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Sample records for epa region ii

  1. Feasibility study for computerized automation of EPA Region II Technical Support Branch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, F.B.; Morris, W.F.; Barton, G.W. Jr.; Fisher, E.R.

    1978-01-01

    Three options are presented for automating the chemistry laboratories at the Surveillance and Analysis Division, Environmental Protection Agency , at Edison, New Jersey. The laboratory served New York State, New Jersey and Puerto Rico. Each option was found to be cost-effective. For two of the systems, existing EPA laboratory software would be used without (option 1) and with (option 2) data management. For the third system, laboratory and data functions would be implemented on a different computer (PDP-11) from those now installed. Option 2, the most favorable system, would make use of existing programs and data-management features now being developed; it would break even in 1.82 y and accumulate $373,928 in the five years after installation

  2. EPA Region 1 Environmentally Sensitive Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This coverage represents polygon equivalents of environmentally sensitive areas (ESA) in EPA Region I. ESAs were developed as part of an EPA headquarters initiative...

  3. US EPA Region 4 Brownfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    To improve public health and the environment, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) collects information about facilities, sites, or places subject to environmental regulation or of environmental interest. Through the Geospatial Data Download Service, the public is now able to download the EPA Geodata shapefile containing facility and site information from EPA's national program systems. The file is Internet accessible from the Envirofacts Web site (https://www3.epa.gov/enviro/). The data may be used with geospatial mapping applications. (Note: The shapefile omits facilities without latitude/longitude coordinates.) The EPA Geospatial Data contains the name, location (latitude/longitude), and EPA program information about specific facilities and sites. In addition, the file contains a Uniform Resource Locator (URL), which allows mapping applications to present an option to users to access additional EPA data resources on a specific facility or site. This dataset shows Brownfields listed in the 2012 Facility Registry System.

  4. EPA Region 6 REAP Composite Geodatabse

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Regional Ecological Assessment Protocol (REAP) is a screening level tool created as a way to identify priority ecological resources within the five EPA Region 6...

  5. EPA Region 6 REAP Diversity Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Regional Ecological Assessment Protocol (REAP) is a screening level tool created as a way to identify priority ecological resources within the five EPA Region 6...

  6. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  7. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  8. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  9. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  10. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  11. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  12. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  13. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  14. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions for EPA Administrative Regions were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the...

  15. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  16. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  17. Quality Management Plan for EPA Region 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    The QMP describes policies, procedures & management systems within EPA NE that govern quality assurance & quality control activities supporting the transparency & scientific defensibility of environmental data collected, used & disseminated by the Region.

  18. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions for EPA Administrative Regions were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the...

  19. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  20. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  1. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions for EPA Administrative Regions were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the...

  2. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  3. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions for EPA Administrative Regions were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the...

  4. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  5. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  6. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  7. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Midco II, Gary, IN. (First remedial action), (amendment), April 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The 7-acre Midco II site is an abandoned chemical waste storage and disposal facility in Gary, Indiana. Land use in the surrounding area is predominantly industrial. The underlying aquifer, which is used primarily for non-drinking purposes, is highly susceptible to contamination from surface sources. From 1976 to 1978, the site was used for treatment, storage, and disposal of chemical and bulk liquid wastes. The ROD amends a 1989 ROD that addressed the remaining contaminated soil, pit wastes, and ground water by treatment of an estimated 35,000 cubic yards of soil wastes. The amended remedy reduces the estimated amount of soil to be treated, as a result of new information on arsenic data and amended soil CALs, further defines the site cover requirements, and further defines the requirements for deep well injection of contaminated ground water. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the subsurface soil, sediment, and ground water are VOCs, including methylene chloride, benzene, toluene, TCE, and xylenes; other organics, including PCBs, phenols, and PAHs; and metals, including chromium, and lead. The amended remedial action for the ROD is included

  8. EPA Region 1 Environmentally Sensitive Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    This coverage represents polygon equivalents of environmentally sensitive areas (ESA) in EPA Region I. ESAs were developed as part of an EPA headquarters initiative based on reviews of various regulatory and guidance documents, as well as phone interviews with federal/state/local government agencies and private organizations. ESAs include, but are not limited to, wetlands, biological resources, habitats, national parks, archaeological/historic sites, natural heritage areas, tribal lands, drinking water intakes, marinas/boat ramps, wildlife areas, etc.

  9. EPA Region 1 No Discharge Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    This dataset details No Discharge Zones (NDZ) for New England. Boaters may not discharge waste into these areas. Boundaries were determined mostly by Federal Register Environmental Documents in coordination with Massachusetts Coastal Zone Management (MA CZM) and EPA Region 1 Office of Ecosystem Protection (OEP) staff.

  10. Tribal Land Polygons, Region 9, 2006, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset of all Indian Reservations in US EPA Region 9 (California, Arizona and Nevada) with some reservation border areas of adjacent states included (adjacent areas...

  11. Tribal Boundary Polygons, Region 9, 2007, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset of all Indian Reservations in US EPA Region 9 (California, Arizona and Nevada) with some reservation border areas of adjacent states included (adjacent areas...

  12. EPA Office Points, Tutuila AS, 2009, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EPA office location in Tutila Island in American Samoa. American Samoa is an unincorporated and unorganized territory of the United States, and administered by...

  13. EPA Region 1 - Valley Depth in Meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raster of the Depth in meters of EPA-delimited Valleys in Region 1.Valleys (areas that are lower than their neighbors) were extracted from a Digital Elevation Model (USGS, 30m) by finding the local average elevation, subtracting the actual elevation from the average, and selecting areas where the actual elevation was below the average. The landscape was sampled at seven scales (circles of 1, 2, 4, 7, 11, 16, and 22 km radius) to take into account the diversity of valley shapes and sizes. Areas selected in at least four scales were designated as valleys.

  14. EPA Region 1 Coast Guard Jurisdictional Boundary - Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Jurisdictional boundary between EPA and Coast Guard for EPA Region I. Created from 1:100000 USGS DLGs with greater detail drawn from 1:24000 commercial street data...

  15. EPA Region 1 Coast Guard Jurisdictional Boundary - Arcs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Jurisdictional boundary between EPA and Coast Guard for EPA Region I. Created from 1:100000 USGS DLGs with greater detail drawn from 1:24000 commercial street data...

  16. 40 CFR 59.210 - Addresses of EPA Regional Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee), Director, Air, Pesticides, and Toxics...-3507. EPA Region VI (Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas), Director, Multimedia Planning...

  17. 40 CFR 59.107 - Addresses of EPA Regional Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-3507. EPA Region VI (Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas), Director, Air, Pesticides and..., Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee), Director, Air, Pesticides and Toxics...

  18. US EPA Region 4 RMP Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    To improve public health and the environment, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) collects information about facilities, sites, or places subject to environmental regulation or of environmental interest. Through the Geospatial Data Download Service, the public is now able to download the EPA Geodata shapefile containing facility and site information from EPA's national program systems. The file is Internet accessible from the Envirofacts Web site (http://www.epa.gov/enviro). The data may be used with geospatial mapping applications. (Note: The shapefile omits facilities without latitude/longitude coordinates.) The EPA Geospatial Data contains the name, location (latitude/longitude), and EPA program information about specific facilities and sites. In addition, the file contains a Uniform Resource Locator (URL), which allows mapping applications to present an option to users to access additional EPA data resources on a specific facility or site.

  19. EPA Region 1 Environmentally Sensitive Areas (Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This coverage represents point equivalents of environmentally sensitive areas in EPA New England. This coverage represents polygon equivalents of environmentally...

  20. Green Roof Research through EPA's Regional Applied Research Effort - slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Regional Applied Research Effort (RARE) allows the Regions of the EPA to choose research projects to be performed in partnership with EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD). Over the last decade, several green roof projects...

  1. Green Roof Research through EPA's Regional Applied Research Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Regional Applied Research Effort (RARE) allows the Regions of the EPA to choose research projects to be performed in partnership with EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD). Over the last decade, several green roo...

  2. EPA Region 1 Coast Guard Jurisdictional Boundary - Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurisdictional boundary between EPA and Coast Guard for EPA Region I. Created from 1:100000 USGS DLGs with greater detail drawn from 1:24000 commercial street data for Region I.This layer is used to determine which agency will be reponsible in the event of an oil spill.

  3. EPA Region 1 Coast Guard Jurisdictional Boundary - Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurisdictional boundary between EPA and Coast Guard for EPA Region I. Created from 1:100000 USGS DLGs with greater detail drawn from 1:24000 commercial street data for Region I.This layer is used to determine which agency will be reponsible in the event of an oil spill.

  4. EPA RE-Powering Mapper Region 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Office of Communications, Partnerships and Analysis (OCPA) initiated...

  5. EPA RE-Powering Mapper Region 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Office of Communications, Partnerships and Analysis (OCPA) initiated...

  6. EPA RE-Powering Mapper Region 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Office of Communications, Partnerships and Analysis (OCPA) initiated...

  7. EPA RE-Powering Mapper Region 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Office of Communications, Partnerships and Analysis (OCPA) initiated...

  8. EPA RE-Powering Mapper Region 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Office of Communications, Partnerships and Analysis (OCPA) initiated...

  9. Springs, US EPA Region 9, 2013, SDWIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPAâ??s Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) databases store information about drinking water. The federal version (SDWIS/FED) stores the information EPA...

  10. Reservoirs, US EPA Region 9, 2013, SDWIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPAâ??s Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) databases store information about drinking water. The federal version (SDWIS/FED) stores the information EPA...

  11. EPA Region 1 Sole Source Aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This coverage contains boundaries of EPA-approved sole source aquifers. Sole source aquifers are defined as an aquifer designated as the sole or principal source of...

  12. EPA RE-Powering Mapper Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Office of Communications, Partnerships and Analysis (OCPA) initiated...

  13. EPA RE-Powering Mapper Region 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Office of Communications, Partnerships and Analysis (OCPA) initiated...

  14. EPA RE-Powering Mapper Region 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Office of Communications, Partnerships and Analysis (OCPA) initiated...

  15. EPA RE-Powering Mapper Region 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Office of Communications, Partnerships and Analysis (OCPA) initiated...

  16. EPA RE-Powering Mapper Region 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Office of Communications, Partnerships and Analysis (OCPA) initiated...

  17. Environmental Finance Center Serving EPA's Region 8 States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Rural Water Association, headquartered in Duncan Oklahoma, has been selected through a competitive grants process to establish a regional Environmental Finance Center (EFC) serving EPA Region 8 states.

  18. US EPA Regional Masks Web Service, US, 2015, US EPA, SEGS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web service contains the following map layers: masks and labels for EPA regions 1 through 10. Mask layers are drawn at all scales. Label layers draw at scales...

  19. EPA Region 1 Sole Source Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This coverage contains boundaries of EPA-approved sole source aquifers. Sole source aquifers are defined as an aquifer designated as the sole or principal source of drinking water for a given aquifer service area; that is, an aquifer which is needed to supply 50% or more of the drinking water for the area and for which there are no reasonable alternative sources should the aquifer become contaminated.The aquifers were defined by a EPA hydrogeologist. Aquifer boundaries were then drafted by EPA onto 1:24000 USGS quadrangles. For the coastal sole source aquifers the shoreline as it appeared on the quadrangle was used as a boundary. Delineated boundaries were then digitized into ARC/INFO.

  20. Evolved H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchwell, E.

    1975-01-01

    A probable evolutionary sequence of H II regions based on six distinct types of observed objects is suggested. Two examples which may deviate from this idealized sequence, are discussed. Even though a size-mean density relation of H II regions can be used as a rough indication of whether a nebula is very young or evolved, it is argued that such a relation is not likely to be useful for the quantitative assignment of ages to H II regions. Evolved H II regions appear to fit into one of four structural types: rings, core-halos, smooth structures, and irregular or filamentary structures. Examples of each type are given with their derived physical parameters. The energy balance in these nebulae is considered. The mass of ionized gas in evolved H II regions is in general too large to trace the nebula back to single compact H II regions. Finally, the morphological type of the Galaxy is considered from its H II region content. 2 tables, 2 figs., 29 refs

  1. Managing the Quality of Environmental Data in EPA Region 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Pacific Southwest, Region 9's Quality Assurance (QA) section's primary mission is to effectively oversee and carry out the Quality System and Quality Management Plan, and project-level quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) activities.

  2. Notification: EPA's Preparedness and Response Efforts to the 2017 Hurricanes in EPA Regions 2, 4 and 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OPE-FY18-0005, December 13, 2017. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on the EPA’s preparedness and response efforts to the 2017 hurricanes that impacted EPA Regions 2, 4 and 6.

  3. GUIDANCE FOR STATISTICAL DETERMINATION OF APPROPRIATE PERCENT MINORITY AND PERCENT POVERTY DISTRIBUTIONAL CUTOFF VALUES USING CENSUS DATA FOR AND EPA REGION II ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE PROJECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this report is to assist Region H by providing a statistical analysis identifying the areas with minority and below poverty populations known as "Community of Concern" (COC). The aim was to find a cutoff value as a threshold to identify a COC using demographic data...

  4. 40 CFR 63.13 - Addresses of State air pollution control agencies and EPA Regional Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas), Director, Air, Pesticides and Toxics, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX..., Pesticides and Toxics Division, J.F.K. Federal Building, Boston, MA 02203-2211. EPA Region II (New Jersey...). Director, Air, Pesticides and Toxics Management Division, Atlanta Federal Center, 61 Forsyth Street...

  5. EPA Region 3 Quality Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Has links to resources that describe the Region's Quality Assurance Program, which is a collection of the Region's ongoing quality assurance (QA) policies, procedures, responsibilities and management systems.

  6. EPA Region 6 REAP Rarity Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Regional Ecological Assessment Protocol (REAP) is a screening level assessment tool created as a way to identify priority ecological resources within the five...

  7. EPA Region 6 REAP Sustainability Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Regional Ecological Assessment Protocol (REAP) is a screening level assessment tool created as a way to identify priority ecological resources within the five...

  8. Coal-Fired Power Plants, Region 9, 2011, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Approximate locations of active coal-fired power plants located in US EPA's Region 9. Emission counts from the 2005 National Emissions Inventory (NEI) are included...

  9. Leaking Underground Storage Tank Points, Region 9 Indian Country, 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains point features that represent Leaking Underground Storage Tanks in US EPA Region 9 Indian Country. This dataset contains facility name and...

  10. National Priorities List (NPL) Site Polygons, Region 9, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site POLYGON locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  11. National Priorities List (NPL) Site Polygons, Region 9, 2010, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site POLYGON locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  12. National Priorities List (NPL) Site Polygons, Region 9, 2014, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site POLYGON locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  13. National Priorities List (NPL) Site Polygons, Region 9, 2013, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site POLYGON locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  14. National Priorities List (NPL) Site Points, Region 9, 2015, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site point locations for the US EPA, Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  15. National Priorities List (NPL) Site Polygons, Region 9, 2015, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site POLYGON locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  16. National Priorities List (NPL) Site Polygons, Region 9, 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site POLYGON locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  17. National Priorities List (NPL) Site Points, Region 9, 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site point locations for the US EPA, Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  18. National Priorities List (NPL) Site Points, Region 9, 2014, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NPL site point locations for the US EPA Region 9. NPL (National Priorities List) sites are hazardous waste sites that are eligible for extensive long-term cleanup...

  19. Two Kilometer Coastal Ocean Current Predictions, Region 9, 2014, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data is derived from the NetCDF files that come from http://hfrnet.ucsd.edu/. EPA Region 9 has developed a series of python scripts to download the data hourly,...

  20. Indian Country Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUST) Map Service, Region 9, 2016, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This map service displays Leaking Underground Storage Tanks in US EPA Region 9 Indian Country. The service is composed of three layers; one for each unique LUST...

  1. Indian Country Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Points, Region 9, 2016, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains point features that represent Leaking Underground Storage Tanks in US EPA Region 9 Indian Country. This dataset contains facility name and...

  2. Six Kilometer Coastal Ocean Current Predictions, Region 9, 2014, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data is derived from the NetCDF files that come from http://hfrnet.ucsd.edu/. EPA Region 9 has developed a series of python scripts to download the data hourly,...

  3. EPA Region 1 - Map Layers for Valley ID Tool (Hosted Feature Service)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Valley Service Feature Layer hosts spatial data for EPA Region 1's Valley Identification Tool. These layers contain attribute information added by EPA R1 GIS...

  4. USEPA Geospatial Metadata EPA Region 2 All Regulated Facilities GIS layer PUB.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This ArcGIS 10.2 point feature class (All Regulated Facilities [R2] Public contains a unique record for every EPA Regulated Facility in EPA Region 2 (NYS, NJ, Puerto...

  5. About Region 3's Laboratory and Field Services at EPA's Environmental Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mission & contact information for EPA Region 3's Laboratory and Field Services located at EPA's Environmental Science Center: the Office of Analytical Services and Quality Assurance & Field Inspection Program

  6. Tribal Geographic Area (RTOC) Polygons with Representative Information, US EPA Region 9, 2015, Regional Tribal Operations Committee

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Regional Tribal Operations Committee (RTOC) is a working committee of EPA and Tribal personnel co-chaired by an EPA representative and a Tribal representative....

  7. Dust in H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, S.

    1977-01-01

    Several pieces of evidence indicate that H II regions may contain dust: 1) the continuum light scattered by dust grains (O'Dell and Hubbard, 1965), 2) thermal radiation from dust grains at infrared wavelengths (Ney and Allen, 1969), 3) the abnormal helium abundance in some H II regions (Peimbert and Costero, 1969), etc. Although observations of the scattered continuum suggest that the H II region cores may be dust-free, dust grains and gas must be well mixed in view of the infrared observations. This difficulty may be solved by introducing globules with sizes approximately 0.001 pc. These globules and the molecular clouds adjacent to H II regions are the main sources supplying dust to H II regions. (Auth.)

  8. National Air Toxics Assessment - 2005, EPA Region 2 (EPA.AIR.NATA99_R2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer is based on the model results of the 1999 National-Scale Assessment (N-SA), a part of the National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA), conducted by EPA's...

  9. National Air Toxics Assessment - 2002, EPA Region 2 (EPA.AIR.NATA99_R2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer is based on the model results of the 1999 National-Scale Assessment (N-SA), a part of the National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA), conducted by EPA's...

  10. National Air Toxics Assessment - 1999, EPA Region 2 (EPA.AIR.NATA99_R2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer is based on the model results of the 1999 National-Scale Assessment (N-SA), a part of the National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA), conducted by EPA's...

  11. EPA Pacific Southwest Enforcement Division Inspected Tax Map Key Polygons, Hawaii, 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This feature class contains the 64 tax map key polygons across the state of Hawaii that have been inspected by US EPA Pacific Southwest Enforcement Division as of...

  12. Extinction of H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel, F.P.; Kennicutt, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    Visual extinction of H II regions in nine nearby galaxies as derived from the ratio of the radio continuum emission to H-alpha emission is systematically larger than visual extinction deduced from the Balmer lines alone, if one assumes a value Av/E(B-V) 3. An optically-limited sample of about 30 extragalactic H II regions has a mean extinction of 1.7 m in the visual while about 1.2 m is not seen in the reddening of the Balmer lines. Both reddening and extinction decreases with increasing galactic radius, at least for M33 and M101

  13. Treatment Plants, US EPA Region 9, 2013, SDWIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPAâ??s Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) databases store information about drinking water. The federal version (SDWIS/FED) stores the information EPA...

  14. Surface Water Intakes, US EPA Region 9, 2013, SDWIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPAâ??s Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) databases store information about drinking water. The federal version (SDWIS/FED) stores the information EPA...

  15. Hawaii Wastewater Map, Hawaii, 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maintains a user interface mapping tool to help manage the Large Capacity Cesspool Program compliance and outreach...

  16. Hawaii Wastewater Map Service, Hawaii, 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maintains a user interface mapping tool to help manage the Large Capacity Cesspool Program compliance and outreach...

  17. Hawaii Wastewater Application, Hawaii, 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maintains a user interface mapping tool to help manage the Large Capacity Cesspool Program compliance and outreach...

  18. Distribution Systems, US EPA Region 9, 2013, SDWIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPAâ??s Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) databases store information about drinking water. The federal version (SDWIS/FED) stores the information EPA...

  19. EPA Region 9 Targeted Brownfields Assessment (TBA) Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA provides contractor assistance for property assessment to determine eligibility for up to $100,000 worth of technical assistance. Use this assessment form for properties in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Hawaii.

  20. Other SDWIS Facilities, US EPA Region 9, 2013, SDWIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPAâ??s Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) databases store information about drinking water. The federal version (SDWIS/FED) stores the information EPA...

  1. Water Storage, US EPA Region 9, 2013, SDWIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPAâ??s Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) databases store information about drinking water. The federal version (SDWIS/FED) stores the information EPA...

  2. Pumping Facilities, US EPA Region 9, 2013, SDWIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPAâ??s Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) databases store information about drinking water. The federal version (SDWIS/FED) stores the information EPA...

  3. Sampling Stations, US EPA Region 9, 2013, SDWIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPAâ??s Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) databases store information about drinking water. The federal version (SDWIS/FED) stores the information EPA...

  4. EPA Region 1 - New England Towns, with Population

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The New England Town Boundary coverage is a compilation of coverages received from the six New England State GIS Offices. The EPA New England GIS Center appended the...

  5. EPA Region 8, Memo on Desktop Printer Ink Cartridges Policy & Voluntary Printer Turn-in

    Science.gov (United States)

    This memo requests EPA Region 8 users to voluntarily turn-in their desktop printers and notifies users of the Region 8 policy to not provide maintenance or ink and toner cartridges for desktop printers.

  6. EPA Region 1 - Map Layers for Valley ID Tool (Hosted Feature Service)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Valley Service Feature Layer hosts spatial data for EPA Region 1's Valley Identification Tool. These layers contain attribute information added by EPA R1 GIS Center to help identify populated valleys:- Fac_2011NEI: Pollution sources selected from the National Emissions Inventory (EPA, 2011).- NE_Towns_PopValleys: New England Town polygons (courtesy USGS), with Population in Valleys and Population Density in Valleys calculated by EPA R1 GIS, from 2010 US Census blocks. - VT_E911: Vermont residences (courtesy VT Center for Geographic Information E-911).

  7. EPA Region 7 Aquatic Focus Areas (ECO_RES.R7_AQUATIC_FOCUS_AREAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This shapefile consists of 347 individual Aquatic Ecological System (AES) polygons that are the Aquatic Conservation Focus Areas for EPA Region 7. The focus areas...

  8. Tribal Grant Program Area Polygons with Project Officer and Tribal Contact Information, US EPA Region 9, 2015, Regional Tribal Operations Committee

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains information pertaining to EPA Region 9 project officers and their areas of oversight, EPA Region 9 grant program recipients and grant types,...

  9. EPA Region 2 Draft NPL Site Contamination Area Boundaries as of February 2007 GIS Layer [EPA.R2_NPL_CONTAMBND

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This layer represents the contamination boundaries of all NPL sites located in EPA Region Region 2 (New York, New Jersey, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands)....

  10. Risk Management Plan (RMP) Facility Points, Region 9, 2011, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Risk Management Plan (RMP): Under the Clean Air Act, Section 112(r), the EPA established a program requiring risk management plans to be provided to the EPA by...

  11. Risk Management Plan (RMP) Facility Points, Region 9, 2014, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Risk Management Plan (RMP): Under the Clean Air Act, Section 112(r), the EPA established a program requiring risk management plans to be provided to the EPA by...

  12. Locations of Combined Sewer Overflow Outfalls - US EPA Region 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    This data layer identifies the locations of Combined sewer overflow outfalls. Combined sewer systems are sewers that are designed to collect rainwater runoff, domestic sewage, and industrial wastewater in the same pipe. Most of the time, combined sewer systems transport all of their wastewater to a sewage treatment plant, where it is treated and then discharged to a water body. During periods of heavy rainfall or snowmelt, however, the wastewater volume in a combined sewer system can exceed the capacity of the sewer system or treatment plant. For this reason, combined sewer systems are designed to overflow occasionally and discharge excess untreated wastewater directly to nearby streams, rivers, or other water bodies. For further information visit: http://cfpub1.epa.gov/npdes/home.cfm?program_id=5

  13. National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Facility Points, Region 9, 2007, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of NPDES Facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates...

  14. Brownfield Grant Site Points, Region 9, 2014, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPA's Brownfields Program provides direct funding for brownfields assessment, cleanup, revolving loans, and environmental job training. To facilitate the leveraging...

  15. National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Facility Points, Region 9, 2011, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of NPDES Facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates...

  16. National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Facility Points, Region 9, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of NPDES Facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates...

  17. EMERGING SCIENCE: EPA'S ORD SUPPORTS REGIONAL HAZE PROGRAM; POSTERS FROM BOSC REVIEW AND SCIENCE FORUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of presentations from EPA's Board of Science Councilors review in April 2005 and the Science Forum in May 2005 are being made available to the Regional Planning Organization conference on June 9-10, 2005. Attendees will be able to review the materials during the confere...

  18. Feasibility study for the computerized automation of the Annapolis Field Office of EPA region III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ames, H.S.; Barton, G.W. Jr.; Bystroff, R.I.; Crawford, R.W.; Kray, A.M.; Maples, M.D.

    1976-08-01

    This report describes a feasibility study for computerized automation of the Annapolis Field Office (AFO) of EPA's Region III. The AFO laboratory provides analytical support for a number of EPA divisions; its primary function at present is analysis of water samples from rivers, estuaries, and the ocean in the Chesapeake Bay area. Automation of the AFO laboratory is found to be not only feasible but also highly desirable. An automation system is proposed which will give major improvements in analytical capacity, quality control, sample management, and reporting capabilities. This system is similar to the LLL-developed automation systems already installed at other EPA laboratories, with modifications specific to the needs of the AFO laboratory and the addition of sample file control. It is estimated that the initial cost of the system, nearly $300,000, would be recouped in about three years by virtue of the increased capacity and efficiency of operation

  19. 78 FR 68060 - Availability of FY 12 Grantee Performance Evaluation Reports for the Eight States of EPA Region 4...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-13

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9902-81--Region 4] Availability of FY 12 Grantee Performance Evaluation Reports for the Eight States of EPA Region 4 and 17 Local Agencies AGENCY: Environmental... evaluation reports. SUMMARY: EPA's grant regulations require the Agency to evaluate the performance of...

  20. Air Division Mapping Application NAAQS Designations Map Service, Region 9, 2015, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Designated Areas - as of October 1, 2015. A designation is the term EPA uses to describe the air quality in a given area for any of six common air pollutants known...

  1. Role of dust in H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarazin, C.L.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to determine quantitatively the effects of U.V. absorbing dust on H II regions, and compare these effects with observations. Many observations indicate that dust grains are present within H II regions. An analytic theory is presented which describes all three of the effects of dust in H II regions. Although this model is relatively crude, it is useful in determining the approximate size of the modifications due to dust. In order to explore this problem more carefully, detailed numerical models of H II regions with dust were constructed. The ionization and thermal structure of these model H II regions is discussed. The observational consequences of the presence of dust are explored; the optical line intensities, radio continuum and line fluxes, and infrared emission of model H II regions with dust are given. These numerical models are compared with observations of diffuse nebulae. The optical line ratios are compared to several nearby bright H II regions, and it is found that the dust models may explain several anomalies in their spectrum

  2. The H II regions of IC 1613

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, P.; Lee, M.G.; Gurwell, M.

    1990-01-01

    Narrow-band CCD H-alpha imaging of the Local Group irregular galaxy IC 1613 has revealed a total of 77 H II regions, five of which are complexes of several smaller emission regions. Positions, H-alpha luminosities, and sizes of these objects are tabulated. The H-alpha luminosity function has the same shape as that for more luminous galaxies, following a power law with an exponent of -1.6. The faintest H II regions are at the low-luminosity end of the generally observed luminosity function for H II regions in galaxies, with fluxes of only 10 to the 35th erg/sec. The size distribution has an exponential shape, as for other galaxies, with a size scale of 56 pc. The morphologies of different H II regions are discussed and compared to those in other galaxies. Published radio continuum maps compare well with the H-alpha emission distribution. The distribution of H I is also similar in the central areas to the H II with, however, a tendency for the H II regions to lie to one side of H I peaks. 31 refs

  3. 77 FR 52022 - Availability of FY 11 Grantee Performance Evaluation Reports for the Eight States of EPA Region 4...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9721-4] Availability of FY 11 Grantee Performance Evaluation Reports for the Eight States of EPA Region 4 and 17 Local Agencies AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability; Clean Air Act Section 105 grantee performance evaluation reports...

  4. 76 FR 64086 - Availability of FY 10 Grantee Performance Evaluation Reports for the Eight States of EPA Region 4...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9478-7] Availability of FY 10 Grantee Performance Evaluation Reports for the Eight States of EPA Region 4 and 17 Local Agencies AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability; Clean Air Act Section 105 grantee performance evaluation reports...

  5. Abandoned Uranium Mines (AUM) Site Screening Map Service, 2016, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As described in detail in the Five-Year Report, US EPA completed on-the-ground screening of 521 abandoned uranium mine areas. US EPA and the Navajo EPA are using the...

  6. Feasibility study for the computerized automation of the Laboratory Services Branch of EPA Region IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, W.G. Jr.; Barton, G.W. Jr.; Taber, L.

    1978-01-01

    This report is a study of the feasibility of computerized automation of the Laboratory Services Branch of the Environmental Protection Agency's Region IV. The LSB provides chemical analytical support for a number of EPA divisions; its primary function at present is compliance monitoring, field surveys, and oil identification. Automation of the LSB is not only feasible but also highly desirable. Automation systems are proposed that will make major improvements in analytical capacity, quality control, sample management, and reporting capabilities. Most of these automation systems are similar to those already developed and installed at other EPA laboratories. These systems have options that include limited modifications suggested as a result of the study of the LSB Laboratory, and also include communications hardware and software for a Sample File Control host computer. It is estimated that the initial cost of three of the four options considered would be recouped in approximately three years through increased capacity and efficiency of operation

  7. EPA Administrative Enforcement Dockets

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EPA Administrative Enforcement Dockets database contains the electronic dockets for administrative penalty cases filed by EPA Regions and Headquarters. Visitors...

  8. CO2 emissions reduction using energy conservation measures: EPA Region IV's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berish, C.; Day, R.; Sibold, K.; Tiller, J.

    1994-01-01

    EPA Region 4 concluded in a recent comparative environmental risk evaluation that global climate change could substantially impact the Southeast. To address this risk, Region 4 developed an action plan to promote cost-effective pollution prevention and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, The regional plan contains programs that aye specific to Region 4 as well as geographic components of the national Climate Change Action Plan. Sources of carbon dioxide emissions were targeted for pollution prevention based on an energy model that allows the user to create energy efficiency scenarios in four sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation. Activities were selected using the modeled information on sector reduction potentials and resource and cost-effectiveness criteria. Given the high level of uncertainty associated with climate change projections, the programs developed are all cost effective, prevent pollution and/or result in sound adaptation policies. Currently, policy makers at national, regional, and local levels are deciding on what types of energy efficiency programs to implement. The region's action plan is composed of several programs and approaches. The authors have developed implemented, and/or participated in the following: energy scenario model. EARTHWALK (residential energy conservation); energy conservation in affordable homes (new residences); Cool Communities Program (strategic tree planting and light colored surfaces); EPA's Green Lights Program; WAVE (water conservation), the Plant Protection Center; QUEST TO SAVE THE EARTH (outreach tools); energy and water use planning for the 1996 Olympic Games, and planning for sea-level rise. Reviewing the practices of the above programs will be the focus of this paper

  9. Regiones H II alrededor de estrellas WR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez Benitez, S.; Niemela, V.

    En base a observaciones espectroscópicas en el rango óptico, obtenidas en el CASLEO, se estudian las condiciones físicas de tres regiones H II alrededor de estrellas WR: N76 en el entorno de Ab7, en la Nube Menor de Magallanes, N79 alrededor de Br 2, en la Nube Mayor de Magallanes y G2.4+1.4 alrededor de WR 102, en nuestra Galaxia. Estas regiones presentan una alta ionización. Se observa la línea nebular de HeII en 4686 Å . Utilizando líneas nebulares de diagnóstico, se derivan los valores de la densidad y la temperatura electrónica, así como también las abundancias de algunos de los elementos químicos nebulares.

  10. Abandoned Uranium Mine (AUM) Regions, Navajo Nation, 2016, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains polygon features representing the boundaries of the six Abandoned Uranium Mines (AUM) Regions, including the: Central, Eastern, Northern,...

  11. Abandoned Uranium Mine (AUM) Region Polygons, Navajo Nation, 2016, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains polygon features representing the boundaries of the six Abandoned Uranium Mines (AUM) Regions, including the: Central, Eastern, Northern,...

  12. Active Pesticide Production Points, Region 9, 2013, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer represents Active Pesticide Producing Establishments in USEPA Region 9 (AZ, CA, HI and NV) that reported production for the year 2013. Pesticide...

  13. H II region-like galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, H.B.

    1979-01-01

    Line fluxes in the region 3700 to 7100A are presented for 14 galaxies with strong, sharp, H II region-like emission lines. Ten of these galaxies are low luminosity objects (M > -17); the others have M approx. < -20. Ratios of the line fluxes are used to derive electron temperatures and densities, and the abundances of helium, oxygen, nitrogen, neon, and sulfur relative to hydrogen. The low luminosity galaxies are generally found to have oxygen abundances about 30% of normal, while the high luminosity ones generally have about 60% of normal. These galaxies are found to be almost certainly photoionized by hot main sequence stars. The velocity dispersion has been measured for one object; the mass of stars derived for it is several times smaller than the mass of neutral hydrogen which has previously been found in an extended halo around this object. The continuum colors of these galaxies are very blue, and are indistinguishable from those of extragalactic H II regions. No older red population has been convincingly detected. Galactic chemical evolution is investigated through a comparison of the relative abundances in these galaxies with their normal values. It is found that: (i) there is a primary contribution to the nitrogen abundance ((N/O)/sub p = 0.019), but that 80% of the nitrogen in the Galaxy today is of secondary origin; (ii) Ne/O appears to be constant for all objects (Ne/O = 0.23); and (iii) S/O decreases with increasing oxygen abundance, implying that most sulfur is produced in the most massive stars

  14. 77 FR 64396 - Order of Succession for HUD Region II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... Region II AGENCY: Office of Field Policy and Management, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of Succession... Field Offices (Region II). This Order of Succession supersedes all previous Orders of Succession for Region II. DATES: Effective Date: October 9, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lawrence D. Reynolds...

  15. National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Wastewater Treatment Plant Points, Region 9, 2007, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of NPDES Waste Water Treatment Plant Facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA...

  16. National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Wastewater Treatment Plant Points, Region 9, 2011, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of NPDES Waste Water Treatment Plant Facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA...

  17. National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Wastewater Treatment Plant Points, Region 9, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of NPDES Waste Water Treatment Plant Facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA...

  18. 75 FR 61485 - Regulatory Training Session With Air Carriers, EPA Regional Partners and Other Interested Parties...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9210-6] Regulatory Training Session With Air Carriers, EPA... Agency (EPA) will hold a two-day training session on the regulatory requirements of the Aircraft Drinking... session will be provided in early 2011. ADDRESSES: The training will be held at the Rosslyn Holiday Inn at...

  19. Radio recombination lines from H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverglate, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    Radio recombination lines have been observed from forty-six H II regions. The Arecibo 1000-foot radio telescope was used to provide high sensitivity and high angular resolution at 1400 MHz (gain approx. 7.7 0 K/Jy, HPBW = 3:2) and 2372 MHZ (gain approx. 6.3 0 K/Jy, HPBW = 2'). Observations were made at 1400 MHz in the frequency switching mode, and at 2372 MHz in the total power mode. Gaussians were fit to be observed lines to derive velocities, line widths, and line temperatures. From the velocities kinematic distances were derived. For eleven sources H I absorption measurements were also made. The absorption spectra enabled the kinematic distance ambiguity to be resolved for some sources. The absorption spectra themselves were found to have extremely sharp, non-gaussian edges. One explanation for these is a model where the interstellar medium contains many H I cloudlets with T/sub s/less than or equal to 100 0 K and turbulent velocities less than or equal to 3 km/s. The H I absorption spectrum is then a superposition of many narrow gaussian profiles. It was also found from a comparison of H I absorption velocities with radio recombination line velocities that peculiar motions exist in the interstellar medium with velocities of up to 10 km/s. Using the measured line temperatures and continuum temperatures, estimates were desired of emission measures, electron temperatures, and electron densities, using a non-LTE analysis. Non-LTE effects were important only for the hottest and densest H II regions. The non-LTE calculations were checked through a comparison derivation of electron temperatures using hydrogen beta lines

  20. Infrared emission from galactic H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeilik, M. II.

    1975-01-01

    Near-infrared observations are presented of selected galactic HII regions (especially G45.5 + 0.1, G45.1 + 0.1, S88, and W3A) to infer the physical conditions of the dust responsible for the 2 to 25 micron emission. Two-component dust models are developed to match the observed characteristics of the infrared emission from HII regions. The dust, assumed to be bare and well-mixed with the gas in the ionized volume, consists of large (0.1 micron) ''silicate'' grains and small (0.2 micron) graphite grains. The ''silicates'' have their cosmic maximum abundance with respect to hydrogen, but the graphite grains are depleted by factors of 25 to 100 in mass. The Lyman-alpha radiation field predominately heats the ''silicate'' grains, which produce almost all the emission at 20 microns and most of it from 8 to 13 microns. The stellar radiation field predominately heats the graphite grains, which generate most of the emission at 3.5 and 5 microns. Roughly half of the observed 2 to 25 micron luminosity (when corrected for extinction) arises from Lyman-alpha photons and the other half from the Lyman and Balmer continua. The grains are too hot to provide significant emission in the far-infrared; this probably arises from a dust shell around the HII region. This two-component model predicts that HII regions should have smaller sizes at 3.5 and 5 microns than at 10 and 20 microns. The emissivities of fine-structure infrared lines for the regions are calculated. In the one instance where observations of such lines have been published (G29.9 - 0.0), predicted emissivities fall below those observed, especially for the 12.86-micron line of NeII. The discrepancy probably arises from an incorrect modeling of the region's ionization structure, but it might also reflect variations in elemental abundances or deficiencies in model stellar atmospheres for hot stars

  1. Communities with Source Separated Organics Programs, United States, 2015, EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains polygon features that represent communities with residential organics collection programs in the United States. EPA used US Census Bureau...

  2. AMCO Construction Phase Air Monitoring Points, Oakland CA, 2016, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This feature class contains points depicting locations of air monitor sensors during the construction phase of the EPA non-time critical removal action (NTCRA) at...

  3. Recipients of Excess Food by Zip Code, US and Territories, 2015, EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains polygon features that represent generalized USPS 5-digit zip code boundaries for the US and its territories. Data is licensed to US EPA by...

  4. Respiratory Risk by Census Tract Polygons, US EPA Region 9, 2005, NATA

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In 2011, EPA released the results of its 2005 national-scale assessment (NATA) of air toxic emissions. The purpose of NATA is to identify and prioritize air toxics,...

  5. Abandoned Uranium Mine (AUM) Enforcement Action Mine Areas, Navajo Nation, 2016, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains polygon features that represent abandoned uranium mines with EPA enforcement actions as of March 2016 in the Navajo Nation. Attributes...

  6. Abandoned Uranium Mine (AUM) Priority Mine Points, Navajo Nation, 2016, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains point features representing priority abandoned uranium mines in Navajo Nation, as determined by the US EPA and the Navajo Nation. USEPA and...

  7. Abandoned Uranium Mine (AUM) Priority Mine Areas, Navajo Nation, 2016, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains polygon features representing priority abandoned uranium mines in Navajo Nation, as determined by the US EPA and the Navajo Nation. USEPA...

  8. Abandoned Uranium Mine (AUM) Enforcement Action Mine Points, Navajo Nation, 2016, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains point features that represent abandoned uranium mines with EPA enforcement actions as of March 2016 in Navajo Nation. Attributes include...

  9. Large Capacity Cesspool Program Enforcements, Hawaii, 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This feature class contains points indicating the 281 Large Capacity Cesspools (LCCs) with enforcement actions across the state of Hawaii according to the US EPA...

  10. EPA:DHA 6:1 prevents angiotensin II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in rats: role of NADPH oxidase- and COX-derived oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Zahid Rasul; Silva, Grazielle C; Ribeiro, Thais Porto; León-González, Antonio J; Kassem, Mohamad; Mirajkar, Abdur; Alvi, Azhar; Abbas, Malak; Zgheel, Faraj; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Auger, Cyril

    2017-12-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid:docosahexaenoic acid (EPA:DHA) 6:1, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid formulation, has been shown to induce a sustained formation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase-derived NO, a major vasoprotective factor. This study examined whether chronic intake of EPA:DHA 6:1 prevents hypertension and endothelial dysfunction induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) in rats. Male Wister rats received orally corn oil or EPA:DHA 6:1 (500 mg kg -1 per day) before chronic infusion of Ang II (0.4 mg kg -1 per day). Systolic blood pressure was determined by tail cuff sphingomanometry, vascular reactivity using a myograph, oxidative stress using dihydroethidium and protein expression by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Ang II-induced hypertension was associated with reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxations of secondary branch mesenteric artery rings affecting the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH)- and the NO-mediated relaxations, both of which were improved by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor VAS-2870. The Ang II treatment induced also endothelium-dependent contractile responses (EDCFs), which were abolished by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin. An increased level of vascular oxidative stress and expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p47 phox and p22 phox ), COX-1 and COX-2, endothelial NO synthase and Ang II type 1 receptors were observed in the Ang II group, whereas SK Ca and connexin 37 were downregulated. Intake of EPA:DHA 6:1 prevented the Ang II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction by improving both the NO- and EDH-mediated relaxations, and by reducing EDCFs and the expression of target proteins. The present findings indicate that chronic intake of EPA:DHA 6:1 prevented the Ang II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in rats, most likely by preventing NADPH oxidase- and COX-derived oxidative stress.

  11. Stability of purgeable VOCs in water samples during pre-analytical holding. Part 2: Analyses by an EPA regional laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, O.R.; Bayne, C.K.; Siegrist, R.L.; Holden, W.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bottrell, D.W. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1997-03-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the hypothesis that prevalent and priority purgeable VOCs in properly preserved water samples are stable for at least 28 days. For the purposes of this study, VOCs were considered functionally stable if concentrations measured after 28 days did not change by more than 10% from the initial values. An extensive stability experiment was performed on freshly-collected surface water spiked with a suite of 44 purgeable VOCs. The spiked water was then distributed into multiple 40-mL VOC vials with 0.010-in Teflon-lined silicone septum caps prefilled with 250 mg of NaHSO{sub 4} (resulting pH of the water {approximately}2). The samples were sent to a commercial [Analytical Resources, Inc. (ARI)] and EPA (Region IV) laboratory where they were stored at 4 C. On 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 71 days after sample preparation, analysts from ARI took 4 replicate samples out of storage and analyzed these samples for purgeable VOCs following EPA/SW846 8260A. A similar analysis schedule was followed by analysts at the EPA laboratory. This document contains the results from the EPA analyses; the ARI results are described in a separate report.

  12. The Southern H ii Region Discovery Survey (SHRDS): Pilot Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.; Dickey, John M.; Jordan, C.; Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Balser, Dana S.; Wenger, Trey V.; Bania, T. M.; Dawson, J. R.; Mc Clure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2017-01-01

    The Southern H ii Region Discovery Survey is a survey of the third and fourth quadrants of the Galactic plane that will detect radio recombination line (RRL) and continuum emission at cm-wavelengths from several hundred H ii region candidates using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The targets for this survey come from the WISE Catalog of Galactic H ii Regions and were identified based on mid-infrared and radio continuum emission. In this pilot project, two different configurations of the Compact Array Broad Band receiver and spectrometer system were used for short test observations. The pilot surveys detected RRL emission from 36 of 53 H ii region candidates, as well as seven known H ii regions that were included for calibration. These 36 recombination line detections confirm that the candidates are true H ii regions and allow us to estimate their distances.

  13. The Southern H ii Region Discovery Survey (SHRDS): Pilot Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.; Dickey, John M. [School of Physical Sciences, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, 7001 (Australia); Jordan, C. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Perth, WA, 6845 (Australia); Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6315, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Balser, Dana S.; Wenger, Trey V. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Bania, T. M. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Dawson, J. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and MQ Research Centre in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, NSW, 2109 (Australia); Mc Clure-Griffiths, N. M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2017-07-01

    The Southern H ii Region Discovery Survey is a survey of the third and fourth quadrants of the Galactic plane that will detect radio recombination line (RRL) and continuum emission at cm-wavelengths from several hundred H ii region candidates using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The targets for this survey come from the WISE Catalog of Galactic H ii Regions and were identified based on mid-infrared and radio continuum emission. In this pilot project, two different configurations of the Compact Array Broad Band receiver and spectrometer system were used for short test observations. The pilot surveys detected RRL emission from 36 of 53 H ii region candidates, as well as seven known H ii regions that were included for calibration. These 36 recombination line detections confirm that the candidates are true H ii regions and allow us to estimate their distances.

  14. 12-Digit Watershed Boundary Data 1:24,000 for EPA Region 2 and Surrounding States (NAT_HYDROLOGY.HUC12_NRCS_REG2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — 12 digit Hydrologic Units (HUCs) for EPA Region 2 and surrounding states (Northeastern states, parts of the Great Lakes, Puerto Rico and the USVI) downloaded from...

  15. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): NL Industries, Inc. , Pedricktown, NJ, July 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-08

    This Record of Decision documents the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) selection of the remedial action for the NL Industries, Inc. site. The remedial action described in this document represents the second of two planned phases, or operable units, at the NL Industries site. This action, designated as Operable Unit One, addresses contaminated ground water, surface water, soils and stream sediments at the site.

  16. Searching for Compact Radio Sources Associated with UCH ii Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masqué, Josep M.; Trinidad, Miguel A.; Rodríguez-Rico, Carlos A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal 144, 36000 Guanajuato, México (Mexico); Rodríguez, Luis F.; Kurtz, Stan; Loinard, Laurent [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Morelia 58089, México (Mexico); Dzib, Sergio A. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2017-02-10

    Ultra-compact (UC)H ii regions represent a very early stage of massive star formation. The structure and evolution of these regions are not yet fully understood. Interferometric observations showed in recent years that compact sources of uncertain nature are associated with some UCH ii regions. To examine this, we carried out VLA 1.3 cm observations in the A configuration of selected UCH ii regions in order to report additional cases of compact sources embedded in UCH ii regions. With these observations, we find 13 compact sources that are associated with 9 UCH ii regions. Although we cannot establish an unambiguous nature for the newly detected sources, we assess some of their observational properties. According to the results, we can distinguish between two types of compact sources. One type corresponds to sources that are probably deeply embedded in the dense ionized gas of the UCH ii region. These sources are photoevaporated by the exciting star of the region and will last for 10{sup 4}–10{sup 5} years. They may play a crucial role in the evolution of the UCH ii region as the photoevaporated material could replenish the expanding plasma and might provide a solution to the so-called lifetime problem of these regions. The second type of compact sources is not associated with the densest ionized gas of the region. A few of these sources appear resolved and may be photoevaporating objects such as those of the first type, but with significantly lower mass depletion rates. The remaining sources of this second type appear unresolved, and their properties are varied. We speculate on the similarity between the sources of the second type and those of the Orion population of radio sources.

  17. ON RADIATION PRESSURE IN STATIC, DUSTY H II REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draine, B. T.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation pressure acting on gas and dust causes H II regions to have central densities that are lower than the density near the ionized boundary. H II regions in static equilibrium comprise a family of similarity solutions with three parameters: β, γ, and the product Q 0 n rms ; β characterizes the stellar spectrum, γ characterizes the dust/gas ratio, Q 0 is the stellar ionizing output (photons/s), and n rms is the rms density within the ionized region. Adopting standard values for β and γ, varying Q 0 n rms generates a one-parameter family of density profiles, ranging from nearly uniform density (small Q 0 n rms ) to shell-like (large Q 0 n rms ). When Q 0 n rms ∼> 10 52 cm -3 s -1 , dusty H II regions have conspicuous central cavities, even if no stellar wind is present. For given β, γ, and Q 0 n rms , a fourth quantity, which can be Q 0 , determines the overall size and density of the H II region. Examples of density and emissivity profiles are given. We show how quantities of interest-such as the peak-to-central emission measure ratio, the rms-to-mean density ratio, the edge-to-rms density ratio, and the fraction of the ionizing photons absorbed by the gas-depend on β, γ, and Q 0 n rms . For dusty H II regions, compression of the gas and dust into an ionized shell results in a substantial increase in the fraction of the stellar photons that actually ionize H (relative to a uniform-density H II region with the same dust/gas ratio and density n = n rms ). We discuss the extent to which radial drift of dust grains in H II regions can alter the dust-to-gas ratio. The applicability of these solutions to real H II regions is discussed.

  18. Spatial distribution of H II regions in NGC 4321

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.; Hodge, P.; Kennicutt, R.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A catalog of 286 H II regions in the giant Sc Virgo Cluster spiral galaxy NGC 4321 is used to analyze some aspects of this galaxy's spiral structure. The H II region distribution is rectified to face-on by least-squares fitting to a logarithmic spiral, and the radial distribution, the across-arm distribution, and the along-arm distribution of H II regions are determined. Comparison of the circular distribution with a simple shock wave model of the density wave theory does not clearly support the model. Arm 1 shows no obvious structure, and arm 2, although it has a clear peak, does not show the expected asymmetrical distribution. Agreement is reasonably good, however, with the somewhat more elaborate density wave model of Bash. Tests for clumping of the H II regions were negative

  19. Infrared study of seven possible compact H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, F.; Lunel, M.; Bergeat, J.

    1976-01-01

    We report observations of seven possible compact H II regions in the infrared with the hydrogen spectrum in order to derive extinction and emission measures. The emission measure is compared with available radio data. For two sources, agreement is found between radio and infrared data. Infrared excess is found in four sources, its origin is discussed. Two sources cannot be interpreted as compact H II regions. (orig.) [de

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Glen Ridge Radium, NJ. (First Remedial Action), June 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Glen Ridge Radium site is in the Borough of Glen Ridge and the town of East Orange in Essex County, New Jersey. The soil at the site is contaminated to varying degrees with radioactive waste materials suspected to have originated from radium processing or utilization facilities located nearby during the early 1900s. Temporary radon ventilation systems and gamma-radiation shielding have been installed and maintained by EPA and the State to reduce indoor exposures. The primary contaminant of concern affecting the soil and structures in radium 226 which delays to radon gas. The selected remedial action includes excavation of approximately 41,000 cu yd of highly contaminated soil and an unspecified amount of debris followed by offsite disposal; installation and maintenance of indoor engineering controls at less contaminated properties; environmental monitoring to ensure remedy effectiveness; and continuation of a treatment technology study for future actions

  1. Potential Environmental Justice (EJ) areas in Region 2 based on 2000 Census [EPA.EJAREAS_2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Potential Environmental Justice (EJ) areas in Region 2 . This dataset was derived from 2000 census data and based on the criteria setforth in the Region 2 Interim...

  2. Dynamics of H II regions around exiled O stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Langer, Norbert; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.

    2013-11-01

    At least 25 per cent of massive stars are ejected from their parent cluster, becoming runaways or exiles, travelling with often-supersonic space velocities through the interstellar medium (ISM). Their overpressurized H II regions impart kinetic energy and momentum to the ISM, compress and/or evaporate dense clouds, and can constrain properties of both the star and the ISM. Here, we present one-, two- and (the first) three-dimensional simulations of the H II region around a massive star moving supersonically through a uniform, magnetized ISM, with properties appropriate for the nearby O star ζ Oph. The H II region leaves an expanding overdense shell behind the star and, inside this, an underdense wake that should be filled with hot gas from the shocked stellar wind. The gas column density in the shell is strongly influenced by the ISM magnetic field strength and orientation. Hα emission maps show that H II region remains roughly circular, although the star is displaced somewhat from the centre of emission. For our model parameters, the kinetic energy feedback from the H II region is comparable to the mechanical luminosity of the stellar wind, and the momentum feedback rate is >100 times larger than that from the wind and ≈10 times larger than the total momentum input rate available from radiation pressure. Compared to the star's eventual supernova explosion, the kinetic energy feedback from the H II region over the star's main-sequence lifetime is >100 times less, but the momentum feedback is up to 4 times larger. H II region dynamics are found to have only a small effect on the ISM conditions that a bow shock close to the star would encounter.

  3. Far infrared spectroscopy of H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.B.

    1976-01-01

    A fully liquid helium cooled grating spectrometer has been developed for far infrared observations from the NASA Lear Jet. This instrument has been used in observations of the galactic HII regions M42 and M17. The instrument is described, and the results of various performance tests and calibrations are presented. The methods employed in observations from the Lear Jet are described, and the data analysis procedures are discussed. The results of a search for the (O III) 88.16 micron fine structure line are presented. The intensity of the line in M17 is reported, and an upper limit given for the intensity in M42. These results are compared with theoretical predictions, and future applications of infrared line observations are discussed. Coarse resolution spectra of M42 and M17 from 45 to 115 microns are also presented. The emission from M42 is shown to be a very smooth function of wavelength, closely fitting the wavelength dependence of a 105 0 K graybody. The spectrum of M17 is very different, having a bump at approximately 75 microns and a general far infrared excess. The observed spectrum is compared to the predictions of models for M17

  4. EPA Alternative Dispute Resolution Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    The success of EPA's ADR efforts depends on a network of talented and experienced professionals in Headquarters offices and EPA Regions. For Agency-wide ADR information, please contact the Conflict Prevention and Resolution Center.

  5. Bipolar H II regions produced by cloud-cloud collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Anthony; Lomax, Oliver; Balfour, Scott; Mège, Pierre; Zavagno, Annie; Deharveng, Lise

    2018-05-01

    We suggest that bipolar H II regions may be the aftermath of collisions between clouds. Such a collision will produce a shock-compressed layer, and a star cluster can then condense out of the dense gas near the center of the layer. If the clouds are sufficiently massive, the star cluster is likely to contain at least one massive star, which emits ionizing radiation, and excites an H II region, which then expands, sweeping up the surrounding neutral gas. Once most of the matter in the clouds has accreted onto the layer, expansion of the H II region meets little resistance in directions perpendicular to the midplane of the layer, and so it expands rapidly to produce two lobes of ionized gas, one on each side of the layer. Conversely, in directions parallel to the midplane of the layer, expansion of the H II region stalls due to the ram pressure of the gas that continues to fall towards the star cluster from the outer parts of the layer; a ring of dense neutral gas builds up around the waist of the bipolar H II region, and may spawn a second generation of star formation. We present a dimensionless model for the flow of ionized gas in a bipolar H II region created according to the above scenario, and predict the characteristics of the resulting free-free continuum and recombination-line emission. This dimensionless model can be scaled to the physical parameters of any particular system. Our intention is that these predictions will be useful in testing the scenario outlined above, and thereby providing indirect support for the role of cloud-cloud collisions in triggering star formation.

  6. H II regions ionized by sigma and tau Sco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaylard, M J [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (South Africa). National Inst. for Telecommunications Research

    1984-11-15

    The H142..cap alpha.. line has been detected in Sharpless 9, which is ionized by sigmaSco, and in RCW 129, ionized by tau Sco. The electron temperatures in the two H II regions are 5700 +- 340 K and 4200 +- 600 K respectively. The thermal radio emission from S9 is asymmetric with respect to the stellar position, and the emission peak coincides with the position of the optical red emission features to the north and west of the star. There is no evidence for collisional excitation. S9 is a density-bounded H II region in the champagne phase, the bright rims and radio peak marking the ionization front.

  7. Report: Agency-Wide Application of Region 7 NPDES Program Process Improvements Could Increase EPA Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #11-P-0315, July 6, 2011. Although Region 7 NPDES Kaizen event participants continued to follow up on the commitments and action items identified, no single authority was responsible for tracking the process improvement outcomes.

  8. Vapor Intrusion Facility Points, South Bay CA, 2014, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — POINT locations for the South Bay Vapor Instrusion Sites were derived from the NPL data for Region 9. One site, Philips Semiconductor, was extracted from the...

  9. Wind bubbles within H ii regions around slowly moving stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Mohamed, Shazrene; Langer, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Interstellar bubbles around O stars are driven by a combination of the star's wind and ionizing radiation output. The wind contribution is uncertain because the boundary between the wind and interstellar medium is difficult to observe. Mid-infrared observations (e.g., of the H ii region RCW 120) show arcs of dust emission around O stars, contained well within the H ii region bubble. These arcs could indicate the edge of an asymmetric stellar wind bubble, distorted by density gradients and/or stellar motion. We present two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations investigating the evolution of wind bubbles and H ii regions around massive stars moving through a dense (nH = 3000 cm-3), uniform medium with velocities ranging from 4 to 16 km s-1. The H ii region morphology is strongly affected by stellar motion, as expected, but the wind bubble is also very aspherical from birth, even for the lowest space velocity considered. Wind bubbles do not fill their H ii regions (we find filling factors of 10-20 per cent), at least for a main sequence star with mass M⋆ ~ 30 M⊙. Furthermore, even for supersonic velocities the wind bow shock does not significantly trap the ionization front. X-ray emission from the wind bubble is soft, faint, and comes mainly from the turbulent mixing layer between the wind bubble and the H ii region. The wind bubble radiates <1 per cent of its energy in X-rays; it loses most of its energy by turbulent mixing with cooler photoionized gas. Comparison of the simulations with the H ii region RCW 120 shows that its dynamical age is ≲0.4 Myr and that stellar motion ≲4 km s-1 is allowed, implying that the ionizing source is unlikely to be a runaway star but more likely formed in situ. The region's youth, and apparent isolation from other O or B stars, makes it very interesting for studies of massive star formation and of initial mass functions. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. H II region in NGC 6744: Spectrophotometry and chemical abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talent, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Spectrophotometry of emission lines in the lambdalambda3700--6800 spectral range is presented for An H II region in an outer arm of NGC6744, a southern hemisphere galaxy of type SAB(r)bc II. The electron temperature, derived from the [O III] lines and assuming N/sub e/ = 100 cm -3 , was found to be 9,630 +- 450 K. Ionic abundances, derived in the usual fashion from the measured line strengths, were corrected to total relative number abundances by application of the standard ionization correction factor (ICF) scheme and by comparison to models. The derived abundances, relative to log Hequivalent12.00, are log He = 10.96 +- 0.06, log N = 7.34 +- 0.26, log O log O = 8.44 +- 0.10, log Ne = 7.80 +- 0.16, and log S = 6.75 +- 0.28. The NGC 6744 H II region abundances, and various ratios, are compared to similar data for H II regions in the SMC, LMC, and the Perseus arm of the Galaxy,. From the comparison it is suggested that the histories of nucleosynthesis in the outer regions of NGC 6744 and the Galaxy could have been quite similar

  11. Gas dynamics of H II regions. II. Two-dimensional axisymmetric calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenheimer, P.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Yorke, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of H II regions is calculated with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical procedure under the assumption that the exciting star is born within a cool molecular cloud whose density is about 10 3 particles cm -3 . As the ionization of the cloud's edge is completed, a large pressure gradient is set up and ionized cloud material expands into the ionized low-density (1 particle cm -3 ) intercloud medium, with velocities larger than 30 km s -1 .The calculations are made under the simplifying assumptions that (i) within the H II region, ionization equilibrium holds at all times, (ii) the ionization front is a discontinuity, thus its detailed structure is not calculated, (iii) the temperature of each region (H II region, neutral cloud, and intercloud medium) is constant in time, (iv) all ionizing photons come radially from the exciting star. Four cases are calculated and compared with observations: (1) the edge of the cloud is overrun by a supersonic ionization front, (2) the initial Stroemgren sphere surrounding the star lies deep inside the cloud, thus the cloud's edge is ionized by a subsonic ionization front, (3) the ionization front breaks through two opposite faces of the same cloud simultaneously, (4) the flow encounters an isolated globule of density 10 3 particles cm -3 shortly after emerging from the molecular cloud.The phenomena here considered show how evolving H II regions are an important input of kinetic energy to the interstellar medium

  12. Ionised gas kinematics in bipolar H II regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgleish, Hannah S.; Longmore, Steven N.; Peters, Thomas; Henshaw, Jonathan D.; Veitch-Michaelis, Joshua L.; Urquhart, James S.

    2018-05-01

    Stellar feedback plays a fundamental role in shaping the evolution of galaxies. Here we explore the use of ionised gas kinematics in young, bipolar H II regions as a probe of early feedback in these star-forming environments. We have undertaken a multi-wavelength study of a young, bipolar H II region in the Galactic disc, G316.81-0.06, which lies at the centre of a massive (˜103 M⊙) infrared-dark cloud filament. It is still accreting molecular gas as well as driving a ˜0.2 pc ionised gas outflow perpendicular to the filament. Intriguingly, we observe a large velocity gradient (47.81 ± 3.21 km s-1 pc-1) across the ionised gas in a direction perpendicular to the outflow. This kinematic signature of the ionised gas shows a reasonable correspondence with the simulations of young H II regions. Based on a qualitative comparison between our observations and these simulations, we put forward a possible explanation for the velocity gradients observed in G316.81-0.06. If the velocity gradient perpendicular to the outflow is caused by rotation of the ionised gas, then we infer that this rotation is a direct result of the initial net angular momentum in the natal molecular cloud. If this explanation is correct, this kinematic signature should be common in other young (bipolar) H II regions. We suggest that further quantitative analysis of the ionised gas kinematics of young H II regions, combined with additional simulations, should improve our understanding of feedback at these early stages.

  13. 75 FR 21979 - NRC Region II Address and Main Telephone Number Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... Region II Address and Main Telephone Number Changes AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Final... address for its Region II office and to update the main telephone number. The Region II office move and... update the NRC Region II office street address and office main telephone number. The physical location of...

  14. THE DISCOVERY OF RAMAN SCATTERING IN H II REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Nicholls, David C.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Groves, Brent A., E-mail: Michael.Dopita@anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2016-06-10

    We report here on the discovery of faint extended wings of H α observed out to an apparent velocity of ∼7600 km s{sup −1} in the Orion Nebula (M42) and in five H ii regions in the Large and the Small Magellanic Clouds. We show that these wings are caused by Raman scattering of both the O i and Si ii resonance lines and stellar continuum UV photons with H i followed by radiative decay to the H i n = 2 level. The broad wings also seen in H β and in H γ result from Raman scattering of the UV continuum in the H i n = 4 and n = 5 levels, respectively. The Raman scattering fluorescence is correlated with the intensity of the narrow permitted lines of O i and Si ii. In the case of Si ii, this is explained by radiative pumping of the same 1023.7 Å resonance line involved in the Raman scattering by the Ly β radiation field. The subsequent radiative cascade produces enhanced Si ii λλ 5978.9, 6347.1, and 6371.4 Å permitted transitions. Finally, we show that in O i, radiative pumping of the 1025.76 Å resonance line by the Lyman series radiation field is also the cause of the enhancement in the permitted lines of this species lying near H α in wavelength, but here the process is a little more complex. We argue that all these processes are active in the zone of the H ii region near the ionization front.

  15. Radio observations of the CMa OB1 H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaylard, M.J.; Kemball, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    A sensitive 10 0 x 15 0 13-cm map made of the CMa OB1 H II regions' radio emission shows a strong similarity to Hα emission photographs. Sharpless 296 is shown to consist of a prominent central and western arc completed by a weaker southern loop, and with a faint northern bar. The emission is thermal, superimposed over a predominantly non-thermal background. The H142α recombination line has been detected at eight positions in S296, and in S292 and S297. The average electron temperature in S296 is 6900 +- 1300 K. The UV fluxes from the CMa OB1 stars account for the observed emission measures of the H II regions. The H142α 1sr velocities indicate that the ionized material is in contact with the molecular clouds. (author)

  16. Notification: EPA Region 10 Management Controls Over Allowing Substantial Public Funds to Construct the Spokane County Wastewater Treatment Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    January 20, 2012. This EPA's OIG is initiating a review from an OIG hotline complaint regarding whether federal funds were properly used to construct the new Spokane County wastewater treatment facility in accordance with 40 CFR 35, Subpart K.

  17. Observational tests for H II region models - A 'champagne party'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alloin, D; Tenorio-Tagle, G

    1979-09-01

    Observations of several neighboring H II regions associated with a molecular cloud were performed in order to test the champagne model of H II region-molecular cloud interaction leading to the supersonic expansion of molecular cloud gas. Nine different positions in the Gum 61 nebula were observed using an image dissector scanner attached to a 3.6-m telescope, and it is found that the area corresponds to a low excitation, high density nebula, with electron densities ranging between 1400 and 2800/cu cm and larger along the boundary of the ionized gas. An observed increase in pressure and density located in an interior region of the nebula is interpreted in terms of an area between two rarefaction waves generated together with a strong isothermal shock, responsible for the champagne-like streaming, by a pressure discontinuity between the ionized molecular cloud in which star formation takes place and the intercloud gas. It is noted that a velocity field determination would provide the key in understanding the evolution of such a region.

  18. Water vapor emission from H II regions and infrared stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cato, B.T.; Ronnang, B.O.; Rydbeck, O.E.H.; Lewin, P.T.; Yngvesson, K.S.; Cardiasmenos, A.G.; Shanley, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    The spatial structure of water vapor microwave line emission has been investigated with moderate angular resolution in several well-known H II regions. New H 2 O sources have been with infrared (1R) sources. One of these sources, IRC: 20411, has been investigated at optical wavelengths. It is found to be of spectral class M3-M5 and by indirect evidence the luminosity class is preliminarily determined to Ib. The distance is estimated to be approx.2 kpc, and the star must be in front of the dust complex which obscures W28 A2. In NGC 7538 new high-velocity features have been discovered. Two new weak water vapor masers, G30.1: 0.7 and G32.8: 0.3, have been detected in a search among eight class II OH/IR sources. H 2 O emission coinciding with the low-velocity OH features of VY Canis Majoris has also been detected. A search for local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) water-vapor line emission in molecular clouds associated with H II regions is also reported. No line was detected with the utilized sensitivity. The physical implications of this are discussed and an upper limit of the H 2 O column density has been estimated. Gaussian analysis of the strong, narrow feature in the spectrum of ON 1 indicates a possible presence of two hyperfine components, viz., F→F'=7→6 and 6→5

  19. Small Galactic H II regions. II. The molecular clouds and star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, D.A.; Thronson, H.A. Jr.; Wilton, C.

    1990-01-01

    CO maps of molecular clouds associated with 11 small Galactic H II regions are presented and compared with IR images obtained by IRAS. The molecular masses of the clouds are computed and compared with the masses of the stellar content. The mapped clouds have masses of 1000-60,000 solar and are typical of the more numerous, smaller Galactic molecular clouds. All of the clouds have recently made massive OB stars, and many have complex spatial and kinematic structures. The coincidence of IRAS sources and CO peaks suggests that many of the clouds have sites of star formation other than the optically visible H II region. Star-formation efficiencies are uncertain, with values for the clouds ranging from 0.02 to 0.6 with an average value of 0.2. There is no trend of the upper stellar mass limit with Galactic radius and with molecular cloud mass. 53 refs

  20. 76 FR 22096 - Federal Plan for Certification of Applicators of Restricted Use Pesticides Within EPA Region 8...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... convenience, EPA could arrange the list by State such that certifications issues for all Indian country... provide a contact person to the Web site so that applicators would know who to contact to learn of any... instructions; develop, acquire, install, and utilize technology and systems for the purposes of collecting...

  1. 75 FR 63177 - Availability of FY 09 Grantee Performance Evaluation Reports for the Eight States of EPA Region 4...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9213-6] Availability of FY 09 Grantee Performance Evaluation... (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability; Clean Air Act Section 105 grantee performance evaluation reports...-year evaluations of eight state air pollution control programs (Alabama Department of Environmental...

  2. 75 FR 16204 - Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council; Public Meeting AGENCY... meeting of the Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public. DATES... Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C., Appendix 2), SBA announces the meeting of the Region II Buffalo...

  3. 77 FR 20871 - Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council; Public Meeting AGENCY... meeting of the Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public. DATES... Committee Act (5 U.S.C., Appendix 2), SBA announces the meeting of the Region II Buffalo District Advisory...

  4. 76 FR 59480 - Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council; Public Meeting AGENCY... meeting of the Region II Buffalo District Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public. DATES... Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C., Appendix 2), SBA announces the meeting of the Region II Buffalo...

  5. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Montclair/West Orange, Radium, NJ. (First Remedial Action), June 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Montclair/West Orange Radium site is in the towns of Montclair and West Orange in Essex County, New Jersey. The soil at the site is contaminated with radioactive-waste materials suspected to have originated from radium processing or utilization facilities located nearby during the early 1900s. Temporary radon ventilation systems and gamma-radiation shielding have been installed and maintained by EPA and the State to reduce indoor exposures. The primary contaminant of concern affecting the soil and structures is radium 226 which decays to radon gas. The selected remedial action for the site includes excavation of approximately 41,000 cu yd of highly contaminated soil and an unspecified amount of debris followed by offsite disposal; installation and maintenance of indoor engineering controls at less contaminated properties; environmental monitoring to ensure remedy effectiveness; and continuation of a treatment technology study for future actions. EPA deferred a final continuation of a treatment-technology study for future action

  6. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 6): Oklahoma Refining Company, Cyril, OK. (First remedial action), June 1992. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The 160-acre Oklahoma Refining site is a petroleum refinery located on the eastern edge of Cyril, Oklahoma, in Caddo County. The facility included refinery process areas, bulk storage tanks, waste pits, wastewater treatment ponds, and a land treatment area. During the mid-1980's, EPA investigations revealed large-scale organic and heavy metal contamination of onsite soil and ground water. In 1990, EPA conducted a removal action, which included characterization and removal of drums, plugging wells, and wildlife protection measures. The ROD addresses the remediation of onsite contaminated soil, sediment, surface water, and ground water as a final remedy. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, ground water, and surface water are VOCs, including benzene, toluene, and xylenes; other organics, including PAHs and phenols; and metals, including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included

  7. AN ANALYTIC MODEL OF DUSTY, STRATIFIED, SPHERICAL H ii REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Ramírez, J. C.; Raga, A. C. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ap. 70-543, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Lora, V. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Cantó, J., E-mail: juan.rodriguez@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ap. 70-468, 04510 D. F., México (Mexico)

    2016-12-20

    We study analytically the effect of radiation pressure (associated with photoionization processes and with dust absorption) on spherical, hydrostatic H ii regions. We consider two basic equations, one for the hydrostatic balance between the radiation-pressure components and the gas pressure, and another for the balance among the recombination rate, the dust absorption, and the ionizing photon rate. Based on appropriate mathematical approximations, we find a simple analytic solution for the density stratification of the nebula, which is defined by specifying the radius of the external boundary, the cross section of dust absorption, and the luminosity of the central star. We compare the analytic solution with numerical integrations of the model equations of Draine, and find a wide range of the physical parameters for which the analytic solution is accurate.

  8. The possible nature of socket stars in H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelaz, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    Close inspection of faint stars (V of about 14 mag) in H II regions show that they appear to be surrounded by circumstellar envelopes of about 10 arcsecs in diameter (as reported by Feibelman in 1989). The present premise is that the sockets are envelopes of obscuring dust which should emit a measurable amount of infrared radiation based on a simple thermal equilibrium model. A search of literature shows that, of 36 socket stars listed by Feibelman, 17 have been measured in the infrared. Of the 17, 14 show excess IR emission. This is very strong evidence that the socket stars are really stars with circumstellar envelopes. Socket stars may be a new type of astronomical object or well-known astronomical objects in environments or evolutionary states not previously seen. 22 refs

  9. 76 FR 36329 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Idaho; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... Tier II Operating Permit No. T2-2009-0105, that was included in the Idaho Regional Haze SIP submittal... correctly used dispersion modeling. See 76 FR 1585 and EPA's evaluation of WRAP modeling in EPA's WRAP TSD... which BART eligible sources are subject to BART. EPA's evaluation of BART modeling can be found in the...

  10. Improved selection criteria for H II regions, based on IRAS sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qing-Zeng; Xu, Ye; Walsh, A. J.; Macquart, J. P.; MacLeod, G. C.; Zhang, Bo; Hancock, P. J.; Chen, Xi; Tang, Zheng-Hong

    2018-05-01

    We present new criteria for selecting H II regions from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Point Source Catalogue (PSC), based on an H II region catalogue derived manually from the all-sky Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The criteria are used to augment the number of H II region candidates in the Milky Way. The criteria are defined by the linear decision boundary of two samples: IRAS point sources associated with known H II regions, which serve as the H II region sample, and IRAS point sources at high Galactic latitudes, which serve as the non-H II region sample. A machine learning classifier, specifically a support vector machine, is used to determine the decision boundary. We investigate all combinations of four IRAS bands and suggest that the optimal criterion is log(F_{60}/F_{12})≥ ( -0.19 × log(F_{100}/F_{25})+ 1.52), with detections at 60 and 100 {μ}m. This selects 3041 H II region candidates from the IRAS PSC. We find that IRAS H II region candidates show evidence of evolution on the two-colour diagram. Merging the WISE H II catalogue with IRAS H II region candidates, we estimate a lower limit of approximately 10 200 for the number of H II regions in the Milky Way.

  11. A Green Bank Telescope Survey of Large Galactic H II Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Luisi, Matteo; Bania, T. M.; Balser, Dana S.; Wenger, Trey V.

    2018-02-01

    As part of our ongoing H II Region Discovery Survey (HRDS), we report the Green Bank Telescope detection of 148 new angularly large Galactic H II regions in radio recombination line (RRL) emission. Our targets are located at a declination of δ > -45^\\circ , which corresponds to 266^\\circ > {\\ell }> -20^\\circ at b=0^\\circ . All sources were selected from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer Catalog of Galactic H II Regions, and have infrared angular diameters ≥slant 260\\prime\\prime . The Galactic distribution of these “large” H II regions is similar to that of the previously known sample of Galactic H II regions. The large H II region RRL line width and peak line intensity distributions are skewed toward lower values, compared with that of previous HRDS surveys. We discover seven sources with extremely narrow RRLs 100 {pc}, making them some of the physically largest known H II regions in the Galaxy. This survey completes the HRDS H II region census in the Northern sky, where we have discovered 887 H II regions and more than doubled the size of the previously known census of Galactic H II regions.

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA region 4): North Hollywood Dump, TN. (First remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-13

    The 70-acre North Hollywood Dump site is an inactive, privately owned landfill in Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee, in the Wolf River floodplain. Directly beneath the site is a contaminated aquifer from which ground water discharges directly to the Wolf River. From the mid-1930s until its closure in 1967, municipal and industrial refuse were disposed of at the site, which was operated by the city of Memphis. A precise description of the materials disposed of is unknown. In 1979 and 1980, EPA and State studies revealed various contaminants both onsite and offsite in soil, sediments, ground water, surface water, and fish. Commercial fishing activities in the Wolf River ceased, and EPA required removal of contaminated soil, capping of the landfill, and fencing of the site. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses all of the contaminated media by containing the source areas. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, debris, ground water, and surface water are organics including aldrin, endrin, chlordane, and pesticides; and metals including arsenic and lead.

  13. Design of the PEP-II Interaction Region Septum Quadrupole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, J.; Tanabe, J.; Yee, D.; Younger, F.

    1997-05-01

    The PEP-II QF2 magnet is one of the final focus quadrupoles for the Low-Energy Ring (LER) and utilizes a septum aperture to accommodate the adjacent High-Energy Ring (HER) beamline. The LER lattice design specification calls for an extremely high field quality for this magnet. A conventional water-cooled copper coil and laminated steel core design was selected to allow adjustment in the excitation. The close proximity between the LER and HER beamlines and the required integrated quadrupole strength result in a moderately high current density septum design. The QF2 magnets are imbedded in a confined region at each end of the BaBar detector, thus requiring a small magnet core cross section. Pole face windings are included in the QF2 design to buck the skew octupole term induced by the solenoidal fringe field that leaks out of the detector. Back-leg windings are included to buck a small dipole component induced by the lack of perfect quadrupole symmetry in this septum design. 2D pole contour optimization and 3D end chamfers are used to minimize harmonic errors; a separate permanent-magnet Harmonic Corrector Ring compensates for remaining field errors. The design methods and approach, 2D and 3D analyses, and the resulting expected magnet performance are described in this paper.

  14. Far-infrared observations of Large Magellanic Cloud H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, M.W.; Becklin, E.E.; Gatley, I.; Ellis, M.J.; Hyland, A.R.; Robinson, G.; Thomas, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Far-infrared emission has been measured from four Large Magellanic Cloud H II regions: the 30 Doradus nebula, MC75, MC76 and MC77. The far-infrared radiation is thermal emission from dust heated by starlight. The results show that the LMC H II regions, like H II regions in the Galaxy, have far-infrared luminosities comparable to the total luminosity of their exciting stars. (author)

  15. H II REGION DRIVEN GALACTIC BUBBLES AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, D. P., E-mail: pavelmi@bu.edu, E-mail: clemens@bu.edu [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The relative alignments of mid-infrared traced Galactic bubbles are compared to the orientation of the mean Galactic magnetic field in the disk. The orientations of bubbles in the northern Galactic plane were measured and are consistent with random orientations-no preferential alignment with respect to the Galactic disk was found. A subsample of H II region driven Galactic bubbles was identified, and as a single population they show random orientations. When this subsample was further divided into subthermal and suprathermal H II regions, based on hydrogen radio recombination linewidths, the subthermal H II regions showed a marginal deviation from random orientations, but the suprathermal H II regions showed significant alignment with the Galactic plane. The mean orientation of the Galactic disk magnetic field was characterized using new near-infrared starlight polarimetry and the suprathermal H II regions were found to preferentially align with the disk magnetic field. If suprathermal linewidths are associated with younger H II regions, then the evolution of young H II regions is significantly affected by the Galactic magnetic field. As H II regions age, they cease to be strongly linked to the Galactic magnetic field, as surrounding density variations come to dominate their morphological evolution. From the new observations, the ratios of magnetic-to-ram pressures in the expanding ionization fronts were estimated for younger H II regions.

  16. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3): Paoli Rail Yard, Paoli, PA. (First remedial action), July 1992. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The 428-acre Paoli Rail Yard site is a maintenance, storage, and repair facility located north of Paoli in Chester County, Pennsylvania. Soil contamination in and around the car shop is attributed to releases of fuel oil and PCB-laden transformer fluid from rail cars during maintenance and repair activities. In 1985, EPA identified PCB contamination in soil and sediment, and on building surfaces. The rail companies agreed to address site clean-up activities, including erosion, sedimentation, and stormwater characteristics and control, decontamination, soil sampling, excavation of 3,500 cubic yards residential soil, and implementation of worker protection measures. The ROD provides a final remedy for contaminated soil (from the rail yard and residences), sediment, and structures at the Paoli Rail Yard, and contaminated ground water. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, debris, and ground water are VOCs, including benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, xylenes; and other organics, including PCBs. The selected remedial action for the site are included

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): NL Industries, Salem County, Pedricktown, NJ. (First remedial action), September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-27

    The 44-acre NL Industries site is an inactive, secondary lead smelting facility in Pedricktown, Salem County, New Jersey. The site overlies the Cape May aquifer, a potential source of drinking water for local residents. In 1989, EPA began a multi-phased removal action. The Focused Feasibility Study resulted in the issuance of the Early Remedial Action Record of Decision (ROD), designated as Operable Unit (OU2). The nature and extent of remaining contamination on the site and areas adjacent to the site in various environmental media, such as soil, sediment, ground water, surface water, and air, are currently being evaluated and will be addressed as OU1 in a subsequent ROD. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the slag and lead oxide piles, sediment, debris, and standing surface water are metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  18. Chemical dechlorination of pesticides at a superfund site in Region II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendergrass, S.; Prince, J.

    1991-01-01

    Selecting technologies for cleaning up hazardous waste sites is a complex task, due in part to the rapidly changing nature of the state-of-the-art in technology. There is strong support for use of innovative technologies as specified in Section 121(b) of CERCLA. However, use of an innovative technology requires overcoming a variety of challenges. These challenges include: Screening potentially appropriate technologies, including innovative technologies, and selecting one or more potential innovative technologies for which preliminary results are promising; however, site-specific data are needed prior to technology evaluation. Evaluating the effectiveness of the proposed technology for the site through the use of treatability studies. Gaining acceptance for the innovative technology, which may employ new or unfamiliar concepts. Determining optimal design and operating parameters for full-scale remediation. This paper discusses the technology evaluation process and how that process supported the selection of an innovative technology for the Myers Property site, a Superfund site in Region II. A case study is presented showing how technology screening and laboratory treatability studies were used to evaluate an innovative technology (chemical dechlorination), which was selected as the technology for remediation of soils and sediments contaminated with pesticides at this environmentally sensitive site in New Jersey. The remedy selected by the U.S. EPA for this site designates chemical dechlorination as the selected technology, but does not specify any particular vendor or process. Rather, the remedy sets forth technology performance standards and recommends certain design tasks which may be used to select a particular chemical process. This paper discusses he of these design tasks as they might apply to innovative technologies, using chemical dechlorination as a model

  19. Infrared studies of H II regions: the Sharpless regions S148, 184, 198, 206 and 269

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pismis, Paris

    1991-01-01

    We present the results of a combined near-infrared and IRAS mapping study of five H II regions for which fairly complete information at optical and radio wavelengths previously existed. The near-infrared observations, carried out with the 2.1-m telescope at Observatorio de San Pedro Martir (Mexico), allowed us to study the the stellar content at the core of each nebula, while an analysis of extended near-infrared emission zones showed these to arise mainly from ionized gas (S148 and S206) or through scattering and thermal emission from dust grains surrounding a massive young star (S269-IRS2). The analysis of IRAS data, on the other hand, suggests that two different populations of grains contribute to the observed 12- to 100-μm fluxes. (author)

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA region 5): Fultz Landfill, Byesville, OH. (First remedial action), September 1991. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The 30-acre Fultz Landfill site is a privately owned inactive sanitary landfill on the north slope of a ridge that overlies abandoned coal mines in Jackson Township, Guernsey County, Ohio. The site lies within the drainage basin of Wills Creek, which flows north adjacent to the site and is used by the city of Cambridge as the municipal water supply. The northern half of the landfill lies in an unreclaimed strip mine where surface mine spoil and natural soil form a shallow aquifer. During the 1970's, the landfill operator was cited for various violations. Investigations in 1988 by EPA indicated that ground water and leachate contaminants emanating from the site have contaminated the shallow aquifer and, to a lesser extent, the deep mine aquifer. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses all contaminated media, and provides a final remedy for the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, debris, ground water, and surface water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylenes; other organics including PAHs and phenols; metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead; and other inorganics. The selected remedial action for this site is included

  1. Characteristics of planetary nebulae and H II regions based on lambda = 1. 35 cm continuum measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braz, M A; Jardim, J O; Kaufmann, P [Universidade Mackenzie, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Radio-Astronomia et Astrofisica

    1975-11-01

    Physical parameters are derived and discussed for stronger H II regions and planetary nebulae for which continuum radio data at lambda = 1.35 cm was obtained. The study includes southern hemisphere planetary nebulae IC-418, NGC-6,302, NGC-6,369, and H II regions RCW-65, RCW-87, RCW-99, H 2-3 and H 2-6.

  2. ISO spectroscopy of compact HII regions in the Galaxy - II. Ionization and elemental abundances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin-Hernandez, NL; Peeters, E; Morisset, C; Tielens, AGGM; Cox, P; Roelfsema, PR; Baluteau, JP; Schaerer, D; Mathis, JS; Damour, F; Churchwell, E; Kessler, MF

    Based on the ISO spectral catalogue of compact H II regions by Peeters et al. (2002), we present a first analysis of the hydrogen recombination and atomic fine-structure lines originated in the ionized gas. The sample consists of 34 H II regions located at galactocentric distances between R-Gal = 0

  3. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 7): Weldon Spring Quarry/Plant/Pits (USDOE), St. Charles, MO, September 30, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The Weldon Spring Quarry is one of two noncontiguous areas that constitute the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Weldon Spring site. The main area of the site is the chemical plant. Both areas are located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) listed the quarry on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987, and the chemical plant area was added to the list in 1989. The quarry is about 6.4 km (4 mi) south-southwest of the chemical plant area; it is accessible from State Route 94 and is currently fenced and closed to the public. The quarry is approximately 300 m (1,000 ft) long by 140 m (450 ft) wide and covers an area of approximately 3.6 ha (9 acres). The quarry was used by the Army for disposal of chemically contaminated (explosive) materials in the 1940s and was later used for the disposal of radioactively contaminated material by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in the 1960s. Approximately 110,000 m 3 (144,000 yd 3 ) of soil and waste material was removed from the quarry and transported to the chemical plant area as part of completing the remedial action stipulated in the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Quarry Bulk Waste Operable Unit (DOE 1990). Bulk waste removal was completed in October 1995. These wastes have been placed in the disposal cell at the chemical plant. Prior to bulk waste removal, contaminated water contained in the quarry pond was also removed; approximately 170 million liters (44 million gal) have been treated as of March 1998

  4. Overview of EPA tools for supporting local- and regional-scale decision makers addressing energy and environmental issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) has been developing tools and illustrative case studies for decision makers in local and regional authorities who are facing challenges of establishing resilience to extreme weather events, aging built environment and infrastru...

  5. Regional disarmament and security issues. Report of working group II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravenhill, J.

    1994-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in building cooperation in the Asia-pacific region in remarkably short period of time. Problems of regional disarmament are analysed by linking the economic and security issues. International cooperation regimes, whether in the military sphere, such as the Non-proliferation treaty, or in the trade sphere such as the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, inevitably impose restrictions on the autonomy of member States. The integrity of the regime depends on countries' acceptance of the obligations it imposes. The task ahead is to convince all countries in the region that cooperation in the security sphere will be of even greater long-term benefit

  6. Generalization and formalization of the US EPA procedure for design of treated wastewater aquifer recharge basins: II. Retrofit of Souhil Wadi (Nabeul, Tunisia) pilot plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallali, Hamadi; Yoshida, Mitsuo; Tarhouni, Jamila; Jedidi, Naceur

    2013-01-01

    The 'Cap Bon' peninsula in Tunisia suffers from intensive tourist activities, high demographic increase and industrial development. As groundwater had been for a long time the main water source, aquifers had been subject to a severe depletion and seawater intrusion. Despite the measures taken prohibiting new drillings and water carrying by the construction of a waterway linking the region to the north-west region of Tunisia, the problem of water shortage persists. Artificial recharge of groundwater with treated wastewater has been decided as a technique to replenish the region aquifers. A pilot plant was constructed in the early 1980s in Souhil Wadi (Nabeul) area. Many experiments have been carried out on this plant and have led to controversial opinions about its performance and its impact on groundwater contamination. This contribution concerns the application of the procedure that we developed from the generalization and the formalization of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) methodology for the design of treated wastewater aquifer recharge basins. This upgrading procedure implemented in a spreadsheet, has been used to retrofit the Souhil Wadi facility in order to improve its performance. This method highlighted the importance of the safety factor to estimate wastewater infiltration rate from clean water permeability measurements. It has, also, demonstrated the discordance between the initial design parameters of Souhil Wadi facility and their current status as they have changed with time and the infiltration capacity of the basins has been affected by clogging. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that with the current state of clogging of the basins, the design infiltration rate limited by the most restrictive layer (6.1 cm/hr) corresponds to 22% of the surface infiltration rate reached after a drying period of 10 d, which means that we need more basins to absorb the daily loading rate. The design method leads to the construct ion of five

  7. Regional Dialogue on the Information Society (DIRSI) - Phase II ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Regional Dialogue on the Information Society Network (DIRSI) is a ... the poorest sectors of society, the project will focus on innovative policy solutions ... their Impact on the Development of the Mobile Telecommunications Services Sector.

  8. Logic of quench protection assembly for BEPC II interaction region superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fusan; Cheng Jian

    2006-01-01

    Two superconducting magnet complexes are used in BEPC II interaction region. The corresponding quench protection system divides all related faults into two classes and takes different protection actions according to the urgency degree. Since BEPC II has two operating modes and the superconducting magnets use different power supplies in different operating modes, the quench protection system must take the mode switching into consideration. (authors)

  9. Dynamical evolution of star-forming regions - II. Basic kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Richard J.; Wright, Nicholas J.

    2016-04-01

    We follow the dynamical evolution of young star-forming regions with a wide range of initial conditions and examine how the radial velocity dispersion, σ, evolves over time. We compare this velocity dispersion to the theoretically expected value for the velocity dispersion if a region were in virial equilibrium, σvir and thus assess the virial state (σ/σvir) of these systems. We find that in regions that are initially subvirial, or in global virial equilibrium but subvirial on local scales, the system relaxes to virial equilibrium within several million years, or roughly 25-50 crossing times, according to the measured virial ratio. However, the measured velocity dispersion, σ, appears to be a bad diagnostic of the current virial state of these systems as it suggests that they become supervirial when compared to the velocity dispersion estimated from the virial mass, σvir. We suggest that this discrepancy is caused by the fact that the regions are never fully relaxed, and that the early non-equilibrium evolution is imprinted in the one-dimensional velocity dispersion at these early epochs. If measured early enough (interquartile range (IQR) dispersion, with measures of spatial structure, places stronger constraints on the dynamical history of a region than using the velocity dispersion in isolation.

  10. THE Fe II EMISSION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: EXCITATION MECHANISMS AND LOCATION OF THE EMITTING REGION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinello, M.; Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Garcia-Rissmann, A.; Sigut, T. A. A.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of Fe ii emission in the near-infrared region (NIR) for 25 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to obtain information about the excitation mechanisms that power it and the location where it is formed. We employ an NIR Fe ii template derived in the literature and find that it successfully reproduces the observed Fe ii spectrum. The Fe ii bump at 9200 Å detected in all objects studied confirms that Lyα fluorescence is always present in AGNs. The correlation found between the flux of the 9200 Å bump, the 1 μm lines, and the optical Fe ii implies that Lyα fluorescence plays an important role in Fe ii production. We determined that at least 18% of the optical Fe ii is due to this process, while collisional excitation dominates the production of the observed Fe ii. The line profiles of Fe ii λ10502, O i λ11287, Ca ii λ8664, and Paβ were compared to gather information about the most likely location where they are emitted. We found that Fe ii, O i and Ca ii have similar widths and are, on average, 30% narrower than Paβ. Assuming that the clouds emitting the lines are virialized, we show that the Fe ii is emitted in a region twice as far from the central source than Paβ. The distance, though, strongly varies: from 8.5 light-days for NGC 4051 to 198.2 light-days for Mrk 509. Our results reinforce the importance of the Fe ii in the NIR to constrain critical parameters that drive its physics and the underlying AGN kinematics, as well as more accurate models aimed at reproducing this complex emission

  11. THE Fe II EMISSION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: EXCITATION MECHANISMS AND LOCATION OF THE EMITTING REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinello, M. [Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Rua Doutor Pereira Cabral 1303, 37500-903, Itajubá, MG (Brazil); Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Garcia-Rissmann, A. [Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica, Rua Estados Unidos 154, Itajubá, MG, 37504-364 (Brazil); Sigut, T. A. A. [The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Pradhan, A. K., E-mail: murilo.marinello@gmail.com [McPherson Laboratory, The Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of Fe ii emission in the near-infrared region (NIR) for 25 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to obtain information about the excitation mechanisms that power it and the location where it is formed. We employ an NIR Fe ii template derived in the literature and find that it successfully reproduces the observed Fe ii spectrum. The Fe ii bump at 9200 Å detected in all objects studied confirms that Lyα fluorescence is always present in AGNs. The correlation found between the flux of the 9200 Å bump, the 1 μm lines, and the optical Fe ii implies that Lyα fluorescence plays an important role in Fe ii production. We determined that at least 18% of the optical Fe ii is due to this process, while collisional excitation dominates the production of the observed Fe ii. The line profiles of Fe ii λ10502, O i λ11287, Ca ii λ8664, and Paβ were compared to gather information about the most likely location where they are emitted. We found that Fe ii, O i and Ca ii have similar widths and are, on average, 30% narrower than Paβ. Assuming that the clouds emitting the lines are virialized, we show that the Fe ii is emitted in a region twice as far from the central source than Paβ. The distance, though, strongly varies: from 8.5 light-days for NGC 4051 to 198.2 light-days for Mrk 509. Our results reinforce the importance of the Fe ii in the NIR to constrain critical parameters that drive its physics and the underlying AGN kinematics, as well as more accurate models aimed at reproducing this complex emission.

  12. Multisite Evaluation of APEX for Water Quality: II. Regional Parameterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nathan O; Baffaut, Claire; Lory, John A; Anomaa Senaviratne, G M M M; Bhandari, Ammar B; Udawatta, Ranjith P; Sweeney, Daniel W; Helmers, Matt J; Van Liew, Mike W; Mallarino, Antonio P; Wortmann, Charles S

    2017-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) Index assessment requires independent estimates of long-term average annual P loss from fields, representing multiple climatic scenarios, management practices, and landscape positions. Because currently available measured data are insufficient to evaluate P Index performance, calibrated and validated process-based models have been proposed as tools to generate the required data. The objectives of this research were to develop a regional parameterization for the Agricultural Policy Environmental eXtender (APEX) model to estimate edge-of-field runoff, sediment, and P losses in restricted-layer soils of Missouri and Kansas and to assess the performance of this parameterization using monitoring data from multiple sites in this region. Five site-specific calibrated models (SSCM) from within the region were used to develop a regionally calibrated model (RCM), which was further calibrated and validated with measured data. Performance of the RCM was similar to that of the SSCMs for runoff simulation and had Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) > 0.72 and absolute percent bias (|PBIAS|) 90%) and was particularly ineffective at simulating sediment loss from locations with small sediment loads. The RCM had acceptable performance for simulation of total P loss (NSE > 0.74, |PBIAS| < 30%) but underperformed the SSCMs. Total P-loss estimates should be used with caution due to poor simulation of sediment loss. Although we did not attain our goal of a robust regional parameterization of APEX for estimating sediment and total P losses, runoff estimates with the RCM were acceptable for P Index evaluation. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  13. A Comparative Observational Study of YSO Classification in Four Small Star-forming H ii Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung-Ju; Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776, Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Kerton, C. R., E-mail: sjkang@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: kerton@iastate.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    We have developed a new young stellar object (YSO) identification and classification technique using mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data. We compare this new technique with previous WISE YSO detection and classification methods that used either infrared colors or spectral energy distribution slopes. In this study, we also use the new technique to detect and examine the YSO population associated with four small H ii regions: KR 7, KR 81, KR 120, and KR 140. The relatively simple structure of these regions allows us to effectively use both spatial and temporal constraints to identify YSOs that are potential products of triggered star formation. We are also able to identify regions of active star formation around these H ii regions that are clearly not influenced by the H ii region expansion, and thus demonstrate that star formation is on-going on megayear timescales in some of these molecular clouds.

  14. County Boundaries clipped to shoreline from Teleatlas, NA for Regions 1, 2 and 3 in EPA Region 2 Oracle/Spatial/SDE Database [TANA.COUNTY

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — R2GIS Combined county boundary data from TANA, Navteq and Census: TANA county boundaries.(static.R2GIS.TANA_BOUNDARY_COUNTY) for all of Region 2 except the Virgin...

  15. Emission-line diagnostics of nearby H II regions including interacting binary populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lin; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Eldridge, J. J.

    2018-06-01

    We present numerical models of the nebular emission from H II regions around young stellar populations over a range of compositions and ages. The synthetic stellar populations include both single stars and interacting binary stars. We compare these models to the observed emission lines of 254 H II regions of 13 nearby spiral galaxies and 21 dwarf galaxies drawn from archival data. The models are created using the combination of the BPASS (Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis) code with the photoionization code CLOUDY to study the differences caused by the inclusion of interacting binary stars in the stellar population. We obtain agreement with the observed emission line ratios from the nearby star-forming regions and discuss the effect of binary-star evolution pathways on the nebular ionization of H II regions. We find that at population ages above 10 Myr, single-star models rapidly decrease in flux and ionization strength, while binary-star models still produce strong flux and high [O III]/H β ratios. Our models can reproduce the metallicity of H II regions from spiral galaxies, but we find higher metallicities than previously estimated for the H II regions from dwarf galaxies. Comparing the equivalent width of H β emission between models and observations, we find that accounting for ionizing photon leakage can affect age estimates for H II regions. When it is included, the typical age derived for H II regions is 5 Myr from single-star models, and up to 10 Myr with binary-star models. This is due to the existence of binary-star evolution pathways, which produce more hot Wolf-Rayet and helium stars at older ages. For future reference, we calculate new BPASS binary maximal starburst lines as a function of metallicity, and for the total model population, and present these in Appendix A.

  16. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2012-01-01

    It saddens us deeply to learn of the passing away of Jean-Paul Diss who died suddenly on 7 June 2012 at his home.  A tribute can be read on the GAC-EPA site. * * * * * Information: http://gac-epa.org/ e-mail: gac-epa@gac-epa.org

  17. The cometary H II regions of DR 21: Bow shocks or champagne flows or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immer, K.; Cyganowski, C.; Reid, M. J.; Menten, K. M.

    2014-03-01

    We present deep Very Large Array H66α radio recombination line (RRL) observations of the two cometary H II regions in DR 21. With these sensitive data, we test the "hybrid" bow shock/champagne flow model previously proposed for the DR 21 H II regions. The ionized gas down the tail of the southern H II region is redshifted by up to ~30 km s-1 with respect to the ambient molecular gas, as expected in the hybrid scenario. The RRL velocity structure, however, reveals the presence of two velocity components in both the northern and southern H II regions. This suggests that the ionized gas is flowing along cone-like shells, swept-up by stellar winds. The observed velocity structure of the well-resolved southern H II region is most consistent with a picture that combines a stellar wind with stellar motion (as in bow shock models) along a density gradient (as in champagne flow models). The direction of the implied density gradient is consistent with that suggested by maps of dust continuum and molecular line emission in the DR 21 region. The image cubes are only available as a FITS file at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/563/A39Table 2, Fig. 4, and Appendices A and B are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY. III. KINEMATIC DISTANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L. D. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Bania, T. M. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Balser, Dana S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Rood, Robert T., E-mail: Loren.Anderson@mail.wvu.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903-0818 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    Using the H I emission/absorption method, we resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity and derive distances for 149 of 182 (82%) H II regions discovered by the Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS). The HRDS is an X-band (9 GHz, 3 cm) GBT survey of 448 previously unknown H II regions in radio recombination line and radio continuum emission. Here, we focus on HRDS sources from 67 Degree-Sign {>=} l {>=} 18 Degree-Sign , where kinematic distances are more reliable. The 25 HRDS sources in this zone that have negative recombination line velocities are unambiguously beyond the orbit of the Sun, up to 20 kpc distant. They are the most distant H II regions yet discovered. We find that 61% of HRDS sources are located at the far distance, 31% at the tangent-point distance, and only 7% at the near distance. 'Bubble' H II regions are not preferentially located at the near distance (as was assumed previously) but average 10 kpc from the Sun. The HRDS nebulae, when combined with a large sample of H II regions with previously known distances, show evidence of spiral structure in two circular arc segments of mean Galactocentric radii of 4.25 and 6.0 kpc. We perform a thorough uncertainty analysis to analyze the effect of using different rotation curves, streaming motions, and a change to the solar circular rotation speed. The median distance uncertainty for our sample of H II regions is only 0.5 kpc, or 5%. This is significantly less than the median difference between the near and far kinematic distances, 6 kpc. The basic Galactic structure results are unchanged after considering these sources of uncertainty.

  19. Politics in the Western Maya Region (II: Emblem Glyphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Bíró

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a series of articles I reflect on the use of various expressions which are connected to what we call the political in the inscriptions of the Classic Maya Western Region. These words express ideas and concepts which help to understand the intricate details of the interactions between the political entities and their internal organisations in the Classic Maya Lowlands. In this article I investigate the meaning of emblem glyphs. I suggest that originally they were toponyms but later on they became titles of origin which indicated descendance from a common origin place.En una serie de artículos investigo el uso de varias palabras en las inscripciones mayas de la época Clásica de la Región Occidental que se conectan con lo que nosotros llamamos "política". Estas palabras expresan ideas y conceptos que ayudan a entender los matices de las relaciones entre las entidades políticas de las Tierras Bajas Mayas y su organización interna. En este artículo investigo el significado de los glifos emblema. Propongo que originalmente fueron topónimos y después llegaron a ser títulos de origen que indicaron descendencia común de un lugar original.

  20. [Polymorphisms of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions HVR I and HVR II in Changdu Tibetan in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianmin; Kang, Longli; Bian, Liqiang; La, Zong

    2008-10-01

    To analyze the sequence polymorphisms of mitochondrial DNA HVR I and HVR II in Tibetan population in Changdu area of Tibet. mtDNAs obtained from 97 unrelated individuals were amplified and directly sequenced. One hundred and eleven variable sites were identified, including nucleotide transitions, transversions, insertions and deletions. In HVR I region (nt16024-nt16365), sixty-eight polymorphic sites and 92 haplotypes were observed, and the genetic diversity was 0.9985. In HVR II region (nt73-nt340), forty-three polymorphic sites and 91 haplotypes were detected, and the genetic diversity was 0.9882. The random match probability of HVR I and HVR II regions were 0.0120 and 0.0118, respectively. When the sequence analysis of HVR I and HVR II regions were combined, ninety-seven different haplotypes were found. The combined match probability of two unrelated persons having the same sequence was 0.0103. There are some unique polymorphic loci in the Changdu Tibetan population. The results suggest that there are significant difference in the genetic structure in the mitochondrial DNA D-loop region between Changdu Tibetans and other Asian populations and Caucasians. Sequence polymorphism in mitochondrial DNA HVR I and HVR II can be used as a genetic marker for forensic individual identification and genetic analysis.

  1. US EPA Region 4 Brownfields

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — To improve public health and the environment, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) collects information about facilities, sites, or places...

  2. EPA Region 6 TEAP Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Texas Ecological Assessment Protocol (TEAP) is a screening level assessment tool created by a working group of the Texas Environmental Resource Stewards (TERS)....

  3. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Rutledge

    2011-02-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership (SWP) on Carbon Sequestration designed and deployed a medium-scale field pilot test of geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Aneth oil field. Greater Aneth oil field, Utah's largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 455 million barrels of oil (72 million m3). Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation. Because it represents an archetype oil field of the western U.S., Greater Aneth was selected as one of three geologic pilots to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO2 sequestration under the auspices of the SWP on Carbon Sequestration, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The pilot demonstration focuced on the western portion of the Aneth Unit as this area of the field was converted from waterflood production to CO2 EOR starting in late 2007. The Aneth Unit is in the northwestern part of the field and has produced 149 million barrels (24 million m3) of the estimated 450 million barrels (71.5 million m3) of the original oil in place - a 33% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil makes the Aneth Unit ideal to demonstrate both CO2 storage capacity and EOR by CO2 flooding. This report summarizes the geologic characterization research, the various field monitoring tests, and the development of a geologic model and numerical simulations conducted for the Aneth demonstration project. The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), with contributions from other Partners, evaluated how the surface and subsurface geology of the Aneth Unit demonstration site will affect sequestration operations and engineering strategies. The UGS-research for the project are summarized in Chapters 1 through 7, and includes (1) mapping the surface geology including stratigraphy, faulting, fractures, and deformation bands, (2) describing the local Jurassic and Cretaceous stratigraphy, (3) mapping the

  4. Spitzer observations of dust emission from H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Ian W. [Now at Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA. (United States); Evans, Jessica Marie; Xue, Rui; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Segura-Cox, Dominique M., E-mail: ianws@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Massive stars can alter physical conditions and properties of their ambient interstellar dust grains via radiative heating and shocks. The H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) offer ideal sites to study the stellar energy feedback effects on dust because stars can be resolved, and the galaxy's nearly face-on orientation allows us to unambiguously associate H II regions with their ionizing massive stars. The Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the LMC provides multi-wavelength (3.6-160 μm) photometric data of all H II regions. To investigate the evolution of dust properties around massive stars, we have analyzed spatially resolved IR dust emission from two classical H II regions (N63 and N180) and two simple superbubbles (N70 and N144) in the LMC. We produce photometric spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of numerous small subregions for each region based on its stellar distributions and nebular morphologies. We use DustEM dust emission model fits to characterize the dust properties. Color-color diagrams and model fits are compared with the radiation field (estimated from photometric and spectroscopic surveys). Strong radial variations of SEDs can be seen throughout the regions, reflecting the available radiative heating. Emission from very small grains drastically increases at locations where the radiation field is the highest, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) appear to be destroyed. PAH emission is the strongest in the presence of molecular clouds, provided that the radiation field is low.

  5. Detecting stellar-wind bubbles through infrared arcs in H II regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Haworth, Thomas J.; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Mohamed, Shazrene; Langer, Norbert; Harries, Tim J.

    2016-02-01

    Mid-infrared arcs of dust emission are often seen near ionizing stars within H II regions. A possible explanations for these arcs is that they could show the outer edges of asymmetric stellar wind bubbles. We use two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of wind bubbles within H II regions around individual stars to predict the infrared emission properties of the dust within the H II region. We assume that dust and gas are dynamically well-coupled and that dust properties (composition, size distribution) are the same in the H II region as outside it, and that the wind bubble contains no dust. We post-process the simulations to make synthetic intensity maps at infrared wavebands using the torus code. We find that the outer edge of a wind bubble emits brightly at 24 μm through starlight absorbed by dust grains and re-radiated thermally in the infrared. This produces a bright arc of emission for slowly moving stars that have asymmetric wind bubbles, even for cases where there is no bow shock or any corresponding feature in tracers of gas emission. The 24 μm intensity decreases exponentially from the arc with increasing distance from the star because the dust temperature decreases with distance. The size distribution and composition of the dust grains has quantitative but not qualitative effects on our results. Despite the simplifications of our model, we find good qualitative agreement with observations of the H II region RCW 120, and can provide physical explanations for any quantitative differences. Our model produces an infrared arc with the same shape and size as the arc around CD -38°11636 in RCW 120, and with comparable brightness. This suggests that infrared arcs around O stars in H II regions may be revealing the extent of stellar wind bubbles, although we have not excluded other explanations.

  6. Environmental monitoring survey of oil and gas fields in Region II in 2009. Summary report; Miljoeovervaaking av olje- og gassfelt i Region II i 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-15

    The oil companies Statoil ASA, ExxonMobil Exploration and Production Norway AS, Total E&P Norge AS, Talisman Energy Norge AS and Marathon Petroleum Norge AS commissioned Section of Applied Environmental Research at UNI RESEARCH AS to undertake the monitoring survey of Region II in 2009. Similar monitoring surveys in Region II have been carried out in 1996, 2000, 2003 and 2006. The survey in 2009 included in total 18 fields: Rev, Varg, Sigyn, Sleipner Vest, Sleipner OEst, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Vale, Skirne, Byggve, Heimdal, Volve, Vilje og Alvheim. Sampling was conducted from the vessel MV Libas between May 18 and May 27. Samples were collected from in totally 137 sampling sites, of which 15 were regional sampling sites. Samples for chemical analysis were collected at all sites, whereas samples for benthos analysis were collected at 12 fields. As in previous surveys, Region II is divided into natural sub-regions. One sub-region is shallow (77-96 m) sub-region, a central sub-region (107-130 m) and a northern subregion (115-119 m). The sediments of the shallow sub-region had relatively lower content of TOM and pelite and higher content of fine sand than the central and northern sub-regions. Calculated areas of contamination are shown for the sub-regions in Table 1.1. The fields Sigyn, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Skirne, Byggve, Vilje og Alvheim showed no contamination of THC. At the other fields there were minor changes from 2006. The concentrations of barium increased in the central sub-region from 2006 to 2009, also at fields where no drilling had been undertaken during the last years. The same laboratory and methods are used during the three last regional investigations. The changes in barium concentrations may be due to high variability of barium concentrations in the sediments. This is supported by relatively large variations in average barium concentrations at the regional sampling sites in

  7. Environmental monitoring survey of oil and gas fields in Region II in 2009. Summary report; Miljoeovervaaking av olje- og gassfelt i Region II i 2009. Sammendragsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-15

    The oil companies Statoil ASA, ExxonMobil Exploration and Production Norway AS, Total E&P Norge AS, Talisman Energy Norge AS and Marathon Petroleum Norge AS commissioned Section of Applied Environmental Research at UNI RESEARCH AS to undertake the monitoring survey of Region II in 2009. Similar monitoring surveys in Region II have been carried out in 1996, 2000, 2003 and 2006. The survey in 2009 included in total 18 fields: Rev, Varg, Sigyn, Sleipner Vest, Sleipner Oest, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Vale, Skirne, Byggve, Heimdal, Volve, Vilje og Alvheim. Sampling was conducted from the vessel MV Libas between May 18 and May 27. Samples were collected from in totally 137 sampling sites, of which 15 were regional sampling sites. Samples for chemical analysis were collected at all sites, whereas samples for benthos analysis were collected at 12 fields. As in previous surveys, Region II is divided into natural sub-regions. One sub-region is shallow (77-96 m) sub-region, a central sub-region (107-130 m) and a northern subregion (115-119 m). The sediments of the shallow sub-region had relatively lower content of TOM and pelite and higher content of fine sand than the central and northern sub-regions. Calculated areas of contamination are shown for the sub-regions in Table 1.1. The fields Sigyn, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Skirne, Byggve, Vilje og Alvheim showed no contamination of THC. At the other fields there were minor changes from 2006. The concentrations of barium increased in the central sub-region from 2006 to 2009, also at fields where no drilling had been undertaken during the last years. The same laboratory and methods are used during the three last regional investigations. The changes in barium concentrations may be due to high variability of barium concentrations in the sediments. This is supported by relatively large variations in average barium concentrations at the regional sampling sites in

  8. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE H II REGION DISCOVERY SURVEY. IV. HELIUM AND CARBON RECOMBINATION LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenger, Trey V.; Bania, T. M. [Astronomy Department, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Balser, Dana S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA, 22903-2475 (United States); Anderson, L. D. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2013-02-10

    The Green Bank Telescope H II Region Discovery Survey (GBT HRDS) found hundreds of previously unknown Galactic regions of massive star formation by detecting hydrogen radio recombination line (RRL) emission from candidate H II region targets. Since the HRDS nebulae lie at large distances from the Sun, they are located in previously unprobed zones of the Galactic disk. Here, we derive the properties of helium and carbon RRL emission from HRDS nebulae. Our target sample is the subset of the HRDS that has visible helium or carbon RRLs. This criterion gives a total of 84 velocity components (14% of the HRDS) with helium emission and 52 (9%) with carbon emission. For our highest quality sources, the average {sup 4}He{sup +}/H{sup +} abundance ratio by number, (y {sup +}), is 0.068 {+-} 0.023(1{sigma}). This is the same ratio as that measured for the sample of previously known Galactic H II regions. Nebulae without detected helium emission give robust y {sup +} upper limits. There are 5 RRL emission components with y {sup +} less than 0.04 and another 12 with upper limits below this value. These H II regions must have either a very low {sup 4}He abundance or contain a significant amount of neutral helium. The HRDS has 20 nebulae with carbon RRL emission but no helium emission at its sensitivity level. There is no correlation between the carbon RRL parameters and the 8 {mu}m mid-infrared morphology of these nebulae.

  9. EPA eXcats

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EPA eXcats is an enterprise-level data tracking application that provides management complaint tracking information for the EPA's Office of Civil Rights (OCR)...

  10. EPA Web Taxonomy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPA's Web Taxonomy is a faceted hierarchical vocabulary used to tag web pages with terms from a controlled vocabulary. Tagging enables search and discovery of EPA's...

  11. SPITZER AND HERSCHEL MULTIWAVELENGTH CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DUST CONTENT OF EVOLVED H II REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paladini, R. [NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200, East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Umana, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Veneziani, M.; Noriega-Crespo, A. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200, East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Anderson, L. D. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Piacentini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma La Sapienza, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Pinheiro Goncalves, D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto 50 George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Paradis, D.; Bernard, J.-P. [Centre d' Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, 9 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Tibbs, C. T. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200, East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Natoli, P., E-mail: paladini@ipac.caltech.edu [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione Ferrara, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2012-12-01

    We have analyzed a uniform sample of 16 evolved H II regions located in a 2 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 2 Degree-Sign Galactic field centered at (l,b) = (30 Degree-Sign , 0 Degree-Sign ) and observed as part of the Herschel Hi-GAL survey. The evolutionary stage of these H II regions was established using ancillary radio-continuum data. By combining Hi-GAL PACS (70 {mu}m, 160 {mu}m) and SPIRE (250 {mu}m, 350 {mu}m, and 500 {mu}m) measurements with MIPSGAL 24 {mu}m data, we built spectral energy distributions of the sources and showed that a two-component gray-body model is a good representation of the data. In particular, wavelengths >70 {mu}m appear to trace a cold dust component, for which we estimated an equilibrium temperature of the big grains (BGs) in the range 20-30 K, while for {lambda} < 70 {mu}m, the data indicate the presence of a warm dust component at temperatures of the order of 50-90 K. This analysis also revealed that dust is present in the interior of H II regions, although likely not in a large amount. In addition, the data seem to corroborate the hypothesis that the main mechanism responsible for the (partial) depletion of dust in H II regions is radiation-pressure-driven drift. In this framework, we speculated that the 24 {mu}m emission that spatially correlates with ionized gas might be associated with either very small grain or BG replenishment, as recently proposed for the case of wind-blown bubbles. Finally, we found that evolved H II regions are characterized by distinctive far-IR and submillimeter colors, which can be used as diagnostics for their identification in unresolved Galactic and extragalactic regions.

  12. Gasdynamics of H II regions. V. The interaction of weak R ionization fronts with dense clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G; Bedijn, P J

    1981-06-01

    The interaction of weak R-type ionization fronts with a density enhancement is calculated numerically as a function of time within the framework of the champagne model of the evolution of H II regions. Calculations are performed under the assumption of plane-parallel geometry for various relative densities of the cloud in which the exciting star is formed and a second cloud with which an ionization front from the first cloud interacts. The supersonic ionization front representing the outer boundary of an H II region experiencing the champagne phase is found to either evolve into a D-type front or remain of type R, depending on the absolute number of photons leaving the H II region that undergoes the champagne phase. Recombinations in the ionized gas eventually slow the ionization front, however photon fluxes allow it to speed up again, resulting in oscillatory propagation of the front. Front-cloud interactions are also shown to lead to the development of a backward-facing shock, a forward-facing shock, and a density maximum in the ionized gas. The results can be used to explain the origin of bright rims in H II regions.

  13. Cheminformatics Analysis of EPA ToxCast Chemical Libraries ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important goal of toxicology research is the development of robust methods that use in vitro and chemical structure information to predict in vivo toxicity endpoints. The US EPA ToxCast program is addressing this goal using ~600 in vitro assays to create bioactivity profiles on a set of 320 compounds, mostly pesticide actives, that have well characterized in vivo toxicity. These 320 compounds (EPA-320 set evaluated in Phase I of ToxCast) are a subset of a much larger set of ~10,000 candidates that are of interest to the EPA (called here EPA-10K). Predictive models of in vivo toxicity are being constructed from the in vitro assay data on the EPA-320 chemical set. These models require validation on additional chemicals prior to wide acceptance, and this will be carried out by evaluating compounds from EPA-10K in Phase II of ToxCast. We have used cheminformatics approaches including clustering, data visualization, and QSAR to develop models for EPA-320 that could help prioritizing EPA-10K validation chemicals. Both chemical descriptors, as well as calculated physicochemical properties have been used. Compounds from EPA-10K are prioritized based on their similarity to EPA-320 using different similarity metrics, with similarity thresholds defining the domain of applicability for the predictive models built for EPA-320 set. In addition, prioritized lists of compounds of increasing dissimilarity from the EPA-320 have been produced, to test the ability of the EPA-320

  14. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II) in human brain: regional distribution of IGF II and of higher molecular mass forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haselbacher, G.K.; Schwab, M.E.; Pasi, A.; Humbel, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four distinct areas of human brain were analyzed for the presence of insulin-like growth factor (IGF). As reported for cerebrospinal fluid, only IGF II-like immunoreactivity, but no significant amounts of IGF I-like immunoreactivity, could be found. Upon gel permeation chromatography, two to five distinct size classes were separated on the basis of their immunoreactivity. Radioimmunoassays and a bioassay also gave results indistinguishable from those of serum IGF II. The highest amounts of IGF II-like immunoreactivity occur in the anterior pituitary. This is up to 100 times more than in most other brain regions analyzed. The higher molecular mass immunoreactive species were partially characterized. After immunoaffinity purification, the 38- and 26-kDa species are active in a bioassay. Specific IGF-binding protein activity could be shown after purification of the 38- and 26-kDa species on an IGF-affinity column. The 13-kDa species released significant amounts of 7.5-kDa material. The results are interpreted as evidence for the presence of IGF II synthesized locally in human brain

  15. Internal Variations in Empirical Oxygen Abundances for Giant H II Regions in the Galaxy NGC 2403

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ye-Wei; Lin, Lin; Kong, Xu

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a spectroscopic investigation of 11 {{H}} {{II}} regions in the nearby galaxy NGC 2403. The {{H}} {{II}} regions are observed with a long-slit spectrograph mounted on the 2.16 m telescope at XingLong station of National Astronomical Observatories of China. For each of the {{H}} {{II}} regions, spectra are extracted at different nebular radii along the slit-coverage. Oxygen abundances are empirically estimated from the strong-line indices R23, N2O2, O3N2, and N2 for each spectrophotometric unit, with both observation- and model-based calibrations adopted into the derivation. Radial profiles of these diversely estimated abundances are drawn for each nebula. In the results, the oxygen abundances separately estimated with the prescriptions on the basis of observations and models, albeit from the same spectral index, systematically deviate from each other; at the same time, the spectral indices R23 and N2O2 are distributed with flat profiles, whereas N2 and O3N2 exhibit apparent gradients with the nebular radius. Because our study naturally samples various ionization levels, which inherently decline at larger radii within individual {{H}} {{II}} regions, the radial distributions indicate not only the robustness of R23 and N2O2 against ionization variations but also the sensitivity of N2 and O3N2 to the ionization parameter. The results in this paper provide observational corroboration of the theoretical prediction about the deviation in the empirical abundance diagnostics. Our future work is planned to investigate metal-poor {{H}} {{II}} regions with measurable T e, in an attempt to recalibrate the strong-line indices and consequently disclose the cause of the discrepancies between the empirical oxygen abundances.

  16. Chemical Abundances and Physical Parameters of H II Regions in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, R. E. C.

    The chemical abundances and physical parameters of H II regions are important pa rameters to determine in order to understand how stars and galaxies evolve. The Magellanic Clouds offer us a unique oportunity to persue such studies in low metallicity galaxies. In this contribution we present the results of the photoionization modeling of 5 H II regions in each of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) sys tems. Optical data were collected from the literature, complemented by our own observa tions (Carlos Reyes et al. 1998), including UV spectra from the new IUE data ban k and infrared fluxes from the IRAS satellite. The chemical abundances of He, C, N, O, Ne, S, Ar and physical parameters like the densities, the ionized masses, the luminosities, the ionization temperatures , the filling factor and optical depth are determined. A comparison of the abundances of these HII regions with those of typical planetary nebulae and supergiants stars is also presented.

  17. Star Formation Activity in the Galactic H II Region Sh2-297

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Bhatt, B. C.; Ghosh, S. K.; Dewangan, L. K.; Tamura, M.

    2012-11-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the Galactic H II region Sh2-297, located in the Canis Major OB1 complex. Optical spectroscopic observations are used to constrain the spectral type of ionizing star HD 53623 as B0V. The classical nature of this H II region is affirmed by the low values of electron density and emission measure, which are calculated to be 756 cm-3 and 9.15 × 105 cm-6 pc using the radio continuum observations at 610 and 1280 MHz, and Very Large Array archival data at 1420 MHz. To understand local star formation, we identified the young stellar object (YSO) candidates in a region of area ~7farcm5 × 7farcm5 centered on Sh2-297 using grism slitless spectroscopy (to identify the Hα emission line stars), and near infrared (NIR) observations. NIR YSO candidates are further classified into various evolutionary stages using color-color and color-magnitude (CM) diagrams, giving 50 red sources (H - K > 0.6) and 26 Class II-like sources. The mass and age range of the YSOs are estimated to be ~0.1-2 M ⊙ and 0.5-2 Myr using optical (V/V-I) and NIR (J/J-H) CM diagrams. The mean age of the YSOs is found to be ~1 Myr, which is of the order of dynamical age of 1.07 Myr of the H II region. Using the estimated range of visual extinction (1.1-25 mag) from literature and NIR data for the region, spectral energy distribution models have been implemented for selected YSOs which show masses and ages to be consistent with estimated values. The spatial distribution of YSOs shows an evolutionary sequence, suggesting triggered star formation in the region. The star formation seems to have propagated from the ionizing star toward the cold dark cloud LDN1657A located west of Sh2-297.

  18. Critical region of a type II superconducting film near Hsub(c2): rational approximants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggeri, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    The high-temperature perturbative expansions for the thermal quantities of a type II superconducting film are extrapolated to the critical region near Hsub(c2) by means of new rational approximants of the Pade type. The new approximants are forced to reproduce the leading correction to the flux lattice contribution on the low-temperature side of the transition. Compared to those previously considered in the literature: (i) the mutual consistency of the approximants is improved; and (ii) they are nearer to the exact solution of the zero-dimensional Landau-Ginsburg model. (author)

  19. The W40 region in the gould belt: An embedded cluster and H II region at the junction of filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Kumar, M. S. N. [Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 s/n Porto (Portugal); Bachiller, Rafael [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional (IGN), Alfonso XII 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Samal, M. R. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille), UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Pirogov, L., E-mail: kshitiz@tifr.res.in [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Uljanov str., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the W40 star-forming region using infrared (IR) observations in the UKIRT JHK bands, Spitzer Infrared Array Camera bands, and Herschel PACS bands, 2.12 μm H{sub 2} narrowband imaging, and radio continuum observations from GMRT (610 and 1280 MHz), in a field of view (FoV) of ∼34' × 40'. Archival Spitzer observations in conjunction with near-IR observations are used to identify 1162 Class II/III and 40 Class I sources in the FoV. The nearest-neighbor stellar surface density analysis shows that the majority of these young stellar objects (YSOs) constitute the embedded cluster centered on the high-mass source IRS 1A South. Some YSOs, predominantly the younger population, are distributed along and trace the filamentary structures at lower stellar surface density. The cluster radius is measured to be 0.44 pc—matching well with the extent of radio emission—with a peak density of 650 pc{sup –2}. The JHK data are used to map the extinction in the region, which is subsequently used to compute the cloud mass—126 M {sub ☉} and 71 M {sub ☉} for the central cluster and the northern IRS 5 region, respectively. H{sub 2} narrowband imaging shows significant emission, which prominently resembles fluorescent emission arising at the borders of dense regions. Radio continuum analysis shows that this region has a blister morphology, with the radio peak coinciding with a protostellar source. Free-free emission spectral energy distribution analysis is used to obtain physical parameters of the overall photoionized region and the IRS 5 sub-region. This multiwavelength scenario is suggestive of star formation having resulted from the merging of multiple filaments to form a hub. Star formation seems to have taken place in two successive epochs, with the first epoch traced by the central cluster and the high-mass star(s)—followed by a second epoch that is spreading into the filaments as uncovered by the Class I sources and even

  20. THE ORION H ii REGION AND THE ORION BAR IN THE MID-INFRARED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, F.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Berné, O.; Adams, J. D.; Herter, T. L.; Keller, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    We present mid-infrared photometry of the Orion bar obtained with the Faint Object infraRed Camera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) on board SOFIA at 6.4, 6.6, 7.7, 19.7, 31.5, and 37.1 μ m. By complementing this observation with archival FORCAST and Herschel /PACS images, we are able to construct a complete infrared spectral energy distribution of the Huygens region in the Orion nebula. Comparing the infrared images with gas tracers, we find that PACS maps trace the molecular cloud, while the FORCAST data trace the photodissociation region (PDR) and the H ii region. Analysis of the energetics of the region reveal that the PDR extends for 0.28 pc along the line of sight and that the bar is inclined at an angle of 4°. The infrared and submillimeter images reveal that the Orion bar represents a swept-up shell with a thickness of 0.1 pc. The mass of the shell implies a shock velocity of ≃3 km s −1 and an age of ≃10 5 years for the H ii region. Our analysis shows that the UV and infrared dust opacities in the H ii region and the PDR are a factor 5 to 10 lower than in the diffuse interstellar medium. In the ionized gas, Ly α photons are a major source of dust heating at distances larger than ≃0.06 pc from θ 1 Ori C. Dust temperatures can be explained if the size of the grains is between 0.1 and 1 μ m. We derive the photoelectric heating efficiency of the atomic gas in the Orion bar. The results are in good qualitative agreement with models and the quantitative differences indicate a decreased polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon abundance in this region.

  1. THE ORION H ii REGION AND THE ORION BAR IN THE MID-INFRARED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, F.; Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, University of Leiden, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Berné, O. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Adams, J. D.; Herter, T. L. [Astronomy Department, 202 Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Keller, L. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    We present mid-infrared photometry of the Orion bar obtained with the Faint Object infraRed Camera for the SOFIA Telescope (FORCAST) on board SOFIA at 6.4, 6.6, 7.7, 19.7, 31.5, and 37.1 μ m. By complementing this observation with archival FORCAST and Herschel /PACS images, we are able to construct a complete infrared spectral energy distribution of the Huygens region in the Orion nebula. Comparing the infrared images with gas tracers, we find that PACS maps trace the molecular cloud, while the FORCAST data trace the photodissociation region (PDR) and the H ii region. Analysis of the energetics of the region reveal that the PDR extends for 0.28 pc along the line of sight and that the bar is inclined at an angle of 4°. The infrared and submillimeter images reveal that the Orion bar represents a swept-up shell with a thickness of 0.1 pc. The mass of the shell implies a shock velocity of ≃3 km s{sup −1} and an age of ≃10{sup 5} years for the H ii region. Our analysis shows that the UV and infrared dust opacities in the H ii region and the PDR are a factor 5 to 10 lower than in the diffuse interstellar medium. In the ionized gas, Ly α photons are a major source of dust heating at distances larger than ≃0.06 pc from θ {sup 1} Ori C. Dust temperatures can be explained if the size of the grains is between 0.1 and 1 μ m. We derive the photoelectric heating efficiency of the atomic gas in the Orion bar. The results are in good qualitative agreement with models and the quantitative differences indicate a decreased polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon abundance in this region.

  2. PROPERTIES OF THE COMPACT H II REGION COMPLEX G-0.02-0.07

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, E.; Morris, M. R.; Lang, C. C.; Dong, H.; Wang, Q. D.; Cotera, A.; Stolovy, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    We present new extinction maps and high-resolution Paschen-alpha images of G-0.02-0.07, a complex of compact H II regions located adjacent to the M-0.02-0.07 giant molecular cloud, 6 pc in projection from the center of the Galaxy. These H II regions, which lie in projection just outside the boundary of the Sgr A East supernova remnant, represent one of the most recent episodes of star formation in the central parsecs of the Galaxy. The 1.87 μm extinctions of regions A, B, and C are almost identical, approximately 3.7 mag. Region D, in contrast, has a peak extinction of A 1.87 = 5.9 mag. Adopting an extinction law specific to the Galactic center, we find that these extinctions correspond to visual extinctions of A V = 45 and A V = 71. The similar and uniform extinctions of regions A, B, and C are consistent with that expected for foreground extinction in the direction of the Galactic center, suggesting that they lie at the front side of the M-0.02-0.07 molecular cloud. Region D is more compact, has a higher extinction, and is thus suspected to be younger and embedded in a dense core in a compressed ridge on the western edge of this cloud.

  3. Temperature and emission-line structure at the edges of H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallik, D.C.V.

    1975-01-01

    Models of ionization fronts located at the edges of expanding H ii regions are presented. These fronts are of the weak D-type and are preceded by shocks in the H i clouds. Since the energy input time is smaller than the cooling time, the gas is found to heat up to a high temperature immediately following ionization. At the trailing edge of the front, the temperature decreases and the ionized gas merges with the main bulk of the nebula where the physical processes are in equilibrium. The emission in O ii and N ii lines is greatly enhanced because of the high temperature at the front. The emission in these and other important lines is calculated and compared with Hβ. Effects of different velocities of flow, of different exciting stars, and of different gas densities on the structure of the fronts are also investigated

  4. Design and field measurement of the BEPC-II interaction region dual-aperture quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Z.S.; Wu, Y.Z.; Zhang, J.F.; Chen, W.; Li, Y.J.; Li, L.; Hou, R.; Yin, B.G.; Sun, X.J.; Ren, F.L.; Wang, F.A.; Chen, F.S.; Yu, C.H.; Chen, C.

    2007-01-01

    With the Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgrade project (BEPC-II), two dual-aperture septum-style quadrupole magnets are used in the interaction region for the final focusing of the electron and positron beams. The BEPC-II lattice design calls for the same high quality integral quadrupole field and large good field region in both apertures for each magnet. Two-dimensional contour optimization and pole-end chamfer iteration are used to minimize the systematic harmonic errors. Unexpected non-systematic errors induced by the unsymmetrical structure and the manufacturing errors are compensated with the pole-end shimming. Magnet measurements with rotating coils are performed to guide and confirm the magnet design. This paper discusses the design consideration, optimizing procedure and measurement results of these dual-aperture magnets

  5. Microstructural analysis of the type-II boundary region in Alloy 152 weld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The weld metals are more susceptible to SCC growth and that most cracks are blunted by the fusion boundary. However, they also found that some cracking occurs along the fusion boundary, often in an area with high hardness. Nelson et al. investigated a DMW of Monel 409 stainless steel and American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 1080 alloy and found a type-II boundary, which exists parallel to the fusion boundary in the dilution zone. They conclude that the type-II boundary is a potential path for crack growth. While there are several theories for the mechanisms of the type-II boundary formation, they conclude that the type-II boundary forms from the allotropic δ-γ transformation at the base metal in the elevated austenitic temperature range. As the operation time of nuclear power plants using DMWs of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B increases, these DMWs must be evaluated for their resistance to SCC for long-term operations. However, only few studies have investigated the thermal aging effects induced by long-term operations at high temperature. Type-II boundary is known as a potential crack path from the results of crack growth test at DMW without any heat treatment. So the analysis about type-II boundary with applying heat treatment could be helpful to evaluate the susceptibility to SCC of structural materials. The objective of this study is to analyze the detailed microstructure of the type-II boundary region in the DMW of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B, after applying heat treatment simulating thermal aging effect of a nuclear power plant operation condition to evaluate the susceptibility of this region to SCC. The microstructure of the type-II boundary region in the DMW of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B were analyzed with an energy dispersive x-ray spectroscope attached to a scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and a nanoindentation test. Microstructural, grain boundary orientation, nanohardness analysis were conducted in the type-II

  6. Microstructural analysis of the type-II boundary region in Alloy 152 weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seung Chang; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The weld metals are more susceptible to SCC growth and that most cracks are blunted by the fusion boundary. However, they also found that some cracking occurs along the fusion boundary, often in an area with high hardness. Nelson et al. investigated a DMW of Monel 409 stainless steel and American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 1080 alloy and found a type-II boundary, which exists parallel to the fusion boundary in the dilution zone. They conclude that the type-II boundary is a potential path for crack growth. While there are several theories for the mechanisms of the type-II boundary formation, they conclude that the type-II boundary forms from the allotropic δ-γ transformation at the base metal in the elevated austenitic temperature range. As the operation time of nuclear power plants using DMWs of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B increases, these DMWs must be evaluated for their resistance to SCC for long-term operations. However, only few studies have investigated the thermal aging effects induced by long-term operations at high temperature. Type-II boundary is known as a potential crack path from the results of crack growth test at DMW without any heat treatment. So the analysis about type-II boundary with applying heat treatment could be helpful to evaluate the susceptibility to SCC of structural materials. The objective of this study is to analyze the detailed microstructure of the type-II boundary region in the DMW of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B, after applying heat treatment simulating thermal aging effect of a nuclear power plant operation condition to evaluate the susceptibility of this region to SCC. The microstructure of the type-II boundary region in the DMW of Alloy 152 and A533 Gr. B were analyzed with an energy dispersive x-ray spectroscope attached to a scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and a nanoindentation test. Microstructural, grain boundary orientation, nanohardness analysis were conducted in the type-II

  7. Radio observations of H II regions and some related theoretical work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezger, P.G.; Wink, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper the whole complex of radio and IR sources associated with an O-star is referred to as H II region. Radio continuum observations are widely used for the interpretation of IR-observations. Thus, this review is limited to recent high frequency single dish observations and aperture synthesis observations. Recent developments in the field of radio recombination line observations and their application to the interpretation of IR-observations are discussed. (G.T.H.)

  8. H II regions and the extinction of Cepheids in NGC 2403

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCall, M L

    1984-04-15

    Spectrophotometric observations of H II regions can be used to constrain the extinction of Population I objects in external galaxies. An analysis of NGC 2403 reveals that the Cepheids used to determine the distance are reddened on average by less than 0.2 mag. Either they are redder intrinsically than the Cepheids used to calibrate the PLC relation, or their photometry suffers from systematic errors.

  9. Internal motions in H II regions. XI. The emission nebula sharpless 206

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pismis, P.; Hasse, I.

    1982-01-01

    Radial velocities at 142 points are obtained on the H II region S206 by photographic Fabry-Perot interferometry using the reflectors with apertures of 2.1 meters at San Pedro Martir and 1 m at Tonantzintla. The overall velocity agrees with previous determinations. Our velocities cover the western faint extensions of the nebula not studied hitherto. The velocity field is consistent with a directional expansion of S206. (author)

  10. Observations of ultraviolet spectra of H II regions and galaxies with IUE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondhalekar, P.M.

    1982-08-01

    The ultraviolet spectra, obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer, of a sample of H II regions and the nuclear regions of spiral and elliptical galaxies are described. The star formation rates in the nuclei of spiral galaxies are similar to the star formation rate in the solar neighbourhood. The data indicate that the current thinking on the synthesis of carbon and nitrogen in galaxies has to be revised and the K-corrections determined from the ultraviolet spectra of galaxies when compared with the photometry of distant galaxies suggests colour evolution of galaxies at z > 0.3. (author)

  11. "Slicer" for EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    During the design of the Electron-Positron-Accumulator (EPA), there was an apprehension about the stability-limit of positron bunch-intensity in the SPS. In case that EPA would be able to produce bunches with intensities exceeding what the SPS could digest, an electrostatic septum was to slice up the EPA beam over 2 or 4 turns, thus lowering the bunch intensity while maintaining fast filling of LEP. The "slicer" septum was built and installed, but thanks to the good appetite of the SPS its use never became necessary. The slicer was removed from EPA to lower the machine impedance.

  12. EPA Envirofacts API

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Envirofacts integrates information from a variety of EPA's environmental databases. Each of these databases contains information about facilities that are required...

  13. Models of infrared emission from dusty and diffuse H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aannestad, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    Models for the infrared emission from amorphous core-mantle dust within diffuse (n/sub e/ 3 cm -3 ) H II regions with neutral shells that are optically thin in the infrared have been calculated. The icy mantles sublimate only within a fractional radius of 0.2--0.5, affecting the overall gas-to-dust ratio only slightly. A region with variable grain composition may have a much smaller infrared luminosity than a similar region with uniform grain properties. Calculations of the total infrared luminosity, the relative contribution by Lα photons, the infrared spectral distribution, and the size of the dust-depleted regions are presented as functions of the ultraviolet optical depths in the ionized and neutral regions and for stellar temperatures of 35,000 and 48,000 K. Comparison with observations indicate that at least 20% of the Lyman-continuum photons are absorbed by the dust, and that the dust optical depth in the Lyman continuum is likely to be of the order of unity. For core-mantle grains most of the infrared energy is emitted between 30 and 70 μm, relatively independent of whether the dust is within or outside the H II region. Amorphous silicate particles tend to emit more energy below 30 μm, but also emit efficiently at far-infrared wavelengths. In order to illustrate the model calculations, we present infrared spectra for the Orion A region and compare them with observed fluxed, accounting for beam-width effects. A reasonable agreement is obtained with most of the near- to middle-infrared observations if the total ultraviolet optical depth is about unity and about equally divided between the ionized region and an outside neutral shell. Intensity profiles for Orion A are presented for wavelengths in the ragne 20--1000 μm, and show a strong increase in width beyond 20 μm

  14. Selected Regional Judicial Officer Cases, 2005 - Present

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset contains selected cases involving EPA's Regional Judicial Officers (RJOs) from 2005 to present. EPA's Regional Judicial Officers (RJOs) perform...

  15. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Marzone Inc. /Chevron Chemical Company Superfund Site, Operable Unit 1, Tifton, GA, September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-30

    This decision document (Record of Decision) presents the selected remedial action for the Marzone, Inc./Chevron Chemical Company Site in Tift County, Georgia. EPA has organized the work at this Site into two phases or operable units (OUs). Operable Unit No. 1 involves contamination on the 1.68-acre former Marzone pesticide blending area, part of the Slack Property, and railroad drainage ditch past the southwest corner of the horse pasture, and contaminated groundwater related to the Site. This first operable unit is broken down into two separate remedies; one for groundwater and the other for soil.

  16. The role of stellar feedback in the dynamics of H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Laura A.; Castro, Daniel; Krumholz, Mark R.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Bolatto, Alberto D.

    2014-01-01

    Stellar feedback is often cited as the biggest uncertainty in galaxy formation models today. This uncertainty stems from a dearth of observational constraints as well as the great dynamic range between the small scales (≲1 pc) where the feedback originates and the large scales of galaxies (≳1 kpc) that are shaped by this feedback. To bridge this divide, in this paper we aim to assess observationally the role of stellar feedback at the intermediate scales of H II regions (∼10-100 pc). In particular, we employ multiwavelength data to examine several stellar feedback mechanisms in a sample of 32 H II regions (with ages ∼3-10 Myr) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, respectively. Using optical, infrared, radio, and X-ray images, we measure the pressures exerted on the shells from the direct stellar radiation, the dust-processed radiation, the warm ionized gas, and the hot X-ray-emitting gas. We find that the warm ionized gas dominates over the other terms in all of the sources, although two have comparable dust-processed radiation pressures to their warm gas pressures. The hot gas pressures are comparatively weak, while the direct radiation pressures are one to two orders of magnitude below the other terms. We discuss the implications of these results, particularly highlighting evidence for hot gas leakage from the H II shells and regarding the momentum deposition from the dust-processed radiation to the warm gas. Furthermore, we emphasize that similar observational work should be done on very young H II regions to test whether direct radiation pressure and hot gas can drive the dynamics at early times.

  17. Environmental monitoring survey of oil and gas fields in Region II in 2009. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-03-15

    The oil companies Statoil ASA, ExxonMobil Exploration and Production Norway AS, Total E&P Norge AS, Talisman Energy Norge AS and Marathon Petroleum Norge AS commissioned Section of Applied Environmental Research at UNI RESEARCH AS to undertake the monitoring survey of Region II in 2009. Similar monitoring surveys in Region II have been carried out in 1996, 2000, 2003 and 2006. The survey in 2009 included in total 18 fields: Rev, Varg, Sigyn, Sleipner Vest, Sleipner OEst, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Vale, Skirne, Byggve, Heimdal, Volve, Vilje og Alvheim. Sampling was conducted from the vessel MV Libas between May 18 and May 27. Samples were collected from in totally 137 sampling sites, of which 15 were regional sampling sites. Samples for chemical analysis were collected at all sites, whereas samples for benthos analysis were collected at 12 fields. As in previous surveys, Region II is divided into natural sub-regions. One sub-region is shallow (77-96 m) sub-region, a central sub-region (107-130 m) and a northern subregion (115-119 m). The sediments of the shallow sub-region had relatively lower content of TOM and pelite and higher content of fine sand than the central and northern sub-regions. Calculated areas of contamination are shown for the sub-regions in Table 1.1. The fields Sigyn, Sleipner Alfa Nord, Glitne, Grane, Balder, Ringhorne, Jotun, Skirne, Byggve, Vilje og Alvheim showed no contamination of THC. At the other fields there were minor changes from 2006. The concentrations of barium increased in the central sub-region from 2006 to 2009, also at fields where no drilling had been undertaken during the last years. The same laboratory and methods are used during the three last regional investigations. The changes in barium concentrations may be due to high variability of barium concentrations in the sediments. This is supported by relatively large variations in average barium concentrations at the regional sampling sites in

  18. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE GALACTIC H II REGION Sh2-297

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Dewangan, L. K.; Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Bhatt, B. C.; Ghosh, S. K.; Tamura, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the Galactic H II region Sh2-297, located in the Canis Major OB1 complex. Optical spectroscopic observations are used to constrain the spectral type of ionizing star HD 53623 as B0V. The classical nature of this H II region is affirmed by the low values of electron density and emission measure, which are calculated to be 756 cm –3 and 9.15 × 10 5 cm –6 pc using the radio continuum observations at 610 and 1280 MHz, and Very Large Array archival data at 1420 MHz. To understand local star formation, we identified the young stellar object (YSO) candidates in a region of area ∼7.'5 × 7.'5 centered on Sh2-297 using grism slitless spectroscopy (to identify the Hα emission line stars), and near infrared (NIR) observations. NIR YSO candidates are further classified into various evolutionary stages using color-color and color-magnitude (CM) diagrams, giving 50 red sources (H – K > 0.6) and 26 Class II-like sources. The mass and age range of the YSOs are estimated to be ∼0.1-2 M ☉ and 0.5-2 Myr using optical (V/V–I) and NIR (J/J–H) CM diagrams. The mean age of the YSOs is found to be ∼1 Myr, which is of the order of dynamical age of 1.07 Myr of the H II region. Using the estimated range of visual extinction (1.1-25 mag) from literature and NIR data for the region, spectral energy distribution models have been implemented for selected YSOs which show masses and ages to be consistent with estimated values. The spatial distribution of YSOs shows an evolutionary sequence, suggesting triggered star formation in the region. The star formation seems to have propagated from the ionizing star toward the cold dark cloud LDN1657A located west of Sh2-297.

  19. Characterization of class II alpha genes and DLA-D region allelic associations in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, U M; Storb, R F

    1988-10-01

    Human major histocompatibility complex (HLA) cDNA probes were used to analyze the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the alpha genes of the DLA-D region in dogs. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood leucocytes of 23 unrelated DLA-D homozygous dogs representing nine DLA-D types (defined by mixed leucocyte reaction) was digested with restriction enzymes (BamHI, EcoRI, Hind III, Pvu II, Taq I, Rsa I, Msp I, Pst I and Bgl II), separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and transferred onto Biotrace membrane. The Southern blots were successively hybridized with radiolabelled HLA cDNA probes corresponding to DQ, DP, DZ and DR alpha genes. Clear evidence was obtained for the canine homologues of DQ and DR alpha genes with simple bi- or tri-allelic polymorphism respectively. Evidence for a single, nonpolymorphic DP alpha gene was also obtained. However, the presence of a DZ alpha gene could not be clearly demonstrated in canine genomic DNA. This report extends our previous RFLP analysis documenting polymorphism of DLA class II beta genes in the same panel of homozygous typing cell dogs, and provides the basis for DLA-D genotyping at a population level. This study also characterizes the RFLP-defined preferential allelic associations across the DLA-D region in nine different homozygous typing cell specificities.

  20. High resolution far-infrared observations of the evolved H II region M16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBreen, B.; Fazio, G.G.; Jaffe, D.T.

    1982-01-01

    M16 is an evolved, extremely density bounded H II region, which now consists only of a series of ionization fronts at molecular cloud boundaries. The source of ionization is the OB star cluster (NGC 6611) which is about 5 x 10 6 years old. We used the CFA/UA 102 cm balloon-borne telescope to map this region and detected three far-infrared (far-IR) sources embedded in an extended ridge of emission. Source I is an unresolved far-IR source embedded in a molecular cloud near a sharp ionization front. An H 2 O maser is associated with this source, but no radio continuum emission has been observed. The other two far-IR sources (II and III) are associated with ionized gas-molecular cloud interfaces, with the far-IR radiation arising from dust at the boundary heated by the OB cluster. Source II is located at the southern prominent neutral intrusion with its associated bright rims and dark ''elephant trunk'' globules that delineate the current progress of the ionization front into the neutral material, and Source III arises at the interface of the northern molecular cloud fragment

  1. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Ciba-Geigy Site (McIntosh Plant), Washington County, McIntosh, AL. (Third remedial action), July 1992. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1,500-acre Ciba-Geigy site is an active chemical manufacturer in an industrial area in McIntosh, Washington County, Alabama. A wetlands area borders the site property, and part of the site lies within the floodplain of the Tombigbee River. In 1985, EPA issued a RCRA permit that included a corrective action plan requiring Ciba-Geigy to remove and treat ground water and surface water contamination at the site. Further investigations by EPA revealed 11 former waste management areas of potential contamination onsite. These areas contain a variety of waste, debris, pesticide by-products and residues. The ROD addresses a final remedy for OU4, which includes contaminated soil and sludge in former waste management Area 8 and the upper dilute ditch. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sludge, and debris are VOCs, including benzene, toluene, and xylenes; other organics, including pesticides; metals, including arsenic, chromium, and lead; and inorganics, including cyanide. The selected remedial action for the site are included

  2. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Denver Radium/Card Corporation Property, Colorado (third remedial action), June 1987. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Denver Radium/Card Corporation property is a 17.2-acre site located in Denver, Colorado. In 1979, the EPA discovered a reference to the National Radium Institute in 1916 U.S. Bureau of Mines report. Subsequent field research revealed the presence of thirty-one radioactive sites in the Denver Metropolitan area, one of these being Card property, the location of the original Pittsburgh Radium Company processing facility. The site consists of five buildings and an oil and waste water pond at the eastern boundary. There is no serious public health risk at present from radium or its decay products, most notable radion gas. However, there is the potential for increased public health risk if the radium contaminated materials are misused or inadvertently spread. Currently, radium has been detected in the soil, sediment, and underneath the True Truss building. EPA's preferred remedial action for the Card property is permanent offsite disposal. However, the alternative can not be implemented until a suitable offsite facility is designated

  3. MOPRA CO OBSERVATIONS OF THE BUBBLE H II REGION RCW 120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Deharveng, L.; Zavagno, A. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Tremblin, P. [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay (CEA/Irfu - Uni. Paris Diderot - CNRS/INSU), Centre d' etudes de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Lowe, V.; Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Mullins, A. M. [Irish Research CouncilEMBARK Scholar, at NUI Galway, Galway (Ireland); Redman, M. P. [Director, Centre for Astronomy, NUI Galway, Galway (Ireland)

    2015-02-20

    We use the Mopra radio telescope to test for expansion of the molecular gas associated with the bubble H II region RCW 120. A ring, or bubble, morphology is common for Galactic H II regions, but the three-dimensional geometry of such objects is still unclear. Detected near- and far-side expansion of the associated molecular material would be consistent with a three-dimensional spherical object. We map the J = 1 → 0 transitions of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O, and C{sup 17}O, and detect emission from all isotopologues. We do not detect the 0{sub 0} → 1{sub –1} E masing lines of CH{sub 3}OH at 108.8939 GHz. The strongest CO emission is from the photo-dissociation region (PDR), and there is a deficit of emission toward the bubble interior. We find no evidence for expansion of the molecular material associated with RCW 120 and therefore can make no claims about its geometry. The lack of detected expansion is roughly in agreement with models for the time-evolution of an H II region like RCW 120, and is consistent with an expansion speed of ≲ 1.5 km s{sup –1}. Single-position CO spectra show signatures of expansion, which underscores the importance of mapped spectra for such work. Dust temperature enhancements outside the PDR of RCW 120 coincide with a deficit of emission in CO, confirming that these temperature enhancements are due to holes in the RCW 120 PDR. H-alpha emission shows that RCW 120 is leaking ∼5% of the ionizing photons into the interstellar medium (ISM) through PDR holes at the locations of the temperature enhancements. Hα emission also shows a diffuse 'halo' from leaked photons not associated with discrete holes in the PDR. Overall ∼25% ± 10% of all ionizing photons are leaking into the nearby ISM.

  4. MOPRA CO OBSERVATIONS OF THE BUBBLE H II REGION RCW 120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Deharveng, L.; Zavagno, A.; Tremblin, P.; Lowe, V.; Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P.; Mullins, A. M.; Redman, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    We use the Mopra radio telescope to test for expansion of the molecular gas associated with the bubble H II region RCW 120. A ring, or bubble, morphology is common for Galactic H II regions, but the three-dimensional geometry of such objects is still unclear. Detected near- and far-side expansion of the associated molecular material would be consistent with a three-dimensional spherical object. We map the J = 1 → 0 transitions of 12 CO, 13 CO, C 18 O, and C 17 O, and detect emission from all isotopologues. We do not detect the 0 0 → 1 –1 E masing lines of CH 3 OH at 108.8939 GHz. The strongest CO emission is from the photo-dissociation region (PDR), and there is a deficit of emission toward the bubble interior. We find no evidence for expansion of the molecular material associated with RCW 120 and therefore can make no claims about its geometry. The lack of detected expansion is roughly in agreement with models for the time-evolution of an H II region like RCW 120, and is consistent with an expansion speed of ≲ 1.5 km s –1 . Single-position CO spectra show signatures of expansion, which underscores the importance of mapped spectra for such work. Dust temperature enhancements outside the PDR of RCW 120 coincide with a deficit of emission in CO, confirming that these temperature enhancements are due to holes in the RCW 120 PDR. H-alpha emission shows that RCW 120 is leaking ∼5% of the ionizing photons into the interstellar medium (ISM) through PDR holes at the locations of the temperature enhancements. Hα emission also shows a diffuse 'halo' from leaked photons not associated with discrete holes in the PDR. Overall ∼25% ± 10% of all ionizing photons are leaking into the nearby ISM

  5. Nonattainment Areas in Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, EPA (2006) [Nonattainment_LA_EPA_2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — EPA Region 6 NonAttainment Areas in Louisiana, current as of May 2006. This shapefile contains parish boundaries and attributes that determine whether the parishes...

  6. M101: Spectral Observations of H II Regions and Their Physical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ning; Wang, Enci; Lin, Zesen; Kong, Xu; Cheng, Fuzhen; Fan, Zou; Fang, Guangwen; Lin, Lin; Mao, Yewei; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Zhiming; Zhu, Yinan; Zou, Hu

    2018-02-01

    By using the Hectospec 6.5 m Multiple Mirror Telescope and the 2.16 m telescope of the National Astronomical Observatories, of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, we obtained 188 high signal-to-noise ratio spectra of {{H}} {{II}} regions in the nearby galaxy M101, which is the largest spectroscopic sample of {{H}} {{II}} regions for this galaxy so far. These spectra cover a wide range of regions on M101, which enables us to analyze two-dimensional distributions of its physical properties. The physical parameters are derived from emission lines or stellar continua, including stellar population age, electron temperature, oxygen abundance, etc. The oxygen abundances are derived using two empirical methods based on O3N2 and R 23 indicators, as well as the direct {T}e method when [{{O}} {{III}}] λ 4363 is available. By applying the harmonic decomposition analysis to the velocity field, we obtained a line-of-sight rotation velocity of 71 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and a position angle of 36°. The stellar age profile shows an old stellar population in the galaxy center and a relatively young stellar population in outer regions, suggesting an old bulge and a young disk. The oxygen abundance profile exhibits a clear break at ∼18 kpc, with a gradient of ‑0.0364 dex kpc‑1 in the inner region and ‑0.00686 dex kpc‑1 in the outer region. Our results agree with the “inside-out” disk growth scenario of M101.

  7. Radiation transport in dense interstellar dust clouds. II. Infrared emission from molecular clouds associated with H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    Theoretical models are constructed to study the distribution of grain temperature (T/sub d/) and infrared emission from molecular clouds associated with H II regions (with embedded O: B stars). The effects of the following parameters on the temperature structure and the emergent spectrum are studied: grain type (graphite, silicate, and core-mantle grains), optical depth, density inhomogeneity, cloud size, anisotropic scattering, radiation field anisotropy, and characteristics of central heat source. T/sub d/ varies from approximately-greater-than100 K to approximately-less-than20 K throughout the major portion of a cloud, and dielectric grains attain lower temperatures. Due to an inward increase in T/sub d/, the radiation field is strongly forward-peaking, thereby producing a pronounced limb-darkening in the surface brightness. Important features of the computed emission spectra from typical models are compared with available observations, and the importance of beam dilution is emphasized. Theoretical surface brightnesses at selected infrared wavelengths are also presented. The outward radiation pressure on the dust grains is found to exceed the self-gravitational force of the gas over a large portion of a cloud, thus possibly causing the gas in the inner region to expand. Assumptions commonly used in the analysis of infrared observations are examined. Finally, observational methods of deriving the temperature structure (from color and brightness temperatures in the far-infrared), density distribution (from surface brightness at lambdaapproximately-greater-than1 mm), and optical depth (from multiaperture photometry) for the dust component in simple sources are discussed

  8. EPA Linked Open Data (Collection)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a collection item referencing the following EPA Linked Data resources: - EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS) - EPA Substance Registry Service (SRS) -...

  9. EPA Library Network Communication Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    To establish Agency-wide procedures for the EPA National Library Network libraries to communicate, using a range of established mechanisms, with other EPA libraries, EPA staff, organizations and the public.

  10. EPA requirements for the uranium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunster, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    The draft Environmental Statement issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the United States in preparation for Proposed Rulemaking Action concerning 'Environmental radiation protection requirements for normal operations of activities in the uranium fuel cycle' is summarized and discussed. The standards proposed by the EPA limit the annual dose equivalents to any member of the public, and also the releases of radionuclides to the 'general environment' for each gigawatt year of electrical energy produced. These standards were based on cost effectiveness arguements and levels and correspond to the ICRP recommendation to keep all exposures as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. They should be clearly distinguished from dose limits, although the EPA does not make this at all clear. The EPA seems to have shown an unexpected lack of understanding of the recommendations of ICRP Publication 9 (1965) and an apparent unawareness of ICRP Publication 22 (1973), and has therefore wrongly presented the new standards as a significant change in policy. The EPA has reviewed the information on the likely level of dose equivalents to members of the public and the likely cost reductions, thereby quantifying existing principles as applied to the fuel cycle as a whole. The EPA has stated that its proposals could be achieved as a cost in the region of Pound100,000 per death (or major genetic defect). It is pointed out that the EPA's use of the term 'waste' to exclude liquid and gaseous effluents may cause confusion. (U.K.)

  11. Triggering the formation of the supergiant H II region NGC 604 in M 33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachihara, Kengo; Gratier, Pierre; Sano, Hidetoshi; Tsuge, Kisetsu; Miura, Rie E.; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Fukui, Yasuo

    2018-05-01

    Formation mechanism of a supergiant H II region NGC 604 is discussed in terms of collision of H I clouds in M 33. An analysis of the archival H I data obtained with the Very Large Array (VLA) reveals complex velocity distributions around NGC 604. The H I clouds are composed of two velocity components separated by ˜20 km s-1 for an extent of ˜700 pc, beyond the size of the the H II region. Although the H I clouds are not easily separated in velocity with some mixed component represented by merged line profiles, the atomic gas mass amounts to 6 × 106 M_{⊙} and 9 × 106 M_{⊙} for each component. These characteristics of H I gas and the distributions of dense molecular gas in the overlapping regions of the two velocity components suggest that the formation of giant molecular clouds and the following massive cluster formation have been induced by the collision of H I clouds with different velocities. Referring to the existence of a gas bridging feature connecting M 33 with M 31 reported by large-scale H I surveys, the disturbed atomic gas possibly represents the result of past tidal interaction between the two galaxies, which is analogous to the formation of the R 136 cluster in the LMC.

  12. [The mutations of the D-loop hypervariable region II and hypervariable region III of mitochondrial DNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Zhong; Jia, Mu-Yun; Yuan, Rong-Tao; Han, Guo-Dong; Bu, Ling-Xue

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the frequency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop hypervariable region II (HVR II) and hypervariable region III (HVR III) mutations in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and their correlation to provide the new targets for the prevention and treatment of OSCC. The D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions of mtDNA in seven cases with OSCC tissues, matched with paracancerous tissues and normal mucosa tissues from the same case, were amplified by polymerase chain raction (PCR), then were detected by direct sequencing to find the mutantsites after the comparison of all sequencing results with the mtDNA Cambridge sequence in the GenBank database. 82 (56 species) nucleotide changes, with 51(26 species) nucleotide polymorphism, were found after the comparison of all sequencing results with the mtDNA Cambridge sequence in the GenBank database. 31(30 species) mutations, with 21 located within the HVR II and HVR III regions, were found in 3 tumor tissue samples, their paracancerous and normal mucosa tissue were found more polymorphic changes but no mutation. The mtDNA D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions mutation rate was 42.9% (3/7) in OSCC. The mtDNA D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions were highly polymorphic and mutable regions in OSCC. It suggested that the D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions of mtDNA might play a significant role in the tumorigenesis of OSCC. It may become new targets for the gene therapy of OSCC by regulating the above indexes.

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA region 2): Glen Ridge Radium site, Essex County, NJ. (Second remedial action), June 1990. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The 90-acre Glen Ridge Radium site is a residential community in the Borough of Glen Ridge, Essex County, New Jersey. The site is adjacent to another Superfund site, the Montclair/West Orange site. The Glen Ridge site includes a community of 274 properties serviced by surface reservoirs in northern New Jersey. In the early 1900s, a radium processing or utilization facility was located in the vicinity of the site. EPA investigations in 1981 and 1983 confirmed the presence of gamma radiation contamination in the Glen Ridge area and in several adjacent houses. The ROD complements the previous 1989 ROD for this site and provides a final remedy. The primary contaminant of concern affecting the soil is radium 226

  14. GIANT H II REGIONS IN M101. I. X-RAY ANALYSIS OF HOT GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wei; Chen Yang; Feng Li; Chu, You-Hua; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Wang, Q. Daniel; Li Jiangtao

    2012-01-01

    We performed a Chandra X-ray study of three giant H II regions (GHRs), NGC 5461, NGC 5462, and NGC 5471, in the spiral galaxy M101. The X-ray spectra of the three GHRs all contain a prominent thermal component with a temperature of ∼0.2 keV. In NGC 5461, the spatial distribution of the soft ( 52 erg, is consistent with a hypernova origin. In addition, a bright source in the field of NGC 5462 has been identified as a background active galactic nucleus, instead of a black hole X-ray binary in M101.

  15. WTO’s information technology agreement (ITA and its expansion (ITA II: multilateralizing regionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Capucio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bearing in mind the complex context of the relationship between multilateralism and regionalism, the conclusion of plurilateral agreements within the WTO, open to participation of all interested members, offers a multilateral perspective of regionalism, in which the benefits of partial consensus are to be extended to the multilateral sphere. The ITA - Information Technology Agreement - is mentioned as an example of this possibility, and its recent expansion, through the negotiation of the ITA II, demonstrates the strengthening of this multilateralisation trend of regionalism, although with special features. Thus, this article is developed drawing the context and introduction of the theme of regionalism and multilateralism, and presents the theory of multilateralisation of regionalism and the ITA as one of those experiences, and its recent expansion as a resumption of the relevance of this theory. Considering the impasses for the conclusion of the Doha Round, the expansion of these partial consensus and the continuation of negotiations at the World Trade Organization by the conclusion of sectoral plurilateral agreements emerges as a possible way out, which demands a re-architecture of the interpretation of the role of the WTO in the global economic governance.

  16. Chronic pain and evoked responses in the brain: A magnetoencephalographic study in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome I and II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theuvenet, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type I and II are chronic pain syndromes with comparable symptoms, only in CRPS II a peripheral nerve injury is present. No objective tests are currently available to differentiate the two types which hampers diagnosis and treatment. Non-invasive brain imaging

  17. Far-infrared observations of M17: The interaction of an H II region with a molecular cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatley, I.; Becklin, E.E.; Sellgren, K.; Werner, M.W.

    1979-01-01

    The central 15' of the M17 H II region--molecular cloud complex has been mapped with 1' resolution simultaneously at 30, 50, and 100 μm. The data suggest that the bulk of the luminosity radiated in the far-infrared is supplied by the exciting stars of the H II region; the far-infrared radiation is thermal emission from dust grains located chiefly outside the ionized gas. Large-scale systematic gradients in both the temperature and the column density of the dust are seen across the source. The appearance of the source in the far-infrared reflects the markedly nonuniform distribution of matter around the exciting stars; the H II region is bounded by the molecular cloud to the southwest. The core of the molecular cloud is heated primarily by infrared radiation from dust within and adjacent to the H II region; no evidence is seen for substantial luminosity sources embedded within the molecular cloud

  18. US EPA CARE Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a provisional dataset that contains point locations for the subset of Community Action for a Renewed Environment (CARE) grants given out by the US EPA. CARE...

  19. EPA User Personas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn how EPA's three web user personas (Information Consumer, Information Intermediary, and Information Interpreter) can help you identify appropriate top audiences and top tasks for a topic or web area.

  20. EPA's Efforts in Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has been collaborating with Russia, Central Asia, the Caucasus and Ukraine for over 20 years and continues to work with their governments and non-governmental organizations on environment, science and technology issues.

  1. US EPA EJ Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a provisional dataset that contains point locations for all Environmental Justice (EJ) grants given out by the US EPA. There are many limitations to the data...

  2. EPA Nanorelease Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPA Nanorelease Dataset. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Wohlleben, W., C. Kingston, J. Carter, E. Sahle-Demessie, S. Vazquez-Campos, B....

  3. Science Inventory | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Science Inventory is a searchable database of research products primarily from EPA's Office of Research and Development. Science Inventory records provide descriptions of the product, contact information, and links to available printed material or websites.

  4. EPA Recovery Mapper

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EPA Recovery Mapper is an Internet interactive mapping application that allows users to discover information about every American Recovery and Reinvestment Act...

  5. Images in the rocket ultraviolet - Young clusters in H II regions of M83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlin, R.C.; Cornett, R.H.; Hill, J.K.; Stecher, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    UV images of M83 at 1540 and 2360 A reveal 18 compact sources that are associated with H II regions. E(B - V) values were estimated individually from the observed UV and optical colors and the Galactic UV extinction curve, using theoretical flux distributions. The dereddened colors are consistent with ages up to 3 x 10 to the 6th yr. A maximum possible age of 6.5 x 10 to the 6th yr is obtained assuming foreground reddening only. The distribution of observed colors is consistent with the Galactic reddening curve but not with enhanced far-UV extinction, as in the LMC 30 Dor curve. The H-alpha fluxes suggest either that dust within the H II regions absorbs up to 70 percent of the Lyman continuum radiation or that a similar fraction of the H-alpha flux is below the surface brightness detection limit. Cluster mass estimates depend on the range of stellar masses present but are probably in the range 10,000-100,000 solar masses. 25 refs

  6. EPA Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemistry Laboratory (ECL) is a national program laboratory specializing in residue chemistry analysis under the jurisdiction of the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs in Washington, D.C. At Stennis Space Center, the laboratory's work supports many federal anti-pollution laws. The laboratory analyzes environmental and human samples to determine the presence and amount of agricultural chemicals and related substances. Pictured, ECL chemists analyze environmental and human samples for the presence of pesticides and other pollutants.

  7. EPA Region 2 and US Coast Guard Jurisdictional Boundaries for Emergency Response for New York and New Jersey [ER.COTPZONE_2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These boundaries reflect the July 26, 2006 Regional Response Team (RRT) Co-Chairs' Amednment to the Region Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan:...

  8. ANOMALOUS MICROWAVE EMISSION IN H ii REGIONS: IS IT REALLY ANOMALOUS? THE CASE OF RCW 49

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paladini, Roberta [Infrared Processing Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 770 South Wilson Ave., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ingallinera, Adriano; Agliozzo, Claudia; Umana, Grazia; Trigilio, Corrado [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania Italy (Italy); Tibbs, Christopher T. [Scientific Support Office, Directorate of Science and Robotic Exploration,European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA/ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Noriega-Crespo, Alberto [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dickinson, Clive [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-01

    The detection of an excess of emission at microwave frequencies with respect to the predicted free–free emission has been reported for several Galactic H ii regions. Here, we investigate the case of RCW 49, for which the Cosmic Background Imager tentatively (∼3σ) detected Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) at 31 GHz on angular scales of 7′. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we carried out a multi-frequency (5, 19, and 34 GHz) continuum study of the region, complemented by observations of the H109α radio recombination line. The analysis shows that: (1) the spatial correlation between the microwave and IR emission persists on angular scales from 3.′4 to 0.″4, although the degree of the correlation slightly decreases at higher frequencies and on smaller angular scales; (2) the spectral indices between 1.4 and 5 GHz are globally in agreement with optically thin free–free emission, however, ∼30% of these are positive and much greater than −0.1, consistent with a stellar wind scenario; and (3) no major evidence for inverted free–free radiation is found, indicating that this is likely not the cause of the Anomalous Emission in RCW 49. Although our results cannot rule out the spinning dust hypothesis to explain the tentative detection of AME in RCW 49, they emphasize the complexity of astronomical sources that are very well known and studied, such as H ii regions, and suggest that, at least in these objects, the reported excess of emission might be ascribed to alternative mechanisms such as stellar winds and shocks.

  9. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): North Hollywood/Burbank Well Field Area 1, San Fernando Valley Site, California (first remedial action), September 1987. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-24

    The North Hollywood - Burbank Well Field (NHBWF) is located within the San Fernando Valley Ground Water basin, which can provide drinking water for approximately 500,000 people residing in the San Fernando Valley and Los Angeles. In 1980 TCE and PCE were discovered in 25% of DWP's wells. In July 1981, DWP and the Southern California Association of Governments began a two-year study funded by EPA. The study revealed the occurrence of ground-water contamination plume patterns that are spreading toward the southeast. The primary contaminant of concern to the ground-water is TCE with PCE and other VOCs present. The selected remedial action for the site is ground-water pump and treatment using aeration and granular-activated-carbon - air-filtering units, with discharge to the DWP Pumping Station for chlorination and distribution. Spent carbon will be removed and replaced with fresh carbon, with the spent carbon scheduled either for disposal or regeneration. The estimated capital cost for this remedial action is $2,192,895 with present worth OandM of $2,284,105.

  10. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Whitehouse Waste Oil Pits Site, Duval County, Jacksonville, FL. (First remedial action), (Amendment), June 1992. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The 7-acre Whitehouse Waste Oil Pits site was used by Allied Petroleum Products (Allied) to dispose of acidic waste oil sludges from its oil reclamation process in Whitehouse, Duval County, Florida. A cypress swamp system and residential area are immediately adjacent to the site. The acid sludge produced in the first step and clay used to decolorize the oil were dumped into the unlined pits at the site. A 1985 ROD addressed source control as a containment remedy consisting of a slurry wall construction, soil cap, and a ground water recovery and treatment system; however, EPA has re-evaluated the 1985 ROD selection and determined that the containment remedy failed to meet the requirements of SARA. As a result, the ROD Amendment focuses on an alternative for treating Whitehouse wastes by eliminating direct contact risk associated with pit soil/sludge wastes and preventing contaminated ground water in the surficial aquifer from migrating laterally. The primary contaminants of concern that affect the soil, sediment, surface water, and ground water are VOCs, including benzene, toluene, and xylenes; organics, including PCBs and phenols; and metals, including arsenic, chromium, and lead. The amended remedial action for the site are included

  11. Scribe Sites, US EPA Region 9, 2013, US EPA ERT

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Scribe is a software tool developed by the USEPA's Environmental Response Team (ERT) to assist in the process of managing environmental data. Scribe captures...

  12. Observations of neutral hydrogen in the region 355 deg II) < 10 deg and -5 deg < bsup(II) < 5 deg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.J.; Pedlar, A.

    1974-01-01

    Studies of the 21cm hydrogen line from the central regions of the Galaxy are reported. The instruments used for the study are the Mark II (31'x35' HPBW) and Mark IA (13' HPBW) radio telescopes at NRAL, Jodrell Bank

  13. [Sequence polymorphisms of the mitochondrial DNA HVR I and HVR II regions in the Deng populations from Tibet in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Longli; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Jianmin

    2009-12-01

    To analyze the sequence polymorphisms of the mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions I (HVR I) and HVR II in the Deng population in Linzhi area of Tibet. mtDNAs obtained from 119 unrelated individuals were amplified and directly sequenced. One hundred and ten variable sites were identified, including nucleotide transitions, transversions, and insertions. In the HVR I region (nt16024-nt16365), 68 polymorphic sites and 119 haplotypes were observed, the genetic diversity was 0.9916. In the HVR II (nt73-nt340) region, 42 polymorphic sites and 113 haplotypes were observed, and the genetic diversity was 0.9907. The random match probability of the HVR I and HVR II regions were 0.0084 and 0.0093, respectively. When combining the HVR I and HVR II regions, 119 different haplotypes were found. The combined match probability of two unrelated persons having the same sequence was 0.0084. There are some unique polymorphic loci in the Deng population. There are different genetic structures between Chinese and other Asian populations in the mitochondrial DNA D-loop region. Sequence polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA HVR I and HVR II can be used as a genetic marker for forensic individual identification and genetic analysis.

  14. Magnetic fields, stellar feedback, and the geometry of H II regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, Gary J.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetic pressure has long been known to dominate over gas pressure in atomic and molecular regions of the interstellar medium. Here I review several recent observational studies of the relationships between the H+, H0 and H2 regions in M42 (the Orion complex) and M17. A simple picture results. When stars form they push back surrounding material, mainly through the outward momentum of starlight acting on grains, and field lines are dragged with the gas due to flux freezing. The magnetic field is compressed and the magnetic pressure increases until it is able to resist further expansion and the system comes into approximate magnetostatic equilibrium. Magnetic field lines can be preferentially aligned perpendicular to the long axis of quiescent cloud before stars form. After star formation and pushback occurs ionized gas will be constrained to flow along field lines and escape from the system along directions perpendicular to the long axis. The magnetic field may play other roles in the physics of the H II region and associated PDR. Cosmic rays may be enhanced along with the field and provide additional heating of atomic and molecular material. Wave motions may be associated with the field and contribute a component of turbulence to observed line profiles.

  15. Diffusion effects on the line intensities of He I and He II in the solar transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shine, R.; Gerola, H.; Linsky, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    A heuristic treatment of diffusion in the solar chromosphere-corona transition region is developed. Diffusion becomes increasingly important with steeper temperature gradients, in active and quiet regions relative to coronal holes, and with increasing excitation potential. Numerical calculations are made for the resonance lines of He i and He ii and show that diffusion can enhance these lines. Thus the helium lines may appear relatively weak in coronal holes due to a weakening of the enhancement mechanism. Most transition region lines will be less affected by diffusion than He i or He ii

  16. Line profile studies of hydrodynamical models of cometary compact H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Feng-Yao; Zhu, Qing-Feng

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the evolution of cometary H II regions based on several champagne flow models and bow shock models, and calculate the profiles of the [Ne II] fine-structure line at 12.81 μm, the H30α recombination line and the [Ne III] fine-structure line at 15.55 μm for these models at different inclinations of 0°, 30° and 60°. We find that the profiles in the bow shock models are generally different from those in the champagne flow models, but the profiles in the bow shock models with lower stellar velocity (≤ 5 km s −1 ) are similar to those in the champagne flow models. In champagne flow models, both the velocity of peak flux and the flux weighted central velocities of all three lines point outward from molecular clouds. In bow shock models, the directions of these velocities depend on the speed of stars. The central velocities of these lines are consistent with the stellar motion in the high stellar speed cases, but they are opposite directions from the stellar motion in the low speed cases. We notice that the line profiles from the slit along the symmetrical axis of the projected 2D image of these models are useful for distinguishing bow shock models from champagne flow models. It is also confirmed by the calculation that the flux weighted central velocity and the line luminosity of the [Ne III] line can be estimated from the [Ne II] line and the H30α line. (paper)

  17. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2014-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 4 février de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org. * * * * * Carte de membre de l'Association du personnel du CERN Les membres GAC-EPA qui souhaitent recevoir une carte de membre AP en 2014 doivent  en faire la demande par email à secretariat@gac-epa.org, ou par lettre au secrétaire ...

  18. EXTINCTION AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON INTENSITY VARIATIONS ACROSS THE H II REGION IRAS 12063-6259

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, D. J.; Peeters, E.; Otaguro, J. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Bik, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The spatial variations in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) band intensities are normally attributed to the physical conditions of the emitting PAHs, however in recent years it has been suggested that such variations are caused mainly by extinction. To resolve this question, we have obtained near-infrared (NIR), mid-infrared (MIR), and radio observations of the compact H II region IRAS 12063-6259. We use these data to construct multiple independent extinction maps and also to measure the main PAH features (6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.2 {mu}m) in the MIR. Three extinction maps are derived: the first using the NIR hydrogen lines and case B recombination theory; the second combining the NIR data with radio data; and the third making use of the Spitzer/IRS MIR observations to measure the 9.8 {mu}m silicate absorption feature using the Spoon method and PAHFIT (as the depth of this feature can be related to overall extinction). The silicate absorption over the bright, southern component of IRAS 12063-6259 is almost absent while the other methods find significant extinction. While such breakdowns of the relationship between the NIR extinction and the 9.8 {mu}m absorption have been observed in molecular clouds, they have never been observed for H II regions. We then compare the PAH intensity variations in the Spitzer/IRS data after dereddening to those found in the original data. It was found that in most cases, the PAH band intensity variations persist even after dereddening, implying that extinction is not the main cause of the PAH band intensity variations.

  19. EXTINCTION AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON INTENSITY VARIATIONS ACROSS THE H II REGION IRAS 12063–6259

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, D. J.; Peeters, E.; Otaguro, J. N.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Bik, A.

    2013-01-01

    The spatial variations in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) band intensities are normally attributed to the physical conditions of the emitting PAHs, however in recent years it has been suggested that such variations are caused mainly by extinction. To resolve this question, we have obtained near-infrared (NIR), mid-infrared (MIR), and radio observations of the compact H II region IRAS 12063–6259. We use these data to construct multiple independent extinction maps and also to measure the main PAH features (6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.2 μm) in the MIR. Three extinction maps are derived: the first using the NIR hydrogen lines and case B recombination theory; the second combining the NIR data with radio data; and the third making use of the Spitzer/IRS MIR observations to measure the 9.8 μm silicate absorption feature using the Spoon method and PAHFIT (as the depth of this feature can be related to overall extinction). The silicate absorption over the bright, southern component of IRAS 12063–6259 is almost absent while the other methods find significant extinction. While such breakdowns of the relationship between the NIR extinction and the 9.8 μm absorption have been observed in molecular clouds, they have never been observed for H II regions. We then compare the PAH intensity variations in the Spitzer/IRS data after dereddening to those found in the original data. It was found that in most cases, the PAH band intensity variations persist even after dereddening, implying that extinction is not the main cause of the PAH band intensity variations.

  20. 76 FR 9780 - Notification of Deletion of System of Records; EPA Parking Control Office File (EPA-10) and EPA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... System of Records; EPA Parking Control Office File (EPA-10) and EPA Transit and Guaranteed Ride Home... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is deleting the systems of records for EPA Parking Control Office File... through the EPA Internet under the ``Federal Register'' listings at http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/ . Dated...

  1. A bright-rimmed cloud sculpted by the H ii region Sh2-48

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, M. E.; Paron, S.; Giacani, E.; Rubio, M.; Dubner, G.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: We characterize a bright-rimmed cloud embedded in the H ii region Sh2-48 while searching for evidence of triggered star formation. Methods: We carried out observations towards a region of 2' × 2' centered at RA = 18h22m11.39s, Dec = -14°35'24.81''(J2000) using the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE; Chile) in the 12CO J = 3-2, 13CO J = 3-2, HCO+J = 4-3, and CS J = 7-6 lines with an angular resolution of about 22''. We also present radio continuum observations at 5 GHz carried out with the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA; EEUU) interferometer with a synthetized beam of 7'' × 5''. The molecular transitions were used to study the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas of the bright-rimmed cloud. The radio continuum data was used to characterize the ionized gas located on the illuminated border of this molecular condensation. Combining these observations with infrared public data allowed us to build up a comprehensive picture of the current state of star formation within this cloud. Results: The analysis of our molecular observations reveals a relatively dense clump with n(H2) ~ 3 × 103cm-3, located in projection onto the interior of the H ii region Sh2-48. The emission distribution of the four observed molecular transitions has, at VLSR ~ 38 km s-1, morphological anticorrelation with the bright-rimmed cloud as seen in the optical emission. From the new radio continuum observations, we identify a thin layer of ionized gas located on the border of the clump that is facing the ionizing star. The ionized gas has an electron density of about 73 cm-3, which is a factor three higher than the typical critical density (nc ~ 25 cm-3), above which an ionized boundary layer can be formed and maintained. This supports the hypothesis that the clump is being photoionized by the nearby O9.5V star, BD-14 5014. From the evaluation of the pressure balance between the ionized and molecular gas, we conclude that the clump would be in a prepressure balance

  2. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2015-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 3 mars de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 7 avril, 5 mai, 2 juin, 1er septembre, 6 octobre, 3 novembre et 1er décembre 2013. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  3. GAC-EPA

    CERN Document Server

    GAC-EPA

    2013-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 1er octobre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 5 novembre et 3 décembre 2013. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  4. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 5 avril de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 3 mai, 7 juin, 6 septembre, 4 octobre, 1er et 29 novembre décembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  5. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : le mardi 29 novembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  6. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : le mardi 1er novembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel. La permanence suivante aura lieu le mardi 29 novembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  7. GAC-EPA

    CERN Document Server

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 3 mai de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 7 juin, 6 septembre, 4 octobre, 1er et 29 novembre décembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  8. GAC-EPA

    CERN Document Server

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 5 avril de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 3 mai, 7 juin, 6 septembre, 4 octobre, 1er et 29 novembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  9. GAC-EPA

    CERN Document Server

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 4 octobre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 1er et 29 novembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  10. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2015-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 1er décembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  11. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 2 février de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 1er mars, 5 avril, 3 mai, 7 juin, 6 septembre, 4 octobre, 1er et 29 novembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  12. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 1er mars de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 5 avril, 3 mai, 7 juin, 6 septembre, 4 octobre, 1er et 29 novembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  13. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2015-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 3 novembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel La permanence suivante aura lieu le mardi 1er décembre 2015. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  14. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2013-01-01

    Carte de membre de l'Association du personnel du CERN Comme cela a été précisé dans le bulletin d'automne n° 43, les membres GAC-EPA qui souhaitent recevoir une carte de membre AP en 2013 devront en faire la demande, avant le 31 janvier, par email à secretariat@gac-epa.org, ou par lettre au secrétaire du GAC-EPA, p/a Association du personnel CERN, CH-1211 GENEVE 23. Il n'y a pas de tacite reconduction de ces cartes et par conséquent une demande doit être faite chaque année par l'intéressé(e).

  15. Testing the existence of non-Maxwellian electron distributions in H II regions after assessing atomic data accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, C. [Permanent address: Centro de Física, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), P.O. Box 20632, Caracas 1020A, Venezuela. (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Bautista, M. A., E-mail: claudio.mendozaguardia@wmich.edu, E-mail: manuel.bautista@wmich.edu [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    The classic optical nebular diagnostics [N II], [O II], [O III], [S II], [S III], and [Ar III] are employed to search for evidence of non-Maxwellian electron distributions, namely κ distributions, in a sample of well-observed Galactic H II regions. By computing new effective collision strengths for all these systems and A-values when necessary (e.g., S II), and by comparing with previous collisional and radiative data sets, we have been able to obtain realistic estimates of the electron-temperature dispersion caused by the atomic data, which in most cases are not larger than ∼10%. If the uncertainties due to both observation and atomic data are then taken into account, it is plausible to determine for some nebulae a representative average temperature while in others there are at least two plasma excitation regions. For the latter, it is found that the diagnostic temperature differences in the high-excitation region, e.g., T{sub e} (O III), T{sub e} (S III), and T{sub e} (Ar III), cannot be conciliated by invoking κ distributions. For the low-excitation region, it is possible in some, but not all, cases to arrive at a common, lower temperature for [N II], [O II], and [S II] with κ ≈ 10, which would then lead to significant abundance enhancements for these ions. An analytic formula is proposed to generate accurate κ-averaged excitation rate coefficients (better than 10% for κ ≥ 5) from temperature tabulations of the Maxwell-Boltzmann effective collision strengths.

  16. Stellar Population and Star Formation History of the Distant Galactic H II Regions NGC 2282 and Sh2-149

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S.; Mondal, S.; Jose, J.; Das, R. K.

    2017-06-01

    We present here the recent results on two distant Galactic H II regions, namely NGC 2282 and Sh2-149, obtained with multiwavelength observations. Our optical spectroscopic analysis of the bright sources have been used to identify the massive members, and to derive the fundamental parameters such as age and distance of these regions. Using IR color-color criteria and Hα-emission properties, we have identified and classified the candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in these regions. The 12CO(1-0) continuum maps along with the K-band extinction maps, and spatial distribution of YSOs are used to investigate the structure and morphology of the molecular cloud associated with these H II regions. Overall analysis of these regions suggests that the star formation occurs at the locations of the denser gas, and we also find possible evidences of the induced star formation due to the feedback from massive stars to its surrounding molecular medium.

  17. The environment and star formation of H II region Sh2-163: a multi-wavelength study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Naiping; Wang, Jun-Jie; Li, Nan

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the environment of H II region Sh2-163 and search for evidence of triggered star formation in this region, we performed a multi-wavelength study of this H II region. Most of our data were taken from large-scale surveys: 2MASS, CGPS, MSX and SCUBA. We also made CO molecular line observations, using the 13.7-m telescope. The ionized region of Sh2-163 is detected by both the optical and radio continuum observations. Sh2-163 is partially bordered by an arc-like photodissociation region (PDR), which is coincident with the strongest optical and radio emissions, indicating interactions between the H II region and the surrounding interstellar medium. Two molecular clouds were discovered on the border of the PDR. The morphology of these two clouds suggests they are compressed by the expansion of Sh2-163. In cloud A, we found two molecular clumps. And it seems star formation in clump A2 is much more active than in clump A1. In cloud B, we found new outflow activities and massive star(s) are forming inside. Using 2MASS photometry, we tried to search for embedded young stellar object (YSO) candidates in this region. The very good agreement between CO emission, infrared shell and YSOs suggest that it is probably a star formation region triggered by the expansion of Sh2-163. We also found the most likely massive protostar related to IRAS 23314+6033.

  18. Optical polarimetric and near-infrared photometric study of the RCW95 Galactic H II region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-González, J.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Santos, F. P.; Franco, G. A. P.; Santos, J. F. C.; Maia, F. F. S.; Sanmartim, D.

    2018-02-01

    We carried out an optical polarimetric study in the direction of the RCW 95 star-forming region in order to probe the sky-projected magnetic field structure by using the distribution of linear polarization segments which seem to be well aligned with the more extended cloud component. A mean polarization angle of θ = 49.8° ± 7.7°7 was derived. Through the spectral dependence analysis of polarization it was possible to obtain the total-to-selective extinction ratio (RV) by fitting the Serkowski function, resulting in a mean value of RV = 2.93 ± 0.47. The foreground polarization component was estimated and is in agreement with previous studies in this direction of the Galaxy. Further, near-infrared (NIR) images from Vista Variables in the Via Láctea (VVV) survey were collected to improve the study of the stellar population associated with the H II region. The Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis algorithm was employed to derive structural parameters for two clusters in the region, and a set of PAdova and TRieste Stellar Evolution Code (PARSEC) isochrones was superimposed on the decontaminated colour-magnitude diagrams to estimate an age of about 3 Myr for both clusters. Finally, from the NIR photometry study combined with spectra obtained with the Ohio State Infrared Imager and Spectrometer mounted at the Southern Astrophysics Research Telescope we derived the spectral classification of the main ionizing sources in the clusters associated with IRAS 15408-5356 and IRAS 15412-5359, both objects classified as O4V stars.

  19. Regulation of Islamic art in confessional policy of Catherine II (on materials of the Tyumen region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia A. Bortnikova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of the religious conflicts and Islamic extremism, education of confessional tolerance, – these and other questions became the most actual political and scientific problem now. Art reflects outlook of people and is an ideological lever on society. In article the policy on use of Islamic art for education of confessional tolerance is analyzed. This policy began by Catherine II in 1773, had the content of reform and extended on religious art and architecture of all gentiles in the Russian Empire. Article is written on the basis of materials of the Central historical archive of the Republic of Bashkortostan and exhibits of the museums. The Tyumen region (the South of the modern Tyumen region was an optimum basis for carrying out this policy because of the mixed option of Islam which arose there. Muslim art included a complex of the subjects intended for execution of a religious cult. It reflected elements of Shamanism and Tengriism, and after carrying out reform – Judaism and Christianity. Thus, at it there were forms and images of all religions of the Tyumen region. Syncretism of Islamic art was shown in a typology of cult objects, their ornament and mission. The most unusual phenomenon was existence of a religious sculpture which was forbidden in Islam and Orthodoxy, but existed in both religions, and also in Catholicism, Tengriism and Shamanism. In article ways of impact on Muslim art which were used by the Orenburg Mohammedan spiritual meeting are considered. It didn't interfere in preservation of religious syncretism, and also executed orders of the government on Christianization of Islamic art. Authors come to a conclusion that reform carried lines of policy of multiculturalism for gentiles.

  20. Study of diffuse H II regions potentially forming part of the gas streams around Sgr A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijos-Abendaño, J.; López, E.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Báez-Rubio, A.; Aravena, M.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Martín, S.; Llerena, M.; Aldás, F.; Logan, C.; Rodríguez-Franco, A.

    2018-05-01

    We present a study of diffuse extended ionized gas towards three clouds located in the Galactic Centre (GC). One line of sight (LOS) is towards the 20 km s-1 cloud (LOS-0.11) in the Sgr A region, another LOS is towards the 50 km s-1 cloud (LOS-0.02), also in Sgr A, while the third is towards the Sgr B2 cloud (LOS+0.693). The emission from the ionized gas is detected from Hnα and Hmβ radio recombination lines (RRLs). Henα and Hemβ RRL emission is detected with the same n and m as those from the hydrogen RRLs only towards LOS+0.693. RRLs probe gas with positive and negative velocities towards the two Sgr A sources. The Hmβ to Hnα ratios reveal that the ionized gas is emitted under local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions in these regions. We find a He to H mass fraction of 0.29±0.01 consistent with the typical GC value, supporting the idea that massive stars have increased the He abundance compared to its primordial value. Physical properties are derived for the studied sources. We propose that the negative velocity component of both Sgr A sources is part of gas streams considered previously to model the GC cloud kinematics. Associated massive stars with what are presumably the closest H II regions to LOS-0.11 (positive velocity gas), LOS-0.02, and LOS+0.693 could be the main sources of ultraviolet photons ionizing the gas. The negative velocity components of both Sgr A sources might be ionized by the same massive stars, but only if they are in the same gas stream.

  1. Identification of candidate regions for a novel Usher syndrome type II locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Rebeh, Imen; Benzina, Zeineb; Dhouib, Houria; Hadjamor, Imen; Amyere, Mustapha; Ayadi, Leila; Turki, Khalil; Hammami, Bouthaina; Kmiha, Noureddine; Kammoun, Hassen; Hakim, Bochra; Charfedine, Ilhem; Vikkula, Miikka; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Ayadi, Hammadi; Masmoudi, Saber

    2008-09-19

    Chronic diseases affecting the inner ear and the retina cause severe impairments to our communication systems. In more than half of the cases, Usher syndrome (USH) is the origin of these double defects. Patients with USH type II (USH2) have retinitis pigmentosa (RP) that develops during puberty, moderate to severe hearing impairment with downsloping pure-tone audiogram, and normal vestibular function. Four loci and three genes are known for USH2. In this study, we proposed to localize the gene responsible for USH2 in a consanguineous family of Tunisian origin. Affected members underwent detailed ocular and audiologic characterization. One Tunisian family with USH2 and 45 healthy controls unrelated to the family were recruited. Two affected and six unaffected family members attended our study. DNA samples of eight family members were genotyped with polymorphic markers. Two-point and multipoint LOD scores were calculated using Genehunter software v2.1. Sequencing was used to investigate candidate genes. Haplotype analysis showed no significant linkage to any known USH gene or locus. A genome-wide screen, using microsatellite markers, was performed, allowing the identification of three homozygous regions in chromosomes 2, 4, and 15. We further confirmed and refined these three regions using microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphisms. With recessive mode of inheritance, the highest multipoint LOD score of 1.765 was identified for the candidate regions on chromosomes 4 and 15. The chromosome 15 locus is large (55 Mb), underscoring the limited number of meioses in the consanguineous pedigree. Moreover, the linked, homozygous chromosome 15q alleles, unlike those of the chromosome 2 and 4 loci, are infrequent in the local population. Thus, the data strongly suggest that the novel locus for USH2 is likely to reside on 15q. Our data provide a basis for the localization and the identification of a novel gene implicated in USH2, most likely localized on 15q.

  2. US EPA overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    EPA believes that effective and efficient solutions to problems in all radioactive waste disposal areas will require close coordination and cooperation among all agencies involved. In this regard, EPA already has participated in meetings with the Energy Research and Development Administration, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Council on Environmental Quality, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the Office of Management and Budget to lay the groundwork for the development of a consolidated national radioactive waste disposal plan. The EPA program is directed first toward developing goals and requirements; and then, in cooperation with the public, industry, the States and Federal agencies, towards determining by what means these goals can be achieved for each waste management option. In addition, the program will develop criteria for determining when the goals of the waste management options have been achieved. In summary, EPA will provide fundamental environmental criteria and generally applicable environmental standards for permanent disposal of high level radwastes. Concurrently, ERDA will develop the necessary technology; and NRC will conduct necessary studies, develop waste-related regulations, and license specific sites and methods of control. Together, we will be able to manage the disposal of the Nation's radioactive waste in an environmentally adequate manner

  3. EPA Web Training Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheduled webinars can help you better manage EPA web content. Class topics include Drupal basics, creating different types of pages in the WebCMS such as document pages and forms, using Google Analytics, and best practices for metadata and accessibility.

  4. EPA's Green Roof Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a presentation on the basics of green roof technology. The presentation highlights some of the recent ORD research projects on green roofs and provices insight for the end user as to the benefits for green roof technology. It provides links to currently available EPA re...

  5. Superfund explanation of significant difference for the record of decision (EPA Region 3): Westinghouse Elevator Company Plant, Gettysburg, PA, August 3, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The document explains significant differences to the remedy selected in the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Site signed by the Regional Administrator on June 30, 1992 (PB93-963911) for Operable Unit 1. The Significant Difference between the remedy presented in the June 30, 1992 ROD and the changes to the ROD that will be implemented are explained.

  6. Profiles of the N II 6584 A line over the giant H II regions IC 1318b and c, NGC 7000 and IC 5070. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canto, J; Johnson, P G; Meaburn, J; Mikhail, J S; Terrett, D L; White, N J [Manchester Univ. (UK). Dept of Astronomy

    1979-06-01

    Previously (Paper I) large-scale splitting of the (N II) line was discovered over an area of IC 1318b. The motions of the ionized material have now been mapped over a much larger region of this nebula and also IC 1318c. The splitting reaches a maximum value of 53 km/s over the faintest regions of IC 1318b and occurs over an area approximately > 20 pc across. However, few split (N II) lines were found over IC 1318c, but the motions of this whole ionized and neutral complex have been shown to be closely related. Wind-driven flows along neutral and ionized shells are proposed to explain the observations. Similar measurements have also been made on either side of the dark lane separating NGC 7000 from IC 5070.

  7. EPA Communications Stylebook: Writing Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the most part, EPA follows the Associated Press (AP) Stylebook. Other requirements of basic punctuation and grammar and usage in EPA writing modify, supplement, or in some cases reiterate AP style.

  8. Biosorption of Cu(II) onto agricultural materials from tropical regions

    KAUST Repository

    Acheampong, Mike A.; Pereira, Joana P.C.; Meulepas, Roel J.W.; Lens, Piet N.L.

    2011-01-01

    model described the Cu(II) removal by coconut husk (R2 = 0.999) and sawdust (R2 = 0.993) very well and the Cu(II) removal by Moringa oleifera seeds (R2 = 0.960) well. The model only reasonably described the Cu(II) removal by coconut shell (R2 = 0.932). A

  9. Evaluation of Class II treatment by cephalometric regional superpositions versus conventional measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstratiadis, Stella; Baumrind, Sheldon; Shofer, Frances; Jacobsson-Hunt, Ulla; Laster, Larry; Ghafari, Joseph

    2005-11-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate cephalometric changes in subjects with Class II Division 1 malocclusion who were treated with headgear (HG) or Fränkel function regulator (FR) and (2) to compare findings from regional superpositions of cephalometric structures with those from conventional cephalometric measurements. Cephalographs were taken at baseline, after 1 year, and after 2 years of 65 children enrolled in a prospective randomized clinical trial. The spatial location of the landmarks derived from regional superpositions was evaluated in a coordinate system oriented on natural head position. The superpositions included the best anatomic fit of the anterior cranial base, maxillary base, and mandibular structures. Both the HG and the FR were effective in correcting the distoclusion, and they generated enhanced differential growth between the jaws. Differences between cranial and maxillary superpositions regarding mandibular displacement (Point B, pogonion, gnathion, menton) were noted: the HG had a more horizontal vector on maxillary superposition that was also greater (.0001 < P < .05) than the horizontal displacement observed with the FR. This discrepancy appeared to be related to (1) the clockwise (backward) rotation of the palatal and mandibular planes observed with the HG; the palatal plane's rotation, which was transferred through the occlusion to the mandibular plane, was factored out on maxillary superposition; and (2) the interaction between the inclination of the maxillary incisors and the forward movement of the mandible during growth. Findings from superpositions agreed with conventional angular and linear measurements regarding the basic conclusions for the primary effects of HG and FR. However, the results suggest that inferences of mandibular displacement are more reliable from maxillary than cranial superposition when evaluating occlusal changes during treatment.

  10. Internal motions in H II regions. XII S162 and NGC 7635

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pismis, P; Moreno, M A; Hasse, I [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City

    1983-01-01

    The apparent structure of S162 and of the bubble nebula (NGC 7635) associated with it is discussed using a number of direct images taken through narrow band (10 A/sup 0/) interference filters in H..cap alpha.., (N II) and in the continuum at lambda6607. The results are discussed together with the radial velocity field of S162 and in particular of the bubble nebula as obtained from photographic Fabry-Perot interferometry. The bubble nebula is shown to be composed of distinct and amorphous very regularly curving arcs, all inscribed on a tenuous slightly ellipsoidal shell of gas expanding at velocity of about 4 km s/sup -1/. The arcs are probably genetically related to the globules which form the caracteristic comet like feature within the bubble nebula. The ionization source of S162 is BD + 60/sup 0/2522 and 071Isub(b)f star classified from our high dispersion spectrum. Our very tentative suggestion is that the brightest globule may be an offshoot fo this star and that the globule has generated the next globule which in turn may have generated the third one. The configuration of NGC 7635 suggests that magnetic fields are likely to be operative in the region. Polarimetry in the optical and in the radio range as well as high resolution infrared studies, high resolution velocity fields are desirable to find a satisfactory model for this nebula.

  11. A Broad 22 Micron Emission Feature in the Carina Nebula H ii Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan; Onaka

    2000-04-10

    We report the detection of a broad 22 µm emission feature in the Carina Nebula H ii region by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) short-wavelength spectrometer. The feature shape is similar to that of the 22 µm emission feature of newly synthesized dust observed in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant. This finding suggests that both of the features are arising from the same carrier and that supernovae are probably the dominant production sources of this new interstellar grain. A similar broad emission dust feature is also found in the spectra of two starburst galaxies from the ISO archival data. This new dust grain could be an abundant component of interstellar grains and can be used to trace the supernova rate or star formation rate in external galaxies. The existence of the broad 22 µm emission feature complicates the dust model for starburst galaxies and must be taken into account correctly in the derivation of dust color temperature. Mg protosilicate has been suggested as the carrier of the 22 µm emission dust feature observed in Cassiopeia A. The present results provide useful information in studies on the chemical composition and emission mechanism of the carrier.

  12. Thermophysical properties of the MER and Beagle II landing site regions on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Hynek, Brian M.; Pelkey, Shannon M.; Mellon, Michael T.; Martínez-Alonso, Sara; Putzig, Nathaniel E.; Murphy, Nate; Christensen, Philip R.

    2006-08-01

    We analyzed remote-sensing observations of the Isidis Basin, Gusev Crater, and Meridiani Planum landing sites for Beagle II, MER-A Spirit, and MER-B Opportunity spacecraft, respectively. We emphasized the thermophysical properties using daytime and nighttime radiance measurements from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer and Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) and thermal inertias derived from nighttime data sets. THEMIS visible images, MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow-angle images, and MGS Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data are incorporated as well. Additionally, the remote-sensing data were compared with ground-truth at the MER sites. The Isidis Basin surface layer has been shaped by aeolian processes and erosion by slope winds coming off of the southern highlands and funneling through notches between massifs. In the Gusev region, surface materials of contrasting thermophysical properties have been interpreted as rocks or bedrock, duricrust, and dust deposits; these are consistent with a complex geological history dominated by volcanic and aeolian processes. At Meridiani Planum the many layers having different thermophysical and erosional properties suggest periodic deposition of differing sedimentological facies possibly related to clast size, grain orientation and packing, or mineralogy.

  13. SPITZER ANALYSIS OF H II REGION COMPLEXES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS: DETERMINING A SUITABLE MONOCHROMATIC OBSCURED STAR FORMATION INDICATOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, B.; Gordon, K. D.; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Babler, B.; Bracker, S.; Meade, M.; Block, M.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Misselt, K.; Bolatto, A. D.; Carlson, L. R.; Hora, J. L.; Robitaille, T.; Indebetouw, R.; Madden, S. C.; Oey, M. S.; Oliveira, J. M.; Vijh, U. P.

    2010-01-01

    H II regions are the birth places of stars, and as such they provide the best measure of current star formation rates (SFRs) in galaxies. The close proximity of the Magellanic Clouds allows us to probe the nature of these star forming regions at small spatial scales. To study the H II regions, we compute the bolometric infrared flux, or total infrared (TIR), by integrating the flux from 8 to 500 μm. The TIR provides a measure of the obscured star formation because the UV photons from hot young stars are absorbed by dust and re-emitted across the mid-to-far-infrared (IR) spectrum. We aim to determine the monochromatic IR band that most accurately traces the TIR and produces an accurate obscured SFR over large spatial scales. We present the spatial analysis, via aperture/annulus photometry, of 16 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and 16 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) H II region complexes using the Spitzer Space Telescope's IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 8 μm) and MIPS (24, 70, 160 μm) bands. Ultraviolet rocket data (1500 and 1900 A) and SHASSA Hα data are also included. All data are convolved to the MIPS 160 μm resolution (40 arcsec full width at half-maximum), and apertures have a minimum radius of 35''. The IRAC, MIPS, UV, and Hα spatial analysis are compared with the spatial analysis of the TIR. We find that nearly all of the LMC and SMC H II region spectral energy distributions (SEDs) peak around 70 μm at all radii, from ∼10 to ∼400 pc from the central ionizing sources. As a result, we find the following: the sizes of H II regions as probed by 70 μm are approximately equal to the sizes as probed by TIR (∼70 pc in radius); the radial profile of the 70 μm flux, normalized by TIR, is constant at all radii (70 μm ∼ 0.45TIR); the 1σ standard deviation of the 70 μm fluxes, normalized by TIR, is a lower fraction of the mean (0.05-0.12 out to ∼220 pc) than the normalized 8, 24, and 160 μm normalized fluxes (0.12-0.52); and these results are the same for the LMC and the

  14. The molecular environment of the pillar-like features in the H II region G46.5-0.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paron, S.; Celis Peña, M.; Ortega, M. E.; Fariña, C.; Petriella, A.; Rubio, M.; Ashley, R. P.

    2017-10-01

    At the interface of H II regions and molecular gas, peculiar structures appear, some of them with pillar-like shapes. Understanding their origin is important for characterizing triggered star formation and the impact of massive stars on the interstellar medium. In order to study the molecular environment and influence of radiation on two pillar-like features related to the H II region G46.5-0.2, we performed molecular line observations with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment and spectroscopic optical observations with the Isaac Newton Telescope. From the optical observations, we identified the star that is exciting the H II region as spectral type O4-6. The molecular data allowed us to study the structure of the pillars and an HCO+ cloud lying between them. In this HCO+ cloud, which has no well-defined 12CO counterpart, we found direct evidence of star formation: two molecular outflows and two associated near-IR nebulosities. The outflow axis orientation is perpendicular to the direction of the radiation flow from the H II region. Several Class I sources are also embedded in this HCO+ cloud, showing that it is usual that young stellar objects (YSOs) form large associations occupying a cavity bounded by pillars. On the other hand, it was confirmed that the radiation-driven implosion (RDI) process is not occurring in one of the pillar tips.

  15. NIEHS/EPA Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers: 2017 Annual Meeting Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2017 Annual Meeting of the NIEHS/EPA Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers was hosted by EPA in collaboration with NIEHS and the Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSUs). The meeting was held at the EPA Region 9 offices i...

  16. The in vitro transcription of a rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii) protamine gene. II. Controlled mutation of the cap site region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, J M; Dixon, G H

    1985-02-01

    A series of plasmids containing new fusion genes in which the trout protamine gene is placed under the control of the complete herpes virus (HSV-1) tk promoter Pvu II-Bgl II fragment (pM8), or a shortened thymidine kinase (tk) promoter in which the region between the TATA box and the cap site is altered by using the Pvu II-Mlu I fragment (pM7), have been constructed. An additional recombinant plasmid was constructed in which the Bgl II-Ava II fragment of the protamine gene containing the entire protamine promoter but missing the protamine coding region was cloned into pBR322 between the Xho II 1666 and Hind III sites (pP5). For in vitro transcription, a HeLa cell lysate system was prepared and the RNA transcription products, after glyoxalation, were electrophoretically analyzed on 5% polyacrylamide gels. In constructing pM8 the DNA sequence between the tk promoter and the cap site was present while in pM7 it was deleted. Similar multiple transcripts were seen in both cases, indicating that the region between the promoter and the cap site has no effect upon transcription in vitro. The multiple transcripts appear to be due to the presence of a cryptic promoter in the complementary strand of the protamine gene. The activity of this cryptic promoter has been confirmed by comparison of the transcription of plasmid pP5, in which the protamine mRNA coding region has been deleted, with a previously described plasmid, pJBRP (Jankowski JM and Dixon GH (1984) Can. J. Biochem. Cell. Biol. 62, 291-300), containing the intact protamine gene.

  17. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 1er novembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel La permanence suivante aura lieu le mardi 29 novembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/ Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php  

  18. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 31 octobre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel La permanence suivante aura lieu le mardi 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/ Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  19. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 29 août de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/ Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php  

  20. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 28 novembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/ Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  1. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 30 mai de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/ Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  2. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 26 septembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 31 octobre et 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/ Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  3. EPA's Radioactive Source Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsick, D.

    2004-01-01

    The US EPA is the lead Federal agency for emergency responses to unknown radiological materials, not licensed, owned or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement state (Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, 1996). The purpose of EPA's clean materials programme is to keep unwanted and unregulated radioactive material out of the public domain. This is achieved by finding and securing lost sources, maintaining control of existing sources and preventing future losses. The focus is on both, domestic and international fronts. The domestic program concentrates on securing lost sources, preventing future losses, alternative technologies like tagging of radioactive sources in commerce, pilot radioactive source roundup, training programs, scrap metal and metal processing facilities, the demolition industry, product stewardship and alternatives to radioactive devices (fewer radioactive source devices means fewer orphan sources). The international program consists of securing lost sources, preventing future losses, radiation monitoring of scrap metal at ports and the international scrap metal monitoring protocol

  4. Meet EPA Scientist Marie O'Shea, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Scientist Dr. Marie O'Shea is Region 2's Liaison to the Agency's Office of Research and Development (ORD). Marie has a background in research on urban watershed management, focused on characterizing and controlling nutrients in stormwater runoff.

  5. 40 CFR 59.409 - Addresses of EPA Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Tennessee), Director, Air, Pesticides, and Toxics Management Division, 61 Forsyth Street, Atlanta, GA 30303... Division, 77 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, IL 60604-3507. EPA Region VI (Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico...

  6. EPA Lean Government Initiative: How to Replicate Lean Successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Lean Replication Primer describes how EPA Offices and Regions can identify and adapt successful practices from previous Lean projects to “replicate” their successes and generate further improvements.

  7. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 31 janvier de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 28 février, 28 mars, 25 avril, 30 mai, 29 août, 26 septembre, 31 octobre et 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  8. Spectrophotometry of four H II regions in the Perseus arm and a reassessment of galactic abundance gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talent, D.L.; Dufour, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    The results from deep spectrophotometry of four Perseus arm H II regions (NGC 1624, NGC 2359, NGC 7538, and NGC 7635) obtained with the KPNO IIDS are presented. The observed line strengths are used to derive electron temperatures, densities, and the relative concentrations of H, He, N, O, S, Cl, and Ar in the nebulae. These abundances are combined with similarly derived abundances for seven other well-observed galactic H II regions, and are used to estimate the magnitude of galactic abundance gradients over the 8--14 kpc region of the solar neighborhood.Significant radial gradients for oxygen and nitrogen are found: d log (O/H)/dR=-0.059 +- 0.017 kpc -1 and d log (N/H)/dR= -0.083 +- 0.018 kpc -1 , while only marginal evidence for a helium gradient is found: d log (He/H)/dR=-0.008 +- 0.008 kpc -1 . Little evidence for gradient in S/H is found. From the red [N II] and [S II] lines we found d log (N + /S + )/dR=-0.068 +- 0.024 kpc -1 , which suggests that a radial gradient in S/O exists in the Galaxy. The O/H gradient found in this study is similar to that found from planetary nebulae, while the N/H gradient is significantly smaller. These results suggest that most of the nitrogen in the interstellar medium of the Galaxy was produced by primary nucleosynthesis processes.We also find evidence that the radial O/H and N/H gradients for H II regions in a given spiral arm are 2 to 3 times steeper than the global gradients over the 8--14 kpc interval in galactocentric distance. For four H II regions in the Sagittarius arm we found d log (O/H)/dR=-0.24 kpc -1 and d log (N/H)/dR=-0.16 kpc -1 . For five H II regions in the Perseus arm we found d log (O/H)/dR=-0.18 kpc -1 and d log (N/H)/dR=-0.15 kpc -1 . The larger magnitudes of these gradients are greater than those of the global gradients by amounts which exceed reasonable errors in abundances and/or relative distances

  9. Biosorption of Cu(II) onto agricultural materials from tropical regions

    KAUST Repository

    Acheampong, Mike A.

    2011-04-26

    Background: In Ghana, the discharge of untreated gold mine wastewater contaminates the aquatic systems with heavy metals such as copper (Cu), threatening ecosystem and human health. The undesirable effects of these pollutants can be avoided by treatment of the mining wastewater prior to discharge. In this work, the sorption properties of agricultural materials, namely coconut shell, coconut husk, sawdust and Moringa oleifera seeds for Cu(II) were investigated. Results: The Freundlich isotherm model described the Cu(II) removal by coconut husk (R2 = 0.999) and sawdust (R2 = 0.993) very well and the Cu(II) removal by Moringa oleifera seeds (R2 = 0.960) well. The model only reasonably described the Cu(II) removal by coconut shell (R2 = 0.932). A maximum Cu(II) uptake of 53.9 mg g-1 was achieved using the coconut shell. The sorption of Cu(II) onto coconut shell followed pseudo-second-order kinetics (R2 = 0.997). FTIR spectroscopy indicated the presence of functional groups in the biosorbents, some of which were involved in the sorption process. SEM-EDX analysis confirmed an exchange of Mg(II) and K(I) for Cu(II) on Moringa oleifera seeds and K(I) for Cu(II) on coconut shell. Conclusion: This study shows that coconut shell can be an important low-cost biosorbent for Cu(II) removal. The results indicate that ion exchange, precipitation and electrostatic forces were involved in the Cu(II) removal by the biosorbents investigated. © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Dusty cradles in a turbulent nursery: the SGR A east H II region complex at the galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, R. M.; Herter, T. L.; Adams, J. D. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, 202 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Morris, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    We present imaging at 19, 25, 31, and 37 μm of the compact H II region complex G-0.02-0.07 located 6 pc in projection from the center of the Galaxy obtained with SOFIA using FORCAST. G-0.02-0.07 contains three compact H II regions (A, B, and C) and one ultra-compact H II region (D). Our observations reveal the presence of two faint, infrared sources located 23'' and 35'' to the east of region C (FIRS 1 and 2) and detect dust emission in two of the three 'ridges' of ionized gas west of region A. The 19/37 color temperature and 37 μm optical depth maps of regions A-C are used to characterize the dust energetics and morphology. Regions A and B exhibit average 19/37 color temperatures of ∼105 K, and regions C and D exhibit color temperatures of ∼115 K and ∼130 K, respectively. Using the DustEM code, we model the SEDs of regions A-D and FIRS 1, all of which require populations of very small, transiently heated grains and large, equilibrium-heated grains. We also require the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in regions A-C in order to fit the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm fluxes observed by Spitzer/IRAC. The location of the heating source for region A is determined by triangulation from distances and temperatures derived from DustEM models fit to SEDs of three different points around the region, and it is found to be displaced to the northeast of the center of curvature near the color temperature peak. Based on total luminosity, expected 1.90 μm fluxes, and proximity to the mid-IR color temperature peaks, we identify heating source candidates for regions A, B, and C. However, for region D, the observed fluxes at 1.87 and 1.90 μm of the previously proposed ionizing star are a factor of ∼40 times too bright to be the heating source and hence is likely just a star lying along the line of sight toward region D.

  11. Tissue-specific expression of insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs with distinct 5' untranslated regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irminger, J.C.; Rosen, K.M.; Humble, R.E.; Villa-Komaroff, L.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have used RNA from human hypothalamus as template for the production of cDNAs encoding insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The prohormone coding sequence of brain IGF-II RNA is identical to that found in liver; however, the 5' untranslated sequence of the brain cDNA has no homology to the 5' untranslated sequence of the previously reported liver cDNAs. By using hybridization to specific probes as well as a method based on the properties of RNase H, they found that the human IGF-II gene has at least three exons that encode alternative 5' untranslated regions and that are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. A probe specific to the brain cDNA 5' untranslated region hybridizes to a 6.0-kilobase transcript present in placenta, hypothalamus, adrenal gland, kidney, Wilms tumor, and a pheochromocytoma. The 5' untranslated sequence of the brain cDNA does not hybridize to a 5.3-kilobase transcript found in liver or to a 5.0-kb transcript found in pheochromocytoma. By using RNase H to specifically fragment the IGF-II transcripts into 3' and 5' fragments, they found that the RNAs vary in size due to differences in the 5' end but not the 3' end

  12. Dust Emission at 8 and 24 μ m as Diagnostics of H ii Region Radiative Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oey, M. S.; López-Hernández, J.; Kellar, J. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 311 West Hall, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-1107 (United States); Pellegrini, E. W. [Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Überle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gordon, K. D.; Meixner, M.; Roman-Duval, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Jameson, K. E. [Astronomy Department and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Li, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Madden, S. C. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA, Université Paris VII, IRFU/Service d’Astrophysique, Bat. 709, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bot, C. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 Rue de l’Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Rubio, M. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2017-07-20

    We use the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) survey of the Magellanic Clouds to evaluate the relationship between the 8 μ m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission, 24 μ m hot dust emission, and H ii region radiative transfer. We confirm that in the higher-metallicity Large Magellanic Cloud, PAH destruction is sensitive to optically thin conditions in the nebular Lyman continuum: objects identified as optically thin candidates based on nebular ionization structure show six times lower median 8 μ m surface brightness (0.18 mJy arcsec{sup −2}) than their optically thick counterparts (1.2 mJy arcsec{sup −2}). The 24 μ m surface brightness also shows a factor of three offset between the two classes of objects (0.13 versus 0.44 mJy arcsec{sup −2}, respectively), which is driven by the association between the very small dust grains and higher density gas found at higher nebular optical depths. In contrast, PAH and dust formation in the low-metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud is strongly inhibited such that we find no variation in either 8 μ m or 24 μ m emission between our optically thick and thin samples. This is attributable to extremely low PAH and dust production together with high, corrosive UV photon fluxes in this low-metallicity environment. The dust mass surface densities and gas-to-dust ratios determined from dust maps using Herschel HERITAGE survey data support this interpretation.

  13. A NEW RADIO RECOMBINATION LINE MASER OBJECT TOWARD THE MonR2 H II REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Serra, I.; Zhang, Q.; Dierickx, M.; Patel, N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Baez-Rubio, A.; Rivilla, V. M.; Martin-Pintado, J., E-mail: ijimenez-serra@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mdierickx@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: npatel@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: ryvendel@gmail.com, E-mail: jmartin@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: baezra@cab.inta-csic.es [Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC/INTA), Ctra. de Torrejon a Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-02-10

    We report the detection of a new radio recombination line (RRL) maser object toward the IRS2 source in the MonR2 ultracompact H II region. The continuum emission at 1.3 mm and 0.85 mm and the H30{alpha} and H26{alpha} lines were observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at angular resolutions of {approx}0.''5-3''. The SMA observations show that the MonR2-IRS2 source is very compact and remains unresolved at spatial scales {<=}400 AU. Its continuum power spectrum at millimeter wavelengths is almost flat ({alpha} = -0.16, with S{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}), indicating that this source is dominated by optically thin free-free emission. The H30{alpha} and H26{alpha} RRL emission is also compact and peaks toward the position of the MonR2-IRS2 source. The measured RRL profiles are double peaked with the H26{alpha} line showing a clear asymmetry in its spectrum. Since the derived line-to-continuum flux ratios ({approx}80 and 180 km s{sup -1} for H30{alpha} and H26{alpha}, respectively) exceed the LTE predictions, the RRLs toward MonR2-IRS2 are affected by maser amplification. The amplification factors are, however, smaller than those found toward the emission-line star MWC349A, indicating that MonR2-IRS2 is a weakly amplified maser. Radiative transfer modeling of the RRL emission toward this source shows that the RRL masers arise from a dense and collimated jet embedded in a cylindrical ionized wind, oriented nearly along the direction of the line of sight. High-angular resolution observations at submillimeter wavelengths are needed to unveil weakly amplified RRL masers in very young massive stars.

  14. UNIFORM INFALL TOWARD THE COMETARY H II REGION IN THE G34.26+0.15 COMPLEX?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Tie; Wu, Yuefang; Zhang, Huawei

    2013-01-01

    Gas accretion is a key process in star formation. However, gas infall detections in high-mass, star-forming regions with high spatial resolution observations are rare. Here, we report the detection of gas infall toward a cometary ultracompact H II region ( C) in the G34.26+0.15 complex. The observations were made with the IRAM 30 m, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope 15 m telescope, and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The hot core associated with 'C' has a mass of ∼76 ± 11 M ☉ and a volume density of (1.1 ± 0.2) × 10 8 cm –3 . The HCN (3-2) and HCO + (1-0) lines observed by single dishes and the CN (2-1) lines observed by the SMA show redshifted absorption features, indicating gas infall. We found a linear relationship between the line width and optical depth of the CN (2-1) lines. Those transitions with larger optical depths and line widths have larger absorption areas. However, the infall velocities measured from different lines seem to be constant, indicating that the gas infall is uniform. We also investigated the evolution of gas infall in high-mass, star-forming regions. A tight relationship was found between the infall velocity and the total dust/gas mass. At stages prior to the hot core phase, the typical infall velocity and mass infall rate are ∼1 km s –1 and ∼10 –4 M ☉ yr –1 , respectively. While in more evolved regions, the infall velocity and mass infall rates can reach as high as several km s –1 and ∼10 –3 -10 –2 M ☉ yr –1 , respectively. Accelerated infall has been detected toward some hypercompact H II and ultracompact H II regions. However, the acceleration phenomenon is not seen in more evolved ultracompact H II regions (e.g., G34.26+0.15)

  15. RNA polymerase II interacts with the promoter region of the noninduced hsp70 gene in Drosophila melanogaster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmour, D.S.; Lis, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    By using a protein-DNA cross-linking method, we examined the in vivo distribution of RNA polymerase II on the hsp70 heat shock gene in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider line 2 cells. In heat shock-induced cells, a high level of RNA polymerase II was detected on the entire gene, while in noninduced cells, the RNA polymerase II was confined to the 5' end of the hsp70 gene, predominantly between nucleotides -12 and +65 relative to the start of transcription. This association of RNA polymerase II was apparent whether the cross-linking was performed by a 10-min UV irradiation of chilled cells with mercury vapor lamps or by a 40-microsecond irradiation of cells with a high-energy xenon flash lamp. We hypothesize that RNA polymerase II has access to, and a high affinity for, the promoter region of this gene before induction, and this poised RNA polymerase II may be critical in the mechanism of transcription activation

  16. Solutions Network Formulation Report. Integration of OMI and TES Aerosol Products into the EPA Regional Planning Organizations' FASTNET Aerosol Tracking and Analysis Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Kelly; Andrews, Jane C.

    2006-01-01

    Every year, more than 280 million visitors tour our Nation s most treasured parks and wilderness areas. Unfortunately, many visitors are unable to see the spectacular vistas they expect because of white or brown haze in the air. Most of this haze is not natural; it is air pollution, carried by the wind often hundreds of miles from its origin. Some of the pollutants have been linked to serious health problems, such as asthma and other lung disorders, and even premature death. In addition, nitrates and sulfates contribute to acid rain formation, which contaminates rivers and lakes and erodes buildings and historical monuments. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency RPOs (Regional Planning Organizations) have been tasked with monitoring and determining the nature and origin of haze in Class I scenic areas, and finding ways to reduce haze in order to improve visibility in these areas. The RPOs have developed an Internet-based air quality DST (Decision Support Tool) called FASTNET (Fast Aerosol Sensing Tools for Natural Event Tracking). While FASTNET incorporates a few satellite datasets, most of the data utilized by this DST comes from ground-based instrument networks. The problem is that in many areas the sensors are sparsely located, with long distances between them, causing difficulties in tracking haze over the United States, determining its source, and analyzing its content. Satellite data could help to fill in the data gaps and to supplement and verify ground-recorded air quality data. Although satellite data are now being used for air quality research applications, such data are not routinely used for environmental decision support, in part because of limited resources, difficulties with interdisciplinary data interpretation, and the need for advanced inter-agency partnerships. As a result, the validation and verification of satellite data for air quality operational system applications has been limited This candidate solution evaluates the usefulness of OMI

  17. A multi-wavelength analysis of the diffuse H II region G25.8700+0.1350

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichowolski, S.; Duronea, N. U.; Suad, L. A.; Reynoso, E. M.; Dorda, R.

    2018-02-01

    We present a multi-wavelength investigation of the H II region G25.8700+0.1350, located in the inner part of the Galaxy. In radio continuum emission, the region is seen as a bright arc-shaped structure. An analysis of the H I line suggests that G25.8700+0.1350 lies at a distance of 6.5 kpc. The ionized gas is bordered by a photodissociation region, which is encircled by a molecular structure where four molecular clumps are detected. At infrared wavelengths, the region is also very conspicuous. Given the high level of visual absorption in the region, the exciting stars should be searched for in the infrared band. In this context, we found in the literature one Wolf-Rayet and one red supergiant, which, together with 37 2MASS sources that are candidate O-type stars, could be related to the origin of G25.8700+0.1350. Finally, as expanding H II regions are hypothesized to trigger star formation, we used different infrared point source catalogues to search for young stellar object candidates (cYSOs). A total of 45 cYSOs were identified projected on to the molecular clouds.

  18. The Effects of Japan's Apology for World War II Atrocities on Regional Relations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cathey, Emily A

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores the impact of atrocities that Japan committed against its neighbors during and prior to World War II on Japan's relationships with its neighbors, China and the Republic of Korea...

  19. SOURCE REGIONS OF THE TYPE II RADIO BURST OBSERVED DURING A CME–CME INTERACTION ON 2013 MAY 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mäkelä, P.; Reiner, M. J.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Krupar, V.

    2016-01-01

    We report on our study of radio source regions during the type II radio burst on 2013 May 22 based on direction-finding analysis of the Wind /WAVES and STEREO /WAVES (SWAVES) radio observations at decameter–hectometric wavelengths. The type II emission showed an enhancement that coincided with the interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) launched in sequence along closely spaced trajectories. The triangulation of the SWAVES source directions posited the ecliptic projections of the radio sources near the line connecting the Sun and the STEREO-A spacecraft. The WAVES and SWAVES source directions revealed shifts in the latitude of the radio source, indicating that the spatial location of the dominant source of the type II emission varies during the CME–CME interaction. The WAVES source directions close to 1 MHz frequencies matched the location of the leading edge of the primary CME seen in the images of the LASCO/C3 coronagraph. This correspondence of spatial locations at both wavelengths confirms that the CME–CME interaction region is the source of the type II enhancement. Comparison of radio and white-light observations also showed that at lower frequencies scattering significantly affects radio wave propagation.

  20. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 25 avril de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 30 mai, 29 août, 26 septembre, 31 octobre et 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  1. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 28 février de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 28 mars, 25 avril, 30 mai, 29 août, 26 septembre, 31 octobre et 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  2. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 28 mars de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 25 avril, 30 mai, 29 août, 26 septembre, 31 octobre et 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  3. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 30 mai de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 29 août, 26 septembre, 31 octobre et 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  4. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1995-01-01

    The application of electric propulsion to communications satellites, however, has been limited to the use of hydrazine thrusters with electric heaters for thrust and specific impulse augmentation. These electrothermal thrusters operate at specific impulse levels of approximately 300 s with heater powers of about 500 W. Low power arcjets (1-3 kW) are currently being investigated as a way to increase specific impulse levels to approximately 500 s. Ion propulsion systems can easily produce specific impulses of 3000 s or greater, but have yet to be applied to communications satellites. The reasons most often given for not using ion propulsion systems are their high level of overall complexity, low thrust with long burn times, and the difficulty of integrating the propulsion system into existing commercial spacecraft busses. The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass.

  5. EPA Region 1 No Discharge Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset details No Discharge Zones (NDZ) for New England. Boaters may not discharge waste into these areas. Boundaries were determined mostly by Federal...

  6. US EPA Region 4 RMP Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — To improve public health and the environment, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) collects information about facilities, sites, or places...

  7. Unveiling the Hot Molecular Core in the Ultracompact H II Region with Extended Emission G12.21-0.10

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, E.; Trinidad, M. A.; Porras, A.; Rodríguez-Rico, C.; Araya, E. D.; Kurtz, S.; Hofner, P.; Nigoche-Netro, A.

    2018-04-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the cometary H II region G12.21-0.10 using the VLA and OVRO. Both radio continuum (0.3, 0.7, 2 and 3.6 cm) and spectral lines of H41α, 13CS(2-1) & (1-0), and NH3(2,2) & (4,4) observations are included. We find two 3 mm continuum peaks toward G12.21-0.10; one of them is spatially coincident with the UC H II region, while the other coincides spatially with a molecular clump. We also find that the 0.7, 2 and 3.6 cm continuum and H41α line are only detected toward the UC H II region, while the 13CS, and NH3 are spatially associated with the molecular clump. Based on the morphology, kinetic temperature (≍86 K), volumetric density (≍1.5×106 cm-3) and linear size (≍0.22 pc) of the molecular clump, we suggest this source is consistent with a hot molecular core.

  8. EPA's radon study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowd, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Last winter, in cooperation with agencies in 10 states and two metropolitan area counties, EPA measured the indoor air radon concentrations of 14,000 houses, some chosen statistically at random and some by request of the homeowner. Passive measurement methodologies were used, such as exposing a charcoal canister to the air for a few days and allowing the air to migrate in to the charcoal naturally. To reduce dilution of radon by the outside air, the protocol required that the house be shut up; therefore, the study was conducted during winter. The measuring device was placed in the lowest livable area (usually the basement) of each house to maximize potential concentration. It should be noted that these procedures are generally considered to be screening tests because they result in a worst-case measurement rather than a best value. The results of these findings are presented

  9. UNIFORM INFALL TOWARD THE COMETARY H II REGION IN THE G34.26+0.15 COMPLEX?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tie; Wu, Yuefang; Zhang, Huawei, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com, E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China)

    2013-10-10

    Gas accretion is a key process in star formation. However, gas infall detections in high-mass, star-forming regions with high spatial resolution observations are rare. Here, we report the detection of gas infall toward a cometary ultracompact H II region ({sup C)} in the G34.26+0.15 complex. The observations were made with the IRAM 30 m, the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope 15 m telescope, and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The hot core associated with 'C' has a mass of ∼76 ± 11 M{sub ☉} and a volume density of (1.1 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 8} cm{sup –3}. The HCN (3-2) and HCO{sup +} (1-0) lines observed by single dishes and the CN (2-1) lines observed by the SMA show redshifted absorption features, indicating gas infall. We found a linear relationship between the line width and optical depth of the CN (2-1) lines. Those transitions with larger optical depths and line widths have larger absorption areas. However, the infall velocities measured from different lines seem to be constant, indicating that the gas infall is uniform. We also investigated the evolution of gas infall in high-mass, star-forming regions. A tight relationship was found between the infall velocity and the total dust/gas mass. At stages prior to the hot core phase, the typical infall velocity and mass infall rate are ∼1 km s{sup –1} and ∼10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, respectively. While in more evolved regions, the infall velocity and mass infall rates can reach as high as several km s{sup –1} and ∼10{sup –3}-10{sup –2} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, respectively. Accelerated infall has been detected toward some hypercompact H II and ultracompact H II regions. However, the acceleration phenomenon is not seen in more evolved ultracompact H II regions (e.g., G34.26+0.15)

  10. EPA's Information Architecture and Web Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Information Architecture creates a topical organization of our website, instead of an ownership-based organization. The EPA Web Taxonomy allows audiences easy access to relevant information from EPA programs, by using a common vocabulary.

  11. Isolation of an insulin-like growth factor II cDNA with a unique 5' untranslated region from human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Shujane; Daimon, Makoto; Wang, Chunyeh; Ilan, J.; Jansen, M.

    1988-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) cDNA from a placental library was isolated and sequenced. The 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR) sequence of this cDNA differs completely from that of adult human liver and has considerable base sequence identity to the same region of an IGF-II cDNA of a rat liver cell line, BRL-3A. Human placental poly(A) + RNA was probed with either the 5'-UTR of the isolated human placental IGF-II cDNA or the 5'-UTR of the IGF-II cDNA obtained from adult human liver. No transcripts were detected by using the 5'-UTR of the adult liver IGF-II as the probe. In contrast, three transcripts of 6.0, 3.2, and 2.2 kilobases were detected by using the 5'-UTR of the placental IGF-II cDNA as the probe or the probe from the coding sequence. A fourth IGF-II transcript of 4.9 kilobases presumably containing a 5'-UTR consisting of a base sequence dissimilar to that of either IGF-II 5'-UTR was apparent. Therefore, IGF-II transcripts detected may be products of alternative splicing as their 5'-UTR sequence is contained within the human IGF-II gene or they may be a consequence of alternative promoter utilization in placenta

  12. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS Type II After Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Tunç

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary Complex regional pain syndrome is a chronic syndrome characterised with dystrophic changes and neurovascular disordes of bone and skin of extremities. The most common etiological factors are trauma, ischemic heart disease, cerebral lesions, servical region disorders, infections, and surgical treatments. Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common compressive neuropaty of the upper extremity. There are various surgical and conservative alternatives in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. Complex regional pain syndrome has been reported as a complication of surgical carpal tunnel release in 2-5% of patients. In this case report clinical characteristics and rehabilitation outcomes of a patient with complex regional pain syndrome after carpal tunnel release surgery is presented. (Osteoporoz Dünyasından 2010;16:41-3

  13. Model Orlando regionally efficient travel management coordination center (MORE TMCC), phase II : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The final report for the Model Orlando Regionally Efficient Travel Management Coordination Center (MORE TMCC) presents the details of : the 2-year process of the partial deployment of the original MORE TMCC design created in Phase I of this project...

  14. EPA Metadata Style Guide Keywords and EPA Organization Names

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following keywords and EPA organization names listed below, along with EPA’s Metadata Style Guide, are intended to provide suggestions and guidance to assist with the standardization of metadata records.

  15. Treatment outcome for a sample of patients with Class II division 1 malocclusion treated at a regional hospital orthodontic department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burden, D J

    1998-01-01

    This retrospective study assessed the outcome of orthodontic treatment of 264 patients with Class II division 1 malocclusion (overjet greater than 6 mm). The sample comprised patients who had completed their fixed appliance orthodontic treatment at a regional hospital orthodontic unit in the Republic of Ireland. The PAR Index (Peer Assessment Rating) was used to evaluate treatment outcome using before and after treatment study casts. The results revealed that treatment for this particular type of malocclusion was highly effective with a very few patients failing to benefit from their orthodontic treatment.

  16. Giant panda BAC library construction and assembly of a 650-kb contig spanning major histocompatibility complex class II region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Hui-Juan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giant panda is rare and endangered species endemic to China. The low rates of reproductive success and infectious disease resistance have severely hampered the development of captive and wild populations of the giant panda. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC plays important roles in immune response and reproductive system such as mate choice and mother-fetus bio-compatibility. It is thus essential to understand genetic details of the giant panda MHC. Construction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library will provide a new tool for panda genome physical mapping and thus facilitate understanding of panda MHC genes. Results A giant panda BAC library consisting of 205,800 clones has been constructed. The average insert size was calculated to be 97 kb based on the examination of 174 randomly selected clones, indicating that the giant panda library contained 6.8-fold genome equivalents. Screening of the library with 16 giant panda PCR primer pairs revealed 6.4 positive clones per locus, in good agreement with an expected 6.8-fold genomic coverage of the library. Based on this BAC library, we constructed a contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX spanning about 650 kb by a three-step method: (1 PCR-based screening of the BAC library with primers from homologous MHC class II gene loci, end sequences and BAC clone shotgun sequences, (2 DNA sequencing validation of positive clones, and (3 restriction digest fingerprinting verification of inter-clone overlapping. Conclusion The identifications of genes and genomic regions of interest are greatly favored by the availability of this giant panda BAC library. The giant panda BAC library thus provides a useful platform for physical mapping, genome sequencing or complex analysis of targeted genomic regions. The 650 kb sequence-ready BAC contig map of the giant panda MHC class II region from BTNL2 to DAXX, verified by the three-step method, offers a

  17. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2013-01-01

    Dear GAC-EPA members, This year, owing to works in the main Auditorium, we have to hold our General assembly in the auditorium of the Globe on 27 March 2013 and we really hope that you can be present. We wish to give you some preliminary practical recommendations: Do not forget your CERN access card, the guards may carry out checks. As far as possible, use public transport because there is very limited parking. If you come by car, park your vehicle on the car parks inside CERN because the outside car park cannot be used by visitors. Refreshments cannot be organized in the Globe; they will be held in cafeteria n°1, which will force us to move by using CERN entrances A or B or via building 33 (access cards required here too). We thank you for your attention and hope to see you soon. Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 2 avril de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l&rsquo...

  18. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2013-01-01

    En tant que Président du GAC-EPA, je porte à votre connaissance ce communiqué émanant de la Direction du CERN. Le 2 juin 2013, le CERN inaugure le projet Passeport Big Bang, un parcours touristique et scientifique formé de dix plates-formes d'exposition devant dix sites du CERN dans le Pays de Gex et le Canton de Genève. Les plateformes sont reliées par des itinéraires balisés et par un jeu de piste. C'est un projet est mené en collaboration avec les communes du Pays de Gex, Meyrin et Genève Tourisme dans un souci de renforcer notre dialogue avec nos voisins : http://passeport-big-bang.web.cern.ch/fr. A l’occasion de cette inauguration, nous organisons un événement populaire et festif : le matin, les familles pourront participer à des randonnées à vélo tandis que les sportifs pourront tester les 5...

  19. ON THE NONTHERMAL κ-DISTRIBUTED ELECTRONS IN PLANETARY NEBULAE AND H ii REGIONS: THE κ INDEX AND ITS CORRELATIONS WITH OTHER NEBULAR PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong [Space Astronomy Laboratory, Faculty of Science, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Zhang, Bing; Liu, Xiao-Wei, E-mail: zhangy96@hku.hk [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-01-20

    Recently, a suspicion arose that the free electrons in planetary nebulae (PNs) and H ii regions might have nonthermal energy distributions. In this scenario, a κ index is introduced to characterize the electron energy distributions, with smaller κ values indicating larger deviations from Maxwell–Boltzmann distributions. Assuming that this is the case, we determine the κ values for a sample of PNs and H ii regions by comparing the intensities of [O iii] collisionally excited lines and the hydrogen Balmer jump. We find the average κ indices of PNs and H ii regions to be 27 and 32, respectively. Correlations between the resultant κ values and various physical properties of the nebulae are examined to explore the potential origin of nonthermal electrons in photoionized gaseous nebulae. However, no positive result is obtained. Thus, the current analysis does not lend support to the idea that κ-distributed electrons are present in PNs and H ii regions.

  20. Probing the Galactic Structure of the Milky Way with H II Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Red, Wesley Alexander; Wenger, Trey V.; Balser, Dana; Anderson, Loren; Bania, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Mapping the structure of the Milky Way is challenging since we reside within the Galactic disk and distances are difficult to determine. Elemental abundances provide important constraints on theories of the formation and evolution of the Milky Way. HII regions are the brightest objects in the Galaxy at radio wavelengths and are detected across the entire Galactic disk. We use the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to observe the radio recombination line (RRL) and continuum emission of 120 Galactic HII regions located across the Galactic disk. In thermal equilibrium, metal abundances are expected to set the nebular electron temperature with high abundances producing low temperatures. We derive the metallicity of HII regions using an empirical relation between an HII region's radio recombination line-to-continuum ratio and nebular metallicity. Here we focus on a subset of 20 HII regions from our sample that have been well studied with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to test our data reduction pipeline and analysis methods. Our goal is to expand this study to the Southern skies with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and create a metallicity map of the entire Galactic disk.

  1. STAR FORMATION IN SELF-GRAVITATING DISKS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. EPISODIC FORMATION OF BROAD-LINE REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WangJianmin; Du Pu; Ge Junqiang; Hu Chen; Baldwin, Jack A.; Ferland, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    This is the second in a series of papers discussing the process and effects of star formation in the self-gravitating disk around the supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We have previously suggested that warm skins are formed above the star-forming (SF) disk through the diffusion of warm gas driven by supernova explosions. Here we study the evolution of the warm skins when they are exposed to the powerful radiation from the inner part of the accretion disk. The skins initially are heated to the Compton temperature, forming a Compton atmosphere (CAS) whose subsequent evolution is divided into four phases. Phase I is the duration of pure accumulation supplied by the SF disk. During phase II clouds begin to form due to line cooling and sink to the SF disk. Phase III is a period of preventing clouds from sinking to the SF disk through dynamic interaction between clouds and the CAS because of the CAS overdensity driven by continuous injection of warm gas from the SF disk. Finally, phase IV is an inevitable collapse of the entire CAS through line cooling. This CAS evolution drives the episodic appearance of broad-line regions (BLRs). We follow the formation of cold clouds through the thermal instability of the CAS during phases II and III, using linear analysis. Since the clouds are produced inside the CAS, the initial spatial distribution of newly formed clouds and angular momentum naturally follow the CAS dynamics, producing a flattened disk of clouds. The number of clouds in phases II and III can be estimated, as well as the filling factor of clouds in the BLR. Since the cooling function depends on the metallicity, the metallicity gradients that originate in the SF disk give rise to different properties of clouds in different radial regions. We find from the instability analysis that clouds have column density N H ∼ 22 cm –2 in the metal-rich regions whereas they have N H ∼> 10 22 cm –2 in the metal-poor regions. The metal-rich clouds

  2. He II λ4686 IN η CARINAE: COLLAPSE OF THE WIND-WIND COLLISION REGION DURING PERIASTRON PASSAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodoro, M.; Damineli, A.; Arias, J. I.; De Araújo, F. X.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Pereira, C. B.; Barbá, R. H.; González, J. F.; Corcoran, M. F.; Fernández-Lajús, E.; Gamen, R. C.; Solivella, G. R.; Fraga, L.; Groh, J. H.; Marshall, J. L.; McGregor, P. J.; Nicholls, D. C.; Parkin, E. R.; Morrell, N.; Phillips, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    The periodic spectroscopic events in η Carinae are now well established and occur near the periastron passage of two massive stars in a very eccentric orbit. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the variations of different spectral features, such as an eclipse by the wind-wind collision (WWC) boundary, a shell ejection from the primary star or accretion of its wind onto the secondary. All of them have problems explaining all the observed phenomena. To better understand the nature of the cyclic events, we performed a dense monitoring of η Carinae with five Southern telescopes during the 2009 low-excitation event, resulting in a set of data of unprecedented quality and sampling. The intrinsic luminosity of the He II λ4686 emission line (L ∼ 310 L ☉ ) just before periastron reveals the presence of a very luminous transient source of extreme UV radiation emitted in the WWC region. Clumps in the primary's wind probably explain the flare-like behavior of both the X-ray and He II λ4686 light curves. After a short-lived minimum, He II λ4686 emission rises again to a new maximum, when X-rays are still absent or very weak. We interpret this as a collapse of the WWC onto the 'surface' of the secondary star, switching off the hard X-ray source and diminishing the WWC shock cone. The recovery from this state is controlled by the momentum balance between the secondary's wind and the clumps in the primary's wind.

  3. A Gravity data along LARSE (Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment) Line II, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooley, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a detailed gravity study along part of the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE) transect across the San Fernando Basin and Transverse Ranges to help characterize the structure underlying this area. 249 gravity measurements were collected along the transect and to augment regional coverage near the profile. An isostatic gravity low of 50-60 mGal reflects the San Fernando-East Ventura basin. Another prominent isostatic gravity with an amplitude of 30 mGal marks the Antelope Valley basin. Gravity highs occur over the Santa Monica Mountains and the Transverse Ranges. The highest isostatic gravity values coincide with outcrops of Pelona schist.

  4. EPA Collaboration with South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA, the Ministry of Environment of Korea, and partner agencies in both countries cooperate to strengthen environmental governance, improve air and water quality, and reduce exposure to toxic chemicals.

  5. EPA scientific integrity policy draft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its draft scientific integrity policy on 5 August. The draft policy addresses scientific ethical standards, communications with the public, the use of advisory committees and peer review, and professional development. The draft policy was developed by an ad hoc group of EPA senior staff and scientists in response to a December 2010 memorandum on scientific integrity from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. The agency is accepting public comments on the draft through 6 September; comments should be sent to osa.staff@epa.gov. For more information, see http://www.epa.gov/stpc/pdfs/draft-scientific-integrity-policy-aug2011.pdf.

  6. EPA Nonregulatory Nonroad Duty Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA nonregulatory, nonroad duty cycles for equipment such as agricultural tractors, backhoe loaders,crawlers tractors, excavators, arc welding skid steer loaders, and wheel loaders. Also,test procedures, laboratory methods, and emissions for this equipmen

  7. H ii REGION G46.5-0.2: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN IONIZING RADIATION, MOLECULAR GAS, AND STAR FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Li, Jin Zeng; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju; Wu, Yuefang

    2015-01-01

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey ( 13 CO J = 1–0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive ( 12 CO, 13 CO, C 18 O J = 3–2, HCO + , and HCN J = 4–3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10′ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution

  8. H ii REGION G46.5-0.2: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN IONIZING RADIATION, MOLECULAR GAS, AND STAR FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E. [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), CC 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Yuan, Jing-Hua; Li, Jin Zeng; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20 A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Wu, Yuefang, E-mail: sparon@iafe.uba.ar [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China)

    2015-06-15

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey ({sup 13}CO J = 1–0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive ({sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O J = 3–2, HCO{sup +}, and HCN J = 4–3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10′ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  9. H II Region G46.5-0.2: The Interplay between Ionizing Radiation, Molecular Gas, and Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Zeng Li, Jin; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju

    2015-06-01

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey (13CO J = 1-0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive (12CO, 13CO, C18O J = 3-2, HCO+, and HCN J = 4-3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10‧ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  10. Effects of expanding compact H II regions upon molecular clouds: Molecular dissociation waves, shock waves, and carbon ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.K.; Hollenbach, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of young expanding compact H II regions upon their molecular environments are studied, emphasizing the simultaneous evolution of the molecular hydrogen dissociation front and the shocked shell of gas surrounding the nebula. For H II regions powered by 05 stars embedded in molecular clouds of ambient density 10 3 -10 4 cm -3 the dissociation wave initially travels outward much more rapidly than the shock, but later decelerates and is swept up by the shock about 10 5 yr after the expansion begins. The 21 cm line of atomic hydrogen will be optically thick in both the preshock and postshock gas for most of this period. The most important coolant transitions are the [O I] 63 μm line and, for t> or approx. =10 5 yr, the rotational transitions of H 2 and/or the rotational transitions of CO. The vibrational transitions of H 2 are excited predominantly by ultraviolet pumping. We estimate the preshock and postshock carbon recombination-line emission measures

  11. Operational forecasting of daily temperatures in the Valencia Region. Part II: minimum temperatures in winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, I.; Estrela, M.

    2009-09-01

    Extreme temperature events have a great impact on human society. Knowledge of minimum temperatures during winter is very useful for both the general public and organisations whose workers have to operate in the open, e.g. railways, roadways, tourism, etc. Moreover, winter minimum temperatures are considered a parameter of interest and concern since persistent cold-waves can affect areas as diverse as public health, energy consumption, etc. Thus, an accurate forecasting of these temperatures could help to predict cold-wave conditions and permit the implementation of strategies aimed at minimizing the negative effects that low temperatures have on human health. The aim of this work is to evaluate the skill of the RAMS model in determining daily minimum temperatures during winter over the Valencia Region. For this, we have used the real-time configuration of this model currently running at the CEAM Foundation. To carry out the model verification process, we have analysed not only the global behaviour of the model for the whole Valencia Region, but also its behaviour for the individual stations distributed within this area. The study has been performed for the winter forecast period from 1 December 2007 - 31 March 2008. The results obtained are encouraging and indicate a good agreement between the observed and simulated minimum temperatures. Moreover, the model captures quite well the temperatures in the extreme cold episodes. Acknowledgement. This work was supported by "GRACCIE" (CSD2007-00067, Programa Consolider-Ingenio 2010), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, contract number CGL2005-03386/CLI, and by the Regional Government of Valencia Conselleria de Sanitat, contract "Simulación de las olas de calor e invasiones de frío y su regionalización en la Comunidad Valenciana" ("Heat wave and cold invasion simulation and their regionalization at Valencia Region"). The CEAM Foundation is supported by the Generalitat Valenciana and BANCAIXA (Valencia

  12. Enhancement of CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) ratios and star formation efficiencies in supergiant H II regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Rie E.; Espada, Daniel; Komugi, Shinya; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Kosuke; Kawabe, Ryohei [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kohno, Kotaro [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Tosaki, Tomoka [Joetsu University of Education, Yamayashiki-machi, Joetsu, Niigata 943-8512 (Japan); Hirota, Akihiko; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, Minamimaki, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1805 (Japan); Okumura, Sachiko K. [Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Japan Woman' s University, Mejirodai 2-8-1, Bunkyo, Tokyo 112-8681 (Japan); Kuno, Nario [Department of Astronomical Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Sokendai), 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Onodera, Sachiko [Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen 1-1, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Kaneko, Hiroyuki, E-mail: rie.miura@nao.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Meisei University, Hino, Tokyo 191-8506 (Japan)

    2014-06-20

    We present evidence that super giant H II regions (GHRs) and other disk regions of the nearby spiral galaxy, M33, occupy distinct locations in the correlation between molecular gas, Σ{sub H{sub 2}}, and the star formation rate surface density, Σ{sub SFR}. This result is based on wide-field and high-sensitivity CO(3-2) observations at 100 pc resolution. Star formation efficiencies (SFEs), defined as Σ{sub SFR}/Σ{sub H{sub 2}}, in GHRs are found to be ∼1 dex higher than in other disk regions. The CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) integrated intensity ratio, R {sub 3-2/1-0}, is also higher than the average over the disk. Such high SFEs and R {sub 3-2/1-0} can reach the values found in starburst galaxies, which suggests that GHRs may be the elements building up a larger-scale starburst region. Three possible contributions to high SFEs in GHRs are investigated: (1) the I {sub CO}-N(H{sub 2}) conversion factor, (2) the dense gas fraction traced by R {sub 3-2/1-0}, and (3) the initial mass function (IMF). We conclude that these starburst-like properties in GHRs can be interpreted by a combination of both a top-heavy IMF and a high dense gas fraction, but not by changes in the I {sub CO}-N(H{sub 2}) conversion factor.

  13. EPA for Businesses and Non-Profits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information and links to EPA web pages that are meant to help businesses and non-profits adhere to EPA regulations and otherwise protect the environment, take advantage of opportunities to collaborate with the EPA, and find training EPA training programs.

  14. Study of the central region of the ternary diagram Zr-Nb-Fe, Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, C; Saragovi, C; Arias, D; Granovsky, M

    2004-01-01

    This work continues with the identification and characterization of the intermetallic phases and of the two-phase and three-phase fields associated with the central region of the Zr-Nb-Fe phase diagram. In order to more precisely define the two-phase field βZr + λ 2 and to specify the range of existence in the zone with the highest Fe content for the λ2 phase, new alloys were smelted with the following nominal compositions: Zr 55 Nb 35 Fe 10 and Zr 35 Nb 5 Fe 60 . These alloys were submitted to a thermal treatment at 900 o C for 4 months. The techniques used to identify and characterize the phases in the samples were: optic metallography and electronic sweep, x-ray diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy. An isothermic cut of the central region for the Zr-Nb-Fe diagram is proposed considering previous results and those obtained in this work (Cw)

  15. POSSIBLE GLOBAL AND REGIONAL EVOLUTIONS OF GEOPOLITICS IN THE XXI CENTURY (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin MINCU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the author briefly presents possible global and regional evolutions of geopolitics in the XXI century grounded on the analysis of some regards expressed by foreign and Romanian specialists in many papers appeared in the late years on this subject. A special attention is granted to the book published by STRATFOR founder George FRIEDMAN “The Next 100 Years: A Forecast for the 21st Century”, edited in Romania to the Litera Publishing House in 2012. The evolutions forecasted on medium and long term will practically damage all Earth’s population and its regions, with dramatic consequences on economic, financial, social, military and environmental plan. The most of the geopolitics’ specialists appreciate with arguments and grounded there will be following intricate decades with riots and wars with spectacular up side downs of situations and major reconfigurations of areas of influence of major powers with important influences also over Romania.

  16. Confidence-building in the Asia-Pacific region. Report of working group II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotton, J.

    1992-01-01

    Detailed presentations of South and North Korea offers positive evaluation concerning bilateral agreements, which aim both reconciliation between the two states and denuclearization of the Korean peninsula. Consideration was given to confidence building measures in the Asia-Pacific region as a whole as well as to the progress made in introducing such measures in various Subregions of Asia-Pacific. The concept of confidence building actually implies a two-part agenda, particular procedures and general process

  17. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Salamanca regional hospital, PEMEX. II. - August of 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles C, A.; Vizuet G, J.; Benitez S, J. A.; Garcia A, J.; Rodriguez A, F.

    2002-01-01

    The Salamanca regional hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  18. THE GOULD’S BELT VERY LARGE ARRAY SURVEY. II. THE SERPENS REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz-León, Gisela N.; Loinard, Laurent; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Pech, Gerardo; Rivera, Juana L.; González-Lópezlira, Rosa A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Morelia 58089 (Mexico); Mioduszewski, Amy J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Domenici Science Operations Center, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dzib, Sergio A. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Torres, Rosa M. [Instituto de Astronomía y Meteorología, Universidad de Guadalajara, Av. Vallarta 2602, Col. Arcos Vallarta, 44130, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México (Mexico); Boden, Andrew F. [Division of Physics, Math and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hartmann, Lee; Kounkel, Marina A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States); II, Neal J. Evans [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Briceño, Cesar [Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Tobin, John, E-mail: g.ortiz@crya.unam.mx [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2015-05-20

    We present deep (∼17 μJy) radio continuum observations of the Serpens molecular cloud, the Serpens south cluster, and the W40 region obtained using the Very Large Array in its A configuration. We detect a total of 146 sources, 29 of which are young stellar objects (YSOs), 2 of which are BV stars, and 5 more of which are associated with phenomena related to YSOs. Based on their radio variability and spectral index, we propose that about 16 of the remaining 110 unclassified sources are also YSOs. For approximately 65% of the known YSOs detected here as radio sources, the emission is most likely non-thermal and related to stellar coronal activity. As also recently observed in Ophiuchus, our sample of YSOs with X-ray counterparts lies below the fiducial Güdel and Benz relation. Finally, we analyze the proper motions of nine sources in the W40 region. This allows us to better constrain the membership of the radio sources in the region.

  19. In-situ measurements of seismic velocities in the San Francisco Bay region...part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, James F.; Fumal, Thomas E.; Borcherdt, Roger D.

    1976-01-01

    Seismic wave velocities (compressional and shear) are important parameters for determining the seismic response characteristics of various geologic units when subjected to strong earthquake ground shaking. Seismic velocities of various units often show a strong correlation with the amounts of damage following large earthquakes and have been used as a basis for certain types of seismic zonation studies. Currently a program is in progress to measure seismic velocities in the San Francisco Bay region at an estimated 150 sites. At each site seismic travel times are measured in drill holes, normally at 2.5-m intervals to a depth of 30 m. Geologic logs are determined from drill hole cuttings, undisturbed samples, and penetrometer samples. The data provide a detailed comparison of geologic and seismic characteristics and provide parameters for estimating strong earthquake ground motions quantitatively at each of the site. A major emphasis of this program is to obtain a detailed comparison of geologic and seismic data on a regional scale for use in seismic zonation. The broad data base available in the San Francisco Bay region suggests using the area as a pilot area for the development of general techniques applicable to other areas.

  20. EXTINCTION AND DUST GEOMETRY IN M83 H II REGIONS: AN HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/WFC3 STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guilin; Calzetti, Daniela; Hong, Sungryong [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Whitmore, Bradley [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chandar, Rupali [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); O' Connell, Robert W. [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Blair, William P. [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cohen, Seth H.; Kim, Hwihyun [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Frogel, Jay A., E-mail: liu@pha.jhu.edu [Galaxies Unlimited, Lutherville, MD 21093 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 narrow-band imaging of the starburst galaxy M83 targeting the hydrogen recombination lines (Hβ, Hα, and Paβ), which we use to investigate the dust extinction in the H II regions. We derive extinction maps with 6 pc spatial resolution from two combinations of hydrogen lines (Hα/Hβ and Hα/Paβ), and show that the longer wavelengths probe larger optical depths, with A{sub V} values larger by ≳1 mag than those derived from the shorter wavelengths. This difference leads to a factor ≳2 discrepancy in the extinction-corrected Hα luminosity, a significant effect when studying extragalactic H II regions. By comparing these observations to a series of simple models, we conclude that a large diversity of absorber/emitter geometric configurations can account for the data, implying a more complex physical structure than the classical foreground ''dust screen'' assumption. However, most data points are bracketed by the foreground screen and a model where dust and emitters are uniformly mixed. When averaged over large (≳100-200 pc) scales, the extinction becomes consistent with a ''dust screen'', suggesting that other geometries tend to be restricted to more local scales. Moreover, the extinction in any region can be described by a combination of the foreground screen and the uniform mixture model with weights of 1/3 and 2/3 in the center (≲2 kpc), respectively, and 2/3 and 1/3 for the rest of the disk. This simple prescription significantly improves the accuracy of the dust extinction corrections and can be especially useful for pixel-based analyses of galaxies similar to M83.

  1. The Charge State of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons across a Reflection Nebula, an H II Region, and a Planetary Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, C.; Bregman, J.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2018-05-01

    Low-resolution Spitzer-IRS spectral map data of a reflection nebula (NGC 7023), H II region (M17), and planetary nebula (NGC 40), totaling 1417 spectra, are analyzed using the data and tools available through the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission is broken down into PAH charge and size subclass contributions using a database-fitting approach. The resulting charge breakdown results are combined with those derived using the traditional PAH band strength ratio approach, which interprets particular PAH band strength ratios as proxies for PAH charge. Here the 6.2/11.2 μm PAH band strength ratio is successfully calibrated against its database equivalent: the {n}PAH}+}/{n}PAH}0} ratio. In turn, this ratio is converted into the PAH ionization parameter, which relates it to the strength of the radiation field, gas temperature, and electron density. Population diagrams are used to derive the {{{H}}}2 density and temperature. The bifurcated plot of the 8.6 versus 11.2 μm PAH band strength for the northwest photo dissociation region in NGC 7023 is shown to be a robust diagnostic template for the {n}PAH}+}/{n}PAH}0} ratio in all three objects. Template spectra for the PAH charge and size subclasses are determined for each object and shown to favorably compare. Using the determined template spectra from NGC 7023 to fit the emission in all three objects yields, upon inspection of the Structure SIMilarity maps, satisfactory results. The choice of extinction curve proves to be critical. Concluding, the distinctly different astronomical environments of a reflection nebula, H II region, and planetary nebula are reflected in their PAH emission spectra.

  2. Theoretical Insight of Physical Adsorption for a Single Component Adsorbent + Adsorbate System: II. The Henry Region

    KAUST Repository

    Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2009-07-07

    The Henry coefficients of a single component adsorbent + adsorbate system are calculated from experimentally measured adsorption isotherm data, from which the heat of adsorption at zero coverage is evaluated. The first part of the papers relates to the development of thermodynamic property surfaces for a single-component adsorbent + adsorbate system1 (Chakraborty, A.; Saha, B. B.; Ng, K. C.; Koyama, S.; Srinivasan, K. Langmuir 2009, 25, 2204). A thermodynamic framework is presented to capture the relationship between the specific surface area (Ai) and the energy factor, and the surface structural and the surface energy heterogeneity distribution factors are analyzed. Using the outlined approach, the maximum possible amount of adsorbate uptake has been evaluated and compared with experimental data. It is found that the adsorbents with higher specific surface areas tend to possess lower heat of adsorption (ΔH°) at the Henry regime. In this paper, we have established the definitive relation between Ai and ΔH° for (i) carbonaceous materials, metal organic frameworks (MOFs), carbon nanotubes, zeolites + hydrogen, and (ii) activated carbons + methane systems. The proposed theoretical framework of At and AH0 provides valuable guides for researchers in developing advanced porous adsorbents for methane and hydrogen uptake. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  3. Bottomside sinusoidal irregularities in the equatorial F region. II - Cross-correlation and spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragin, B. L.; Hanson, W. B.; Mcclure, J. P.; Valladares, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Equatorial bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) irregularities have been studied by applying techniques of cross-correlation and spectral analysis to the Atmosphere Explorer data set. The phase of the cross-correlations of the plasma number density is discussed and the two drift velocity components observed using the retarding potential analyzer and ion drift meter on the satellite are discussed. Morphology is addressed, presenting the geographical distributions of the occurrence of BSS events for the equinoxes and solstices. Physical processes including the ion Larmor flux, interhemispheric plasma flows, and variations in the lower F region Pedersen conductivity are invoked to explain the findings.

  4. Computer program for regional assessment of lung perfusion defect. Part II - verification of the algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefaniak, B.

    2002-01-01

    As described earlier, a dedicated computer program was developed for quantitative evaluation of regional lung perfusion defects, visualized by pulmonary scintigraphy. The correctness of the basic assumptions accepted to construct the algorithms and of the all program functions needed to be checked, before application of the program into the clinical routine. The aim of this study was to verified the program using various software instruments and physical models. Evaluation of the proposed method was performed using software procedures, physical lung phantom, and selected lung image.The reproducibility of lung regions, defined by the program was found excellent. No significant distortion of registered data was observed after ROI transformation into the circle and retransformation into the original shape. The obtained results comprised parametric presentation of activity defects as well as a set of numerical indices which defined extent and intensity of decreased counts density. Among these indices PD2 and DM* were proved the most suitable for the above purposes. The obtained results indicate that the algorithms used for the program construction were correct and suitable for the aim of the study. The above algorithms enable function under study to be presented graphically with true imaging of activity distribution, as well as numerical indices, defining extent and intensity of activity defects to calculated. (author)

  5. Dependence of the trapping regions with the radial electric field in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Liniers, M.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the electric field upon the radial and angular distributions of trapped ions of energies between 0.1 and 1 keV in TJ-II is analysed. Near the magnetic axis, with moderate electric fields, the trapped fraction increases for negative potentials and decreases for positive ones. Nevertheless for high potentials this decreasing for positive sign can be reversed. Near the plasma periphery trapping is affected only for high potentials and always increases, independently of the potential sign. The sensibility to negative potentials is always higher than for the positive ones. These trapping changes are almost uniform in poloidal and toroidal angular profiles and affect mainly to marginally trapped or passing particles. Nevertheless for high potentials or energie the resonances modify this behaviour and inhibit the increasing of trapping in the outer side or the torus. For the locally trapped population fraction a steady decrease with the potential appears independently of the sign, except very near the magnetic axis or the plasma periphery. The global result of all these partial effects is the presence of a wide trapping minimum for moderate positive electric potential, potential that increases with the ion energy as well as a strong increase for high electric fields of either sign, more visible for negative potentials and high energies. For the locally trapped population a steady decrease with potential appears independently of the sign. All these effects can be explained by the combined action of the appearance and elimination of radial magnetic barriers and of the electric field resonances. (Author)

  6. Environment of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 971214: A Giant H ii Region Surrounded by a Galactic Supershell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn

    2000-02-10

    Among a number of gamma-ray bursts whose host galaxies are known, GRB 971214 stands out for its high redshift (z>/=3) and the Lyalpha emission line having a P Cygni-type profile, which is interpreted to be a direct consequence of the expanding supershell. From a profile-fitting analysis, we estimate the expansion velocity of the supershell (vexp=1500 km s-1) and the neutral column density (NHi=1020 cm -2). The redshift z=3.418 of the host galaxy proposed by Kulkarni et al. in 1998 has been revised to be z=3.425 from our profile analysis. The observed Lyalpha profile is fitted well by a Gaussian curve, which yields the Lyalpha luminosity LLyalpha=&parl0;1.8+/-0.8&parr0;x1042 ergs s-1. Assuming that the photon source is a giant H ii region, we deduce the electron number density in the H ii region ne=&parl0;40+/-10&parr0;&parl0;L/LLyalpha&parr0;0.5&parl0;R/100 pc&parr0;-1.5 cm-3, which corresponds to the illumination by about 104 O5 stars. We estimate the star formation rate to be RSF=7+/-3 M middle dot in circle yr-1 with the internal and the Galactic extinction corrected. The theory on the evolution of supernova remnants is used to propose that the supershell is at the adiabatic phase, with its radius R=18E1&solm0;253 pc, its age t=4.7x103E1&solm0;253 yr, and the density of the ambient medium n1=5.4E-1&solm0;253 cm-3, where E53=E&solm0;1053 ergs; we estimate the kinetic energy of the supershell to be Ek=7.3x1052E53 ergs. These values are consistent with the hypothesis that the supershell is the remnant of a gamma-ray burst. We note similarities between supershells found in nearby galaxies and remote primeval galaxies and propose that the gamma-ray burst may have occurred in a giant H ii region whose environment is similar to that in star-forming galaxies.

  7. TRIGONOMETRIC PARALLAXES OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS. II. CEP A AND NGC 7538

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscadelli, L.; Reid, M. J.; Menten, K. M.; Brunthaler, A.; Xu, Y.; Zheng, X. W.

    2009-01-01

    We report trigonometric parallaxes for the sources NGC 7538 and Cep A, corresponding to distances of 2.65 +0.12 -0.11 and 0.70 +0.04 -0.04 kpc, respectively. The distance to NGC 7538 is considerably smaller than its kinematic distance and places it in the Perseus spiral arm. The distance to Cep A is also smaller than its kinematic distance and places it in the L ocalarm or spur. Combining the distance and proper motions with observed radial velocities gives the location and full space motion of the star-forming regions. We find significant deviations from circular galactic orbits for these sources: both sources show large peculiar motions (greater than 10 km s -1 ) counter to galactic rotation and NGC 7538 has a comparable peculiar motion toward the Galactic center.

  8. Gap winds and their effects on regional oceanography Part II: Kodiak Island, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Carol; Cheng, Wei; Salo, Sigrid

    2016-10-01

    Frequent gap winds, defined here as offshore-directed flow channeled through mountain gaps, have been observed near Kodiak Island in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). Gap winds from the Iliamna Lake gap were investigated using QuikSCAT wind data. The influence of these wind events on the regional ocean was examined using satellite and in situ data combined with Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) model runs. Gap winds influence the entire shelf width (> 200 km) northeast of Kodiak Island and extend an additional 150 km off-shelf. Due to strong gradients in the along-shelf direction, they can result in vertical velocities in the ocean of over 20 m d-1 due to Ekman pumping. The wind events also disrupt flow of the Alaska Coastal Current (ACC), resulting in decreased flow down Shelikof Strait and increased velocities on the outer shelf. This disruption of the ACC has implications for freshwater transport into the Bering Sea. The oceanographic response to gap winds may influence the survival of larval fishes as Arrowtooth Flounder recruitment is negatively correlated with the interannual frequency of gap-wind events, and Pacific Cod recruitment is positively correlated. The frequency of offshore directed winds exhibits a strong seasonal cycle averaging 7 days per month during winter and 2 days per month during summer. Interannual variability is correlated with the Pacific North America Index and shows a linear trend, increasing by 1.35 days per year. An accompanying paper discusses part I of our study (Ladd and Cheng, 2016) focusing on gap-wind events flowing out of Cross Sound in the eastern GOA.

  9. He II {lambda}4686 IN {eta} CARINAE: COLLAPSE OF THE WIND-WIND COLLISION REGION DURING PERIASTRON PASSAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodoro, M.; Damineli, A. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Arias, J. I. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de La Serena, Av. Cisternas 1200 Norte, La Serena (Chile); De Araujo, F. X.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Pereira, C. B. [Observatorio Nacional, Rua General Jose Cristino 77, Sao Cristovao, Rio de Janeiro 20921-400 (Brazil); Barba, R. H.; Gonzalez, J. F. [Instituto de Ciencias Astronomicas, de la Tierra, y del Espacio (ICATE-CONICET), Avenida Espana Sur 1512, J5402DSP San Juan (Argentina); Corcoran, M. F. [CRESST and X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Fernandez-Lajus, E.; Gamen, R. C.; Solivella, G. R. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, La Plata, BA, B1900FWA (Argentina); Fraga, L. [Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research, Colina El Pino s/n, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Groh, J. H. [Max-Planck-Institute fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Marshall, J. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); McGregor, P. J.; Nicholls, D. C.; Parkin, E. R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA), Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Morrell, N.; Phillips, M. M., E-mail: mairan@astro.iag.usp.br [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); and others

    2012-02-10

    The periodic spectroscopic events in {eta} Carinae are now well established and occur near the periastron passage of two massive stars in a very eccentric orbit. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the variations of different spectral features, such as an eclipse by the wind-wind collision (WWC) boundary, a shell ejection from the primary star or accretion of its wind onto the secondary. All of them have problems explaining all the observed phenomena. To better understand the nature of the cyclic events, we performed a dense monitoring of {eta} Carinae with five Southern telescopes during the 2009 low-excitation event, resulting in a set of data of unprecedented quality and sampling. The intrinsic luminosity of the He II {lambda}4686 emission line (L {approx} 310 L{sub Sun }) just before periastron reveals the presence of a very luminous transient source of extreme UV radiation emitted in the WWC region. Clumps in the primary's wind probably explain the flare-like behavior of both the X-ray and He II {lambda}4686 light curves. After a short-lived minimum, He II {lambda}4686 emission rises again to a new maximum, when X-rays are still absent or very weak. We interpret this as a collapse of the WWC onto the 'surface' of the secondary star, switching off the hard X-ray source and diminishing the WWC shock cone. The recovery from this state is controlled by the momentum balance between the secondary's wind and the clumps in the primary's wind.

  10. He II lambda-4686 in Eta Carinae: Collapse of the Wind-Wind Collision Region During Periastron Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, M.; Damineli, A.; Arias, J. I.; DeAraujo, F. X.; Barba, R. H.; Corcoran, M. F.; Fernandes, M. Borges; Fernandez-Lajus, E.; Fraga, L.; Gamen, R. C.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The periodic spectroscopic events in Eta Carinae are now well established and occur near the periastron passage of two massive stars in a very eccentric orbit. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the variations of different spectral features, such as an eclipse by the wind-wind collision boundary, a shell ejection from the primary star or accretion of its wind onto the secondary. All of them have problems explaining all the observed phenomena. To better understand the nature of the cyclic events we performed a dense monitoring of Eta Carinae with 5 Southern telescopes during the 2009 low excitation event, resulting in a set of data of unprecedented quality and sampling. The intrinsic luminosity of the He II lambda-4686 emission line (L approx 310 solar L) just before periastron reveals the presence of a very luminous transient source of extreme UV radiation emitted in the wind-wind collision (WWC) region. Clumps in the primary's wind probably explain the flare-like behavior of both the X-ray and He II lambda-4686 light-curves. After a short-lived minimum, He II lambda-4686 emission rises again to a new maximum, when X-rays are still absent or very weak. We interpret this as a collapse of the WWC onto the "surface" of the secondary star, switching off the hard X-ray source and diminishing the WWC shock cone. The recovery from this state is controlled by the momentum balance between the secondary's wind and the clumps in the primary's wind.

  11. Metal-poor dwarf galaxies in the SIGRID galaxy sample. I. H II region observations and chemical abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Jerjen, Helmut; Kewley, Lisa J.; Basurah, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of observations of 17 H II regions in thirteen galaxies from the SIGRID sample of isolated gas-rich irregular dwarf galaxies. The spectra of all but one of the galaxies exhibit the auroral [O III] 4363 Å line, from which we calculate the electron temperature, T e , and gas-phase oxygen abundance. Five of the objects are blue compact dwarf galaxies, of which four have not previously been analyzed spectroscopically. We include one unusual galaxy which exhibits no evidence of the [N II] λλ 6548,6584 Å lines, suggesting a particularly low metallicity (< Z ☉ /30). We compare the electron temperature based abundances with those derived using eight of the new strong-line diagnostics presented by Dopita et al. Using a method derived from first principles for calculating total oxygen abundance, we show that the discrepancy between the T e -based and strong-line gas-phase abundances have now been reduced to within ∼0.07 dex. The chemical abundances are consistent with what is expected from the luminosity-metallicity relation. We derive estimates of the electron densities and find them to be between ∼5 and ∼100 cm –3 . We find no evidence for a nitrogen plateau for objects in this sample with metallicities 0.5 > Z ☉ > 0.15.

  12. Metal-poor dwarf galaxies in the SIGRID galaxy sample. I. H II region observations and chemical abundances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholls, David C.; Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Jerjen, Helmut; Kewley, Lisa J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston ACT 2611 (Australia); Basurah, Hassan, E-mail: David.Nicholls@anu.edu.au [Astronomy Department, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203 Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-05-10

    In this paper we present the results of observations of 17 H II regions in thirteen galaxies from the SIGRID sample of isolated gas-rich irregular dwarf galaxies. The spectra of all but one of the galaxies exhibit the auroral [O III] 4363 Å line, from which we calculate the electron temperature, T{sub e} , and gas-phase oxygen abundance. Five of the objects are blue compact dwarf galaxies, of which four have not previously been analyzed spectroscopically. We include one unusual galaxy which exhibits no evidence of the [N II] λλ 6548,6584 Å lines, suggesting a particularly low metallicity (< Z {sub ☉}/30). We compare the electron temperature based abundances with those derived using eight of the new strong-line diagnostics presented by Dopita et al. Using a method derived from first principles for calculating total oxygen abundance, we show that the discrepancy between the T{sub e} -based and strong-line gas-phase abundances have now been reduced to within ∼0.07 dex. The chemical abundances are consistent with what is expected from the luminosity-metallicity relation. We derive estimates of the electron densities and find them to be between ∼5 and ∼100 cm{sup –3}. We find no evidence for a nitrogen plateau for objects in this sample with metallicities 0.5 > Z {sub ☉} > 0.15.

  13. Hydrogeological modelling of the eastern region of Areco river locally detailed on Atucha I and II nuclear power plants area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grattone, Natalia I.; Fuentes, Nestor O.

    2009-01-01

    Water flow behaviour of Pampeano aquifer was modeled using Visual Mod-flow software Package 2.8.1 with the assumption of a free aquifer, within the region of the Areco river and extending to the rivers of 'Canada Honda' and 'de la Cruz'. Steady state regime was simulated and grid refinement allows obtaining locally detailed calculation in the area of Atucha I and II Nuclear power plants, in order to compute unsteady situations as the consequence of water flow variations from and to the aquifer, enabling the model to study the movement of possible contaminant particles in the hydrogeologic system. In this work the effects of rivers action, the recharge conditions and the flow lines are analyzed, taking always into account the range of reliability of obtained results, considering the incidence of uncertainties introduced by data input system, the estimates and interpolation of parameters used. (author)

  14. Prediction of a new region in the H-T phase diagram of a disordered type II superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandgaonkar, Ajay; Kanhere, D.G.; Trivedi, Nandini

    1997-01-01

    The phase diagram of a type II superconductor (SC) in the magnetic field (B) - temperature (T) plane is shown schematically. At low T the system consists of an Abrikosov triangular vortex lattice which melts as the temperature is increased. At high B, the rigidity of the vortex lattice C 66 decreases with increasing B. Thus, the melting curve essentially tracks the H c2 behaviour, as shown in region (a) in fig. It was further suggested by Nelson, based on a mapping of vortices in 3D onto a problem of boson world-lines in spatial 2D and 1 imaginary dimension, that the classical statistical mechanics of vortices is analogous to the problem of quantum melting of the bosons. He used this mapping to predict a novel reentrant behavior of the phase boundary. These predictions were verified by experiments

  15. Brownfield Sites, Region 9, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Brownfields are real property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance,...

  16. Social Vulnerability Index, Region 9, 2011, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Social Vulnerability Index is derived from the 2000 US Census data. The fields included are percent minority, median household income, age (under 18 and over...

  17. FLICKERING OF 1.3 cm SOURCES IN SGR B2: TOWARD A SOLUTION TO THE ULTRACOMPACT H II REGION LIFETIME PROBLEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pree, C. G.; Monsrud, A. [Agnes Scott College, 141 East College Avenue, Decatur, GA 30030 (United States); Peters, T. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Zürich, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Mac Low, M.-M. [American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Wilner, D. J.; Keto, E. R. [Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Galván-Madrid, R. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Klessen, R. S. [Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-02-01

    Accretion flows onto massive stars must transfer mass so quickly that they are themselves gravitationally unstable, forming dense clumps and filaments. These density perturbations interact with young massive stars, emitting ionizing radiation, alternately exposing and confining their H II regions. As a result, the H II regions are predicted to flicker in flux density over periods of decades to centuries rather than increase monotonically in size as predicted by simple Spitzer solutions. We have recently observed the Sgr B2 region at 1.3 cm with the Very Large Array in its three hybrid configurations (DnC, CnB, and BnA) at a resolution of ∼0.''25. These observations were made to compare in detail with matched continuum observations from 1989. At 0.''25 resolution, Sgr B2 contains 41 ultracompact (UC) H II regions, 6 of which are hypercompact. The new observations of Sgr B2 allow comparison of relative peak flux densities for the H II regions in Sgr B2 over a 23 year time baseline (1989-2012) in one of the most source-rich massive star forming regions in the Milky Way. The new 1.3 cm continuum images indicate that four of the 41 UC H II regions exhibit significant changes in their peak flux density, with one source (K3) dropping in peak flux density, and the other three sources (F10.303, F1, and F3) increasing in peak flux density. The results are consistent with statistical predictions from simulations of high mass star formation, suggesting that they offer a solution to the lifetime problem for UC H II regions.

  18. Electron-Positron Accumulator (EPA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1986-01-01

    After acceleration in the low-current linac LIL-W, the electrons and positrons are accumulated in EPA to obtain a sufficient intensity and a suitable time-structure, before being passed on to the PS for further acceleration to 3.5 GeV. Electrons circulate from right to left, positrons in the other direction. Dipole bending magnets are red, focusing quadrupoles blue, sextupoles for chromaticity-control orange. The vertical tube at the left of the picture belongs to an optical transport system carrying the synchrotron radiation to detectors for beam size measurement. Construction of EPA was completed in spring 1986. LIL-W and EPA were conceived for an energy of 600 MeV, but operation was limited to 500 MeV.

  19. Cosmic-Ray Transport in Heliospheric Magnetic Structures. II. Modeling Particle Transport through Corotating Interaction Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Andreas [Université Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Physique Statistique et des Plasmas, CP 231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Wiengarten, Tobias; Fichtner, Horst [Institut für Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Effenberger, Frederic [Department of Physics and KIPAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kühl, Patrick; Heber, Bernd [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrecht-Universität zu Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Raath, Jan-Louis; Potgieter, Marius S. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa)

    2017-03-01

    The transport of cosmic rays (CRs) in the heliosphere is determined by the properties of the solar wind plasma. The heliospheric plasma environment has been probed by spacecraft for decades and provides a unique opportunity for testing transport theories. Of particular interest for the three-dimensional (3D) heliospheric CR transport are structures such as corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which, due to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength and magnetic fluctuations within and due to the associated shocks as well as stream interfaces, do influence the CR diffusion and drift. In a three-fold series of papers, we investigate these effects by modeling inner-heliospheric solar wind conditions with the numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework Cronos (Wiengarten et al., referred as Paper I), and the results serve as input to a transport code employing a stochastic differential equation approach (this paper). While, in Paper I, we presented results from 3D simulations with Cronos, the MHD output is now taken as an input to the CR transport modeling. We discuss the diffusion and drift behavior of Galactic cosmic rays using the example of different theories, and study the effects of CIRs on these transport processes. In particular, we point out the wide range of possible particle fluxes at a given point in space resulting from these different theories. The restriction of this variety by fitting the numerical results to spacecraft data will be the subject of the third paper of this series.

  20. Study of the molecular and ionized gas in a possible precursor of an ultra-compact H II region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, M. E.; Paron, S.; Giacani, E.; Celis Peña, M.; Rubio, M.; Petriella, A.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: We aim to study the molecular and the ionized gas in a possible precursor of an ultra-compact H II region to contribute to the understanding of how high-mass stars build-up their masses once they have reached the zero-age main sequence. Methods: We carried out molecular observations toward the position of the Red MSX source G052.9221-00.4892, using the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE; Chile) in the 12CO J = 3-2, 13CO J = 3-2, C18O J = 3-2, and HCO+J = 4-3 lines with an angular resolution of about 22''. We also present radio continuum observations at 6 GHz carried out with the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA; USA) interferometer with a synthesized beam of 4.8 arcsec × 4.1 arcsec. The molecular data were used to study the distribution and kinematics of the molecular gas, while the radio continuum data were used to characterize the ionized gas in the region. Combining these observations with public infrared data allowed us to inquire about the nature of the source. Results: The analysis of the molecular observations reveals the presence of a kinetic temperature and H2 column density gradients across the molecular clump in which the Red MSX source G052.9221-00.4892 is embedded, with the hotter and less dense gas in the inner region. The 12CO J = 3-2 emission shows evidence of misaligned massive molecular outflows, with the blue lobe in positional coincidence with a jet-like feature seen at 8 μm. The radio continuum emission shows a slightly elongated compact radio source, with a flux density of about 0.9 mJy, in positional coincidence with the Red MSX source. The polar-like morphology of this compact radio source perfectly matches the hourglass-like morphology exhibited by the source in the Ks band. Moreover, the axes of symmetry of the radio source and the near-infrared nebula are perfectly aligned. Thus, based on the presence of molecular outflows, the slightly elongated morphology of the compact radio source matching the hourglass

  1. Physical and chemical properties of Red MSX Sources in the southern sky: H II regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Naiping; Wang, Jun-Jie; Li, Nan

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the physical and chemical properties of 18 southern Red Midcourse Space Experiment Sources (RMSs), using archival data taken from the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy, the Australia Telescope Compact Array, and the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team Survey at 90 GHz. Most of our sources have simple cometary/unresolved radio emissions at 4.8 and/or 8.6GHz. The large number of Lyman continuum fluxes (NL) indicates they are probably massive O- or early B-type star formation regions. Archival IRAS infrared data are used to estimate the dust temperature, which is about 30 K of our sources. Then, the H2 column densities and the volume-averaged H2 number densities are estimated using the 870 μm dust emissions. Large-scale infall and ionized accretions may be occurring in G345.4881+00.3148. We also attempt to characterize the chemical properties of these RMSs through molecular line (N2H+ (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0)) observations. Most of the detected N2H+ and HCO+ emissions match well with the dust emission, implying a close link to their chemical evolution in the RMSs. We found that the abundance of N2H+ is one order of magnitude lower than that in other surveys of infrared dark clouds, and a positive correlation between the abundances of N2H+ and HCO+. The fractional abundance of N2H+ with respect to H2 seems to decrease as a function of NL. These observed trends could be interpreted as an indication of enhanced destruction of N2H+, either by CO or through dissociative recombination with electrons produced by central UV photons.

  2. Optical photometric variable stars towards the Galactic H II region NGC 2282

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Somnath; Mondal, Soumen; Joshi, Santosh; Jose, Jessy; Das, Ramkrishna; Ghosh, Supriyo

    2018-05-01

    We report here CCD I-band time series photometry of a young (2-5 Myr) cluster NGC 2282, in order to identify and understand the variability of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars. The I-band photometry, down to ˜20.5 mag, enables us to probe the variability towards the lower mass end (˜0.1 M⊙) of PMS stars. From the light curves of 1627 stars, we identified 62 new photometric variable candidates. Their association with the region was established from H α emission and infrared (IR) excess. Among 62 variables, 30 young variables exhibit H α emission, near-IR (NIR)/mid-IR (MIR) excess or both and are candidate members of the cluster. Out of 62 variables, 41 are periodic variables, with a rotation rate ranging from 0.2-7 d. The period distribution exhibits a median period at ˜1 d, as in many young clusters (e.g. NGC 2264, ONC, etc.), but it follows a unimodal distribution, unlike others that have bimodality, with slow rotators peaking at ˜6-8 d. To investigate the rotation-disc and variability-disc connection, we derived the NIR excess from Δ(I - K) and the MIR excess from Spitzer [3.6]-[4.5] μm data. No conclusive evidence of slow rotation with the presence of discs around stars and fast rotation for discless stars is obtained from our periodic variables. A clear increasing trend of the variability amplitude with IR excess is found for all variables.

  3. 40 CFR 131.22 - EPA promulgation of water quality standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA promulgation of water quality... PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Procedures for Review and Revision of Water Quality Standards § 131.22 EPA promulgation of water quality standards. (a) If the State does not adopt the changes specified by the Regional...

  4. Photospheric Magnetic Field Properties of Flaring versus Flare-quiet Active Regions. II. Discriminant Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leka, K. D.; Barnes, G.

    2003-10-01

    We apply statistical tests based on discriminant analysis to the wide range of photospheric magnetic parameters described in a companion paper by Leka & Barnes, with the goal of identifying those properties that are important for the production of energetic events such as solar flares. The photospheric vector magnetic field data from the University of Hawai'i Imaging Vector Magnetograph are well sampled both temporally and spatially, and we include here data covering 24 flare-event and flare-quiet epochs taken from seven active regions. The mean value and rate of change of each magnetic parameter are treated as separate variables, thus evaluating both the parameter's state and its evolution, to determine which properties are associated with flaring. Considering single variables first, Hotelling's T2-tests show small statistical differences between flare-producing and flare-quiet epochs. Even pairs of variables considered simultaneously, which do show a statistical difference for a number of properties, have high error rates, implying a large degree of overlap of the samples. To better distinguish between flare-producing and flare-quiet populations, larger numbers of variables are simultaneously considered; lower error rates result, but no unique combination of variables is clearly the best discriminator. The sample size is too small to directly compare the predictive power of large numbers of variables simultaneously. Instead, we rank all possible four-variable permutations based on Hotelling's T2-test and look for the most frequently appearing variables in the best permutations, with the interpretation that they are most likely to be associated with flaring. These variables include an increasing kurtosis of the twist parameter and a larger standard deviation of the twist parameter, but a smaller standard deviation of the distribution of the horizontal shear angle and a horizontal field that has a smaller standard deviation but a larger kurtosis. To support the

  5. The effect of pricing level to the loss of welfare costs (case study: Indonesia region II water company)

    Science.gov (United States)

    K, B. Rosalina E. W.; Gravitiani, E.; Raharjo, M.; Mulyaningsih, T.

    2018-03-01

    Climate change makes the water balance composition being unstable, both quality and quantity. As a company which responsible for water management, Regional Drinking Water Company (abbreviated as PDAM) is often unable to solve the problem. Welfare costs are indicators to evaluate the economic efficiency. This study aims to calculate the welfare cost of the people lost due to the price determination of PDAM Indonesia in region II with deadweight loss (DWL) approach, so it can provide information to pricing regulator, pricing decision makers and for coIDRorate management. DWL is a loss of economic efficiency that can occur when equilibrium for a good or a service is not achieved, caused by monopoly pricing of artificial scarcity, an externality, a tax or subsidy, or a binding price ceiling or price floor such as a minimum wage. Results showed that the pricing rules set by PDAM yielded different DWL, depending on margin set by the company DWL PDAM ranges between IDR 260,485.66/M3 to IDR 127,486,709.86/M3 which is actually shared to improve the welfare of customers, other communities, and PDAM itself. Data analysis used PDAM performance in 2015 that have not Good CoIDRorate Governance Management and Efficiency.

  6. A single nucleotide in stem loop II of 5'-untranslated region contributes to virulence of enterovirus 71 in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Te Yeh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has emerged as a neuroinvasive virus responsible for several large outbreaks in the Asia-Pacific region while virulence determinant remains unexplored. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, we investigated increased virulence of unadapted EV71 clinical isolate 237 as compared with isolate 4643 in mice. A fragment 12 nucleotides in length in stem loop (SL II of 237 5'-untranslated region (UTR visibly reduced survival time and rate in mice was identified by constructing a series of infectious clones harboring chimeric 5'-UTR. In cells transfected with bicistronic plasmids, and replicon RNAs, the 12-nt fragment of isolate 237 enhanced translational activities and accelerated replication of subgenomic EV71. Finally, single nucleotide change from cytosine to uridine at base 158 in this short fragment of 5'-UTR was proven to reduce viral translation and EV71 virulence in mice. Results collectively indicated a pivotal role of novel virulence determinant C158 on virus translation in vitro and EV71 virulence in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: These results presented the first reported virulence determinant in EV71 5'-UTR and first position discovered from unadapted isolates.

  7. Evolution of Air Quality Model at the US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    At the US EPA, we have developed an air quality model, CMAQ, in the past 20+ years. Throughout the years, the model has been upgraded with respect to advancement of science. We have extended the model from regional to hemispheric. We have coupled it with meteorological model, WR...

  8. EPA Principles for Greener Cleanups

    Science.gov (United States)

    A goal of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office and Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) and its many partners is to preserve and restore land by promoting and using protective waste management practices and by assessing and cleaning..

  9. GET SMART: EPA'S SMARTE INITIATIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA's Office of Research and Development with the assistance of the U.S.-German Bilateral Working Group and the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC), is developing Site-specific Management Approaches and Revitalization Tools (SMART) that will help stakeholders over...

  10. EPA's Benchmark Dose Modeling Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA developed the Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS) as a tool to help Agency risk assessors facilitate applying benchmark dose (BMD) method’s to EPA’s human health risk assessment (HHRA) documents. The application of BMD methods overcomes many well know limitations ...

  11. Statistical downscaling of historical monthly mean winds over a coastal region of complex terrain. II. Predicting wind components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamp, Derek van der [University of Victoria, Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium, Victoria, BC (Canada); University of Victoria, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Victoria, BC (Canada); Curry, Charles L. [Environment Canada University of Victoria, Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Victoria, BC (Canada); University of Victoria, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Victoria, BC (Canada); Monahan, Adam H. [University of Victoria, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2012-04-15

    A regression-based downscaling technique was applied to monthly mean surface wind observations from stations throughout western Canada as well as from buoys in the Northeast Pacific Ocean over the period 1979-2006. A predictor set was developed from principal component analysis of the three wind components at 500 hPa and mean sea-level pressure taken from the NCEP Reanalysis II. Building on the results of a companion paper, Curry et al. (Clim Dyn 2011), the downscaling was applied to both wind speed and wind components, in an effort to evaluate the utility of each type of predictand. Cross-validated prediction skill varied strongly with season, with autumn and summer displaying the highest and lowest skill, respectively. In most cases wind components were predicted with better skill than wind speeds. The predictive ability of wind components was found to be strongly related to their orientation. Wind components with the best predictions were often oriented along topographically significant features such as constricted valleys, mountain ranges or ocean channels. This influence of directionality on predictive ability is most prominent during autumn and winter at inland sites with complex topography. Stations in regions with relatively flat terrain (where topographic steering is minimal) exhibit inter-station consistencies including region-wide seasonal shifts in the direction of the best predicted wind component. The conclusion that wind components can be skillfully predicted only over a limited range of directions at most stations limits the scope of statistically downscaled wind speed predictions. It seems likely that such limitations apply to other regions of complex terrain as well. (orig.)

  12. The changes of regional cerebral blood flow: successful pain relief of intractable CRPS type II patients by motor cortex stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J. A.; Son, H. S.; Kim, S. H.; Jung, S. G

    2004-01-01

    Authors report the effectiveness of MCS in extraordinarily extended pain due to intractable CRPS type II and rCBF study result for mechanism of pain control by MCS. A 43-year-old male presented severe spontaneous burning pain in his left hand and forearm and allodynia over the left arm and left hemibody. Authors planned MCS as a neuromodulation therapy for this intractable peripheral neuropathic pain patient because further neurodestructive procedure did not work anymore and have a potential risk of further aggrevation of neuopathic pain. We performed baseline and stimulation brain perfusion SPECT using 20 mCi of Tc-99m ECD. The baseline CBD studies were done with stimulator 'off' state and stimulation studies were done after stimulator 'on' with satisfactory pain relief. For the stimulation study, the radioisotope was injected immediately after pain-relief and the images were taken about 50 minutes after injection of radioisotope. In resting rCBF in the patient was compared with normal control datas, we found significant increase in rCBF in the bilateral prefrontal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right superior temporal gyrus, left temporooccipital area. When rCBF datas obtained after alleviation of pain with stimulator 'on' . there were significant increase in rCBF in bilateral prefrontal cortex and left temporoocipital area. After subtraction of ECD SPECT, we found significant increase in rCBF in the right premotor and supplementary motor cortex left sensorimotor cortex, right cingulated cortex, right posterior insular cortex, right anterior limb of internal capsule. left orbitofrontal cortex and right pyramidal tract in cerebral peduncle. Authors report exellent pain control by MCS in a case of severe CRPS type II with hemibody involvement and regional cerebral blood flow changes according to successful pain control

  13. The changes of regional cerebral blood flow: successful pain relief of intractable CRPS type II patients by motor cortex stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J. A.; Son, H. S.; Kim, S. H.; Jung, S. G [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Authors report the effectiveness of MCS in extraordinarily extended pain due to intractable CRPS type II and rCBF study result for mechanism of pain control by MCS. A 43-year-old male presented severe spontaneous burning pain in his left hand and forearm and allodynia over the left arm and left hemibody. Authors planned MCS as a neuromodulation therapy for this intractable peripheral neuropathic pain patient because further neurodestructive procedure did not work anymore and have a potential risk of further aggrevation of neuopathic pain. We performed baseline and stimulation brain perfusion SPECT using 20 mCi of Tc-99m ECD. The baseline CBD studies were done with stimulator 'off' state and stimulation studies were done after stimulator 'on' with satisfactory pain relief. For the stimulation study, the radioisotope was injected immediately after pain-relief and the images were taken about 50 minutes after injection of radioisotope. In resting rCBF in the patient was compared with normal control datas, we found significant increase in rCBF in the bilateral prefrontal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right superior temporal gyrus, left temporooccipital area. When rCBF datas obtained after alleviation of pain with stimulator 'on' . there were significant increase in rCBF in bilateral prefrontal cortex and left temporoocipital area. After subtraction of ECD SPECT, we found significant increase in rCBF in the right premotor and supplementary motor cortex left sensorimotor cortex, right cingulated cortex, right posterior insular cortex, right anterior limb of internal capsule. left orbitofrontal cortex and right pyramidal tract in cerebral peduncle. Authors report exellent pain control by MCS in a case of severe CRPS type II with hemibody involvement and regional cerebral blood flow changes according to successful pain control.

  14. U.S. EPA Metadata Editor (EME)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EPA Metadata Editor (EME) allows users to create geospatial metadata that meets EPA's requirements. The tool has been developed as a desktop application that...

  15. EPA Linked Open Data: Substance Registry Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Substance Registry Services (SRS) is the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) central system for information about substances that are tracked or regulated by EPA...

  16. 2011 EPA Pesticide General Permit (PGP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The 2011 EPA Pesticide General Permit (PGP) covers discharges of biological pesticides, and chemical pesticides that leave a residue, in areas where EPA is the NPDES...

  17. EPA's role in uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    EPA's role and actions in regulating uranium mining and milling are reviewed and updated. Special emphasis is given to EPA's current activities under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978

  18. HELIUM IN NATAL H II REGIONS: THE ORIGIN OF THE X-RAY ABSORPTION IN GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, Darach; Andersen, Anja C.; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Hjorth, Jens; Krühler, Thomas; Laursen, Peter; Leloudas, Giorgos; Malesani, Daniele; Zafar, Tayyaba; Gorosabel, Javier; Jakobsson, Páll

    2013-01-01

    Soft X-ray absorption in excess of Galactic is observed in the afterglows of most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), but the correct solution to its origin has not been arrived at after more than a decade of work, preventing its use as a powerful diagnostic tool. We resolve this long-standing problem and find that absorption by He in the GRB's host H II region is responsible for most of the absorption. We show that the X-ray absorbing column density (N H X ) is correlated with both the neutral gas column density and with the optical afterglow's dust extinction (A V ). This correlation explains the connection between dark bursts and bursts with high N H X values. From these correlations, we exclude an origin of the X-ray absorption which is not related to the host galaxy, i.e., the intergalactic medium or intervening absorbers are not responsible. We find that the correlation with the dust column has a strong redshift evolution, whereas the correlation with the neutral gas does not. From this, we conclude that the column density of the X-ray absorption is correlated with the total gas column density in the host galaxy rather than the metal column density, in spite of the fact that X-ray absorption is typically dominated by metals. The strong redshift evolution of N H X /A V is thus a reflection of the cosmic metallicity evolution of star-forming galaxies and we find it to be consistent with measurements of the redshift evolution of metallicities for GRB host galaxies. We conclude that the absorption of X-rays in GRB afterglows is caused by He in the H II region hosting the GRB. While dust is destroyed and metals are stripped of all of their electrons by the GRB to great distances, the abundance of He saturates the He-ionizing UV continuum much closer to the GRB, allowing it to remain in the neutral or singly-ionized state. Helium X-ray absorption explains the correlation with total gas, the lack of strong evolution with redshift, as well as the absence of dust, metal or

  19. Low-level and narm radioactive wastes. Model documentation: accounting model for PRESTO-EPA-POP, PRESTO-EPA-DEEP, and PRESTO-EPA-BRC. Methodology and users manual. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, V.; Hung, C.

    1987-12-01

    The accounting model was used as a utility model for assessing the cumulative health effects to the general population residing in the downstream regional water basin as a result of the disposal of LLW when a unit response analysis method is used. The utility model is specifically designed to assess the cumulative population health effects in conjunction with the PRESTO-EPA-POP, PRESTO-EPA-BRC, or PRESTO-EPA-DEEP model simply for the purpose of reducing the cost of analysis. Therefore, the assessment of the cumulative population health effects may also be conducted with one of the above appropriate models without the aid of this accounting model

  20. Two-dimensional Molecular Gas and Ongoing Star Formation around H II Region Sh2-104

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin-Long; Xu, Ye; Yu, Naiping; Zhang, Chuan-peng; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Wang, Jun-Jie; Ning, Chang-chun; Ju, Bing-Gang; Zhang, Guo-Yin

    2017-11-01

    We performed a multi-wavelength study toward H II region Sh2-104. New maps of 12CO J = 1 - 0 and 13CO J = 1 - 0 were obtained from the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m radio telescope. Sh2-104 displays a double-ring structure. The outer ring with a radius of 4.4 pc is dominated by 12, 500 μm, 12CO J = 1 - 0, and 13CO J = 1 - 0 emission, while the inner ring with a radius of 2.9 pc is dominated by 22 μm and 21 cm emission. We did not detect CO emission inside the outer ring. The north-east portion of the outer ring is blueshifted, while the south-west portion is redshifted. The present observations have provided evidence that the collected outer ring around Sh2-104 is a two-dimensional structure. From the column density map constructed by the Hi-GAL survey data, we extract 21 clumps. About 90% of all the clumps will form low-mass stars. A power-law fit to the clumps yields M=281 {M}⊙ {(r/{pc})}1.31+/- 0.08. The selected YSOs are associated with the collected material on the edge of Sh2-104. The derived dynamical age of Sh2-104 is 1.6× {10}6 yr. Comparing the Sh2-104 dynamical age with the YSO timescale and the fragmentation time of the molecular ring, we further confirm that the collect-and-collapse process operates in this region, indicating positive feedback from a massive star for surrounding gas.

  1. Physiotherapy for pain and disability in adults with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) types I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Keith M; Wand, Benedict M; O'Connell, Neil E

    2016-02-24

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a painful and disabling condition that usually manifests in response to trauma or surgery. When it occurs, it is associated with significant pain and disability. It is thought to arise and persist as a consequence of a maladaptive pro-inflammatory response and disturbances in sympathetically-mediated vasomotor control, together with maladaptive peripheral and central neuronal plasticity. CRPS can be classified into two types: type I (CRPS I) in which a specific nerve lesion has not been identified, and type II (CRPS II) where there is an identifiable nerve lesion. Guidelines recommend the inclusion of a variety of physiotherapy interventions as part of the multimodal treatment of people with CRPS, although their effectiveness is not known. To determine the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions for treating the pain and disability associated with CRPS types I and II. We searched the following databases from inception up to 12 February 2015: CENTRAL (the Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, LILACS, PEDro, Web of Science, DARE and Health Technology Assessments, without language restrictions, for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of physiotherapy interventions for treating pain and disability in people CRPS. We also searched additional online sources for unpublished trials and trials in progress. We included RCTs of physiotherapy interventions (including manual therapy, therapeutic exercise, electrotherapy, physiotherapist-administered education and cortically directed sensory-motor rehabilitation strategies) employed in either a stand-alone fashion or in combination, compared with placebo, no treatment, another intervention or usual care, or of varying physiotherapy interventions compared with each other in adults with CRPS I and II. Our primary outcomes of interest were patient-centred outcomes of pain intensity and functional disability. Two review authors independently evaluated those studies

  2. Prospective phase II trial of regional hyperthermia and whole liver irradiation for numerous chemorefratory liver metastases from colerectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-03-15

    A prospective phase II trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and toxicity of regional hyperthermia and whole liver irradiation (WLI) for numerous chemorefractory liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Enrolled patients had numerous chemorefractory hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. Five sessions of hyperthermia and seven fractions of 3-gray WLI were planned. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was determined using the Korean version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire C-30 and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary version 4.0. Objective and pain response was evaluated. A total of 12 patients consented to the study and the 10 who received WLI and hyperthermia were analyzed. WLI was completed as planned in nine patients and hyperthermia in eight. Pain response was partial in four patients and stable in four. Partial objective response was achieved in three patients (30.0%) and stable disease was seen in four patients at the 1-month follow-up. One patient died 1 month after treatment because of respiratory failure related to pleural metastasis progression. Other grade III or higher toxicities were detected in three patients; however, all severe toxicities were related to disease progression rather than treatment. No significant difference in HRQoL was noted at the time of assessment for patients who were available for questionnaires. Combined WLI and hyperthermia were well tolerated without severe treatment-related toxicity with a promising response from numerous chemorefractory hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer.

  3. Comparative in vivo analysis of recombinant type II feline coronaviruses with truncated and completed ORF3 region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ádám Bálint

    Full Text Available Our previous in vitro comparative study on a feline coronavirus (FCoV pair, differing only in the intactness of their ORF3abc regions, showed that the truncated ORF3abc plays an important role in the efficient macrophage/monocyte tropism of type II feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV. In the present study, we describe a challenge experiment with the same recombinant FCoVs in order to gain data on the in vivo characteristics on these viruses. While parent virus FIPV DF-2 developed feline infectious peritonitis in all the infected cats, its recombinant virus PBFIPV-DF-2, differing only in seven nucleotides, proved to be surprisingly low virulent, although caused an acute febrile episode similarly to the original FIPV DF-2. PBFIPV-DF-2 infection induced significantly lower virus neutralization titers than its parent virus, and lacked the second phase of viremia and development of fatal course of the disease. The recombinant PBFIPV-DF-2-R3i with completed ORF3abc gained biological properties that differentiate between the feline enteric coronavirus (FECV and FIPV biotypes such as intensive replication in the gut, absence of viremia and weak or no serological response. Using reverse genetic approaches our study is the first experimental proof that ORF3abc is indeed responsible for the restriction of FECV replication to the intestine in vivo.

  4. Comparative In Vivo Analysis of Recombinant Type II Feline Coronaviruses with Truncated and Completed ORF3 Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bálint, Ádám; Farsang, Attila; Zádori, Zoltán; Belák, Sándor

    2014-01-01

    Our previous in vitro comparative study on a feline coronavirus (FCoV) pair, differing only in the intactness of their ORF3abc regions, showed that the truncated ORF3abc plays an important role in the efficient macrophage/monocyte tropism of type II feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). In the present study, we describe a challenge experiment with the same recombinant FCoVs in order to gain data on the in vivo characteristics on these viruses. While parent virus FIPV DF-2 developed feline infectious peritonitis in all the infected cats, its recombinant virus PBFIPV-DF-2, differing only in seven nucleotides, proved to be surprisingly low virulent, although caused an acute febrile episode similarly to the original FIPV DF-2. PBFIPV-DF-2 infection induced significantly lower virus neutralization titers than its parent virus, and lacked the second phase of viremia and development of fatal course of the disease. The recombinant PBFIPV-DF-2-R3i with completed ORF3abc gained biological properties that differentiate between the feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) and FIPV biotypes such as intensive replication in the gut, absence of viremia and weak or no serological response. Using reverse genetic approaches our study is the first experimental proof that ORF3abc is indeed responsible for the restriction of FECV replication to the intestine in vivo. PMID:24586385

  5. Dietary sodium deprivation evokes activation of brain regional neurons and down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and angiotensin-convertion enzyme mRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, B; Yang, X J; Chen, K; Yang, D J; Yan, J Q

    2009-12-15

    Previous studies have indicated that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the induction of sodium appetite in rats and that different dietary sodium intakes influence the mRNA expression of central and peripheral RAAS components. To determine whether dietary sodium deprivation activates regional brain neurons related to sodium appetite, and changes their gene expression of RAAS components of rats, the present study examined the c-Fos expression after chronic exposure to low sodium diet, and determined the relationship between plasma and brain angiotensin I (ANG I), angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (ALD) levels and the sodium ingestive behavior variations, as well as the effects of prolonged dietary sodium deprivation on ANG II type 1 (AT1) and ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptors and angiotensin-convertion enzyme (ACE) mRNA levels in the involved brain regions using the method of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results showed that the Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) expression in forebrain areas such as subfornical organ (SFO), paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) all increased significantly and that the levels of ANG I, ANG II and ALD also increased in plasma and forebrain in rats fed with low sodium diet. In contrast, AT1, ACE mRNA in PVN, SON and OVLT decreased significantly in dietary sodium depleted rats, while AT2 mRNA expression did not change in the examined areas. These results suggest that many brain areas are activated by increased levels of plasma and/or brain ANG II and ALD, which underlies the elevated preference for hypertonic salt solution after prolonged exposure to low sodium diet, and that the regional AT1 and ACE mRNA are down-regulated after dietary sodium deprivation, which may be mediated by increased ANG II in plasma and/or brain tissue.

  6. Detailed CO(J = 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2) observations toward an H II region RCW 32 in the Vela Molecular Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enokiya, Rei; Sano, Hidetoshi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Tachihara, Kengo; Torii, Kazufumi; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Hattori, Yusuke; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ohama, Akio; Kimura, Kimihiro; Ogawa, Hideo; Fukui, Yasuo

    2018-05-01

    We performed CO(J = 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2) observations toward an H II region RCW 32 in the Vela Molecular Ridge. The CO gas distribution associated with the H II region was revealed for the first time at a high resolution of 22″. The results revealed three distinct velocity components which show correspondence with the optical dark lanes and/or Hα distribution. Two of the components show complementary spatial distribution which suggests collisional interaction between them at a relative velocity of ˜ 4 km s-1. Based on these results, we present a hypothesis that a cloud-cloud collision determined the cloud distribution and triggered formation of the exciting star ionizing RCW 32. The collision time scale is estimated from the cloud size and the velocity separation to be ˜2 Myr and the collision terminated ˜1 Myr ago, which is consistent with the age of the exciting star and the associated cluster. By combing the previous works on the H II regions in the Vela Molecular Ridge, we argue that the majority (at least four) of the H II regions in the Ridge were formed by triggering of cloud-cloud collision.

  7. Indel-II region deletion sizes in the white spot syndrome virus genome correlate with shrimp disease outbreaks in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran Thi Tuyet, H.; Zwart, M.P.; Phuong, N.T.; Oanh, D.T.H.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Vlak, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Sequence comparisons of the genomes of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) strains have identified regions containing variable-length insertions/deletions (i.e. indels). Indel-I and Indel-II, positioned between open reading frames (ORFs) 14/15 and 23/24, respectively, are the largest and the most

  8. Custom Search | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  9. Watershed Statistics | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  10. EPA Sets Schedule to Improve Visibility in the Nation's Most Treasured Natural Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA issued a schedule to act on more than 40 state pollution reduction plans that will improve visibility in national parks and wilderness areas and protect public health from the damaging effects of the pollutants that cause regional haze.

  11. CCR Certification Form for Wyoming or EPA R8 Tribal Community Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CCR Certification Form can be used to certify that community water systems in Wyoming or on Tribal Lands in EPA Region 8 have completed and distributed their annual Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) or water quality report.

  12. A GMOS-N IFU study of the central H II region in the blue compact dwarf galaxy NGC 4449: kinematics, nebular metallicity and star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Nimisha; James, Bethan L.; Irwin, Mike J.

    2017-10-01

    We use integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations from the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph North (GMOS-N) to study the central H II region in a nearby blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy NGC 4449. The IFS data enable us to explore the variation of physical and chemical conditions of the star-forming region and the surrounding gas on spatial scales as small as 5.5 pc. Our kinematical analysis shows possible signatures of shock ionization and shell structures in the surroundings of the star-forming region. The metallicity maps of the region, created using direct Te and indirect strong line methods (R23, O3N2 and N2), do not show any chemical variation. From the integrated spectrum of the central H II region, we find a metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.88 ± 0.14 ({˜ }0.15^{+0.06}_{-0.04} Z⊙) using the direct method. Comparing the central H II region metallicity derived here with those of H II regions throughout this galaxy from previous studies, we find evidence of increasing metallicity with distance from the central nucleus. Such chemical inhomogeneities can be due to several mechanisms, including gas loss via supernova blowout, galactic winds or metal-poor gas accretion. However, we find that the localized area of decreased metallicity aligns spatially with the peak of star-forming activity in the galaxy, suggesting that gas accretion may be at play here. Spatially resolved IFS data for the entire galaxy are required to confirm the metallicity inhomogeneity found in this study and determine its possible cause.

  13. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Quantification issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dourson, M.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The quantitative procedures associated with noncancer risk assessment include reference dose (RfD), benchmark dose, and severity modeling. The RfD, which is part of the EPA risk assessment guidelines, is an estimation of a level that is likely to be without any health risk to sensitive individuals. The RfD requires two major judgments: the first is choice of a critical effect(s) and its No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL); the second judgment is choice of an uncertainty factor. This paper discusses major assumptions and limitations of the RfD model.

  14. STAR-FORMING ACTIVITY IN THE H ii REGIONS ASSOCIATED WITH THE IRAS 17160–3707 COMPLEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandakumar, G.; Veena, V. S.; Vig, S.; Tej, A. [Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695 547 (India); Ghosh, S. K.; Ojha, D. K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (Bombay) 400 005 (India)

    2016-11-01

    We present a multiwavelength investigation of star formation activity toward the southern H ii regions associated with IRAS 17160–3707, located at a distance of 6.2 kpc with a bolometric luminosity of 8.3 × 10{sup 5} L {sub ⊙}. The ionized gas distribution and dust clumps in the parental molecular cloud are examined in detail using measurements at infrared, submillimeter and radio wavelengths. The radio continuum images at 1280 and 610 MHz obtained using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope reveal the presence of multiple compact sources as well as nebulous emission. At submillimeter wavelengths, we identify seven dust clumps and estimate their physical properties such as temperature: 24–30 K, mass: 300–4800 M {sub ⊙} and luminosity: 9–317 × 10{sup 2} L {sub ⊙} using modified blackbody fits to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) between 70 and 870 μ m. We find 24 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the mid-infrared, with a few of them coincident with the compact radio sources. The SEDs of the YSOs have been fitted by the Robitaille models and the results indicate that those having radio compact sources as counterparts host massive objects in early evolutionary stages with best fit age ≤0.2 Myr. We compare the relative evolutionary stages of clumps using various signposts such as masers, ionized gas, presence of YSOs and infrared nebulosity, and find six massive star-forming clumps and one quiescent clump. Of the former, five are in a relatively advanced stage and one in an earlier stage.

  15. Preclinical assessment of viral vectored and protein vaccines targeting the Duffy-binding protein region II of Plasmodium vivax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone C de Cassan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Malaria vaccine development has largely focused on Plasmodium falciparum; however a reawakening to the importance of P. vivax has spurred efforts to develop vaccines against this difficult to treat and at times severe form of relapsing malaria, which constitutes a significant proportion of human malaria cases worldwide. The almost complete dependence of P. vivax red blood cell invasion on the interaction of the P. vivax Duffy-binding protein region II (PvDBP_RII with the human Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC, makes this antigen an attractive vaccine candidate against blood-stage P. vivax. Here, we generated both preclinical and clinically-compatible adenoviral and poxviral vectored vaccine candidates expressing the Salvador I allele of PvDBP_RII – including human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV5, chimpanzee adenovirus serotype 63 (ChAd63 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA vectors. We report on the antibody and T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines in mice or rabbits, either used alone in a viral vectored prime-boost regime, or in ‘mixed-modality’ adenovirus prime – protein-in-adjuvant boost regimes (using a recombinant protein PvDBP_RII protein antigen formulated in Montanide®ISA720 or Abisco®100 adjuvants. Antibodies induced by these regimes were found to bind to native parasite antigen from P. vivax infected Thai patients and were capable of inhibiting the binding of PvDBP_RII to its receptor DARC using an in vitro binding inhibition assay. In recent years, recombinant ChAd63 and MVA vectors have been quickly translated into human clinical trials for numerous antigens from P. falciparum as well as a growing number of other pathogens. The vectors reported here are immunogenic in small animals, elicit antibodies against PvDBP_RII and have recently entered clinical trials which will provide the first assessment of the safety and immunogenicity of the PvDBP_RII antigen in humans.

  16. Immunogenicity and prediction of epitopic region of antigen Ag I/II and glucosyltransferase from Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xi-Xi; Fan, Jian; Chen, Jiang; Li, Yu-Hong; Fan, Ming-Wen

    2016-06-01

    The levels of Streptococcus (S.) mutans infections in saliva were evaluated and a comparison for specific antibody levels among children with different levels of S. mutans infection was made. The promising epitopic regions of antigen AgI/II (PAc) and glucosyltransferase (GTF) for potential vaccine targets related to S. mutans adherence were screened. A total of 94 children aged 3-4 years were randomly selected, including 53 caries-negative and 41 caries-positive children. The values of S. mutans and those of salivary total secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), anti-PAc and anti-Glucan binding domain (anti-GLU) were compared to determine the correlation among them. It was found the level of s-IgA against specific antigens did not increase with increasing severity of S. mutans infection, and the complete amino acid sequence of PAc and GTFB was analyzed using the DNAStar Protean system for developing specific anti-caries vaccines related to S. mutans adherence. A significantly positive correlation between the amount of S. mutans and children decayed, missing, and filled teeth index was observed. No significant difference was detected in specific sIgA against PAc or GLU between any two groups. No significant correlation was found between such specific sIgA and caries index. A total of 16 peptides from PAc as well as 13 peptides from GTFB were chosen for further investigation. S. mutans colonization contributed to early children caries as an important etiological factor. The level of sIgA against specific antigens did not increase with increasing severity of S. mutans infection in children. The epitopes of PAc and GTF have been screened to develop the peptide-based or protein-based anti-caries vaccines.

  17. High-mass star formation possibly triggered by cloud-cloud collision in the H II region RCW 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Sano, Hidetoshi; Enokiya, Rei; Torii, Kazufumi; Hattori, Yusuke; Kohno, Mikito; Fujita, Shinji; Nishimura, Atsushi; Ohama, Akio; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Kimura, Kimihiro; Ogawa, Hideo; Fukui, Yasuo

    2018-05-01

    We report on the possibility that the high-mass star located in the H II region RCW 34 was formed by a triggering induced by a collision of molecular clouds. Molecular gas distributions of the 12CO and 13CO J = 2-1 and 12CO J = 3-2 lines in the direction of RCW 34 were measured using the NANTEN2 and ASTE telescopes. We found two clouds with velocity ranges of 0-10 km s-1 and 10-14 km s-1. Whereas the former cloud is as massive as ˜1.4 × 104 M⊙ and has a morphology similar to the ring-like structure observed in the infrared wavelengths, the latter cloud, with a mass of ˜600 M⊙, which has not been recognized by previous observations, is distributed to just cover the bubble enclosed by the other cloud. The high-mass star with a spectral type of O8.5V is located near the boundary of the two clouds. The line intensity ratio of 12CO J = 3-2/J = 2-1 yields high values (≳1.0), suggesting that these clouds are associated with the massive star. We also confirm that the obtained position-velocity diagram shows a similar distribution to that derived by a numerical simulation of the supersonic collision of two clouds. Using the relative velocity between the two clouds (˜5 km s-1), the collisional time scale is estimated to be ˜0.2 Myr with the assumption of a distance of 2.5 kpc. These results suggest that the high-mass star in RCW 34 was formed rapidly within a time scale of ˜0.2 Myr via a triggering of a cloud-cloud collision.

  18. Loss of lager specific genes and subtelomeric regions define two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineages for Saccharomyces pastorianus Group I and II strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monerawela, Chandre; James, Tharappel C; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Bond, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Lager yeasts, Saccharomyces pastorianus, are interspecies hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus and are classified into Group I and Group II clades. The genome of the Group II strain, Weihenstephan 34/70, contains eight so-called 'lager-specific' genes that are located in subtelomeric regions. We evaluated the origins of these genes through bioinformatic and PCR analyses of Saccharomyces genomes. We determined that four are of cerevisiae origin while four originate from S. eubayanus. The Group I yeasts contain all four S. eubayanus genes but individual strains contain only a subset of the cerevisiae genes. We identified S. cerevisiae strains that contain all four cerevisiae 'lager-specific' genes, and distinct patterns of loss of these genes in other strains. Analysis of the subtelomeric regions uncovered patterns of loss in different S. cerevisiae strains. We identify two classes of S. cerevisiae strains: ale yeasts (Foster O) and stout yeasts with patterns of 'lager-specific' genes and subtelomeric regions identical to Group I and II S. pastorianus yeasts, respectively. These findings lead us to propose that Group I and II S. pastorianus strains originate from separate hybridization events involving different S. cerevisiae lineages. Using the combined bioinformatic and PCR data, we describe a potential classification map for industrial yeasts. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  19. Epidemiological situation of tuberculosis in Poland: part II. What are the causes of the different epidemiological situation in various regions of Poland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowińska-Zakrzewska, Ewa; Korzeniewska-Koseła, Maria; Roszkowski-Śliż, Kazimierz

    2014-01-01

    The different epidemiological situation of tuberculosis in various regions of Poland (higher and lower notification rates) was described previously by our group. The patients diagnosed with tuberculosis in the higher notification rate areas were younger and there were more cases of primary tuberculosis (tuberculous pleurisy and tuberculosis of chest lymph nodes) than in the patients diagnosed in the lower notification areas. The aim of the present study was to assess the possible causes of the different epidemiological situation of tuberculosis in various regions of Poland. Analysis was done at the same regions as in the previous paper. A comparison was made between two groups: Group I, which included three voivodeships with higher rates of notification, from 23.7 to 32.3/100,000 (mean rates in the analysed period of time); and Group II, which included five voivodeships with lower notification rates (mean rates from 12.2 to 18.6/100,000). The wealth of the regions (GDP, gross domestic product per capita), the level of unemployment, and social status of the patients were analysed. We compared the population density in both regions. The results of treatment in both regions were also analysed. We did not find any differences in GDP and unemployment rates between the compared regions. The results of treatment were different in particular regions, but there was no clear tendency for worse results in voivodeships in Group I compared to voivodeships in Group II. However, the number of patients lost from observation was significantly higher in the regions from Group I than in those from Group II. There was also a significantly higher death rate from tuberculosis in younger patients (£ 59 years) from Group I than from Group II. This is additional proof that the epidemiological situation in the two regions was different. Finally, we found that the mean density of population in the regions from Group I was higher than that from Group II. The density of population may

  20. Region 9 Tribal Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset of all Indian Reservations in US EPA Region 9 (California, Arizona and Nevada) with some reservation border areas of adjacent states included (adjacent areas...

  1. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L; Hood, Molly M; Lord, John W; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F; Patt, William C; Smith, Bryan D; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D; Petillo, Peter A; Wise, Scott C; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L

    2010-10-01

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Petrography, fine stratigraphy and petrofacies of the Stassfurt rock salt (Zechstein 2) in the development region of ASSE II salt mine near Brunswick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diem, W.

    1985-01-01

    The Stassfurt rock salt (Na2) in the Asse II salt mine constitutes a saline sequence of the sub-Hercynian basin. In the anticline of the Asse II the Na2 constitutes a core of the anticline with an interior special folding. The combination of underground mapping with the investigations of the salt petrography permits the recognition of stratigraphic unities and with it sedimentary and early diagenetic formation processes for the stratigraphic beds of the Hauptsalz (Na2β), the Speisesalz (Na2SP) and the Polyhalitbaenkchensalz (Na2P). An additional postdiagenetic new formation of minerals from the overlying Stassfurt potash layer (K2C) can be recognized in the kieseritic region of the ''Carnallitisch-Kieseritische Ueberganssalz (Na2K+C)'' and in the ''Tonliniensalz'' (Na2TL). The lower part of the Na2β belongs to a saline basin facies. In the upper part of the Na2β structural and textural characteristics refer to the swallowing of the saline sedimentation room. Simultaneously, more and more terrestrial influences of the saline sedimentation become conspicuous in the northwestern part of the Asse II. They have their clearest facies in the only locally formed Tonliniensalz (Na2TL). The petrographic review of the ''polyhalite region'', which encloses the upper part of the Na2β, the Na2SP and the Na2P, rendered obvious indications for a pseudomorphic origin of polyhalite from primarily sedimened gypsum. The replacement of anhydrite by polyhalite was compared to it as being of unimportant significance. The quantitative parts of the accessory minerals (polyhalite, anhydrite, kieserite, sylvite, carnallite) were determined by means of geochemical investigations in the stratigraphic horizons of Na2 in the mine Asse II. A regional comparison with the saline sedimentation of Zechstein 2 in the sub-Hercynian basin shows a progressive saline sedimentation cycle of the Stassfurt type for the fine stratigraphic division of the Na2 in Asse II. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Comments on EPA's LLW preproposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littleton, B.K.; Weinstock, L.

    1995-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently developing standards for the management, storage, and disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW). The Atomic Energy Act delegated EPA, among other provisions, the authority to establish generally applicable standards for the disposal of radioactive waste to ensure that the public and the environment are adequately protected from potential radiation impacts. As an initial effort to open communications on a standard for LLW, the Agency developed a preproposal draft (Preproposal Draft of 40 CFR Part 193 - 30 Nov 94) and circulated it to interested parties for review and comment. The extended comment period ended April 12, 1995. A summary of the comments received and analyzed to date follows. After all comments have been analyzed, the rule will undergo an Agency clearance process and be sent to the Office of Management and Budget for review. After that review, the formal process of publication of the proposed rule in the Federal Register and the formal public comment period will begin

  4. Agriculture: About EPA's National Agriculture Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's National Agriculture Center (Ag Center), with the support of the United States Department of Agriculture, serves growers, livestock producers, other agribusinesses, and agricultural information/education providers.

  5. Study of the Mn-binding sites in photosystem II using antibodies raised against lumenal regions of the D1 and D2 reaction center proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmasso, Enrique Agustin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The experiments discussed in this thesis focus on identifying the protein segments or specific amino acids which provide ligands to the Mn cluster of photosystem II (PS II). This Mn cluster plays a central role in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PS II. The Mn cluster is thought to be bound by lumenal regions of the PS II reaction center proteins known as D1 and D2. First, several peptides were synthesized which correspond to specific lumenal segments of the D1 and D2 proteins. Next, polyclonal antibodies were successfully elicited using three of these peptides. The peptides recognized by these antibodies correspond to protein segments of the spinach reaction center proteins: Ile-321 to Ala-344 of D1 (D1-a), Asp-319 to Arg-334 of D1 (D1-b), and Val-300 to Asn-319 of D2 (D2-a). These antibodies were then used in assays which were developed to structurally or functionally probe the potential Mn-binding regions of the D1 and D2 proteins.

  6. Tropospheric mixing ratios of NO and NOy obtained during TROPOZ II in the latitude region 67 deg N-56 deg S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, F.; Bruening, D.; Ehhalt, D.H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Chemie

    1997-12-31

    Tropospheric mixing ratios of NO and NOy were measured along the flight track of the TROPOZ II aircraft campaign. These measurements cover regions along the east coast of North America, the Pacific and Atlantic coast of South America and the Atlantic coast of North Africa and Europe. The meteorological conditions are close to the climatological mean: westerly winds at high and mid latitudes, variable and weak winds at low latitudes. (author) 2 refs.

  7. Tropospheric mixing ratios of NO and NOy obtained during TROPOZ II in the latitude region 67 deg N-56 deg S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, F; Bruening, D; Ehhalt, D H [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerische Chemie

    1998-12-31

    Tropospheric mixing ratios of NO and NOy were measured along the flight track of the TROPOZ II aircraft campaign. These measurements cover regions along the east coast of North America, the Pacific and Atlantic coast of South America and the Atlantic coast of North Africa and Europe. The meteorological conditions are close to the climatological mean: westerly winds at high and mid latitudes, variable and weak winds at low latitudes. (author) 2 refs.

  8. Molecular gas in the H II-region complex RCW 166: Possible evidence for an early phase of cloud-cloud collision prior to the bubble formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohama, Akio; Kohno, Mikito; Fujita, Shinji; Tsutsumi, Daichi; Hattori, Yusuke; Torii, Kazufumi; Nishimura, Atsushi; Sano, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Fukui, Yasuo

    2018-05-01

    Young H II regions are an important site for the study of O star formation based on distributions of ionized and molecular gas. We reveal that two molecular clouds at ˜48 km s-1 and ˜53 km s-1 are associated with the H II regions G018.149-00.283 in RCW 166 by using the JCMT CO High-Resolution Survey (COHRS) of the 12CO(J = 3-2) emission. G018.149-00.283 comprises a bright ring at 8 μm and an extended H II region inside the ring. The ˜48 km s-1 cloud delineates the ring, and the ˜53 km s-1 cloud is located within the ring, indicating a complementary distribution between the two molecular components. We propose a hypothesis that high-mass stars within G018.149-00.283 were formed by triggering during cloud-cloud collision at a projected velocity separation of ˜5 km s-1. We argue that G018.149-00.283 is in an early evolutionary stage, ˜0.1 Myr after the collision according to the scheme detailed by Habe and Ohta (1992, PASJ, 44, 203), which will be followed by a bubble formation stage like RCW 120. We also suggest that nearby H II regions N21 and N22 are candidates for bubbles possibly formed by cloud-cloud collision. Inoue and Fukui (2013, ApJ, 774, L31) showed that the interface gas becomes highly turbulent and realizes a high-mass accretion rate of 10-3-10-4 M⊙ yr-1 by magnetohydrodynamical numerical simulations, which offers an explanation of the O-star formation. The fairly high frequency of cloud-cloud collision in RCW 166 is probably due to the high cloud density in this part of the Scutum arm.

  9. The molecular complex associated with the Galactic H II region Sh2-90: a possible site of triggered star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, M. R.; Zavagno, A.; Deharveng, L.; Molinari, S.; Ojha, D. K.; Paradis, D.; Tigé, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Russeil, D.

    2014-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the star formation activity in the molecular complex associated with the Galactic H ii region Sh2-90. Methods: We obtain the distribution of the ionized and cold neutral gas using radio-continuum and Herschel observations. We use near-infrared and Spitzer data to investigate the stellar content of the complex. We discuss the evolutionary status of embedded massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) using their spectral energy distribution. Results: The Sh2-90 region presents a bubble morphology in the mid-infrared. Radio observations suggest it is an evolved H ii region with an electron density ~144 cm-3, emission measure ~ 6.7 × 104 cm-6 pc and an ionized mass ~55 M⊙. From Herschel and CO (J = 3 - 2) observations we found that the H ii region is part of an elongated extended molecular cloud (H2 column density ≥ 3 × 1021 cm-2 and dust temperature 18-27 K) of total mass ≥ 1 × 104 M⊙. We identify the ionizing cluster of Sh2-90, the main exciting star being an O8-O9 V star. Five cold dust clumps, four mid-IR blobs around B stars, and a compact H ii region are found at the edge of the bubble. The velocity information derived from CO data cubes suggest that most of them are associated with the Sh2-90 region. One hundred and twenty-nine low mass (≤3 M⊙) YSOs have been identified, and they are found to be distributed mostly in the regions of high column density. Four candidate Class 0/I MYSOs have been found. We suggest that multi-generation star formation is present in the complex. From evidence of interaction, time scales involved, and evolutionary status of stellar/protostellar sources, we argue that the star formation at the edges of Sh2-90 might have been triggered. However, several young sources in this complex are probably formed by some other processes. Full Table 5 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/566/A122

  10. Radiative and magnetic properties of solar active regions. II. Spatially resolved analysis of O V 62.97 nm transition region emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fludra, A.; Warren, H.

    2010-11-01

    Context. Global relationships between the photospheric magnetic flux and the extreme ultraviolet emission integrated over active region area have been studied in a previous paper by Fludra & Ireland (2008, A&A, 483, 609). Spatially integrated EUV line intensities are tightly correlated with the total unsigned magnetic flux, and yet these global power laws have been shown to be insufficient for accurately determining the coronal heating mechanism owing to the mathematical ill-conditioning of the inverse problem. Aims: Our aim is to establish a relationship between the EUV line intensities and the photospheric magnetic flux density on small spatial scales in active regions and investigate whether it provides a way of identifying the process that heats the coronal loops. Methods: We compare spatially resolved EUV transition region emission and the photospheric magnetic flux density. This analysis is based on the O V 62.97 nm line recorded by the SOHO Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) and SOHO MDI magnetograms for six solar active regions. The magnetic flux density ϕ is converted to a simulated O V intensity using a model relationship I(ϕ, L) = Cϕδ Lλ, where the loop length L is obtained from potential magnetic field extrapolations. This simulated spatial distribution of O V intensities is convolved with the CDS instrument's point spread function and compared pixel by pixel with the observed O V line intensity. Parameters δ and λ are derived to give the best fit for the observed and simulated intensities. Results: Spatially-resolved analysis of the transition region emission reveals the complex nature of the heating processes in active regions. In some active regions, particularly large, local intensity enhancements up to a factor of five are present. When areas with O V intensities above 3000 erg cm-2 s-1 sr-1 are ignored, a power law has been fitted to the relationship between the local O V line intensity and the photospheric magnetic flux density in each

  11. Hispanos en la EPA: Grace Robiou

    Science.gov (United States)

    La diversidad de la fuerza laboral es importante para la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de EE.UU. (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés). Los empleados hispanos de la EPA contribuyen diariamente hacia la protección de la salud y el medio ambiente.

  12. Hispanos en la EPA: Fabiola Estrada

    Science.gov (United States)

    La diversidad de la fuerza laboral es importante para la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de EE.UU. (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés). Los empleados hispanos de la EPA contribuyen diariamente hacia la protección de la salud y el medio ambiente.

  13. Perfiles de hispanos en la EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    La diversidad de la fuerza laboral es importante para la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de EE.UU. (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés). Los empleados hispanos de la EPA contribuyen diariamente hacia la protección de la salud y el medio ambiente de todos.

  14. Hispanos en la EPA: Nadtya Y. Hong

    Science.gov (United States)

    La diversidad de la fuerza laboral es importante para la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de EE.UU. (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés). Los empleados hispanos de la EPA contribuyen diariamente hacia la protección de la salud y el medio ambiente.

  15. Hispanos en la EPA: Matthew Tejada

    Science.gov (United States)

    La diversidad de la fuerza laboral es importante para la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de EE.UU. (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés). Los empleados hispanos de la EPA contribuyen diariamente hacia la protección de la salud y el medio ambiente.

  16. Hispanos en la EPA: Joel Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    La diversidad de la fuerza laboral es importante para la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de EE.UU. (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés). Los empleados hispanos de la EPA contribuyen diariamente hacia la protección de la salud y el medio ambiente.

  17. EPA Scientific Knowledge Management Assessment and Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of activities have been conducted by a core group of EPA scientists from across the Agency. The activities were initiated in 2012 and the focus was to increase the reuse and interoperability of science software at EPA. The need for increased reuse and interoperability ...

  18. EPA Regulation of Bed Bug Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    All pesticides must be registered by EPA before being sold and used in the U.S., other than those that rely on a limited set of active ingredients (so-called minimum risk pesticides). EPA reviews for safety and effectiveness.

  19. 40 CFR 73.52 - EPA recordation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA recordation. 73.52 Section 73.52... ALLOWANCE SYSTEM Allowance Transfers § 73.52 EPA recordation. (a) General recordation. Except as provided in...) following receipt of an allowance transfer request pursuant to § 73.50, by moving each allowance from the...

  20. EPA perspective on federal facility agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundler, C.

    1988-01-01

    Although DOE's image with Congress and the media concerning environmental compliance may be poor, EPA sees the Department's recent attitude toward the environment as good. DOE and EPA must continue to move forward. In particular, EPA would like to emphasize less study of a problem and more clean-up. Strong, enforceable agreements will allow this goal to be met by letting EPA take more risks in its decision making. Currently EPA is developing an enforcement strategy for Federal facilities. This strategy will address identifying Federal facilities of concern, increasing enforcement and compliance monitoring activities at those facilities, implementing the model agreements, resource planning, and the establishment of an Agency Management System for Federal facilities. There are over 1000 Federal facilities which are listed on the EPA compliance docket. Over 200 Federal facilities are expected to be included on the NPL. Increased EPA attention may increase the ability of the various Federal agencies to obtain the necessary funding. Another subject being addressed by EPA is the liability of government contractors under the environmental statutes. The Agency is developing a GoCo enforcement strategy. In the hazardous waste enforcement program, three criteria are being considered for determining when to proceed against a contractor: Degree of contractor control over the hazardous waste management activity. Who is actually performing the work, and Degree of Departmental cooperation

  1. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  2. Purchasing Supplies, Equipment and Services Under EPA Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA developed this guidance to help ensure you meet EPA requirements when making such necessary purchases. With very few exceptions, you must follow a competitive process when you use EPA grant funds to acquire equipment and professional services.

  3. NEW STRONG-LINE ABUNDANCE DIAGNOSTICS FOR H II REGIONS: EFFECTS OF κ-DISTRIBUTED ELECTRON ENERGIES AND NEW ATOMIC DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Nicholls, David C.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Vogt, Frédéric P. A., E-mail: Michael.Dopita@anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Rd., Weston ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-09-01

    Recently, Nicholls et al., inspired by in situ observations of solar system astrophysical plasmas, suggested that the electrons in H II regions are characterized by a κ-distribution of energies rather than a simple Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Here, we have collected together new atomic data within a modified photoionization code to explore the effects of both the new atomic data and the κ-distribution on the strong-line techniques used to determine chemical abundances in H II regions. By comparing the recombination temperatures (T {sub rec}) with the forbidden line temperatures (T {sub FL}), we conclude that κ ∼ 20. While representing only a mild deviation from equilibrium, this result is sufficient to strongly influence abundances determined using methods that depend on measurements of the electron temperature from forbidden lines. We present a number of new emission line ratio diagnostics that cleanly separate the two parameters determining the optical spectrum of H II regions—the ionization parameter q or U and the chemical abundance, 12+log(O/H). An automated code to extract these parameters is presented. Using the homogeneous data set from van Zee et al., we find self-consistent results between all of these different diagnostics. The systematic errors between different line ratio diagnostics are much smaller than those found in the earlier strong-line work. Overall, the effect of the κ-distribution on the strong-line abundances derived solely on the basis of theoretical models is rather small.

  4. Separate photosensitizers mediate degradation of the 32-kDa photosystem II reaction center protein in the visible and UV spectral regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, B.M.; Gaba, V.; Canaani, O.; Malkin, S.; Mattoo, A.K.; Edelman, M.

    1989-01-01

    A component of the photosystem II reaction center, the 32-kDa protein, is rapidly turned over in the light. The mechanism of its light-dependent metabolism is largely unknown. We quantified the rate of 32-kDa protein degradation over a broad spectral range (UV, visible, and far red). The quantum yield for degradation was highest in the UVB (280-320 nm) region. Spectral evidence demonstrates two distinctly different photosensitizers for 32-kDa protein degradation. The data implicate the bulk photosynthetic pigments (primarily chlorophyll) in the visible and far red regions, and plastoquinone (in one or more of its redox states) in the UV region. A significant portion of 32-kDa protein degradation in sunlight is attributed to UVB irradiance

  5. 40 CFR 147.650 - State-administrative program-Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Agreement between EPA and Region X and the Idaho Department of Water Resources signed by the EPA Regional...), sections 42-3915 through 42-3919 (Supp. 1984); (8) Idaho Trade Secrets Act, Title 48, Chapter 8, Idaho Code...

  6. A Deep Chandra ACIS Study of NGC 4151. II. The Innermost Emission Line Region and Strong Evidence for Radio Jet-NLR Cloud Collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junfeng; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Elvis, Martin; Risaliti, Guido; Mundell, Carole G.; Karovska, Margarita; Zezas, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    We have studied the X-ray emission within the inner ~150 pc radius of NGC 4151 by constructing high spatial resolution emission line images of blended O VII, O VIII, and Ne IX. These maps show extended structures that are spatially correlated with the radio outflow and optical [O III] emission. We find strong evidence for jet-gas cloud interaction, including morphological correspondences with regions of X-ray enhancement, peaks of near-infrared [Fe II] emission, and optical clouds. In these regions, moreover, we find evidence of elevated Ne IX/O VII ratios; the X-ray emission of these regions also exceeds that expected from nuclear photoionization. Spectral fitting reveals the presence of a collisionally ionized component. The thermal energy of the hot gas suggests that >~ 0.1% of the estimated jet power is deposited into the host interstellar medium through interaction between the radio jet and the dense medium of the circumnuclear region. We find possible pressure equilibrium between the collisionally ionized hot gas and the photoionized line-emitting cool clouds. We also obtain constraints on the extended iron and silicon fluorescent emission. Both lines are spatially unresolved. The upper limit on the contribution of an extended emission region to the Fe Kα emission is <~ 5% of the total, in disagreement with a previous claim that 65% of the Fe Kα emission originates in the extended narrow line region.

  7. A DEEP CHANDRA ACIS STUDY OF NGC 4151. II. THE INNERMOST EMISSION LINE REGION AND STRONG EVIDENCE FOR RADIO JET-NLR CLOUD COLLISION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junfeng; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Elvis, Martin; Risaliti, Guido; Karovska, Margarita; Zezas, Andreas; Mundell, Carole G.

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the X-ray emission within the inner ∼150 pc radius of NGC 4151 by constructing high spatial resolution emission line images of blended O VII, O VIII, and Ne IX. These maps show extended structures that are spatially correlated with the radio outflow and optical [O III] emission. We find strong evidence for jet-gas cloud interaction, including morphological correspondences with regions of X-ray enhancement, peaks of near-infrared [Fe II] emission, and optical clouds. In these regions, moreover, we find evidence of elevated Ne IX/O VII ratios; the X-ray emission of these regions also exceeds that expected from nuclear photoionization. Spectral fitting reveals the presence of a collisionally ionized component. The thermal energy of the hot gas suggests that ∼> 0.1% of the estimated jet power is deposited into the host interstellar medium through interaction between the radio jet and the dense medium of the circumnuclear region. We find possible pressure equilibrium between the collisionally ionized hot gas and the photoionized line-emitting cool clouds. We also obtain constraints on the extended iron and silicon fluorescent emission. Both lines are spatially unresolved. The upper limit on the contribution of an extended emission region to the Fe Kα emission is ∼< 5% of the total, in disagreement with a previous claim that 65% of the Fe Kα emission originates in the extended narrow line region.

  8. Line formation in the solar chromosphere. II - An optically thick region of the chromosphere-corona transition region observed with OSO 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lites, B. W.; Hansen, E. R.; Shine, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The University of Colorado ultraviolet spectrometer aboard the Orbiting Solar Observatory 8(OSO 8) has measured self-reversed profiles of the resonance line of C IV lamda 1548.2 at the limb passage of an active region. The degree of the self-reversal together with the absolute intensity of the line profile determine the electron density in the active region at 10 to the 10th/cu cm at temperatures where the C IV line is formed. The nonthermal component of the broadening velocity is no more than 14km/s, and the physical thickness of an equivalent plane-parallel slab in hydrostatic equilibrium that would give rise to the observed line profiles is about 430 km.

  9. A VERY LARGE ARRAY STUDY OF ULTRACOMPACT AND HYPERCOMPACT H II REGIONS FROM 0.7 TO 3.6 cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewilo, M.; Churchwell, E.; Kurtz, S.; Goss, W. M.; Hofner, P.

    2011-01-01

    We report multi-frequency Very Large Array observations of three massive star formation regions (MSFRs) containing radio continuum components that were identified as broad radio recombination line (RRL) sources and hypercompact (HC) H II region candidates in our previous H92α and H76α study: G10.96+0.01 (component W), G28.20-0.04 (N), and G34.26+0.15 (B). An additional HC H II region candidate, G45.07+0.13, known to have broad H66α and H76α lines, small size, high electron density, and emission measure, was also included. We observed with high spatial resolution (0.''9-2.''3) the H53α, H66α, H76α, and H92α RRLs and the radio continuum at the corresponding wavelengths (0.7-3.6 cm). The motivation for these observations was to obtain RRLs over a range of principal quantum states to look for signatures of pressure broadening and macroscopic velocity structure. We find that pressure broadening contributes significantly to the linewidths, but it is not the sole cause of the broad lines. We compare radio continuum and dust emission distributions and find a good correspondence. We also discuss maser emission and multi-wavelength observations reported in the literature for these MSFRs.

  10. PROBING THE PHYSICS OF NARROW LINE REGIONS IN ACTIVE GALAXIES. II. THE SIDING SPRING SOUTHERN SEYFERT SPECTROSCOPIC SNAPSHOT SURVEY (S7)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Davies, Rebecca; Kewley, Lisa; Hampton, Elise; Sutherland, Ralph [RSAA, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Shastri, Prajval; Kharb, Preeti; Jose, Jessy; Bhatt, Harish; Ramya, S. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala 2 B Block, Bangalore 560034 (India); Scharwächter, Julia [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UMR 8112, 61 Avenue de l’Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Jin, Chichuan [Qian Xuesen Laboratory for Space Technology, Beijing (China); Banfield, Julie [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW, 1710 Australia (Australia); Zaw, Ingyin [New York University (Abu Dhabi), 70 Washington Square South, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Juneau, Stéphanie [CEA-Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); James, Bethan [Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Srivastava, Shweta, E-mail: Michael.Dopita@anu.edu.au [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Here we describe the Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7) and present results on 64 galaxies drawn from the first data release. The S7 uses the Wide Field Spectrograph mounted on the ANU 2.3 m telescope located at the Siding Spring Observatory to deliver an integral field of 38 × 25 arcsec at a spectral resolution of R = 7000 in the red (530–710 nm), and R = 3000 in the blue (340–560 nm). From these data cubes we have extracted the narrow-line region spectra from a 4 arcsec aperture centered on the nucleus. We also determine the Hβ and [O iii] λ5007 fluxes in the narrow lines, the nuclear reddening, the reddening-corrected relative intensities of the observed emission lines, and the Hβ and [O iii] λ5007 luminosities determined from spectra for which the stellar continuum has been removed. We present a set of images of the galaxies in [O iii] λ5007, [N ii] λ6584, and Hα, which serve to delineate the spatial extent of the extended narrow-line region and also to reveal the structure and morphology of the surrounding H ii regions. Finally, we provide a preliminary discussion of those Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies that display coronal emission lines in order to explore the origin of these lines.

  11. Regional analysis of ground and above-ground climate. Part I. Regional suitability of earth-tempering practices: summary and conclusions. Part II. Bioclimatic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labs, K.

    The regional suitability of underground construction as a climate-control technique is discussed with reference to (1) a bioclimatic analysis of long-term weather data for 29 locations in the United States to determine appropriate above-ground climate-control techniques, (2) a data base of synthesized ground temperatures for the coterminous United States, and (3) monthly dewpoint ground temperature comparisons for identifying the relative likelihood of condensation, from one region to another. It is concluded that the suitability of earth tempering as a practice and of specific earth-sheltered design stereotypes varies geographically. While the subsurface almost always provides a thermal advantage on its own terms when compared to above-ground climatic data, it can, nonetheless, compromise the effectiveness of other, regionally more important climate-control techniques. Also contained in the report are reviews of above- and below-ground climate mapping schemes related to human comfort and architectural design, and a detailed description of a theoretical model of ground temperature, heat flow, and heat storage in the ground. Strategies of passive climate control are presented in a discussion of the building bioclimatic analysis procedure which has been applied in a computer analysis of 30 years of weather data for each of 29 locations in the United States. 3 references, 12 figures, 14 tables.

  12. Lower solar chromosphere-corona transition region. II - Wave pressure effects for a specific form of the heating function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, D. Tod; Holzer, Thomas E.; Macgregor, Keith B.

    1990-01-01

    Lower transition region models with a balance between mechanical heating and radiative losses are expanded to include wave pressure effects. The models are used to study the simple damping length form of the heating function. The results are compared to the results obtained by Woods et al. (1990) for solutions in the lower transition region. The results suggest that a mixture of fast-mode and slow-mode waves may provide the appropriate heating mechanism in the lower transition region, with the decline in effective vertical wave speed caused by the refraction and eventual total reflection of the fast-mode wave resulting from the decreasing atmospheric density.

  13. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part II: Mechanical modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei; Azdoud, Yan; Lubineau, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    We present two modeling approaches for predicting the macroscopic elastic properties of carbon nanotubes/polymer composites with thick interphase regions at the nanotube/matrix frontier. The first model is based on local continuum mechanics

  14. A composite method based on formal grammar and DNA structural features in detecting human polymerase II promoter region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutapa Datta

    Full Text Available An important step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the promoter regions where the transcription factor binding takes place. Predicting a promoter region de novo has been a theoretical goal for many researchers for a long time. There exists a number of in silico methods to predict the promoter region de novo but most of these methods are still suffering from various shortcomings, a major one being the selection of appropriate features of promoter region distinguishing them from non-promoters. In this communication, we have proposed a new composite method that predicts promoter sequences based on the interrelationship between structural profiles of DNA and primary sequence elements of the promoter regions. We have shown that a Context Free Grammar (CFG can formalize the relationships between different primary sequence features and by utilizing the CFG, we demonstrate that an efficient parser can be constructed for extracting these relationships from DNA sequences to distinguish the true promoter sequences from non-promoter sequences. Along with CFG, we have extracted the structural features of the promoter region to improve upon the efficiency of our prediction system. Extensive experiments performed on different datasets reveals that our method is effective in predicting promoter sequences on a genome-wide scale and performs satisfactorily as compared to other promoter prediction techniques.

  15. A Composite Method Based on Formal Grammar and DNA Structural Features in Detecting Human Polymerase II Promoter Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sutapa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis

    2013-01-01

    An important step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the promoter regions where the transcription factor binding takes place. Predicting a promoter region de novo has been a theoretical goal for many researchers for a long time. There exists a number of in silico methods to predict the promoter region de novo but most of these methods are still suffering from various shortcomings, a major one being the selection of appropriate features of promoter region distinguishing them from non-promoters. In this communication, we have proposed a new composite method that predicts promoter sequences based on the interrelationship between structural profiles of DNA and primary sequence elements of the promoter regions. We have shown that a Context Free Grammar (CFG) can formalize the relationships between different primary sequence features and by utilizing the CFG, we demonstrate that an efficient parser can be constructed for extracting these relationships from DNA sequences to distinguish the true promoter sequences from non-promoter sequences. Along with CFG, we have extracted the structural features of the promoter region to improve upon the efficiency of our prediction system. Extensive experiments performed on different datasets reveals that our method is effective in predicting promoter sequences on a genome-wide scale and performs satisfactorily as compared to other promoter prediction techniques. PMID:23437045

  16. SUMMARY OF EPA'S RADON REDUCTION RESEARCH IN SCHOOLS DURING 1989-90

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report details radon mitigation research in schools conducted by EPA during 1989 and part of 1990. The major objective was to evaluate the potential of active subslab depressurization (ASD) in various geologic and climatic regions. The different geographic regions also pres...

  17. [Development of pharmacy in the Leskovac region for the period from liberation from the Turks until World War II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milić, Petar; Milić, Slavica

    2013-01-01

    From the historical point of view, there are three time periods when the process of modernization of Serbian society took place. First period includes the interval from the beginning of the 19th century until the end of World War I, when the Serbian country was reestablished as Serbian Knezevina (princedom) and in 1882 as Serbian Kingdom. Second period includes an interval from the unity of Serbia into the Kingdom of Serbs, Croatians and Slovenians, which was established at the end of World War I (1918) and in 1929 changed the name into the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, which lasted until the end of World War II. The third period includes time after World War II. In this paper, the social-economical conditions in the Leskovac area during the first two periods of modernization were described, as well as the pharmacy development emphasizing the characteristic of the pharmaceutics. The Leskovac area belongs to most recently liberated areas in Serbia, i.e. Leskovac was liberated at the end of 1877. Nevertheless, the first pharmacy was opened in Leskovac in 1862, during the reign of the Turks. The authors being the people from Leskovac as well as the pharmacists believe that they contributed to better overview of the activities of people from modernization period, paying them well-deserved recognition.

  18. Environmental Protection Agency - EPA Pub Central

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — PubMed Central (PMC) is a full-text, online archive of journal literature operated by the National Library of Medicine. The EPA is using PMC to permanently preserve...

  19. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RADINFO

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  20. EPA CIO Governance Board Membership List

    Science.gov (United States)

    In keeping with OMB guidance on implementing the Federal Information Technology Reform Act (FITARA), EPA is publishing its list of officials who perform the duties or responsibilities of a Bureau CIO.