniaki; Furukawa, Seikyo; Matsumoto, Satoshi.

    1985-01-01

    Four cases of lissencephaly were analyzed in light of clinical manifestations, CT findings and the state of hydrocephalus. Lissencephaly had been diagnosed mainly by autopsy until CT scan was introduced in the early 1970's. Since then, diagnosis of lissencephaly early in life is possible. Presently the major interest in this congenital CNS anomaly, which is caused by a neuronal migration disorder in the relatively late stages of fetal development, is to learn the dynamic pathophysiological state and management. The purpose of this paper is to analyze those points of lissencephaly in diagnosis during life and possible treatment in the hydrocephalic state. The common findings in CT in all four cases are as follows: No. 1. smooth cortical surface (agyria--pachygyria), No. 2. wide sylvian fissure (complete or incomplete lack of opercularization, No. 3. ventricular dilatation (remarkable bilateral enlargement of lateral ventricle and third ventricle--colpocephaly), No. 4. wide subdural or subarachnoid space in supratentorial region, No. 5. periventricular low density, No. 6. midline cavum, No. 7. normal CT findings in posterior fossa structure. Three out of four patients demonstrated full or bulged and tense anterior fontanella. Because of this suggestion of increased intracranial pressure and enlarged ventricles with periventricular lucency in CT findings, one patient underwent CT cisternography for dynamic analysis of the CSF circulation and continuous ICP monitoring for dynamic evaluation of the ICP pattern. The results revealed very much delayed CSF circulation and intermittently increased. ICP, with pressure waves appearing in 35.7 % of all recordings. (J.P.N.)

  5. Thalassemia: Pathophysiology and management. Part A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fucharoen, S.; Rowley, P.T.; Paul, N.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers divided among the following sections: molecular biology and pathogenesis; pathophysiology - molecular and cellular; clinical manifestations and hematologic changes; cardiopulmonary defects and platelet function; hormones and minerals; and infection and immunology

  6. A vicious circle in chronic lymphoedema pathophysiology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cucchi, F; Rossmeislova, L; Simonsen, L

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lymphoedema is a disease caused by a congenital or acquired damage to the lymphatic system and characterized by complex chains of pathophysiologic events such as lymphatic fluid stasis, chronic inflammation, lymphatic vessels impairment, adipose tissue deposition and fibrosis. These event....... Together, these observations indicate strong reciprocal relationship between lymphatics and adipose tissue and suggest a possible key role of the adipocyte in the pathophysiology of chronic lymphoedema's vicious circle....

  7. Prune-belly syndrome: case series and review of the literature regarding early prenatal diagnosis, epidemiology, genetic factors, treatment, and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonni, Gabriele; Ida, Vito; Alessandro, Ventura; Bonasoni, Maria Paola

    2013-02-01

    Prune-belly syndrome (PBS) is a rare congenital syndrome characterized by deficient abdominal muscles, urinary tract malformation, and in males, cryptorchidism and has an estimated incidence of 1 in 35,000 to 1 in 50,000 live births. The syndrome might be due to severe bladder outlet obstruction or to abdominal muscle deficiency secondary to a migrational defect of the lateral mesoblast between weeks 6 and 7 of pregnancy. The current review of the medical record reports a special focus on epidemiology, genetic factors, early prenatal diagnosis clusters, treatment, and prognosis of PBS.

  8. [Tuberculosis in Amazonian municipalities of the Brazil-Colombia-Peru-Venezuela border: epidemiological situation and risk factors associated with treatment default].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, Elsia Nascimento; Orellana, Jesem Douglas Yamall; Levino, Antônio; Basta, Paulo Cesar

    2013-11-01

    To describe the epidemiological situation and the incidence of tuberculosis and to investigate the factors associated with treatment default in the Amazonian municipalities located in the northern Brazilian international border. This retrospective study employed sociodemographic, clinical, and epidemiological tuberculosis data recorded in the Brazilian Notifiable Diseases Information System (SINAN) between 2001 and 2010. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with treatment default. Tuberculosis affected mostly indigenous peoples (51.9%), males (57.9%), and people aged 25-44 years (31.4%). The predominant clinical presentation was pulmonary (89.7%), yet in 24.5% of the cases the patients did not undergo sputum smear microscopy, and only half received supervised treatment. In 70.0% of the cases notified, patients were discharged as cured. Treatment default was recorded in 10.0% of the patients. Of all deaths, 4.1% were by tuberculosis and other causes, and 1.7% by multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The average incidence by race/color was greater among indigenous peoples, ranging from 202.3/100 000 in 2001 to 65.6/100 000 in 2010. Treatment default was associated with failure to perform the follow-up smear at the second, fourth, and sixth months (OR = 11.9, 95%CI: 7.4-19.0); with resuming treatment after default (OR = 3.0, 95%CI: 1.5-5.9); and with living in specific subregions, particularly the Alto Solimões region (OR = 6.7, 95%CI: 4.6-9.8). The present results show a high incidence of tuberculosis in the Amazon portion of the northern Brazilian international border, especially among indigenous peoples. Considering the socio-cultural specificities of these populations and the poor tuberculosis control in this area, the authors of the study conclude that the integration of different national health systems is both necessary and urgent.

  9. Pathophysiology of heatstroke in dogs - revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchim, Yaron; Horowitz, Michal; Aroch, Itamar

    2017-01-01

    Heatstroke results from a failure to dissipate accumulated heat during exposure to hot environments, or during strenuous physical exercise under heat stress. It is characterized by core body temperatures > 41°C, with central nervous system dysfunction. Functional morphology and thermoregulatory effectors differences between dogs and humans may require special heatstroke protective adaptations in dogs, however, the risk factors for developing heatstroke are similar in both. In dogs, these include hot, especially highly humid environments, excessive physical activity, obesity, large (>15 kg) body weight, being of certain breed (e.g., Labrador retrievers and brachycephalic breeds), upper airway obstruction and prolonged seizures. Lack of acclimation to heat and physical fitness decreases the survival of heat stroked dogs. At the systemic level, blood pooling within the large internal organs (e.g., spleen, liver) is a major contributor to the development of shock and consequent intestinal ischemia, hypoxia and endothelial hyperpermeability, commonly occurring in heatstroke patients. Evoked serious complications include rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and ultimately, sepsis and disseminated intravascular coagulation. The most common clinical signs in dogs include acute collapse, tachypnea, spontaneous bleeding, shock signs and mental abnormalities, including depression, disorientation or delirium, seizures, stupor and coma. In such dogs, presence of peripheral blood nucleated red blood cells uniquely occurs, and is a highly sensitive diagnostic and prognostic biomarker. Despite early, appropriate body cooling, and intensive supportive treatment, with no available specific treatment to ameliorate the severe inflammatory and hemostatic derangements, the mortality rate is around 50%, similar to that of human heatstroke victims. This review discusses the pathophysiology of canine heatstroke from a veterinarian's point of view

  10. Tics and Tourette's: update on pathophysiology and tic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganos, Christos

    2016-08-01

    To describe recent advances in the pathophysiology of tics and Tourette syndrome, and novel insights on tic control. The cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops are implicated in generation of tics. Disruption of GABAergic inhibition lies at the core of tic pathophysiology, but novel animal models also implicate cholinergic and histaminergic neurotransmission. Tourette syndrome patients have altered awareness of volition and enhanced formation of habits. Premonitory urges are not the driving force behind all tics. The intensity of premonitory urges depends on patients' capacity to perceive interoceptive signals. The insular cortex is a key structure in this process. The trait intensity of premonitory urges is not a prerequisite of voluntary tic inhibition, a distinct form of motor control. Voluntary tic inhibition is most efficient in the body parts that tic the least. The prefrontal cortex is associated with the capacity to inhibit tics. The management of tics includes behavioral, pharmacological and surgical interventions. Treatment recommendations differ based on patients' age. The study of Tourette syndrome pathophysiology involves different neural disciplines and provides novel, exciting insights of brain function in health and disease. These in turn provide the basis for innovative treatment approaches of tics and their associations.

  11. Pathophysiological relationships between heart failure and depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Deborah W; Akintade, Bimbola; Son, Heesook; Woltz, Patricia; Hunt, Dennis; Friedmann, Erika; Hartung, Mary Kay; Thomas, Sue Ann

    2014-04-01

    Depression and anxiety are common comorbid conditions in patients with heart failure. Patients with heart failure and depression have increased mortality. The association of anxiety with increased mortality in patients with heart failure is not established. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the similarities of the underlying pathophysiology of heart failure, depression, and anxiety by using the Biopsychosocial Holistic Model of Cardiovascular Health. Depression and anxiety affect biological processes of cardiovascular function in patients with heart failure by altering neurohormonal function via activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic dysregulation, and activation of cytokine cascades and platelets. Patients with heart failure and depression or anxiety may exhibit a continued cycle of heart failure progression, increased depression, and increased anxiety. Understanding the underlying pathophysiological relationships in patients with heart failure who experience comorbid depression and/or anxiety is critical in order to implement appropriate treatments, educate patients and caregivers, and educate other health professionals.

  12. Hypertension in women--pathophysiological and clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdine, Serap; Arslan, Eren; Olszanecka, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is the most important risk factor, responsible for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide, both in men and women. Cardiovascular disorders in women are still underestimated, due to lower absolute risk calculations and the underdetection of classical risk factors. In recent years the differences in pathophysiology and the clinical presentation and treatment of cardiac diseases in women have become fields of interest and research. Several studies have examined gender-related differences in the pathophysiology of hypertension, its prevalence and control. The influence of menopause, obesity and salt-sensitivity on the pathogenesis of hypertension in women has been widely investigated. This article presents current data on differences in prevalence, control and mechanisms of hypertension in women.

  13. Pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Venegas-Mariño

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is a disease characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction (UAO, with decreased airflow, intermittent hypoxemia, and awakening during sleep. Two essential factors are related to the pathophysiology of OSAHS: anatomical alterations and reduction or absence of neural control. While studying OSAHS, the site or sites of obstruction of the UA should be identified; they may extend from the nasal wings to the hypopharynx. Another important factor in this syndrome is the nervous influence on muscle tone of the hypopharynx, as well as the changes in blood pH, which are secondary to micro-arousals. Body position and sleep stage determine the severity. The pathophysiology of OSAHS should be understood to properly study a patient and provide the best treatment option.

  14. Clinical epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S W; Bonnett, B

    1987-06-01

    Rational clinical practice requires deductive particularization of diagnostic findings, prognoses, and therapeutic responses from groups of animals (herds) to the individual animal (herd) under consideration This process utilizes concepts, skills, and methods of epidemiology, as they relate to the study of the distribution and determinants of health and disease in populations, and casts them in a clinical perspective.We briefly outline diagnostic strategies and introduce a measure of agreement, called kappa, between clinical diagnoses. This statistic is useful not only as a measure of diagnostic accuracy, but also as a means of quantifying and understanding disagreement between diagnosticians. It is disconcerting to many, clinicians included, that given a general deficit of data on sensitivity and specificity, the level of agreement between many clinical diagnoses is only moderate at best with kappa values of 0.3 to 0.6.Sensitivity, specificity, pretest odds, and posttest probability of disease are defined and related to the interpretation of clinical findings and ancillary diagnostic test results. An understanding of these features and how they relate to ruling-in or ruling-out a diagnosis, or minimizzing diagnostic errors will greatly enhance the diagnostic accuracy of the practitioner, and reduce the frequency of clinical disagreement. The approach of running multiple tests on every patient is not only wasteful and expensive, it is unlikely to improve the ability of the clinician to establish the correct diagnosis.We conclude with a discussion of how to decide on the best therapy, a discussion which centers on, and outlines the key features of, the well designed clinical trial. Like a diagnosis, the results from a clinical trial may not always be definitive, nonetheless it is the best available method of gleaning information about treatment efficacy.

  15. Priapism: etiology, pathophysiology and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Der Horst C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of erectile physiology has improved the prompt diagnosis and treatment of priapism. Priapism is defined as prolonged and persistent erection of the penis without sexual stimulation and failure to subside despite orgasm. Numerous etiologies of this condition are considered. Among others a disturbed detumescence mechanism, which may due to excess release of contractile neurotransmitters, obstruction of draining venules, malfunction of the intrinsic detumescence mechanism or prolonged relaxation of intracavernosal smooth muscle are postulated. Treatment of priapism varies from a conservative medical to a drastic surgical approach. Two main types of priapism; veno-occlusive low flow (ischemic and arterial high flow (non-ischemic, must be distinguished to choose the correct treatment option for each type. Patient history, physical examination, penile hemodynamics and corporeal metabolic blood quality provides distinction between a static or dynamic pathology. Priapism can be treated effectively with intracavernous vasoconstrictive agents or surgical shunting. Alternative options, such as intracavernous injection of methylene blue (MB or selective penile arterial embolization (SPEA, for the management of high and low flow priapism are described and a survey on current treatment modalities is given.

  16. Type 2 diabetes across generations: from pathophysiology to prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Christopher J; Damm, Peter; Prentki, Marc

    2011-07-09

    Type 2 diabetes is now a pandemic and shows no signs of abatement. In this Seminar we review the pathophysiology of this disorder, with particular attention to epidemiology, genetics, epigenetics, and molecular cell biology. Evidence is emerging that a substantial part of diabetes susceptibility is acquired early in life, probably owing to fetal or neonatal programming via epigenetic phenomena. Maternal and early childhood health might, therefore, be crucial to the development of effective prevention strategies. Diabetes develops because of inadequate islet β-cell and adipose-tissue responses to chronic fuel excess, which results in so-called nutrient spillover, insulin resistance, and metabolic stress. The latter damages multiple organs. Insulin resistance, while forcing β cells to work harder, might also have an important defensive role against nutrient-related toxic effects in tissues such as the heart. Reversal of overnutrition, healing of the β cells, and lessening of adipose tissue defects should be treatment priorities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inflammatory and Other Biomarkers: Role in Pathophysiology and Prediction of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Sally K.; De Courten, Barbora; Boyle, Jacqueline A.; Teede, Helena J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding pathophysiology and identifying mothers at risk of major pregnancy complications is vital to effective prevention and optimal management. However, in current antenatal care, understanding of pathophysiology of complications is limited. In gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), risk prediction is mostly based on maternal history and clinical risk factors and may not optimally identify high risk pregnancies. Hence, universal screening is widely recommended. Here, we will explore the literature on GDM and biomarkers including inflammatory markers, adipokines, endothelial function and lipids to advance understanding of pathophysiology and explore risk prediction, with a goal to guide prevention and treatment of GDM. PMID:26110385

  18. Brain microbleeds: Epidemiology and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyano, I; Bravo, N; Miranda, J; Gil-Gregorio, P; Olazarán, J

    2016-06-22

    Brain microbleeds (BMB) are haemosiderin deposits contained within macrophages, which are displayed as hypointense images in some T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences. There are still many questions to be answered about the pathophysiology and clinical relevance of BMB. We conducted a literature review of the main epidemiological, clinical, and anatomical pathology studies of BMB performed in the general population, in patients at risk of or already suffering from a vascular disease, and in patients with cognitive impairment. We analysed the prevalence of BMB, risk factors, and potential pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical implications. The prevalence of BMB is highly variable (3%-27% in the general population, 6%-80% in patients with vascular risk factors or vascular disease, and 16%-45% in patients with cognitive impairment). BMB are associated with ageing, Alzheimer disease (AD), and in particular haemorrhagic or ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. The pathological substrate of BMB is either lipohyalinosis (subcortical BMB) or cerebral amyloid angiopathy (lobar BMB). BMB exacerbate cognitive impairment, possibly through cortical-subcortical and intracortical disconnection, and increase the risk of death, mostly due to vascular causes. BMB also increase the risk of cerebral haemorrhage, particularly in patients with multiple lobar BMB (probable erebral amyloid angiopathy). Therefore, anticoagulant treatment may be contraindicated in these patients. In patients with lower risk of bleeding, the new oral anticoagulants and the combination of clinical and magnetic resonance imaging follow-up could be helpful in the decision-making process. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Depressive disorders and suicide: Epidemiology, risk factors, and burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret, Marta; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luis; Sanchez-Moreno, Jose; Vieta, Eduard

    2013-12-01

    The social and economic impact of mood disorders and suicide is extremely high and may be even higher in coming years, and yet, research in mental health is largely underfunded. This report summarizes the most recent data concerning the epidemiology and burden of depression and suicide, and underlines the most recent initiatives to identify the barriers to effective treatment and prevention of mood disorders. Global cooperation and networks of research networks are proposed. Progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology and subtypes of depression, technological advances, emphasis on early prediction of response and prevention, and a paradigm shift in drug development are crucial to overcome the current challenges posed by increasing rates of depression and suicide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Clinical - Epidemiological characteristics of the Hepatocellular Carcinoma and treatment in the departament of digestive system diseases of the National Hospital "Eduardo Rebagliatti Martins" (HNERM) - ESSALUD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustíos Sánchez, Carla; Díaz Ferrer, Javier; Román Vargas, Rossana; Dávalos Moscol, Milagros; Zumaeta Villena, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (CHC) is one of the leading causes of worldwide cancer mortality. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics, as well as treatment prescribed in patients with this diagnosis. Longitudinal and prospective study that included patients with diagnosis of CHC in the Department of Digestive System at the HNERM-EsSalud between august 2007 and august 2008. We included 36 patients, median age was 60,1 years and 61,1% were male. Cirrhosis was present in 69,1% and median age in this group was 68,9 years, the median age in those without cirrhosis was 40 years (pChild-Pugh score B or C. Symptomatic treatment was prescribed in 44,4% of the patients. Epidemiological features are different between patients with or without cirrhosis. In the first case their characteristics are similar to those described in areas of low risk for CHC; in the second group the characteristics are similar to those described in areas with high risk population. CHC has frequent association with hepatitis B virus. High percentage of patients is diagnosed with an advanced stage of HCC.

  1. Epidemiology of burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokter, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand the epidemiology, treatment and outcomes of specialized burn care in The Netherlands. This thesis is mainly based on historical data of the burn centre in Rotterdam from 1986, combined with historical data from the burn centres in Groningen and Beverwijk from

  2. The epidemiology of acne vulgaris in late adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Darren D; Umari, Tamara; Dunnick, Cory A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Importance Acne vulgaris is the most common skin condition affecting late adolescents across the globe. Although prior studies have evaluated epidemiologic patterns of acne vulgaris in various ethnicities and regions, adequate understanding of the worldwide burden of the disease associated with patients in their late adolescence (15–19-year olds) remains lacking. Objective To assess the global burden of the disease associated with acne vulgaris for late adolescents (15–19-year olds) and provide an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options for acne in this population. Design Database summary study. Setting Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 database. Participants Global Burden of Disease regions comprised countries with prevalence of acne vulgaris between the ages of 15 and 19 years. Main outcomes and measures Geographic region-level disability-adjusted life year rates (per 100,000 persons) associated with acne vulgaris in years 1990 through 2010. Median percentage change in disability-adjusted life year rates was estimated for each region across the specified study period. Conclusion and relevance Acne vulgaris-associated disease burden exhibits global distribution and has continued to grow in prevalence over time within this population. This continued growth suggests an unmet dermatologic need worldwide for this disorder and potential opportunities for improved access and delivery of dermatologic care. Our analysis of the literature reveals numerous opportunities for enhanced patient care. To that end, we highlight some of the effective and promising treatments currently available and address important factors, such as sex, nationality, genetics, pathophysiology, and diet, as they relate to acne vulgaris in late adolescence. PMID:26955297

  3. Sarcoptes mite epidemiology and treatment in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer calves captured for translocation from the Kafue game management area to game ranches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munyeme Musso

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Zambia, translocation of wildlife from National Parks to private owned game ranches demands that only animals free of infectious diseases that could adversely affect the expansion of the wildlife industry should be translocated to game ranches. Sarcoptes mange (Sarcoptes scarbiei has been involved in the reduction of wildlife populations in some species. Results Sarcoptes mange (Sarcoptes scarbiei was detected and eradicated from two herds of African buffalo (Syncerus caffer calves captured in the Kafue GMA in July 2004 and August 2005. The overall prevalence was estimated at 89.5% (77/86. Sex had no influence on the occurrence and severity of the disease. Of the 86 calves used in the study, 72.1% had good body condition scores, 20.9% were fair and 7.0% were poor. Of the 77 infected calves, 53.2% were mildly infected, 28.6% were moderately and 18.2% were severely infected. Body condition score was correlated to the severity of the infection (r = 0.72, p n = 86 at capture. Eradication of Sarcoptes mites from the entire herd using ivermetcin was dependant on the severity of the infection. The overall ability of ivermectin to clear the infection after the first treatment was estimated at 81.8% (n = 77. It increased to 94.8% and 100% after the second and third treatments respectively. Conclusion This is the first report on the epidemiology and treatment of Sarcoptes mange in African buffaloes in Zambia. This study improves our understanding about Sarcoptes scabiei epidemiology and treatment which will have further applications for the safe animal translocation.

  4. Epidemiology, Treatment Efficacy, and Anxiety Aspects of Music Students Affected by Playing-Related Pain: A Retrospective Evaluation with Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Christos I; Hafer, Julia; Lee, André; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2018-03-01

    Playing-related pain (PRP) is a common problem among music students. We retrospectively assessed epidemiological factors that contributed to the manifestation of PRP and evaluated the efficacy of treatment methods used by affected music students. The long-term course of PRP symptoms was also examined, along with current (today) levels of trait anxieties. Demographic and epidemiological data of 186 music students who visited the musicians' outpatient clinic over a 5-year period were retrieved. Of these students, 122 had been diagnosed with PRP and were invited to participate (response rate 61.5%) in a follow-up online survey to: a) estimate the long-term course of their PRP symptoms, b) assess the efficacy of treatment methods they used, and c) assess their current trait anxiety (general and performance-related) using two standardized psychodiagnostic questionnaires. Two-thirds of music students who sought medical care were affected by PRP, with most being affected during their first year of studies, and with 69% having acute rather than chronic pain. The sudden increase in practice time was the main triggering factor for PRP (but not for non-PRP-related problems). Concerning the course of PRP, almost all students recovered or improved significantly. Students reported that "active" treatment methods (e.g., physical activities) were more effective than "passive" methods (e.g., oral medications). Psychodiagnostic questionnaires indicated that about 40% of PRP-affected students currently had increased levels of trait anxieties (music and non-music related), possibly warranting further medical assistance. PRP in music students occurs mainly at the beginning of their studies and has a good prognosis, although recovery may be lengthy. It is necessary to provide students with early information about PRP and about the multidimensional treatment framework that allows for individualized care of PRP in affected music students.

  5. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Diane Fischer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1, which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 hours post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 hours. Post-TBI administration of Mdivi-1, a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the hippocampus and improved

  6. Rinite alérgica: aspectos epidemiológicos, diagnósticos e terapêuticos Allergic Rhinitis: epidemiological aspects, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio da Cunha Ibiapina

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo tem como objetivo revisar a literatura a respeito da rinite alérgica quanto aos aspectos epidemiológicos, clínicos, diagnósticos e terapêuticos. A revisão da bibliografia foi realizada utilizando-se as bases de dados Medline, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde e HighWire, nos últimos trinta anos, utilizando-se os descritores allergic rhinitis, epidemiology, diagnosis, e treatment. Foram selecionados 60 artigos. Este estudo destaca o aumento na prevalência da rinite alérgica, sua associação com a asma, os critérios diagnósticos e seu tratamento. A classificação da rinite alérgica é apresentada, bem como as estratégias de tratamento. As modalidades terapêuticas apresentadas e discutidas são anti-histamínicos, corticóides, imunoterapia, antileucotrienos, cromoglicato dissódico e anticorpos anti-IgE, bem como a redução da exposição aos alérgenos. Finalmente, ressalta-se a importância da abordagem da rinite alérgica em saúde pública.This study was a review of the literature on the epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of allergic rhinitis. Bibliographic searches were based on the information contained within the Medline, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature and HighWire databases, covering the last thirty years and using the following search terms: 'allergic rhinitis', 'epidemiology', 'diagnosis' and 'treatment'. Sixty articles were selected. This study describes the increase in the prevalence of allergic rhinitis, its relationship with asthma, the diagnostic criteria and the treatment. The classification of allergic rhinitis and strategies for its treatment are presented. Therapeutic modalities presented and discussed include the administration of antihistamines, corticosteroids, immunotherapy, anti-leukotrienes, sodium cromoglycate and anti-IgE antibodies, as well as minimizing exposure to inhaled allergens. Finally, the importance of

  7. Imaging Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology with PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Porcello Schilling

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alzheimer's disease (AD has been reconceptualised as a dynamic pathophysiological process characterized by preclinical, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and dementia stages. Positron emission tomography (PET associated with various molecular imaging agents reveals numerous aspects of dementia pathophysiology, such as brain amyloidosis, tau accumulation, neuroreceptor changes, metabolism abnormalities and neuroinflammation in dementia patients. In the context of a growing shift toward presymptomatic early diagnosis and disease-modifying interventions, PET molecular imaging agents provide an unprecedented means of quantifying the AD pathophysiological process, monitoring disease progression, ascertaining whether therapies engage their respective brain molecular targets, as well as quantifying pharmacological responses. In the present study, we highlight the most important contributions of PET in describing brain molecular abnormalities in AD.

  8. Current concepts in the pathophysiology of glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Renu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is characterized by changes in the optic disc and visual field defects. The elevated intraocular pressure was considered the prime factor responsible for the glaucomatous optic neuropathy involving death of retinal ganglion cells and their axons. Extensive investigations into the pathophysiology of glaucoma now reveal the role of multiple factors in the development of retinal ganglion cell death. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy is crucial in the development of better therapeutic options. This review is an effort to summarize the current concepts in the pathophysiology of glaucoma so that newer therapeutic targets can be recognized. The literature available in the National Medical Library and online Pubmed search engine was used for literature review.

  9. [Neural pathophysiology of cancer anorexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lara, K; Sosa-Sánchez, R; Green-Renner, D; Méndez-Sánchez, N

    2011-01-01

    Approximately two thirds of cancer patients at advanced stages of the disease suffer from anorexia. Defined as the loss of the desire to eat, anorexia lower the energy intake which further exacerbates a progressive deterioration of the patient nutritional status. Malnutrition has a large impact on morbidity and mortality affecting the quality of life. Cancer anorexia etiology is multifactorial including complex interactions among the tumor, host metabolism and antineoplastic treatment. New related theories include peripheral and brain mechanisms affecting hypothalamic pathways; inducing behavioral and metabolic failure of responses to energy balance. The aim of this review is to describe actual concepts involved in the pathogenesis of cancer anorexia with special interest in brain mechanisms. Anorexia and reduced food intake are important issues in the management of cancer patients, more knowledge about pathogenic mechanism is needed to improve therapeutic options, prognosis and quality of life in cancer patients.

  10. The epidemiology of acne vulgaris in late adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn DD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Darren D Lynn,1 Tamara Umari,1 Cory A Dunnick,2,3 Robert P Dellavalle2–4 1Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 2Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, 3Dermatology Service, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver, 4Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA Importance: Acne vulgaris is the most common skin condition affecting late adolescents across the globe. Although prior studies have evaluated epidemiologic patterns of acne vulgaris in various ethnicities and regions, adequate understanding of the worldwide burden of the disease associated with patients in their late adolescence (15–19-year olds remains lacking. Objective: To assess the global burden of the disease associated with acne vulgaris for late adolescents (15–19-year olds and provide an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options for acne in this population. Design: Database summary study. Setting: Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 database. Participants: Global Burden of Disease regions comprised countries with prevalence of acne vulgaris between the ages of 15 and 19 years. Main outcomes and measures: Geographic region-level disability-adjusted life year rates (per 100,000 persons associated with acne vulgaris in years 1990 through 2010. Median percentage change in disability-adjusted life year rates was estimated for each region across the specified study period. Conclusion and relevance: Acne vulgaris-associated disease burden exhibits global distribution and has continued to grow in prevalence over time within this population. This continued growth suggests an unmet dermatologic need worldwide for this disorder and potential opportunities for improved access and delivery of dermatologic care. Our analysis of the literature reveals numerous

  11. Evaluation of Treatment Patterns and Survival Outcomes in Elderly Pancreatic Cancer Patients: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaib, Walid L; Jones, Jeb S; Goodman, Michael; Sarmiento, Juan M; Maithel, Shishir K; Cardona, Kenneth; Kane, Sujata; Wu, Christina; Alese, Olatunji B; El-Rayes, Bassel F

    2018-02-14

    Management of pancreatic cancer (PC) in elderly patients is unknown; clinical trials exclude patients with comorbidities and those of extreme age. This study evaluated treatment patterns and survival outcomes in elderly PC patients using linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and Medicare data. Histology codes 8140, 8500, 8010, 8560, 8490, 8000, 8260, 8255, 8261, 8263, 8020, 8050, 8141, 8144, 8210, 8211, or 8262 in Medicare Parts A and B were identified. Data regarding demographic, characteristics, treatments, and vital status between 1998 and 2009 were collected from the SEER. Determinants of treatment receipt and overall survival were examined using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models, respectively. A total of 5,975 patients met inclusion. The majority of patients were non-Hispanic whites (85%) and female (55%). Most cases presented with locoregional stage disease (74%); 41% received only chemotherapy, 30% chemotherapy and surgery, 10% surgery alone, 3% radiation, and 16% no cancer-directed therapy. Patients with more advanced cancer, older age, and those residing in areas of poverty were more likely to receive no treatment. Among patients 66-74 years of age with locoregional disease, surgery alone (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.54; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39-0.74) and surgery in combination with chemotherapy (HR = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.53-0.91) showed survival benefit as compared with the no treatment group. Among patients ≥75 years of age with locoregional disease, surgery alone (HR = 2.04; 95% CI: 0.87-4.8) or in combination with chemotherapy (HR = 1.59; 95% CI: 0.87-2.91) was not associated with better survival. Treatment modality and survival differs by age and stage. Low socioeconomic status appears to be a major barrier to the receipt of PC therapy among Medicare patients. Elderly patients with cancer are under-represented on clinical trials and usually have comorbid illnesses. The management of elderly

  12. Dry eye disease: pathophysiology, classification, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Henry D

    2008-04-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a multifactorial disorder of the tear film and ocular surface that results in eye discomfort, visual disturbance, and often ocular surface damage. Although recent research has made progress in elucidating DED pathophysiology, currently there are no uniform diagnostic criteria. This article discusses the normal anatomy and physiology of the lacrimal functional unit and the tear film; the pathophysiology of DED; DED etiology, classification, and risk factors; and DED diagnosis, including symptom assessment and the roles of selected diagnostic tests.

  13. The pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Iwanami, Masaoki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Hirata, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a sensorimotor disorder that is frequently associated with periodic leg movements (PLMS). RLS is generally considered to be a central nervous system (CNS)-related disorder although no specific lesion has been found to be associated with the syndrome. Reduced intracortical inhibition has been demonstrated in RLS by transcranial magnetic stimulation. Some MRI studies have revealed the presence of morphologic changes in the somatosensory cortex, motor cortex and thalamic gray matter. The results of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) studies showed that the limbic and opioid systems also play important roles in the pathophysiology of RLS. A functional MRI study revealed abnormal bilateral cerebellar and thalamic activation during the manifestation of sensory symptoms, with additional red nucleus and reticular formation activity during PLMS. PLMS is likely to occur in patients with spinal cord lesions, and some patients with sensory polyneuropathy may exhibit RLS symptoms. RLS symptoms seem to depend on abnormal spinal sensorimotor integration at the spinal cord level and abnormal central somatosensory processing. PLMS appears to depend on increased excitability of the spinal cord and a decreased supraspinal inhibitory mechanism from the A11 diencephalic dopaminergic system. RLS symptoms respond very dramatically to dopaminergic therapy. The results of analysis by PET and SPECT studies of striatal D2 receptor binding in humans are inconclusive. However, studies in animal models suggest that the participation of the A11 dopaminergic system and the D3 receptor in RLS symptoms. The symptoms of RLS are aggravated in those with iron deficiency, and iron treatment ameliorates the symptoms in some patients. Neuroimaging studies, analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid, and studies on postmortem tissue and use of animal models have indicated that low brain iron concentrations and dysfunction of

  14. Sibilância no lactente: epidemiologia, investigação e tratamento Wheezing in infancy: epidemiology, investigation, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herberto José Chong Neto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar revisão de aspectos epidemiológicos, de investigação e tratamento da sibilância em lactentes. FONTES DOS DADOS: Foram avaliados os estudos disponíveis na base de dados MEDLINE utilizando os descritores "sibilosc, "lactentes", "diagnóstico", "tratamento" e "crianças", e estudos encontrados com a ferramenta Google utilizando o tema "Estudio Internacional de Sibilancias en Lactantes". SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Foi observada globalmente grande variabilidade na prevalência de sibilância em lactentes. Os fatores associados à sibilância na infância diferem entre os centros. O tratamento de lactentes sibilantes ainda é controverso e depende de diagnóstico preciso. A história clínica e o exame físico são fundamentais para o diagnóstico. CONCLUSÕES: A padronização de método pode demonstrar dados relevantes sobre a epidemiologia e o tratamento da sibilância em nosso país para comparação entre os centros envolvidos.OBJECTIVE: To perform a review of the epidemiological aspects of investigating and treating wheezing in infants. SOURCES: A search was run on MEDLINE using the keywords "wheezing," "infants," "diagnosis," "treatment," and "children," and Google was also used to search for "Estudio Internacional de Sibilancias en Lactantes." SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: The prevalence of wheezing in infants varies greatly around the world. The factors associated with wheezing in infants are different at different research centers. Treatment of wheezing infants is still controversial and is dependent on a precise diagnosis. Clinical history and physical examination are fundamental to diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: A standardized method could reveal data of relevance to the epidemiology and treatment of wheezing in Brazil and allow comparisons between different participating centers.

  15. Epidemiological causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological methods, which combine population thinking and group comparisons, can primarily identify causes of disease in populations. There is therefore a tension between our intuitive notion of a cause, which we want to be deterministic and invariant at the individual level, and the epidemiological notion of causes, which are invariant only at the population level. Epidemiologists have given heretofore a pragmatic solution to this tension. Causal inference in epidemiology consists in checking the logical coherence of a causality statement and determining whether what has been found grossly contradicts what we think we already know: how strong is the association? Is there a dose-response relationship? Does the cause precede the effect? Is the effect biologically plausible? Etc. This approach to causal inference can be traced back to the English philosophers David Hume and John Stuart Mill. On the other hand, the mode of establishing causality, devised by Jakob Henle and Robert Koch, which has been fruitful in bacteriology, requires that in every instance the effect invariably follows the cause (e.g., inoculation of Koch bacillus and tuberculosis). This is incompatible with epidemiological causality which has to deal with probabilistic effects (e.g., smoking and lung cancer), and is therefore invariant only for the population.

  16. [Indigenous peoples, HIV and public policy in Latin America: an exploration of the current situations of epidemiological prevalence, prevention, care and timely treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Patricia; Muñoz, Rubén; Stival, Matías

    2017-01-01

    This article aims to describe and analyze the situations of epidemiological prevalence, prevention, care and treatment of HIV in indigenous populations of Latin America. In order to do so, 304 published materials - including declarations, public policy and health program protocols, case studies and literature reviews with local, national and regional scopes - were identified, classified and analyzed. The differential social vulnerability to HIV infection and the inequity in health care access among indigenous populations can be attributed to the juxtaposition of factors such as structural violence, gender, racism, and discrimination due health condition (living with HIV) as well as the subordinated position of indigenous peoples in societies stratified not only socially and economically but also ethnically and culturally. The few studies done in the region on epidemiological prevalence, morbidity and mortality that are disaggregated by ethnicity reveal alarming data highlighting the need for further information on the epidemic in this population so as to address its repercussions in terms of prevention, care and timely follow-up.

  17. Indigenous peoples, HIV and public policy in Latin America: an exploration of the current situations of epidemiological prevalence, prevention, care and timely treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ponce

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to describe and analyze the situations of epidemiological prevalence, prevention, care and treatment of HIV in indigenous populations of Latin America. In order to do so, 304 published materials – including declarations, public policy and health program protocols, case studies and literature reviews with local, national and regional scopes – were identified, classified and analyzed. The differential social vulnerability to HIV infection and the inequity in health care access among indigenous populations can be attributed to the juxtaposition of factors such as structural violence, gender, racism, and discrimination due health condition (living with HIV as well as the subordinated position of indigenous peoples in societies stratified not only socially and economically but also ethnically and culturally. The few studies done in the region on epidemiological prevalence, morbidity and mortality that are disaggregated by ethnicity reveal alarming data highlighting the need for further information on the epidemic in this population so as to address its repercussions in terms of prevention, care and timely follow-up.

  18. Pathophysiology of valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y I; Sun, Rongrong; Li, Xianchi; Liu, Min; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Peiying

    2016-04-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is caused by either damage or defect in one of the four heart valves, aortic, mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary. Defects in these valves can be congenital or acquired. Age, gender, tobacco use, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and type II diabetes contribute to the risk of disease. VHD is an escalating health issue with a prevalence of 2.5% in the United States alone. Considering the likely increase of the aging population worldwide, the incidence of acquired VHD is expected to increase. Technological advances are instrumental in identifying congenital heart defects in infants, thereby adding to the growing VHD population. Almost one-third of elderly individuals have echocardiographic or radiological evidence of calcific aortic valve (CAV) sclerosis, an early and subclinical form of CAV disease (CAVD). Of individuals ages >60, ~2% suffer from disease progression to its most severe form, calcific aortic stenosis. Surgical intervention is therefore required in these patients as no effective pharmacotherapies exist. Valvular calcium load and valve biomineralization are orchestrated by the concerted action of diverse cell-dependent mechanisms. Signaling pathways important in skeletal morphogenesis are also involved in the regulation of cardiac valve morphogenesis, CAVD and the pathobiology of cardiovascular calcification. CAVD usually occurs without any obvious symptoms in early stages over a long period of time and symptoms are identified at advanced stages of the disease, leading to a high rate of mortality. Aortic valve replacement is the only primary treatment of choice. Biomarkers such as asymmetric dimethylarginine, fetuin-A, calcium phosphate product, natriuretic peptides and osteopontin have been useful in improving outcomes among various disease states. This review, highlights the current understanding of the biology of VHD, with particular reference to molecular and cellular aspects of its regulation. Current clinical questions

  19. The possible role of gastrointestinal endocrine cells in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Hausken, Trygve; Gilja, Odd Helge; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar

    2017-02-01

    The etiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is unknown, but several factors appear to play a role in its pathophysiology, including abnormalities of the gastrointestinal endocrine cells. The present review illuminates the possible role of gastrointestinal hormones in the pathophysiology of IBS and the possibility of utilizing the current knowledge in treating the disease. Areas covered: Research into the intestinal endocrine cells and their possible role in the pathophysiology of IBS is discussed. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells in IBS patients are revealed. Expert commentary: The abnormalities observed in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells in IBS patients explains their visceral hypersensitivity, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and abnormal intestinal secretion, as well as the interchangeability of symptoms over time. Clarifying the role of the intestinal stem cells in the pathophysiology of IBS may lead to new treatment methods for IBS.

  20. Epidemiological and Clinical Baseline Characteristics as Predictive Biomarkers of Response to Anti-VEGF Treatment in Patients with Neovascular AMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miltiadis K. Tsilimbaris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To review the current literature investigating patient response to antivascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF therapy in the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD and to identify baseline characteristics that might predict response. Method. A literature search of the PubMed database was performed, using the keywords: AMD, anti-VEGF, biomarker, optical coherence tomography, treatment outcome, and predictor. The search was limited to articles published from 2006 to date. Exclusion criteria included phase 1 trials, case reports, studies focusing on indications other than nAMD, and oncology. Results. A total of 1467 articles were identified, of which 845 were excluded. Of the 622 remaining references, 47 met all the search criteria and were included in this review. Conclusion. Several baseline characteristics correlated with anti-VEGF treatment response, including best-corrected visual acuity, age, lesion size, and retinal thickness. The majority of factors were associated with disease duration, suggesting that longer disease duration before treatment results in worse treatment outcomes. This highlights the need for early treatment for patients with nAMD to gain optimal treatment outcomes. Many of the identified baseline characteristics are interconnected and cannot be evaluated in isolation; therefore multivariate analyses will be required to determine any specific relationship with treatment response.

  1. Epidemiologic Determinants Affecting Cigarette Smoking Cessation: A Retrospective Study in a National Health System (SSN) Treatment Service in Rome (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, M.G.; Pana, A.; Maurici, M.; Fusconi, E.; Magnatta, R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This retrospective study aims to evaluate epidemiologic characteristics of patients attending stop smoking courses, based on group therapy, testing their influence on smoking cessation in univariate and multivariate model. A total of 123 patients were included in this study. Mean age was 53 11). Sixty-seven percent were women. At the end of the courses 66% of patients stopped smoking, after 12 months only 39% remained abstinent. Patients younger than 50 years statistically tended to continue smoking 6 months (P=.02- R.R.= 1.49, C.I. 95%: 1.06-2.44) and 12 months (P=.03-R.R.1.37, C.I. 95%: 1.02-2.52) after the end of the courses. A low self-confidence in quitting smoking was significantly related to continuing tobacco consumption after 6 months (P=.016-R.R.= 1.84, C.I. 95%: 1.14-2.99). Low adherence to therapeutic program was statistically associated to maintenance of tobacco use at 6 months (P=.006-R.R.= 1.76, C.I. 95%: 1.32-2.35) and 12 months (P=.050-R.R.= 1.45, C.I. 95%: 1.11-1.88). This association was confirmed at 6 months in the analysis performed on logistic regression model (P=.013).

  2. Pathophysiology of Portal Hypertension and Its Clinical Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeon Seok; Shah, Vijay H

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis. Intrahepatic vascular resistance due to architectural distortion and intrahepatic vasoconstriction, increased portal blood flow due to splanchnic vasodilatation, and development of collateral circulation have been considered as major factors for the development of portal hypertension. Recently, sinusoidal remodeling and angiogenesis have been focused as potential etiologic factors and various researchers have tried to improve portal hypertension by modulating these new targets. This article reviews potential new treatments in the context of portal hypertension pathophysiology concepts. PMID:25755320

  3. Obesity and Pulmonary Hypertension: A Review of Pathophysiologic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott E. Friedman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a potentially life-threatening condition arising from a wide variety of pathophysiologic mechanisms. Effective treatment requires a systematic diagnostic approach to identify all reversible mechanisms. Many of these mechanisms are relevant to those afflicted with obesity. The unique mechanisms of PH in the obese include obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, anorexigen use, cardiomyopathy of obesity, and pulmonary thromboembolic disease. Novel mechanisms of PH in the obese include endothelial dysfunction and hyperuricemia. A wide range of effective therapies exist to mitigate the disability of PH in the obese.

  4. Clinical, epidemiological and treatment failure data among HIV-1 non-B-infected patients in the Spanish AIDS Research Network Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrecilla García, Esther; Yebra Sanz, Gonzalo; Llácer-Delicado, Teresa; Rubio García, Rafael; González-García, Juan; García García, Federico; López-Aldeguer, José; Asensi Álvarez, Víctor; Holguín Fernández, África

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of HIV-1 non-B variants is increasing in Spain, showing a higher number of transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDR) since 2002. This study presents the features of non-B-infected patients enrolled in the cohort of antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve HIV-infected patients included in the Research Network on HIV/AIDS (CoRIS). The study includes a selected group of HIV-1 non-B-infected subjects from 670 subjects with pol sequences collected from 2004 to 2008 in the CoRIS cohort. Epidemiological-clinical-virological data were analyzed since cohort entry until October 2011, considering the presence or absence of treatment failure (TF). Eighty two non-B infected subjects with known HIV-1 variants were selected from 2004 to 2008 in the CoRIS cohort, being mainly female, immigrants, infected by recombinant viruses, and by heterosexual route. They had an intermediate TDR rate (9.4%), a high rate of TF (25.6%), of losses to follow-up (35%), of coinfections (32.9%), and baseline CD4+ counts ≥350cells/mm(3) (61.8%). Non-B subjects with TF showed higher rates of heterosexual infection (85.7% vs. 69.5%, pHIV-1 non-B-infected patients in Spain had a particular epidemiological and clinical profile that should be considered during their clinical management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Epidemiology and Self-Treatment of Travelers’ Diarrhea in a Large, Prospective Cohort of Department of Defense Beneficiaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Tahaniyat; Maguire, Jason D.; Grant, Edward M.; Fraser, Jamie; Ganesan, Anuradha; Johnson, Mark D.; Deiss, Robert G.; Riddle, Mark S.; Burgess, Timothy; Tribble, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infectious diarrhea is a common problem among travelers. Expert guidelines recommend the prompt use of antibiotics for self-treatment of moderate or severe traveler’s diarrhea (TD). There is limited data on whether travelers follow these self-treatment guidelines. We evaluated the risk factors associated with TD, use of TD self-treatment, and risk of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) during travel. Methods Department of Defense beneficiaries traveling outside the US for ≤ 6.5 months were enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Participants received pre- and post-travel surveys, and could opt into a travel illness diary and follow-up surveys for symptoms of IBS. Standard definitions were used to assess for TD and IBS. Sub-optimal self-treatment was defined as use of antibiotics (with or without antidiarrheal agents) for mild TD, or use of antidiarrheals alone or no self-treatment in cases of moderate or severe TD. Results Twenty-four percent of participants (270/1120) met criteria for TD. The highest incidence was recorded in Africa (8.6 cases/100 person-weeks, 95% CI: 6.7–10.5). Two hundred and twelve TD cases provided information regarding severity and self-treatment: 89 (42%) had mild TD and 123 (58%) had moderate or severe TD. Moderate or severe TD was independently associated with suboptimal self-treatment (OR 10.4 [95% CI: 4.92–22.0]). Time to last unformed stool did not differ between optimal and suboptimal self-treatment. IBS occurred in 4.5% (7/154) of TD cases and 3.1% (16/516) of patients without TD (p=0.39). Among TD cases, a lower incidence of IBS was noted in participants who took antibiotics (4.8% (5/105) vs. 2.2% (1/46)), but the difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.60). Conclusions Our results suggest the underutilization of antibiotics in travelers with moderate or severe TD. Further studies are needed to systematically evaluate pre-travel instruction and traveler adherence to self-treatment guidelines, and the

  6. The leukemias: Epidemiologic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linet, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Particularly geared to physicians and cancer researchers, this study of the epidemiology and etiology of leukemia analyzes the four major leukemia subtypes in terms of genetic and familial determinant factors and examines the incidence, distribution and frequency of reported leukemia clusters. Linet discusses the connection between other types of malignancies, their treatments, and the subsequent development of leukemia and evaluates the impact on leukemia onset of such environmental factors as radiation therapy, drugs, and occupational hazards

  7. CLINICO - EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY AND TREATMENT OUTCOME OF EALES’ DISEASE AT A TERTIARY EYE CARE HOSPITAL IN EASTERN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijnya Birajita

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eales’ disease is an idiopathic inflammatory venous occlusion that primarily affects the peripheral retina of adults. Retinal changes include perivascular phlebitis, peripheral non - perfusion, and neovascularization. The prese nt - day modalities of treatment are confined to corticosteroids, anti - VEGF (Vasculo - endothelial growth factor therapy, and photocoagulation with or without anterior retinal cryoablation, and vitrectomy at various stages of the disease process. AIM : This study was conducted to study the age and sex distribution along with the mode of presentation of Eales disease. The natural course, aetiopathogenesis, treatment outcome in the study population was also studied. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this descriptiv e study, 63 eyes of 37 newly diagnosed cases of Eales disease were enrolled. The demographic profile and clinical parameters of each patient were studied with special reference to place of origin, age and sex, mode of presentation, and treatment outcome. A ll patients underwent complete systemic and ophthalmologic examinations. Study patients were classified according to the stage of their disease and treated accordingly. RESULTS: Young males (21 - 30 years were mostly affected and 70% had bilateral presentat ion. 61% presented with symptoms related to posterior segment disease. Recorded best corrected visual acuity were 6/6 - 6/12 in 44.5%, 6/12 - 6/60 in 20% and <6/60 in 36.5%. 2 patients were kept on observation, 17 with medical treatment alone, 10 with photocoa gulation alone, 3 with photocoagulation and medical treatment and 5 were taken for vitreo - retinal surgery. Good visual recovery was observed in all subgroups at subsequent follow - up visits. CONCLUSION: As noted by this study, Eales disease is a disease mos tly in the young. These patients can present with no typical symptom or can be asymptomatic. Staging of the disease at presentation is important and correct treatment options should be

  8. Translational Epidemiology in Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Myrna M.; Brown, Alan S.; Talati, Ardesheer

    2012-01-01

    Translational research generally refers to the application of knowledge generated by advances in basic sciences research translated into new approaches for diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of disease. This direction is called bench-to-bedside. Psychiatry has similarly emphasized the basic sciences as the starting point of translational research. This article introduces the term translational epidemiology for psychiatry research as a bidirectional concept in which the knowledge generated from the bedside or the population can also be translated to the benches of laboratory science. Epidemiologic studies are primarily observational but can generate representative samples, novel designs, and hypotheses that can be translated into more tractable experimental approaches in the clinical and basic sciences. This bedside-to-bench concept has not been explicated in psychiatry, although there are an increasing number of examples in the research literature. This article describes selected epidemiologic designs, providing examples and opportunities for translational research from community surveys and prospective, birth cohort, and family-based designs. Rapid developments in informatics, emphases on large sample collection for genetic and biomarker studies, and interest in personalized medicine—which requires information on relative and absolute risk factors—make this topic timely. The approach described has implications for providing fresh metaphors to communicate complex issues in interdisciplinary collaborations and for training in epidemiology and other sciences in psychiatry. PMID:21646577

  9. Epidemiology of acute poisoning in children presenting to the poisoning treatment center at Ain Shams University in Cairo, Egypt, 2009–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Sonya M. S.; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Hayes, Bryan D.; El-Setouhy, Maged; Smith, Gordon S.; Sakr, Mahmoud Lotfy; Tawfik, Hany; Klein-Schwartz, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pediatric poisonings represent a major and preventable cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Epidemiologic information about poisoning among children in many lower- and middle-income countries is scarce. This study describes the epidemiology of acute poisonings in children presenting to Ain Shams University's Poisoning Treatment Center (ASU-PTC) in Cairo and determines the causative agents and characteristics of acute poisoning in several pediatric age groups. Methods This retrospective study involved acutely poisoned patients, 0 to 18 years of age, who presented to the ASU-PTC between 1/1/2009 and 12/31/2013. Data were extracted from electronic records maintained by the ASU-PTC. Collected data included demographics, substance of exposure, circumstances of the poisoning, patient disposition, and outcome. Results During the 5-year study period, 38,470 patients meeting our criteria were treated by the ASU-PTC; 19,987 (52%) were younger than 6 years of age; 4,196 (11%) were 6 to 12 years; and 14,287 (37%) were >12 years. Unintentional poisoning accounted for 68.5% of the ingestions, though among adolescents 84.1% of ingestions were with self-harm intent. In all age groups, the most frequent causative drugs were non-opioid analgesics, antipyretics, and antirheumatics. The most common nonpharmaceutical agents were corrosives in preschool children and pesticides in adolescents. Most patients had no/minor effects (29,174 [75.8%]); hospitalization rates were highest among adolescents. There were 119 deaths (case fatality rate of 0.3), primarily from pesticide ingestion. Conclusion Poisoning in preschool children is mainly unintentional and commonly due to nonpharmaceutical agents while poisoning in adolescents is mainly intentional (self-harm). Pesticides, mainly organophosphorous compounds and carbamates, were the most frequent agent leading to morbidity and mortality. PMID:26653953

  10. Epidemiology of acute poisoning in children presenting to the poisoning treatment center at Ain Shams University in Cairo, Egypt, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Sonya M S; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Hirshon, John Mark; Hayes, Bryan D; El-Setouhy, Maged; Smith, Gordon S; Sakr, Mahmoud Lotfy; Tawfik, Hany; Klein-Schwartz, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric poisonings represent a major and preventable cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Epidemiologic information about poisoning among children in many lower- and middle-income countries is scarce. This study describes the epidemiology of acute poisonings in children presenting to Ain Shams University's Poisoning Treatment Center (ASU-PTC) in Cairo and determines the causative agents and characteristics of acute poisoning in several pediatric age groups. This retrospective study involved acutely poisoned patients, 0-18 years of age, who presented to the ASU-PTC between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. Data were extracted from electronic records maintained by the ASU-PTC. Collected data included demographics, substance of exposure, circumstances of the poisoning, patient disposition, and outcome. During the 5-year study period, 38 470 patients meeting our criteria were treated by the ASU-PTC; 19 987 (52%) were younger than 6 years of age; 4196 (11%) were 6-12 years; and 14 287 (37%) were >12 years. Unintentional poisoning accounted for 68.5% of the ingestions, though among adolescents 84.1% of ingestions were with self-harm intent. In all age groups, the most frequent causative drugs were non-opioid analgesics, antipyretics, and antirheumatics. The most common nonpharmaceutical agents were corrosives in preschool children and pesticides in adolescents. Most patients had no/minor effects (29 174 [75.8%]); hospitalization rates were highest among adolescents. There were 119 deaths (case fatality rate of 0.3), primarily from pesticide ingestion. Poisoning in preschool children is mainly unintentional and commonly due to nonpharmaceutical agents whereas poisoning in adolescents is mainly intentional (self-harm). Pesticides, mainly organophosphorous compounds and carbamates, were the most frequent agents leading to morbidity and mortality.

  11. Pathophysiology of spontaneous venous gas embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Albertine, K. H.; Pisarello, J. B.; Flores, N. D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of controllable degrees and durations of continuous isobaric counterdiffusion venous gas embolism to investigate effects of venous gas embolism upon blood, cardiovascular, and respiratory gas exchange function, as well as pathological effects upon the lung and its microcirculation is discussed. Use of N2O/He counterdiffusion permitted performance of the pathophysiologic and pulmonary microstructural effects at one ATA without hyperbaric or hypobaric exposures.

  12. Otosclerosis update (1). Pathophysiology and diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kaoru; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Saito, Hideyuki; Kanzaki, Sho; Okamoto, Yasuhide; Mizutari, Kunio; Suzuki, Takashi; Oishi, Naoki

    2009-01-01

    Otosclerosis is an otological disease that typicaly causes conductive hearing loss. This disease is an important clinical entity since hearing impairment in these case can be dramatically improved by surgery. In this review paper, we review recent research into the pathophysiology of otosclerosis and summarize clinical features, audiometry and diagnostic imaging examinations in 160 ears with otosclerosis that we treated surgically in our department. (author)

  13. Postoperative ileus: Recent developments in pathophysiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Damian; El-Sharkawy, Ahmed M; Psaltis, Emmanouil; Maxwell-Armstrong, Charles A; Lobo, Dileep N

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI) is a frequent occurrence after abdominal and other types of surgery, and is associated with significant morbidity and costs to health care providers. The aims of this narrative review were to provide an update of classification systems, preventive techniques, pathophysiological mechanisms, and treatment options for established POI. The Web of Science, MEDLINE, PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched using the key phrases 'ileus', 'postoperative ileus' and 'definition', for relevant studies published in English from January 1997 to August 2014. POI is still a problematic and frequent complication of surgery. Fluid overload, exogenous opioids, neurohormonal dysfunction, and gastrointestinal stretch and inflammation are key mechanisms in the pathophysiology of POI. Evidence is supportive of thoracic epidural analgesia, avoidance of salt and water overload, alvimopan and gum chewing as measures for the prevention of POI, and should be incorporated into perioperative care protocols. Minimal access surgery and avoidance of nasogastric tubes may also help. Novel strategies are emerging, but further studies are required for the treatment of prolonged POI, where evidence is still lacking. Although POI is often inevitable, methods to reduce its duration and facilitate recovery of postoperative gastrointestinal function are evolving rapidly. Utilisation of standardised diagnostic classification systems will help improve applicability of future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  14. Approaches to and Treatment Strategies for Playing-Related Pain Problems Among Czech Instrumental Music Students: An Epidemiological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Christos I; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-09-01

    The current study examined the severity of playing-related pain (PRP) problems among music students at the Prague State Conservatoire, as well as the various treatment methods used by these students and how they approach and deal with these phenomena while studying. In total, 180 instrumental students participated and completed a paper questionnaire. Of these, 88.9% reported that they had experienced PRP at least once in their lives, with 12.6% experiencing pain every time they play. The onset of PRP seemed to coincide with the transition period on entry to the conservatoire and was associated with the increase in hours of practice. Specific body regions associated with playing each particular instrument were most frequently affected, with females being more susceptible than males to the development of PRP. An alarming 35% of the affected students tended not to seek help at all, whereas those who did tended to seek advice first from their instrument tutor and second from medical doctors. Most students who visited doctors reported that medical treatments only partially helped them to overcome PRP problems. The most frequent treatment methods used were resting, gel or creams, and physical exercises. Students believed that inappropriate posture played a key role in the development of their PRP problems. Finally, students indicated a willingness to be aware of and educated about PRP issues during their studies. Further exploration of PRP problems among student musicians is warranted. Better understanding of differing attitudes toward, use of, and efficiency of various treatment methods after the occurrence of PRPs will provide additional insight for prevention and treatment.

  15. Widespread Bordetella parapertussis Infections-Wisconsin, 2011-2012: Clinical and Epidemiologic Features and Antibiotic Use for Treatment and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepke, Ruth; Bartholomew, Michael L; Eickhoff, Jens C; Ayele, Roman A; Rodd, Diane; Kuennen, Joan; Rosekrans, Jean; Warshauer, David M; Conway, James H; Davis, Jeffrey P

    2015-11-01

    During October 2011-December 2012, concurrent with a statewide pertussis outbreak, 443 Bordetella parapertussis infections were reported among Wisconsin residents. We examined clinical features of patients with parapertussis and the effect of antibiotic use for treatment and prevention. Patients with polymerase chain reaction results positive for B. parapertussis reported during October 2011-May 2012 were interviewed regarding presence and durations of pertussis-like symptoms and receipt of azithromycin treatment. Data regarding acute cough illnesses and receipt of azithromycin prophylaxis among parapertussis patient household members (HHMs) were also collected. Using multivariate repeated measures log-binomial regression analysis, we examined associations of treatment receipt by the HHM with the earliest illness onset and prophylaxis receipt among other HHMs with the presence of any secondary cough illnesses in the household. Among 218 patients with parapertussis, pertussis-like symptoms were frequently reported. Illness durations were significantly shorter among patients with treatment initiated 0-6 days after cough onset, compared with nonrecipients (median durations: 10 vs 19 days, P = .002). Among 361 HHMs from 120 households, compared with nonrecipients, prompt prophylaxis of HHMs was associated with no secondary cough illnesses (relative risk: 0.16; 95% confidence interval, .04-.69). Bordetella parapertussis infection causes pertussis-like illness that might be misclassified as pertussis if B. parapertussis testing is not performed. Prompt treatment might shorten illness duration, and prompt HHM prophylaxis might prevent secondary illnesses. Further study is needed to evaluate antibiotic effectiveness for preventing parapertussis and to determine risks and benefits of antibiotic use. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Genetic epidemiology of hypertension: an update on the African diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Harold I; Rotimi, Charles N

    2003-01-01

    Hypertension is a serious global public health problem, affecting approximately 600 million people worldwide. The lifetime risk of developing the condition exceeds 50% in most populations. Despite considerable success in the pharmacological treatment of hypertension in all-human populations, the health-care community still lacks understanding of how and why individuals develop chronically elevated blood pressure. This gap in knowledge, and the high prevalence of hypertension and associated complications in some populations of African descent, have led some to conclude that hypertension is a "different disease" in people of African descent. Despite considerable evidence from epidemiologic studies showing that blood pressure distribution in populations of the African diaspora spans the known spectrum for all human populations, theories in support of unique "defects" among populations of African descent continue to gain wide acceptance. To date, no known environmental factors or genetic variants relevant to the pathophysiology of human hypertension have been found to be unique to Black populations. However, available genetic epidemiologic data demonstrate differential distributions of risk factors that are consistent with current environmental and geographic origins. This review summarizes the available evidence and demonstrates that as the exposure to known risk factors for hypertension (eg, excess consumption of salt and calories, stress, sedentary lifestyle, and degree of urbanization) increases among genetically susceptible individuals, the prevalence of hypertension and associated complications also increases across populations of the African diaspora. This observation is true for all human populations.

  17. Risk of leukemia associated with the first course of cancer treatment: an analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, R.E.; Hankey, B.F.; Myers, M.H.; Young, J.L. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The risk of leukemia associated with the first course of cancer treatment was evaluated in over 440,000 patients diagnosed during 1973-80 (average follow-up . 1.91 yr) from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. Although the reporting of the first course of therapy probably was incomplete, 34 acute nonlymphocytic leukemias (ANLL) developed compared with 7.6 expected among 70,674 patients known to receive initial chemotherapy [relative risk (RR) . 4.5, 95% confidence interval (Cl) . 3.1-6.3]. Significant ANLL excesses were observed following chemotherapy for breast cancer (RR . 8.1), ovarian cancer (RR . 22.2), and multiple myeloma (RR . 9.5). Patients initially treated with radiation (with no record of chemotherapy) also had a significantly increased ANLL risk; 45 leukemias occurred versus 17.9 expected (RR . 2.5, 95% Cl . 1.8-3.4). In this group, excess ANLL were found following irradiation for uterine corpus cancer (RR . 4.0). Kidney and renal pelvis cancer patients had a twofold leukemia risk (all types) that was unrelated to treatment (RR . 2.2)

  18. [Use of rivaroxaban in real-life treatment of venous thromboembolism: results of the TEV Survey, an Italian epidemiological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Raffaele; Iori, Ido

    2017-03-01

    Rivaroxaban is a direct and selective inhibitor of factor Xa. The randomized clinical trials EINSTEIN evaluated the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) proving that the drug was non-inferior to standard treatment. The aim of this survey was to describe how rivaroxaban was used in a group of "real-life" patients with VTE. Between June and October 2014, physicians collected aggregate data, through an online questionnaire, on consecutive patients affected by VTE and treated with rivaroxaban in the previous 6 months. Descriptive statistics were performed on the collected data. A total of 345 questionnaires were filled out. The mean age of patients was 62 years, with a low prevalence of concomitant diseases and/or pharmacological treatments. Deep vein thrombosis was diagnosed in 90% of patients and pulmonary embolism in 47%; only 48% was hospitalized. Rivaroxaban was prescribed at the recommended doses and/or regimen in no more than 60% of cases. In 96% of patients, the initial therapeutic plan did not require changes. Adherence to the therapeutic plan and overall patient satisfaction with therapy were high. Rivaroxaban was found easy to use and was highly appreciated by patients.

  19. Stable coronary syndromes: pathophysiology, diagnostic advances and therapeutic need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, David

    2018-01-01

    The diagnostic management of patients with angina pectoris typically centres on the detection of obstructive epicardial CAD, which aligns with evidence-based treatment options that include medical therapy and myocardial revascularisation. This clinical paradigm fails to account for the considerable proportion (approximately one-third) of patients with angina in whom obstructive CAD is excluded. This common scenario presents a diagnostic conundrum whereby angina occurs but there is no obstructive CAD (ischaemia and no obstructive coronary artery disease—INOCA). We review new insights into the pathophysiology of angina whereby myocardial ischaemia results from a deficient supply of oxygenated blood to the myocardium, due to various combinations of focal or diffuse epicardial disease (macrovascular), microvascular dysfunction or both. Macrovascular disease may be due to the presence of obstructive CAD secondary to atherosclerosis, or may be dynamic due to a functional disorder (eg, coronary artery spasm, myocardial bridging). Pathophysiology of coronary microvascular disease may involve anatomical abnormalities resulting in increased coronary resistance, or functional abnormalities resulting in abnormal vasomotor tone. We consider novel clinical diagnostic techniques enabling new insights into the causes of angina and appraise the need for improved therapeutic options for patients with INOCA. We conclude that the taxonomy of stable CAD could improve to better reflect the heterogeneous pathophysiology of the coronary circulation. We propose the term ‘stable coronary syndromes’ (SCS), which aligns with the well-established terminology for ‘acute coronary syndromes’. SCS subtends a clinically relevant classification that more fully encompasses the different diseases of the epicardial and microvascular coronary circulation. PMID:29030424

  20. POTENTIAL PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS OF ULTRAFINE PARTICLE TOXIC EFFECTS IN HUMANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JASMINA JOVIĆ-STOŠIĆ

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical studies suggested the association of the particulate matter ambient air pollution and the increased morbidity and mortality, mainly from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. The size of particles has great influence on their toxicity, because it determines the site in the respiratory tract where they deposit. The most well established theory explaining the mechanisms behind the increased toxicity of ultrafine particles (UFP, < 0.1 µm is that it has to do with the increased surface area and/or the combination with the increased number of particles. Biological effects of UFP are also determined by their shape and chemical composition, so it is not possible to estimate their toxicity in a general way. General hypothesis suggested that exposure to inhaled particles induces pulmonary alveolar inflammation as a basic pathophysiological event, triggering release of various proinflammatory cytokines. Chronic inflammation is a very important underlying mechanism in the genesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. UFP can freely move through the circulation, but their effects on the secondary organs are not known yet, so more studies on recognizing toxicological endpoints of UFP are needed. Determination of UFP toxicity and the estimation of their internal and biologically active dose are necessary for the evidence based conclusions connecting air pollution by UFP and human diseases.

  1. Narcolepsy and Psychiatric Disorders: Comorbidities or Shared Pathophysiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Morse

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy and psychiatric disorders have a significant but unrecognized relationship, which is an area of evolving interest, but unfortunately, the association is poorly understood. It is not uncommon for the two to occur co-morbidly. However, narcolepsy is frequently misdiagnosed initially as a psychiatric condition, contributing to the protracted time to accurate diagnosis and treatment. Narcolepsy is a disabling neurodegenerative condition that carries a high risk for development of social and occupational dysfunction. Deterioration in function may lead to the secondary development of psychiatric symptoms. Inversely, the development of psychiatric symptoms can lead to the deterioration in function and quality of life. The overlap in pharmaceutical intervention may further enhance the difficulty to distinguish between diagnoses. Comprehensive care for patients with narcolepsy should include surveillance for psychiatric illness and appropriate treatment when necessary. Further research is necessary to better understand the underlying pathophysiology between psychiatric disease and narcolepsy.

  2. Pathophysiology of Resistant Hypertension: The Role of Sympathetic Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Tsioufis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistant hypertension (RH is a powerful risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Among the characteristics of patients with RH, obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, and aldosterone excess are covering a great area of the mosaic of RH phenotype. Increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS activity is present in all these underlying conditions, supporting its crucial role in the pathophysiology of antihypertensive treatment resistance. Current clinical and experimental knowledge points towards an impact of several factors on SNS activation, namely, insulin resistance, adipokines, endothelial dysfunction, cyclic intermittent hypoxaemia, aldosterone effects on central nervous system, chemoreceptors, and baroreceptors dysregulation. The further investigation and understanding of the mechanisms leading to SNS activation could reveal novel therapeutic targets and expand our treatment options in the challenging management of RH.

  3. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY ON THE IMPLANT TREATMENT NEEDS IN CASES OF BONE AFFECTION IN PATIENTS WITH PERIODONTAL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Paula Radu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The scope of the study is to critically evaluate and, implicitly, to establish a correlation among the status of edentation, the missing odonto-periodontal support and the necessary implantary therapy. Materials and method: The experimental group was formed of 179 patients, 93 women and 86 men, with ages between 18 and 72 years, who addressed the Clinics of Periodontology and some private consulting room between 2010-2012. The investigations involved both a minute clinical examination, by descriptive and canonic methods, and paraclinical exams: gnatophotostatic examinations on intra- and extra-oral (front and profile photos, patterns of study and radiological evaluation by OPT with markers. Results and discussion: The highest values were registered for III class Kennedy edentations, especially in the 31-50 years group of age, and mainly in women. This evaluation led to a higher number of implantary treatments. The necessary of implantary treatments was of 100% in IV, V and VI class Kennedy edentations, as well as in total edentations. Conclusions: The necessary number of interventions on bone structures for the optimization of the implantary field is of 43.92%, the highest ratios being represented by controlled bone regeneration.

  4. ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY CAUSED BY Crotalus AND Bothrops SNAKE VENOM: A REVIEW OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polianna L.M.M. Albuquerque

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Ophidic accidents are an important public health problem due to their incidence, morbidity and mortality. An increasing number of cases have been registered in Brazil in the last few years. Several studies point to the importance of knowing the clinical complications and adequate approach in these accidents. However, knowledge about the risk factors is not enough and there are an increasing number of deaths due to these accidents in Brazil. In this context, acute kidney injury (AKI appears as one of the main causes of death and consequences for these victims, which are mainly young males working in rural areas. Snakes of the Bothrops and Crotalus genera are the main responsible for renal involvement in ophidic accidents in South America. The present study is a literature review of AKI caused by Bothrops and Crotalus snake venom regarding diverse characteristics, emphasizing the most appropriate therapeutic approach for these cases. Recent studies have been carried out searching for complementary therapies for the treatment of ophidic accidents, including the use of lipoic acid, simvastatin and allopurinol. Some plants, such as Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae and Rubiaceae seem to have a beneficial role in the treatment of this type of envenomation. Future studies will certainly find new therapeutic measures for ophidic accidents.

  5. ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY CAUSED BY Crotalus AND Bothrops SNAKE VENOM: A REVIEW OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Polianna L.M.M.; Jacinto, Camilla N.; Silva, Geraldo B.; Lima, Juliana B.; Veras, Maria do Socorro B.; Daher, Elizabeth F.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Ophidic accidents are an important public health problem due to their incidence, morbidity and mortality. An increasing number of cases have been registered in Brazil in the last few years. Several studies point to the importance of knowing the clinical complications and adequate approach in these accidents. However, knowledge about the risk factors is not enough and there are an increasing number of deaths due to these accidents in Brazil. In this context, acute kidney injury (AKI) appears as one of the main causes of death and consequences for these victims, which are mainly young males working in rural areas. Snakes of the Bothrops and Crotalus genera are the main responsible for renal involvement in ophidic accidents in South America. The present study is a literature review of AKI caused by Bothrops and Crotalus snake venom regarding diverse characteristics, emphasizing the most appropriate therapeutic approach for these cases. Recent studies have been carried out searching for complementary therapies for the treatment of ophidic accidents, including the use of lipoic acid, simvastatin and allopurinol. Some plants, such as Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae and Rubiaceae seem to have a beneficial role in the treatment of this type of envenomation. Future studies will certainly find new therapeutic measures for ophidic accidents. PMID:24037282

  6. Is Primary Prostate Cancer Treatment Influenced by Likelihood of Extraprostatic Disease? A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Patterns of Care Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Jordan A.; Wang, Andrew Z.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Rosenman, Julian G.; Carpenter, William R.; Godley, Paul A.; Chen, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the patterns of primary treatment in a recent population-based cohort of prostate cancer patients, stratified by the likelihood of extraprostatic cancer as predicted by disease characteristics available at diagnosis. Methods and Materials: A total of 157,371 patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2008 with clinically localized and potentially curable (node-negative, nonmetastatic) prostate cancer, who have complete information on prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, and clinical stage, were included. Patients with clinical T1/T2 disease were grouped into categories of 50% likelihood of having extraprostatic disease using the Partin nomogram. Clinical T3/T4 patients were examined separately as the highest-risk group. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between patient group and receipt of each primary treatment, adjusting for age, race, year of diagnosis, marital status, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database region, and county-level education. Separate models were constructed for primary surgery, external-beam radiotherapy (RT), and conservative management. Results: On multivariable analysis, increasing likelihood of extraprostatic disease was significantly associated with increasing use of RT and decreased conservative management. Use of surgery also increased. Patients with >50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer had almost twice the odds of receiving prostatectomy as those with 50% likelihood of extraprostatic cancer (34%) and clinical T3–T4 disease (24%). The proportion of patients who received prostatectomy or conservative management was approximately 50% or slightly higher in all groups. Conclusions: There may be underutilization of RT in older prostate cancer patients and those with likely extraprostatic disease. Because more than half of prostate cancer patients do not consult with a radiation oncologist, a multidisciplinary consultation may affect the treatment decision-making process.

  7. Epidemiology of Hookworm Infection in Kintampo North Municipality, Ghana: Patterns of Malaria Coinfection, Anemia, and Albendazole Treatment Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Debbie; Mosites, Emily; Otchere, Joseph; Twum, Welbeck Amoani; Woo, Lauren; Jones-Sanpei, Hinckley; Harrison, Lisa M.; Bungiro, Richard D.; Benham-Pyle, Blair; Bimi, Langbong; Edoh, Dominic; Bosompem, Kwabena; Wilson, Michael; Cappello, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A cross-sectional pilot study of hookworm infection was carried out among 292 subjects from 62 households in Kintampo North, Ghana. The overall prevalence of hookworm infection was 45%, peaking in those 11–20 years old (58.5%). In children, risk factors for hookworm infection included coinfection with malaria and increased serum immunoglobulin G reactivity to hookworm secretory antigens. Risk factors for infection in adults included poor nutritional status, not using a latrine, not wearing shoes, and occupation (farming). Although albendazole therapy was associated with an overall egg reduction rate of 82%, 37 subjects (39%) remained infected. Among those who failed therapy, treatment was not associated with a significant reduction in egg excretion, and nearly one-third had higher counts on repeat examination. These data confirm a high prevalence of low-intensity hookworm infection in central Ghana and its association with poor nutritional status. The high rate of albendazole failure raises concern about emerging resistance. PMID:21540391

  8. Treatment Effect in Earlier Trials of Patients With Chronic Medical Conditions: A Meta-Epidemiologic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahdab, Fares; Farah, Wigdan; Almasri, Jehad; Barrionuevo, Patricia; Zaiem, Feras; Benkhadra, Raed; Asi, Noor; Alsawas, Mouaz; Pang, Yifan; Ahmed, Ahmed T; Rajjo, Tamim; Kanwar, Amrit; Benkhadra, Khalid; Razouki, Zayd; Murad, M Hassan; Wang, Zhen

    2018-03-01

    To determine whether the early trials in chronic medical conditions demonstrate an effect size that is larger than that in subsequent trials. We identified randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating a drug or device in patients with chronic medical conditions through meta-analyses (MAs) published between January 1, 2007, and June 23, 2015, in the 10 general medical journals with highest impact factor. We estimated the prevalence of having the largest effect size or heterogeneity in the first 2 published trials. We evaluated the association of the exaggerated early effect with several a priori hypothesized explanatory variables. We included 70 MAs that had included a total of 930 trials (average of 13 [range, 5-48] RCTs per MA) with average follow-up of 24 (range, 1-168) months. The prevalence of the exaggerated early effect (ie, proportion of MAs with largest effect or heterogeneity in the first 2 trials) was 37%. These early trials had an effect size that was on average 2.67 times larger than the overall pooled effect size (ratio of relative effects, 2.67; 95% CI, 2.12-3.37). The presence of exaggerated effect was not significantly associated with trial size; number of events; length of follow-up; intervention duration; number of study sites; inpatient versus outpatient setting; funding source; stopping a trial early; adequacy of random sequence generation, allocation concealment, or blinding; loss to follow-up or the test for publication bias. Trials evaluating treatments of chronic medical conditions published early in the chain of evidence commonly demonstrate an exaggerated treatment effect compared with subsequent trials. At the present time, this phenomenon remains unpredictable. Considering the increasing morbidity and mortality of chronic medical conditions, decision makers should act on early evidence with caution. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hepatitis C virus infection epidemiology among people who inject drugs in Europe: a systematic review of data for scaling up treatment and prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Wiessing

    Full Text Available People who inject drugs (PWID are a key population affected by hepatitis C virus (HCV. Treatment options are improving and may enhance prevention; however access for PWID may be poor. The availability in the literature of information on seven main topic areas (incidence, chronicity, genotypes, HIV co-infection, diagnosis and treatment uptake, and burden of disease to guide HCV treatment and prevention scale-up for PWID in the 27 countries of the European Union is systematically reviewed.We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library for publications between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2012, with a search strategy of general keywords regarding viral hepatitis, substance abuse and geographic scope, as well as topic-specific keywords. Additional articles were found through structured email consultations with a large European expert network. Data availability was highly variable and important limitations existed in comparability and representativeness. Nine of 27 countries had data on HCV incidence among PWID, which was often high (2.7-66/100 person-years, median 13, Interquartile range (IQR 8.7-28. Most common HCV genotypes were G1 and G3; however, G4 may be increasing, while the proportion of traditionally 'difficult to treat' genotypes (G1+G4 showed large variation (median 53, IQR 43-62. Twelve countries reported on HCV chronicity (median 72, IQR 64-81 and 22 on HIV prevalence in HCV-infected PWID (median 3.9%, IQR 0.2-28. Undiagnosed infection, assessed in five countries, was high (median 49%, IQR 38-64, while of those diagnosed, the proportion entering treatment was low (median 9.5%, IQR 3.5-15. Burden of disease, where assessed, was high and will rise in the next decade.Key data on HCV epidemiology, care and disease burden among PWID in Europe are sparse but suggest many undiagnosed infections and poor treatment uptake. Stronger efforts are needed to improve data availability to guide an increase in HCV treatment among PWID.

  10. Mathematical epidemiology

    CERN Document Server

    Driessche, Pauline; Wu, Jianhong

    2008-01-01

    Based on lecture notes of two summer schools with a mixed audience from mathematical sciences, epidemiology and public health, this volume offers a comprehensive introduction to basic ideas and techniques in modeling infectious diseases, for the comparison of strategies to plan for an anticipated epidemic or pandemic, and to deal with a disease outbreak in real time. It covers detailed case studies for diseases including pandemic influenza, West Nile virus, and childhood diseases. Models for other diseases including Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, fox rabies, and sexually transmitted infections are included as applications. Its chapters are coherent and complementary independent units. In order to accustom students to look at the current literature and to experience different perspectives, no attempt has been made to achieve united writing style or unified notation. Notes on some mathematical background (calculus, matrix algebra, differential equations, and probability) have been prepared and may be downlo...

  11. EPRI epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    A fight is brewing within the electric power community over the fate of a proposed $5 to $8 million epidemiological study of the effects of radiation on US nuclear plant workers. Several industry experts, claiming the project would merely lead to confusion by producing no clear results, are trying to prevent the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) from funding what would be the largest ever occupational study of this kind, covering perhaps as many as 500,000 workers. Ralph Lapp, a well-known radiation physicist, says that EPRI is facing unprecedented technical dissent from within. He claims there is already plenty of evidence that nuclear utilities are among the safest places to work, at least in terms of cancer risk, and that the proposed EPRI study would raise new concerns without yielding any answers

  12. Air leak after lung resection: pathophysiology and patients' implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Cecilia; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Protocols for the management of air leaks are critical aspects in the postoperative course of patients following lung resections. Many investigations in the last decade are focusing on the chest tube modalities or preventative measures, however, little is known about the pathophysiology of air leak and the patient perception of this common complication. This review concentrates on understanding the reasons why a pulmonary parenchyma may start to leak or an air leak may be longer than others. Experimental works support the notion that lung overdistension may favor air leak. These studies may represent the basis of future investigations. Furthermore, the standardization of nomenclature in the field of pleural space management and the creation of novel air leak scoring systems have contributed to improve the knowledge among thoracic surgeons and facilitate the organization of trials on this matter. We tried to summarize available evidences about the patient perception of a prolonged air leak and about what would be useful for them in order to prevent worsening of their quality of life. Future investigations are warranted to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible of prolonged air leak in order to define tailored treatments and protocols. Improving the care at home with web-based telemonitoring or real time connected chest drainage may in a future improve the quality of life of the patients experience this complication and also enhance hospital finances.

  13. The pathophysiology of lifelong premature ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    For many decades it has been thought that lifelong premature ejaculation (PE) is only characterized by persistent early ejaculations. Despite enormous progress of in vivo animal research, and neurobiological, genetic and pharmacological research in men with lifelong PE, our current understanding of the mechanisms behind early ejaculations is far from complete. The new classification of PE into four PE subtypes has shown that the symptomatology of lifelong PE strongly differs from acquired PE, subjective PE and variable PE. The phenotype of lifelong PE and therefore also the pathophysiology of lifelong PE is much more complex. A substantial number of men with lifelong PE not only have PE, but also premature erection and premature penile detumescence as part of an acute hypertonic or hypererotic state when engaged in an erotic situation or when making love. As both erectio praecox, ejaculatio praecox, detumescentia praecox, and the hypererotic state are part of the phenotype lifelong PE, it is argued that lifelong PE is not only a disturbance of the timing of ejaculation but also a disturbance of the timing of erection, detumescence and arousal. Since 1998, the pathophysiology of lifelong PE was thought to be mainly mediated by the central serotonergic system in line with genetic polymorphisms of specific serotonergic genes. However, by accepting that lifelong PE is characterized by the reversible hypertonic state the hypothesis of mainly serotonergic dysfunction is no longer tenable. Instead, it has been postulated that the pathophysiology of lifelong PE is mediated by a very complex interplay of central and peripheral serotonergic, dopaminergic, oxytocinergic, endocrinological, genetic and probably also epigenetic factors. Progress in research of lifelong PE can only be accomplished when a stopwatch is used to measure the IELT and the cut-off point of 1 minute for the definition of lifelong PE is maintained. Current use of validated questionnaires, neglect of

  14. Pathophysiology of the anorexia of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, John E

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia represents a major problem for older persons leading to weight loss, sarcopenia, functional decline, and mortality. There is increasing information on the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to anorexia. Increasing evidence has shown the importance of gastrointestinal hormones (ghrelin, cholecystokinin, and glucagon-like peptide) and adipokines in producing the anorexia of aging. Numerous neurotransmitters have been shown to be involved in this aging anorexia, but evidence in humans is lacking. The early recognition of anorexia of aging is important to allow intervention and prevent functional deterioration in older persons. Screening tests for anorexia have been developed. New approaches to managing anorexia are being tested.

  15. Discrete Pathophysiology is Uncommon in Patients with Nonspecific Arm Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortlever, Joost T P; Janssen, Stein J; Molleman, Jeroen; Hageman, Michiel G J S; Ring, David

    2016-06-01

    Nonspecific symptoms are common in all areas of medicine. Patients and caregivers can be frustrated when an illness cannot be reduced to a discrete pathophysiological process that corresponds with the symptoms. We therefore asked the following questions: 1) Which demographic factors and psychological comorbidities are associated with change from an initial diagnosis of nonspecific arm pain to eventual identification of discrete pathophysiology that corresponds with symptoms? 2) What is the percentage of patients eventually diagnosed with discrete pathophysiology, what are those pathologies, and do they account for the symptoms? We evaluated 634 patients with an isolated diagnosis of nonspecific upper extremity pain to see if discrete pathophysiology was diagnosed on subsequent visits to the same hand surgeon, a different hand surgeon, or any physician within our health system for the same pain. There were too few patients with discrete pathophysiology at follow-up to address the primary study question. Definite discrete pathophysiology that corresponded with the symptoms was identified in subsequent evaluations by the index surgeon in one patient (0.16% of all patients) and cured with surgery (nodular fasciitis). Subsequent doctors identified possible discrete pathophysiology in one patient and speculative pathophysiology in four patients and the index surgeon identified possible discrete pathophysiology in four patients, but the five discrete diagnoses accounted for only a fraction of the symptoms. Nonspecific diagnoses are not harmful. Prospective randomized research is merited to determine if nonspecific, descriptive diagnoses are better for patients than specific diagnoses that imply pathophysiology in the absence of discrete verifiable pathophysiology.

  16. Ischaemic heart disease in women: are there sex differences in pathophysiology and risk factors? Position paper from the working group on coronary pathophysiology and microcirculation of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarino, Viola; Badimon, Lina; Corti, Roberto; de Wit, Cor; Dorobantu, Maria; Hall, Alistair; Koller, Akos; Marzilli, Mario; Pries, Axel; Bugiardini, Raffaele

    2011-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in women, and knowledge of the clinical consequences of atherosclerosis and CVD in women has grown tremendously over the past 20 years. Research efforts have increased and many reports on various aspects of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in women have been published highlighting sex differences in pathophysiology, presentation, and treatment of IHD. Data, however, remain limited. A description of the state of the science, with recognition of the shortcomings of current data, is necessary to guide future research and move the field forward. In this report, we identify gaps in existing literature and make recommendations for future research. Women largely share similar cardiovascular risk factors for IHD with men; however, women with suspected or confirmed IHD have less coronary atherosclerosis than men, even though they are older and have more cardiovascular risk factors than men. Coronary endothelial dysfunction and microvascular disease have been proposed as important determinants in the aetiology and prognosis of IHD in women, but research is limited on whether sex differences in these mechanisms truly exist. Differences in the epidemiology of IHD between women and men remain largely unexplained, as we are still unable to explain why women are protected towards IHD until older age compared with men. Eventually, a better understanding of these processes and mechanisms may improve the prevention and the clinical management of IHD in women.

  17. Developments in the treatment of transfusion-dependent anemia in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: epidemiology, etiology, genetics, and targeted therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raza A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Azra Raza, Nicholas Iverson, Abdullah M AliThe MDS Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Myelodysplastic syndromes are malignant hematopoietic stem cell disorders that present with variable cytopenias and predominantly affect the elderly. Treatment options are limited, with allogeneic transplant being the only potentially curative strategy. Recent mutational profiling studies have led to cataloguing of driver and passenger mutations most commonly affecting the epigenetic regulators and genes involved in RNA splicing. Despite improved understanding of the disease biology, these emerging molecular insights have not led to identification of novel therapeutic strategies. Although several drugs approved in the last decade improve the cytopenias, the relief is temporary, most likely due to the sequential activation of clones. Future advances depend upon identification of signaling pathways in dominant clones and targeting these with agents that might be known but need to be matched to suit the needs of individual patients in a longitudinal, dynamic fashion. Myelodysplastic syndromes are ideally suited for the development of such personalized medicine.Keywords: cancer, epigenetics, iron, MDS, myelodysplasia, splicing

  18. The changing pattern of human brucellosis: clinical manifestations, epidemiology, and treatment outcomes over three decades in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenaishvili Otar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis is an endemic infection in Georgia. We conducted a review of patient records with a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of brucellosis over three decades at the central referral hospital for brucellosis cases, the Institute of Parasitology and Tropical Medicine (IPTM in Tbilisi. The purpose was to describe the demographic profile and clinical characteristics as well as diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with brucellosis. Methods Data were abstracted from randomly selected patient records at the IPTM. In total, 300 records were reviewed from three time periods: 1970-73, 1988-89, and 2004-2008. Results The age distribution of patients shifted from a median age of 40 years in the first time period to 20 years in the third time period. Azeri ethnicity was an increasing proportion of the total number of cases. The frequency of relapsed infection was 14.7% (44 cases. A total of 50 patients received vaccine therapy, and although the vaccine produced immune responses, demonstrated by an increase in agglutination titers, it was not associated with improved outcome. Conclusion The demographics of brucellosis in Georgia fit a profile of persons that tend sheep. Osteoarticular complications were commonly detected, especially in children. The changing pattern of brucellosis in Georgia suggests clinicians should be updated about different trends in brucellosis in their country.

  19. Chronic kidney disease in lithium-treated older adults: a review of epidemiology, mechanisms, and implications for the treatment of late-life mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rej, Soham; Elie, Dominique; Mucsi, Istvan; Looper, Karl J; Segal, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Lithium is an important medication in the treatment of mood disorders. However, clinicians are hesitant to use lithium in older adults for fear of its medical effects, particularly kidney disease. This review describes the current understanding of the epidemiology and mechanisms underlying chronic kidney disease (CKD) in older lithium users, with recommendations for using lithium safely in late life. Prevalence estimates of CKD in older lithium users range from 42-50%, which does not differ greatly from the 37.8% rates seen in community-dwelling non-lithium using, non-psychiatric populations. Clinical and pre-clinical data suggest a variety of synergistic mechanisms contributing to CKD in older lithium users, including aging, cardiovascular factors, oxidative stress, inflammation, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, acute kidney injury, and medication interactions. With regards to CKD, lithium can be used safely in many older adults with mood disorders. Compared to patients with pre-existing CKD, those with an estimated glomerular filtration rate >60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) are probably not as susceptible to lithium-associated renal decline. Using lithium concentrations kidney injury, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, and coronary artery disease can all help prevent CKD and further renal decline in older lithium users.

  20. Epidemiological Characteristics and Clinical Treatment Outcome of Typhoid Fever in Ningbo, China, 2005-2014: Pulsed-Field Gel Electorophoresis Results Revealing Great Proportion of Common Transmission Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qifa; Yang, Yuanbin; Lin, Wenping; Yi, Bo; Xu, Guozhang

    2017-09-25

    We aimed to describe the molecular epidemiological characteristics and clinical treatment outcome of typhoid fever in Ningbo, China during 2005-2014. Eighty-eight Salmonella Typhi isolates were obtained from 307 hospitalized patients. Three prevalent pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of 54 isolates from 3 outbreaks were identified. Overall, there were 64 (72.7%) isolates from clustered cases and 24 (27.3%) isolates from sporadic cases. Resistance to nalidixic acid (NAL) (n = 47; 53.4%) and ampicillin (AMP) (n = 40; 45.4%) and rare resistance to tetracycline (TET) (n = 2; 2.3%) and gentamicin (GEN) (n = 2; 2.3%) were observed. No isolates resistant to cefotaxime (CTX), chloramphenicol (CL), ciprofloxacin (CIP), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) were found. The occurrence of reduced sensitivity to CIP was 52.3% (n = 46). The medians of fever clearance time in cases with and without complications were 7 (interquartile range (IQR): 4-10) and 5 (IQR: 3-7) days (P = 0.001), respectively, when patients were treated with CIP or levofloxacin (LEV) and/or third-generation cephalosporins (CEP). Rates of serious complications were at low levels: peritonitis (2.3%), intestinal hemorrhage (6.8%), and intestinal perforation (1.1%). The present study revealed a long-term clustering trend with respect to PFGE patterns, occasional outbreaks, and the rapid spread of AMP resistance and decreased CIP susceptibility among S. Typhi isolates in recent years.

  1. Human Pathophysiological Adaptations to the Space Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian C. Demontis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Space is an extreme environment for the human body, where during long-term missions microgravity and high radiation levels represent major threats to crew health. Intriguingly, space flight (SF imposes on the body of highly selected, well-trained, and healthy individuals (astronauts and cosmonauts pathophysiological adaptive changes akin to an accelerated aging process and to some diseases. Such effects, becoming manifest over a time span of weeks (i.e., cardiovascular deconditioning to months (i.e., loss of bone density and muscle atrophy of exposure to weightlessness, can be reduced through proper countermeasures during SF and in due time are mostly reversible after landing. Based on these considerations, it is increasingly accepted that SF might provide a mechanistic insight into certain pathophysiological processes, a concept of interest to pre-nosological medicine. In this article, we will review the main stress factors encountered in space and their impact on the human body and will also discuss the possible lessons learned with space exploration in reference to human health on Earth. In fact, this is a productive, cross-fertilized, endeavor in which studies performed on Earth yield countermeasures for protection of space crew health, and space research is translated into health measures for Earth-bound population.

  2. Adropin – physiological and pathophysiological role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Marczuk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Adropin is a peptide hormone that was discovered in 2008 by Kumar et al. This protein consists of 76 amino acids, and it was originally described as a secreted peptide, with residues 1-33 encoding a secretory signal peptide sequence. The amino acid sequence of this protein in humans, mice and rats is identical. While our knowledge of the exact physiological roles of this poorly understood peptide continues to evolve, recent data suggest a role in energy homeostasis and the control of glucose and fatty acid metabolism. This protein is encoded by the Enho gene, which is expressed primarily in the liver and the central nervous system. The regulation of adropin secretion is controversial. Adropin immunoreactivity has been reported by several laboratories in the circulation of humans, non-human primates and rodents. However, more recently it has been suggested that adropin is a membrane-bound protein that modulates cell-cell communication. Moreover, adropin has been detected in various tissues and body fluids, such as brain, cerebellum, liver, kidney, heart, pancreas, small intestine, endothelial cells, colostrum, cheese whey and milk. The protein level, as shown by previous research, changes in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Adropin is involved in carbohydrate-lipid metabolism, metabolic diseases, central nervous system function, endothelial function and cardiovascular disease. The knowledge of this interesting protein, its exact role and mechanism of action is insufficient. This article provides an overview of the existing literature about the role of adropin, both in physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  3. [Current concepts in pathophysiology of CRPS I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, F T; Maihöfner, C

    2010-02-01

    Knowledge about the pathophysiology underlying the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) has increased over the last years. Classically, CRPS has been considered to be mainly driven by sympathetic dysfunction with sympathetically maintained pain being its major pathogenetic mechanism. Currently, the disease is understood as result of a complex interplay between altered somatosensory, motor, autonomic and inflammatory systems. Peripheral and central sensitization is a common feature in CRPS as in other neuropathic pain syndromes. One important mechanism is the sensitization of spinal dorsal horn cells via activation of postsynaptic NMDA-receptors by chronic C-fiber input. Differential activity of endogenous pain modulating systems may play a pivotal role in the development of CRPS, too. Neuronal plasticity of the somatosensory cortex accounts for central sensory signs. Also the motor system is subject to central adaptive changes in patients with CRPS. Calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) and substance P mediate neurogenic inflammation. Additionally other proinflammatory cytokines involved in the inflammatory response in CRPS have been identified. In terms of the sympathetic nervous system, recent evidence rather points to a sensitization of adrenergic receptors than to increased efferent sympathetic activity. Particularly the expression of alpha (1)-adrenoceptors on nociceptive C-fibers may play a major role. These pathophysiological ideas do not exclude each other. In fact they complement one another. The variety of the involved systems may explain the versatile clinical picture of CRPS. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  4. Epidemiological Profile and Treatment Outcomes in Young Adults (19-29 Years of Age) Treated for Cancer in a Tertiary Hospital in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Victor Hugo Fonseca; Ribeiro, Taynan Nunes; Chinen, Ludmilla T Domingos; Alves, Vanessa; Curado, Maria Paula; Fanelli, Marcello Ferretti

    2017-06-01

    Worldwide, the incidence of cancer in young adults (20-39 years) is increasing, and represents an important cause of mortality in this age group. A retrospective study was undertaken to provide information that may lead to improved treatment outcomes. Epidemiological, clinicopathological, treatment, and survival information were retrieved from the electronic database registry of a tertiary referral hospital in São Paulo, Brazil for patients 19-29 years of age diagnosed with cancer between January 2007 and December 2012. There were 960 patients with a median age at diagnosis of 26 years; female patients comprised 59.2%. A previous diagnosis of malignancy was present in 2.3%; 0.4% had malignant tumors that were radiation-associated; regular alcohol use was present in 10.4%; 9% of patients reported tobacco use; a family history of cancer was present in 41.7%. Malignant tumors included carcinomas (45.7%), germ cell and trophoblastic neoplasms (12.3%), and lymphomas (12.1%). Median follow-up was 47.7 months (range: 0.62-100.9 months) during which time 111 patients (13.5%) died. Carcinomas (n = 43, 38.7%), soft tissue sarcomas (n = 18, 16.2%), and leukemias (n = 10, 9.0%) were the most common causes of death. This study has shown that carcinomas represent the most common malignancy in adolescents and young adults referred to a tertiary cancer center in Brazil and are the most common cause of mortality. Because clinical outcome may be affected by multiple factors in this patient population, further global studies are needed to characterize this population and improve clinical care.

  5. Perioperative management of liver surgery-review on pathophysiology of liver disease and liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, Lukas; Eschertzhuber, Stephan; Tiefenthaler, Werner

    2018-01-01

    An increasing number of patients present for liver surgery. Given the complex pathophysiological changes in chronic liver disease (CLD), it is pivotal to understand the fundamentals of chronic and acute liver failure. This review will give an overview on related organ dysfunction as well as recommendations for perioperative management and treatment of liver failure-related symptoms.

  6. A systematic review of the pathophysiology of 5-fluorouracil-induced cardiotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polk, Anne; Vistisen, Kirsten; Vaage-Nilsen, Merete

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiotoxicity is a serious side effect to treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the pathophysiology of 5-FU- induced cardiotoxicity. METHODS: We systematically searched Pub...

  7. Coccidioidomycosis: epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown J

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Brown,1 Kaitlin Benedict,2 Benjamin J Park,2 George R Thompson III1,31Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA; 2Mycotic Diseases Branch, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, One Shields Avenue, Tupper Hall, Coccidioidomycosis Serology Laboratory, University of California, Davis, CA, USAAbstract: Coccidioidomycosis consists of a spectrum of disease, ranging from a mild, self-limited, febrile illness to severe, life-threatening infection. It is caused by the soil-dwelling fungi, Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii, which are present in diverse endemic areas. Climate changes and environmental factors affect the Coccidioides lifecycle and influence infection rates. The incidence of coccidioidomycosis has risen substantially over the past two decades. The vast majority of Coccidioides infections occur in the endemic zones, such as California, Arizona, Mexico, and Central America. Infections occurring outside those zones appear to be increasingly common, and pose unique clinical and public health challenges. It has long been known that elderly persons, pregnant women, and members of certain ethnic groups are at risk for severe or disseminated coccidioidomycosis. In recent years, it has become evident that persons with immunodeficiency diseases, diabetics, transplant recipients, and prisoners are also particularly vulnerable.Keywords: coccidioidomycosis, Coccidioides, epidemiology, incidence, risk factors, geography

  8. The pathophysiology of migraine: implications for clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Andrew

    2018-02-01

    The understanding of migraine pathophysiology is advancing rapidly. Improved characterisation and diagnosis of its clinical features have led to the view of migraine as a complex, variable disorder of nervous system function rather than simply a vascular headache. Recent studies have provided important new insights into its genetic causes, anatomical and physiological features, and pharmacological mechanisms. The identification of new migraine-associated genes, the visualisation of brain regions that are activated at the earliest stages of a migraine attack, a greater appreciation of the potential role of the cervical nerves, and the recognition of the crucial role for neuropeptides are among the advances that have led to novel targets for migraine therapy. Future management of migraine will have the capacity to tailor treatments based on the distinct mechanisms of migraine that affect individual patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pathophysiology, Evaluation, and Management of Chronic Watery Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Sellin, Joseph H.; Barrett, Kim E.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic watery diarrhea poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge and is often a disabling condition for patients. Although acute diarrhea is likely to be caused by infection, the causes of chronic diarrhea (more than 4 weeks in duration) are more elusive. We review on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic diarrhea. Drawing on recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of intestinal epithelial transport and barrier function, we discuss how diarrhea can result from a decrease in luminal solute absorption, an increase in secretion, or both, as well as derangements in barrier properties. We also describe the various extra-epithelial factors that activate diarrheal mechanisms. Finally, clinical evaluation and tests used in assessment of patients presenting with chronic diarrhea are reviewed, and an algorithm guiding therapeutic decisions and pharmacotherapy is presented. PMID:27773805

  10. Gaucher Disease: The Metabolic Defect, Pathophysiology, Phenotypes And Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baris, Hagit N.; Cohen, Ian J.; Mistry, Pramod K.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), a prototype lysosomal storage disorder, results from inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase due to biallelic mutations in GBA. The result is widespread accumulation of macrophages engorged with predominantly lysosomal glucocerebroside. A complex multisystem phenotype arises involving the liver, spleen, bone marrow and occasionally the lungs in type 1 Gaucher disease; in neuronopathic fulminant type 2 and chronic type 3 disease there is in addition progressive neurodegenerative disease. Manifestations of Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1) include hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenia, a complex pattern of bone involvement with avascular osteonecrosis (AVN), osteoporosis, fractures and lytic lesions. Enzyme replacement therapy became the standard of care in 1991, and this has transformed the natural history of GD1. This article reviews the clinical phenotypes of GD, diagnosis, pathophysiology and its natural history. A subsequent chapter discusses the treatment options. PMID:25345088

  11. Sexual and gonadal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease: Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Rathi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual and gonadal dysfunction/infertility are quite common in patients with chronic kidney disease. Forty percent of male and 55% of female dialysis patients do not achieve orgasm. The pathophysiology of gonadal dysfunction is multifactorial. It is usually a combination of psychological, physiological, and other comorbid factors. Erectile dysfunction in males is mainly due to arterial factors, venous leakage, psychological factors, neurogenic factors, endocrine factors, and drugs. Sexual dysfunction in females is mainly due to hormonal factors and manifests mainly as menstrual irregularities, amenorrhea, lack of vaginal lubrication, and failure to conceive. Treatment of gonadal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease is multipronged and an exact understanding of underlying pathology is essential in proper management of these patients.

  12. Negative pressure pulmonary edema revisited: Pathophysiology and review of management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balu Bhaskar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE is a dangerous and potentially fatal condition with a multifactorial pathogenesis. Frequently, NPPE is a manifestation of upper airway obstruction, the large negative intrathoracic pressure generated by forced inspiration against an obstructed airway is thought to be the principal mechanism involved. This negative pressure leads to an increase in pulmonary vascular volume and pulmonary capillary transmural pressure, creating a risk of disruption of the alveolar-capillary membrane. The early detection of the signs of this syndrome is vital to the treatment and to patient outcome. The purpose of this review is to highlight the available literature on NPPE, while probing the pathophysiological mechanisms relevant in both the development of this condition and that involved in its resolution.

  13. Pathophysiology-based phenotyping in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Jacob V; Henriksen, Jan E; Olsen, Michael H

    2018-01-01

    clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes. METHODS: We first identified all patients with rare subtypes of diabetes, latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA), secondary diabetes, or glucocorticoid-associated diabetes. We then used the homeostatic assessment model to subphenotype all remaining patients......BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes may be a more heterogeneous disease than previously thought. Better understanding of pathophysiological subphenotypes could lead to more individualized diabetes treatment. We examined the characteristics of different phenotypes among 5813 Danish patients with new...... into insulinopenic (high insulin sensitivity and low beta cell function), classical (low insulin sensitivity and low beta cell function), or hyperinsulinemic (low insulin sensitivity and high beta cell function) type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: Among 5813 patients diagnosed with incident type 2 diabetes in the community...

  14. BACE inhibition-dependent repair of Alzheimer's pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Aylin D; Kekuš, Maja; Adelsberger, Helmuth; Neumann, Ulf; Shimshek, Derya R; Song, Beomjong; Zott, Benedikt; Peng, Tingying; Förstl, Hans; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Nelken, Israel; Sakmann, Bert; Konnerth, Arthur; Busche, Marc Aurel

    2017-08-08

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is thought to play an essential pathogenic role in Alzheimer´s disease (AD). A key enzyme involved in the generation of Aβ is the β-secretase BACE, for which powerful inhibitors have been developed and are currently in use in human clinical trials. However, although BACE inhibition can reduce cerebral Aβ levels, whether it also can ameliorate neural circuit and memory impairments remains unclear. Using histochemistry, in vivo Ca 2+ imaging, and behavioral analyses in a mouse model of AD, we demonstrate that along with reducing prefibrillary Aβ surrounding plaques, the inhibition of BACE activity can rescue neuronal hyperactivity, impaired long-range circuit function, and memory defects. The functional neuronal impairments reappeared after infusion of soluble Aβ, mechanistically linking Aβ pathology to neuronal and cognitive dysfunction. These data highlight the potential benefits of BACE inhibition for the effective treatment of a wide range of AD-like pathophysiological and cognitive impairments.

  15. Renal Denervation for Chronic Heart Failure: Background and Pathophysiological Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Michael; Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2017-01-01

    The activation of the sympathetic nervous system is associated with cardiovascular hospitalizations and death in heart failure. Renal denervation has been shown to effectively reduce sympathetic overdrive in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Pilot trials investigating renal denervation as a potential treatment approach for heart failure were initiated. Heart failure comorbidities like obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome and arrhythmias could also be targets for renal denervation, because these occurrences are also mediated by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, renal denervation in heart failure is worthy of further investigation, although its effectiveness still has to be proven. Herein, we describe the pathophysiological rationale and the effect of renal denervation on surrogates of the heart failure syndrome.

  16. Renal Denervation for Chronic Heart Failure: Background and Pathophysiological Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2017-01-01

    The activation of the sympathetic nervous system is associated with cardiovascular hospitalizations and death in heart failure. Renal denervation has been shown to effectively reduce sympathetic overdrive in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Pilot trials investigating renal denervation as a potential treatment approach for heart failure were initiated. Heart failure comorbidities like obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome and arrhythmias could also be targets for renal denervation, because these occurrences are also mediated by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, renal denervation in heart failure is worthy of further investigation, although its effectiveness still has to be proven. Herein, we describe the pathophysiological rationale and the effect of renal denervation on surrogates of the heart failure syndrome. PMID:28154583

  17. Pathophysiology of Manganese-Associated Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Brad A.; Aschner, Michael; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Dydak, Ulrike; Criswell, Susan R.; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Conference Summary Manganese (Mn) is a well established neurotoxin associated with specific damage to the basal ganglia in humans. The phenotype associated with Mn neurotoxicity was first described in two workers with occupational exposure to Mn oxide.(Couper, 1837) Although the description did not use modern clinical terminology, a parkinsonian illness characterized by slowness of movement (bradykinesia), masked facies, and gait impairment (postural instability) appears to have predominated. Nearly 100 years later an outbreak of an atypical parkinsonian illness in a Chilean Mn mine provided a phenotypic description of a fulminant neurologic disorder with parkinsonism, dystonia, and neuropsychiatric symptoms.(Rodier J, 1955) Exposures associated with this syndrome were massive and an order of magnitude greater than modern exposures.(Rodier J, 1955; Hobson et al., 2011) The clinical syndrome associated with Mn neurotoxicity has been called manganism. Modern exposures to Mn occur primarily through occupations in the steel industry and welding. These exposures are often chronic and varied, occurring over decades in the healthy workforce. Although the severe neurologic disorder described by Rodier and Couper are no longer seen, several reports have suggested a possible increased risk of neurotoxicity in these workers.(Racette et al., 2005b; Bowler et al., 2007; Harris et al., 2011) Based upon limited prior imaging and pathologic investigations into the pathophysiology of neurotoxicity in Mn exposed workers,(Huang et al., 2003) many investigators have concluded that the syndrome spares the dopamine system distinguishing manganism from Parkinson disease (PD), the most common cause of parkinsonism in the general population, and a disease with characteristic degenerative changes in the dopaminergic system.(Jankovic, 2005) The purpose of this symposium was to highlight recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of Mn associated neurotoxicity from C. elegans

  18. [Eco-epidemiology: towards epidemiology of complexity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizouarn, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    In order to solve public health problems posed by the epidemiology of risk factors centered on the individual and neglecting the causal processes linking the risk factors with the health outcomes, Mervyn Susser proposed a multilevel epidemiology called eco-epidemiology, addressing the interdependence of individuals and their connection with molecular, individual, societal, environmental levels of organization participating in the causal disease processes. The aim of this epidemiology is to integrate more than a level of organization in design, analysis and interpretation of health problems. After presenting the main criticisms of risk-factor epidemiology focused on the individual, we will try to show how eco-epidemiology and its development could help to understand the need for a broader and integrative epidemiology, in which studies designed to identify risk factors would be balanced by studies designed to answer other questions equally vital to public health. © 2016 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  19. Contrast medium-induced nephropathy: the pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, P B; Tepel, Martin

    2006-01-01

    A widespread, rather general, definition of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is an impairment in renal function occurring within 3 days following the intravascular administration of contrast media (CM) and the absence of an alternative aetiology. In spite of the vast clinical importance of CIN...... haemodynamics, regional hypoxia, auto-, and paracrine factors (adenosine, endothelin, reactive oxygen species) to direct cytotoxic effects. Although these potential mediators of CIN will be discussed separately, several factors may act in concert to perturb kidney function after exposure to contrast media. From...... the current knowledge of the mechanisms causing CIN, it is not possible to recommend a certain class of contrast media, except to avoid large doses of CM of the first generation. From a pathophysiological perspective, volume expansion is effective in avoiding CIN, since water permeability of the collecting...

  20. Role of leukotrienes in asthma pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2000-01-01

    Inflammation is an essential component of asthma pathophysiology. While beta(2)-agonists are often used for short-term relief of acute bronchospasm, anti-inflammatory agents are required for the long-term management of chronic inflammation in this disease. Corticosteroids have emerged as the first......-line anti-inflammatory therapy for asthma management. However, in some patients, especially children, the high doses of corticosteroids that may be required to control features of hyperresponsiveness, including exercise-induced asthma, raise safety concerns. Thus, there is a need for complementary anti......-inflammatory, steroid-sparing agents in asthma therapy. Several inflammatory mediators have been targeted in an attempt to thwart this inflammatory process, but so far with little success. The cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLT), LTC(4), LTD(4), and LTE(4), have been shown to be essential mediators in asthma, making them...

  1. New insights into pathophysiology of vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Espinosa-Sanchez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular migraine (VM is a common disorder in which genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors probably contribute to its development. The pathophysiology of VM is unknown; nevertheless in the last few years, several studies are contributing to understand the neurophysiological pathways involved in VM. The current hypotheses are mostly based on the knowledge of migraine itself. The evidence of trigeminal innervation of the labyrinth vessels and the localization of vasoactive neuropeptides in the perivascular afferent terminals of these trigeminal fibers support the involvement of the trigemino-vascular system. The neurogenic inflammation triggered by activation of the trigeminal-vestibulocochlear reflex, with the subsequent inner ear plasma protein extravasation and the release of inflammatory mediators, can contribute to a sustained activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons explaining VM symptoms. The reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs (rostral ventromedial medulla, ventrolateral periaqueductal grey, locus coeruleus and nucleus raphe magnus are critical to understand the pathophysiology of VM. Although cortical spreading depression can affect cortical areas involved in processing vestibular information, functional neuroimaging techniques suggest a dysmodulation in the multimodal sensory integration and processing of vestibular and nociceptive information, resulting from a vestibulo-thalamo-cortical dysfunction, as the pathogenic mechanism underlying VM. The elevated prevalence of VM suggests that multiple functional variants may confer a genetic susceptibility leading to a dysregulation of excitatory-inhibitory balance in brain structures involved in the processing of sensory information, vestibular inputs and pain. The interactions among several functional and structural neural networks could explain the pathogenic

  2. [Whiplash. Epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lønnberg, F

    2001-04-16

    Recent years have seen an increasing number of car occupants with neck complaints following a car collision and a declining number of persons involved in car crashes--a relationship that is not well understood. Presumably less than 5% will suffer from persistent, (long-lasting), disabling neck pain. Although mostly men are involved in motor vehicle accidents, an equal number of men and women seek emergency care, but it is mostly women, who have persistent (long-lasting) neck complaints after a car collision. In general, there is no documentation of specific injury to the brain or spinal cord from a simple whiplash (WAD 1-3). Whiplash-related neck pain is caused by a distortion of the cervical spine, and, as such, should be interpreted as a benign condition with a good prognosis. Whiplash should be considered a risk factor rather than a medical diagnosis. The association between cause (whiplash mechanism) and effect (symptoms) is poor. Persistent (long-lasting) health problems from a whiplash should be treated like other post-traumatic conditions, and need a bio-psycho-social approach.

  3. Neurobehavioral aspects, pathophysiology, and management of Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprecher, David R; Schrock, Lauren; Himle, Michael

    2014-08-01

    This update summarizes progress in understanding Tourette syndrome clinical characteristics, etiology, and treatment over the past year. Premonitory sensory phenomena were found to have important impacts on Tourette syndrome quality of life. A rare genetic form of Tourette syndrome due to L-histidine-decarboxylase mutation, with similar features in human and rodent, has inspired new research on functional anatomy of Tourette syndrome. In response to new data, treatment guidelines have been revised to include behavioral therapy as first-line treatment. Novel dopamine receptor antagonists aripiprazole and ecopipam have shown potential efficacy - as well as tolerability concerns. Recent work has suggested efficacy and tolerability of topiramate and fluphenazine, but more rigorous studies are needed to further understand their role in Tourette syndrome management. Recent consensus guidelines explain when deep brain stimulation can be considered for severe refractory cases under a multidisciplinary team. More research is needed to identify better tolerated treatments for, to understand pathophysiology or functional anatomy of, and to predict or influence longitudinal outcome of Tourette syndrome.

  4. Epidemiology of extremity fractures in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerekamp, M. S. H.; de Muinck Keizer, R. J. O.; Schep, N. W. L.; Ubbink, D. T.; Panneman, M. J. M.; Goslings, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Insight in epidemiologic data of extremity fractures is relevant to identify people at risk. By analyzing age- and gender specific fracture incidence and treatment patterns we may adjust future policy, take preventive measures and optimize health care management. Current epidemiologic data on

  5. Transforming pathophysiology instruction through narrative pedagogy and Socratic questioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, M M

    2001-01-01

    Pathophysiology, heavily content driven, has typically been taught through the use of traditional behavioral pedagogy and a reliance on the formal lecture. The author describes the limitations of this approach to teaching pathophysiology and describes the use of narrative pedagogy and Socratic questioning as alternative methods of instruction to augment lecture methods. Specific strategies for transforming traditional classroom teaching by using Socratic questions in a pathophysiology course for nurse practitioners are described. Student and faculty reactions to the initial efforts to transform pathophysiology instruction are also described.

  6. Redox Dysregulation in the Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulak, Anita; Steullet, Pascal; Cabungcal, Jan-Harry

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are classified as two distinct diseases. However, accumulating evidence shows that both disorders share genetic, pathological, and epidemiological characteristics. Based on genetic and functional findings, redox dysregulation due...... abnormal prefrontal levels of glutathione (GSH), the major cellular redox regulator and antioxidant. Here we review experimental data from rodent models demonstrating that permanent as well as transient GSH deficit results in behavioral, morphological, electrophysiological, and neurochemical alterations...... hypofunction, elevated glutamate levels, impairment of parvalbumin GABA interneurons, abnormal neuronal synchronization, altered dopamine neurotransmission, and deficient myelination. Critical Issues: Treatment with the GSH precursor and antioxidant N-acetylcysteine normalizes some of those deficits in mice...

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gustav Smith, MD, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is the end-stage of all heart disease and arguably constitutes the greatest unmet therapeutic need in cardiovascular medicine today. Classic epidemiological studies have established clinical risk factors for HF, but the cause remains poorly understood in many cases. Biochemical analyses of small case-control series and animal models have described a plethora of molecular characteristics of HF, but a single unifying pathogenic theory is lacking. Heart failure appears to result not only from cardiac overload or injury but also from a complex interplay among genetic, neurohormonal, metabolic, inflammatory, and other biochemical factors acting on the heart. Recent development of robust, high-throughput tools in molecular biology provides opportunity for deep molecular characterization of population-representative cohorts and HF cases (molecular epidemiology, including genome sequencing, profiling of myocardial gene expression and chromatin modifications, plasma composition of proteins and metabolites, and microbiomes. The integration of such detailed information holds promise for improving understanding of HF pathophysiology in humans, identification of therapeutic targets, and definition of disease subgroups beyond the current classification based on ejection fraction which may benefit from improved individual tailoring of therapy. Challenges include: 1 the need for large cohorts with deep, uniform phenotyping; 2 access to the relevant tissues, ideally with repeated sampling to capture dynamic processes; and 3 analytical issues related to integration and analysis of complex datasets. International research consortia have formed to address these challenges and combine datasets, and cohorts with up to 1 million participants are being collected. This paper describes the molecular epidemiology of HF and provides an overview of methods and tissue types and examples of published and ongoing efforts to systematically evaluate molecular

  8. Stress fractures: pathophysiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcuk, George R; Mahanty, Scott R; Skalski, Matthew R; Patel, Dakshesh B; White, Eric A; Gottsegen, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Stress fracture, in its most inclusive description, includes both fatigue and insufficiency fracture. Fatigue fractures, sometimes equated with the term "stress fractures," are most common in runners and other athletes and typically occur in the lower extremities. These fractures are the result of abnormal, cyclical loading on normal bone leading to local cortical resorption and fracture. Insufficiency fractures are common in elderly populations, secondary to osteoporosis, and are typically located in and around the pelvis. They are a result of normal or traumatic loading on abnormal bone. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the hip or knee may cause acute pain that may present in the emergency setting. Medial tibial stress syndrome is a type of stress injury of the tibia related to activity and is a clinical syndrome encompassing a range of injuries from stress edema to frank-displaced fracture. Atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture associated with long-term bisphosphonate therapy is also a recently discovered entity that needs early recognition to prevent progression to a complete fracture. Imaging recommendations for evaluation of stress fractures include initial plain radiographs followed, if necessary, by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is preferred over computed tomography (CT) and bone scintigraphy. Radiographs are the first-line modality and may reveal linear sclerosis and periosteal reaction prior to the development of a frank fracture. MRI is highly sensitive with findings ranging from periosteal edema to bone marrow and intracortical signal abnormality. Additionally, a brief description of relevant clinical management of stress fractures is included.

  9. Atopic Dermatitis in Children: Clinical Features, Pathophysiology and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jonathan J.; Milner, Joshua D.; Stone, Kelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing, highly pruritic skin condition resulting from disruption of the epithelial barrier and associated immune dysregulation in the skin of genetically predisposed hosts. AD generally develops in early childhood, has a characteristic age-dependent distribution and is commonly associated with elevated IgE, peripheral eosinophilia and other allergic diseases. Staphylococcus aureus colonization is common and may contribute to disease progression and severity. Targeted therapies to restore both impaired skin barrier and control inflammation are required for optimal outcomes for patients with moderate to severe disease. Pruritus is universal among patients with AD and has a dominant impact on diminishing quality of life. Medications such as anti-histamines have demonstrated poor efficacy in controlling AD-associated itch. Education of patients regarding the primary underlying defects and provision of a comprehensive skin care plan is essential for disease maintenance and management of flares. PMID:25459583

  10. Hydrocephalus after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocephalus (HCP is a common complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this review, we summarize the advanced research on HCP and discuss the understanding of the molecular originators of HCP and the development of diagnoses and remedies of HCP after SAH. It has been reported that inflammation, apoptosis, autophagy, and oxidative stress are the important causes of HCP, and well-known molecules including transforming growth factor, matrix metalloproteinases, and iron terminally lead to fibrosis and blockage of HCP. Potential medicines for HCP are still in preclinical status, and surgery is the most prevalent and efficient therapy, despite respective risks of different surgical methods, including lamina terminalis fenestration, ventricle-peritoneal shunting, and lumbar-peritoneal shunting. HCP remains an ailment that cannot be ignored and even with various solutions the medical community is still trying to understand and settle why and how it develops and accordingly improve the prognosis of these patients with HCP.

  11. Hereditary Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus: Pathophysiology and Possible Treatment. An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Serena; Carmosino, Monica; Gerbino, Andrea; Svelto, Maria; Procino, Giuseppe

    2017-11-10

    Under physiological conditions, excessive loss of water through the urine is prevented by the release of the antidiuretic hormone arginine-vasopressin (AVP) from the posterior pituitary. In the kidney, AVP elicits a number of cellular responses, which converge on increasing the osmotic reabsorption of water in the collecting duct. One of the key events triggered by the binding of AVP to its type-2 receptor (AVPR2) is the exocytosis of the water channel aquaporin 2 (AQP2) at the apical membrane the principal cells of the collecting duct. Mutations of either AVPR2 or AQP2 result in a genetic disease known as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, which is characterized by the lack of responsiveness of the collecting duct to the antidiuretic action of AVP. The affected subject, being incapable of concentrating the urine, presents marked polyuria and compensatory polydipsia and is constantly at risk of severe dehydration. The molecular bases of the disease are fully uncovered, as well as the genetic or clinical tests for a prompt diagnosis of the disease in newborns. A real cure for nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is still missing, and the main symptoms of the disease are handled with s continuous supply of water, a restrictive diet, and nonspecific drugs. Unfortunately, the current therapeutic options are limited and only partially beneficial. Further investigation in vitro or using the available animal models of the disease, combined with clinical trials, will eventually lead to the identification of one or more targeted strategies that will improve or replace the current conventional therapy and grant NDI patients a better quality of life. Here we provide an updated overview of the genetic defects causing NDI, the most recent strategies under investigation for rescuing the activity of mutated AVPR2 or AQP2, or for bypassing defective AVPR2 signaling and restoring AQP2 plasma membrane expression.

  12. Hereditary Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus: Pathophysiology and Possible Treatment. An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Milano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Under physiological conditions, excessive loss of water through the urine is prevented by the release of the antidiuretic hormone arginine-vasopressin (AVP from the posterior pituitary. In the kidney, AVP elicits a number of cellular responses, which converge on increasing the osmotic reabsorption of water in the collecting duct. One of the key events triggered by the binding of AVP to its type-2 receptor (AVPR2 is the exocytosis of the water channel aquaporin 2 (AQP2 at the apical membrane the principal cells of the collecting duct. Mutations of either AVPR2 or AQP2 result in a genetic disease known as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, which is characterized by the lack of responsiveness of the collecting duct to the antidiuretic action of AVP. The affected subject, being incapable of concentrating the urine, presents marked polyuria and compensatory polydipsia and is constantly at risk of severe dehydration. The molecular bases of the disease are fully uncovered, as well as the genetic or clinical tests for a prompt diagnosis of the disease in newborns. A real cure for nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI is still missing, and the main symptoms of the disease are handled with s continuous supply of water, a restrictive diet, and nonspecific drugs. Unfortunately, the current therapeutic options are limited and only partially beneficial. Further investigation in vitro or using the available animal models of the disease, combined with clinical trials, will eventually lead to the identification of one or more targeted strategies that will improve or replace the current conventional therapy and grant NDI patients a better quality of life. Here we provide an updated overview of the genetic defects causing NDI, the most recent strategies under investigation for rescuing the activity of mutated AVPR2 or AQP2, or for bypassing defective AVPR2 signaling and restoring AQP2 plasma membrane expression.

  13. Hereditary Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus: Pathophysiology and Possible Treatment. An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Serena; Carmosino, Monica; Gerbino, Andrea; Svelto, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, excessive loss of water through the urine is prevented by the release of the antidiuretic hormone arginine-vasopressin (AVP) from the posterior pituitary. In the kidney, AVP elicits a number of cellular responses, which converge on increasing the osmotic reabsorption of water in the collecting duct. One of the key events triggered by the binding of AVP to its type-2 receptor (AVPR2) is the exocytosis of the water channel aquaporin 2 (AQP2) at the apical membrane the principal cells of the collecting duct. Mutations of either AVPR2 or AQP2 result in a genetic disease known as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, which is characterized by the lack of responsiveness of the collecting duct to the antidiuretic action of AVP. The affected subject, being incapable of concentrating the urine, presents marked polyuria and compensatory polydipsia and is constantly at risk of severe dehydration. The molecular bases of the disease are fully uncovered, as well as the genetic or clinical tests for a prompt diagnosis of the disease in newborns. A real cure for nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is still missing, and the main symptoms of the disease are handled with s continuous supply of water, a restrictive diet, and nonspecific drugs. Unfortunately, the current therapeutic options are limited and only partially beneficial. Further investigation in vitro or using the available animal models of the disease, combined with clinical trials, will eventually lead to the identification of one or more targeted strategies that will improve or replace the current conventional therapy and grant NDI patients a better quality of life. Here we provide an updated overview of the genetic defects causing NDI, the most recent strategies under investigation for rescuing the activity of mutated AVPR2 or AQP2, or for bypassing defective AVPR2 signaling and restoring AQP2 plasma membrane expression. PMID:29125546

  14. Coagulopathy: Its Pathophysiology and Treatment in the Injured Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    death. In fact, in their series, 77% of brain-injured patients who died had a coagulopathy at the time of hospital admission.8 Similarly, Faringer et...coagulation process. Arch Surg 1996;131:923–927. 9. Faringer PD, Mullins RJ, Johnson RL, Trunkey DD. Blood component supplementation during massive

  15. Achalasia: A Review of Etiology, Pathophysiology, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Hedayanti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia was a condition marked by peristaltic movement absent in lower esophageal sphincter and segment that hypertonic result in imperfect relaxation during food ingestion. Achalasia incidence did not differ between men and women, account for 1 in 100.000 people every year with prevalence of 10 in 100.000 people, unrelated specifically with ethnic, and has its highest incidence on 30-60 age group. Based on its etiology, it was divided into primary and secondary Achalasia, while based on its motility, it was into hypermotil, hypomotil, and amotil Achalasia. Until present, several therapeutic modalities were available to treat Achalasia, among them was pharmacology therapy, botulinum toxin injection via endoscopy, pneumatic dilatation, Heller myotomy surgery, and Per Oral Endoscopy Myotomy (POEM.

  16. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias: Pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, Alexandra; Palevsky, Harold I

    2018-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hemoglobinopathies and chronic hemolytic anemias. These hematological diseases include - but are not limited to - sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria, and hereditary spherocytosis. Although most studies have been based on the use of echocardiography as a screening tool for pulmonary hypertension as opposed to the gold standard of right heart catheterization for definitive diagnosis, the association between chronic hemolytic anemia and pulmonary hypertension is evident. Studies have shown that patients with SCD and a tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) ≥ 2.5 m/sec are at increased risk of pulmonary hypertension and are at increased mortality risk. Additional markers of risk of pulmonary hypertension and increased mortality include a pro-BNP >160 pg/mL combined with a 6-min walk distance of pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Melatonin and diabetes: from pathophysiology to the treatment perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    V I Konenkov; V V Klimontov; S V Michurina; M A Prudnikova; I Ju Ishenko

    2013-01-01

    Pineal hormone melatonin synchronizes insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis with solar periods. Misalliance between melatonin- mediated circadian rhythms and insulin secretion characterizes diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 (T2DM). Insulin defi- ciency in T1DM is accompanied by increased melatonin production. Conversely, T2DM is characterized by diminished melatonin secretion. In genome-wide association studies the variants of melatonin receptor MT2 gene (rs1387153 and rs10830963...

  18. Melatonin and diabetes: from pathophysiology to the treatment perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Iosifovich Konenkov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pineal hormone melatonin synchronizes insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis with solar periods. Misalliance between melatonin-mediated circadian rhythms and insulin secretion characterizes diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM and type 2 (T2DM. Insulin deficiency in T1DM is accompanied by increased melatonin production. Conversely, T2DM is characterized by diminished melatonin secretion. In genome-wide association studies the variants of melatonin receptor MT2 gene (rs1387153 and rs10830963 were associated with fasting glucose, beta-cell function and T2DM. In experimental models of diabetes melatonin enhanced beta-cell proliferation and neogenesis, improved insulin resistance and alleviated oxidative stress in retina and kidneys. However, further investigation is required to assess the therapeutic value of melatonin in diabetic patients.

  19. Workshop on The Epidemiology of the ATM Gene: Impact on Breast Cancer Risk and Treatment, Present Status and Future Focus, Lillehammer, Norway, 29 June 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, Jonine L; Seminara, Daniela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2002-01-01

    The role of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) heterozygosity in cancer is uncertain. In vitro studies of cells from ATM heterozygotes provide strong evidence of radiation sensitivity. Some, but not all, clinical studies suggest an increased risk of breast cancer among ATM gene carriers, and this risk may be greater among those exposed to radiation. This possible excess risk of breast cancer associated with ATM heterozygosity constitutes the basis for several genetic epidemiological studies designed to clarify the role that the ATM gene plays in the etiology of breast and other cancers. The primary focus of this international, multidisciplinary, National Cancer Institute-sponsored workshop was to discuss ongoing and planned epidemiologic studies aimed at understanding the complexities of the ATM gene and its role in carcinogenesis. The invited participants were from diverse disciplines including molecular and clinical genetics, radiation biology and physics, epidemiology, biostatistics, pathology, and medicine. In the present meeting report, the aims of each project are described

  20. Pathophysiology and Biomarkers in Acute Ischemic Stroke – A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pathophysiology of ischemic stroke is complex, and majorly involves excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, blood-brain barrier dysfunction, apoptosis, etc. Several of the biomarkers are related to these pathophysiologic mechanisms and they may have applications in stroke prediction, diagnosis, assessment, ...

  1. Tinnitus: Network pathophysiology-network pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belen eElgoyhen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus, the phantom perception of sound, is a prevalent disorder. One in 10 adults has clinically significant subjective tinnitus, and for 1 in 100, tinnitus severely affects their quality of life. Despite the significant unmet clinical need for a safe and effective drug targeting tinnitus relief, there is currently not a single FDA-approved drug on the market. The search for drugs that target tinnitus is hampered by the lack of a deep knowledge of the underlying neural substrates of this pathology. Recent studies are increasingly demonstrating that, as described for other central nervous system disorders, tinnitus is a pathology of brain networks. The application of graph theoretical analysis to brain networks has recently provided new information concerning their topology, their robustness and their vulnerability to attacks. Moreover, the philosophy behind drug design and pharmacotherapy in central nervous system pathologies is changing from that of magic bullets that target individual chemoreceptors or disease-causing genes into that of magic shotguns, promiscuous or dirty drugs that target disease-causing networks, also known as network pharmacology. In the present work we provide some insight into how this knowledge could be applied to tinnitus pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy.

  2. Tinnitus: network pathophysiology-network pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgoyhen, Ana B; Langguth, Berthold; Vanneste, Sven; De Ridder, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Tinnitus, the phantom perception of sound, is a prevalent disorder. One in 10 adults has clinically significant subjective tinnitus, and for one in 100, tinnitus severely affects their quality of life. Despite the significant unmet clinical need for a safe and effective drug targeting tinnitus relief, there is currently not a single Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug on the market. The search for drugs that target tinnitus is hampered by the lack of a deep knowledge of the underlying neural substrates of this pathology. Recent studies are increasingly demonstrating that, as described for other central nervous system (CNS) disorders, tinnitus is a pathology of brain networks. The application of graph theoretical analysis to brain networks has recently provided new information concerning their topology, their robustness and their vulnerability to attacks. Moreover, the philosophy behind drug design and pharmacotherapy in CNS pathologies is changing from that of "magic bullets" that target individual chemoreceptors or "disease-causing genes" into that of "magic shotguns," "promiscuous" or "dirty drugs" that target "disease-causing networks," also known as network pharmacology. In the present work we provide some insight into how this knowledge could be applied to tinnitus pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy.

  3. Orthostatic intolerance: potential pathophysiology and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chih-Cherng; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn; Tang, Hung-Shang; Tung, Che-Se

    2004-09-30

    Orthostatic intolerance affects an estimated 1 in 500 persons and causes a wide range of disabilities. After essential hypertension, it is the most frequently encountered dysautonomia, accounting for the majority of patients referred to centers specializing in autonomic disorders. Patients are typically young females with symptoms such as dizziness, visual changes, head and neck discomfort, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety, and, in some cases, syncope. Syncope is the most hazardous symptom of orthostatic intolerance, presumably occurring because of impaired cerebral perfusion and in part to compensatory autonomic mechanisms. The etiology of this syndrome is still unclear but is heterogeneous. Orthostatic intolerance used to be characterized by an overall enhancement of noradrenergic tone at rest in some patients and by a patchy dysautonomia of postganglionic sympathetic fibers with a compensatory cardiac sympathetic activation in others. However, recent advances in molecular genetics are improving our understanding of orthostatic intolerance, such as several genetic diseases (such as Ehler-Danlos syndrome and norepinephrine transporter deficiency) presenting with symptoms typical of orthostatic intolerance. Future work will include investigation of genetic functional mutations underlying interindividual differences in autonomic cardiovascular control, body fluid regulation, and vascular regulation in orthostatic intolerance patients. The goal of this review article is to describe recent advances in understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance and their clinical significance.

  4. Orexinergic system and pathophysiology of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doreulee, N; Alania, M; Vashalomidze, G; Skhirtladze, E; Kapanadze, Ts

    2010-11-01

    Neuropeptids orexins, also known as the hypocretins, are expressed in the lateral hypothalamus. Orexin-containing cells project widely throughout the brains, are crucial for the regulation of wakefulness and dysfunction of this system is associated with pathophysiology of narcolepsy-cataplexy. Orexin neurons play an important role in motivation, feeding and adaptive behaviors. Distribution of orexinergic receptors in the hippocampus tended to the ideas that orexins might be involved in the functions relating to the hippocampus. Effects of neuropeptide orexin-A on epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices were investigated. 500 µm thick hippocampal slices from 8-10 week-old rodents were used. Field excitatory postsynaptic potential (pop-fEPSP) and population spike in CA1 of hippocamopus were registered using standard protocol of in vitro electrophysiological experiments. Initial slope of the fEPSP and amplitude of II pop-spike were measured. Bursting neurons in CA3 were recorded in modified saline. We have found that orexin-A decreases duration/amplitude of multiple discharges of pop-spikes and inhibits spontaneous epileptiform afterdischarges induced by bicuculline methiodide in CA1. Orexin-A also modulates the frequency of discharges of bursting neurons in CA3. Our results suggest possible involvement of orexinergic system in antiepileptic action. Supported by ISTC Grant G-1318.

  5. Metabolic syndrome pathophysiology and clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, Yehuda

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a relatively new definition, designed to help the health care practitioner to easily identify people at risk for the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. With the obesity epidemic, we are witnessing an epidemic of multiple-risk patients. Insulin resistance is the perceived pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and defines its clinical presentation. Hypertension, dyslipedemia, polycystic ovarian syndrome, fatty liver disease, pre-diabetes, sleep and breathing disorder, certain cancers, and cognitive impairment are many of the presentations of the syndrome; patients with any of these conditions are at a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The metabolic syndrome helps identify people at risk to allow early intervention for prevention. Lifestyle modification is the most important part of the management of people with the syndrome. Lately medications--though none approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)--have been recommended by major medical societies when lifestyle modification is not enough or when it fails.

  6. The pathophysiology of trauma-induced coagulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Daniel; Brohi, Karim

    2012-12-01

    Transfusion paradigms and protocols have evolved at a rapid pace in the last few years to ameliorate the adverse effects of trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC). This has occurred despite fragmented and inadequate knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology that they are supposed to treat. This review will collate and assimilate the most recent data about TIC in order to present our state-of-the-art understanding of this condition. TIC was conventionally construed simply as depletion, dysfunction or dilution of procoagulant factors. However, contemporary understanding recognizes it as an imbalance of the dynamic equilibrium between procoagulant factors, anticoagulant factors, platelets, endothelium and fibrinolysis. The endogenous component of TIC (acute traumatic coagulopathy) is not merely a consumptive coagulopathy, but is characterized by isolated factor V inhibition, dysfibrinogenaemia, systemic anticoagulation, impaired platelet function and hyperfibrinolysis. Acute traumatic coagulopathy then becomes exacerbated by hypothermia, acidosis and resuscitation with hypocoagulable fluids. Further improvement in the outcome from trauma-haemorrhage is possible with more refined and tailored haemostatic resuscitation. Achieving this will depend upon a better understanding of the haemostatic defects that develop after injury.

  7. The pathophysiology of amenorrhea in the adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Neville H; Carlson, Jennifer L

    2008-01-01

    Menstrual irregularity is a common occurrence during adolescence, especially within the first 2-3 years after menarche. Prolonged amenorrhea, however, is not normal and can be associated with significant medical morbidity, which differs depending on whether the adolescent is estrogen-deficient or estrogen-replete. Estrogen-deficient amenorrhea is associated with reduced bone mineral density and increased fracture risk, while estrogen-replete amenorrhea can lead to dysfunctional uterine bleeding in the short term and predispose to endometrial carcinoma in the long term. In both situations, appropriate intervention can reduce morbidity. Old paradigms of whom to evaluate for amenorrhea have been challenged by recent research that provides a better understanding of the normal menstrual cycle and its variability. Hypothalamic amenorrhea is the most prevalent cause of amenorrhea in the adolescent age group, followed by polycystic ovary syndrome. In anorexia nervosa, exercise-induced amenorrhea, and amenorrhea associated with chronic illness, an energy deficit results in suppression of hypothalamic secretion of GnRH, mediated in part by leptin. Administration of recombinant leptin to women with hypothalamic amenorrhea has been shown to restore LH pulsatility and ovulatory menstrual cycles. The use of recombinant leptin may improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of hypothalamic amenorrhea in adolescents and may also have therapeutic possibilities.

  8. Pathophysiology of AAA: heredity vs environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björck, Martin; Wanhainen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has a complex pathophysiology, in which both environmental and genetic factors play important roles, the most important being smoking. The recently reported falling prevalence rates of AAA in northern Europe and Australia/New Zeeland are largely explained by healthier smoking habits. Dietary factors and obesity, in particular abdominal obesity, are also of importance. A family history of AAA among first-degree relatives is present in approximately 13% of incident cases. The probability that a monozygotic twin of a person with an AAA has the disease is 24%, 71 times higher than that for a monozygotic twin of a person without AAA. Approximately 1000 SNPs in 100 candidate genes have been studied, and three genome-wide association studies were published, identifying different diverse weak associations. An example of interaction between environmental and genetic factors is the effect of cholesterol, where genetic and dietary factors affect levels of both HDL and LDL. True epigenetic studies have not yet been published. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pathophysiology and Immune Dysfunction in Endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P.; Miller, Caragh; Singh, Sukhbir S.; Thomas, Richard; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent, chronic, proinflammatory disease prevalent in 10% of women of reproductive age worldwide. Characterized by the growth of endometrium-like tissue in aberrant locations outside of the uterus, it is responsible for symptoms including chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, and subfertility that degrade quality of life of women significantly. In Canada, direct and indirect economic cost of endometriosis amounts to 1.8 billion dollars, and this is elevated to 20 billion dollars in the United States. Despite decades of research, the etiology and pathophysiology of endometriosis still remain to be elucidated. This review aims to bring together the current understanding regarding the pathogenesis of endometriosis with specific focus on mechanisms behind vascularization of the lesions and the contribution of immune factors in facilitating lesion establishment and development. The role of hormones, immune cells, and cytokine signaling is highlighted, in addition to discussing the current pharmaceutical options available for management of pain symptoms in women with endometriosis. PMID:26247027

  10. Pathophysiology and Immune Dysfunction in Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Hyun Ahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent, chronic, proinflammatory disease prevalent in 10% of women of reproductive age worldwide. Characterized by the growth of endometrium-like tissue in aberrant locations outside of the uterus, it is responsible for symptoms including chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, and subfertility that degrade quality of life of women significantly. In Canada, direct and indirect economic cost of endometriosis amounts to 1.8 billion dollars, and this is elevated to 20 billion dollars in the United States. Despite decades of research, the etiology and pathophysiology of endometriosis still remain to be elucidated. This review aims to bring together the current understanding regarding the pathogenesis of endometriosis with specific focus on mechanisms behind vascularization of the lesions and the contribution of immune factors in facilitating lesion establishment and development. The role of hormones, immune cells, and cytokine signaling is highlighted, in addition to discussing the current pharmaceutical options available for management of pain symptoms in women with endometriosis.

  11. [Scientific, practical and educational aspects of clinical epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briko, N I

    2012-01-01

    This article defines clinical epidemiology and describes its goal and objectives. The author claims that clinical epidemiology is a section of epidemiology which underlies the development of evidence-based standards for diagnostics, treatment and prevention and helps to select the appropriate algorithm for each clinical case. The study provides a comprehensive overview of the relationship between clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine. Epidemiological research is shown to be methodological basis of clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine with randomized controlled trials being the "gold standard" for obtaining reliable data. The key stages in the history of clinical epidemiology are discussed and further development of clinical epidemiology and the integration of courses on clinical epidemiology in education is outlined for progress in medical research and health care practice.

  12. [Vertigo and falls in the elderly. Part 1: epidemiology, pathophysiology, vestibular diagnostics and risk of falling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, L E; Nikolaus, T; Schaaf, H; Hörmann, K

    2008-08-01

    Disorders of the equilibrium function in the elderly will increase in the coming years due to demographic changes in Germany. In addition to a reduction in the quality of life of affected patients, the risk of suffering from a fall increases with age. At the morphological level age-specific changes of the peripheral vestibular structures, somatosensory pathways and vision can be found, such as degenerative alterations, reduced number of cells and receptors and an accumulation of lipofuscin. Disorders of the equilibrium function in old age are individual-specific, complex procedures which develop from age-related physiological, degenerative alterations in the components of the sensomotor system which maintain equilibrium and can come into being together with vestibular and non-vestibular accompanying diseases as well as psychological factors.

  13. Canine and feline obesity: a review of pathophysiology, epidemiology, and clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loftus JP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available John P Loftus, Joseph J Wakshlag Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Medical Center, Ithaca, NY, USAAbstract: Canine and feline obesity rates have reached pandemic proportions and are similar to those in humans, with approximately 30%–40% of dogs and cats being overweight to obese. Obesity has been associated with other health problems, including osteoarthritis, renal disease, skin disease, insulin resistance, and neoplasia in dogs, while in cats obesity is associated with dermatological issues, diabetes mellitus, neoplasia, and urolithiasis. The health issues appear to be slightly different across the two species, which may be due to some inherent differences in the hormonal milieu involved in obesity that differs between the dog and the cat. In this review, we discuss the complicated nature of the pathogenesis of obesity, the hormonal stimulus for orexigenic and anorexigenic behavior, adipose tissue as an endocrine organ, and most importantly, clinical management of the number one disease in canine and feline medicine.Keywords: obesity, canine, feline, veterinary

  14. Female urinary incontinence, from pregnancy to menopause: a review of epidemiological and pathophysiological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritel, Xavier; Ringa, Virginie; Quiboeuf, Emeline; Fauconnier, Arnaud

    2012-08-01

    Hypotheses that might explain urinary incontinence during pregnancy and after childbirth have been examined. The prevalence of urinary incontinence reaches a maximum during pregnancy and decreases after childbirth. Cesarean delivery is associated with lower rates of stress incontinence than vaginal delivery. Women delivered by cesarean section differ from women who had a vaginal delivery through pre-existing characteristics associated with the incontinence risk, producing a selection bias. The only randomized trial (intention of vaginal delivery vs. elective caesarean section) was not conclusive. The suspected etiological factors consist of congenital elements, obesity, aging, pregnancy and vaginal delivery. They are likely to have an effect at different times and on different portions of the urethral sphincter complex. Unfortunately, there exist no cohorts facilitating description of the natural history of female urinary incontinence. Given the small amount of usable data available, it is not possible to draw any conclusions concerning the possible long-term protective effects of cesarean section. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. Canine and feline obesity: a review of pathophysiology, epidemiology, and clinical management

    OpenAIRE

    Wakshlag, Joseph J; Loftus,John

    2014-01-01

    John P Loftus, Joseph J Wakshlag Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Medical Center, Ithaca, NY, USAAbstract: Canine and feline obesity rates have reached pandemic proportions and are similar to those in humans, with approximately 30%–40% of dogs and cats being overweight to obese. Obesity has been associated with other health problems, including osteoarthritis, renal disease, skin disease, insulin resistance, and neoplasia in dogs, while in cats obesity is...

  16. Methodological characteristics and treatment effect sizes in oral health randomised controlled trials: Is there a relationship? Protocol for a meta-epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltaji, Humam; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Cummings, Greta G; Amin, Maryam; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2014-02-25

    It is fundamental that randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are properly conducted in order to reach well-supported conclusions. However, there is emerging evidence that RCTs are subject to biases which can overestimate or underestimate the true treatment effect, due to flaws in the study design characteristics of such trials. The extent to which this holds true in oral health RCTs, which have some unique design characteristics compared to RCTs in other health fields, is unclear. As such, we aim to examine the empirical evidence quantifying the extent of bias associated with methodological and non-methodological characteristics in oral health RCTs. We plan to perform a meta-epidemiological study, where a sample size of 60 meta-analyses (MAs) including approximately 600 RCTs will be selected. The MAs will be randomly obtained from the Oral Health Database of Systematic Reviews using a random number table; and will be considered for inclusion if they include a minimum of five RCTs, and examine a therapeutic intervention related to one of the recognised dental specialties. RCTs identified in selected MAs will be subsequently included if their study design includes a comparison between an intervention group and a placebo group or another intervention group. Data will be extracted from selected trials included in MAs based on a number of methodological and non-methodological characteristics. Moreover, the risk of bias will be assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Effect size estimates and measures of variability for the main outcome will be extracted from each RCT included in selected MAs, and a two-level analysis will be conducted using a meta-meta-analytic approach with a random effects model to allow for intra-MA and inter-MA heterogeneity. The intended audiences of the findings will include dental clinicians, oral health researchers, policymakers and graduate students. The aforementioned will be introduced to the findings through workshops, seminars, round

  17. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia - A Review of Pathophysiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory Features and Emerging Treatment Options. ... Research has reached advanced stage on the use of alternative drugs (eg Nilotinib and Desatinib) especially in resistant cases. It is hoped that these new drugs will become the treatment of ...

  18. Nondopaminergic neurotransmission in the pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udvardi, Patrick T; Nespoli, Ester; Rizzo, Francesca; Hengerer, Bastian; Ludolph, Andrea G

    2013-01-01

    A major pathophysiological role for the dopaminergic system in Tourette's syndrome (TS) has been presumed ever since the discovery that dopamine-receptor antagonists can alleviate tics. Especially recent molecular genetic studies, functional imaging studies, and some rare postmortem studies have given more and more hints that other neurotransmitter systems are involved as well. Dysfunction in the dopamine metabolism-in particular during early development-might lead to counter-regulations in the other systems or vice versa. This chapter will give an overview of the studies that prove the involvement of other neurotransmitter systems such as the major monoaminergic neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin, and histamine; the most important excitatory neurotransmitter, the amino acid glutamate; the major inhibitory neurotransmitter y-aminobutyric acid, as well as acetylcholine, endocannabinoid, corticoid; and others. These studies will hopefully lead to fundamental advances in the psychopharmacological treatment of TS. While tic disorders have been previously treated mainly with dopamine antagonists, some authors already favor alpha-agonists. Clinical trials with glutamate agonists and antagonists and compounds influencing the histaminergic system are currently being conducted. Since the different neurotransmitter systems consist of several receptor subtypes which might mediate different effects on locomotor activity, patients with TS may respond differentially to selective agonists or antagonists. Effects of agonistic or antagonistic compounds on tic symptoms might also be dose dependent. Further studies will lead to a broader spectrum of psychopharmacological treatment options in TS. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical Epidemiology Of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a huge public health problem because of its high morbidity and disability. The epidemiology of stroke is of relevance to construct practical paradigms to tackle this major health issue in the community. Recent data have shown that about 72-86% of strokes are ischemic, 9-18% are due to hemorrhage (intracerebral of subarachnoid and the rest are undefined. The risk factors for stroke are multiple and combined. At present, stroke is no more considered as unavoidable and untreatable. It is an emergency and specialized units and teams improve outcome and lower costs. Death related to stroke is declining in many countries and in both sexes. This decrease in multifactorial. The detection and more effective treatment of hypertension may play an important factor, as well as the improved medical care and improvement in diagnostic procedures. While stroke incidence appears stable and stroke mortality is slowly declining, the absolute magnitude of stroke is likely to grow over the next 30 years. as the population ages, the absolute number of stroke victims and demands on healthcare and other support systems is likely to increase substantially in the future. Keeping this in perspective, this chapter shall focus on the epidemiology of stroke in the world and in Indian, in particular.

  20. Epidemiology of IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IBD? Projects and Partners Data and Statistics Resources Epidemiology of the IBD Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... 5:1424-9. 2 Loftus EV, Jr. Clinical epidemiology of inflammatory bowel disease: Incidence, prevalence, and environmental ...

  1. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  2. Pathophysiological characterization of asthma transitions across adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Syed Hasan; Raza, Abid; Lau, Laurie; Bawakid, Khalid; Karmaus, Wilfried; Zhang, Hongmei; Ewart, Susan; Patil, Veersh; Roberts, Graham; Kurukulaaratchy, Ramesh

    2014-11-29

    Adolescence is a period of change, which coincides with disease remission in a significant proportion of subjects with childhood asthma. There is incomplete understanding of the changing characteristics underlying different adolescent asthma transitions. We undertook pathophysiological characterization of transitional adolescent asthma phenotypes in a longitudinal birth cohort. The Isle of Wight Birth Cohort (N = 1456) was reviewed at 1, 2, 4, 10 and 18-years. Characterization included questionnaires, skin tests, spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide, bronchial challenge and (in a subset of 100 at 18-years) induced sputum. Asthma groups were "never asthma" (no asthma since birth), "persistent asthma" (asthma at age 10 and 18), "remission asthma" (asthma at age 10 but not at 18) and "adolescent-onset asthma" (asthma at age 18 but not at age 10). Participants whose asthma remitted during adolescence had lower bronchial reactivity (odds ratio (OR) 0.30; CI 0.10 -0.90; p = 0.03) at age 10 plus greater improvement in lung function (forced expiratory flow 25-75% gain: 1.7 L; 1.0-2.9; p = 0.04) compared to persistent asthma by age 18. Male sex (0.3; 0.1-0.7; p adolescent-onset asthma showed eosinophilic airway inflammation (3.0%, 0.7-6.6), not seen in persistent asthma (1.0%, 0-3.9), while remission group had the lowest sputum eosinophil count (0.3%, 0-1.4) and lowest eosinophils/neutrophils ratio of 0.0 (Interquartile range: 0.1). Asthma remission during adolescence is associated with lower initial BHR and greater gain in small airways function, while adolescent-onset asthma is primarily eosinophilic.

  3. Chagas disease. A new pathophysiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redruello, M.; Masoli, O.; Hasson, I.; Cragnolino, D.; Traverso, S.; Perez Balino, N.; Sarmiento, R.; Lazzari, J.; Luluaga, E.

    2002-01-01

    Background: There is scarce information on myocardial perfusion abnormalities and on the coronary vasomotor condition in Chagas disease patients. Aims: To assess regional perfusion abnormalities and the coronary vasomotor response of patients in the chronic phase of Chagas disease. Methods: With the use of 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT imaging and cold pressor test and intracoronary acetylcoline (ACH) perfusion, we studied 9 patients aged 42,6±12 years, 4 males, in the chronic stage of Chagas disease (5 with the indeterminate form and 4 with heart lesion) with normal coronary arteries. Vasomotor responses to intracoronary increasing doses of ACH and to a single dose of nitroglycerine (NTG) were assessed with digital quantitative angiography. Regional myocardial perfusion was evaluated at rest and after cold pressor test by a semi quantitative score analysis in an 18-segment model with 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT images. Results were expressed as mean ± 2SD. Differences between continuous variables were measured by two tails Student's t test for paired variables and the significance level was set at 5 %. Results: All patients had regional perfusion defects and abnormal vasomotor response. The diameter of the left anterior descending artery decreased 34% from a basal diameter of 3.66∫0.95 mm down to 2.42±0.74 mm after maximal response to ACH (p<0.002). NTG infusion augmented its diameter to 3.86±0.77 mm (p<0.0002) that is a 60% increase from post ACH diameter. Myocardial perfusion score was 1∫2.66 at rest and 6.22±3.6 after cold pressor test (p<0.0001). Conclusions: This group of patients in the chronic phase of Chagas disease showed an abnormal vasoconstrictive response to intracoronary ACH and cold-induced perfusion defects suggesting that endothelial dysfunction plays a role in the pathophysiology of chronic Chagas heart disease

  4. Epilepsy in autism: A pathophysiological consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yoshiko; Nagao, Yuri; Kimura, Kazue; Hachimori, Kei; Segawa, Masaya

    2010-11-01

    Eighty cases of idiopathic autism with epilepsy and 97 cases without epilepsy were studied to evaluate the pathophysiology of epilepsy in autism. The initial visit to this clinic ranged 8months-30years 3months of age, and the current ages are 5years 8months-42years 3months, 60% reaching to over 30years of age. The average follow up duration is 22.2years±9.4years. The ages of onset of epilepsy were from 7months to 30years of age, with the two peaks at 3.2years and 16.7years. EEG central focus appeared earlier than frontal focus. Abnormality of locomotion and atonic NREM were observed more frequently in epileptic group. These suggest the neuronal system related to abnormality of locomotion and atonic NREM, which are the hypofunction of the brainstem monoaminergic system, is the pathomechanism underling the epilepsy in autism. By showing the abnormal sleep-wake rhythm and locomotion being the very initial symptoms in autism, we had shown the hypofunction of the brainstem monoaminergic system is the initial pathomechanism of autism. Thus, epilepsy in autism is not the secondary manifestation, but one of the pathognomonic symptoms of autism. The brainstem monoaminergic system project to the wider cortical area, and the initial monoaminergic hypofunction may lead to the central focus which appears earlier. The failure of the monoaminergic (serotonergic) system causes dysfunction of the pedunculo-pontine nucleus (PPN) and induces dysfunction of the dopamine (DA) system, and with development of the DA receptor supersensitivity consequently disinhibits the thalamo-frontal pathway, which after maturation of this pathway in teens cause the epileptogenesis in the frontal cortex. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Faecal soiling: pathophysiology of postdefaecatory incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciani, F

    2013-08-01

    Passive postdefaecatory incontinence is poorly understood and yet is an important clinical problem. The aim of this study was to characterize the pathophysiology of postdefaecatory incontinence in patients affected by faecal soiling. Seventy-two patients (30 women, age range 49-79 years; 42 men, age range, 53-75 years) affected by faecal passive incontinence with faecal soiling were included in the study. Two patient groups were identified: Group 1 comprised 42 patients with postdefaecatory incontinence and Group 2 had 30 patients without incontinence after bowel movements. After a preliminary clinical evaluation, including the Faecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI) score and the obstructed defaecation syndrome (ODS) score, all patients of Groups 1 and 2 were studied by means of endoanal ultrasound and anorectal manometry. The results were compared with those from 20 healthy control subjects. A significantly higher ODS score was found in Group 1 (P IAS) in Group 2 (P IAS atrophy and the FISI score (ρs 0.78; P < 0.03). Anal resting pressure (Pmax and Pm ) was significantly lower in Group 2 (P < 0.04). The straining test was considered positive in 30 (71.4%) patients in Group 1, significantly greater than in Group 2 (P < 0.01). A significantly higher conscious rectal sensitivity threshold (CRST) was found in Group 1 patients (P < 0.01). The ODS score, a positive straining test and high CRST values suggest that postdefaecatory incontinence is secondary to impaired defaecation. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. Evaluation of epidemiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breckow, J.

    1995-01-01

    The publication is intended for readers with a professional background in radiation protection who are not experts in the field of epidemiology. The potentials and the limits of epidemiology are shown and concepts and terminology of radioepidemilogic studies as well as epidemiology in general are explained, in order to provide the necessary basis for understanding or performing evaluations of epidemiologic studies. (orig./VHE) [de

  7. Depressive Disorder, Anxiety Disorder and Chronic Pain: Multiple Manifestations of a Common Clinical and Pathophysiological Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango-Dávila, Cesar A; Rincón-Hoyos, Hernán G

    A high proportion of depressive disorders are accompanied by anxious manifestations, just as depression and anxiety often present with many painful manifestations, or conversely, painful manifestations cause or worsen depressive and anxious expressions. There is increasingly more evidence of the pathophysiological, and neurophysiological and technical imaging similarity of pain and depression. Narrative review of the pathophysiological and clinical aspects of depression and chronic pain comorbidity. Research articles are included that emphasise the most relevant elements related to understanding the pathophysiology of both manifestations. The pathological origin, physiology and clinical approach to these disorders have been more clearly established with the latest advances in biochemical and cellular techniques, as well as the advent of imaging technologies. This information is systematised with comprehensive images and clinical pictures. The recognition that the polymorphism of inflammation-related genes generates susceptibility to depressive manifestations and may modify the response to antidepressant treatments establishes that the inflammatory response is not only an aetiopathogenic component of pain, but also of stress and depression. Likewise, the similarity in approach with images corroborates not only the structural, but the functional and pathophysiological analogy between depression and chronic pain. Knowledge of depression-anxiety-chronic pain comorbidity is essential in the search for effective therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Maladaptive Reward-Learning and Impulse Control Disorders in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease: A Clinical Overview and Pathophysiology Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee-Young Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Impulse control disorders (ICD in Parkinson’s disease (PD are a disabling non-motor symptom with frequencies of 13–35% among patients receiving dopamine replacement therapy. ICD in PD is strongly associated with dopaminergic drug use, especially non-ergot dopamine agonists (DA. However, individual susceptibility and disease-related neural changes are also important contributors to the development of ICD. Discrepancies between nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopaminergic degeneration and non-physiological administration of dopaminergic drugs may induce abnormal ’hyperstimulation’ of the mesolimbic system, which alters reward-learning behaviors in PD patients. In addition, DA can make patients more impulsive during decision-making and seek risk-taking behaviors. DA intake is also related to the biased representation of rewards. Ultimately, loss of negative feedback control due to dysfunctional frontostriatal connections is necessary for the establishment of ICD in PD. The subsequent behavioral and neural changes are affected by PD treatment and disease progression; thus, proper treatment guidelines for physicians are needed to prevent the development of ICD. Future studies aimed at producing novel therapeutics to control the risk factors for ICD or treat ICD behaviors in PD are warranted. This review summarizes recent advances from epidemiological and pathophysiological studies on ICD in PD. Management principles and limitations of current therapeutics are briefly discussed.

  9. Pathophysiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Chronic Parenchymal Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inderjit; Ma, Kevin Cong; Berlin, David Adam

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension commonly complicates chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease. The association of chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension portends a worse prognosis. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension differs in the presence or absence of lung disease. We describe the physiological determinants of the normal pulmonary circulation to better understand the pathophysiological factors implicated in chronic parenchymal lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of 3 forms of chronic lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and sarcoidosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation in Huntington’s Disease—Preliminary Evidence on Pathophysiology, Efficacy and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Wojtecki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is one of the most disabling degenerative movement disorders, as it not only affects the motor system but also leads to cognitive disabilities and psychiatric symptoms. Deep brain stimulation (DBS of the pallidum is a promising symptomatic treatment targeting the core motor symptom: chorea. This article gives an overview of preliminary evidence on pathophysiology, safety and efficacy of DBS in HD.

  11. Hepatorenal Syndrome: Aetiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Low

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal impairment is common in patients with chronic liver disease, occurring in approximately 19% of hospitalised patients with cirrhosis. A variety of types of renal impairment are recognised. The most important of these is the hepatorenal syndrome, a functional renal impairment due to circulatory and neurohormonal abnormalities that underpin cirrhosis. It is one of the most severe complications of cirrhosis with survival often measured in weeks to months. A variety of treatment options exist with early diagnosis and appropriate treatment providing the best hope for cure. This paper provides a comprehensive and up-to-date review of hepatorenal syndrome and lays out the topic according to the following sections: pathophysiology, historical developments, diagnostic criteria and limitations, epidemiology, precipitating factors, predictors, clinical and laboratory findings, prognosis, treatment options, prophylaxis, and conclusion.

  12. [Tardive dyskinesia--diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazamatsuri, H

    1993-11-01

    Tardive dyskinesia is defined as a syndrome consisting of abnormal, stereotypical involuntary movements usually of choreoathetoid type, principally affected the mouth, face, limbs and trunk, which occurs relatively late in the course of neuroleptic drug treatment and in the etiology of which the drug treatment is a necessary factor. Presently, the prevalence of tardive dyskinesia in the hospitalized patients in psychiatric hospitals in Japan is estimated to be 20-30%. Epidemiology, possible pathophysiology and symptomatology of tardive dyskinesia are briefly described. Differential diagnosis between this syndrome and other involuntary movements such as psychotic mannerism, senile orofacial dyskinesia, rabbit's syndrome, Pisa syndrome or Meige's syndrome is discussed. Several drugs to suppress involuntary movements of tardive dyskinesia are described. However, there appears to be no consistently reliable therapies for patients who develop the tardive dyskinesia. Treatment for this syndrome, other than neuroleptic withdrawal, are still uncertain.

  13. Patient's behavior and attitudes toward the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia among patients with the risk of disease progression: prospective study by "Prostate and Expectations of Treatment Epidemiology Research (PETER) study group".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibl, Peter; Klatte, Tobias; Laurinc, Peter; Tomaškin, Roman; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Helbich, Miroslav; Fackovcova, Danica; Bujdák, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate patients attitudes with benign prostatic hyperplasia at the risk of progression during a 12-month period of observation. A total of 426 patients from 45 outpatients centers were included and prospectively followed. Inclusion criteria were: age > 50 years, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) > 8, prostate volume > 30 cm(3) (transabdominal ultrasound) and PSA > 1.5 to study. Prostate and Expectations of Treatment Epidemiology Research study highlights and reflects on patients behavior and self-perception, patients self-perception of the disease and therapeutic priorities during the 1 year of observation.

  14. Pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of hypothalamic obesity in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja Hye Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus plays a key role in the regulation of body weight by balancing the intake of food, energy expenditure, and body fat stores, as evidenced by the fact that most monogenic syndromes of morbid obesity result from mutations in genes expressed in the hypothalamus. Hypothalamic obesity is a result of impairment in the hypothalamic regulatory centers of body weight and energy expenditure, and is caused by structural damage to the hypothalamus, radiotherapy, Prader-Willi syndrome, and mutations in the LEP, LEPR, POMC, MC4R and CART genes. The pathophysiology includes loss of sensitivity to afferent peripheral humoral signals, such as leptin, dysregulated insulin secretion, and impaired activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Dysregulation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 activity and melatonin may also have a role in the development of hypothalamic obesity. Intervention of this complex entity requires simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms that are deranged in patients with hypothalamic obesity. Despite a great deal of theoretical understanding, effective treatment for hypothalamic obesity has not yet been developed. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that control food intake and energy homeostasis and pathophysiology of hypothalamic obesity can be the cornerstone of the development of new treatments options. Early identification of patients at-risk can relieve the severity of weight gain by the provision of dietary and behavioral modification, and antiobesity medication. This review summarizes recent advances of the pathophysiology, endocrine characteristics, and treatment strategies of hypothalamic obesity.

  15. The Pathophysiological Effects of Acrylamide in Albino Wister Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shler Akram Faqe Mahmood

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the pathophysiological effects of suspected compounds are conducted in rodent species, especially rats and mice, to determine the potential toxic effects of a particular compound. In the assessment of acrylamide (ACR which is available as a dietary compound in daily food stuffs, the potential toxicity was determined following the method described earlier. In this study, Albino Wister rats were used and were observed for clinical abnormalities, changes in food consumption, a n d s y m p t o m s o f toxicity over a period of two months following the oral administration of ACR. Among the parameters used to assess the effect of ACR were include ovarian histopathology, blood sugar, haemogram and lipid profile. The most notable clinical abnormalities observed in a few rats were a rough coat and decreased activity. None of the rats died or howedbehavioural change resulting from treatment with ACR. The concentration of serum biochemical parameters and haemogram showed significant differences between normal and treated rats. Histological examination of the ovaries of the treated rats showed great abnormalities as well. In fact, oral ACR doses are practically toxic with regard to rats after exposure for two months at a dose rate of 30 mg/kg, suggesting the compound is quite non-innocuous.

  16. Nonmotor fluctuations: phenotypes, pathophysiology, management, and open issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, Joseph; Koschel, Jiri; Oehlwein, Christian; Seppi, Klaus; Urban, Peter; Winkler, Christian; Wüllner, Ullrich; Storch, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative multisystem disorder characterized by progressive motor symptoms such as bradykinesia, tremor and muscle rigidity. Over the course of the disease, numerous non-motor symptoms, sometimes preceding the onset of motor symptoms, significantly impair patients' quality of life. The significance of non-motor symptoms may outweigh the burden through progressive motor incapacity, especially in later stages of the disease. The advanced stage of the disease is characterized by motor complications such as fluctuations and dyskinesias induced by the long-term application of levodopa therapy. In recent years, it became evident that various non-motor symptoms such as psychiatric symptoms, fatigue and pain also show fluctuations after chronic levodopa therapy (named non-motor fluctuations or NMFs). Although NMFs have moved into the focus of interest, current national guidelines on the treatment of PD may refer to non-motor symptoms and their management, but do not mention NMF, and do not contain recommendations on their management. The present article summarizes major issues related to NMF including clinical phenomenology and pathophysiology, and outlines a number of open issues and topics for future research.

  17. [Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrup, I; Warnecke, T

    2016-07-01

    Oropharyngeal and esophageal dysphagia are a frequent, but seldom diagnosed symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). More than 80 % of patients with PD develop dysphagia during the course of their disease leading to a reduced quality of life, complicated medication intake, malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. The underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. Impaired dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms of the cortical swallowing network as well as peripheral neuromuscular involvement have been suggested to contribute to its multifactorial genesis. Diagnostic screening methods include PD-specific questionnaires and a modified water test. Fiber optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS), which complement each other, are the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. For evaluation of esophageal dysphagia, the high-resolution manometry (HRM) may be a helpful tool. In addition to dysphagia-specific treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs), optimized dopaminergic medication is a meaningful therapeutic option. A promising novel method is intensive training of expiratory muscle strength (EMST). Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinically relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Ankle sprain: pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tricia J Hubbard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tricia J Hubbard, Erik A WikstromUNC Charlotte, Department of Kinesiology, CharlotteAbstract: With the high percentage (up to 75% of initial lateral ankle sprains (LAS leading to repetitive sprains and chronic symptoms, it is imperative to better understand how best to treat and rehabilitate LAS events. The purpose of this paper is to review LAS pathophysiology, predisposing factors, and the current evidence regarding therapeutic modalities and exercises used in the treatment of LAS. Functional rehabilitation, early mobilization with support, is the current standard of care for LAS. However, the high percentage of reinjury occurrence and development of chronic symptoms (up to 75% after a LAS, suggests the current standard of care may not be effective. Recent evidence has shown the need for more stringent immobilization to facilitate ligament healing and restoration of joint stability and function after a LAS. Additionally, the importance of adding adjunctive therapies, specifically joint mobilizations and balance training have been shown to improve function and decrease the incidence of reinjury after a LAS. Modifying current rehabilitation protocols to include protecting the ankle joint with stringent immobilization, and including joint mobilizations and balance training may be the first step to decreasing the incidence of short and long term ankle joint dysfunction.Keywords: rehabilitation, recurrent sprains, chronic ankle instability (CAI

  19. Genetics of liver disease: From pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Tom H; Lammert, Frank; Thompson, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    Paralleling the first 30 years of the Journal of Hepatology we have witnessed huge advances in our understanding of liver disease and physiology. Genetic advances have played no small part in that. Initial studies in the 1970s and 1980s identified the strong major histocompatibility complex associations in autoimmune liver diseases. During the 1990 s, developments in genomic technologies drove the identification of genes responsible for Mendelian liver diseases. Over the last decade, genome-wide association studies have allowed for the dissection of the genetic susceptibility to complex liver disorders, in which also environmental co-factors play important roles. Findings have allowed the identification and elaboration of pathophysiological processes, have indicated the need for reclassification of liver diseases and have already pointed to new disease treatments. In the immediate future genetics will allow further stratification of liver diseases and contribute to personalized medicine. Challenges exist with regard to clinical implementation of rapidly developing technologies and interpretation of the wealth of accumulating genetic data. The historical perspective of genetics in liver diseases illustrates the opportunities for future research and clinical care of our patients. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Estrogens and Androgens in Skeletal Physiology and Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Maria; Laurent, Michaël R; Dubois, Vanessa; Claessens, Frank; O'Brien, Charles A; Bouillon, Roger; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Manolagas, Stavros C

    2017-01-01

    Estrogens and androgens influence the growth and maintenance of the mammalian skeleton and are responsible for its sexual dimorphism. Estrogen deficiency at menopause or loss of both estrogens and androgens in elderly men contribute to the development of osteoporosis, one of the most common and impactful metabolic diseases of old age. In the last 20 years, basic and clinical research advances, genetic insights from humans and rodents, and newer imaging technologies have changed considerably the landscape of our understanding of bone biology as well as the relationship between sex steroids and the physiology and pathophysiology of bone metabolism. Together with the appreciation of the side effects of estrogen-related therapies on breast cancer and cardiovascular diseases, these advances have also drastically altered the treatment of osteoporosis. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of action of estrogens and androgens on bone, their influences on skeletal homeostasis during growth and adulthood, the pathogenetic mechanisms of the adverse effects of their deficiency on the female and male skeleton, as well as the role of natural and synthetic estrogenic or androgenic compounds in the pharmacotherapy of osteoporosis. We highlight latest advances on the crosstalk between hormonal and mechanical signals, the relevance of the antioxidant properties of estrogens and androgens, the difference of their cellular targets in different bone envelopes, the role of estrogen deficiency in male osteoporosis, and the contribution of estrogen or androgen deficiency to the monomorphic effects of aging on skeletal involution. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Astroglial role in the pathophysiology of status epilepticus: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Sánchez, Karina; Mogilevskaya, Maria; Rodríguez-Pérez, John; Rubiano, María G; Javela, José J; González-Reyes, Rodrigo E

    2018-06-01

    Status epilepticus is a medical emergency with elevated morbidity and mortality rates, and represents a leading cause of epilepsy-related deaths. Though status epilepticus can occur at any age, it manifests more likely in children and elderly people. Despite the common prevalence of epileptic disorders, a complete explanation for the mechanisms leading to development of self-limited or long lasting seizures (as in status epilepticus) are still lacking. Apart from neurons, research evidence suggests the involvement of immune and glial cells in epileptogenesis. Among glial cells, astrocytes represent an ideal target for the study of the pathophysiology of status epilepticus, due to their key role in homeostatic balance of the central nervous system. During status epilepticus, astroglial cells are activated by the presence of cytokines, damage associated molecular patterns and reactive oxygen species. The persistent activation of astrocytes leads to a decrease in glutamate clearance with a corresponding accumulation in the synaptic extracellular space, increasing the chance of neuronal excitotoxicity. Moreover, major alterations in astrocytic gap junction coupling, inflammation and receptor expression, facilitate the generation of seizures. Astrocytes are also involved in dysregulation of inhibitory transmission in the central nervous system and directly participate in ionic homeostatic alterations during status epilepticus. In the present review, we focus on the functional and structural changes in astrocytic activity that participate in the development and maintenance of status epilepticus, with special attention on concurrent inflammatory alterations. We also include potential astrocytic treatment targets for status epilepticus.

  2. A potential pathophysiological role for galectins and the renin-angiotensin system in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Sandra M; Dechend, Ralf; Barrientos, Gabriela; Staff, Anne Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses a potential role of galectins and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia (PE). Preeclampsia affects between 3 and 5 % of all pregnancies and is a heterogeneous disease, which may be caused by multiple factors. The only cure is the delivery of the placenta, which may result in a premature delivery and baby. Probably due to its heterogeneity, PE studies in human have hitherto only led to the identification of a limited number of factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Animal models, particularly in mice and rats, have been used to gain further insight into the molecular pathology behind PE. In this review, we discuss the picture emerging from human and animal studies pointing to galectins and the RAS being associated with the PE syndrome and affecting a broad range of cellular signaling components. Moreover, we review the epidemiological evidence for PE increasing the risk of future cardiovascular disease later in life.

  3. Antisocial Behavioral Syndromes in Adulthood and Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment over Three-Year Follow-Up: Results from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B; Dawson, Deborah A; Grant, Bridget F

    2010-07-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is associated with poorer treatment outcomes, but more help seeking, for alcohol use disorders (AUDs); however, associations of ASPD with AUD treatment in the general population have not been studied prospectively. To examine prediction of treatment over 3-year follow-up among adults with AUDs by baseline ASPD and syndromal adult antisocial behavior without conduct disorder before age 15 (AABS). Face-to-face interviews with 34,653 respondents to the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, of whom 3875 had prevalent AUDs between Waves 1 and 2 and ASPD, AABS, or no antisocial syndrome at Wave 1. In unadjusted analyses, baseline ASPD predicted AUD treatment but AABS did not. After adjustment for additional need, predisposing, and enabling factors, antisocial syndromes did not predict treatment. Baseline predictors of treatment included more past-year AUD symptoms, and past-year nicotine dependence and AUD treatment. That baseline antisocial syndrome did not predict AUD treatment may reflect strong associations of antisociality with previously identified predictors of help seeking.

  4. Pathophysiological basis of pharmacotherapy in the hepatorenal syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens H

    2005-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a functional and reversible impairment of renal function in patients with severe cirrhosis. Major pathophysiological elements include liver dysfunction, a circulatory derangement with central hypovolaemia and neurohumoral activation of potent vasoactive systems leading...

  5. Pathophysiology of shunt dysfunction in shunt treated hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blegvad, C.; Skjolding, A D; Broholm, H

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that shunt dysfunction in the ventricular catheter and the shunt valve is caused by different cellular responses. We also hypothesized that the cellular responses depend on different pathophysiological mechanisms....

  6. Visceral hypersensitivity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome:pathophysiological mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerckhoffs, A.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disease characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort associated with a disordered defecation. No unique pathophysiological mechanism has been identified. It is most likely a multifactorial disease involving alterations in intestinal microbiota

  7. Epidemiologia e tratamento das úlceras de pressão: experiência de 77 casos Epidemiological profile and treatment of pressure sores: experience with 77 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Paulino Costa

    2005-01-01

    crompression due to sitting, lying or wearing brace in a heathy person results in discomfort and pain due to local isquemia. The normal protective pahtways are interrupted, however, in paraplegics, quadriplegic or the signals are ignored in severely de hibilitade, eldery or chronic ill patients. The pressure sore develops in these patients. Few papers have been done in Brazil abour pressure sores, despite economic problem envolved with. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the epidemiology, treatment and complications of pressure sores in the Hospital das Clínicas (University of São Paulo from February 1997 to March 1999 in the Orthopedics Institute. A prospective study has been done. Data were evaluated as to the sex, age, sites, classification, type of treatment employed, length of stay and complications. The treatment was evaluated by the success rate and recurrence rate . The average follow-up period was 1 year and a half, ranging from 6 month to 2 years. 77 pressure sores in 45 patients were apraised. 36 men and 9 women, age range 17-64, mean 34,78 years. Of the patients, 100% had severe spinal cord injuries, and most of them victims of gun shot (60%. 93,3% of the wound were chronic (present longer than 3 months. 77,92% were treated by surgical procedures, and most of them with myocutaneous flaps (45%. The success rate changed with the site of the lesion: 80% trochanter, 84% sacrum and 66,6% ischium. The recurrence rate was 25%. The complication rate also changed with the site of the lesion: 84% trocanter, 64% sacrum and 50% isquium.

  8. Pathophysiology of acute small bowel disease with CT correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwani, N.; Tappouni, R.; Tice, J.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to review the pathophysiology of acute small bowel diseases, and to correlate the mechanisms of disease with computed tomography (CT) findings. Disease entities will be classified into the following: immune mediated and infectious causes, vascular causes, mechanical causes, trauma, and others. Having an understanding of acute small bowel pathophysiology is a useful teaching tool, and can lead to imaging clues to the most likely diagnosis of acute small bowel disorders.

  9. Early Developmental Conditioning of Later Health and Disease: Physiology or Pathophysiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, M. A.; Gluckman, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive experimental animal studies and epidemiological observations have shown that environmental influences during early development affect the risk of later pathophysiological processes associated with chronic, especially noncommunicable, disease (NCD). This field is recognized as the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD). We discuss the extent to which DOHaD represents the result of the physiological processes of developmental plasticity, which may have potential adverse consequences in terms of NCD risk later, or whether it is the manifestation of pathophysiological processes acting in early life but only becoming apparent as disease later. We argue that the evidence suggests the former, through the operation of conditioning processes induced across the normal range of developmental environments, and we summarize current knowledge of the physiological processes involved. The adaptive pathway to later risk accords with current concepts in evolutionary developmental biology, especially those concerning parental effects. Outside the normal range, effects on development can result in nonadaptive processes, and we review their underlying mechanisms and consequences. New concepts concerning the underlying epigenetic and other mechanisms involved in both disruptive and nondisruptive pathways to disease are reviewed, including the evidence for transgenerational passage of risk from both maternal and paternal lines. These concepts have wider implications for understanding the causes and possible prevention of NCDs such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, for broader social policy and for the increasing attention paid in public health to the lifecourse approach to NCD prevention. PMID:25287859

  10. Pathophysiological mechanisms linking obesity and esophageal adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Leo; Long, Elizabeth; Beales, Ian LP

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades there has been a dramatic rise in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in the developed world. Over approximately the same period there has also been an increase in the prevalence of obesity. Obesity, especially visceral obesity, is an important independent risk factor for the development of gastro-esophageal reflux disease, Barrett’s esophagus and EAC. Although the simplest explanation is that this mediated by the mechanical effects of abdominal obesity promoting gastro-esophageal reflux, the epidemiological data suggest that the EAC-promoting effects are independent of reflux. Several, not mutually exclusive, mechanisms have been implicated, which may have different effects at various points along the reflux-Barrett’s-cancer pathway. These mechanisms include a reduction in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection enhancing gastric acidity and possibly appetite by increasing gastric ghrelin secretion, induction of both low-grade systemic inflammation by factors secreted by adipose tissue and the metabolic syndrome with insulin-resistance. Obesity is associated with enhanced secretion of leptin and decreased secretion of adiponectin from adipose tissue and both increased leptin and decreased adiponectin have been shown to be independent risk factors for progression to EAC. Leptin and adiponectin have a set of mutually antagonistic actions on Barrett’s cells which appear to influence the progression of malignant behaviour. At present no drugs are of proven benefit to prevent obesity associated EAC. Roux-en-Y reconstruction is the preferred bariatric surgical option for weight loss in patients with reflux. Statins and aspirin may have chemopreventative effects and are indicated for their circulatory benefits. PMID:25400997

  11. Metabolic syndrome, its pathophysiology and the role of melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Venkataramanujam; Ohta, Yoshiji; Espino, Javier; Pariente, Jose A; Rodriguez, Ana B; Mohamed, Mahaneem; Zakaria, Rahimah

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterised by symptoms of obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in MetS are complex and involved dysregulation of many biochemical and physiological regulatory mechanisms of the body. Elevated levels of low density lipoproteins like VLDL, and LDL with reduction of HDL seen in patients with MetS contribute to atherogenic dyslipedemia. Melatonin has been suggested to be effective in improving MetS through its anti-hyperlipidemic action. Melatonin reduced both adiposity, and body weight in experimental animal studies and also attenuated weight gain and obesityinduced metabolic alterations and this effect of melatonin is attributed to its anti-oxidative effects. Melatonin administration has been shown to inhibit insulin release by acting through both MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors present in pancreatic β-cells. Melatonin also increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in animals fed with either high fat or high sucrose diet. Melatonin exerts most of its beneficial actions by acting through MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors present in various tissues of the body and some of the metabolic actions of melatonin have been blocked by melatonin antagonist like luzindole. Ramelteon, the newly available melatonin agonist will also have more promising role in the control of MetS. The numbers of patents are available with regard to treatment of MetS. Drug related to antidepressant fluoxetine is used for treatment of MetS (US Patent No. 2008001400450). Anti-oxidants like S-adenosyl-methionine, Vitamin E, and Vitamin C have been found beneficial in treating MetS (US Patent No. 8063024). Melatonin being a powerful Antioxidant will have a promising role in treating patients with metabolic syndrome.

  12. A review on Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology and its management: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Singh, Arti; Ekavali

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease acknowledged as progressive multifarious neurodegenerative disorder, is the leading cause of dementia in late adult life. Pathologically it is characterized by intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular amyloidal protein deposits contributing to senile plaques. Over the last two decades, advances in the field of pathogenesis have inspired the researchers for the investigation of novel pharmacological therapeutics centered more towards the pathophysiological events of the disease. Currently available treatments i.e. acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (rivastigmine, galantamine, donepezil) and N-methyl d-aspartate receptor antagonist (memantine) contribute minimal impact on the disease and target late aspects of the disease. These drugs decelerate the progression of the disease, provide symptomatic relief but fail to achieve a definite cure. While the neuropathological features of Alzheimer's disease are recognized but the intricacies of the mechanism have not been clearly defined. This lack of understanding regarding the pathogenic process may be the likely reason for the non-availability of effective treatment which can prevent onset and progression of the disease. Owing to the important progress in the field of pathophysiology in the last couple of years, new therapeutic targets are available that should render the underlying disease process to be tackled directly. In this review, authors will discusses the different aspects of pathophysiological mechanisms behind Alzheimer's disease and its management through conventional drug therapy, including modern investigational therapeutic strategies, recently completed and ongoing. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  13. Short overview on metabolomics approach to study pathophysiology of oxidative stress in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Andrisic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Association of oxidative stress with carcinogenesis is well known, but not understood well, as is pathophysiology of oxidative stress generated during different types of anti-cancer treatments. Moreover, recent findings indicate that cancer associated lipid peroxidation might eventually help defending adjacent nonmalignant cells from cancer invasion. Therefore, untargeted metabolomics studies designed for advanced translational and clinical studies are needed to understand the existing paradoxes in oncology, including those related to controversial usage of antioxidants aiming to prevent or treat cancer. In this short review we have tried to put emphasis on the importance of pathophysiology of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in cancer development in relation to metabolic adaptation of particular types of cancer allowing us to conclude that adaptation to oxidative stress is one of the main driving forces of cancer pathophysiology. With the help of metabolomics many novel findings are being achieved thus encouraging further scientific breakthroughs. Combined with targeted qualitative and quantitative methods, especially immunochemistry, further research might reveal bio-signatures of individual patients and respective malignant diseases, leading to individualized treatment approach, according to the concepts of modern integrative medicine. Keywords: Carcinogenesis, Cancer, Oxidative stress, Lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxynonenal, Glutathione, Metabolomics, Immunochemistry, Biomarkers, Omics science

  14. New insights into the pathophysiology of dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Borén, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality for patients with type 2 diabetes, despite recent significant advances in management strategies to lessen CVD risk factors. A major cause is the atherogenic dyslipidemia, which consists of elevated plasma concentrations of both fasting and postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs), small dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The different components of diabetic dyslipidemia are not isolated abnormalities but closely linked to each other metabolically. The underlying disturbances are hepatic overproduction and delayed clearance of TRLs. Recent results have unequivocally shown that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and their remnants are atherogenic. To develop novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of dyslipidaemia, it is essential to understand the pathophysiology of dyslipoproteinaemia in humans. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetic dyslipidemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Low dose epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirmarche, M.; Hubert, P.

    1992-01-01

    Actually, epidemiological studies have to establish if the assessment of cancer risk can be verified at low chronic radiation doses. The population surveillance must be very long, the side effects and cancers of such radiation appearing much later. In France, this epidemiological study on nuclear workers have been decided recently. Before describing the experiment and french projects in epidemiology of nuclear workers, the authors present the main english and american studies

  16. Treatment of Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy in Older Adults with Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinberg, Nataliya; Salbu, Rebecca L; Goswami, Gayotri; Cohen, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    To review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, screening and diagnosis, and optimal treatment of diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) and its implications in older adults. A search of PubMed using the Mesh terms "diabetes," "type 1," "insulin-dependent," "T1DM," and "diabetic autonomic neuropathy" was performed to find relevant primary literature. Additional search terms "epidemiology," "geriatric," and "risk" were employed. All English-language articles from 2005 to 2015 appearing in these searches were reviewed for relevance. Related articles suggested in the PubMed search and clinical guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists were reviewed. These uncovered further resources for risk stratification, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of DAN. DAN is highly prevalent in the diabetes population and increases the risk of morbidity and mortality in older adults, yet, often goes undiagnosed and untreated. Treatment of DAN is complex in the older adult because of poor tolerability of many pharmacologic treatment options; therefore, great care must be taken when selecting therapy as to avoid unwanted adverse effects. With increasing life-expectancy of patients with diabetes mellitus, awareness of DAN and its implications to older adults is needed in primary care. Consistent screening and appropriate treatment of DAN in older adults with diabetes mellitus is essential in helping to maintain functional status and avoid adverse events.

  17. Pathophysiology of Radiation-Induced Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)