WorldWideScience

Sample records for epicondylosis prolotherapy polidocanol

  1. PROLOTHERAPY APPLICATIONS IN SPORTS MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Mustafa ADA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Injection therapies are often applied in the treatment of sports injuries concerning muscles, tendons, ligaments and capsules. Prolotherapy has been used as a regenerative injection treatment since the 1950s. It aims to compensate for the insufficient blood supply in tissues such as tendons, ligaments and their enthesis. Prolotherapy enhances the regeneration of these weak tissues and improves joint stabilization. There are some insufficient studies revealing the effectiveness of prolotherapy; thus further well-designed studies are required. In the present review, lateral epicondylitis, Achilles tendinopathy, adductor tendinitis and plantar fasciitis applications of prolotherapy, and the subjects of concern are discussed.

  2. Prolotherapy: An Effective Treatment for Low Back Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain? Is prolotherapy an effective treatment for chronic low back pain? Answers from Brent A. Bauer, M.D. Prolotherapy is ... reduced pain. Studies of prolotherapy in people with low back pain have had mixed results. A combination of prolotherapy ...

  3. Healing effects of prolotherapy in treatment of knee osteoarthritis healing effects of prolotherapy in treatment of knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. I. Soliman

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Prolotherapy resulted in clinically sustained improvement of pain, function, and radiological assessment, which means that the healing effects of prolotherapy is better than that of physiotherapy. The combination of the two prolotherapy techniques Results in quicker and better improvement for patients in terms of the clinical assessment, VAS, and WOMAC.

  4. Triangular fibrocartilage complex injury treated with prolotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Kesikburun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Triangular fibrocartilage complex has a crucial role in stability and functionality of the wrist. Traumatic or degenerative injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex is a common cause of ulnar side wrist pain. Arthroscopic treatment has been offered in chronic triangular fibrocartilage complex injury. A 19-year old male patient presented with pain at ulnar side of the wrist. He was diagnosed as having triangular fibrocartilage complex injury after assessment with MR imaging. The patients who did not benefit from drugs underwent prolotherapy three times. After treatment, he had pain relief and reported that he could use his wrist better. In this case, triangular fibrocartilage complex injury improved with prolotherapy and arthroscopic treatment was not required. Further clinical trials are needed to show better the role of prolotherapy in the treatment of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 403-405

  5. No beneficial effect of Polidocanol treatment in Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, B H; Mølgaard, C M; Olesen, J L

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Polidocanol injections have been used to treat chronic Achilles tendinopathy in clinical settings, but the few studies published show inconsistent results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term effect of Polidocanol in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. It was hypo......PURPOSE: Polidocanol injections have been used to treat chronic Achilles tendinopathy in clinical settings, but the few studies published show inconsistent results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term effect of Polidocanol in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy...... of Achilles tendinopathy for at least 3 months and with neovascularisation demonstrated by ultrasonography was included. A minimum of 3 months of eccentric exercise treatment was required before participating. The patients were allocated to a maximum of two injection of either Polidocanol or Lidocaine...... an improvement at 3- and 6-month follow-up, but no mid-term differences between the groups were seen. An equal number of patients in the two groups were satisfied with the treatment at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that Polidocanol is a safe treatment, but the mid-term effects are the same...

  6. Outcomes of a pilates-based intervention for individuals with lateral epicondylosis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Lucinda M; Mikuski, Connie; Miller, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Core stability and flexibility, features of Pilates exercise, can reduce loads to the upper extremities. Reducing loads is essential to improve symptoms for individuals with lateral epicondylosis. Although Pilates exercise has gained popularity in healthy populations, it has not been studied for individuals with lateral epicondylosis. The purpose of this study was to determine if adding Pilates-based intervention to standard occupational therapy intervention improved outcomes as measured by the Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE) more than standard intervention for individuals with lateral epicondylosis. Participants (N= 17) were randomized to the standard intervention group or Pilates-based intervention group. All participants received standard intervention. The Pilates-based intervention group additionally completed abdominal strengthening, postural correction, and flexibility. For both groups, paired t-tests showed significantly improved PRTEE scores, 38.1 for the Pilates-based intervention group, and 22.9 for the standard intervention group. Paired t-test showed significantly improved provocative grip strength and pain for both groups. Independent t-tests showed no significant difference between groups in improved scores of PRTEE, pain, and provocative grip. Although the Pilates-based intervention group showed greater improvement in PRTEE outcome, provocative grip, and pain, scores were not significantly better than those of the standard intervention group, warranting further research.

  7. The Effects of Prolotherapy in Recreational Athletes with Plantar Fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Haydar Apaydın

    2018-03-01

    Results: When pre- and post-treatment values were compared; a statistically significant difference was found between the scores of visual pain scale, foot and ankle outcome score and balance coordination test (p<0.01. Conclusion: According to the results of the research, one can conclude that the application of prolotherapy provides symptomatic and functional improvement in recreational athletes with plantar fasciitis. Prolotherapy application seems to be an alternative treatment method in patients who have not been healed by conservative treatment.

  8. A Systematic Review of Dextrose Prolotherapy for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, Ross A.; Lackner, Johanna B.; Steilen-Matias, Danielle; Harris, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to systematically review dextrose (D-glucose) prolotherapy efficacy in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Data Sources Electronic databases PubMed, Healthline, OmniMedicalSearch, Medscape, and EMBASE were searched from 1990 to January 2016. Study Selection Prospectively designed studies that used dextrose as the sole active prolotherapy constituent were selected. Data Extraction Two independent reviewers rated studies for quality of evidence usi...

  9. Dextrose Prolotherapy for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabago, David; Patterson, Jeffrey J.; Mundt, Marlon; Kijowski, Richard; Grettie, Jessica; Segal, Neil A.; Zgierska, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Knee osteoarthritis is a common, debilitating chronic disease. Prolotherapy is an injection therapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain. We conducted a 3-arm, blinded (injector, assessor, injection group participants), randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of prolotherapy for knee osteoarthritis. METHODS Ninety adults with at least 3 months of painful knee osteoarthritis were randomized to blinded injection (dextrose prolotherapy or saline) or at-home exercise. Extra- and intra-articular injections were done at 1, 5, and 9 weeks with as-needed additional treatments at weeks 13 and 17. Exercise participants received an exercise manual and in-person instruction. Outcome measures included a composite score on the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC; 100 points); knee pain scale (KPS; individual knee), post-procedure opioid medication use, and participant satisfaction. Intention-to-treat analysis using analysis of variance was used. RESULTS No baseline differences existed between groups. All groups reported improved composite WOMAC scores compared with baseline status (P dextrose prolotherapy improved more (P <.05) at 52 weeks than did scores for patients receiving saline and exercise (score change: 15.3 ± 3.5 vs 7.6 ± 3.4, and 8.2 ± 3.3 points, respectively) and exceeded the WOMAC-based minimal clinically important difference. Individual knee pain scores also improved more in the prolotherapy group (P = .05). Use of prescribed postprocedure opioid medication resulted in rapid diminution of injection-related pain. Satisfaction with prolotherapy was high. There were no adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Prolotherapy resulted in clinically meaningful sustained improvement of pain, function, and stiffness scores for knee osteoarthritis compared with blinded saline injections and at-home exercises. PMID:23690322

  10. Autologous blood versus corticosteroid local injection for treatment of Lateral Epicondylosis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Singh,

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the present single blinded prospective randomized control trial was assessment of efficacy of autologous blood injection versus local steroid injection in treatment of lateral epicondylosis of elbow. Methodology: Using a pre-post experimental design, a total of sixty patients of previously untreated lateral epicondylosis were selected; Group 1 (n=30 was administered single injection of autologous blood and Group 2 (n=30 single local corticosteroid injection. Assessment was done at baseline, 2 weeks, 6 weeks and 12 weeks using PRTEE (Patient Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation score. Results: Pre injection parameters showed no difference between groups (chi square test, p > 0.005. Analysis between groups showed significant decrease in steroid group at very short term - 2 weeks (unpaired t test, p < 0.005.There was no difference between groups at 6 weeks. There was a significant improvement in blood group at medium term -12 weeks (unpaired t test, p < 0.05. Conclusion: Both the interventions were effective in reducing pain and improving functional status of patients in short term, but autologous blood was more effective in longer run.

  11. Prolotherapy for Osteoarthritis and Tendinopathy: a Descriptive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabago, David; Nourani, Bobby

    2017-06-01

    Osteoarthritis and overuse tendinopathy are common chronic conditions of high societal and patient burden. The precise etiology of pain and disability in both conditions is multifactorial and not well understood. Patients are often refractory to conservative therapy. The development of new therapeutic options in both conditions is a public health priority. Prolotherapy is an injection-based outpatient regenerative therapy for chronic musculoskeletal conditions, including osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. The authors reviewed the basic science and clinical literature associated with prolotherapy for these conditions. Systematic review, including meta-analysis, and randomized controlled trials suggest that prolotherapy may be associated with symptom improvement in mild to moderate symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and overuse tendinopathy. Although the mechanism of action is not well understood and is likely multifactorial, a growing body of literature suggests that prolotherapy for knee osteoarthritis may be appropriate for the treatment of symptoms associated with knee osteoarthritis in carefully selected patients who are refractory to conservative therapy and deserves further basic and clinical science investigation for the treatment of osteoarthritis and tendinopathy.

  12. Outcomes of prolotherapy in chondromalacia patella patients: improvements in pain level and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Ross A; Sprague, Ingrid Schaefer

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of prolotherapy in resolving pain, stiffness, and crepitus, and improving physical activity in consecutive chondromalacia patients from February 2008 to September 2009. Sixty-nine knees that received prolotherapy in 61 patients (33 female and 36 male) who were 18-82 years old (average, 47.2 years) were enrolled. Patients received 24 prolotherapy injections (15% dextrose, 0.1% procaine, and 10% sarapin) with a total of 40 cc in the anterior knee. At least 6 weeks after their last prolotherapy session, patients provided self-evaluation of knee pain upon rest, activities of daily living (ADL) and exercise, range of motion (ROM), stiffness, and crepitus. Symptom severity, sustained improvement of symptoms, number of pain pills needed, and patient satisfaction before treatment and improvement after treatment were recorded. Following prolotherapy, patients experienced statistically significant decreases in pain at rest, during ADL, and exercise. Stiffness and crepitus decreased after prolotherapy, and ROM increased. Patients reported improved walking ability and exercise ability after prolotherapy. For daily pain level, ROM, daily stiffness, crepitus, and walking and exercise ability, sustained improvement of over 75% was reported by 85% of patients. Fewer patients required pain medication. No side effects of prolotherapy were noted. The average length of time from last prolotherapy session was 14.7 months (range, 6 months to 8 years). Only 3 of 16 knees were still recommended for surgery after prolotherapy. Prolotherapy ameliorates chondromalacia patella symptoms and improves physical ability. Patients experience long-term improvement without requiring pain medications. Prolotherapy should be considered a first-line, conservative therapy for chondromalacia patella.

  13. Outcomes of Prolotherapy in Chondromalacia Patella Patients: Improvements in Pain Level and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A. Hauser MD

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of prolotherapy in resolving pain, stiffness, and crepitus, and improving physical activity in consecutive chondromalacia patients from February 2008 to September 2009. Sixty-nine knees that received prolotherapy in 61 patients (33 female and 36 male who were 18–82 years old (average, 47.2 years were enrolled. Patients received 24 prolotherapy injections (15% dextrose, 0.1% procaine, and 10% sarapin with a total of 40 cc in the anterior knee. At least 6 weeks after their last prolotherapy session, patients provided self-evaluation of knee pain upon rest, activities of daily living (ADL and exercise, range of motion (ROM, stiffness, and crepitus. Symptom severity, sustained improvement of symptoms, number of pain pills needed, and patient satisfaction before treatment and improvement after treatment were recorded. Following prolotherapy, patients experienced statistically significant decreases in pain at rest, during ADL, and exercise. Stiffness and crepitus decreased after prolotherapy, and ROM increased. Patients reported improved walking ability and exercise ability after prolotherapy. For daily pain level, ROM, daily stiffness, crepitus, and walking and exercise ability, sustained improvement of over 75% was reported by 85% of patients. Fewer patients required pain medication. No side effects of prolotherapy were noted. The average length of time from last prolotherapy session was 14.7 months (range, 6 months to 8 years. Only 3 of 16 knees were still recommended for surgery after prolotherapy. Prolotherapy ameliorates chondromalacia patella symptoms and improves physical ability. Patients experience long-term improvement without requiring pain medications. Prolotherapy should be considered a first-line, conservative therapy for chondromalacia patella.

  14. Sclerotherapy with 6% polidocanol solution in patients with placenta accreta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagón Reyes, Ricardo Mauricio; Castorena de Ávila, Rubén; Ángeles Vázquez, María de Jesús; Núñez Monteagudo, César Augusto; Mendieta Zerón, Hugo

    2016-10-01

    Placenta accreta is one of the main obstetrical complications worldwide. The aim of this study was to report the experience of managing placenta accreta with a 6% polidocanol solution sclerotherapy. We selected patients between 37 weeks of gestation and 38 weeks of gestation, diagnosed with placenta accreta, treated at the Maternal Perinatal Hospital "Monica Pretelini Sáenz", Toluca, Mexico, during the period from November 2013 to August 2014. The surgical technique has two steps: (1) fundic-arciform caesarean section followed by a 6% polidocanol sclerosing solution through a 6Fr neonatal feeding tube upon its reaching the placental bed; (2) total abdominal hysterectomy with internal hypogastric artery ligation. Data were collected from 11 patients with a mean age of 33.9 years (range, 26-42 years) and 2.8±0.6 days of hospitalization in the obstetrical intensive care unit. The majority of patients were classified as having pregnancies at an advanced age. All women were multigravidas. Bleeding volume exhibited a range between 2.5 L and 3 L without any case of neonatal death but one mother died because of coagulopathy. We conclude that the technique that we are reporting is feasible for implementation in obstetric hospitals, with technical and economic feasibility. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Improvement of stability of polidocanol foam for nonsurgical permanent contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian Xin; Lucchesi, Lisa; Gregory, Kenton W

    2015-08-01

    Polidocanol foam (PF), used clinically as a venous sclerosant, has recently been studied as a safe and inexpensive means for permanent contraception. Delivering the sclerosant to the fallopian tubes as a foam rather than a liquid increases the surface areas and thus enhances the desired epithelial disrupting activity of the agent. However, the foam is inherently unstable and degrades with time. Therefore, increasing foam stability and thus duration of the agent exposure time could increase epithelial effect while allowing reduction in agent concentration and potential toxicity. We studied methods to improve foam properties that might improve safety and efficacy of PF for intrauterine application. Several types of microporous filters adapted to a syringe-based foaming device were used to study the effect of pore structures on the formation of PF. The foam drainage time and bubble size were characterized. The addition of benzalkonium chloride (BZK) to polidocanol was also investigated for its effects on foam characteristics. A syringe-based foaming device adapted with an inline filter produced smaller bubble PF with a longer foam drainage time. PF generated with a circular pore filter lasts longer than with a noncircular pore filter. The addition of 0.01% of BZK also improved the stability of PF. The stability of PF is affected by the pore characteristics of the filter used for foam generation and enhanced by the presence of a small amount of BZK. The improved foam, if shown to be efficacious in animal models of contraception, could lead to a safe, simple and inexpensive method alternative to surgical contraception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional outcome from sacroiliac joint prolotherapy in patients with sacroiliac joint instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Martin D; Agnish, Vikram

    2018-04-01

    Examine the effectiveness of sacroiliac (SI) joint prolotherapy for SI joint instability, and characterize the patients most likely to benefit from this treatment. Retrospective cohort study. Department of Veterans Affairs outpatient physical medicine clinic. Patients referred for low back pain and diagnosed with SI joint instability received a series of three SI joint prolotherapy injections (15% dextrose in lidocaine) at approximately a one-month interval. The outcome of those completing treatment was retrospectively examined, and characteristics were compared between those with at least a minimum clinically important improvement and those without improvement. Patients completed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) before treatment was initiated, immediately preceding each prolotherapy injection, and at 3-4 month follow-up. Of 103 treated patients returning for post-treatment follow-up at a median of 117 days, 24 (23%) showed a minimum clinically important improvement despite a median of 2 years with low back pain and a mean (±SD) pre-intervention ODI of 54 ± 15 points. Much of the improvement was evident after the initial prolotherapy injection, and a 15-point improvement in ODI prior to the second prolotherapy injection had a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 80% for determining which patients would improve. A satisfactory proportion of patients with symptomatic SI joint instability as an etiology of low back pain can have clinically meaningful functional gains with prolotherapy treatment. The patients who are not likely to improve with prolotherapy are generally evident by lack of improvement following the initial prolotherapy injection. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. A randomized controlled trial of intra-articular prolotherapy versus steroid injection for sacroiliac joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woong Mo; Lee, Hyung Gon; Jeong, Cheol Won; Kim, Chang Mo; Yoon, Myung Ha

    2010-12-01

    Controversy exists regarding the efficacy of ligament prolotherapy in alleviating sacroiliac joint pain. The inconsistent success rates reported in previous studies may be attributed to variability in patient selection and techniques between studies. It was hypothesized that intra-articular prolotherapy for patients with a positive response to diagnostic block may mitigate the drawbacks of ligament prolotherapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and long-term effectiveness of intra-articular prolotherapy in relieving sacroiliac joint pain, compared with intra-articular steroid injection. This was a prospective, randomized, controlled trial. The study was conducted at an outpatient pain medicine clinic at Chonnam National University Hospital in Gwang-ju, Korea. The study included patients with sacroiliac joint pain, confirmed by ≥50% improvement in response to local anesthetic block, lasting 3 months or longer, and who failed medical treatment. The treatment involved intra-articular dextrose water prolotherapy or triamcinolone acetonide injection using fluoroscopic guidance, with a biweekly schedule and maximum of three injections. Pain and disability scores were assessed at baseline, 2 weeks, and monthly after completion of treatment. The numbers of recruited patients were 23 and 25 for the prolotherapy and steroid groups, respectively. The pain and disability scores were significantly improved from baseline in both groups at the 2-week follow-up, with no significant difference between them. The cumulative incidence of ≥50% pain relief at 15 months was 58.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 37.9%-79.5%) in the prolotherapy group and 10.2% (95% CI 6.7%-27.1%) in the steroid group, as determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis; there was a statistically significant difference between the groups (log-rank p prolotherapy provided significant relief of sacroiliac joint pain, and its effects lasted longer than those of steroid injections. Further studies

  18. A Systematic Review of Dextrose Prolotherapy for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Ross A.; Lackner, Johanna B.; Steilen-Matias, Danielle; Harris, David K.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to systematically review dextrose (d-glucose) prolotherapy efficacy in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. DATA SOURCES Electronic databases PubMed, Healthline, OmniMedicalSearch, Medscape, and EMBASE were searched from 1990 to January 2016. STUDY SELECTION Prospectively designed studies that used dextrose as the sole active prolotherapy constituent were selected. DATA EXTRACTION Two independent reviewers rated studies for quality of evidence using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database assessment scale for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and the Downs and Black evaluation tool for non-RCTs, for level of evidence using a modified Sackett scale, and for clinically relevant pain score difference using minimal clinically important change criteria. Study population, methods, and results data were extracted and tabulated. DATA SYNTHESIS Fourteen RCTs, 1 case–control study, and 18 case series studies met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Pain conditions were clustered into tendinopathies, osteoarthritis (OA), spinal/pelvic, and myofascial pain. The RCTs were high-quality Level 1 evidence (Physiotherapy Evidence Database ≥8) and found dextrose injection superior to controls in Osgood–Schlatter disease, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, traumatic rotator cuff injury, knee OA, finger OA, and myofascial pain; in biomechanical but not subjective measures in temporal mandibular joint; and comparable in a short-term RCT but superior in a long-term RCT in low back pain. Many observational studies were of high quality and reported consistent positive evidence in multiple studies of tendinopathies, knee OA, sacroiliac pain, and iliac crest pain that received RCT confirmation in separate studies. Eighteen studies combined patient self-rating (subjective) with psychometric, imaging, and/or biomechanical (objective) outcome measurement and found both positive subjective and objective outcomes in 16 studies and positive

  19. A Systematic Review of Dextrose Prolotherapy for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Ross A; Lackner, Johanna B; Steilen-Matias, Danielle; Harris, David K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review dextrose (d-glucose) prolotherapy efficacy in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Electronic databases PubMed, Healthline, OmniMedicalSearch, Medscape, and EMBASE were searched from 1990 to January 2016. Prospectively designed studies that used dextrose as the sole active prolotherapy constituent were selected. Two independent reviewers rated studies for quality of evidence using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database assessment scale for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and the Downs and Black evaluation tool for non-RCTs, for level of evidence using a modified Sackett scale, and for clinically relevant pain score difference using minimal clinically important change criteria. Study population, methods, and results data were extracted and tabulated. Fourteen RCTs, 1 case-control study, and 18 case series studies met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Pain conditions were clustered into tendinopathies, osteoarthritis (OA), spinal/pelvic, and myofascial pain. The RCTs were high-quality Level 1 evidence (Physiotherapy Evidence Database ≥8) and found dextrose injection superior to controls in Osgood-Schlatter disease, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, traumatic rotator cuff injury, knee OA, finger OA, and myofascial pain; in biomechanical but not subjective measures in temporal mandibular joint; and comparable in a short-term RCT but superior in a long-term RCT in low back pain. Many observational studies were of high quality and reported consistent positive evidence in multiple studies of tendinopathies, knee OA, sacroiliac pain, and iliac crest pain that received RCT confirmation in separate studies. Eighteen studies combined patient self-rating (subjective) with psychometric, imaging, and/or biomechanical (objective) outcome measurement and found both positive subjective and objective outcomes in 16 studies and positive objective but not subjective outcomes in two studies. All 15 studies

  20. A Systematic Review of Dextrose Prolotherapy for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross A. Hauser

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this study was to systematically review dextrose (D-glucose prolotherapy efficacy in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Data Sources Electronic databases PubMed, Healthline, OmniMedicalSearch, Medscape, and EMBASE were searched from 1990 to January 2016. Study Selection Prospectively designed studies that used dextrose as the sole active prolotherapy constituent were selected. Data Extraction Two independent reviewers rated studies for quality of evidence using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database assessment scale for randomized controlled trials (RCTs and the Downs and Black evaluation tool for non-RCTs, for level of evidence using a modified Sackett scale, and for clinically relevant pain score difference using minimal clinically important change criteria. Study population, methods, and results data were extracted and tabulated. Data Synthesis Fourteen RCTs, 1 case–control study, and 18 case series studies met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Pain conditions were clustered into tendinopathies, osteoarthritis (OA, spinal/pelvic, and myofascial pain. The RCTs were high-quality Level 1 evidence (Physiotherapy Evidence Database ≥8 and found dextrose injection superior to controls in Osgood–Schlatter disease, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, traumatic rotator cuff injury, knee OA, finger OA, and myofascial pain; in biomechanical but not subjective measures in temporal mandibular joint; and comparable in a short-term RCT but superior in a long-term RCT in low back pain. Many observational studies were of high quality and reported consistent positive evidence in multiple studies of tendinopathies, knee OA, sacroiliac pain, and iliac crest pain that received RCT confirmation in separate studies. Eighteen studies combined patient self-rating (subjective with psychometric, imaging, and/or biomechanical (objective outcome measurement and found both positive subjective and objective outcomes in 16 studies

  1. Treatment of 63 Subjects With Digital Mucous Cysts With Percutaneous Sclerotherapy Using Polidocanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esson, Gavin A; Holme, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Digital mucous cysts (digital myxoid cysts or DMCs) are benign cystic swellings typically affecting the digital distal interphalangeal joint or the proximal nail fold. Many treatment modalities exist; however, permanent scarring, wound infection, and recurrence are common. Polidocanol sclerotherapy has been reported as a potential treatment. To assess the efficacy and safety of percutaneous polidocanol sclerotherapy in the treatment of DMC. The authors performed polidocanol sclerotherapy in 63 patients (23 men and 40 women). For each patient, the DMC contents were extruded and 3% polidocanol (0.02-0.5 mL) was injected to gently refill the cyst to its previous size. Subjects were reviewed after 6 weeks and offered a second treatment if necessary, and reviewed again after 12 weeks. Changes in lesions and adverse reactions were noted. Of the 63 subjects treated, 43 (68.3%) experienced complete resolution of the cyst by 6 weeks, and 49 (77.8%) experienced complete resolution by 12 weeks. Side effects were minor and had resolved in all patients by 12-week review. Percutaneous polidocanol sclerotherapy is a simple, safe, and effective approach to treating DMC, and is suitable for office-based practice.

  2. Prolotherapy: A new hope for temporomandibular joint pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of orofacial pain is the Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD, a collective term used to describe a group of medical disorders causing temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain and dysfunction. As the causes of TMD are varied and run the gamut from mechanical issues, such as disc degeneration and dislocation or erosion of the fibrocartilaginous surfaces of the condyle, fossa, and articular eminence, the treatment approaches for the chronic TMJ case are also quite varied. As surgery is considered a last resort for TMD, it is common for sufferers to seek out alternatives and one of the alternative treatments is ′Prolotherapy,′ which is also known as Regenerative Injection Therapy. This article provides an overview of this new alternative therapy.

  3. Prolotherapy Interventions in Treatment of Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydan Örsçelik

    2016-12-01

    Material and Method: Sixteen recreational athletes between the ages of 35 to 51 (mean age: 44.6 years with chronic lateral epicondylitis for more than 3 months and refractory to conservative treatment were enrolled. Prolotherapy solution was injected on to the lateral epicondyle with “peppering” technique along the insertion part of the tendon and annular ligament at the tender areas. 3 weeks of intervals were given between injections. All patients were prescribed with a standard home exercise program. The outcome measures of Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and DASH (The Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scales were assessed at baseline and 3 months after last injections. Results: 12 patients received a triple, 1 patient received a double and 3 patients received a single injection according to healing process. The VAS scores revealed a significant improvement; the baseline score of 8.1(±1.3 decreased to 1.2(±1.2 (p

  4. Familial disseminated cutaneous glomuvenous malformation: Treatment with polidocanol sclerotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Jha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomuvenous malformations (GVMs present as asymptomatic multiple pink-to-blue nodules or plaques. Disseminated lesions are rare, representing 10% of all the cases. Familial cases are caused by mutations in the glomulin gene. A young male presented with multiple bluish-to-dusky red-coloured nodules 10-15 in numbers over the trunk, limbs and buttocks since 12 years of age. They ranged in size from 1 to 3 cm, partially to non-compressible and tender on palpation. There was no history of any systemic complaint. His sister and mother had similar lesions but in a limited distribution. Biopsy showed multiple ectatic dilated vascular channels lined by multiple layers of glomus cells consistent with the diagnosis of GVM. The biopsy of the lesions from the mother and sister also showed similar features. Mutation analysis for glomulin gene could not be done because of the unavailability of the facility at our setting. He underwent sclerotherapy with 3% polidocanol every 2 weeks, and there was significant improvement in the lesions after six sessions of sclerotherapy. The patient is under follow-up and there is no recurrence of the lesions over treated sites after 6 months.

  5. Dextrose Prolotherapy Versus Control Injections in Painful Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Helene; Reeves, Kenneth Dean; Bennett, Cameron J; Bicknell, Simon; Cheng, An-Lin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the effect of dextrose prolotherapy on pain levels and degenerative changes in painful rotator cuff tendinopathy against 2 potentially active control injection procedures. Randomized controlled trial, blinded to participants and evaluators. Outpatient pain medicine practice. Persons (N=73) with chronic shoulder pain, examination findings of rotator cuff tendinopathy, and ultrasound-confirmed supraspinatus tendinosis/tear. Three monthly injections either (1) onto painful entheses with dextrose (Enthesis-Dextrose), (2) onto entheses with saline (Enthesis-Saline), or (3) above entheses with saline (Superficial-Saline). All solutions included 0.1% lidocaine. All participants received concurrent programmed physical therapy. Primary: participants achieving an improvement in maximal current shoulder pain ≥2.8 (twice the minimal clinically important difference for visual analog scale pain) or not. Secondary: improvement in the Ultrasound Shoulder Pathology Rating Scale (USPRS) and a 0-to-10 satisfaction score (10, completely satisfied). The 73 participants had moderate to severe shoulder pain (7.0±2.0) for 7.6±9.6 years. There were no baseline differences between groups. Blinding was effective. At 9-month follow-up, 59% of Enthesis-Dextrose participants maintained ≥2.8 improvement in pain compared with Enthesis-Saline (37%; P=.088) and Superficial-Saline (27%; P=.017). Enthesis-Dextrose participants' satisfaction was 6.7±3.2 compared with Enthesis-Saline (4.7±4.1; P=.079) and Superficial-Saline (3.9±3.1; P=.003). USPRS findings were not different between groups (P=.734). In participants with painful rotator cuff tendinopathy who receive physical therapy, injection of hypertonic dextrose on painful entheses resulted in superior long-term pain improvement and patient satisfaction compared with blinded saline injection over painful entheses, with intermediate results for entheses injection with saline. These differences could not be attributed to a

  6. The use of prolotherapy in the sacroiliac joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusi, M; Saunders, J; Hungerford, B; Wisbey-Roth, T; Lucas, P; Wilson, S

    2010-02-01

    In this study the effectiveness of prolotherapy in the treatment of deficient load transfer of the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) was determined. A prospective descriptive study. Authors' private practice. 25 patients who consented to treatment and attended for at least one follow-up visit and assessment. From April 2004 to July 2007. Three injections of hypertonic dextrose solution into the dorsal interosseous ligament of the affected SIJ, under CT control, 6 weeks apart. Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale, Roland-Morris 24, Roland-Morris 24 Multiform questionnaires and clinical examination by two authors independently. All patients included in this study attended at least one follow-up visit at 3, 12 or 24 months.. The number of patients at follow-up decreased at 12 and 24 months. Functional questionnaires demonstrated significant improvements for those followed-up at 3, 12 and 24 months (pprolotherapy in private practice has shown positive clinical outcomes for the 76% of patients who attended the 3-month follow-up visit (76% at 12 months and 32% at 24 months). Similar results were found in the questionnaires (Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale, Roland-Morris 24 and Roland-Morris 24 Multiform questionnaires) at 3, 12 and 24 months.

  7. Prospective Evaluation of Intra-Articular Dextrose Prolotherapy for Treatment of Osteoarthritis in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, J Matthew; Roush, James K; Armbrust, Laura J; Renberg, Walter C

    The objective of this study was to evaluate intra-articular dextrose prolotherapy for osteoarthritis of the elbow or stifle in dogs in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, prospective pilot study. Seventeen dogs were evaluated with 10 meeting inclusion criteria for this study. Evaluations included orthopedic exam, visual lameness scoring, Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI), goniometry, kinetic gait analysis, and radiography. Initial lameness score, age, body weight, duration of lameness, and CBPI scores did not differ between groups. Change in CBPI pain severity score in the prolotherapy group from wk 6-12 was significantly less improved than in the placebo group, with no other significant differences in pain severity or pain interference scores between groups. Range of motion and radiographic scores did not differ between groups at any time. Mean kinetic forces improved in prolotherapy dogs but were not significantly different between treatment groups at any time. Although easily performed and well-tolerated, there were no statistically significant benefits of dextrose prolotherapy for treatment of osteoarthritis of the elbow and stifle in dogs. Post hoc power analysis of these sample means and standard deviations found that 29-106 animals per group would be necessary to demonstrate significant differences in kinetic forces, providing useful guidance for future studies.

  8. Dextrose prolotherapy and corticosteroid injection into rat Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, C A Q; Bertuzzi, R T; Tisot, R A; Michelin, A F; do Prado, J M; Stroher, A; Burigo, M

    2012-10-01

    To assess the mechanical behavior and the histology of collagen fibers after prolotherapy with 12.5% dextrose into rat Achilles tendons and to compare with those of corticosteroid treatment. Out of 60 adult female Wistar rats (70 tendons), 15 received 12.5% dextrose (group I); 15 were treated with corticosteroid injection (group II); and 15 were given 0.9% saline injection (group III), all into the right Achilles tendon, whereas 13 animals received no injections (group IV). Three doses of each substance (groups I, II, and III) were given at a 5-day interval. Collagen fiber color was quantitatively assessed in three samples from each group and in five samples from the control group using picrosirius red staining under polarized and nonpolarized light. Twelve tendons from each group treated with the test substance and 20 tendons from the control group were submitted to the tensile strength test. There was no statistical difference across the groups with respect to maximum load at failure (n.s.) and absorbed energy (n.s.). With respect to tendon rupture, there was no difference between the myotendinous and the tendinous regions (n.s.). However, hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed statistical significance in lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate (P = 0.008) and in parallel fiber orientation (P = 0.003) when comparing groups to the control group, without significance for either neovascularization (n.s.) or the presence of fibroblasts (n.s.). Likewise, there was no significant difference between the percentage of mature (n.s.) and immature (n.s.) fibers. Dextrose was not deleterious to the tendinous tissue, as it did not change the mechanical and histological properties of Achilles tendons in rats. The data obtained in this study may help clinicians in their daily work as they suggest that injections of 12.5% dextrose caused no harm to the tendons, although the clinical importance in humans still needs to be defined.

  9. A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED PLACEBO STUDY OF DEXTROSE IONTOPHORESIS VERSUS DEXTROSE PROLOTHERAPY IN CASE OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Mohamed Ahmed Ewidea

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is the most common cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability in the knee joint. This study investigated the efficacy of Dextrose iontophoresis versus Dextrose prolotherapy in case of knee osteoarthritis in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study. Methods: sixty patients diagnosed mild to moderate osteoarthritis were included in the study. Their age's were45:65 years with mean age 51 ± 3.5 years. Patients were divided randomly into three equal groups, group (Areceived 50 % dextrose iontophoresis, group (B Each patient received three intra-articular injections of dextrose at 1-month intervals in weeks 0, 4, and 8 and group (C received sham iontophoresis. The outcome measurements were Western Ontario and McMaster Universities arthritis index (WOMAC values, knee ROM, and pain severity at rest (seated and in activity (after walking 6 m using the visual analogue scale (VAS were recorded. The patients were evaluated for these parameters before allocated in their groups then after 4, 8, and 24 weeks later. Results: compared to sham group (placebo there were significant improvement of VAS and ROM of iontophoresis group than sham (placebo group (p<0.000. Also there were significant improvement of prolotherapy group than placebo (p<0.006, and 0.02 respectively. Furthermore there was significant improve of iontophoresis group than prolotherapy where p was <0.000 for VAS, ROM and (WOMAC. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested that both dextrose iontophoresis and dextrose prolotherapy may be as useful modalities in treatment of osteoarthritis with better effects of dextrose iontophoresis than prolotherapy.

  10. Long-term effect of Prolotherapy on symptomatic rotator cuff tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suad Trebinjac

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to assess a long-term clinical effect of Prolotherapy on chronic symptomatic rotator cuff tendinopathy.Methods: We conducted a retrospective, uncontrolled study in the outpatient setting with 12 months follow-up. Adults diagnosed clinically and radiologically with rotator cuff tendinopathy that has been persisting for a minimum of six months were included. Patients received 15% extra-articular and 25% intra-articular hyperosmolar dextrose injections, repeated at weeks 5, 9, 13, 17 and 21. Primary outcome measure was validated Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI. Secondary outcome measure was validated visual pain analogue scale (VAS 0-10. The third outcome measures were patient’s satisfaction with Prolotherapy and adverse reactions after injections.Results: Twenty-one patients, 14 male and 7 female were treated with 6 sessions of hyperosmolar dextrose Prolotherapy repeated every 4 weeks. Average SPADI before starting the treatment was 73.995 ± 13.6, while 12 months after completed treatment was 20.84 ± 26.03 (P< 0.0001. Average VAS score before starting the treatment was 8.14 ± 1.2, while 12 months after completed treatment was 2.29 ± 2.8 (P<0.0001. Out of 21 patients, 18 (85.71% would recommend Prolotherapy to other people with the similar condition, and no one participant reported any side effect that was not resolved within one week after the treatment.Conclusion: Hyperosmolar dextrose Prolotherapy may result in significant reduction of pain and disability index in adult patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy, without eliciting long-lasting side effects. Results of this pilot study need to be validated in prospective controlled randomized trials.

  11. Effect of prolotherapy on hemiplegic shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tendinopathy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Kesikburun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolotherapy on pain and shoulder range of motion in stroke patients with hemiplegic shoulder pain due to rotator cuff tendinopathy. Material and Methods: The data of 10 patients (mean age, 64.2+/-11.6 years who had a history stroke of more than six months and underwent prolotherapy treatment were collected retrospectively. The treatment included 3 sessions of dextrose pr olotherapy injections applied to rotator cuff tendon. Visual analogue scale pain scores and shoulder range of motions measured at baseline and two weeks later after end of the treatment were assessed. Results: Visual analogue scale shoulder pain scores of the patients decreased from 8.2+/-1.1 at baseline to 4.8+/-1.9 after prolotherapy The degrees of shoulder flexion and abduction increased significantly after the treatment. Conclusion: Preliminary results in this pilot study suggested the beneficial effect of proloterapi in the treatmentof hemiplegicshoulderpain. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 13-18

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Prolotherapy with Polydeoxyribonucleotide for Painful Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoungho Ryu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rotator cuff tendinopathy is a primary cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction. Several effective nonsurgical treatment methods have been described for chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy. Prolotherapy with polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN, which consists of active deoxyribonucleotide polymers that stimulate tissue repair, is a nonsurgical regenerative injection that may be a viable treatment option. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of PDRN in the treatment of chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy. Method. The records of patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy (n=131 were reviewed retrospectively, and the patients treated with PDRN prolotherapy (n=32 were selected. We measured the main outcome of the shoulder pain and disability index score on a numerical rating scale of average shoulder pain. Results. Compared with baseline data, significant improvements in the shoulder pain and disability index and pain visual analog scale scores were demonstrated at one week after the end of treatment, and at one month and three months later. Conclusions. PDRN prolotherapy may improve the conservative treatment of painful rotator cuff tendinopathy for a specific subset of patients.

  13. Polidocanol injection for chemical delay and its effect on the survival of rat dorsal skin flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menevşe, Gülsüm Tetik; TeomanTellioglu, Ali; Altuntas, Nurgül; Cömert, Ayhan; Tekdemir, Ibrahim

    2014-06-01

    Surgical delay is an invasive method requiring a two-stage surgical procedure. Hence, methods that may serve as an alternative to surgical delay have become the focus of interest of research studies. From a conceptual view, any technique that interrupts the blood flow along the edges of a proposed flap will render the flap ischemic and induce a delay phenomenon. Polidocanol (Aethoxysklerol(®)-Kreussler) was initially used as a local anesthetic. Nowadays, it has been used as a sclerosing agent to treat telangiectasias and varicose veins. The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effects of polidocanol injected around the periphery of a random flap as a sclerosing agent on flap delay and survival in a random flap model. A preliminary histopathologic study was performed on two rats to evaluate the sclerosing effect and distribution of polidocanol injection. After the preliminary study, the main study was carried out with three groups: group 1: dorsal flap (n = 10); group 2: dorsal flap + surgical delay (n = 10), group 3: dorsal flap + chemical delay (n = 10). Tissue samples obtained from the flap and injection area revealed destruction of intradermal vessels. The area affected with sclerosis was limited to 0.1 cm beyond the injection site. Mean viable flap areas were 52.1 ± 4.38% (44.0-58.2) in group 1, 64.8 ± 8.92% (57.2-89.2) in group 2, and 71.8 ± 5.18% (64.0-84.0) in group 3. A statistically highly significant difference was found between the surgical delay and chemical delay groups versus the group without delay (p injection around the dorsal flap in the rat is a safe and easy method for nonsurgical delay. The results have shown a flap survival benefit that is superior to controls and equivalent to surgical delay. The clinical application of polidocanol, already in clinical practice for occlusal of telangiectasias, for surgical delay appears feasible. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons

  14. Dextrose and morrhuate sodium injections (prolotherapy) for knee osteoarthritis: a prospective open-label trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabago, David; Patterson, Jeffrey J; Mundt, Marlon; Zgierska, Aleksandra; Fortney, Luke; Grettie, Jessica; Kijowski, Richard

    2014-05-01

    This study determined whether injection with hypertonic dextrose and morrhuate sodium (prolotherapy) using a pragmatic, clinically determined injection schedule for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) results in improved knee pain, function, and stiffness compared to baseline status. This was a prospective three-arm uncontrolled study with 1-year follow-up. The setting was outpatient. The participants were 38 adults who had at least 3 months of symptomatic KOA and who were in the control groups of a prior prolotherapy randomized controlled trial (RCT) (Prior-Control), were ineligible for the RCT (Prior-Ineligible), or were eligible but declined the RCT (Prior-Declined). The injection sessions at occurred at 1, 5, and 9 weeks with as-needed treatment at weeks 13 and 17. Extra-articular injections of 15% dextrose and 5% morrhuate sodium were done at peri-articular tendon and ligament insertions. A single intra-articular injection of 6 mL 25% dextrose was performed through an inferomedial approach. The primary outcome measure was the validated Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). The secondary outcome measure was the Knee Pain Scale and postprocedure opioid medication use and participant satisfaction. The Prior-Declined group reported the most severe baseline WOMAC score (p=0.02). Compared to baseline status, participants in the Prior-Control group reported a score change of 12.4±3.5 points (19.5%, p=0.002). Prior-Decline and Prior-Ineligible groups improved by 19.4±7.0 (42.9%, p=0.05) and 17.8±3.9 (28.4%, p=0.008) points, respectively; 55.6% of Prior-Control, 75% of Prior-Decline, and 50% of Prior-Ineligible participants reported score improvement in excess of the 12-point minimal clinical important difference on the WOMAC measure. Postprocedure opioid medication resulted in rapid diminution of prolotherapy injection pain. Satisfaction was high and there were no adverse events. Prolotherapy using dextrose and morrhuate sodium injections for

  15. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Different Concentrations of Dextrose Prolotherapy in Temporomandibular Joint Hypermobility Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Rawand; Güngörmüş, Metin; Mollaoğlu, Nur

    2018-03-12

    The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the efficacy of different concentrations of dextrose prolotherapy for the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) hypermobility. A prospective, randomized clinical trial including patients with subluxation or dislocation was performed. The study comprised 40 patients. Patients were randomly divided into 4 groups: control group, 10% dextrose, 20% dextrose, and 30% dextrose group. Patients in all groups received injections into 4 different areas of each TMJ in 4 sessions at monthly intervals. Visual analog scale of TMJ pain intensity, maximum mouth opening (MMO), joint sounds, and frequency of luxations were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively after 1 month of last injection. The collected data were then statistically analyzed. Each group showed postoperatively significant improvement in TMJ pain, significant decrease in both MMO and joint sound. Besides that, TMJ locking was not observed in any patient during the follow-up period. There were no statistically significant differences throughout the study intervals between the groups. It was concluded that there was no significant difference between control group and dextrose groups and there is no superiority of any concentration of dextrose over the others in TMJ prolotherapy, and all treatment procedures were efficient in improvement of clinical symptoms related to TMJ hypermobility. If dextrose is used as a proliferant, it can be said that 10% dextrose can be sufficient in TMJ hypermobility treatment.

  16. Results of Combined, Single-Session Arthrocentesis and Dextrose Prolotherapy for Symptomatic Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezairli, Burak; Sivrikaya, Efe Can; Omezli, Mehmet Melih; Ayranci, Ferhat; Seyhan Cezairli, Neslihan

    2017-10-01

    Arthrocentesis and prolotherapy are nonsurgical treatments for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the treatment of hypermobility, pain, and displacement of the TMJ by consecutively performing arthrocentesis and prolotherapy in the same session. In this study, 10 adults with disc displacement and painful, hypermobile TMJ were selected. Arthrocentesis and prolotherapy were consecutively performed using a 30% dextrose solution that was simultaneously injected into five areas: posterior disc attachment, superior joint space, superior and inferior capsular attachments, and stylomandibular ligament. Paired t-test, McNemar test, and chi-square test were used to assess the maximum mouth opening, clicking sounds, pain, and subluxation of the TMJ. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis and parafunctional habits such as teeth clenching and grinding and biting of the cheeks or any other objects and those who had undergone surgery were excluded from this study. A total of 10 participants (36.20 ± 7.06 years old, 7 women and 3 men) received a single treatment session of combined arthrocentesis and prolotherapy at the same office visit. Subluxation frequency and pain significantly decreased after the first week of treatment (p < 0.05). Subluxation also decreased at the 3-month follow-up (p < 0.05). Clicking sound values did not significantly change at any of the follow-up time points. Maximum mouth opening values decreased at all follow-up time points compared to baseline (p < 0.05). A single session of combined arthrocentesis and prolotherapy to treat symptomatic TMJ safely and significantly improved the subluxation and pain after 1 week and subluxation after 3 months compared to baseline status. The maximum mouth opening significantly decreased at all follow-up time points. Future studies assessing multiple treatment sessions are warranted.

  17. Ultrasonographic findings of healing of torn tendon in the patients with lateral epicondylitis after prolotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Song, In Sup; Lee, Jong Beom; Lee, Hea Yeon; Yoo, Seung Min; Yang, Sung Joon; Seo, Kyung Muk; Kim, Don Gyu

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the sonographic findings of healing in torn common extensor tendon of elbow after prolotherapy and to evaluate the value of US in the course of management of lateral epicondylitis. 12 common extensor tendons in eleven patients were examined by sonography before and after prolotherapy. On initial US examination, 11 tendons showed a partial tear and one tendon showed a full thickness but incomplete width tear. All patients were managed with prolotherapy several times(2 to 6 times). The time interval between the initial US and follow up US examination after treatment was from 4.5 to 6.5 months(mean ; 5.8 months). The findings of healing were evaluated with respect to the change of echogenicity(anechoic focus, hypoechoic focus), presence or absence of fibrillar pattern in the tendon on gray scale US, and focus of hypervascularity on color Doppler image. We used the visual analogue scale(VAS) of pain to assess the response to the treatment. All patients showed symptom improvement as the points drop on VAS in a range between 1.5 and 6.5(mean ; 4.5). In one tendon, a few echogenic lines were seen within the initially anechoic lesion(pattern I). In three tendons, most of the anechoic lesion(tear) was filled with fibrillar echogenicity except for a small focus of anechogenicity(pattern II). In two tendons, initial anechoic lesion in common extensor tendon was changed to same sized hypoechoic lesion with diffuse fibrillar pattern within the initial anechoic lesion (pattern III). In 6 tendons, initial anechoic lesion became smaller with diffuse fibrillar pattern were seen(pattern IV). Color Doppler examination was performed in 11 tendons after therapy and six of 11 tendons showed hypervascularity. Most important finding of healing in torn tendon is reappearance of fibrillar pattern in initial anechoic lesion(tear). The follow up sonography of the common extensor tendon in the course of treatment can be useful to evaluate the effects

  18. Ultrasonographic findings of healing of torn tendon in the patients with lateral epicondylitis after prolotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Song, In Sup; Lee, Jong Beom; Lee, Hea Yeon; Yoo, Seung Min; Yang, Sung Joon; Seo, Kyung Muk; Kim, Don Gyu [Chungang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe the sonographic findings of healing in torn common extensor tendon of elbow after prolotherapy and to evaluate the value of US in the course of management of lateral epicondylitis. 12 common extensor tendons in eleven patients were examined by sonography before and after prolotherapy. On initial US examination, 11 tendons showed a partial tear and one tendon showed a full thickness but incomplete width tear. All patients were managed with prolotherapy several times(2 to 6 times). The time interval between the initial US and follow up US examination after treatment was from 4.5 to 6.5 months(mean ; 5.8 months). The findings of healing were evaluated with respect to the change of echogenicity(anechoic focus, hypoechoic focus), presence or absence of fibrillar pattern in the tendon on gray scale US, and focus of hypervascularity on color Doppler image. We used the visual analogue scale(VAS) of pain to assess the response to the treatment. All patients showed symptom improvement as the points drop on VAS in a range between 1.5 and 6.5(mean ; 4.5). In one tendon, a few echogenic lines were seen within the initially anechoic lesion(pattern I). In three tendons, most of the anechoic lesion(tear) was filled with fibrillar echogenicity except for a small focus of anechogenicity(pattern II). In two tendons, initial anechoic lesion in common extensor tendon was changed to same sized hypoechoic lesion with diffuse fibrillar pattern within the initial anechoic lesion (pattern III). In 6 tendons, initial anechoic lesion became smaller with diffuse fibrillar pattern were seen(pattern IV). Color Doppler examination was performed in 11 tendons after therapy and six of 11 tendons showed hypervascularity. Most important finding of healing in torn tendon is reappearance of fibrillar pattern in initial anechoic lesion(tear). The follow up sonography of the common extensor tendon in the course of treatment can be useful to evaluate the effects

  19. Novel developments in foam sclerotherapy: Focus on Varithena® (polidocanol endovenous microfoam) in the management of varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star, Phoebe; Connor, David E; Parsi, Kurosh

    2018-04-01

    Scope Varithena® is a recently approved commercially available drug/delivery unit that produces foam using 1% polidocanol for the management of varicose veins. The purpose of this review is to examine the benefits of foam sclerotherapy, features of the ideal foam sclerosant and the strengths and limitations of Varithena® in the context of current foam sclerotherapy practices. Method Electronic databases including PubMed, Medline (Ovid) SP as well as trial registries and product information sheets were searched using the keywords, 'Varithena', 'Varisolve', 'polidocanol endovenous microfoam', 'polidocanol' and/or 'foam sclerotherapy/sclerosant'. Articles published prior to 20 September 2016 were identified. Results Foam sclerosants have effectively replaced liquid agents due to their physiochemical properties resulting in better clinical outcomes. Medical practitioners commonly prepare sclerosant foam at the bedside by agitating liquid sclerosant with a gas such as room air, using techniques as described by Tessari or the double syringe method. Such physician-compounded foams are highly operator dependent producing inconsistent foams of different gas/liquid compositions, bubble size, foam behaviour and varied safety profiles. Varithena® overcomes the variability and inconsistencies of physician-compounded foam. However, Varithena® has limited applications due to its fixed sclerosant type and concentration, cost and lack of worldwide availability. Clinical trials of Varithena® have demonstrated efficacy and safety outcomes equivalent or better than physician-compounded foam but only in comparison to placebo alone. Conclusion Varithena® is a promising step towards the creation of an ideal sclerosant foam. Further assessment in independent randomised controlled clinical trials is required to establish the advantages of Varithena® over and above the current best practice physician-compounded foam.

  20. Chondrogenic Effect of Intra-articular Hypertonic-Dextrose (Prolotherapy) in Severe Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topol, Gastón Andrés; Podesta, Leandro Ariel; Reeves, Kenneth Dean; Giraldo, Marcia Mallma; Johnson, Lanny L; Grasso, Raul; Jamín, Alexis; Clark, Tom; Rabago, David

    2016-11-01

    Dextrose injection is reported to improve knee osteoarthritis (KOA)-related clinical outcomes, but its effect on articular cartilage is unknown. A chondrogenic effect of dextrose injection has been proposed. To assess biological and clinical effects of intra-articular hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) in painful KOA. Case series with blinded arthroscopic evaluation before and after treatment. Physical medicine and day surgery practice. Symptomatic KOA for at least 6 months, arthroscopy-confirmed medial compartment exposed subchondral bone, and temporary pain relief with intra-articular lidocaine injection. Four to 6 monthly 10-mL intra-articular injections with 12.5% dextrose. Visual cartilage growth assessment of 9 standardized medial condyle zones in each of 6 participants by 3 arthroscopy readers masked to pre-/postinjection status (total 54 zones evaluated per reader); biopsy of a cartilage growth area posttreatment, evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin and Safranin-O stains, quantitative polarized light microscopy, and immunohistologic cartilage typing; self-reported knee specific quality of life using the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, 0-100 points). Six participants (1 female and 5 male) with median age of 71 years, WOMAC composite score of 57.5 points, and a 9-year pain duration received a median of 6 dextrose injections and follow-up arthroscopy at 7.75 months (range 4.5-9.5 months). In 19 of 54 zone comparisons, all 3 readers agreed that the posttreatment zone showed cartilage growth compared with the pretreatment zone. Biopsy specimens showed metabolically active cartilage with variable cellular organization, fiber parallelism, and cartilage typing patterns consistent with fibro- and hyaline-like cartilage. Compared with baseline status, the median WOMAC score improved 13 points (P = .013). Self-limited soreness after methylene blue instillation was noted. Positive clinical and chondrogenic effects were seen

  1. Comparative effectiveness of dextrose prolotherapy versus control injections and exercise in the management of osteoarthritis pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chen-Yu; Hsiao, Ming-Yen; Chang, Ke-Vin; Han, Der-Sheng; Wang, Tyng-Guey

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has supported the use of dextrose prolotherapy for patients with osteoarthritis. However, the real benefits may be affected by differences in injection protocols, comparative regimens, and evaluation scales. PubMed and Scopus were searched from the earliest record until February 2016. One single-arm study and five randomized controlled trials were included, comprising 326 participants. We estimated the effect sizes of pain reduction before and after serial dextrose injections and compared the values between dextrose prolotherapy, comparative regimens, and exercise 6 months after the initial injection. Regarding the treatment arm using dextrose prolotherapy, the effect sizes compared with baseline were 0.65 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14-1.17), 0.84 (95% CI, 0.40-1.27), 0.85 (95% CI, 0.60-1.10), and 0.87 (95% CI, 0.53-1.21) after the first, second, third, and fourth or more injections, respectively. The overall effect of dextrose was better than control injections (effect size, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.10-0.63). Dextrose prolotherapy had a superior effect compared with local anesthesia (effect size, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.07-0.70) and exercise (effect size, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.30-1.11). There was an insignificant advantage of dextrose over corticosteroids (effect size, 0.31; 95% CI, -0.18 to 0.80) which was only estimated from one study. Dextrose injections decreased pain in osteoarthritis patients but did not exhibit a positive dose-response relationship following serial injections. Dextrose prolotherapy was found to provide a better therapeutic effect than exercise, local anesthetics, and probably corticosteroids when patients were retested 6 months following the initial injection.

  2. Treatment of male varicoceles by transcatheter polidocanol foam sclerotherapy: evaluation of clinical success, complications, and patients' satisfaction with regard to alternative techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Alma; Wirth, Stefan; Treitl, Karla Maria; Treitl, Marcus [Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    We report our experience with polidocanol foam sclerotherapy with no additional coils, evaluating clinical success, patients' satisfaction, and complications. We conducted a retrospective study of 141 patients with 146 varicoceles (mean age: 29.3 years; range: 13 - 60 years) who underwent foam sclerotherapy with polidocanol 2 % (range: 2 - 12 ml) in an outpatient setting between January 2007 and December 2013. For the follow-up, telephone interviews with the patients were conducted (mean follow-up time: 46.4 months, standard deviation: 20.17 months). The technical success rate was 91.8 %. There was a 55.8 % response rate to the telephone interviews. Follow-up revealed a clinical success rate of 83.9 % and a persistence or relapse rate of 16.1 %. Of the patients, 81.9 % were absolutely satisfied with the outcome. In 94.9 % of cases, pain or discomfort resolution was reported, and in 97 % of cases, aesthetic issues were no longer a problem. Of partners, 63.2 % achieved pregnancy, and in 50 % of patients with preprocedural testicular atrophy, catch-up growth was observed. One patient with pampiniform plexus phlebitis received inpatient treatment with no long-term damage recorded. Polidocanol foam varicocele sclerotherapy is a safe and effective procedure, with a high rate of patients' satisfaction, clinical and technical success, and considerable catch-up growth and pregnancy achievement. (orig.)

  3. Treatment of male varicoceles by transcatheter polidocanol foam sclerotherapy: evaluation of clinical success, complications, and patients' satisfaction with regard to alternative techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Alma; Wirth, Stefan; Treitl, Karla Maria; Treitl, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    We report our experience with polidocanol foam sclerotherapy with no additional coils, evaluating clinical success, patients' satisfaction, and complications. We conducted a retrospective study of 141 patients with 146 varicoceles (mean age: 29.3 years; range: 13 - 60 years) who underwent foam sclerotherapy with polidocanol 2 % (range: 2 - 12 ml) in an outpatient setting between January 2007 and December 2013. For the follow-up, telephone interviews with the patients were conducted (mean follow-up time: 46.4 months, standard deviation: 20.17 months). The technical success rate was 91.8 %. There was a 55.8 % response rate to the telephone interviews. Follow-up revealed a clinical success rate of 83.9 % and a persistence or relapse rate of 16.1 %. Of the patients, 81.9 % were absolutely satisfied with the outcome. In 94.9 % of cases, pain or discomfort resolution was reported, and in 97 % of cases, aesthetic issues were no longer a problem. Of partners, 63.2 % achieved pregnancy, and in 50 % of patients with preprocedural testicular atrophy, catch-up growth was observed. One patient with pampiniform plexus phlebitis received inpatient treatment with no long-term damage recorded. Polidocanol foam varicocele sclerotherapy is a safe and effective procedure, with a high rate of patients' satisfaction, clinical and technical success, and considerable catch-up growth and pregnancy achievement. (orig.)

  4. Is dextrose prolotherapy superior to placebo for the treatment of temporomandibular joint hypermobility? A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cömert Kiliç, S; Güngörmüş, M

    2016-07-01

    A randomized clinical trial involving adult patients with bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) hypermobility referred for treatment was implemented. The sample comprised 30 consecutive patients, who were divided randomly into two groups. The TMJ hypermobility was treated with either saline (placebo group) or dextrose injections (study group). The solution was injected into five different TMJ areas in three sessions at monthly intervals. The predictor variable was the treatment technique. The outcome variables were visual analogue scale (VAS) evaluations and maximum inter-incisal opening (MIO). Outcome variables were recorded preoperatively and at 12 months postoperatively. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed, and significance was set at a P-value of dextrose prolotherapy is no more effective than placebo treatment for any of the outcome variables of TMJ hypermobility assessed. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Polidocanol versus hypertonic glucose for sclerotherapy treatment of reticular veins of the lower limbs: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertanha, Matheus; Sobreira, Marcone Lima; Pinheiro Lúcio Filho, Carlos Eduardo; de Oliveira Mariúba, Jamil Victor; Farres Pimenta, Rafael Elias; Jaldin, Rodrigo Gibin; Moroz, Andrei; Moura, Regina; Rollo, Hamilton Almeida; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti

    2014-12-19

    The prevalence of chronic venous disease is high and occurs more frequently in females. According to the clinical, etiological, anatomical, and pathological classification (CEAP) definition, the reticular veins are included in the C1 class and are mainly associated with aesthetic complaints. Several invasive techniques are used for treatment, including mini phlebectomy, laser ablation, and radiofrequency ablation. However, a wide range of sclerosing agents may serve as minimally invasive alternatives, promoting chemical sclerosis of the vein wall. Although this technique is routinely performed around the world, there is no consensus on the most efficacious and safe chemical agent to be used. Inclusion criteria are women between 18 and 69 years old with at least 10 cm long reticular veins in the lower limbs, on the outer side of the leg/thigh. Patients with CEAP 2 to 6, or with allergies, pregnancy, performing breastfeeding, or with any dermatologic or clinical problems will be excluded. Patients with venous ultrasound mapping showing involvement of saphenous trunks and/or a deep venous system will also be excluded. Patients will be randomized into two groups, one receiving 75% pure glucose and the other group receiving 0.2% polidocanol diluted in 70% glucose. Just one limb and one session per patient will be performed. The sclerosing agent volume will not exceed 5 mL. Clinical follow-up will include visits on days 7 and 60, always with photographic documentation. This project aims to enroll 96 patients and subject them to a double-blind treatment after the randomization process. The design is intended to evaluate efficacy through a primary end point and safety through a secondary end point. Forty-eight patients have currently been enrolled. Preliminary results for these patients showed that 25 received treatment, 2 were excluded, and 22 returned after 7 days and showed no greater adverse events. To date, establishing efficacy criteria has not been possible, and no

  6. Optimal and safe treatment of spider leg veins measuring less than 1.5 mm on skin type IV patients, using repeated low-fluence Nd:YAG laser pulses after polidocanol injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Moraga, Javier; Hernández, Esteban; Royo, Josefina; Alcolea, Justo; Isarría, M Jose; Pascu, Mihail Lucian; Smarandache, Adriana; Trelles, Mario

    2013-05-01

    Treatment of micro-veins of less than 1.5 mm with laser and with chemical sclerosis is technically challenging because of their difficulty to remedy. Laser treatment is even more difficult when dark phototypes are involved.Three groups of 30 patients each, skin type IV, and vessels measuring less than 1.5 mm in diameter, were enrolled for two treatment sessions 8 weeks apart: group A, polidocanol (POL) micro-foam injection; group B, Nd:YAG laser alone; and group C, laser after POL injection. Repeated 8-Hz low-fluence pulses, moving the hand piece over a 3-cm vein segment with an average of five laser passes maximum and with a total time irradiation of 1 s were used. Sixteen weeks after the second treatment, statistically, degree of clearance after examining photographs and patients satisfaction index, plotted on a visual analogue scale and comparing results of all three groups, results were significantly better for group C (psafe and satisfactory in 96 % of patients using low-fluence laser pulses with a total cumulative energy in the 3 cm venous segment, lower than that of conventional treatment. Very few and transient complications were observed. POL foam injection followed by laser pulses is safe and efficient for vein treatment in dark-skinned patients.

  7. Comparative effectiveness of injection therapies in lateral epicondylitis: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Thøger Persson; Bartels, Else Marie; Ellingsen, Torkell; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Fredberg, Ulrich; Bliddal, Henning; Christensen, Robin

    2013-06-01

    Injection therapy with glucocorticoids has been used since the 1950s as a treatment strategy for lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow). Lately, several novel injection therapies have become available. To assess the comparative effectiveness and safety of injection therapies in patients with lateral epicondylitis. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Randomized controlled trials comparing different injection therapies for lateral epicondylitis were included provided they contained data for change in pain intensity (primary outcome). Trials were assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Network (random effects) meta-analysis was applied to combine direct and indirect evidence within and across trial data using the final end point reported in the trials, and results for the arm-based network analyses are reported as standardized mean differences (SMDs). Seventeen trials (1381 participants; 3 [18%] at low risk of bias) assessing injection with 8 different treatments-glucocorticoid (10 trials), botulinum toxin (4 trials), autologous blood (3 trials), platelet-rich plasma (2 trials), and polidocanol, glycosaminoglycan, prolotherapy, and hyaluronic acid (1 trial each)-were included. Pooled results (SMD [95% confidence interval]) showed that beyond 8 weeks, glucocorticoid injection was no more effective than placebo (-0.04 [-0.45 to 0.35]), but only 1 trial (which did not include a placebo arm) was at low risk of bias. Although botulinum toxin showed marginal benefit (-0.50 [-0.91 to -0.08]), it caused temporary paresis of finger extension, and all trials were at high risk of bias. Both autologous blood (-1.43 [-2.15 to -0.71]) and platelet-rich plasma (-1.13 [-1.77 to -0.49]) were also statistically superior to placebo, but only 1 trial was at low risk of bias. Prolotherapy (-2.71 [-4.60 to -0.82]) and hyaluronic acid (-5.58 [-6.35 to -4.82]) were both more efficacious than placebo, whereas polidocanol (0.39 [-0.42 to 1.20]) and glycosaminoglycan (-0.32 [-1.02 to 0

  8. Polidocanol concentration and time affect the properties of foam used for sclerotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurzen, van H.J.M.; Ceulen, R.P.; Tellings, S.S.; Geld, van der C.W.M.; Nijsten, T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND How foam is created for sclerotherapy varies and is not standardized. Moreover, the effect of several factors on the quality of the foam is not well studied. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of different parameters on foam stability and bubble size. METHODS As a measure of foam

  9. Polidocanol versus hypertonic glucose for sclerotherapy treatment of reticular veins of the lower limbs: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bertanha, Matheus [UNESP; Sobreira, Marcone Lima [UNESP; Lúcio Filho, Carlos Eduardo Pinheiro [UNESP; Mariúba, Jamil Victor de Oliveira [UNESP; Pimenta, Rafael Elias Farres [UNESP; Jaldin, Rodrigo Gibin [UNESP; Moroz, Andrei [UNESP; Moura, Regina [UNESP; Rollo, Hamilton Almeida [UNESP; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti [UNESP

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of chronic venous disease is high and occurs more frequently in females. According to the clinical, etiological, anatomical, and pathological classification (CEAP) definition, the reticular veins are included in the C1 class and are mainly associated with aesthetic complaints. Several invasive techniques are used for treatment, including mini phlebectomy, laser ablation, and radiofrequency ablation. However, a wide range of sclerosing agents may serve as minimally in...

  10. Less promising results with sclerosing ethoxysclerol injections for midportion achilles tendinopathy: a retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sterkenburg, Maayke N.; de Jonge, Milko C.; Sierevelt, Inger N.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Local injections of the sclerosing substance polidocanol (Ethoxysclerol) have shown good clinical results in patients with chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. After training by the inventors of the technique, sclerosing Ethoxysclerol injections were applied on a group of patients

  11. Ultrasound-guided sclerosis of neovessels in painful chronic patellar tendinopathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoksrud, Aasne; Ohberg, Lars; Alfredson, Håkan; Bahr, Roald

    2006-11-01

    Color Doppler ultrasound examination frequently reveals neovascularization in chronic painful Achilles and patellar tendinopathy. Sclerosing the area with vascular ingrowth using polidocanol has shown promising clinical results in patients with Achilles tendinopathy. To investigate sclerosing treatment using polidocanol on a group of elite athletes with patellar tendinopathy. Randomized controlled trial/cross-over study; Level of evidence, 1. The authors recruited 33 patients (42 tendons), mainly from the Norwegian elite divisions in basketball, team handball, and volleyball. Seventeen patients (23 knees) were randomized to the treatment group (polidocanol injections in the area of neovascularization) and 16 patients (20 knees) to the control group (similar injections with lidocaine/epinephrine). After 4 months of treatment, the control group was crossed over to active treatment. Pain and function were recorded using the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment score before the start of treatment and 4, 8, and 12 months after the first injection. Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment scores between groups were compared using multivariate analysis of variance for repeated measures. The treatment group reported a significant improvement in Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment score from 51 to 62 after 4 months; there was no change for the control group (group by time interaction, P = .052). After 8 months, when the control group had also received active treatment with polidocanol, they had a greater improvement in Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment score (58-79) than did the treatment group (54-70; group by time interaction, P = .022; time effect, P patellar tendinopathy.

  12. Complementary and alternative medicine treatments for low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Dan

    2012-09-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine, often referred to as integrated medicine, is often used for the treatment of low back pain. This article presents 6 therapies (ie, behavioral treatment, acupuncture, manipulation, prolotherapy, neuroreflexotherapy, and herbal treatments), which are discussed in terms of the specifics of the modality, as well as the empirical evidence related to their effectiveness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Alternatives to Biologics in Management of Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Fadi; Murrell, William D; Refalo, Andrew; Maffulli, Nicola

    2018-06-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a common condition encountered by physicians. KOA is addressed by a wide array of modalities including a number of nonbiological treatments. PubMed, ISI Web of Science, and SPORTDiscus were searched for level 1 to 4 studies published from inception to August 2017. A total of 18 studies were evaluated and results demonstrated moderate supporting evidence for prolotherapy and limited evidence for botulinum toxin type A, sodium bicarbonate and calcium gluconate, and low-molecular weight fraction of 5% human serum albumin. Evidence for local anesthetic agents was conflicting. There is moderate supportive evidence for the effectiveness of prolotherapy in improving pain and function in both, short-term and long-term. Limited supporting evidence found for botulinum toxin type A, sodium bicarbonate and calcium gluconate, and low-molecular weight fraction of 5% human serum albumin in improving pain and function. There is conflicting evidence for the use of local anesthetic agents in patients with KOA.

  14. Generation of sclerosant foams by mechanical methods increases the foam temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lulu; Wong, Kaichung; Connor, David; Fakhim, Babak; Behnia, Masud; Parsi, Kurosh

    2017-08-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of agitation on foam temperature. Methods Sodium tetradecyl sulphate and polidocanol were used. Prior to foam generation, the sclerosant and all constituent equipment were cooled to 4-25℃ and compared with cooling the sclerosant only. Foam was generated using a modified Tessari method. During foam agitation, the temperature change was measured using a thermocouple for 120 s. Results Pre-cooling all the constituent equipment resulted in a cooler foam in comparison with only cooling the sclerosant. A starting temperature of 4℃ produced average foam temperatures of 12.5 and 13.2℃ for sodium tetradecyl sulphate and polidocanol, respectively. It was also found that only cooling the liquid sclerosant provided minimal cooling to the final foam temperature, with the temperature 20 and 20.5℃ for sodium tetradecyl sulphate and polidocanol, respectively. Conclusion The foam generation process has a noticeable impact on final foam temperature and needs to be taken into consideration when creating foam.

  15. Audit of conservative management of chronic low back pain in a secondary care setting--part I: facet joint and sacroiliac joint interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraverty, Robin; Dias, Richard

    2004-12-01

    The work of a chronic back pain service in secondary care in the West Midlands is reported. The service offers acupuncture, spinal injection procedures, osteopathy and a range of other interventions for patients whose back pain has not responded to conservative management. This section of the report focuses on injection procedures for lumbar facet joint and sacroiliac joint pain, which have been shown to be the cause of chronic low back pain in 16-40% and 13-19% of patients respectively. Diagnosis relies on the use of intra-articular or sensory nerve block injections with local anaesthetic. Possible treatments following diagnosis include intra-articular corticosteroid, radiofrequency denervation (for facet joint pain) or ligament prolotherapy injections (for sacroiliac joint pain). The results of several hospital audits are reported. At six month follow up, 50% of 38 patients undergoing radiofrequency denervation following diagnostic blocks for facet joint pain had improved by more than 50%, compared to 29% of 34 patients treated with intra-articular corticosteroid injection. Sixty three per cent of 19 patients undergoing prolotherapy following diagnostic block injection for sacroiliac joint pain had improved at six months, compared to 33% of 33 who had intra-articular corticosteroid. Both radiofrequency denervation and sacroiliac prolotherapy showed good long-term outcomes at one year.

  16. Elbow tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzer, Michael E; Seidenberg, Peter H; Bader, Dov A

    2014-07-01

    Overuse injuries of the lateral and medial elbow are common in sport, recreational activities, and occupational endeavors. They are commonly diagnosed as lateral and medial epicondylitis; however, the pathophysiology of these disorders demonstrates a lack of inflammation. Instead, angiofibroblastic degeneration is present, referred to as tendinosis. As such, a more appropriate terminology for these conditions is epicondylosis. This is a clinical diagnosis, and further investigations are only performed to rule out other clinical entities after conventional therapy has failed. Yet, most patients respond to conservative measures with physical therapy and counterforce bracing. Corticosteroid injections are effective for short-term pain control but have not demonstrated long-term benefit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Decreased Brain Neurokinin-1 Receptor Availability in Chronic Tennis Elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnman, Clas; Catana, Ciprian; Svärdsudd, Kurt; Appel, Lieuwe; Engler, Henry; Långström, Bengt; Sörensen, Jens; Furmark, Tomas; Fredrikson, Mats; Borsook, David; Peterson, Magnus

    Substance P is released in painful and inflammatory conditions, affecting both peripheral processes and the central nervous system neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor. There is a paucity of data on human brain alterations in NK1 expression, how this system may be affected by treatment, and interactions between central and peripheral tissue alterations. Ten subjects with chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis) were selected out of a larger (n = 120) randomized controlled trial evaluating graded exercise as a treatment for chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis). These ten subjects were examined by positron emission tomography (PET) with the NK1-specific radioligand 11C-GR205171 before, and eight patients were followed up after treatment with graded exercise. Brain binding in the ten patients before treatment, reflecting NK1-receptor availability (NK1-RA), was compared to that of 18 healthy subjects and, longitudinally, to the eight of the original ten patients that agreed to a second PET examination after treatment. Before treatment, patients had significantly lower NK1-RA in the insula, vmPFC, postcentral gyrus, anterior cingulate, caudate, putamen, amygdala and the midbrain but not the thalamus and cerebellum, with the largest difference in the insula contralateral to the injured elbow. No significant correlations between brain NK1-RA and pain, functional severity, or peripheral NK1-RA in the affected limb were observed. In the eight patients examined after treatment, pain ratings decreased in everyone, but there were no significant changes in NK1-RA. These findings indicate a role for the substance P (SP) / NK1 receptor system in musculoskeletal pain and tissue healing. As neither clinical parameters nor successful treatment response was reflected in brain NK1-RA after treatment, this may reflect the diverse function of the SP/NK1 system in CNS and peripheral tissue, or a change too small or slow to capture over the three-month treatment.

  18. Management of Tennis Elbow with sodium hyaluronate periarticular injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrella Robert J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To determine the efficacy and safety of peri-articular hyaluronic acid injections in chronic lateral epicondylosis (tennis elbow. Design Prospective randomized clinical trial in primary care sport medicine. Patients Three hundred and thirty one consecutive competitive racquette sport athletes with chronic (>3 months lateral epicondylosis were administered 2 injections (first injection at baseline into the subcutaneous tissue and muscle 1 cm. from the lateral epicondyle toward the primary point of pain using a two-dimensional fanning technique. A second injection was administered 1 week later. Outcomes measures Assessments were done at baseline, days 7, 14, 30, 90 and 356. Efficacy measures included patient's visual analogue scale (VAS of pain at rest (0-100 mm and following assessment of grip strength (0-100 mm. Grip strength was determined using a jamar hydraulic hand dynamometer. Other assessments included patients' global assessment of elbow injury (5 point categorical scale; 1 = no disability, 5 = maximal disability, patients' assessment of normal function/activity (5 point categorical scale, patients/physician satisfaction assessment (10 point categorical scale, time to return to pain-free and disability-free sport and adverse events as per WHO definition. Differences between groups were determined using an intent-to-treat ANOVA. Results Average age of the study population was 49 years (± 12 years. One hundred and sixty-five patients were randomized to the HA and 166 were randomized to the control groups. The change in VAS pain was -6.7 (± 2.0 for HA vs -1.3 (± 1.5 for control (p Conclusion Peri-articular HA treatment for tennis elbow was significantly better than control in improving pain at rest and after maximal grip testing. Further, HA treatment was highly satisfactory by patients and physicians and resulted in better return to pain free sport compared to control.

  19. Decreased Brain Neurokinin-1 Receptor Availability in Chronic Tennis Elbow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clas Linnman

    Full Text Available Substance P is released in painful and inflammatory conditions, affecting both peripheral processes and the central nervous system neurokinin 1 (NK1 receptor. There is a paucity of data on human brain alterations in NK1 expression, how this system may be affected by treatment, and interactions between central and peripheral tissue alterations. Ten subjects with chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis were selected out of a larger (n = 120 randomized controlled trial evaluating graded exercise as a treatment for chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis. These ten subjects were examined by positron emission tomography (PET with the NK1-specific radioligand 11C-GR205171 before, and eight patients were followed up after treatment with graded exercise. Brain binding in the ten patients before treatment, reflecting NK1-receptor availability (NK1-RA, was compared to that of 18 healthy subjects and, longitudinally, to the eight of the original ten patients that agreed to a second PET examination after treatment. Before treatment, patients had significantly lower NK1-RA in the insula, vmPFC, postcentral gyrus, anterior cingulate, caudate, putamen, amygdala and the midbrain but not the thalamus and cerebellum, with the largest difference in the insula contralateral to the injured elbow. No significant correlations between brain NK1-RA and pain, functional severity, or peripheral NK1-RA in the affected limb were observed. In the eight patients examined after treatment, pain ratings decreased in everyone, but there were no significant changes in NK1-RA. These findings indicate a role for the substance P (SP / NK1 receptor system in musculoskeletal pain and tissue healing. As neither clinical parameters nor successful treatment response was reflected in brain NK1-RA after treatment, this may reflect the diverse function of the SP/NK1 system in CNS and peripheral tissue, or a change too small or slow to capture over the three-month treatment.

  20. Modified Pair Technique for Treatment of Hydatid Cysts in the Spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enver Zerem

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of single-session sclerotherapy with mixture of alcohol and polidocanol and a subsequent injection of albendazole for devisceration of hydatid cysts in the spleen. Eight patients (four women and four men, average age 22.9±11.4 with hydatid cyst in the spleen were treated with 10 minutes time of exposure to mixture of ethanol 95% and polidocanol 1%. After that, 2 to 5 ml of albendazole was injected into the cyst cavity. Two patients had 2 cysts. At follow-up the patients were examined with clinical and biochemical examinations, ultrasonography, and serologic test for echinococcal antibody titres. The mean hospital stay was 2.5±0.93 days. During the follow-up period, mean cyst diameter decreased from 46±16.4 mm to 13.6±16.26 mm. In all ten cysts, a reduction of post procedural recolection of fluid over 40% was observed. Five cysts (50% disappeared during the follow-up period. All cysts (5 smaller then 50 mm in diameter disappeared during follow-up period. After an initial rise, the echinococcal-an-tibody titres fell progressively and at the last follow-up were negative (< 1: 160 in 7 (88% patients. No complications were observed, except for pain, fever and urticaria during the first 24-hours after the procedure. Sclerotherapy using only one session and 10 min time of exposure to the mixture of ethanol and polidocanol, and a subsequent injection of al-bendasole solution represents an effective treatment of hydatid cysts in the spleen. This procedure is even more efficacious for hydatid cyst with diametar smaller then 50mm.

  1. Sclerotherapy for Reticular Veins in the Lower Limbs: A Triple-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertanha, Matheus; Jaldin, Rodrigo Gibin; Moura, Regina; Pimenta, Rafael Elias Farres; Mariúba, Jamil Victor de Oliveira; Lúcio Filho, Carlos Eduardo Pinheiro; Alcantara, Giovana Piteri; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti; Sobreira, Marcone Lima

    2017-12-01

    Reticular veins are subdermal veins located in the lower limbs and are mainly associated with aesthetic complaints. Although sclerotherapy is the treatment of choice for reticular veins in the lower limbs, no consensus has been reached regarding to the optimal sclerosant. To compare the efficacy and safety of 2 sclerosants used to treat reticular veins: 0.2% polidocanol diluted in 70% hypertonic glucose (HG) (group 1) vs 75% HG alone (group 2). Prospective, randomized, triple-blind, controlled, parallel-group clinical trial with patients randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio between the 2 treatment groups from March through December 2014, with 2 months' follow-up. The study was conducted in a single academic medical center. Eligible participants were all women, aged 18 to 69 years, who had at least 1 reticular vein with a minimum length of 10 cm in 1 of their lower limbs. The patients underwent sclerotherapy in a single intervention with either 0.2% polidocanol plus 70% HG or 75% HG alone to eliminate reticular veins. The primary efficacy end point was the disappearance of the reticular veins within 60 days after treatment with sclerotherapy. The reticular veins were measured on images obtained before treatment and after treatment using ImageJ software. Safety outcomes were analyzed immediately after treatment and 7 days and 60 days after treatment and included serious adverse events (eg, deep vein thrombosis and systemic complications) and minor adverse events (eg, pigmentation, edema, telangiectatic matting, and hematomas). Ninety-three women completed the study, median (interquartile range) age 43.0 (24.0-61.0) years for group 1 and 41.0 (27.0-62.0) years for group 2. Sclerotherapy with 0.2% polidocanol plus 70% HG was significantly more effective than with 75% HG alone in eliminating reticular veins from the treated area (95.17% vs 85.40%; P vein pigmentation length for group 1 and 7.09% for group 2, with no significant difference between the groups (P = .09

  2. Injection Therapies for Rotator Cuff Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kenneth M; Wang, Dean; Dines, Joshua S

    2018-04-01

    Rotator cuff disease affects a large proportion of the overall population and encompasses a wide spectrum of pathologies, including subacromial impingement, rotator cuff tendinopathy or tear, and calcific tendinitis. Various injection therapies have been used for the treatment of rotator cuff disease, including corticosteroid, prolotherapy, platelet-rich plasma, stem cells, and ultrasound-guided barbotage for calcific tendinitis. However, the existing evidence for these therapies remains controversial or sparse. Ultimately, improved understanding of the underlying structural and compositional deficiencies of the injured rotator cuff tissue is needed to identify the biological needs that can potentially be targeted with injection therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sacroiliac Joint Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Quijano, David A; Otero Loperena, Eduardo

    2018-02-01

    Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain is an important cause of lower back problems. Multiple SIJ injection techniques have been proposed over the years to help in the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. However, the SIJ innervation is complex and variable, and truly intra-articular injections are sometimes difficult to obtain. Different sacroiliac joint injections have shown to provide pain relief in patients suffering this ailment. Various techniques for intraarticular injections, sacral branch blocks and radiofrequency ablation, both fluoroscopy guided and ultrasound guided are discussed in this paper. Less common techniques like prolotherapy, platelet rich plasma injections and botulism toxin injections are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Central Retinal and Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion After Intralesional Injection of Sclerosant to Glabellar Subcutaneous Hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Gobara, Hideo; Mimura, Hidefumi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe vision loss caused by central retinal artery and posterior ciliary artery occlusion as a consequence of sclerotherapy with a polidocanol injection to a glabellar hemangioma. An 18-year-old man underwent direct injection with a 23-gauge needle of 1 mL of a polidocanol-carbon dioxide emulsion into the glabellar subcutaneous hemangioma under ultrasound visualization of the needle tip by radiologists. He developed lid swelling the next day, and 3 days later at referral, the visual acuity in the left eye was no light perception. Funduscopy revealed central retinal artery occlusion and fluorescein angiography disclosed no perfusion at all in the left fundus, indicating concurrent posterior ciliary artery occlusion. The patient also showed mydriasis, blepharoptosis, and total external ophthalmoplegia on the left side. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the swollen medial rectus muscle. In a month, blepharoptosis and ophthalmoplegia resolved but the visual acuity remained no light perception. Sclerosing therapy for facial hemangioma may develop a severe complication such as permanent visual loss.

  5. Air contamination in the sclerosing foam for the treatment of varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Franciscis, S; Nobile, Cga; Larosa, E; Montemurro, R; Serra, R

    2016-03-01

    Fluids and drugs formulated for intravenous infusion may potentially promote the growth of microorganisms that can cause infections. The aim of this study is to test the sterility of sclerosing foam. Polidocanol was used for the production of the foam. The Tessari method was used in order to generate the foam. The preparation was carried out both in the operating theater and in an outpatient room. A validation test with microorganisms was also performed. The measurements showed no evident growth of microorganisms and in the validation tests the foam appeared to even display bacteriostatic and/or bactericide properties. Sclerosing foam seems to be safe from a microbiological point of view. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Guided interventions in musculoskeletal ultrasound: what's the evidence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, J., E-mail: jdavidson@doctors.org.u [St Richard' s Hospital, Spitalfield Lane, Chichester, West Sussex (United Kingdom); Jayaraman, S. [St Richard' s Hospital, Spitalfield Lane, Chichester, West Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Increasing histological and radiological understanding of the processes involved in soft-tissue injury is leading to novel targeted treatments. A number of reviews have recommended that these treatments should be performed with image guidance. This review describes current ultrasound-guided interventions and injections, together with the level of evidence for these. Discussion of guided interventions will include; percutaneous lavage (barbotage), brisement, dry needling, electrocoagulation, and of guided injections; corticosteroids, autologous substances (blood and platelet rich plasma), sclerosants, and prolotherapy (hyperosmolar dextrose). Representative imaging illustrating some of these techniques is included for correlation with the methods described. As these procedures are often performed in sportspeople, it is essential that the radiologist is aware of prohibited substances and methods outlined in an annual publication from the World Anti-Doping Association (WADA). Finally, future directions, including the use of autologous substances, mesenchymal and stem cells will be discussed.

  7. Guided interventions in musculoskeletal ultrasound: what's the evidence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.; Jayaraman, S.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing histological and radiological understanding of the processes involved in soft-tissue injury is leading to novel targeted treatments. A number of reviews have recommended that these treatments should be performed with image guidance. This review describes current ultrasound-guided interventions and injections, together with the level of evidence for these. Discussion of guided interventions will include; percutaneous lavage (barbotage), brisement, dry needling, electrocoagulation, and of guided injections; corticosteroids, autologous substances (blood and platelet rich plasma), sclerosants, and prolotherapy (hyperosmolar dextrose). Representative imaging illustrating some of these techniques is included for correlation with the methods described. As these procedures are often performed in sportspeople, it is essential that the radiologist is aware of prohibited substances and methods outlined in an annual publication from the World Anti-Doping Association (WADA). Finally, future directions, including the use of autologous substances, mesenchymal and stem cells will be discussed.

  8. From clinical evidence to everyday practice: implementing findings from a cost-effectiveness analysis for endoscopic injection therapy for upper-gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitter, Helmut; Lorenz, Wilfried; Nicolay, Uwe; Krack, Walter; Hellenbrandt, Armin; Zielke, Andreas; Gajek, Hartwig; Ledertheil, Gertrud

    2003-03-01

    A previous upper-gastrointestinal bleeding trial showed that patients treated with repeated fibrin glue injection for upper-gastrointestinal bleeding have significantly less rebleeding than those treated with polidocanol. To analyse the cost and effectiveness of repeated fibrin glue injection and to investigate whether these results change physicians' attitudes. A retrospective random sample of five hospitals from the previous study, collection of cost identification, and follow-up data on 320 patients (155 in the polidocanol group, 165 in the fibrin glue group). An incremental cost-effectiveness analysis and comparison of outcomes was performed using chi-squared tests and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. A survey was carried out using a questionnaire in the five hospitals on local guidelines for management of ulcer bleeding, and its results were analysed qualitatively. The measure of effectiveness is the number of prevented rebleedings. Further variables were length of hospital stay and length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay. The cost for the prevention of one additional rebleeding by repeated fibrin glue treatment amounts to 14,316 +/- 4981 euros (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio). There were no significant differences in length of stays in ICU or in hospital. The physicians did not change their management plans for patients with upper-gastrointestinal bleeding. In a survey, it was seen that other factors, such as local guidelines, attitudes towards new treatment options, and ease of handling of drugs, are more important than a result of a single study for a behavioural change of the doctors. The study was not designed prospectively to address a pharmacoeconomic question. As relevant variables (e.g. length of ICU stay) could not be reliably ascertained retrospectively, this may lead to biased estimates of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio.

  9. Non-surgical treatment of lateral epicondylitis: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Susan E G; Miller, Katherine; Elfar, John C; Hammert, Warren C

    2014-12-01

    Non-surgical approaches to treatment of lateral epicondylitis are numerous. The aim of this systematic review is to examine randomized, controlled trials of these treatments. Numerous databases were systematically searched from earliest records to February 2013. Search terms included "lateral epicondylitis," "lateral elbow pain," "tennis elbow," "lateral epicondylalgia," and "elbow tendinopathy" combined with "randomized controlled trial." Two reviewers examined the literature for eligibility via article abstract and full text. Fifty-eight articles met eligibility criteria: (1) a target population of patients with symptoms of lateral epicondylitis; (2) evaluation of treatment of lateral epicondylitis with the following non-surgical techniques: corticosteroid injection, injection technique, iontophoresis, botulinum toxin A injection, prolotherapy, platelet-rich plasma or autologous blood injection, bracing, physical therapy, shockwave therapy, or laser therapy; and (3) a randomized controlled trial design. Lateral epicondylitis is a condition that is usually self-limited. There may be a short-term pain relief advantage found with the application of corticosteroids, but no demonstrable long-term pain relief. Injection of botulinum toxin A and prolotherapy are superior to placebo but not to corticosteroids, and botulinum toxin A is likely to produce concomitant extensor weakness. Platelet-rich plasma or autologous blood injections have been found to be both more and less effective than corticosteroid injections. Non-invasive treatment methods such as bracing, physical therapy, and extracorporeal shockwave therapy do not appear to provide definitive benefit regarding pain relief. Some studies of low-level laser therapy show superiority to placebo whereas others do not. There are multiple randomized controlled trials for non-surgical management of lateral epicondylitis, but the existing literature does not provide conclusive evidence that there is one preferred method

  10. CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mundt Marlon P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. Method A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess utilization, efficacy and costs of CAM therapies in this population. Results Patients were treated for a variety of pain problems including low back pain (38.4%, headaches (9.9%, and knee pain (6.5%; the average duration of pain was 16 years. The median morphine equivalent opioid dose was 41 mg/day, and the mean dose was 92 mg/day. Forty-four percent of the sample reported CAM therapy use in the past 12 months. Therapies utilized included massage therapy (27.3%, n = 248, chiropractic treatment (17.8%, n = 162, acupuncture (7.6%, n = 69, yoga (6.1%, n = 55, herbs and supplements (6.8%, n = 62, and prolotherapy (5.9%, n = 54. CAM utilization was significantly related to age female gender, pain severity income pain diagnosis of neck and upper back pain, and illicit drug use. Medical insurance covered chiropractic treatment (81.8% and prolotherapy (87.7%, whereas patients primarily paid for other CAM therapies. Over half the sample reported that one or more of the CAM therapies were helpful. Conclusion This study suggests CAM therapy is widely used by patients receiving opioids for chronic pain. Whether opioids can be reduced by introducing such therapies remains to be studied.

  11. Nonsurgical interventional therapies for low back pain: a review of the evidence for an American Pain Society clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Roger; Atlas, Steven J; Stanos, Steven P; Rosenquist, Richard W

    2009-05-01

    Systematic review. To systematically assess benefits and harms of nonsurgical interventional therapies for low back and radicular pain. Although use of certain interventional therapies is common or increasing, there is also uncertainty or controversy about their efficacy. Electronic database searches on Ovid MEDLINE and the Cochrane databases were conducted through July 2008 to identify randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of local injections, botulinum toxin injection, prolotherapy, epidural steroid injection, facet joint injection, therapeutic medial branch block, sacroiliac joint injection, intradiscal steroid injection, chemonucleolysis, radiofrequency denervation, intradiscal electrothermal therapy, percutaneous intradiscal radiofrequency thermocoagulation, Coblation nucleoplasty, and spinal cord stimulation. All relevant studies were methodologically assessed by 2 independent reviewers using criteria developed by the Cochrane Back Review Group (for trials) and by Oxman (for systematic reviews). A qualitative synthesis of results was performed using methods adapted from the US Preventive Services Task Force. For sciatica or prolapsed lumbar disc with radiculopathy, we found good evidence that chemonucleolysis is moderately superior to placebo injection but inferior to surgery, and fair evidence that epidural steroid injection is moderately effective for short-term (but not long-term) symptom relief. We found fair evidence that spinal cord stimulation is moderately effective for failed back surgery syndrome with persistent radiculopathy, though device-related complications are common. We found good or fair evidence that prolotherapy, facet joint injection, intradiscal steroid injection, and percutaneous intradiscal radiofrequency thermocoagulation are not effective. Insufficient evidence exists to reliably evaluate other interventional therapies. Few nonsurgical interventional therapies for low back pain have been shown to be effective in

  12. CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Sara; Rabago, David P; Mundt, Marlon P; Fleming, Michael F

    2007-05-16

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess utilization, efficacy and costs of CAM therapies in this population. Patients were treated for a variety of pain problems including low back pain (38.4%), headaches (9.9%), and knee pain (6.5%); the average duration of pain was 16 years. The median morphine equivalent opioid dose was 41 mg/day, and the mean dose was 92 mg/day. Forty-four percent of the sample reported CAM therapy use in the past 12 months. Therapies utilized included massage therapy (27.3%, n = 248), chiropractic treatment (17.8%, n = 162), acupuncture (7.6%, n = 69), yoga (6.1%, n = 55), herbs and supplements (6.8%, n = 62), and prolotherapy (5.9%, n = 54). CAM utilization was significantly related to age female gender, pain severity income pain diagnosis of neck and upper back pain, and illicit drug use. Medical insurance covered chiropractic treatment (81.8%) and prolotherapy (87.7%), whereas patients primarily paid for other CAM therapies. Over half the sample reported that one or more of the CAM therapies were helpful. This study suggests CAM therapy is widely used by patients receiving opioids for chronic pain. Whether opioids can be reduced by introducing such therapies remains to be studied.

  13. Chronic neck pain: making the connection between capsular ligament laxity and cervical instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steilen, Danielle; Hauser, Ross; Woldin, Barbara; Sawyer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The use of conventional modalities for chronic neck pain remains debatable, primarily because most treatments have had limited success. We conducted a review of the literature published up to December 2013 on the diagnostic and treatment modalities of disorders related to chronic neck pain and concluded that, despite providing temporary relief of symptoms, these treatments do not address the specific problems of healing and are not likely to offer long-term cures. The objectives of this narrative review are to provide an overview of chronic neck pain as it relates to cervical instability, to describe the anatomical features of the cervical spine and the impact of capsular ligament laxity, to discuss the disorders causing chronic neck pain and their current treatments, and lastly, to present prolotherapy as a viable treatment option that heals injured ligaments, restores stability to the spine, and resolves chronic neck pain. The capsular ligaments are the main stabilizing structures of the facet joints in the cervical spine and have been implicated as a major source of chronic neck pain. Chronic neck pain often reflects a state of instability in the cervical spine and is a symptom common to a number of conditions described herein, including disc herniation, cervical spondylosis, whiplash injury and whiplash associated disorder, postconcussion syndrome, vertebrobasilar insufficiency, and Barré-Liéou syndrome. When the capsular ligaments are injured, they become elongated and exhibit laxity, which causes excessive movement of the cervical vertebrae. In the upper cervical spine (C0-C2), this can cause a number of other symptoms including, but not limited to, nerve irritation and vertebrobasilar insufficiency with associated vertigo, tinnitus, dizziness, facial pain, arm pain, and migraine headaches. In the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), this can cause muscle spasms, crepitation, and/or paresthesia in addition to chronic neck pain. In either case, the presence of

  14. Embolia atrial de trombo flutuante da veia safena magna após escleroterapia com microespuma ecoguiada Atrial embolism of floating thrombus of the great saphenous vein after microfoam ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Pierry Ferreira Lopes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A escleroterapia com microespuma vem sendo utilizada amplamente no tratamento da doença venosa varicosa. No entanto, a despeito da sua pouca invasividade e segurança, complicações potencialmente graves e letais já foram descritas, como o acidente vascular cerebral e parada cardiorrespiratória. Descrevemos um caso de embolia atrial tardia de trombo flutuante da junção safeno-femoral de veia safena magna varicosa, após escleroterapia com microespuma de polidocanol guiada por ultrassom, e o tratamento dessa complicação.Microfoam sclerotherapy has been widely used in the treatment of varicose vein disease. However, despite its low invasiveness and safety, potentially serious and lethal complications have been described, such as stroke and cardiorespiratory arrest. We describe a case of delayed atrial embolism of floating thrombus in the saphenofemoral junction of a great saphenous varicose vein after microfoam ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy, as well as the treatment of this complication.

  15. Novel approaches for the management of tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2010-11-03

    Tendinopathy is a failed healing response of the tendon. Despite an abundance of therapeutic options, very few randomized prospective, placebo-controlled trials have been carried out to assist physicians in choosing the best evidence-based management. Eccentric exercises have been proposed to promote collagen fiber cross-link formation within the tendon, thereby facilitating tendon remodeling. Overall results suggest a trend for a positive effect of eccentric exercises, with no reported adverse effects. Combining eccentric training and shock wave therapy produces higher success rates compared with eccentric loading alone or shock wave therapy alone. The use of injectable substances such as platelet-rich plasma, autologous blood, polidocanol, corticosteroids, and aprotinin in and around tendons is popular, but there is minimal clinical evidence to support their use. The aim of operative treatment is to excise fibrotic adhesions, remove areas of failed healing, and make multiple longitudinal incisions in the tendon to detect intratendinous lesions and to restore vascularity and possibly stimulate the remaining viable cells to initiate cell matrix response and healing. New operative procedures include endoscopy, electrocoagulation, and minimally invasive stripping. The aim of these techniques is to disrupt the abnormal neoinnervation to interfere with the pain sensation caused by tendinopathy. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to better clarify the best therapeutic options for the management of tendinopathy.

  16. Costos del tratamiento de las telangiectasias y várices tronculares con escleroterapia con espuma en el Hospital "Freyre de Andrade" de La Habana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anai García Fariñas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: determinar cuánto cuesta por paciente el tratamiento de várices por la técnica de escleroterapia con espuma en la consulta externa de Angiología y Cirugía Vascular del Hospital C.Q. "Freyre de Andrade". Método: evaluación económica del tipo descripción de costo. Se estudió el costo directo institucional del tratamiento ambulatorio para várices en extremidades inferiores con escleroterapia con espuma y donde el principio activo fue Polidocanol al 0,5% a una dosis de 2ml. Se emplearon las partidas recursos humanos, material gastable y medicamento. Se determinó el costo promedio por paciente, total y según tipo de consulta. Resultados: el costo total por paciente atendido fue de 68,60 pesos cubanos. El costo medio por paciente de la consulta de clasificación fue de 0,18 centavos de pesos cubanos (DS 95%= 0,12. El costo medio de la consulta de tratamiento fue de 50,60 pesos cubanos (DS 95%=7,65. No hubo diferencias significativas entre los diferentes tipos de varices a tratar. Conclusiones: el costo directo institucional del tratamiento de telangiectasias y varices tronculares con escleroterapia con espuma fue similar. A corto plazo, el tratamiento de las várices con escleroterapia con espuma genera menores costos que la opción quirúrgica.

  17. A comprehensive protocol to diagnose and treat pain of muscular origin may successfully and reliably decrease or eliminate pain in a chronic pain population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Norman J; Gracely, Edward J; Keefe, Kelly O

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive protocol is presented to identify muscular causes of regional pain syndromes utilizing an electrical stimulus in lieu of palpation, and combining elements of Prolotherapy with trigger point injections. One hundred seventy-six consecutive patients were evaluated for the presence of muscle pain by utilizing an electrical stimulus produced by the Muscle Pain Detection Device. The diagnosis of "Muscle Pain Amenable to Injection" (MPAI), rather than trigger points, was made if pain was produced for the duration of the stimulation. If MPAI was found, muscle tendon injections (MTI) were offered to patients along with post-MTI physical therapy, providing neuromuscular electrical stimulation followed by a validated exercise program [1]. A control group, evaluated 1 month prior to their actual consultation/evaluation when muscle pain was identified but not yet treated, was used for comparison. Forty-five patients who met criteria completed treatment. Patients' scores on the Brief Pain Inventory decreased an average of 62%; median 70% (P < 0.001) for pain severity and 68%; median 85% (P < 0.001) for pain interference one month following treatment. These changes were significantly greater (P < 0.001) than those observed in the untreated controls. A protocol incorporating an easily reproducible electrical stimulus to diagnose a muscle causing pain in a region of the body followed by an injection technique that involves the entirety of the muscle, and post injection restoration of muscle function, can successfully eliminate or significantly reduce regional pain present for years.

  18. New Developments in the Use of Biologics and Other Modalities in the Management of Lateral Epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Knesek, Michael; Terry, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Lateral epicondylitis is a common source of elbow pain. Though it is often a self-limited condition, refractory lateral epicondylitis can lead to problems with activities of daily living and sometimes requires sick leave from work. Therefore prompt treatment is essential. Histopathologic studies have suggested that lateral epicondylitis is a tendinopathy, associated with apoptosis and autophagy, rather than a tendonitis associated with inflammation. Although corticosteroids have been used for short-term treatment, recent studies have suggested that they are not helpful and may even be harmful and delay healing in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. Researchers have recently begun to investigate the use of biologics as potential treatment options for lateral epicondylitis. Autologous blood preparations including platelet rich plasma (PRP) and autologous whole blood injections (ABIs) have been proposed in order to deliver growth factors and other nutrients to the diseased tendon. Stem cell therapies have also been suggested as a method of improving tendon healing. This review discusses the current evidence for the use of PRP, ABI, and stem cell therapies for treatment of lateral epicondylitis. We also review the evidence for nonbiologic treatments including corticosteroids, prolotherapy, botulinum toxin A, and nitric oxide.

  19. New Developments in the Use of Biologics and Other Modalities in the Management of Lateral Epicondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia A. Kahlenberg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral epicondylitis is a common source of elbow pain. Though it is often a self-limited condition, refractory lateral epicondylitis can lead to problems with activities of daily living and sometimes requires sick leave from work. Therefore prompt treatment is essential. Histopathologic studies have suggested that lateral epicondylitis is a tendinopathy, associated with apoptosis and autophagy, rather than a tendonitis associated with inflammation. Although corticosteroids have been used for short-term treatment, recent studies have suggested that they are not helpful and may even be harmful and delay healing in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. Researchers have recently begun to investigate the use of biologics as potential treatment options for lateral epicondylitis. Autologous blood preparations including platelet rich plasma (PRP and autologous whole blood injections (ABIs have been proposed in order to deliver growth factors and other nutrients to the diseased tendon. Stem cell therapies have also been suggested as a method of improving tendon healing. This review discusses the current evidence for the use of PRP, ABI, and stem cell therapies for treatment of lateral epicondylitis. We also review the evidence for nonbiologic treatments including corticosteroids, prolotherapy, botulinum toxin A, and nitric oxide.

  20. Chronic sacroiliac joint and pelvic girdle dysfunction in a 35-year-old nulliparous woman successfully managed with multimodal and multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonely, Holly; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Desai, Mehul J; Reoli, Rachel

    2015-02-01

    Sacroiliac joint pain and dysfunction affect 15-25% of patients reporting low back pain, including reports of spontaneous, idiopathic, traumatic, and non-traumatic onsets. The poor reliability and validity associated with diagnostic clinical and imaging techniques leads to challenges in diagnosing and managing sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A 35-year-old nulliparous female with a 14-year history of right sacroiliac joint dysfunction was managed using a multimodal and multidisciplinary approach when symptoms failed to resolve after 2 months of physical therapy. The plan of care included four prolotherapy injections, sacroiliac joint manipulation into nutation, pelvic girdle belting, and specific stabilization exercises. The patient completed 20 physical therapy sessions over a 12-month period. At 6 months, the patient's Oswestry Disability Questionnaire score was reduced from 34% to 14%. At 1-year follow-up, her score was 0%. The patient's rating of pain on a numeric rating scale decreased to an average of 4/10 at 6 months and 0/10 at 1-year follow-up. A multidisciplinary and multimodal approach for the management of chronic sacroiliac joint dysfunction appeared successful in a single-case design at 1-year follow-up.

  1. Combination therapy of hyaluronic acid mesotherapic injections and sclerotherapy for treatment of lower leg telangiectasia without major venous insufficiency: a preliminary clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannitti, Tommaso; Rottigni, Valentina; Torricelli, Federica; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2014-04-01

    Telangiectasia is the dilation of dermal capillaries mainly due to hypertension and vein insufficiency. Treatments of choice for this condition are sclerotherapy with foam liquid or intradermal fiber optic laser energy delivery. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a new therapeutic approach consisting in the use of polymerized hyaluronic acid mesotherapic injections following sclerotherapy in the areas of the skin affected by telangiectasia in patients without major vein insufficiency. A total of 20 women, aged between 19 and 64 years, affected by recurrent lower leg telangiectasia, were included in this study. Patients were preliminarily submitted to echo color Doppler sonography to rule out severe saphenofemoral valve and lower limb major vein insufficiency. All patients underwent 3 sessions a month of polidocanol 1% capillary injections for 2 months. This was followed by 0.1 ml cross-linked hyaluronic acid introduction in the polidocanol 1% needle track. A total of 50 mesotherapic injections (0.05 ml each) were performed on the skin surface where an ice pack was previously applied for 4 to 5 minutes. A follow-up visit was performed at 3 months. The results, based on photographic examination, were rated as follows: poor improvement (0%-50%), good improvement (51%-75%), and very good improvement (76%-100%). The side effects of the clinical procedure, in terms of pain, itching, paresthesia, ecchymosis, and relapse of telangiectasia over the treated skin surface, as well as a persisting pigmentation in the injection spots and induced benefits related to leg heaviness and comfort, were recorded. In total, 6 patients displayed a slight venous insufficiency, 3 patients displayed patent venous insufficiency, and 11 patients did not show any venous insufficiency. Before treatment, itching was present in 18 out of 20 patients, paresthesia in 15 out of 20 patients, ecchymosis in 16 out of 20 patients, and leg heaviness in 15 out of 20 patients. At the 3

  2. Costos del tratamiento de las telangiectasias y várices tronculares con escleroterapia con espuma en el Hospital "Freyre de Andrade" de La Habana Cost of the treatment of t elangiectases and varicose veins with foam sclerotherapy in ¨Freyre de Andrade¨hospital in Havana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anai García Fariñas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: determinar cuánto cuesta por paciente el tratamiento de várices por la técnica de escleroterapia con espuma en la consulta externa de Angiología y Cirugía Vascular del Hospital C.Q. "Freyre de Andrade". Método: evaluación económica del tipo descripción de costo. Se estudió el costo directo institucional del tratamiento ambulatorio para várices en extremidades inferiores con escleroterapia con espuma y donde el principio activo fue Polidocanol al 0,5% a una dosis de 2ml. Se emplearon las partidas recursos humanos, material gastable y medicamento. Se determinó el costo promedio por paciente, total y según tipo de consulta. Resultados: el costo total por paciente atendido fue de 68,60 pesos cubanos. El costo medio por paciente de la consulta de clasificación fue de 0,18 centavos de pesos cubanos (DS 95%= 0,12. El costo medio de la consulta de tratamiento fue de 50,60 pesos cubanos (DS 95%=7,65. No hubo diferencias significativas entre los diferentes tipos de varices a tratar. Conclusiones: el costo directo institucional del tratamiento de telangiectasias y varices tronculares con escleroterapia con espuma fue similar. A corto plazo, el tratamiento de las várices con escleroterapia con espuma genera menores costos que la opción quirúrgica.Objective: to determine the cost of the treatment of varicose veins per patient with the foam sclerotherapy in the angiology and vascular surgery outpatient service of ¨Freyre de Andrade¨ clinical and surgical hospital. Method: a cost description-type economic assessment. The institutional direct cost of the leg varicose veins treatment with foam sclerotherapy at the outpatient service, using the active principle called 0.5% polidocanol at a dose of 2 ml, was studied. The variables were human resources, disposable materials and drugs. The average cost per patient, the total cost and type of service-depending cost were all estimated. Results: the total cost per patient was 68.60 Cuban

  3. Less promising results with sclerosing ethoxysclerol injections for midportion achilles tendinopathy: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sterkenburg, Maayke N; de Jonge, Milko C; Sierevelt, Inger N; van Dijk, C Niek

    2010-11-01

    Local injections of the sclerosing substance polidocanol (Ethoxysclerol) have shown good clinical results in patients with chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. After training by the inventors of the technique, sclerosing Ethoxysclerol injections were applied on a group of patients in our center. Sclerosing Ethoxysclerol injections will yield good results in the majority of patients. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. In 113 patients (140 tendons) with Achilles tendinopathy, we identified 62 patients (70 tendons) showing neovascularization on color Doppler ultrasound. Fifty-three Achilles tendons (48 patients) were treated with sclerosing Ethoxysclerol injections, with intervals of 6 weeks and a maximum of 5 sessions. Treatment was completed when neovascularization or pain had disappeared, or when there was no positive treatment effect after 3 to 4 sessions. Forty-eight patients (20 women and 28 men) with a median age of 45 years, (range, 33-68 years) were treated. Median symptom duration was 23 months (range, 3-300 months). Fifty-three tendons were treated with a median of 3 sessions of Ethoxysclerol injections. Six weeks after the last injection, 35% of patients had no complaints, 9% had minimal symptoms, 42% were the same, and 14% had more complaints. Women were 3.8 times (95% confidence interval: 1.1-13.8) more likely to have unsatisfactory outcome than men. Pain correlated positively with neovessels on ultrasound (P < .01). At 2.7 to 5.1 year follow-up, 53% had received additional (surgical/conservative) treatment; 3 of these patients (7.5%) still had complaints of Achilles tendinopathy. In 6 patients, complaints that were still present 6 weeks after treatment had resolved spontaneously by final follow-up. Our study did not confirm the high beneficial value of sclerosing neovascularization in patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Despite the retrospective design of our study, we consider it important to stress that injection of Ethoxysclerol may

  4. Flexible video-endsocopic injection sclerotherapy for second and third degree internal hemorrhoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Nijhawan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Bleeding from hemorrhoids is the commonest cause of rectal bleeding in adults. Injection sclerotherapy of internal hemorrhoids is one of the non-surgical treatments, and is simple, safe and feasible. Conventionally sclerotherapy is performed with rigid proctoscope which has limitations of maneuverability, narrower field of vision and documentation compared to flexible videoendoscope. Therefore, we assessed the efficacy and safety of video-colonoscopic sclerotherapy for bleeding internal hemorrhides. Methods: Seventy-nine patients of bleeding internal hemorrhoids were subjected to colonoscopic sclerotherapy using 1.5% polidocanol in retroflexed or forward viewing positions. Success of treatment was defined as cessation of bleeding for six weeks. Patients were observed for complications and were followed up regularly for 3 months. Results: A total of 79 evaluable patients, 61 had grade II and 18 had grade III hemorrhoids. There was no statistically significant differences in achieving excellent or good results for control of bleeding between patients with grade II and grade III hemorrhoids (100% vs 94,5%; p>0.05. The number of sessions of sclerotherapy required were significantly more in grade II than grade III hemorrhoids (1.1 ± 0.3 vs 1.3 ± 0.7; p = 0.04. No significant complications were noted except for bloating in ten patients (12.6 % and rectal pain in 6 (7.6% patients. Median time taken for the procedure was 30 minutes. Conclusions: Video-endoscopic sclerotherapy is safe, well-tolerated and effective treatment for bleeding internal hemorrhoids.

  5. New options in the management of tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Tendon injuries can be acute or chronic, and caused by intrinsic or extrinsic factors, either alone or in combination. Tendinopathies are a common cause of disability in occupational medicine and account for a substantial proportion of overuse injuries in sports. Tendinopathy is essentially a failed healing response, with haphazard proliferation of tenocytes, abnormalities in tenocytes, with disruption of collagen fibres and subsequent increase in noncollagenous matrix. The scientific evidence base for managing tendinopathies is limited. What may appear clinically as an “acute tendinopathy” is actually a well advanced failure of a chronic healing response in which there is neither histologic nor biochemical evidence of inflammation. In this review we report the new options for the management of tendinopathy, including eccentric exercises, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, injections (intratendinous injections of corticosteroids, aprotinin, polidocanol platelet-rich plasma, autologous blood injection, high-volume injections) and surgery. Open surgery aims to excise fibrotic adhesions, remove areas of failed healing and make multiple longitudinal incisions in the tendon to detect intratendinous lesions, and to restore vascularity and possibly stimulate the remaining viable cells to initiate cell matrix response and healing. New surgical techniques aim to disrupt the abnormal neoinnervation to interfere with the pain sensation caused by tendinopathy. These procedures are intrinsically different from the classical ones in present use, because they do not attempt to address directly the pathologic lesion, but act only to denervate them. They include endoscopy, electrocoagulation, and minimally invasive stripping. Further randomized controlled trials are necessary to clarify better the best therapeutic options for the management of tendinopathy. PMID:24198540

  6. New options in the management of tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Maffulli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Maffulli1, Umile Giuseppe Longo2, Mattia Loppini2, Filippo Spiezia2, Vincenzo Denaro21Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Mile End Hospital, London, England; 2Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Campus Biomedico University, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Tendon injuries can be acute or chronic, and caused by intrinsic or extrinsic factors, either alone or in combination. Tendinopathies are a common cause of disability in occupational medicine and account for a substantial proportion of overuse injuries in sports. Tendinopathy is essentially a failed healing response, with haphazard proliferation of tenocytes, abnormalities in tenocytes, with disruption of collagen fibres and subsequent increase in noncollagenous matrix. The scientific evidence base for managing tendinopathies is limited. What may appear clinically as an “acute tendinopathy” is actually a well advanced failure of a chronic healing response in which there is neither histologic nor biochemical evidence of inflammation. In this review we report the new options for the management of tendinopathy, including eccentric exercises, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, injections (intratendinous injections of corticosteroids, aprotinin, polidocanol platelet-rich plasma, autologous blood injection, high-volume injections and surgery. Open surgery aims to excise fibrotic adhesions, remove areas of failed healing and make multiple longitudinal incisions in the tendon to detect intratendinous lesions, and to restore vascularity and possibly stimulate the remaining viable cells to initiate cell matrix response and healing. New surgical techniques aim to disrupt the abnormal neoinnervation to interfere with the pain sensation caused by tendinopathy. These procedures are intrinsically different from the classical ones in present use, because they do not attempt to address directly the pathologic

  7. Comparison of Local Sclerotherapy With Lauromacrogol Versus Nasal Packing in the Treatment of Anterior Epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farneti, Paolo; Pasquini, Ernesto; Sciarretta, Vittorio; Macrì, Giovanni; Gramellini, Giulia; Pirodda, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Epistaxis is one of the most common otorhinolaryngologic emergencies representing more than 12% of conditions managed at the Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) Emergency Consulting Room of our Otorhinolaryngologic Unit each year. The elevated frequency of this pathology makes it necessary to adopt the most effective and least expensive therapeutic strategy available. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy, costs and morbidity of nasal packing (NP), which is the mainstay of treatment for anterior epistaxis in our ENT Emergency Consulting Room versus submucosal infiltrations of lauromacrogol (LA). A retrospective study was designed from August 2012 to April 2013 involving 53 patients suffering from anterior epistaxis. Anterior NP was used in 27 patients versus 26 patients undergoing 27 procedures performed with submucosal infiltrations of LA (or polidocanol). Outcomes for each treatment were evaluated. Patients in group 1 were treated with LA 400 injection next to the bleeding point: 0.5- to 1-mL single or multiple infiltrations with a 27-gauge needle. The whitening of the nasal mucosa around the bleeding point during infiltration was considered a marker of correct procedure in order to achieve the best results. Bilateral treatment was also performed at the same time. Patients in group 2 were treated with standard NP. Bleeding recurrence was higher in the NP group even if it was not statistically significant (P=0.2935). However, the LA infiltrations were better tolerated with lower morbidity and costs as compared to NP. No complications were observed in either group. LA infiltrations were shown to be a viable alternative in anterior epistaxis treatment. They are safe, easy to use with good efficacy and have a low cost.

  8. Timing and modality of the sclerosing agents binding to the human proteins: laboratory analysis and clinical evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Tessari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing agents (SA are blood inactivated. Nevertheless, investigations concerning the interaction among SA and blood components have never been deeply investigated. Aim of the study is to precisely identify SA blood ligands, to determine their binding time and to highlight the clinical consequences. Thirty-one blood samples were collected from chronic venous disease patients and tested by capillary and agarose gel (AGE electrophoresis before and after adding polidocanol (POL and sodiumtetradecylsulphate (STS. The two different types of electrophoresis allowed an evaluation of the blood proteins binding with the sclerosing agents, with a reaction time lower than 8 seconds for the AGE. Subsequently six patients underwent foam sclerotherapy and then were subdivided in group A (4 patients and B (2 patients. In group A blood sample was obtained from the ipsilateral brachial vein immediately before (T0 and repeated 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes after injection of STS 3% injection into the GSV. In group B, the same procedure was performed with the same timing from the ipsilateral femoral vein. Free STS (fSTS and total proteinbound STS (bSTS were measured. POL mainly binds to β-globulins (11%, while STS to albumin and α-globulins (62.6% and 30.7% on the protidogram, respectively. Both in the brachial and in the femoral vein, the average fSTS was always 0. STS binds to albumin (62.6% and α-globulins (30.7%, while POL is bound mainly by the b-globulins (11%. The present paper demonstrates how the vast majority of the sclerosing agent is bound to the blood proteins, suggesting the need to look for possible sclerotherapy complications factors also in the used gas and/or in the subsequent cathabolites release.

  9. Endovenous Laser Ablation and Concomitant Foam Sclerotherapy: Experience in 504 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Saim; Ceken, Kagan; Alparslan, Ahmet; Durmaz, Sedat; Sindel, Timur

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the value of endovenous laser ablation (ELA) and concomitant ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy (USGFS) in patients with chronic venous insufficiency. Methods: During a 6-year period, concomitant USGFS of the varicose veins were performed in 504 out of 610 patients who underwent ELA for truncal or perforating vein insufficiency. In these 504 patients (944 legs; bilateral in 440 patients), the incompetent veins were greater saphenous vein in 615 legs, small saphenous vein in 118 veins, perforating veins in 42 legs, and a combination of these in 169 legs. In all patients, after ELA of the incompetent veins, USGFS was performed for the remaining varicosities with 1–3% polidocanol foam. Patients were followed up clinically and with color Doppler ultrasound at 1, 6, and 12 months. Results: ELA was technically successful in all cases, although another venous puncture was necessary in 29 legs. Concomitant USGFS was also technically successful in all cases, but one to three additional sclerotherapy sessions were performed in 203 legs with persistent varicosities. During the follow-up, recanalization of the laser-ablated refluxing veins occurred in 16 legs (1.7%) and was treated with repeat ELA or USGFS. Major complications occurred in 1.4% of the treated legs and included skin necrosis and calf vein thrombosis. Conclusion: ELA and concomitant foam sclerotherapy is feasible and effective. The procedures are associated with a low complication rate and can be performed in both legs in the same session. Concomitant use of laser and foam may potentially decrease the recanalization rate of laser-ablated vessels.

  10. The sacroiliac joint: anatomy, physiology and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forst, Stacy L; Wheeler, Michael T; Fortin, Joseph D; Vilensky, Joel A

    2006-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a putative source of low back pain. The objective of this article is to provide clinicians with a concise review of SIJ structure and function, diagnostic indicators of SIJ-mediated pain, and therapeutic considerations. The SIJ is a true diarthrodial joint with unique characteristics not typically found in other diarthrodial joints. The joint differs with others in that it has fibrocartilage in addition to hyaline cartilage, there is discontinuity of the posterior capsule, and articular surfaces have many ridges and depressions. The sacroiliac joint is well innervated. Histological analysis of the sacroiliac joint has verified the presence of nerve fibers within the joint capsule and adjoining ligaments. It has been variously described that the sacroiliac joint receives its innervation from the ventral rami of L4 and L5, the superior gluteal nerve, and the dorsal rami of L5, S1, and S2, or that it is almost exclusively derived from the sacral dorsal rami. Even though the sacroiliac joint is a known putative source of low back and lower extremity pain, there are few findings that are pathognomonic of sacroiliac joint pain. The controlled diagnostic blocks utilizing the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) criteria demonstrated the prevalence of pain of sacroiliac joint origin in 19% to 30% of the patients suspected to have sacroiliac joint pain. Conservative management includes manual medicine techniques, pelvic stabilization exercises to allow dynamic postural control, and muscle balancing of the trunk and lower extremities. Interventional treatments include sacroiliac joint, intra-articular joint injections, radiofrequency neurotomy, prolotherapy, cryotherapy, and surgical treatment. The evidence for intra-articular injections and radiofrequency neurotomy has been shown to be limited in managing sacroiliac joint pain.

  11. Efficacy of Iralfaris shampoo in the treatment of scalp psoriasis: a videodermoscopy evaluation prospective study in 70 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A; Pranteda, G; Iorio, A; Mari, E; Milani, M

    2012-12-01

    This work has the aim to test the sensibility of VSCAPSI method in the evaluation of effectiveness of a medicated shampoo for the treatment of scalp psoriasis. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease histologically characterized by proliferation and loss of differentiation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis with vasodilatation and increased permeability, and inflammation. Scalp involvement is a common clinical feature of psoriasis, that is present in the 25% of patients who suffer of it. Videodermoscopy (VD) permits a magnified view of the surface components of the epidermis and papillary dermis, which are not visible to the naked eye, together with the ability to capture digitally the viewed images and to store them for later use. Moreover videodermoscopy is a non-invasive technique, used to analyze cutaneous peripheral microcirculation. Therefore VD could be an useful tool in evaluating the efficacy of treatments for scalp psoriasis. The clinical benefit of currently available medicated shampoos for the treatment of scalp psoriasis is restricted, due to their limited efficacy, low cosmetic appeal and safety and tolerability problems. Therefore effective and safe products are needed especially for the long term management of scalp psoriasis. A specific shampoo designed for the scalp hygiene in psoriatic patients has been recently developed. This shampoo contains urea, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, icthyol pale and laureth 9 (polidocanol). Aim of the study was to evaluate in a 12-week prospective monocenter, open-study the efficacy and tolerability of an emollient, keratolytic shampoo (Iralfaris shampoo ISDIN, Barcelona; Ir-S) applied three times a week in patients with scalp psoriasis. The efficacy of the shampoo has been valuated with VSCAPSI. Seventy subjects with mild to moderate/severe scalp psoriasis were enrolled in the trial, after their informed consent. Efficacy was assessed using a specific and validated videodermoscopy scalp psoriasis severity

  12. Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) for Monitoring of Treatment of Tendinopathies: A Double-blinded, Longitudinal Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirrichs, Timm; Quack, Valentin; Gatz, Matthias; Tingart, Markus; Rath, Björn; Betsch, Marcel; Kuhl, Christiane K; Schrading, Simone

    2018-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the diagnostic accuracy with which shear wave elastography (SWE) can be used to monitor response to treatment of tendinopathies, and to compare it to conventional ultrasound (US)-imaging methods (B-mode US (B-US) and power Doppler US (PD-US)). A prospective Institutional Review Board-approved longitudinal study on 35 patients with 47 symptomatic tendons (17 Achilles-, 15 patellar-, and 15 humeral-epicondylar) who underwent standardized multimodal US and standardized clinical assessment before and after 6 months of treatment (tailored stretching exercise, sport break, and local Polidocanol) was carried out. All US studies were performed by radiologists blinded to the clinical symptoms on both tendon sides to avoid biased interpretations, by B-US, PD-US, and SWE, conducted in the same order, using a high-resolution linear 15 MHz probe (Aixplorer). Orthopedic surgeons who were in turn blinded to US imaging results used established orthopedic scores (Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment questionnaire for Achilles, Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment questionnaire for patellar tendons, and Disability Arm Shoulder Hand scoring system) to rate presence, degree, and possible resolution of symptoms. We analyzed the diagnostic accuracy with which the different US imaging methods were able to detect symptomatic tendons at baseline as well as treatment effects, with orthopedic scores serving as reference standard. B-US, PD-US, and SWE detected symptomatic tendons with a sensitivity of 66% (31 of 47), 72% (34 of 47), and 87.5% (41 of 47), respectively. Positive predictive value was 0.67 for B-US, 0.87 for PD-US, and 1 for SWE. After treatment, clinical scores improved in 68% (32 of 47) of tendons. Treatment effects were observable by B-US, PD-US, and SWE with a sensitivity of 3.1% (1 of 32), 28.1% (9 of 32), and 81.3% (26 of 32), respectively. B-US was false-positive in 68.8% (20 of 32), PD-US in 46.9% (15 of 32), and SWE in 12.5% (4 of 32

  13. Prolonged knee pain relief by saphenous block (new technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Harshe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain in the knee joint can be from a variety of reasons. It can be either from the joint itself, it can be myofascial or it can be neuropathy, radicular pain. The myofascial component can be in different forms, namely, collateral ligament pain, bursitis, tendinitis, and so on. This responds well to local injections of steroids. Pain from the joint can be because of osteoarthritis (OA, rheumatoid arthritis or any other variety of arthritis. Among these osteoarthritis is the most common and naturally occurring pain. There are several modalities used for managing pain in the knee joint. They include medicines and physiotherapy, intra-articular steroid injection, intra-articular Hyalgan, Synvisc injection, prolotherapy, genicular nerve block, ablation, intra-articular pulsed radio frequency (PRF ablation, acupuncture, injection of platelet-rich plasma in the joint, total knee replacement, high tibial osteotomy, arthroscopy and lavage, and so on. All these modalities have their pros and cons. Literature and experience state that the pain relief provided may last for a few months with these modalities except in surgical interventions in advanced OA. The saphenous nerve is termination of femoral nerve and it is essentially sensory nerve. It supplies the medial compartment and some part of the anterior compartment of the knee joint. This nerve has been blocked near the knee joint by way of infiltration by surgeons and anesthetists, for relief of pain after knee surgery, with varying pain relief of postoperative pain. When we block the saphenous in the mid thigh in the sartorial canal, the fluid tends to block the medial branch of the anterior femoral cutaneous nerve also. It is hypothesized that this may give complete medial and anterior knee pain relief and as most of the knee OA patients have medial and anterior knee pain, this may prove useful. Use of ultrasonography helps to locate the nerve better, ensuring perfection. An effort has been made to

  14. Short Term Analgesic Effects of 5% Dextrose Epidural Injections for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniquis-Smigel, Liza; Dean Reeves, Kenneth; Jeffrey Rosen, Howard; Lyftogt, John; Graham-Coleman, Cassie; Cheng, An-Lin; Rabago, David

    2017-02-01

    Hypertonic dextrose injection (prolotherapy) is reported to reduce pain including non-surgical chronic low back pain (CLBP), and subcutaneous injection of 5% dextrose is reported to reduce neurogenic pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia. The mechanism in both cases is unclear, though a direct effect of dextrose on neurogenic pain has been proposed. This study assessed the short-term analgesic effects of epidural 5% dextrose injection compared with saline for non-surgical CLBP. Randomized double-blind (injector, participant) controlled trial. Adults with moderate-to-severe non-surgical low back pain with radiation to gluteal or leg areas for at least 6 months received a single epidurogram-confirmed epidural injection of 10 mL of 5% dextrose or 0.9% saline using a published vertical caudal injection technique. The primary outcome was change in a numerical rating scale (NRS, 0 - 10 points) pain score between baseline and 15 minutes; and 2, 4, and 48 hours and 2 weeks post-injection. The secondary outcome was percentage of participants achieving 50% or more pain improvement at 4 hours. No baseline differences existed between groups; 35 participants (54 ± 10.7 years old; 11 female) with moderate-to-severe CLBP (6.7 ± 1.3 points) for 10.6 ± 10.5 years. Dextrose participants reported greater NRS pain score change at 15 minutes (4.4 ± 1.7 vs 2.4 ± 2.8 points; P = 0.015), 2 hours (4.6 ± 1.9 vs 1.8 ± 2.8 points; P = 0.001), 4 hours (4.6 ± 2.0 vs 1.4 ± 2.3 points; P dextrose recipients and 19% (3/16) of saline recipients reported ≥ 50% pain reduction at 4 hours (P dextrose on pain at the dorsal root level; waning pain control at 2 weeks suggests the need to assess the effect of serial dextrose epidural injections in a long-term study with robust outcome assessment.

  15. Injection therapy for subacute and chronic low back pain: an updated Cochrane review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, J Bart; de Bie, Rob A; de Vet, Henrica C W; Hildebrandt, Jan; Nelemans, Patty

    2009-01-01

    A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). To determine if injection therapy is more effective than placebo or other treatments for patients with subacute or chronic low back pain. The effectiveness of injection therapy for low back pain is still debatable. Heterogeneity of target tissue, pharmacological agent, and dosage, generally found in RCTs, point to the need for clinically valid comparisons in a literature synthesis. We updated the search of the earlier systematic review and searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases up to March 2007 for relevant trials reported in English, French, German, Dutch, and Nordic languages. We also screened references from trials identified. RCTs on the effects of injection therapy involving epidural, facet, or local sites for subacute or chronic low back pain were included. Studies that compared the effects of intradiscal injections, prolotherapy, or ozone therapy with other treatments were excluded unless injection therapy with another pharmaceutical agent (no placebo treatment) was part of one of the treatment arms. Studies about injections in sacroiliac joints and studies evaluating the effects of epidural steroids for radicular pain were also excluded. Eighteen trials (1179 participants) were included in this review. The injection sites varied from epidural sites and facet joints (i.e. intra-articular injections, peri-articular injections and nerve blocks) to local sites (i.e. tender-and trigger points). The drugs that were studied consisted of corticosteroids, local anesthetics, and a variety of other drugs. The methodologic quality of the trials was limited with 10 of 18 trials rated as having a high methodologic quality. Statistical pooling was not possible because of clinical heterogeneity in the trials. Overall, the results indicated that there is no strong evidence for or against the use of any type of injection therapy. There is insufficient evidence to

  16. Injection therapy for subacute and chronic low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, J Bart; de Bie, Rob; de Vet, Henrica Cw; Hildebrandt, Jan; Nelemans, Patty

    2008-07-16

    The effectiveness of injection therapy for low-back pain is still debatable. Heterogeneity of target tissue, pharmacological agent and dosage generally found in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) points to the need for clinically valid comparisons in a literature synthesis. To determine if injection therapy is more effective than placebo or other treatments for patients with subacute or chronic low-back pain. We updated the search of the earlier systematic review and searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from January 1999 to March 2007 for relevant trials reported in English, French, German, Dutch and Nordic languages. We also screened references from trials identified. RCTs on the effects of injection therapy involving epidural, facet or local sites for subacute or chronic low-back pain were included. Studies which compared the effects of intradiscal injections, prolotherapy or Ozone therapy with other treatments, were excluded unless injection therapy with another pharmaceutical agent (no placebo treatment) was part of one of the treatment arms. Studies about injections in sacroiliac joints and studies evaluating the effects of epidural steroids for radicular pain were also excluded. Two review authors independently assessed the quality of the trials. If study data were clinically and statistically too heterogeneous to perform a meta-analysis, we used a best evidence synthesis to summarize the results. The evidence was classified into five levels (strong, moderate, limited, conflicting or no evidence), taking into account the methodological quality of the studies. 18 trials (1179 participants) were included in this updated review. The injection sites varied from epidural sites and facet joints (i.e. intra-articular injections, peri-articular injections and nerve blocks) to local sites (i.e. tender- and trigger points). The drugs that were studied consisted of corticosteroids, local anesthetics and a variety of

  17. BLEEDING PEPTIC ULCER, NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS AND HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION – A PROSPECTIVE, CONTROLLED, RANDOMIZED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skok

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The explanation of peptic ulcer etiology has changed significantly in the past decade after the clarification of the significance of Helicobacter pylori infection.Aim. To evaluate the effectiveness of Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients with hemorrhaging peptic ulcer and patients with peptic ulcer without complications.Study ethics. The study was approved in 1998 by the Medical Ethics Committee of the Republic of Slovenia (No. 90/09/98.Type of study. Prospective, controlled and randomized study, carried out between 1998–2000.Patients and methods. The study included 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av.age 57.5 years, SD ± 17.1, range 22– 80 in which endoscopy confirmed hemorrhage from peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and Helicobacter pylori infection. In all cases endoscopic hemostasis was performed: injection sclerotherapy with diluted adrenalin 1:10,000 and 1% polidocanol or argon plasma coagulation. The control group was made up of 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av.age 56.8 years, SD ± 16.8, range 19–80 with peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and Helicobacter pylori infection. Infection was confirmed by a rapid urease test and histologic investigation of the gastric mucosa. In all cases the recommended drug combinations were used in the treatment of the infection: a proton pump inhibitor, omeprazol (4 weeks, and combination of antibiotics, claritromycin and metronidazole or with regard to the antibiogram (1 week. The therapeutic success was ascertained endoscopically four weeks after inclusion in the study. Infection eradication was confirmed by the rapid urease test and histologic investigation of the gastric mucosa.Results. Four weeks after inclusion in the study the success of infection eradication was 92.5% in the study group, in the control group it was 91.3% (p > 0.05. In 6 patients (7.5%, 6/ 80 from the study group and in 7 (8.8%, 7/80 from the control group we introduced a replacement treatment

  18. Relevant factors affecting the outcome of ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy of the great saphenous vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Falaschi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound guided foam sclerotherapy (UGFS constitutes a valid ablative treatment for superficial vein diseases for the great saphenous vein (GSV, but no standardized protocol for its execution has yet been defined. Different variable factors involved in this procedure influence the final outcome and clinical results. The aim of our study was to analyze the respective influence on efficacy and side effects of three variable factors (foam volume, foam concentration, and contact time between the foam and the endothelium for UGFS procedures for GSV insufficiency in order to select the best protocol for treatment. A retrospective analysis was made of UGFS procedures (190 patients, 201 legs performed for GSV insufficiency in our institute from January 2007 to January 2010. All great saphenous veins included in our study exhibited a trans-ostial reflux and caliber range was 7-11 mm. In all cases, foam was prepared according to the Tessari method, using polidocanol (POL and a gas mixture of CO2 (70% and filtered room air (30%, in a proportion of 1:4. A single injection procedure in the GSV was performed under Doppler ultrasound guidance at mid to lower third of the thigh. Legs were randomly assigned to one of three different treatment protocols: - Group A (71 legs: POL 3%, mean foam volume 4.5 cc, intermittent groin pressure 5 min, supine bed rest 10 min; - Group B (61 legs: POL 2%, mean foam volume 9 cc, intermittent groin pressure 5 min, supine bed rest 10 min; - Group C (69 legs: POL 2%, mean foam volume 9 cc, continuous groin pressure 5 min followed by intermittent groin pressure 5 min, continuous leg compression 5 min, supine bed rest 10 min. Efficacy of treatment and occurrence of side effects were evaluated in each group at two weeks and again at two years after the procedure and the cumulative results compared. Analysis of outcomes did not show any significant difference between the complete obliteration rate (P=0.825 or occurrence of local

  19. Effect of the period of extrinsic mechanical compression following sclerotherapy in veins in rabbit ears Efeito do tempo da compressão mecânica extrínseca após escleroterapia em veias de orelhas de coelhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Santana Ivo

    2011-06-01

    suficiente para evitar reperfusão nas veias tratadas; se há relação entre a intensidade inflamatória na parede venosa e tecidos adjacentes e o tamanho do trombo venoso; se a intensidade da inflamação pós-escleroterapia varia com o tempo de compressão; se há relação entre a presença de hemossiderina nos tecidos adjacentes ao vaso esclerosado e coágulo venoso. MÉTODOS: Utilizaram-se 28 coelhos, machos, distribuídos em quatro grupos (0, 24, 72 e 120. Em todos os animais foram administrados 0,25 ml de solução de polidocanol 1% e, como controle, 0,25 ml de solução de cloreto de sódio 0,9% na veia marginal dorsal das orelhas direita e esquerda, respectivamente. Realizou-se compressão mecânica em trecho da veia perfundida, exceto nos animais do grupo 0. O tempo de compressão variou de 0 a 120 horas nos grupos. Realizou-se exame anatomopatológico de trecho das veias marginais dorsais direita e esquerda de todos os animais. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferenças significativas nos diversos tempos de compressão, tanto no grau de trombose venosa como na intensidade inflamatória, em ambas as orelhas, nos diversos grupos. Observou-se correlação positiva e significativa entre intensidade inflamatória e tamanho do trombo e na ocorrência de trombos e hemossiderina. CONCLUSÕES: O tempo de até 120 horas de compressão não é suficiente para evitar reperfusão nos vasos esclerosados. A intensidade da inflamação nos tecidos tem relação com o tamanho do trombo, mas não com o tempo de compressão. A presença de hemossiderina nos tecidos adjacentes ao vaso submetido à esclerose está relacionada com a presença de coágulo venoso.