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Sample records for epa radiation quality

  1. The role of the EPA radiation quality assurance program in the measurement quality assurance accreditation program for radioassay laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, T.M. [Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1993-12-31

    As the nature and extent of radiological contamination becomes better documented and more public, radioanalytical laboratories are faced with a constantly expanding variety of new and difficult analytical requirements. Concurrent with those requirements is the responsibility to provide customers, regulatory officials, or the public with defensible data produced in an environment of verifiable, controlled quality. To meet that need, a quality assurance accreditation program for radioassay laboratories has been proposed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The standard will provide the organizational framework and functional requirements needed to assure the quality of laboratory outputs. Under the proposed program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Laboratory Intercomparison Program plays a key role as a reference laboratory. The current and proposed roles of the EPA Intercomparison Program are discussed, as are the functional relationships between EPA, the accreditating organization, and the service and monitoring laboratories.

  2. Checklist for Reviewing EPA Quality Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    This checklist will be used to review the Quality Management Plans (QMPs) that are submitted to the Quality Staff of the Office of Environmental Information (OEI) for Agency review under EPA Order 5360.1 A2.

  3. Quality Management Plan for EPA Region 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    The QMP describes policies, procedures & management systems within EPA NE that govern quality assurance & quality control activities supporting the transparency & scientific defensibility of environmental data collected, used & disseminated by the Region.

  4. Development of radiation protection standards at EPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, S.

    1987-01-01

    Development of EPA radiation protection standards combines the elements of risk assessment and risk management. The process of risk assessment consists of technical evaluation of the source term, environmental transport mechanisms, and biological effects. Engineering evaluations provide data on control options and costs. The risk management process considers the scope of legal authorities and the balancing of costs and benefits of alternatives within the framework of national priorities. The regulatory process provides for substantial public participation and is subject to legal reviews

  5. Radiation Education Activities | RadTown USA | | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-12

    EPA's Radiation Education Activities are designed to help increase awareness and understanding of radiation concepts among middle and high school students. The activities introduce basic concepts of radiation, non-ionizing and ionizing radiation, radiation protection, radioactive atoms and radioactive decay.

  6. Managing the Quality of Environmental Data in EPA Region 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Pacific Southwest, Region 9's Quality Assurance (QA) section's primary mission is to effectively oversee and carry out the Quality System and Quality Management Plan, and project-level quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) activities.

  7. Radiation protection, 1975. Annual EPA review of radiation protection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The EPA, under its Federal Guidance authorities, is responsible for advising the President on all matters pertaining to radiation and, through this mechanism, to provide guidance to other Federal agencies on radiation protection matters. Highlights are presented of significant radiation protection activities of all Federal agencies which were completed in 1975, or in which noteworthy progress was made during that period, and those events affecting members of the public. State or local activities are also presented where the effects of those events may be more far-reaching. At the Federal level significant strides have been made in reducing unnecessary radiation exposure through the efforts of the responsible agencies. These efforts have resulted in the promulgation of certain standards, criteria and guides. Improved control technologies in many areas make it feasible to reduce emissions at a reasonable cost to levels below current standards and guides. This report provides information on the significant activities leading to the establishment of the necessary controls for protection of public health and the environment. Radiation protection activities have been undertaken in other areas such as medical, occupational and consumer product radiation. In the context of radiation protection, ancillary activities are included in this report in order to present a comprehensive overview of the events that took place in 1975 that could have an effect on public health, either directly or indirectly. Reports of routine or continuing radiation protection operations may be found in publications of the sponsoring Federal agencies, as can more detailed information about activities reported in this document. A list of some of these reports is included

  8. Modifying EPA radiation risk models based on BEIR VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawel, D.; Puskin, J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes a 'draft White Paper' that provides details on proposed changes in EPA's methodology for estimating radiogenic cancer risks. Many of the changes are based on the contents of a recent National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report (BEIR VII), that addresses cancer and genetic risks from low doses of low-LET radiation. The draft White Paper was prepared for a meeting with the EPA's Science Advisory Board's Radiation Advisory Committee (RAC) in September for seeking advice on the application of BEIR VII and on issues relating to these modifications and expansions. After receiving the Advisory review, we plan to implement the changes by publishing the new methodology in an EPA report, which we expect to submit to the RAC for final review. The revised methodology could then be applied to update the cancer risk coefficients for over 800 radionuclides that are published in EPA's Federal Guidance Report 13. (author)

  9. Air Quality System (AQS) Monitoring Network, EPA OAR OAQPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains points which depict air quality monitors within EPA's Air Quality System (AQS) monitoring network. This dataset is updated weekly to...

  10. Industrial Radiography | Radiation Protection | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Manufacturers use a method called industrial radiography to check for cracks or flaws in materials. Radiation is used in industrial radiography to show problems not visible from the outside without damaging the material.

  11. Overview of the EPA quality system for environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Formalized quality assurance program requirements for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been established for more than a decade. During this period, the environmental issues and concerns addressed by the EPA have changed. Many issues, such as ozone depletion and global climate warming, have become international concerns among the world environmental community. Other issues, such as hazardous waste cleanup and clean air, remain a focus of national environmental concerns. As the environmental issues of the 1980`s evolved, the traditional quality assurance (QA) program was transformed through the use of quality management principles into a Quality System to help managers meet the needs of the 1990`s and beyond.

  12. Overview of the EPA quality system for environmental programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    Formalized quality assurance program requirements for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been established for more than a decade. During this period, the environmental issues and concerns addressed by the EPA have changed. Many issues, such as ozone depletion and global climate warming, have become international concerns among the world environmental community. Other issues, such as hazardous waste cleanup and clean air, remain a focus of national environmental concerns. As the environmental issues of the 1980's evolved, the traditional quality assurance (QA) program was transformed through the use of quality management principles into a Quality System to help managers meet the needs of the 1990's and beyond

  13. References on EPA Quality Assurance Project Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides requirements for the conduct of quality management practices, including quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) activities, for all environmental data collection and environmental technology programs performed by or for this Agency.

  14. EPA Region 3 Quality Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Has links to resources that describe the Region's Quality Assurance Program, which is a collection of the Region's ongoing quality assurance (QA) policies, procedures, responsibilities and management systems.

  15. Evolution of Air Quality Model at the US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    At the US EPA, we have developed an air quality model, CMAQ, in the past 20+ years. Throughout the years, the model has been upgraded with respect to advancement of science. We have extended the model from regional to hemispheric. We have coupled it with meteorological model, WR...

  16. Contact Information for EPA's Office of Transportation and Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    You will find an EPA employee by name or by topic of interest, also, you will know who to contact if you want to find a specific transportation and air quality document, importing a vehicle to the US, and other frequently asked questions.

  17. Radiation From Solar Activity | Radiation Protection | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Solar flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and geomagnetic storms from the sun can send extreme bursts of ionizing radiation and magnetic energy toward Earth. Some of this energy is in the form ionizing radiation and some of the energy is magnetic energy.

  18. Quality in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlicki, Todd; Mundt, Arno J.

    2007-01-01

    A modern approach to quality was developed in the United States at Bell Telephone Laboratories during the first part of the 20th century. Over the years, those quality techniques have been adopted and extended by almost every industry. Medicine in general and radiation oncology in particular have been slow to adopt modern quality techniques. This work contains a brief description of the history of research on quality that led to the development of organization-wide quality programs such as Six Sigma. The aim is to discuss the current approach to quality in radiation oncology as well as where quality should be in the future. A strategy is suggested with the goal to provide a threshold improvement in quality over the next 10 years

  19. 40 CFR 131.22 - EPA promulgation of water quality standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA promulgation of water quality... PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Procedures for Review and Revision of Water Quality Standards § 131.22 EPA promulgation of water quality standards. (a) If the State does not adopt the changes specified by the Regional...

  20. EPA Office of Water (OW): STORET Water Quality Monitoring Stations NHDPlus Indexed Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Storage and Retrieval for Water Quality Data (STORET and the Water Quality Exchange, WQX) defines the methods and the data systems by which EPA compiles monitoring...

  1. EPA Office of Water (OW): STORET Water Quality Monitoring Stations Source Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Storage and Retrieval for Water Quality Data (STORET and the Water Quality Exchange, WQX) defines the methods and the data systems by which EPA compiles monitoring...

  2. Independent Quality Control Review of EPA OIG Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The review considers selected audit work performed by EPA OIG, Office of Audit, Congressional and Public Liaison, Mission Systems, and Program Evaluation, during the period for 1 October 2006 through 30 September 2007 .

  3. 77 FR 1687 - EPA Workshops on Achieving Water Quality Through Integrated Municipal Stormwater and Wastewater...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... quality benefits and consider various innovative approaches, such as green infrastructure, that may be... approach, EPA encourages municipalities to pursue more innovative approaches such as green infrastructure technologies and asset management or similar utility-wide planning approaches. EPA has strongly encouraged...

  4. Radiation protection - quality and metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broutin, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    The radiation protection gathers three occupations: radiation protection agents; environment agents ( control and monitoring); metrology agents ( activities measurement and calibration). The quality and the metrology constitute a contribution in the technique competence and the guarantee of the service quality. This article, after a historical aspect of quality and metrology in France explains the advantages of such a policy. (N.C.)

  5. Surface Water Quality Trends from EPA's LTM Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C.; Lynch, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Surface water chemistry provides direct indicators of the potential effects of anthropogenic impacts, such as acid deposition and climate change, on the overall health of aquatic ecosystems. Long-term surface water monitoring networks provide a host of environmental data that can be used, in conjunction with other networks, to assess how water bodies respond to stressors and if they are potentially at risk (e.g., receiving pollutant deposition beyond its critical load). Two EPA-administered monitoring programs provide information on the effects of acidic deposition on headwater aquatic systems: the Long Term Monitoring (LTM) program and the Temporally Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) program, designed to track the effectiveness of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) in reducing the acidity of surface waters in acid sensitive ecoregions of the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic. Here we present regional variability of long term trends in surface water quality in response to substantial reductions in atmospheric deposition. Water quality trends at acid sensitive LTM sites exhibit decreasing concentrations of sulfate at 100% of monitored sites in the Adirondack Mountains and New England, 80% of Northern Appalachian Plateau sites, and yet only 15% of sites in the Ridge and Blue Ridge Provinces over the 1990-2011 period of record. Across all regions, most LTM sites exhibited constant or only slightly declining nitrate concentrations over the same time period. Acid Neutralizing Capacity (ANC) levels improved at 68% and 45% of LTM sites in the Adirondacks and Northern Appalachian Plateau, respectively, but few sites showed increases in New England or the Ridge and Blue Ridge Provinces due to lagging improvements in base cation concentration. The ANC of northeastern TIME lakes was also evaluated from 1991 to 1994 and 2008 to 2011. The percentage of lakes with ANC values below 50 μeq/L, lakes of acute or elevated concern, dropped by about 7%, indicating improvement

  6. Technical comments on EPA`s proposed revisions to the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for particulate matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1997-03-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed new ambient air quality standards specifically for fine particulate matter, regulating concentrations of particles with median aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m (PM{sub 2.5}). Two new standards have been proposed: a maximum 24-hr concentration that is intended to protect against acute health effects, and an annual concentration limit that is intended to protect against longer-term health effects. EPA has also proposed a slight relaxation of the 24-hr standard for inhalable particles (PM{sub 10}), by allowing additional exceedances each year. Fine particles are currently being indirectly controlled by means of regulations for PM{sub 10} and TSP, under the Clean Air Act of 1970 and subsequent amendments. Although routine monitoring of PM{sub 2.5} is rare and data are sparse, the available data indicate that ambient concentrations have been declining at about 6% per year under existing regulations.

  7. Quality Indicators in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Das, Prajnan, E-mail: prajdas@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Oncologic specialty societies and multidisciplinary collaborative groups have dedicated considerable effort to developing evidence-based quality indicators (QIs) to facilitate quality improvement, accreditation, benchmarking, reimbursement, maintenance of certification, and regulatory reporting. In particular, the field of radiation oncology has a long history of organized quality assessment efforts and continues to work toward developing consensus quality standards in the face of continually evolving technologies and standards of care. This report provides a comprehensive review of the current state of quality assessment in radiation oncology. Specifically, this report highlights implications of the healthcare quality movement for radiation oncology and reviews existing efforts to define and measure quality in the field, with focus on dimensions of quality specific to radiation oncology within the “big picture” of oncologic quality assessment efforts.

  8. Quality Indicators in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Das, Prajnan

    2013-01-01

    Oncologic specialty societies and multidisciplinary collaborative groups have dedicated considerable effort to developing evidence-based quality indicators (QIs) to facilitate quality improvement, accreditation, benchmarking, reimbursement, maintenance of certification, and regulatory reporting. In particular, the field of radiation oncology has a long history of organized quality assessment efforts and continues to work toward developing consensus quality standards in the face of continually evolving technologies and standards of care. This report provides a comprehensive review of the current state of quality assessment in radiation oncology. Specifically, this report highlights implications of the healthcare quality movement for radiation oncology and reviews existing efforts to define and measure quality in the field, with focus on dimensions of quality specific to radiation oncology within the “big picture” of oncologic quality assessment efforts

  9. Radiation shielding quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Dallsun

    For the radiation shielding quality assurance, the validity and reliability of the neutron transport code MCNP, which is now one of the most widely used radiation shielding analysis codes, were checked with lot of benchmark experiments. And also as a practical example, follows were performed in this thesis. One integral neutron transport experiment to measure the effect of neutron streaming in iron and void was performed with Dog-Legged Void Assembly in Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in 1991. Neutron flux was measured six different places with the methane detectors and a BF-3 detector. The main purpose of the measurements was to provide benchmark against which various neutron transport calculation tools could be compared. Those data were used in verification of Monte Carlo Neutron & Photon Transport Code, MCNP, with the modeling for that. Experimental results and calculation results were compared in both ways, as the total integrated value of neutron fluxes along neutron energy range from 10 KeV to 2 MeV and as the neutron spectrum along with neutron energy range. Both results are well matched with the statistical error +/-20%. MCNP results were also compared with those of TORT, a three dimensional discrete ordinates code which was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. MCNP results are superior to the TORT results at all detector places except one. This means that MCNP is proved as a very powerful tool for the analysis of neutron transport through iron & air and further it could be used as a powerful tool for the radiation shielding analysis. For one application of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) to neutron and gamma transport problems, uncertainties for the calculated values of critical K were evaluated as in the ANOVA on statistical data.

  10. 40 CFR 131.21 - EPA review and approval of water quality standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Procedures for Review and Revision of Water Quality Standards § 131.21 EPA review and approval of water quality standards. (a) After the State submits its... analysis. (b) The Regional Administrator's approval or disapproval of a State water quality standard shall...

  11. Air Quality Flags Program, U.S., 2017, EPA/OAR/OAQPS/OID

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This map service contains participants in EPA's Air Quality Flags Program. The map service also includes the current day's AQI forecast for each participant in the...

  12. Water Quality Indicators Data Review | ECHO | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ECHO, Enforcement and Compliance History Online, provides compliance and enforcement information for approximately 800,000 EPA-regulated facilities nationwide. ECHO includes permit, inspection, violation, enforcement action, and penalty information about facilities regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) Stationary Source Program, Clean Water Act (CWA) National Pollutant Elimination Discharge System (NPDES), and/or Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Information also is provided on surrounding demographics when available.

  13. Proceedings of the fourth JAEA-US EPA workshop on radiation risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Akira; Boyd, Michael

    2007-02-01

    This report is the proceedings of the fourth workshop jointly organized by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) under the terms of agreement for cooperation in the field of radiation protection. The workshop was sponsored by the Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate and was held at the Nuclear Science Research Institute, the Tokai Research and Development Center, JAEA, on November 7-8, 2006. The objective of the workshop was to exchange and discuss recent information on radiation effects, radiation risk assessment, radiation dosimetry, emergency response, radiation protection standards, and waste management. Twenty-two papers were presented by experts from JAEA, US EPA, the National Academies, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Washington State University and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Three keynotes addressed research on radiation effects and radiation protection at JAEA, the latest report on health risks from exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation published by the National Research Council (BEIR VII Phase 2), and recent developments in Committee 2 for the forthcoming recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The workshop provided a good opportunity for identifying future research needed for radiation risk assessment. The 22 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  14. Interaction of hyperthermia and radiation: radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loshek, D.D.; Orr, J.S.; Solomonidis, E.

    1981-01-01

    Cell-survival data were collected to determine the survival response of asynchronous CHO cells subject to radiation and hyperthermia. The irradiation was at room temperature 100 minutes before exposure to hyperthermia at 42 0 C. The survival response to the combination of these two agents is expressed by means of a survival surface, a three-dimensional concept relating cell survival to heat dose and radiation dose. The survival surface could be approximately described by a survival model comprising three components of cell killing: the unperturbed radiation component, the unperturbed hyperthermia component and the interaction component. The dependence of the radiation component and the interaction component on radiation quality were investigated by irradiating with either 60 Co γ rays, 250 kV X rays or 14.7 MeV neutrons. An analysis suggests that the interaction component and the radiation component exhibit similar dependencies on radiation quality both for the deposition of damage and the repair or accumulation of that damage. (U.K.)

  15. Quality management in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehrle, H.G.

    1997-01-01

    Quality Management in Radiation Protection Quality management (QM) in the field of Radiation Protection was discussed in a previous issue (2/97) using the example of QMS at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The present article describes the major features involved in the establishment of a functional QMS. Establishment of the QMS lead to a deeper understanding of administrative and operational aspects of the working methods involved. (orig.) [de

  16. Quality assurance in radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah Mod Ali

    2002-01-01

    The growth of the radiation processing industries in Malaysia has presented the SSDL-MINT a new set of parameter for the Quality Assurance (QA) programs. The large massive doses of radiation required for commercial application of sterilization, cross-linking etc needs measurement method outside the scope of familiar radiation detection instruments. This requires establishment of proper calibration procedure and selection of appropriate transfer system/technique to assure adequate traceability to an international radiation standard. The benefit of accurate in-plant dosimetry for the operator, approving authority and purchaser are balanced against the extra dosimetric efforts required for good QA is presented. (Author)

  17. Transforming an EPA QA/R-2 quality management plan into an ISO 9002 quality management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, R A; Hedin, C M; Kassakhian, G H; Reynolds, E S

    2001-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR) requires environmental data of known quality to support Superfund hazardous waste site projects. The Quality Assurance Technical Support (QATS) Program is operated by Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc. to provide EPA's Analytical Operations Center (AOC) with performance evaluation samples, reference materials, on-site laboratory auditing capabilities, data audits (including electronic media data audits), methods development, and other support services. The new QATS contract awarded in November 2000 required that the QATS Program become ISO 9000 certified. In a first for an EPA contractor, the QATS staff and management successfully transformed EPA's QA/R-2 type Quality Management Plan into a Quality Management System (QMS) that complies with the requirements of the internationally recognized ISO 9002 standard and achieved certification in the United States, Canada, and throughout Europe. The presentation describes how quality system elements of ISO 9002 were implemented on an already existing quality system. The psychological and organizational challenges of the culture change in QATS' day-to-day operations will be discussed for the benefit of other ISO 9000 aspirants.

  18. Quality of radiation field imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petr, I.

    1988-01-01

    The questions were studied of the quality of imaging the gamma radiation field and of the limits of the quality in directional detector scanning. A resolution angle was introduced to quantify the imaging quality, and its relation was sought with the detection effective half-angle of the directional detector. The resolution angle was defined for the simplest configuration of the radiation field consisting of two monoenergetic gamma beams in one plane. It was shown that the resolution angle decreases, i.e., resolution in imaging the radiation field is better, with the effective half-angle of the directional detector. It was also found that resolution of both gamma beams deteriorated when the beams were surrounded with an isotropic background field. If the beams are surrounded with a background field showing general distribution, the angle size will be affected not only by the properties of the detector but also by the distribution of the ambient radiation field and the method of its scanning. The method described can be applied in designing a directional detector necessary for imaging the presumed radiation field in the required quality. (Z.M.). 4 figs., 3 refs

  19. U.S. EPA Environmental Quality Index - Air Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is an invited presentation by Region 5, Air Office, who asked me to provide an overview of the Air Domain and health results associated with the Air Domain of the Environmental Quality Index. Region 5 is hosting an Air Toxics meeting for its member states (Ohio, Michigan, I...

  20. EPA's Air Quality Rules for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (RICE) and their Application to CHP (Webinar) – June 24, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    This webinar discusses the effect of EPA's air quality regulations on CHP facilities and stationary RICE, and describes how CHP systems can comply with air quality regulations by using stationary RICE.

  1. Radiation measurements and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    Accurate measurements are essential to research leading to a successful radiation process and to the commissioning of the process and the facility. On the other hand, once the process is in production, the importance to quality control of measuring radiation quantities (i.e., absorbed dose, dose rate, dose distribution) rather than various other parameters of the process (i.e. conveyor speed, dwell time, radiation field characteristics, product dimensions) is not clearly established. When the safety of the product is determined by the magnitude of the administered dose, as in radiation sterilization, waste control, or food preservation, accuracy and precision of the measurement of the effective dose are vital. Since physical dose measurements are usually simpler, more reliable and reproducible than biological testing of the product, there is a trend toward using standardized dosimetry for quality control of some processes. In many industrial products, however, such as vulcanized rubber, textiles, plastics, coatings, films, wire and cable, the effective dose can be controlled satisfactorily by controlling process variables or by product testing itself. In the measurement of radiation dose profiles by dosimetry, it is necessary to have suitable dose meter calibrations, to account for sources of error and imprecision, and to use correct statistical procedures in specifying dwell times or conveyor speeds and source and product parameters to achieve minimum and maximum doses within specifications. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the WIPP Project`s compliance with the EPA radiation protection standards for disposal of transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neill, R.H.; Chaturvedi, L.; Rucker, D.F.; Silva, M.K.; Walker, B.A.; Channell, J.K.; Clemo, T.M. [Environmental Evaluation Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Environmental Evaluation Group, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) proposed rule to certify that the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) meets compliance with the long-term radiation protection standards for geologic repositories (40CFR191 Subparts B and C), is one of the most significant milestones to date for the WIPP project in particular, and for the nuclear waste issue in general. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has provided an independent technical oversight for the WIPP project since 1978, and is responsible for many improvements in the location, design, and testing of various aspects of the project, including participation in the development of the EPA standards since the early 1980s. The EEG reviewed the development of documentation for assessing the WIPP`s compliance by the Sandia National Laboratories following the 1985 promulgation by EPA, and provided many written and verbal comments on various aspects of this effort, culminating in the overall review of the 1992 performance assessment. For the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) compliance certification application (CCA), the EEG provided detailed comments on the draft CCA in March, 1996, and additional comments through unpublished letters in 1997 (included as Appendices 8.1 and 8.2 in this report). Since the October 30, 1997, publication of the EPA`s proposed rule to certify WIPP, the EEG gave presentations on important issues to the EPA on December 10, 1997, and sent a December 31, 1997 letter with attachments to clarify those issues (Appendix 8.3). The EEG has raised a number of questions that may have an impact on compliance. In spite of the best efforts by the EEG, the EPA reaction to reviews and suggestions has been slow and apparently driven by legal considerations. This report discusses in detail the questions that have been raised about containment requirements. Also discussed are assurance requirements, groundwater protection, individual protection, and an evaluation of EPA`s responses to EEG`s comments.

  3. Data Quality Objectives Supporting the Environmental Direct Radiation Monitoring Program for the INL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundell, J. F. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Magnuson, S. O. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Scherbinske, P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Case, M. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This document presents the development of the data quality objectives (DQOs) for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Environmental Direct Radiation Monitoring Program and follows the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) DQO process (EPA 2006). This document also develops and presents the logic to determine the specific number of direct radiation monitoring locations around INL facilities on the desert west of Idaho Falls and in Idaho Falls, at locations bordering the INL Site, and in the surrounding regional area. The selection logic follows the guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) (2015) for environmental surveillance of DOE facilities.

  4. Evolution of EPA/DOE technical cooperation in remediation of radiation/mixed waste contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, Robert S.; Garcia-Frias, Beverly; Wolbarst, Anthony B.; Coe, Larry J.

    1992-01-01

    The EPA Office of Radiation Programs (ORP) and the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) are cooperating in efforts related to restoration of radioactive and mixed waste sites. The impetus for these efforts derived from DOE's need to perform restoration activities according to CERCLA/RCRA requirements, and from ORP's role as a supplier of radiation expertise to federal agencies. These activities include: assessing remediation technology, developing radioanalytical protocols; matching cleanup technologies to soil characteristics; developing a process for the evaluation, selection, and appropriate use of groundwater models; reviewing incinerator practices; and addressing technical issues associated with the WIPP. Cooperative projects planned for the future include: evaluation of methodologies for streamlining the restoration process; assessment of the applicability of process knowledge for waste characterization; evaluation of recycling of radioactive metals; and expansion of selected environmental protection initiatives at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Public acceptance is a crucial component of the remediation process. An underlying objective of these cooperative initiatives is to address issues of concern to the public in an open and honest fashion. (author)

  5. Evaluation of the WIPP Project's compliance with the EPA radiation protection standards for disposal of transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neill, R.H.; Chaturvedi, L.; Rucker, D.F.; Silva, M.K.; Walker, B.A.; Channell, J.K.; Clemo, T.M.

    1998-03-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed rule to certify that the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) meets compliance with the long-term radiation protection standards for geologic repositories (40CFR191 Subparts B and C), is one of the most significant milestones to date for the WIPP project in particular, and for the nuclear waste issue in general. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has provided an independent technical oversight for the WIPP project since 1978, and is responsible for many improvements in the location, design, and testing of various aspects of the project, including participation in the development of the EPA standards since the early 1980s. The EEG reviewed the development of documentation for assessing the WIPP's compliance by the Sandia National Laboratories following the 1985 promulgation by EPA, and provided many written and verbal comments on various aspects of this effort, culminating in the overall review of the 1992 performance assessment. For the US Department of Energy's (DOE) compliance certification application (CCA), the EEG provided detailed comments on the draft CCA in March, 1996, and additional comments through unpublished letters in 1997 (included as Appendices 8.1 and 8.2 in this report). Since the October 30, 1997, publication of the EPA's proposed rule to certify WIPP, the EEG gave presentations on important issues to the EPA on December 10, 1997, and sent a December 31, 1997 letter with attachments to clarify those issues (Appendix 8.3). The EEG has raised a number of questions that may have an impact on compliance. In spite of the best efforts by the EEG, the EPA reaction to reviews and suggestions has been slow and apparently driven by legal considerations. This report discusses in detail the questions that have been raised about containment requirements. Also discussed are assurance requirements, groundwater protection, individual protection, and an evaluation of EPA's responses to EEG's comments

  6. LANDSAT supports data needs for EPA 208 planning. [water quality control and waste treatment management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Excerpts from federal legislation and regulations mandating areawide waster treatment management as a means of restoring and maintaining the integrity of the nation's water are presented along with requirements for grants to the states for water quality planning, management, and implementation. Experiences using LANDSAT to identify nonpoint sources of water pollution as well as land/use/land cover features in South Dakota, Kentucky, Georgia, New Jersey, and Texas are described. Present activities suggest that this type of remote sensing is an efficient, effective tool for areawide water quality planning. Interaction with cognizant federal, state, and local government personnel involved in EPA section 208 planning activities can guide the development of new capabilities and enhance their utility and prospect for use.

  7. National Emissions Inventory (NEI), County-Level, US, 2008, 2011, 2014, EPA OAR, OAPQS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This US EPA Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Air Quality Assessment Division, Air Quality Analysis Group (OAR, OAQPS, AQAD,...

  8. National Emissions Inventory (NEI), Facility-Level, US, 2008, 2011, 2014, EPA OAR, OAPQS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This US EPA Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Air Quality Assessment Division, Air Quality Analysis Group (OAR, OAQPS, AQAD,...

  9. Quality Assurance Testing of Version 1.3 of U.S. EPA Benchmark Dose Software (Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA benchmark dose software (BMDS) issued to evaluate chemical dose-response data in support of Agency risk assessments, and must therefore be dependable. Quality assurance testing methods developed for BMDS were designed to assess model dependability with respect to curve-fitt...

  10. Quality assurance in radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah Mod Ali

    2002-01-01

    The achievement of traceability to recognize measurement standards for ionizing radiation posses special requirements. Methods of transferring reference standard to the working situation are devised through calibration and appropriate traceability, which optimize the accuracy attainable with the method of dose determination in routine use. Appropriate procedures are developed by the SSDL-MINT to establish accurate dose measurement in wide range of radiation fields such as in medicine, agriculture and industrial application. The status of work including effort towards ISO 9000 certification of SSDL dosimetry services will be summarized. (Author)

  11. Quality control of gamma radiation measuring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surma, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    The problem of quality control and assurance of gamma radiation measuring systems has been described in detail. The factors deciding of high quality of radiometric measurements as well as statistical testing and calibration of measuring systems have been presented and discussed

  12. Radiation quality and radiation risks - some current problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellerer, A.M.; Hahn, K.

    1989-01-01

    The newly evaluated cancer mortality data of the atomic bomb survivors suggest substantially enhanced risk estimates, and the various factors that are involved in the change are considered. The enhanced risk estimates have already led to added restrictions in the dose limits for radiation workers, and there may be a further tightening of regulations in the future. The impending revision of the quality factors in radiation protection may, therefore, lead to practical difficulties, and a careful consideration of the various aspects involved in a revision is required. A liaison group of ICRU and ICRP has proposed a reformulation of the quality factor that is related not to the LET, but to the microdosimetric variably y. The relation leads to increased quality factors for neutrons, but also to a quality factor for γ rays of only 0.5. Alternatives are presented that relate the quality factor to LET and that retain γ- rays as the reference radiation. One option corresponds to different quality factors for γ rays and X-rays, the other option sets the quality factor for photons approximately equal to unity, irrespective of energy. (author)

  13. Biological indicators of radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.A.; Wong, R.M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The induction of many biological effects by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is strikingly different in one or two respects from the induction by acute low-LET radiation. If the acute low-LET dose-effect curve is of the usual quadratic form, it becomes linear as LET increases. In any case the linear slope increases as LET increases; that is, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) increases. Both changes might be exploited as biological indicators of whether or not the recent recalculations of dose and of neutron contribution to dose at Hiroshima and Nagasaki seem consistent with the epidemiological observations. The biological end points that have been extensively studied in survivors include acute effects, growth and development after in utero or childhood exposure, genetic and cytogenetic effects in offspring, somatic chromosomal aberrations in survivors, and, of course, cancers, including leukemia. No significant indication among offspring of genetic or cytogenetic effects attributable to parental exposure has been found. Among the remaining end points, only the data on somatic chromosomal aberrations and on cancers appear robust enough to allow one to draw definite inferences by comparing experiences at the two cities

  14. Report: EPA Provided Quality and Timely Information on Hurricane Katrina Hazardous Material Releases and Debris Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #2006-P-00023, May 2, 2006. After Hurricane Katrina, EPA was the agency with lead responsibility to prevent, minimize, or mitigate threats to public health and the environment caused by hazardous materials and oil spills in inland zones.

  15. Notification: Audit of EPA's Data Quality Review of Self-Reported Information in XACTA System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY14-0078, February 10, 2014. This memorandum is to notify you that the Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plans to begin the above subject audit.

  16. The quality factor in ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changmao

    1990-12-01

    The existing quality factors for ionizing radiation and the Q values recommended by ICRU report 40 are briefly introduced, and the relevant aspects are also discussed. It is recommended that the new Q values presented by ICRU should not be adopted in protection radiation practices, but the ultimate decision from ICRP should be noted. It is pointed out that the relevant academic discussion should be developed at present, in order to study the position and policy which should be taken. (author)

  17. Quality Control and Quality Assurance of Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abaza, A.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) has played important roles in cancer treatment for more than one century. The development of RT techniques allows high-dose irradiation to tumors while reducing the radiation doses delivered to surrounding normal tissues. However, RT is a complex process and involves understanding of the principles of medical physics, radiobiology, radiation safety, dosimetry, radiation treatment planning, simulation and interaction of radiation with other treatment modalities. Each step in the integrated process of RT needs quality control and quality assurance (QA) to prevent errors and to ensure that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. The aim of this study is to help the radio therapists in identifying a system for QA that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. Recent advances in RT focus on the need for a systematic RT QA program that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. It is necessary to develop more formal error mitigation and process analysis methods, such as failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), to focus available QA resources optimally on the process components. External audit programs are also effective. Additionally, Clinical trial QA has a significant role in enhancing the quality of care. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has operated both an on-site and off-site postal dosimetry audit to improve practice and to assure the dose from RT equipment. Both postal dosimetry audit and clinical trial RTQA, especially for advanced technologies, in collaboration with global networks, will serve to enhance patient safety and quality of care

  18. Quality of Life Among Radiation Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is a general term applied to the totality of physical, psychological, and social functioning. The World Health Organization (WHO) regards health as a state of complete physical, mental, and social well being, and not merely the absence of disease. Every person's life is different, and thus the way in which each person experiences a QOL is unique. Individuals lead complex lives that have many dimensions. A QOL approach recognizes that there are many different aspects of living that may contribute to quality. In this study, Quality of life was evaluated using the Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire for one hundred and fifty radiation workers who handled ionizing radiation for at least twelve years, and one hundred fifty control individuals who did not knowingly come in contact with any radiation source., the QOL effects on work and achievements were also evaluated. Results revealed that radiation workers have lower quality of life compared to those who never come in contact with a radiation source

  19. Quality assurance in ionizing radiation application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastkhah; Nasser.

    1995-01-01

    Quality assurance is a mean for controlling all the activities within an organization which affect the quality of the product or service. A series of international standards have been prepared which incorporate the accumulated knowledge and provide guidance on what activities within an organization should be controlled. A proposal on a quality assurance system to be implemented in ionizing radiation application centers is the primary concern of Atomic Energy Organization of Iran is represented. The Objectives were identification of quality related problems ;Comply with national and international requirements ;Controlling all activities within an organization which affects the quality and assurance of maintaining the quality within organization. In performing protection measures, risk, cost, benefit consideration, cause of problems and the classic solution are summarized in four chapters

  20. Clinical quality assurance in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    A quality assurance program in radiation oncology monitors and evaluates any departmental functions which have an impact on patient outcome. The ultimate purpose of the program is to maximize health benefit to the patient without a corresponding increase in risk. The foundation of the program should be the credo: at least do no harm, usually do some good and ideally realize the greatest good. The steep dose response relationships for tumor control and complications require a high degree of accuracy and precision throughout the entire process of radiation therapy. It has been shown that failure to control local disease with radiation may result in decreased survival and may increase the cost of care by a factor of 3. Therefore, a comprehensive quality assurance program which seeks to optimize dose delivery and which encompasses both clinical and physics components, is needed

  1. Quality assurance in field radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    In most cases, an ion chamber radiation measuring instrument is calibrated in a uniform gamma radiation field. This results in a uniform ionization field throughout the ion chamber. Measurement conditions encountered in the field often produce non-uniform ionization fields within the ion chamber, making determination of true dose rates to personnel difficult and prone to error. Extensive studies performed at Hanford have provided appropriate correction factors for use with one type of ion chamber instrument, the CP. Suitable corrections are available for the following distinct measurement circumstances: (1) contact measurements on large beta and gamma sources, (2) contact measurements on small beta and gamma sources, (3) contact measurements on small-diameter cylinders, (4) measurements in small gamma beams, and (5) measurements at a distance from large beta sources. Recommendations are made for the implementation of these correction factors, in the interest of improved quality assurance in field radiation measurements. 12 references, 10 figures

  2. A quality control program for radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, C.E. de; Sibata, C.H.; Cecatti, E.R.; Kawakami, N.S.; Alexandre, A.C.; Chiavegatti Junior, M.

    1982-01-01

    An extensive quality control program was established covering the following areas: physical parameters of the therapeutical machines, dosimetric standards, preventive maintenance of radiation sources and measuring instruments. A critical evaluation of this program was done after two years (1977-1979) of routine application and the results will be presented. The fluctuation on physical parameters strongly supports the efforts and cost of a quality control program. This program has certainly improved the accuracy required on the delivery of the prescribed dose for radiotherapy treatment. (Author) [pt

  3. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) Indoor-Air Quality Implementation Plan. A report to Congress under Title IV of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986: radon gas and indoor air-quality research. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The EPA Indoor Air Quality Implementation Plan provides information on the direction of EPA's indoor air program, including the Agency's policy on indoor air and priorities for research and information dissemination over the next two years. EPA submitted the report to Congress on July 2, 1987 as required by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. There are five appendices to the report: Appendix A--Preliminary Indoor Air Pollution Information Assessment; Appendix B--FY 87 Indoor Air Research Program; Appendix C--EPA Radon Program; Appendix D--Indoor Air Resource History (Published with Appendix C); Appendix E--Indoor Air Reference Data Base

  4. Radiation Dosimetry Management: Quality Assurance and Investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perle, S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In a litigation-prone society, it is prudent for any business to evaluate its potential exposure to legal action, initiated by either an employee or a member of the general public. This potential is exacerbated when the phobia of radiation exposure and radioactive materials is interjected into the equation. This phobia is fuelled by the perceived risks of radiation exposure, be they fact or fantasy. With the current cancer incidence rate being approximately 1 in every 2.5 individuals (for all types of cancer), it is imperative that all facilities take a proactive look at their business vulnerability. When radiation exposure is the issue, records documentation is a critical factor, and a significant amount of effort should be expended to implement a comprehensive records management system. A comprehensive Radiation Dosimetry Management Program is essential if a business is going to mitigate any regulatory or legal intervention. This lecture will address appropriate Records Quality Assurance, and, the appropriate requirements for investigations of dosimetry results. (author)

  5. Biophysics of NASA radiation quality factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA has implemented new radiation quality factors (QFs) for projecting cancer risks from space radiation exposures to astronauts. The NASA QFs are based on particle track structure concepts with parameters derived from available radiobiology data, and NASA introduces distinct QFs for solid cancer and leukaemia risk estimates. The NASA model was reviewed by the US National Research Council and approved for use by NASA for risk assessment for International Space Station missions and trade studies of future exploration missions to Mars and other destinations. A key feature of the NASA QFs is to represent the uncertainty in the QF assessments and evaluate the importance of the QF uncertainty to overall uncertainties in cancer risk projections. In this article, the biophysical basis for the probability distribution functions representing QF uncertainties was reviewed, and approaches needed to reduce uncertainties were discussed. (author)

  6. Biophysics of NASA radiation quality factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A

    2015-09-01

    NASA has implemented new radiation quality factors (QFs) for projecting cancer risks from space radiation exposures to astronauts. The NASA QFs are based on particle track structure concepts with parameters derived from available radiobiology data, and NASA introduces distinct QFs for solid cancer and leukaemia risk estimates. The NASA model was reviewed by the US National Research Council and approved for use by NASA for risk assessment for International Space Station missions and trade studies of future exploration missions to Mars and other destinations. A key feature of the NASA QFs is to represent the uncertainty in the QF assessments and evaluate the importance of the QF uncertainty to overall uncertainties in cancer risk projections. In this article, the biophysical basis for the probability distribution functions representing QF uncertainties was reviewed, and approaches needed to reduce uncertainties were discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Radon and radon daughter measurements and methods utilized by EPA's Eastern Environmental Radiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    The Eastern Environmental Radiation Facility (EERF), Office of Radiation Programs, has the responsibility for conducting the Environmental Protection Agency's study of the radiological impact of the phosphate industry. Numerous measurements in structures constructed on land reclaimed from phosphate mining showed that working levels in these structures range from 0.001 to 0.9 WL. Sampling is performed by drawing air through a 0.8 micrometer pore size, 25 mm diameter filter at a flow rate of 10 to 15 liters/minute for from 5 to 20 minutes, depending on the daughter levels anticipated. The detection system consists of a ruggedized silicon surface barrier detector (450 mm 2 -100 micrometer depletion) connected through an appropriate pre-amplifier-amplifier to a 1024-channel multichannel analyzer. Other measurement methods are also discussed

  8. Quality assurance in radiation therapy: clinical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souhami, L.

    1984-01-01

    A survey was conducted in Latin America to evaluate the clinical aspects of quality assurance in radiotherapy. A questionnaire was prepared and sent to 46 institutions. Twenty-seven centers (58.5%), from nine countries, answered the questionnaire. The study was divided into three topics: a) patient-related statistics; b) staffing and education; and c) equipment and facilities. Radiotherapy training programs are available in only 37% of the centers studied. A large number of megavoltage units are old, operating at a shorter than optimum distance with sources of very low activity. The number of high energy linear accelerators is unsatisfactory. Problems in treatment planning facilities were also identified. Regionalization of radiation therapy services is recommended as a possible way to improve quality at a reasonable cost

  9. Radiation quality factor of spherical antennas with material cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Troels Vejle; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a description of the radiation quality factor and resonances of spherical antennas with material cores. Conditions for cavity and radiating resonances are given, and a theoretical description of the radiation quality factor, as well as simple expressions describing the relative...

  10. NASA-Modified Precipitation Products to Improve EPA Nonpoint Source Water Quality Modeling for the Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Joseph; Toll, David; Partington, Ed; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Lee, Shihyan; Gutierrez-Magness, Angelica; Engman, Ted; Arsenault, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that over 20,000 water bodies within the United States do not meet water quality standards. Ninety percent of the impairments are typically caused by nonpoint sources. One of the regulations in the Clean Water Act of 1972 requires States to monitor the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), or the amount of pollution that can be carried by a water body before it is determined to be "polluted", for any watershed in the U.S.. In response to this mandate, the EPA developed Better Assessment Science Integrating Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) as a Decision Support Tool (DST) for assessing pollution and to guide the decision making process for improving water quality. One of the models in BASINS, the Hydrological Simulation Program -- Fortran (HSPF), computes daily stream flow rates and pollutant concentration at each basin outlet. By design, precipitation and other meteorological data from weather stations serve as standard model input. In practice, these stations may be unable to capture the spatial heterogeneity of precipitation events especially if they are few and far between. An attempt was made to resolve this issue by substituting station data with NASA modified/NOAA precipitation data. Using these data within HSPF, stream flow was calculated for seven watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Basin during low flow periods, convective storm periods, and annual flows. In almost every case, the modeling performance of HSPF increased when using the NASA-modified precipitation data, resulting in better stream flow statistics and, ultimately, in improved water quality assessment.

  11. San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund Points, SF Bay CA, 2015, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund is a competitive grant program that is helping implement TMDLs to improve water quality, protect wetlands, and...

  12. Characterization of radiation qualities used in diagnostic X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bero, M.; Zahili, M.; Al Ahmad, M.

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to adjust the radiation beams emitted from X-ray tubes installed at the National Radiation Metrology Laboratory in the field of diagnostic radiology (radiology and mammography) according to the IAEA protocol code number TRS 457, the second goal of this study is to establish various radiation qualities used fordiagnostic radiology applications: RQR, RQA and RQT and the radiation qualities related to mammography applications: RQA-M and RQR-M (author).

  13. Report: Quality Control Review of EPA OIG Reports Issued in Fiscal Year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #16-N-0223, July 18, 2016. OIG reports issued in FY 2015 demonstrated high levels of compliance with OIG quality assurance procedures, and received average compliance scores of 90 percent or greater.

  14. EPA's role in uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    EPA's role and actions in regulating uranium mining and milling are reviewed and updated. Special emphasis is given to EPA's current activities under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978

  15. THE DISTRIBUTION OF CHLORPYRIFOS FOLLOWING A CRACK AND CREVICE TYPE APPLICATION IN THE U.S. EPA INDOOR AIR QUALITY RESEARCH HOUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted in the U.S. EPA Indoor Air Quality Research House to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of chlorpyrifos following a professional crack and crevice application in the kitchen. Following the application, measurements were made in the kitchen, de...

  16. THE DISTRIBUTION OF CHLORPYRIFOS FOLLOWING A CRACK AND CREVICE TYPE APPLICATION IN THE U.S. EPA INDOOR AIR QUALITY TEST HOUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted in the U.S. EPA Indoor Air Quality Test House to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of chlorpyrifos following a professional crack and crevice application in the kitchen. Following the application, measurements were made in the kitchen, den a...

  17. Gamma radiation combined with cinnamon oil to maintain fish quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Fei; Zhang, Jing; Wei, Qianqian; Gao, Fei; Ding, Yuting; Liu, Shulai

    2017-12-01

    Effects of gamma radiation combined with cinnamon oil on quality of Northern Snakehead fish fillets were observed during storage at 4 °C. Fish fillets were treated with 1-5 kGy gamma radiation, 0.05-0.5% cinnamon oil or the combination of radiation and cinnamon oil. The antimicrobial activity increased with radiation dose and cinnamon oil concentration. During storage, the combination of 1 kGy radiation and 0.5% cinnamon oil displayed better inhibiting activities on aerobic plate counts, total volatile basic nitrogen, thiobarbituric acid reaction substances than 1 kGy radiation or 0.5% cinnamon oil used alone. Moreover, the combination could arrive at the similar inhibiting activities of cinnamon oil with higher concentration of 0.5% or radiation with higher dose of 5 kGy. Thus, the combination could decrease the radiation dose and cinnamon oil concentration without decreasing the effect of them on maintaining fish quality.

  18. Genomic instability and the role of radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadhim, M. A.; Hill, M. A.; Moore, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    Genomic instability (GI) is a hallmark of tumorigenic progression and is observed as delayed genetic damage in the progeny of irradiated and unirradiated bystander cells. The expression of GI can be influenced by genotype, cell type and radiation quality. While several studies have demonstrated the induction of GI by high and low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, our work on human and mouse primary cell systems has shown LET-dependent differences in the induction and expression of GI. These differences might be attributed to differences in radiation track structure, dose rate, contribution of bystander cells and radiation dose. This paper reviews the role of radiation quality in the induction of GI and describe the possible mechanisms underlining the observed differences between radiation types on its induction. The experimental results presented suggest that dose might be the most significant factor in determining induction of GI after low-LET radiation. (authors)

  19. Radiation technology of improved quality materials production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajkin, Yu.A.; Nadirov, N.K.; Zajkina, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    The technology of materials production from metals and alloys with high operational properties is developed. The technology is based on use of radiation methods in powder metallurgy. Use of radiation processing allows to improve technological conditions of sintering. It is established, that in certain regimes the sintering temperature is decreasing from 1200 deg C up to 950 deg C in the result of radiation processing of stainless steel powders . According to the processing regimes it is possible load reduction by powder pressing on 15-20 % and sintering time in to 1,5 - 2 times . The radiation methods give possibility to produce high qualitative goods from cheap powder materials without use energy-intensive processes and prolonged processing of finished products

  20. Ambient Air Quality Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Office of Air and Radiation's (OAR) Ambient Air Quality Data (Current) contains ambient air pollution data collected by EPA, other federal agencies, as well as...

  1. Organoleptic quality and antioxidant status of radiation processed food commodities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Sharma, J.; Arul, A.K.; Variyar, P.S.; Sharma, A.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of radiation processing on the organoleptic qualities such as aroma, taste and colour as well as antioxidant status of various food classes such as beverages (monsooned coffee), spices (nutmeg), fruits (pomegranate), oil seeds (soybean) and vegetables (guar beans) was investigated. The factors responsible for these attributes were shown to be liberated from their glycosidic precursors during radiation processing, thus resulted in an enhancement of organoleptic quality and antioxidant status. (author)

  2. Radiation litigation: Quality assurance and the radiation analyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper touches on three areas of interest to the radiation analyst; the dose issue, legal persuasion, and future legal issues. While many laboratory scientists would think that the actual dose received by the plaintiff's relevant organ would be an easy issue to resolve, that has not been the experience to date. All radiation cases are assumed to be ultrahazardous activity cases, even though they involve a dose well below yearly natural background. At some point the law needs to realize that such low dose cases are a waste of scarce judicial resources. Lawyers and scientists need to communicate with each other and work together to help improve the way the legal system processes these important cases

  3. Assuring the quality of practical radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuburger, E.; Schroeder, H.J.

    1993-01-01

    There is no possibility in Germany to serve an apprenticeship in practical radiation protection in nuclear facilities. However, the scope of knowledge required for such activities is defined in a binding 'Directive about Ensuring the Knowledge Required in Persons otherwise Engaged in the Operation of Nuclear Power Plants'. That Directive by far exceeds the scope, in terms of safety, normally applied to a vocation or activity. The Directive implicitly contains three important provisions: Plant operators must ensure that radiation protection workers have all the knowledge they need to do their job safely; that radiation protection workers are autonomous, within certain limits, as a consequence of the depth of knowledge they have; that radiation protection workers are given formal advanced training possibilities. An examination to be taken by radiation protection workers before a Chamber of Industry and Commerce was introduced in 1982 in order to make available personnel trained in the whole range of possible activities as defined in the Directive referred to above. However, persons who have passed the exam before a Chamber of Commerce and Industry no longer automatically fulfill the criteria under the Directive after three years, but must undergo advanced training in a formal program. (orig.) [de

  4. Radiation therapy quality control in MRCCC radiotherapy units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielda Djuita; Rina Taurisia; Andreas Nainggolan

    2011-01-01

    Increasing cancer patients in Indonesia is not supported with the number of equipment that is able to treat cancer patients, especially in the radiation therapy field. Therefore, several private hospitals have joined to provide radiation therapy services and one of them is MRCCC. As a new hospital providing services in radiotherapy field, the writer tries to present our quality control program that we have done in our hospital. Purpose: As quality control to radiation therapy clinical practice. Methods: Descriptive essay of what we do in our institution. Conclusion: Average output photon and electron lower more than tolerance dose. (author)

  5. Quality of life after radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Katsuyuki; Kihana, Toshimasa; Inoue, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) of the 3rd lumbar vertebra (L3) and the 5th lumbar vertebra (L5) were measured by quantitative computed tomography (QCT). BMD of L3 and L5 in 139 normal persons was decreased linearly with age (L3: Y=317.32-3.283X, L5: Y=314.35-2.906X). Ratio of the BMD of L5 to L3 (L5/L3 ratio, %) was constant in the value of 106.03±12.84% before 50 years old and increased linearly after 50 years old (Y=21.62+1.718X). In 30 radiated cases, BMD of the radiated L5 was decreased after 20 Gy of radiation (11.23±1.31 days from the first day of radiation) and reached 47.44±18.74% of the pre-radiated value after 50 Gy of radiation (32.07±1.55 days). L5/L3 ratio was also decreased after 20 Gy of radiation and reached 48.34±19.33% of pre-radiated value after 50 Gy of radiation. BMD of L5 and L5/L3 ratio after 50 Gy of radiation were linearly decreased with age (L5: Y=107.44-0.9686X, L5/L3 ratio: Y=106.98-0.9472X). Six month after the end of radiation therapy, BMD of L5 was most decreased and Lumbago score was most increased. Alfacalcidol treatment caused by the improvement of decreased BMD of L5 and Lumbago by radiation. In conclusion, it should be said that pelvic radiation for gynecologic malignancy may disturb the bone metabolism and quality of life in the early phase after radiation. This side effect by radiation could be improved by treatment of alfacalcidol. (author)

  6. Quality control of radiation therapy in clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.; Lustig, R.; Grundy, G.

    1983-01-01

    The RTOG is a group of participating institutions which has a major interest in furthering clinical radiation oncology. They have formulated protocols for clinical investigation in which radiation therapy is the major modality of treatment. In addition, other modalities, such as chemotherapy, radiation sensitizers, and hyperthermia, are used in combined approach to cancer. Quality control in all aspects of patient management is necessary to insure quality data. These areas include evaluation of pathology, physics, and dosimetry, and clinical patient data. Quality control is both time consuming and expensive. However, by dividing these tasks into various levels and time frames, by using computerized data-control mechanisms, and by employing appropriate levels of ancillary personnel expertise, quality control can improve compliance and decrease the cost of investigational trials

  7. Quality assurance of radiation therapy machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, P.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the modifications of components, to unexpected breakage of elements or to electronic dysfunctions, the performance of radiotherapy machines may decrease with age. Quality Assurance procedures and maintenance program are necessary to guarantee the performances. For linear accelerators, modus operandi of control tests and their frequency are based on regulations and recommendations widely published, that are presented here. Concerning accessories, especially those recently developed (multi-leaf collimators, dynamic wedges,...), recommendations remains to be defined. Simple tests are proposed. Concerning numerical imaging systems, widely used for three dimensional dosimetry, image quality and geometry controls must be performed with fantom tests. For portal imaging, a quality assurance program is proposed. A strict and complete Quality Assurance program is essential to guarantee quality and safety of the treatment. A regular control of linear accelerator is one of the important component of this program. It suppose the implementation of permanent tests procedures, periodically modified following technological progresses and treatment techniques. Measurements must be sensible to variations below the tolerance level defined during the installation process. The analysis of the variations of measurements with time are an objective criterion of quality. (author)

  8. [Possibilities and perspectives of quality management in radiation oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegenschmiedt, M H; Zehe, M; Fehlauer, F; Barzen, G

    2012-11-01

    The medical discipline radiation oncology and radiation therapy (treatment with ionizing radiation) has developed rapidly in the last decade due to new technologies (imaging, computer technology, software, organization) and is one of the most important pillars of tumor therapy. Structure and process quality play a decisive role in the quality of outcome results (therapy success, tumor response, avoidance of side effects) in this field. Since 2007 all institutions in the health and social system are committed to introduce and continuously develop a quality management (QM) system. The complex terms of reference, the complicated technical instruments, the highly specialized personnel and the time-consuming processes for planning, implementation and assessment of radiation therapy made it logical to introduce a QM system in radiation oncology, independent of the legal requirements. The Radiation Center Hamburg (SZHH) has functioned as a medical care center under medical leadership and management since 2009. The total QM and organization system implemented for the Radiation Center Hamburg was prepared in 2008 and 2009 and certified in June 2010 by the accreditation body (TÜV-Süd) for DIN EN ISO 9001:2008. The main function of the QM system of the SZHH is to make the basic principles understandable for insiders and outsiders, to have clear structures, to integrate management principles into the routine and therefore to organize the learning processes more effectively both for interior and exterior aspects.

  9. Quality assurance for radon exposure chambers at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semler, M.O.; Sensintaffar, E.L. [National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, AL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), operates six radon exposure chambers in its two laboratories, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, and the Las Vegas Facility, Las Vegas, Nevada. These radon exposure chambers are used to calibrate and test portable radon measuring instruments, test commercial suppliers of radon measurement services through the Radon Measurement Proficiency Program, and expose passive measurement devices to known radon concentrations as part of a quality assurance plan for federal and state studies measuring indoor radon concentrations. Both laboratories participate in national and international intercomparisons for the measurement of radon and are presently working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to receive a certificate of traceability for radon measurements. NAREL has developed an estimate of the total error in its calibration of each chamber`s continuous monitors as part of an internal quality assurance program. This paper discusses the continuous monitors and their calibration for the three chambers located in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as the results of the authors intercomparisons and total error analysis.

  10. Biophysical Aspects of Radiation Quality. Second Panel Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    If a living system is exposed to ionizing radiation a sequence of events follows. It starts with the absorption and dissipation of radiation energy, and continues through various physico-chemical and biochemical reactions up to the final biological end point observed. One of the aims of research in quantitative radiation biology is to understand the mechanism of this sequence of actions and to explore the differences in quality of different kinds of radiations. Because of its complexity, progress in this work requires the combined efforts of physicists, biochemists, biologists and physicians. It should, however, be done in very close collaboration rather than in following isolated lines in any one direction. For this reason, and because of the growing importance of the field for almost all applications of ionizing radiations, it was felt desirable to bring together a group of scientists engaged in research on radiation quality who represented a wide range of interests. The first panel on Biophysical Aspects of Radiation Quality, convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna and held from 29 March to 2 April 1965, proved to be a successful beginning, stimulating a useful exchange of ideas and information. By this meeting, and the resulting collection of papers, published in 1966 as No. 58 of the Agency's Technical Reports Series, the importance of research on radiation quality was highlighted and the field itself became more clearly defined. The Agency held a second Panel on the same subject in Vienna from 14 to 18 April 1967. This meeting was attended by 18 experts from 10 countries, and representatives from Euratom and WHO. The Czechoslovak Socialist Republic, France, India and Poland were represented for the first time. Fourteen papers were presented and discussed in some detail. It became evident that much progress had been made since the previous meeting in certain areas such as microdosimetry, the dependence of the oxygen effect on radiation

  11. EPA Collaboration with South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA, the Ministry of Environment of Korea, and partner agencies in both countries cooperate to strengthen environmental governance, improve air and water quality, and reduce exposure to toxic chemicals.

  12. Quality assurance of radiation protection monitoring instruments in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, S.M.; Daniel, Liji; Rao, Suresh; Sharma, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) is the National Metrology Institute (NMI) for developing, maintaining and disseminating standards for ionizing radiation in India. Radiation Safety Systems Division (RSSD) of BARC has the requisite infrastructure in the form of experts, trained manpower, laboratories, equipment and facilities for providing calibration services to users and ascertaining traceability to international standards. It periodically participates in various international inter-comparisons. RSSD maintains reference radiation fields that are required for calibrating Radiation Protection Monitoring Instruments that form the backbone of the radiation monitoring programme for harnessing the benefits of nuclear energy and ionizing radiations. These instruments are type-tested and periodically calibrated at standard reference radiation fields to ensure their healthy working condition and fitness for their intended use. This paper describes the details of the standardization procedures adopted for reference radiation fields and infrastructure established and maintained at RSSD, BARC in accordance with the recommendations of ISO-4037. The paper describes the various tests that are carried out for radiation protection monitoring instrument to study the variation of the calibration factor with influencing quantities like linearity of response, energy response, angular dependence and overload characteristics. The results of these tests for typical instruments are also discussed. The present work also describes various types of indigenously developed radiation protection monitoring instruments and their performance characteristics. Adaptability of these instruments for the implementation of operational quantities are discussed briefly. It also dwells on the IAEA Quality Audit for radiation protection level calibrations, which RSSD has been participating since 2001. Our results of the quality audit are well within the acceptance limit (±7%) set by IAEA for the

  13. Comparison of the COMRADEX-IV and AIRDOS-EPA methodologies for estimating the radiation dose to man from radionuclide releases to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.W.; Hoffman, F.O.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents a comparison between two computerized methodologies for estimating the radiation dose to man from radionuclide releases to the atmosphere. The COMRADEX-IV code was designed to provide a means of assessing potential radiological consequences from postulated power reactor accidents. The AIRDOS-EPA code was developed primarily to assess routine radionuclide releases from nuclear facilities. Although a number of different calculations are performed by these codes, three calculations are in common - atmospheric dispersion, estimation of internal dose from inhalation, and estimation of external dose from immersion in air containing gamma emitting radionuclides. The models used in these calculations were examined and found, in general, to be the same. Most differences in the doses calculated by the two codes are due to differences in values chosen for input parameters and not due to model differences. A sample problem is presented for illustration

  14. Comprehensive quality management program for radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.; Roy, T.; Abrath, F.; Wu, T.; Gu, J.; McDonald, R.; Kim, H.; Haenchen, M.

    1994-01-01

    A quality management program for both external beam irradiation (electron and photon modes) and brachytherapy (high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) has been developed. The program follows current USA federal regulations for therapeutic administration of by-product materials. After implementation of the program, 54 HDR patients, 36 LDR brachytherapy patients and 311 external beam patients (including 30 stereotactic radiosurgery cases) were treated. The results of this program are presented

  15. Sound quality prediction for engine-radiated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai; Zhang, Junhong; Guo, Peng; Bi, Fengrong; Yu, Hanzhengnan; Ni, Guangjian

    2015-05-01

    Diesel engine-radiated noise quality prediction is an important topic because engine noise has a significant impact on the overall vehicle noise. Sound quality prediction is based on subjective and objective evaluation of engine noise. The integrated satisfaction index (ISI) is proposed as a criterion for differentiate noise quality in the subjective evaluation, and five psychoacoustic parameters are selected for characterizing and analyzing the noise quality of the diesel engine objectively. The combination of support vector machines (SVM) and genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed in order to establish a model for predicting the diesel engine-radiated noise quality for all operation conditions. The performance of the GA-SVM model is compared with the BP neural network model, and the results show that the mean relative error of the GA-SVM model is smaller than the BP neural network model. The importance rank of the sound quality metrics to the ISI is indicated by the non-parametric correlation analysis. This study suggests that the GA-SVM model is very useful for accurately predicting the diesel engine-radiated noise quality.

  16. Influence of radiation dose on image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichmann, S; Aastrand, K [Sahlgrenska Sjukhuset, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1979-01-01

    When the speed of a recording medium is doubled the background quantum mottle is increased by a factor ..sqrt..2. However, the signal/noise ratio is changed not in proportion to the square root of the exposure, but in a linear fashion, i.e. by a factor 2. The change in the depiction of objects with a very high attenuation difference in relation to its surroundings appears not to be linear, but proportional to the square root of the exposure. Such objects (metal wire meshes, lead bar grids) should thus be avoided in routine evaluation of image quality since they give incomplete information as to image impairment when high-speed recording media are used.

  17. Influence of radiation dose on image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichmann, S.; Aastrand, K.

    1979-01-01

    When the speed of a recording medium is doubled the background quantum mottle is increased by a factor √2. However, the signal/noise ratio is changed not in proportion to the square root of the exposure, but in a linear fashion, i.e. by a factor 2. The change in the depiction of objects with a very high attenuation difference in relation to its surroundings appears not to be linear, but proportional to the square root of the exposure. Such objects (metal wire meshes, lead bar grids) should thus be avoided in routine evaluation of image quality since they give incomplete information as to image impairment when high-speed recording media are used. (Auth.)

  18. Certification. Tool for quality? Market and client for radiation experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwaard, W.

    1999-01-01

    The role and impact of certification in the advisory work of radiation experts is briefly outlined. Certification is a guarantee for quality of the advice or a product in case there is a client and a market. In cases where there is not a client or a market certification will lead to 'window-dressing and a bureaucratic system

  19. Radiation Safety and Quality Assurance in North American Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farman, Allan G.; Hines, Vickie G.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of dental schools that revealed processing quality control and routine maintenance checks on x-ray generators are being carried out in a timely manner is discussed. However, methods for reducing patient exposure to radiation are not being fully implemented, and some dental students are being exposed to x-rays. (Author/MLW)

  20. Radiation Dosimetry for Quality Control of Food Preservation and Disinfestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, Arne; Uribe, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    In the use of x and gamma rays and scanned electron beams to extend the shelf life of food by delay of sprouting and ripening, killing of microbes, and control of insect population, quality assurance is provided by standardized radiation dosimetry. By strategic placement of calibrated dosimeters...

  1. Radiation protection and image quality in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, J.A. den; Sprengers, J.H.M.

    1980-01-01

    A comparison is made between radiation protection standards affecting dental X-ray equipment for intra-oral film. The comparison shows that the standards not only promote a reduction of the radiation load on the patient but also, and with more emphasis in the more recent standards, an optimum image quality. These standards can therefore be considered to balance the cost in terms of the radiation load against the benefit of the image quality obtained, a conclusion which explains the lack of strict requirements on tube voltage and the complete absence of requirements on film speed. An evolutionary development of the standards in the course of time can be traced, and future developments can be anticipated. A continuing consultation between the regulatory organizations, the dental profession and the industry is necessary to maintain the cost/benefit balance. (Auth.)

  2. Radiation protection and image quality in dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    den Boer, J A; Sprengers, J H.M. [Philips Gloeilampenfabrieken N.V., Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    1980-01-01

    A comparison is made between radiation protection standards affecting dental X-ray equipment for intra-oral film. The comparison shows that the standards not only promote a reduction of the radiation load on the patient but also, and with more emphasis in the more recent standards, an optimum image quality. These standards can therefore be considered to balance the cost in terms of the radiation load against the benefit of the image quality obtained, a conclusion which explains the lack of strict requirements on tube voltage and the complete absence of requirements on film speed. An evolutionary development of the standards in the course of time can be traced, and future developments can be anticipated. A continuing consultation between the regulatory organizations, the dental profession and the industry is necessary to maintain the cost/benefit balance.

  3. Quality audit service of the IAEA for radiation processing dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, K.; Girzikowsky, R.

    1996-01-01

    The mandate of the International Atomic Energy Agency includes assistance to Member States to establish nuclear technologies safely and effectively. In pursuit of this, a quality audit service for dosimetry relevant to radiation processing was initiated as a key element of the High-Dose Standardization Programme of the IAEA. The standardization of dosimetry for radiation processing provides a justification for the regulatory approval of irradiated products and their unrestricted international trade. In recent times, the Agency's Dosimetry Laboratory has placed concentrated effort towards establishing a quality assurance programme based on the ISO 9000 series documents. The need for reliable and accurate dosimetry for radiation processing is increasing in Member States and we can envisage a definite role for the SSDLs in such a programme. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs

  4. Quality control through dosimetry at a contract radiation processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, T.A.; Roediger, A.H.A.

    1985-01-01

    Reliable dosimetry procedures constitute a very important part of process control and quality assurance at a contract gamma radiation processing facility that caters for a large variety of different radiation applications. The choice, calibration and routine intercalibration of the dosimetry systems employed form the basis of a sound dosimetry policy in radiation processing. With the dosimetric procedures established, detailed dosimetric mapping of the irradiator upon commissioning (and whenever source modifications take place) is carried out to determine the radiation processing characteristics and peformance of the plant. Having established the irradiator parameters, routine dosimetry procedures, being part of the overall quality control measures, are employed. In addition to routine dosimetry, independent monitoring of routine dosimetry is performed on a bi-monthly basis and the results indicate a variation of better than 3%. On an annaul basis the dosimetry systems are intercalibrated through at least one primary standard dosimetry laboratory and to date a variation of better than 5% has been experienced. The company also participates in the Pilot Dose Assurance Service of the International Atomic Energy Agency, using the alanine/ESR dosimetry system. Routine calibration of the instrumentation employed is carried out on a regular basis. Detailed permanent records are compiled on all dosimetric and instrumentation calibrations, and the routine dosimetry employed at the plant. Certificates indicating the measured absorbed radiation doses are issued on request and in many cases are used for the dosimetric release of sterilized medical and pharmaceutical products. These procedures, used by Iso-Ster at its industrial gamma radiation facility, as well as the experience built up over a number of years using radiation dosimetry for process control and quality assurance are discussed. (author)

  5. EPA's Radioactive Source Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsick, D.

    2004-01-01

    The US EPA is the lead Federal agency for emergency responses to unknown radiological materials, not licensed, owned or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement state (Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, 1996). The purpose of EPA's clean materials programme is to keep unwanted and unregulated radioactive material out of the public domain. This is achieved by finding and securing lost sources, maintaining control of existing sources and preventing future losses. The focus is on both, domestic and international fronts. The domestic program concentrates on securing lost sources, preventing future losses, alternative technologies like tagging of radioactive sources in commerce, pilot radioactive source roundup, training programs, scrap metal and metal processing facilities, the demolition industry, product stewardship and alternatives to radioactive devices (fewer radioactive source devices means fewer orphan sources). The international program consists of securing lost sources, preventing future losses, radiation monitoring of scrap metal at ports and the international scrap metal monitoring protocol

  6. US EPA overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, W.D.

    1976-01-01

    EPA believes that effective and efficient solutions to problems in all radioactive waste disposal areas will require close coordination and cooperation among all agencies involved. In this regard, EPA already has participated in meetings with the Energy Research and Development Administration, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Council on Environmental Quality, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the Office of Management and Budget to lay the groundwork for the development of a consolidated national radioactive waste disposal plan. The EPA program is directed first toward developing goals and requirements; and then, in cooperation with the public, industry, the States and Federal agencies, towards determining by what means these goals can be achieved for each waste management option. In addition, the program will develop criteria for determining when the goals of the waste management options have been achieved. In summary, EPA will provide fundamental environmental criteria and generally applicable environmental standards for permanent disposal of high level radwastes. Concurrently, ERDA will develop the necessary technology; and NRC will conduct necessary studies, develop waste-related regulations, and license specific sites and methods of control. Together, we will be able to manage the disposal of the Nation's radioactive waste in an environmentally adequate manner

  7. Aspermy, Sperm Quality and Radiation in Chernobyl Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Bonisoli-Alquati, Andrea; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Rudolfsen, Geir

    2014-01-01

    Background Following the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, large amounts of radionuclides were emitted and spread in the environment. Animals living in such contaminated areas are predicted to suffer fitness costs including reductions in the quality and quantity of gametes. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied whether aspermy and sperm quality were affected by radioactive contamination by examining ejaculates from wild caught birds breeding in areas varying in background radiation level by more than three orders of magnitude around Chernobyl, Ukraine. The frequency of males with aspermy increased logarithmically with radiation level. While 18.4% of males from contaminated areas had no sperm that was only the case for 3.0% of males from uncontaminated control areas. Furthermore, there were negative relationships between sperm quality as reflected by reduced sperm velocity and motility, respectively, and radiation. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that radioactive contamination around Chernobyl affects sperm production and quality. We are the first to report an interspecific difference in sperm quality in relation to radioactive contamination. PMID:24963711

  8. Quality Management System Improves Effectiveness and Quality of Activities of Radiation Protection Regulatory Body in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastauskas, A.

    2016-01-01

    Processes of creation of quality management system (QMS) in regulatory body in radiation protection field – Radiation Protection Centre (RPC) and the benefit of this system to ensure the quality of the performance of functions are described. RPC QMS compliant with ISO 9001:2008 standard and in line with the requirements of the IAEA GSR- 3 document. It allowed achieving a new quality of works carried out by RPC. Because creation and introduction of the QMS is a continuous process, the QMS of RPC is continually renewed and new procedures are developed.

  9. Effect of Gamma Radiation on Quality of Imitation Crab Meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charoen, Saovapong; Sajjabut, Surasak

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Irradiation at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy of some commercial imitation crab meats with non-vacuum packaging reduced the total viable count by 1-2 log cycles, while coliform and Staphylococcus aureus were eliminated by 1.5 kGy gamma radiation. Although TBA number of 1 and 1.5 kGy irradiated samples increased significantly, but the sensory evaluation did not show any significant differences compared with the controls. Radiation dosage of 1.5 kGy appeared to be sufficient for improving bacterial quality and eliminating coliform and Staphylococcus aureus

  10. Quality management system in the CIEMAT Radiation Dosimetry Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, R; Navarro, T; Romero, A M; López, M A

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the activities realised by the CIEMAT Radiation Dosimetry Service (SDR) for the implementation of a quality management system (QMS) in order to achieve compliance with the requirements of ISO/IEC 17025 and to apply for the accreditation for testing measurements of radiation dose. SDR has decided the accreditation of the service as a whole and not for each of its component laboratories. This makes it necessary to design a QMS common to all, thus ensuring alignment and compliance with standard requirements, and simplifying routine works as possible.

  11. Quality assurance in individual monitoring of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julius, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    In todays world, where competition gets tougher, there is a growing consciousness of Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) being key elements to success. This does not only apply o manufacturing of industrial products, it is equally true for public services. Because of the increasing awareness in our modern societies of the quality of life and hence of optimal health care and general safety, it is also the general public that calls for 'products' of the highest possible quality. Good examples of the latter are the continuously improving safety standards for automobiles, for medical diagnostic imaging and for the working environment. Therefore, QA unquestionably plays a vital role in individual monitoring of ionizing radiation, especially since the media talked so many into some sort of radiation phobia. In the following an attempt is made to roughly outline some aspects that may come into play if QA is applied to routine personnel dosimetry. The author wants to emphasize that the subject, which has hardly been dealt with in the professional literature on radiation dosimetry, is a rather 'soft' one. There may be a large number of different approaches to QA, depending on special local situations and individual - sometimes national - views. It should therefore be considered as a general guide, provided in the form of (check)lists containing items of interest in routine monitoring

  12. Regulatory requirements and quality assurance of radiation monitoring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimharao, K.L.; Sharma, Ranjit

    2005-01-01

    The successful utilisation of radiation sources in the fields of medicine and industry requires the accurate measurement of activity, exposure rate and dose. Many varieties of instruments are in use for measurement of these parameters and new ones are being developed. The criteria for the design of the radiation monitoring instrument include the type and intensity of the radiation, purpose of measurement and ruggedness of the instrument. Quality and reliability of radiation monitoring instruments ensure that individuals are adequately protected. Accuracy, response time and ruggedness are required to be as per the approved/ prescribed guidelines. Regulatory authorities outline the design and performance criteria for radiation monitoring instruments and prescribe the recommendations of international agencies such as IAEA, ICRU and ISO for radiological measurement assurance programme. National Standards Laboratories all over the world prescribe procedures for calibration of various radiation monitoring instruments. The instruments should be calibrated as per these guidelines and should be traceable to national standards. The calibration traceable to national/ international standards and documentation as well as limits stipulated by the competent authority ensures the expected performance of the instrument. (author)

  13. Influence of radiation processing of grapes on wine quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sumit; Padole, Rupali; Variyar, Prasad S.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Grapes (Var. Shiraz and Cabernet) were subjected to radiation processing (up to 2 kGy) and wines were prepared and matured (4 months, 15 °C). The wines were analyzed for chromatic characteristics, total anthocyanin (TA), phenolic (TP) and total antioxidant (TAC) content. Aroma of wines was analyzed by GC/MS and sensory analysis was carried out using descriptive analysis. TA, TP and TAC were 77, 31 and 37 percent higher for irradiated (1500 Gy) Cabernet wines, while irradiated Shiraz wines demonstrated 47, 18 and 19 percent higher TA, TP and TAC, respectively. HPLC-DAD analysis revealed that radiation processing of grapes resulted in increased extraction of phenolic constituents in wine with no qualitative changes. No major radiation induced changes were observed in aroma constituents of wine. Sensory analysis revealed that 1500 Gy irradiated samples had higher fruity and berry notes. Thus, radiation processing of grapes resulted in wines with improved organoleptic and antioxidant properties. - Highlights: • Grapes were subjected to radiation processing before wine making. • Wines from irradiated grapes had higher antioxidant and phenolics compared to control. • HPLC analysis confirmed improved extraction of phenolics due to radiation processing. • Aroma profile and sensory quality of control and irradiated wines were similar

  14. Chromosome aberration studies and microdosimetry with radiations of varying quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillmaier, R.E.; Bihy, L.; Menzel, H.G.; Schuhmacher, H.

    1978-01-01

    To investigate the biological effectivity of complex irradiation fields encountered in radiation protection and high LET radiation therapy and to find meaningful specification of radiation quality closely related to the biological effectivity, correlated chromosome aberration studies and microdosimetric investigations have been carried out using cyclotron produced collimated fast neutrons. Human lymphocytes have been irradiated at different dose levels in the direct beam and in different positions in the penumbra and the rates of acentric fragments and dicentrics have been determined. In identical positions microdosimetric measurements have been performed. The dose relationship of aberration rates after irradiation in the direct beam, the aberration rates observed in the penumbra and the microdosimetric quantities ysub(D), ysub(F) and y* are presented and their relations are discussed. Furthermore the dose relationship of chromosome aberrations induced by 60 Co-γ-rays has been investigated and used to establish the RBE dose relationship of cyclotron neutrons

  15. Effect of gamma radiation on honey quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bera, A.; Almeida-Muradian, L.B.; Sabato, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    Honey is one of the most complex substances produced by bees, mainly from the nectar of flowers. Gamma radiation is a technique that can be used to decrease the number of microbiological problems associated with food and increase the shelf life of certain products. The objective of this study was to verify the effect of gamma radiation with source of cobalto-60 (10 kGy) on some parameters used in honey quality control. Seven samples of pure honey were obtained from local markets in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2007. The methods used are in accordance with Brazilian Regulations. The physicochemical parameters analyzed were: moisture, HMF, free acidity, pH, sugars and ash. The results showed that gamma radiation, in the dose mentioned above, did not cause significant physicochemical alterations.

  16. Effect of gamma radiation on honey quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, A. [Radiation Technology Center, IPEN-CNEN/SP, A. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: berale@usp.br; Almeida-Muradian, L.B. [Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 580-Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sabato, S.F. [Radiation Technology Center, IPEN-CNEN/SP, A. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: sfsabato@ipen.br

    2009-07-15

    Honey is one of the most complex substances produced by bees, mainly from the nectar of flowers. Gamma radiation is a technique that can be used to decrease the number of microbiological problems associated with food and increase the shelf life of certain products. The objective of this study was to verify the effect of gamma radiation with source of cobalto-60 (10 kGy) on some parameters used in honey quality control. Seven samples of pure honey were obtained from local markets in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2007. The methods used are in accordance with Brazilian Regulations. The physicochemical parameters analyzed were: moisture, HMF, free acidity, pH, sugars and ash. The results showed that gamma radiation, in the dose mentioned above, did not cause significant physicochemical alterations.

  17. Region 7 Quality Management Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    To document adherence to EPA Order 5360.1 A2, EPA requires each organizational unitto develop a quality management plan per the specifications in EPA Requirements for QualityManagement Plans, EPA QA R-2.

  18. Quality assurance and radiation safety in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kmetyuk, Ya.V.; Radosh, H.V.; Bezshyyko, O.A.; Golinka-Bezshyyko, L.O.; Kadenko, I.M.; Kazinova, O.A.; Nagai, A.O.

    2012-01-01

    Scientific studies, clinical experience and economic analysis have shown that the positron emission tomography (PET) is clinically and cost effective cancer diagnostics method. Combined PET and computed tomography (PET/CT) has proven clinical utility, particularly in the diagnosis, staging or restaging malignant disease and metastases, surgical planning, radiation therapy planning and evaluation of treatment response. The use of PET/CT has grown substantially in the past few years, with an increasing number of hospitals and installations of PET/CT imaging centers each year. In the same time combination of 2 procedures, each of which impart a radiation dose and, as a result, increases the deleterious influence for health, creates additional radiation safety issues. In these conditions the role of quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) programs is getting more and more important. We considered main QA and radiation safety requirements for whole PET technology chain from radio-pharmacy facilities to PET/CT scanning and patient release criteria. All these issues were considered and assessed having the example of PET facilities and technology chain of All-Ukrainian Center for Radiosurgery of the Clinical Hospital 'Feofania'

  19. San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund Project Locations, San Francisco CA, 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund is a competitive grant program that is helping implement TMDLs to improve water quality, protect wetlands, and...

  20. San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund Map Service, San Francisco CA, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund is a competitive grant program that is helping implement TMDLs to improve water quality, protect wetlands, and...

  1. EPA Administrative Enforcement Dockets

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EPA Administrative Enforcement Dockets database contains the electronic dockets for administrative penalty cases filed by EPA Regions and Headquarters. Visitors...

  2. A quality management model for radiation oncology physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternick, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    State-of-the-art radiation physics quality programs operate in a data rich environment. Given the abundance of recordable events, any formalism that serves to identify and monitor a set of attributes correlated with quality is to be regarded as an important management tool. The hierarchical tree structure model describes one such useful planning method. Of the several different types of tree structures, one of the most appropriate for quality management is the pyramid model. In this model, the associations between an overall program objective and the intermediate steps leading to its attainment, are indicated by both horizontal and vertical connectors. The overall objective of the system under study occupies the vertex of the pyramid, while the level immediately below contains its principal components. Further subdivisions of each component occur in successively lower levels. The tree finally terminates at a base level consisting of actions or requirements that must be fulfilled in order to satisfy the overall objective. A pyramid model for a radiation oncology physics quality program is discussed in detail. (author). 21 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Assessing the Hydrologic Performance of the EPA's Nonpoint Source Water Quality Assessment Decision Support Tool Using North American Land Data Assimilation System (Products)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Ni-Meister, W.; Toll, D.; Nigro, J.; Guiterrez-Magness, A.; Engman, T.

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of streamflow predictions in the EPA's BASINS (Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources) decision support tool is affected by the sparse meteorological data contained in BASINS. The North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) data with high spatial and temporal resolutions provide an alternative to the NOAA National Climatic Data Center (NCDC)'s station data. This study assessed the improvement of streamflow prediction of the Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) model contained within BASINS using the NLDAS 118 degree hourly precipitation and evapotranspiration estimates in seven watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay region. Our results demonstrated consistent improvements of daily streamflow predictions in five of the seven watersheds when NLDAS precipitation and evapotranspiration data was incorporated into BASINS. The improvement of using the NLDAS data is significant when watershed's meteorological station is either far away or not in a similar climatic region. When the station is nearby, using the NLDAS data produces similar results. The correlation coefficients of the analyses using the NLDAS data were greater than 0.8, the Nash-Sutcliffe (NS) model fit efficiency greater than 0.6, and the error in the water balance was less than 5%. Our analyses also showed that the streamflow improvements were mainly contributed by the NLDAS's precipitation data and that the improvement from using NLDAS's evapotranspiration data was not significant; partially due to the constraints of current BASINS-HSPF settings. However, NLDAS's evapotranspiration data did improve the baseflow prediction. This study demonstrates the NLDAS data has the potential to improve stream flow predictions, thus aid the water quality assessment in the EPA nonpoint water quality assessment decision tool.

  4. Survey of Radiation Oncology Centres in Australia: report of the radiation oncology treatment quality program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klybaba, M.; Kenny, L.; Kron, T.; Harris, J.; O'Brien, P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: One of the first steps towards the development of a comprehensive quality program for radiation oncology in Australia has been a survey of practice. This paper reports on the results of the survey that should inform the development of standards for radiation oncology in Australia. A questionnaire of 108 questions spanning aspects of treatment services, equipment, staff, infrastructure and available quality systems was mailed to all facilities providing radiation treatment services in Australia (n = 45). Information of 42 sites was received by June 2006 providing data on 113 operational linear accelerators of which approximately 2/3 are equipped with multi-leaf collimators. More than 75% of facilities were participating in a formal quality assurance (QA) system, with 63% following a nationally or internationally recognised system. However, there was considerable variation in the availability of policies and procedures specific to quality aspects, and the review of these. Policies for monitoring patient waiting times for treatment were documented at just 71% of all facilities. Although 85% of all centres do, in fact, monitor machine throughput, the number and types of efficiency measures varied markedly, thereby limiting the comparative use of these results. Centres identified workload as the single most common factor responsible for limiting staff involvement in both QA processes and clinical trial participation. The data collected in this 'snapshot' survey provide a unique and comprehensive baseline for future comparisons and evaluation of changes

  5. Effects of n-3 fatty acids, EPA v. DHA, on depressive symptoms, quality of life, memory and executive function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: a 6-month randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, Natalie; Milte, Catherine M; Street, Steven J; Buckley, Jonathan D; Coates, Alison M; Petkov, John; Howe, Peter R C

    2012-06-01

    Depressive symptoms may increase the risk of progressing from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. Consumption of n-3 PUFA may alleviate both cognitive decline and depression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the benefits of supplementing a diet with n-3 PUFA, DHA and EPA, for depressive symptoms, quality of life (QOL) and cognition in elderly people with MCI. We conducted a 6-month double-blind, randomised controlled trial. A total of fifty people aged >65 years with MCI were allocated to receive a supplement rich in EPA (1·67 g EPA + 0·16 g DHA/d; n 17), DHA (1·55 g DHA + 0·40 g EPA/d; n 18) or the n-6 PUFA linoleic acid (LA; 2·2 g/d; n 15). Treatment allocation was by minimisation based on age, sex and depressive symptoms (Geriatric Depression Scale, GDS). Physiological and cognitive assessments, questionnaires and fatty acid composition of erythrocytes were obtained at baseline and 6 months (completers: n 40; EPA n 13, DHA n 16, LA n 11). Compared with the LA group, GDS scores improved in the EPA (P=0·04) and DHA (P=0·01) groups and verbal fluency (Initial Letter Fluency) in the DHA group (P=0·04). Improved GDS scores were correlated with increased DHA plus EPA (r 0·39, P=0·02). Improved self-reported physical health was associated with increased DHA. There were no treatment effects on other cognitive or QOL parameters. Increased intakes of DHA and EPA benefited mental health in older people with MCI. Increasing n-3 PUFA intakes may reduce depressive symptoms and the risk of progressing to dementia. This needs to be investigated in larger, depressed samples with MCI.

  6. Physiological quality of rice seed submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Helen Lucia da Cruz; Tillmann, Maria Angela Andre; Meneghello, Geri Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of the gamma radiation ( 60 Co) on the physiological quality of rice seeds. The research was carried out through three tests; in the first test rice seeds were irradiated at dosages of 0; 1; 2.5 and 5Gy, while for the second and third tests the seeds were subjected to accelerated aging before being irradiated. For the second test the seeds were divided into wet and dry and both groups subjected to accelerated aging previous to irradiation at dosages of 0; 1; 2.5 and 5Gy. For the third test the seeds were dried after being subjected to accelerated aging, and then irradiated at dosages of 0, 10, 25 and 50Gy. To assess the physiological effects of the gamma radiation, all seeds were tested for germination and their germination speed index recorded. Seedling growth was graded through the measurement of the lengths of the first leaf and seminal root system and total seedling dry weight, across all tests. The enzymatic activity of acid phosphatase and alpha-amylase was measured on dry seeds from the second test. The results from all tests indicate that the applied gamma radiation dosages did not cause any changes to the physiological quality of rice seeds. (author)

  7. Quality assurance of environmental gamma radiation monitoring in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuhec, M.; Zorko, B.; Mitic, D.; Miljanic, S.; Ranogajec-Komor, M.

    2006-01-01

    Environmental gamma radiation monitoring established in Slovenia consists of a network of multifunctional gamma monitors (MFMs) based on pairs of Geiger-Mueller counters and a network of measuring sites with high-sensitive thermoluminescence dosemeters. The measuring points are evenly spread across Slovenia, located at the meteorological stations and more densely on additional locations around the Krsko NPP. The MFM network has a 2-fold function with one sensor used for the purpose of early warning system in near surroundings of the NPP and the other, more sensitive, for natural radiation monitoring. The paper summarises activities to establish quality assurance of the environmental gamma radiation measurements in Slovenia, with a critical view of the results in comparison with the international standards and recommendations. While the results of linearity and energy dependence tests were satisfying, on-field intercomparison showed that the inherent signal of one of the monitors (MFM) has to be taken into account in the range of environmental background radiation. (authors)

  8. Current status of the radiation technology and quality control for radiation processing in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Enrique Francisco Prietro

    2013-01-01

    The use of the radiation technology has gained acceptance in various regions of the world, where studies estimated that the installed capacity increases at a rate of 6 % per year and Latin America is part of this increase, due the advantages of this process when it is employed for the food preservation, sterilization of medical pharmaceutical material and to control the insect pests. This paper shows the art state of the application of Radiation Technology in Latin America, as well as the technological characteristics of the most gamma irradiation facilities and minor number the electron beam accelerator facilities, the types of irradiated products, state of the Quality Management System and the Dosimetric Systems used in the Radiation Processing Control in the Region. (author)

  9. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2012-01-01

    It saddens us deeply to learn of the passing away of Jean-Paul Diss who died suddenly on 7 June 2012 at his home.  A tribute can be read on the GAC-EPA site. * * * * * Information: http://gac-epa.org/ e-mail: gac-epa@gac-epa.org

  10. Quality assurance for 3D conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, J.A.; Harms, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) can be considered as an integrated process of treatment planning, delivery, and verification that attempts to conform the prescription dose closely to the target volume while limiting dose to critical normal structures. Requiring the prescription dose to conform as closely as possible to the target volume raises the level of the precision and accuracy requirements generally found in conventional radiation therapy. 3D CRT treatment planning requires robust patient immobilization/repositioning systems and volumetric image data (CT and/or MR) acquired in the treatment position. 3D treatment planning more explicitly details the particular of a patient's treatment than was ever possible with 2D treatment planning. In 1992, we implemented a formal 3D treatment planning service in our clinic and at the same time instituted a formal quality assurance (QA) program addressing the individual procedures that make up the 3D CRT process. Our 3D QA program includes systematic testing of the hardware and software used in the 3D treatment planning process, careful review of each patient's treatment plan, careful review of the physical implementation of the treatment plan, a peer review 3D QA Case Conference, and a formal continuing education program in 3D CRT for our radiation therapy staff. This broad 3D QA program requires the involvement of physicians, physicists, dosimetrists, and the treating radiation therapists that complete the team responsible for 3D CRT.3D CRT capabilities change the kinds of radiation therapy treatments that are possible and that changes the process with which treatment planning and treatment delivery are performed. There is no question that 3D CRT shows significant potential for improving the quality of radiation therapy and improving the efficiency with which it can be delivered. However, its implementation and wide spread use is still in its initial stages. The techniques used for 3D treatment

  11. Phototherapy appliances, their ultraviolet radiation and quality assurance of phototherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huurto, L.; Leszczynski, K.; Visuri, R.; Ylianttila, L.; Jokela, K.

    1998-01-01

    Artificial UV radiation (UVR) is used in the treatment of psoriasis and other skin diseases. Long term phototherapy is associated to increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma. This report gives a short review of biological effects of UVR and technical aspects of phototherapy units. The phototherapy units used in Finnish Central hospitals are described and the measured UVR dose rates of these units are presented. In addition, the UVR meters used in hospitals are described and the calibration factors are given for UVR dose rate measurements: Finally, recommendations are given for the quality assurance of photo-therapy units as well as for assessing UVR doses of patients. (orig.)

  12. Fishing for radiation quality: chromosome aberrations and the role of radiation track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The yield of chromosome aberrations is not only dependent on dose but also on radiation quality, with high linear energy transfer (LET) typically having a greater biological effectiveness per unit dose than those of low-LET radiation. Differences in radiation track structure and cell morphology can also lead to quantitative differences in the spectra of the resulting chromosomal rearrangements, especially at low doses associated with typical human exposures. The development of combinatorial fluorescent labelling techniques (such as mFISH and mBAND) has helped to reveal the complexity of rearrangements, showing increasing complexity of observed rearrangements with increasing LET but has a resolution limited to ∼10 MBp. High-LET particles have not only been shown to produce clustered sites of DNA damage but also produce multiple correlated breaks along its path resulting in DNA fragments smaller than the resolution of these techniques. Additionally, studies have shown that the vast majority of radiation-induced HPRT mutations were also not detectable using fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) techniques, with correlation of breaks along the track being reflected in the complexity of mutations, with intra- and inter-chromosomal insertions, and inversions occurring at the sites of some of the deletions. Therefore, the analysis of visible chromosomal rearrangements observed using current FISH techniques is likely to represent just the tip of the iceberg, considerably underestimating the extent and complexity of radiation induced rearrangements. (author)

  13. Specification of fast neutron radiation quality from cell transformation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppola, M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data on the neoplastic transformation of C3H 10T1/2 cells measured at Casaccia after neutron and X-ray irradiation were used to determine neutron RBE values for the RSV-Tapiro fast reactor energy spectrum and for monoenergetic neutrons of 0.5, 1, and 6 MeV. In parallel, micro-dosimetric measurements provided the actual lineal energy distributions and related mean parameters for the reactor radiation. From these experiments, values of the neutron quality factor were derived for the reactor neutron energy spectrum and, in turn, for the other neutron energies tested. A mathematical expression giving a smooth dependence on neutron energy was also determined for the effective quality factor in the entire energy range examined. The results were compared with other proposals

  14. Processes for Quality Improvements in Radiation Oncology Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald, T.J.; Urie, Marcia; Ulin, Kenneth; Laurie, Fran; Yorty, Jeffrey C.; Hanusik, Richard; Kessel, Sandy; Jodoin, Maryann Bishop; Osagie, Gani; Cicchetti, M. Giulia; Pieters, Richard; McCarten, Kathleen; Rosen, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Quality assurance in radiotherapy (RT) has been an integral aspect of cooperative group clinical trials since 1970. In early clinical trials, data acquisition was nonuniform and inconsistent and computational models for radiation dose calculation varied significantly. Process improvements developed for data acquisition, credentialing, and data management have provided the necessary infrastructure for uniform data. With continued improvement in the technology and delivery of RT, evaluation processes for target definition, RT planning, and execution undergo constant review. As we move to multimodality image-based definitions of target volumes for protocols, future clinical trials will require near real-time image analysis and feedback to field investigators. The ability of quality assurance centers to meet these real-time challenges with robust electronic interaction platforms for imaging acquisition, review, archiving, and quantitative review of volumetric RT plans will be the primary challenge for future successful clinical trials

  15. Radiation quality assurance intercomparison studies 1974--1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    The Quality Assurance Branch of the Monitoring Systems Research and Development Division at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory-Las Vegas prepares and distributes calibrated low-level radioactive solutions to Federal, State, and private laboratories involved in environmental radiation monitoring and surveillance. These solutions are used for both the calibration of counting instruments and chemical yield determinations. Since the laboratories using these samples must have confidence in their accuracy, the Quality Assurance Branch has instituted intercomparison studies with the National Bureau of Standards and with the Energy Research and Development Administration Health and Service Laboratory. The results of the studies conducted during 1974 and 1975 are described

  16. [Technological innovations in radiation oncology require specific quality controls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, E; Mathot, M

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the field of radiotherapy has benefited from major technological innovations and continuously improving treatment efficacy, comfort and safety of patients. This mainly concerns the imaging techniques that allow 4D CT scan recording the respiratory phases, on-board imaging on linear accelerators that ensure perfect positioning of the patient for treatment and irradiation techniques that reduce very significantly the duration of treatment sessions without compromising quality of the treatment plan, including IMRT (Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy) and VMAT (Volumetric Modulated Arc therapy). In this context of rapid technological change, it is the responsibility of medical physicists to regularly and precisely monitor the perfect functioning of new techniques to ensure patient safety. This requires the use of specific quality control equipment best suited to these new techniques. We will briefly describe the measurement system Delta4 used to control individualized treatment plan for each patient treated with VMAT technology.

  17. Electron-Positron Accumulator (EPA)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1986-01-01

    After acceleration in the low-current linac LIL-W, the electrons and positrons are accumulated in EPA to obtain a sufficient intensity and a suitable time-structure, before being passed on to the PS for further acceleration to 3.5 GeV. Electrons circulate from right to left, positrons in the other direction. Dipole bending magnets are red, focusing quadrupoles blue, sextupoles for chromaticity-control orange. The vertical tube at the left of the picture belongs to an optical transport system carrying the synchrotron radiation to detectors for beam size measurement. Construction of EPA was completed in spring 1986. LIL-W and EPA were conceived for an energy of 600 MeV, but operation was limited to 500 MeV.

  18. Improving the hygienic quality of chicken through radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgby-Tetteh, W.

    2010-06-01

    Irradiation is considered one of the most efficient technological processes for the reduction of microorganisms in food, It can be used to improve the safety of food products, and to extend their shelf lives. The aim of this study was to improve the hygienic quality of chicken through radiation processing. As part of the study a microbial assessment of broiler chicken thighs from three retail outlets (supermarket, local markets and farms) was conducted. The total viable count and total coliform counts were determined. Hygienic quality indicator organisms such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated and microbial counts made. Radiation sensitivity test to determine the D 10 (decimal reduction does) of E. coli on chicken at refrigeration and frozen temperature were conducted. D 10 values were 0.22 ± 0.02 and 0.32 ± 0.03 kGy at refrigerated and frozen temperatures respectively. A storage test consisting of an uninoculated pack experiment and a challenge test to explore the effect of irradiation and frozen food storage on the total viable count and survival of E. coli was conducted. Chicken thigh samples were treated with 0 (non irradiated), 2.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0 kGy of gamma irradiation and held frozen for 56 days. The control and irradiated samples were stored at -18 o C and underwent microbial analysis and sensory evaluation at 7 days intervals. It was observed that irradiation and frozen storage reduced microbial loads. There were significant differences in sensory quality characteristics during freezing storage in chicken meat. The combination of irradiation and frozen storage resulted in greater overall reductions on microbial loads thus improving hygienic quality. (au)

  19. A factorial experiment on image quality and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norrman, E.; Persliden, J.

    2005-01-01

    To find if factorial experiments can be used in the optimisation of diagnostic imaging, a factorial experiment was performed to investigate some of the factors that influence image quality, kerma area product (KAP) and effective dose (E). In a factorial experiment the factors are varied together instead of one at a time, making it possible to discover interactions between the factors as well as major effects. The factors studied were tube potential, tube loading, focus size and filtration. Each factor was set to two levels (low and high). The influence of the factors on the response variables (image quality, KAP and E) was studied using a direct digital detector. The major effects of each factor on the response variables were estimated as well as the interaction effects between factors. The image quality, KAP and E were mainly influenced by tube loading, tube potential and filtration. There were some active interactions, for example, between tube potential and filtration and between tube loading and filtration. The study shows that factorial experiments can be used to predict the influence of various parameters on image quality and radiation dose. (authors)

  20. Effect of ionizing radiation in the quality of exportable asparagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio C, T.; Espinoza B, J.; Godoy, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Due to the severe restriction which has been set upon the use of chemical fumigant by the importing countries of our horticulture products it has been studied the use of ionizing radiation in asparagus as an alternative treatment for quarantine restriction. The used are 0,15; 0,5; 1.0 y 2.0 kGy. Argenteuil and UC-157 varieties were used. The harvest, handing and storage conditions were the same as the ones export companies use. Both varieties were studied by the following quality parameters: pH, acidity, moisture, soluble solids, vitamin C, fibre content, dissecation, seeding and spreading, shooting, spear lengh, weight loss, microbial and moulds contamination, cutting resistance, respiratory rate, color and sensorial evaluation. From the result obtained it is possible to conclude that the irradiation did not produce deleterous effects on chemical, microbiological or organoleptic parameters in both varieties. From the point of view of the market quality the ionizing radiation could be used as a quarantine treatment under the normal marketing conditions used in Chile. Dose of 2.0 kGy does not produce a shelf life extention. (author)

  1. Development of quality assurance procedures for production of sealed radiation source

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, J H; Cho, W K; Han, H S; Hong, S B; Kim, K H; Kim, S D; Lee, Y G; Lim, N J

    2001-01-01

    The quality assurance procedures for sealed radiation sources production using HANARO and RIPF have been developed. The detailed quality assurance procedures are essential to manage the whole work process effectively and ensure the quality of the produced sealed sources. Through applying this quality assurance procedures to the entire production works of the sealed radiation sources, it is expected that the quality of the products, the safety of the works and the satisfaction of the customers will be increased.

  2. Hit and target theories and the molecular theory of radiation action: Notes on the influence of radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    The two target and two hit models are the simplest that can be invoked to explain the dependence of the response of eukaryotic cells on radiation quality. The formal mathematical developments of these two models are contrasted using the LET concept as a description of radiation quality. The two hit model is generalised in terms of event sizes in spherical volumes, as in the dual radiation action theory of Kellerer and Rossi. The effects of short tracks and oxygen enhancement are described. Biological damage is considered as originating in any one of a large number of sites within a cell as in the molecular theory of Chadwick and Leenhouts. Evidence from prokaryotic systems of the possible necessity for more complicated models of radiation action and, in particular, for the necessity to account for the dependence of repair and metabolic factors on radiation quality is cited. The 'track segment' and 'track structure' theories are briefly discussed as alternatives to LET for the description of radiation quality. It is suggested that it would be premature to apply the simple two target or two hit models as a basis for the specification of quality factor in radiological protection. The consequence of doing so would be that the current dose limits for gamma radiation would appear to be too high or that the limits for neutron radiation would appear to be too low. (author)

  3. Examination of optimal radiation quality in the lead equivalent examination of x-ray protective clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Shinichi; Matsuzawa, Rie; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effective lead thickness of the apron for radiation protective clothing, i.e., the lead equivalent, a method of performing the lead equivalent examination is provided in the Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS). We proposed a method of computation using an attenuation coefficient, and examined the measurement accuracy and optimal radiation quality using both. We were able to compute the lead equivalent with sufficient accuracy when using radiation quality of about 60 keV in the range of radiation quality examined. This technique was also examined in the measurement used for the marketing of radiation protective clothing. (author)

  4. The relative biological effectiveness of radiations of different quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is a review of the literature relevant to the selection of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for use in arriving at values of the quality factor (Q). Emphasis is placed on response to small ( M . In a wide variety of systems, the RBE M for fast (fission) neutrons, with low doses and dose rates, appears to be of the order of 20 or more compared to moderately filtered 250 kVp x rays and 40 or more compared to higher energy gamma rays. These values, which are much larger than those observed with large doses delivered at high dose rates, are due mainly, but not entirely, to a decrease in the slope of the curve for the ow-LET reference radiation at low dose

  5. Clinical implementation and quality assurance for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Price, R.; McNeeley, S.; Chen, L.; Li, J.S.; Wang, L.; Ding, M.; Fourkal, E.; Qin, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical implementation and quality assurance (QA) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on the experience at Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, USA. We will review our procedures for the clinical implementation of the IMRT technique and the requirements for patient immobilization, target delineation, treatment optimization, beam delivery and system administration. We will discuss the dosimetric requirements and measurement procedures for beam commissioning and dosimetry verification for IMRT. We will examine the details of model-based dose calculation for IMRT treatment planning and the potential problems with such dose calculation algorithms. We will discuss the effect of beam delivery systems on the actual dose distributions received by the patients and the methods to incorporate such effects in the treatment optimization process. We will investigate the use of the Monte Carlo method for dose calculation and treatment verification for IMRT

  6. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2008-08-01

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 µGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 µGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  7. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E [Radiology Department, Medicine School, Complutense University and San Carlos University Hospital, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ubeda, C [Clinical Sciences Department, Faculty of the Science of Health, Tarapaca University, 18 de Septiembre 2222, Arica (Chile); Leyton, F [Institute of Public Health of Chile, Marathon 1000, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile); Miranda, P [Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Avenida Antonio Varas 360, Providencia, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: eliseov@med.ucm.es

    2008-08-07

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 {mu}Gy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 {mu}Gy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  8. Modern instrumentation for radiation introscopic testing of welding quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosnin, F.R.

    1985-01-01

    Modern instrumenlation used for radiation introscopy of welded joints is discussed. the absolute (relative) sensitivity of radiation testing, resolution range, efficiency are considered as basic parameters of introscopes. The characteristics of fluoroscopes, radiation-television installations with the external scintillator and radiative image converter as well as with X-ray vidicons are given. The characterisitcs of radiation introscopes with manipulators to move objects being tested are analysed as well as digitized radiation introscopes

  9. Quality assurance of intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Jatinder R; Liu, Chihray; Li, Jonathan G

    2008-01-01

    The current paradigm for the quality assurance (QA) program for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) includes QA of the treatment planning system, QA of the delivery system, and patient-specific QA. Although the IMRT treatment planning and delivery system is the same as for conventional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, it has more parameters to coordinate and verify. Because of complex beam intensity modulation, each IMRT field often includes many small irregular off-axis fields, resulting in isodose distributions for each IMRT plan that are more conformal than those from conventional treatment plans. Therefore, these features impose a new and more stringent set of QA requirements for IMRT planning and delivery. The generic test procedures to validate dose calculation and delivery accuracy for both treatment planning and IMRT delivery have to be customized for each type of IMRT planning and delivery strategy. The rationale for such an approach is that the overall accuracy of IMRT delivery is incumbent on the piecewise uncertainties in both the planning and delivery processes. The end user must have well-defined evaluation criteria for each element of the planning and delivery process. Such information can potentially be used to determine a priori the accuracy of IMRT planning and delivery.

  10. Quality Assurance of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palta, Jatinder R.; Liu, Chihray; Li, Jonathan G.

    2008-01-01

    The current paradigm for the quality assurance (QA) program for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) includes QA of the treatment planning system, QA of the delivery system, and patient-specific QA. Although the IMRT treatment planning and delivery system is the same as for conventional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, it has more parameters to coordinate and verify. Because of complex beam intensity modulation, each IMRT field often includes many small irregular off-axis fields, resulting in isodose distributions for each IMRT plan that are more conformal than those from conventional treatment plans. Therefore, these features impose a new and more stringent set of QA requirements for IMRT planning and delivery. The generic test procedures to validate dose calculation and delivery accuracy for both treatment planning and IMRT delivery have to be customized for each type of IMRT planning and delivery strategy. The rationale for such an approach is that the overall accuracy of IMRT delivery is incumbent on the piecewise uncertainties in both the planning and delivery processes. The end user must have well-defined evaluation criteria for each element of the planning and delivery process. Such information can potentially be used to determine a priori the accuracy of IMRT planning and delivery

  11. EPA eXcats

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EPA eXcats is an enterprise-level data tracking application that provides management complaint tracking information for the EPA's Office of Civil Rights (OCR)...

  12. EPA Web Taxonomy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPA's Web Taxonomy is a faceted hierarchical vocabulary used to tag web pages with terms from a controlled vocabulary. Tagging enables search and discovery of EPA's...

  13. The quality of stray radiation in the ovarian region in diagnostic X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewen, K.; Fiebach, B.J.O.; Fischer, P.G.; Loehr, E.

    1976-01-01

    Dose measurements (LiF-TLD) and recordings of stray radiation spectra (Ge(Li)-Detectors) in a phantom show that shielding of the ovaries against stray radiation is advisable even though the effectivity of this measure decreases at higher tube voltages. The exposure of the ovaries to stray radiation increases with increasing tube voltage; the radiation quality of the stray radiation is, for the most part, independent of the filter value. (orig./AK) [de

  14. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  15. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  16. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  17. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  18. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  19. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  20. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  1. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  2. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  3. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  4. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 10

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  5. Level IV Ecoregions of EPA Region 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  6. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  7. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  8. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 5

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  9. Level III Ecoregions of EPA Region 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by EPA region were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality,...

  10. Phthalate exposure, even below US EPA reference doses, was associated with semen quality and reproductive hormones: Prospective MARHCS study in general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Yang, Huan; Zhou, Niya; Sun, Lei; Bao, Huaqiong; Tan, Lu; Chen, Hongqiang; Ling, Xi; Zhang, Guowei; Huang, Linping; Li, Lianbing; Ma, Mingfu; Yang, Hao; Wang, Xiaogang; Zou, Peng; Peng, Kaige; Liu, Taixiu; Shi, Xiefei; Feng, Dejian; Zhou, Ziyuan; Ao, Lin; Cui, Zhihong; Cao, Jia

    2017-07-01

    Environment-Protection-Agency Reference Doses (EPA RfDs) for phthalate intakes are based on limited evidence, especially regarding low-dose male-reproductive toxicity. This study investigates the association between phthalate exposure and semen parameters and reproductive hormones in a general population with low phthalate exposure compared to the EPA RfDs. The MARHCS (Male-Reproductive-Health-in-Chongqing-College-Students) cohort recruited 796 male students, who experienced a relocation of campuses and shifting environmental exposure. Urine, semen and blood before and after the relocation was collected and investigated for: (1) the associations between 13 urinary phthalate metabolites and 11 semen/hormone outcomes (five semen parameters including semen volume, sperm concentration, total sperm number, progressive motility, normal morphology) and six serum reproductive hormones including estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, progesterone, testosterone; (2) re-analysis of the metabolite-outcome associations in the subjects with estimated phthalate intakes below the RfDs; (3) a change in phthalate metabolites and change in semen/hormone outcomes after the relocation; (4) the association between these changes. (1) All but two semen/hormone outcomes were associated with at least one phthalate metabolite, e.g., each quartile monoethyl phthalate was associated with a 5.3%, 5.7% and 2.6% decrease of sperm concentration, total sperm number and progressive motility respectively. (2) In the subjects with phthalate intakes below the RfDs, these metabolite-outcome associations remained significant. (3) All metabolites except mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate declined after relocation (Phormone increased (by 5.9%, 25.0%, 34.2% and 10.0%) and testosterone decreased (by 7.0%). (4) The changes in semen volume, normal morphology, estradiol and testosterone, but not the change in luteinizing hormone after relocation, were associated with the changes in

  11. Development of quality control procedures at a new radiation therapy centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, A.

    1999-01-01

    Before patients can be treated with radiation therapy, the radiation therapist must be certain that the equipment is functioning within specified parameters. When commencing a new service, introducing appropriate Quality Control procedures on all equipment can be a major accomplishment. At the North Queensland Oncology Service, the Radiation Therapists are responsible for the daily Quality Control on all the radiation therapy equipment. The documentation and procedures were developed by radiation therapists to ensure that all machine parameter discrepancies would be detected before a patient was treated. Monthly Quality Control is the responsibility of the Physics Department. These are carried out on the bi-weekly service days rostered for each linear accelerator and monthly for the simulator. Ongoing Quality Control and Maintenance Meetings ensures reporting and feedback is ongoing between the Radiation Therapists and Physicists. All other liaising is done through the Deputy Chief Radiation Therapist and Senior Physicist. Copyright (1999) Australian Institute of Radiography

  12. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  13. Objective assessment of image quality VI: imaging in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Harrison H; Kupinski, Matthew A; Müeller, Stefan; Halpern, Howard J; Morris, John C III; Dwyer, Roisin

    2013-01-01

    Earlier work on objective assessment of image quality (OAIQ) focused largely on estimation or classification tasks in which the desired outcome of imaging is accurate diagnosis. This paper develops a general framework for assessing imaging quality on the basis of therapeutic outcomes rather than diagnostic performance. By analogy to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and their variants as used in diagnostic OAIQ, the method proposed here utilizes the therapy operating characteristic or TOC curves, which are plots of the probability of tumor control versus the probability of normal-tissue complications as the overall dose level of a radiotherapy treatment is varied. The proposed figure of merit is the area under the TOC curve, denoted AUTOC. This paper reviews an earlier exposition of the theory of TOC and AUTOC, which was specific to the assessment of image-segmentation algorithms, and extends it to other applications of imaging in external-beam radiation treatment as well as in treatment with internal radioactive sources. For each application, a methodology for computing the TOC is presented. A key difference between ROC and TOC is that the latter can be defined for a single patient rather than a population of patients. (paper)

  14. Radiation safety and quality control in the cyclotron laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.; Krause, G.; Ebadi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation safety was determined to maintain quality control in the cyclotron laboratory. Based on the results of 438 runs in the Faraday cup (20 μA for 10 min), 20 runs on 18 O-water target (40 μA for 2 h) and 10 runs on 18 O-gas targets (30 μA for 45 min), we have established that occupationally exposed workers remain 10 ± 5 times below federal regulatory limits (FRLs) in the cyclotron vault, 30 ± 8 times below FRL in the radiochemistry laboratory and 200 ± 10 times below the FRL outside the cyclotron laboratory during beam operation. (The FRL for unrestricted area are <20 μSv in 1 h.) The non-occupationally exposed workers serving in offices in the vicinity of the cyclotron vault within 100 m distance remained 200 times below the FRL irrespective of beam being on or off, suggesting that routine beam operation of 40 μA for 2 h once a day during office hours is safe provided quality control and system performance measures as discussed in this report are strictly maintained. (authors)

  15. Intervention quality is not routinely assessed in Cochrane systematic reviews of radiation therapy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, Mohamad R; James, Melissa L; Hickey, Brigid E

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to maximise the benefits from clinical trials involving technological interventions such as radiation therapy. High compliance to the quality assurance protocols is crucial. We assessed whether the quality of radiation therapy intervention was evaluated in Cochrane systematic reviews. We searched 416 published Cochrane systematic reviews and identified 67 Cochrane systematic reviews that investigated radiation therapy or radiotherapy as an intervention. For each systematic review, either quality assurance or quality control for the intervention was identified by a description of such processes in the published systematic reviews. Of the 67 Cochrane systematic reviews studied, only two mentioned quality assurance or quality control. Our findings revealed that 65 of 67 (97%) Cochrane systematic reviews of radiation therapy interventions failed to consider the quality of the intervention. We suggest that advice about the evaluation of intervention quality be added to author support materials. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  16. Effects of gamma radiation on raspberries: safety and quality issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verde, S Cabo; Trigo, M J; Sousa, M B; Ferreira, A; Ramos, A C; Nunes, I; Junqueira, C; Melo, R; Santos, P M P; Botelho, M L

    2013-01-01

    There is an ever-increasing global demand from consumers for high-quality foods with major emphasis placed on quality and safety attributes. One of the main demands that consumers display is for minimally processed, high-nutrition/low-energy natural foods with no or minimal chemical preservatives. The nutritional value of raspberry fruit is widely recognized. In particular, red raspberries are known to demonstrate a strong antioxidant capacity that might prove beneficial to human health by preventing free radical-induced oxidative stress. However, food products that are consumed raw, are increasingly being recognized as important vehicles for transmission of human pathogens. Food irradiation is one of the few technologies that address both food quality and safety by virtue of its ability to control spoilage and foodborne pathogenic microorganisms without significantly affecting sensory or other organoleptic attributes of the food. Food irradiation is well established as a physical, nonthermal treatment (cold pasteurization) that processes foods at or nearly at ambient temperature in the final packaging, reducing the possibility of cross contamination until the food is actually used by the consumer. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of gamma radiation on raspberries in order to assess consequences of irradiation. Freshly packed raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.) were irradiated in a (60)Co source at several doses (0.5, 1, or 1.5 kGy). Bioburden, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, physicochemical properties such as texture, color, pH, soluble solids content, and acidity, and sensorial parameters were assessed before and after irradiation and during storage time up to 14 d at 4°C. Characterization of raspberries microbiota showed an average bioburden value of 10(4) colony-forming units (CFU)/g and a diverse microbial population predominantly composed of two morphological types (gram-negative, oxidase-negative rods, 35%, and filamentous fungi, 41

  17. Lonizing radiation regulations and the dental practitioner: 3. Quality assurance in dental radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, John; Brown, Jackie

    2012-06-01

    This is the last in a series of three articles on X-ray dose reduction and covers aspects of quality assurance. The first outlined radiation physics and protection and the second the legislation relating to radiation safety. Quality assurance is an essential part of dental radiography and is required to produce images of a consistently high standard, necessary for accurate diagnosis.

  18. Discussion on the compilation of document of iso quality management system for radiation sterilization enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chunhong; Ha Yiming; Zhou Hongjie; Feng Zhiguo; Wang Feng

    2006-01-01

    According to the character of cooperation of radiation sterilization, and association with request of ISO9001, ISO13485 and ISO11137, compilation of document in quality manual, procedure document and technological document during certification of ISO quality management system of cooperation of radiation sterilization was discussed. (authors)

  19. A strategy to develop and implement Canadian standards for quality assurance in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    In Canada, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) regulates the limits of radiation exposure to the public and to workers in industry. In 1993, it discussed the fact that the safety of radiation therapy patients who receive medical exposures is not regulated [AE93]. The Group of Medical Advisors (GMA) to the AECB initiated a research contract to review quality assurance in Canadian radiation oncology centres and nuclear medicine departments. The review [MA95] revealed that the level of quality assurance in radiation therapy facilities varied across the country. As a result, the GMA undertook its own review of quality assurance in radiation therapy centres and made recommendations on how to achieve a uniform national system [MA98]. In response to the GMA report, the President of the AECB formed a Joint Working Group (JWG-11) to propose how Canadian Standards for Quality Assurance in Radiation Therapy could be developed and implemented. These national standards for quality assurance will serve as a common basis for establishing and evaluating quality assurance programs at individual radiation therapy centres. These standards should address the structure of quality assurance programs and quality assurance for radiation therapy equipment, personnel, and procedures. (author)

  20. Exposing exposure: automated anatomy-specific CT radiation exposure extraction for quality assurance and radiation monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodickson, Aaron; Warden, Graham I; Farkas, Cameron E; Ikuta, Ichiro; Prevedello, Luciano M; Andriole, Katherine P; Khorasani, Ramin

    2012-08-01

    To develop and validate an informatics toolkit that extracts anatomy-specific computed tomography (CT) radiation exposure metrics (volume CT dose index and dose-length product) from existing digital image archives through optical character recognition of CT dose report screen captures (dose screens) combined with Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine attributes. This institutional review board-approved HIPAA-compliant study was performed in a large urban health care delivery network. Data were drawn from a random sample of CT encounters that occurred between 2000 and 2010; images from these encounters were contained within the enterprise image archive, which encompassed images obtained at an adult academic tertiary referral hospital and its affiliated sites, including a cancer center, a community hospital, and outpatient imaging centers, as well as images imported from other facilities. Software was validated by using 150 randomly selected encounters for each major CT scanner manufacturer, with outcome measures of dose screen retrieval rate (proportion of correctly located dose screens) and anatomic assignment precision (proportion of extracted exposure data with correctly assigned anatomic region, such as head, chest, or abdomen and pelvis). The 95% binomial confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for discrete proportions, and CIs were derived from the standard error of the mean for continuous variables. After validation, the informatics toolkit was used to populate an exposure repository from a cohort of 54 549 CT encounters; of which 29 948 had available dose screens. Validation yielded a dose screen retrieval rate of 99% (597 of 605 CT encounters; 95% CI: 98%, 100%) and an anatomic assignment precision of 94% (summed DLP fraction correct 563 in 600 CT encounters; 95% CI: 92%, 96%). Patient safety applications of the resulting data repository include benchmarking between institutions, CT protocol quality control and optimization, and cumulative

  1. EPA requirements for the uranium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunster, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    The draft Environmental Statement issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the United States in preparation for Proposed Rulemaking Action concerning 'Environmental radiation protection requirements for normal operations of activities in the uranium fuel cycle' is summarized and discussed. The standards proposed by the EPA limit the annual dose equivalents to any member of the public, and also the releases of radionuclides to the 'general environment' for each gigawatt year of electrical energy produced. These standards were based on cost effectiveness arguements and levels and correspond to the ICRP recommendation to keep all exposures as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. They should be clearly distinguished from dose limits, although the EPA does not make this at all clear. The EPA seems to have shown an unexpected lack of understanding of the recommendations of ICRP Publication 9 (1965) and an apparent unawareness of ICRP Publication 22 (1973), and has therefore wrongly presented the new standards as a significant change in policy. The EPA has reviewed the information on the likely level of dose equivalents to members of the public and the likely cost reductions, thereby quantifying existing principles as applied to the fuel cycle as a whole. The EPA has stated that its proposals could be achieved as a cost in the region of Pound100,000 per death (or major genetic defect). It is pointed out that the EPA's use of the term 'waste' to exclude liquid and gaseous effluents may cause confusion. (U.K.)

  2. "Slicer" for EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    During the design of the Electron-Positron-Accumulator (EPA), there was an apprehension about the stability-limit of positron bunch-intensity in the SPS. In case that EPA would be able to produce bunches with intensities exceeding what the SPS could digest, an electrostatic septum was to slice up the EPA beam over 2 or 4 turns, thus lowering the bunch intensity while maintaining fast filling of LEP. The "slicer" septum was built and installed, but thanks to the good appetite of the SPS its use never became necessary. The slicer was removed from EPA to lower the machine impedance.

  3. EPA Envirofacts API

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Envirofacts integrates information from a variety of EPA's environmental databases. Each of these databases contains information about facilities that are required...

  4. Radiation safety and quality in diagnostic x-ray imaging 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T.

    2001-05-01

    The obligations of the medical exposure directive (97/43/Euratom) for hospitals dominate the current activities in radiation protection in medical radiology. The directive gives special emphasis to radiation exposure of children, to examinations with high radiation doses and to radiation exposure in health screening programmes. The most important examinations with high doses are radiological interventions, where even acute skin effects are possible, and the computed tomography where the number of CT examinations makes only about 5% from the total number of x-ray examinations but the collective effective dose about 40% from the combined collective effective dose of all x-ray examinations. In the research projects financed by the European Commission, radiation exposures to paediatric patients have been measured in radiography, fluoroscopy and CT, and various dose assessment methods have been compared to develop a method for national follow-up of patients' radiation dose. The newest research project is focused on dosimetry and quality assurance in interventional radiology and digital imaging. Other actual topics are the development of radiation protection regulations and quality systems, education and training programmes, and clinical audits. This report deals with new radiation protection guides and recommendations and the education and training of radiological staff in radiation protection. One important topic is the development of national follow-up method of radiation exposure to patients and comparison of various dose assessment methods. Quality assurance in health care and in paediatric radiology, and the acceptance test and quality assurance measurements of radiological equipment are also described. (orig.)

  5. Radiation safety and quality assurance in diagnostic x-ray imaging 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servonmaa, A.

    1999-04-01

    In the European Union, the Directive 97/43/Euratom concerning the medical use of radiation brings many new tasks to radiation users. Quality assurance, patient dose measurement, staff training and clinical audit are among the most essential of these tasks. The Finnish radiation legislation has been modified to comply with the Directive. Much work is still required for practical implementation of these rules. This report deals with applications of the medical radiation Directive. Most applications are still at the planning stage, and clear guidance is lacking. However, the users have to know in time about these plans and future duties concerning them. Experience on quality assurance and clinical audit in hospitals are especially valuable in providing practical information on benefits and problems of these practices. Other radiation related topics, such as radiation risks, radioactivity in foods, and use of radiation in other European countries, are also included in the report. (orig.)

  6. Quality assurance of patients for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Min; Yi, Byong Yong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang Wook

    2002-01-01

    To establish and verify the proper and the practical IMRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy) patient QA (Quality Assurance). An IMRT QA which consists of 3 steps and 16 items were designed and examined the validity of the program by applying to 9 patients, 12 IMRT cases of various sites. The three step QA program consists of RTP related QA, treatment information flow QA, and a treatment delivery QA procedure. The evaluation of organ constraints, the validity of the point dose, and the dose distribution are major issues in the RTP related QA procedure. The leaf sequence file generation, the evaluation of the MLC control file, the comparison of the dry run film, and the IMRT field simulate image were included in the treatment information flow procedure QA. The patient setup QA, the verification of the IMRT treatment fields to the patients, and the examination of the data in the Record and Verify system make up the treatment delivery QA procedure. The point dose measurement results of 10 cases showed good agreement with the RTP calculation within 3%. One case showed more than a 3% difference and the other case showed more than 5%, which was out side the tolerance level. We could not find any differences of more than 2 mm between the RTP leaf sequence and the dry run film. Film dosimetry and the dose distribution from the phantom plan showed the same tendency, but quantitative analysis was not possible because of the film dosimetry nature. No error had been found from the MLC control file and one mis-registration case was found before treatment. This study shows the usefulness and the necessity of the IMRT patient QA program. The whole procedure of this program should be performed, especially by institutions that have just started to accumulate experience. But, the program is too complex and time consuming. Therefore, we propose practical and essential QA items for institutions in which the IMRT is performed as a routine procedure

  7. X radiation qualities characterization following the standard IEC 61267 recommendations at the calibration laboratory of IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franciscatto, Priscila Cerutti

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a methodology for the X radiation qualities characterization following the new recommendations of the standard 61267 of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) to establish a new procedure for calibration of dosimetric systems used in the field of diagnostic radiology. The reference qualities radiation of IEC 61267: RQR 2 to RQR 10, RQA 2 to RQA 10, RQB 2 to RQB 10 and RQN 2 to RQN 10 were implanted at the calibration laboratory of IPEN (LCI). Their characteristics were analyzed through measurements of beam parameters such as: Practical peak voltage (PPV), specific additional filtrations for each qualities (high purity aluminum of about 99.9%), 1st and 2nd Half Value Layers, homogeneity coefficient. The inherent filtration of the X ray tube was also determined. With the establishment of these radiation qualities, the LCI will be ready to calibrate the measuring instruments of radiation in the new qualities, allowing an improvement in radiological services offered by IPEN. (author)

  8. Some problems in methodology of economjc evaluation of radiation technique quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodyukov, V.M.; Purtova, M.I.; Sokolova, Z.I.; Smirnova, Z.M.

    1976-01-01

    The quality of radiation equipment (RE) should essentially be assessed when designing, standardizing, planning, and evaluating the cost and economy of RE. The basic factors are sited upon which subsequent economic assessment of quality levels were based. It also discusses the specifics involved in determining the principal quality factors for radioisotopic flaw-detection equipment and gamma-therapeutic instruments

  9. Medical Physics Challenges for the Implementation of Quality Assurance Programmes in Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghzifene, A

    2017-02-01

    The importance of quality assurance in radiation therapy, as well as its positive consequences on patient treatment outcome, is well known to radiation therapy professionals. In low- and middle-income countries, the implementation of quality assurance in radiation therapy is especially challenging, due to a lack of staff training, a lack of national guidelines, a lack of quality assurance equipment and high patient daily throughput. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Directory of Radiotherapy Centres, the proportion of linear accelerators compared with Co-60 machines has increased significantly in recent years in low- and middle-income countries. However, this increase in the proportion of relatively more demanding technology is not always accompanied with the necessary investment in staff training and quality assurance. The IAEA provides supports to low- and middle-income countries to develop and strengthen quality assurance programmes at institutional and national level. It also provides guidance, through its publications, on quality assurance and supports implementation of comprehensive clinical audits to identify gaps and makes recommendations for quality improvement in radiation therapy. The new AAPM TG100 report suggests a new approach to quality management in radiation therapy. If implemented, it will lead to improved cost-effectiveness of radiation therapy in all income settings. Low- and middle-income countries could greatly benefit from this new approach as it will help direct their scarce resources to areas where they can produce the optimum impact on patient care, without compromising patient safety. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. A quality control program for the thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) in personnel radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kyung Won; Kim, Jang Lyul; Lee, Sang Yoon; Lee, Hyung Sub

    1994-01-01

    High quality radiation dosimetry is essential for workers who rely upon personal dosemeters to record the amount of radiation to which they are exposed. The ministry of science and technology (MOST) issued a ministerial ordinance (No 199-15) about the technical criteria on personnel dosimeter processors on 1992. The purpose of this quality control program is to prescribe the procedures approved by the management of KAERI for implementing a quality badge service by means of TLD for personnel working in an area where they may be exposed to ionization radiation. (Author) 10 refs

  11. Implantation of radiation qualities for mammography in accordance with the IEC 61627 and TRS 457 criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, Evandro J.; David, Mariano G.; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de

    2009-01-01

    In this work it is discussed the technical conditions of the implantation of radiation qualities adequate for dosemeter applied to mammography at the Radiological Science Laboratory (RSL) of the University of State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It performed tests for evaluation the homogeneity of the radiation field, the scattering, the half-layers and the system stability. The test results point for adequacy of the laboratory installed at the LCR for calibration of the mentioned dosemeters in seven qualities of radiation and the expanded uncertainty with better capacity of measurement at those qualities was of ±1.8% (k = 2)

  12. Role of radiations in assuring quality in space programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, K.

    1993-01-01

    Penetrating radiations such as x-rays, gamma rays, neutrons are extensively used for radiographic inspection of various components used in space programmes. Some of these are rocket motor segments, assembled motors, composite nozzles, igniters, pyro devices, and various critical sub systems. These components employ advanced materials like composites, propellants, insulation materials, alloy steels, maraging steel, pyro techniques etc. Often they are in complex geometrical shapes and assemblies. Simulation of radiation environment on a number of components used in satellites is also carried out using radiation sources. This will help in assessing the effect of terrestrial radiation on the components that work in space. Future trends in the exploitation of radiation for space applications include automated radiography and development of expert systems, computed tomography, improvement in realtime radiography, Compton back scatter tomography etc. Adapting some of the advancements in medical radiology to industrial environment is also a welcome step in future. (author). 2 figs

  13. Environmental radiation control and quality management system in design and operation of sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.Z.

    2007-01-01

    New environmental regulations and radiation safety standards are being implemented almost daily to ensure radiation safety, in particular for practices causing exposures to undue radiation doses. A particular emphasis of real challenge for organizations and users of radiation sources has to be for proper radiological safety assessment and is becoming cost effectively to be prepared for auditing. Special concern for the environment is of global . nature, and hence environmental auditing has been and will continue to be an essential practice for improving the environment and for meeting the relevant regulations and standards. In general, most facilities that deal with radioactive sources undertake strict safety measures in terms of personnel radiation protection, handling procedures and security. Hence, those measures should comply with the requirements of the environmental protection standards. Accordingly, a successful quality management system must balance realities of organization and personnel in achieving quality objectives. Organizational principles are found in the technical aspects of' quality management, such as, charting, requirements, measurements, procedures, ... , etc. Human principles are found in the communication side of quality management (e.g. meetings, ,decision making, ,teams, ... , etc). The quality management must understand and balance skills needed to blend them together. Large gamma irradiators present a high potential radiation hazard to the surrounding environment, since the amount of radioactivity is of the order of (P Bq) and a very high dose rates are produced during irradiation. Application of environmental radiation control deemed by regulatory authority and a proper quality management system by the utility would serve public health and safety

  14. A questionnaire survey of medical physicist and quality manager for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Teiji; Ashino, Yasuo; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    A questionnaire survey of medical physicists and quality managers for radiation therapy was performed by the Japanese Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JASTRO) Future Planning Committee. We mailed the questionnaire to 726 radiotherapy facilities with the answers returned from 353 radiotherapy facilities. The result showed 178 facilities were staffed by radiotherapy workers who were licensed medical physicists or quality managers. A staff of 289 was licensed radiotherapy workers. Most of the staff were radiotherapy technologists. Quality control for radiation therapy was rated satisfactory according to each facility's assessment. Radiation therapy of high quality requires continued education of medical physicists and quality managers, in addition to keeping up with times for quality control. (author)

  15. Radiation safety and quality control assurance in X-ray diagnostics 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, A.

    1998-03-01

    The report is based on a seminar course of lectures 'Radiation safety and quality assurance in X-ray diagnostics 1998' organized by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) in Finland. The lectures included actual information on X-ray examinations: methods of quality assurance, methods of measuring and calculating patient doses, examination frequencies, patient doses, occupational doses, and radiation risks. Paediatric X-ray examinations and interventional procedures were the most specific topics. The new Council Directive 97/43/Euratom on medical exposure, and the European Guidelines on quality criteria for diagnostic radiographic images, were discussed in several lectures. Lectures on general radiation threats and preparedness, examples of radiation accidents, and emergency preparedness in hospitals were also included. (editor)

  16. Present status of quality assurance system for radiation therapy in the national hospital and sanatorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun; Kotaka, Kikuo; Terui, Takashi

    1994-01-01

    In order to improve the precision of radiation therapy and structure of radiation oncology, the state of quality assurance (QA) system for external radiation therapy in Japanese national hospitals and sanatoriums were investigated, by a questionnaire method. The questionnaire included the equipments, the personnel, and a frequency in quality assurance check of each radiation therapy facilities. The results clarified that real photon energy of megavoltage equipment was measured in only 57% of 58% institutions; frequency of the dose monitor calibration was suboptimal; personnel scale was markedly insufficient; some treatment-related apparatus was inappropriately arranged between institutions. Based on these results, it was considered that the precision of radiation therapy and its QA state could not be improved without personnel sufficiency. In the present situation, we should consider the arrangement of treatment facilities in each area and specialization of radiation therapy between institutions. (author)

  17. EPA Linked Open Data (Collection)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a collection item referencing the following EPA Linked Data resources: - EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS) - EPA Substance Registry Service (SRS) -...

  18. EPA Library Network Communication Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    To establish Agency-wide procedures for the EPA National Library Network libraries to communicate, using a range of established mechanisms, with other EPA libraries, EPA staff, organizations and the public.

  19. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-D Cultures After Charged Particle Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kidane, Yared H.; Huff, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluated the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Current risk models for assessment of space radiation-induced cancer have large uncertainties because the models for adverse health effects following radiation exposure are founded on epidemiological analyses of human populations exposed to low-LET radiation. Reducing these uncertainties requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. In order to better quantify these radiation quality effects in biological systems, we are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models for space radiation research. These models hold promise for risk assessment as they provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information.

  20. Quality assurance in medical radiation applications. The medical and dental appointment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst-Elz, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Medical radiation applications cause averaged over the German population an annual exposure of almost 2 mSv. Medical authorities have the assignment to assure and control the diagnostic and therapeutic quality of these applications and to provide recommendations for operators with respect to dose reductions and radiation protection, including guidance for radiotherapy planning aimed to questions of dose and therapy optimization.

  1. Implementation of quality assurance and quality control in the Nuclear Analytical Laboratory of the Estonian Radiation Protection Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeoep, T.; Jakobson, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Analytical Laboratory of the Estonian Radiation Protection Centre is in the process of implementing the system of Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) in the framework of the IAEA TC Project RER/2/004/ 'QA/QC of Nuclear Analytical Techniques'. The draft Quality Manual with annexes has been prepared accordingly to the ISO 17025 Guide, documents and other printed material delivered on the seminars of the project. The laboratory supply has been supplemented with necessary equipment for guaranteeing of quality. Proficiency testing included in the project has been performed successfully. (author)

  2. Re-Establishment of Standard Radiation Qualities for Calibration of Dosemeter in Diagnostic Radiology - RQR Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmaliza Hashim; Norhayati Abdullah; Mohd Firdaus Abd Rahman

    2016-01-01

    After repairing the high voltage (HV) generator for Philips MG165 X-Ray Machine, the reestablishment of the standard radiation qualities has been done at Medical Physics Calibration Laboratory to meet the IEC and IAEA standard. Standard radiation qualities are the important criteria for calibration of dosemeter in diagnostic radiology. Standard radiation qualities are defined as the added filtration needed to produce and the half value layer (HVL) of the beam for specifies x-ray tube kilo voltage (kV). For calibration of dosemeter in diagnostic radiology, standard radiation qualities RQR represent the beam incident on the patient in general radiography, fluoroscopy and dental application. The HVL were measured using PTW ion chamber of volume 1 cm"3 with PTW electrometer and aluminium filter with 99.9 % purity was used as additional filter for RQR and filter for HVL. The first establishment of standard radiation qualities was made in 2009 for the radiation qualities of RQR. The results of additional filter and 1st HVL from 2009 to 2016 will be discussed further in paper. The ratios of the measured HVL to the standard IEC HVL value for the RQR series also described in this paper. The details of the measurement and the results are described in this paper. (author)

  3. Task-based measures of image quality and their relation to radiation dose and patient risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Harrison H; Kupinski, Matthew A; Myers, Kyle J; Hoeschen, Christoph; Little, Mark P

    2015-01-01

    The theory of task-based assessment of image quality is reviewed in the context of imaging with ionizing radiation, and objective figures of merit (FOMs) for image quality are summarized. The variation of the FOMs with the task, the observer and especially with the mean number of photons recorded in the image is discussed. Then various standard methods for specifying radiation dose are reviewed and related to the mean number of photons in the image and hence to image quality. Current knowledge of the relation between local radiation dose and the risk of various adverse effects is summarized, and some graphical depictions of the tradeoffs between image quality and risk are introduced. Then various dose-reduction strategies are discussed in terms of their effect on task-based measures of image quality. (topical review)

  4. Group consensus peer review in radiation oncology: commitment to quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggar, W Neil; Bhandari, Rahul; Yang, Chunli Claus; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2018-03-27

    Peer review, especially prospective peer review, has been supported by professional organizations as an important element in optimal Radiation Oncology practice based on its demonstration of efficacy at detecting and preventing errors prior to patient treatment. Implementation of peer review is not without barriers, but solutions do exist to mitigate or eliminate some of those barriers. Peer review practice at our institution involves three key elements: new patient conference, treatment planning conference, and chart rounds. The treatment planning conference is an adaptation of the group consensus peer review model from radiology which utilizes a group of peers reviewing each treatment plan prior to implementation. The peer group in radiation oncology includes Radiation Oncologists, Physician Residents, Medical Physicists, Dosimetrists, and Therapists. Thus, technical and clinical aspects of each plan are evaluated simultaneously. Though peer review is held in high regard in Radiation Oncology, many barriers commonly exist preventing optimal implementation such as time intensiveness, repetition, and distraction from clinic time with patients. Through the use of automated review tools and commitment by individuals and administration in regards to staffing, scheduling, and responsibilities, these barriers have been mitigated to implement this Group Consensus Peer Review model into a Radiation Oncology Clinic. A Group Consensus Peer Review model has been implemented with strategies to address common barriers to effective and efficient peer review.

  5. New patient-controlled abdominal compression method in radiography: radiation dose and image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piippo-Huotari, Oili; Norrman, Eva; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta; Geijer, Håkan

    2018-05-01

    The radiation dose for patients can be reduced with many methods and one way is to use abdominal compression. In this study, the radiation dose and image quality for a new patient-controlled compression device were compared with conventional compression and compression in the prone position . To compare radiation dose and image quality of patient-controlled compression compared with conventional and prone compression in general radiography. An experimental design with quantitative approach. After obtaining the approval of the ethics committee, a consecutive sample of 48 patients was examined with the standard clinical urography protocol. The radiation doses were measured as dose-area product and analyzed with a paired t-test. The image quality was evaluated by visual grading analysis. Four radiologists evaluated each image individually by scoring nine criteria modified from the European quality criteria for diagnostic radiographic images. There was no significant difference in radiation dose or image quality between conventional and patient-controlled compression. Prone position resulted in both higher dose and inferior image quality. Patient-controlled compression gave similar dose levels as conventional compression and lower than prone compression. Image quality was similar with both patient-controlled and conventional compression and was judged to be better than in the prone position.

  6. U.S. NO2 trends (2005-2013): EPA Air Quality System (AQS) data versus improved observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamsal, Lok N.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Streets, David G.; Lu, Zifeng

    2015-06-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and, subsequently, atmospheric levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have decreased over the U.S. due to a combination of environmental policies and technological change. Consequently, NO2 levels have decreased by 30-40% in the last decade. We quantify NO2 trends (2005-2013) over the U.S. using surface measurements from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Air Quality System (AQS) and an improved tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) data product from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite. We demonstrate that the current OMI NO2 algorithm is of sufficient maturity to allow a favorable correspondence of trends and variations in OMI and AQS data. Our trend model accounts for the non-linear dependence of NO2 concentration on emissions associated with the seasonal variation of the chemical lifetime, including the change in the amplitude of the seasonal cycle associated with the significant change in NOx emissions that occurred over the last decade. The direct relationship between observations and emissions becomes more robust when one accounts for these non-linear dependencies. We improve the OMI NO2 standard retrieval algorithm and, subsequently, the data product by using monthly vertical concentration profiles, a required algorithm input, from a high-resolution chemistry and transport model (CTM) simulation with varying emissions (2005-2013). The impact of neglecting the time-dependence of the profiles leads to errors in trend estimation, particularly in regions where emissions have changed substantially. For example, trends calculated from retrievals based on time-dependent profiles offer 18% more instances of significant trends and up to 15% larger total NO2 reduction versus the results based on profiles for 2005. Using a CTM, we explore the theoretical relation of the trends estimated from NO2 VCDs to those estimated from ground-level concentrations. The model-simulated trends in VCDs strongly

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on food packaging materials and quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welle, F.; Franz, R.

    1999-01-01

    Tests have shown that ionizing radiation induces a characteristic smell in the packaging laminates which also affects the simulated foods used, which however were relatively neutral in flavour, so that the tests represent the worst case. The paper explains that due to the various additives used in the production of the plastic packaging materials, the same types of polymers may react differently to the ionizing radiation, so that the results obtained from the tests are not suitable for general application. It is recommended to very carefully select the suitable packaging material for given foods and intended irradiation processes. Aspects of particular importance are discusses. (orig./CB) [de

  8. A brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) for probe-type dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Ulrich; Kaulich, Theodor W; Álvarez-Romero, José T; Carlsson Tedgren, Sa; Enger, Shirin A; Medich, David C; Mourtada, Firas; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Rivard, Mark J; Zakaria, G Abu

    2016-06-01

    In photon brachytherapy (BT), experimental dosimetry is needed to verify treatment plans if planning algorithms neglect varying attenuation, absorption or scattering conditions. The detector's response is energy dependent, including the detector material to water dose ratio and the intrinsic mechanisms. The local mean photon energy E¯(r) must be known or another equivalent energy quality parameter used. We propose the brachytherapy photon radiation quality indexQ(BT)(E¯), to characterize the photon radiation quality in view of measurements of distributions of the absorbed dose to water, Dw, around BT sources. While the external photon beam radiotherapy (EBRT) radiation quality index Q(EBRT)(E¯)=TPR10(20)(E¯) is not applicable to BT, the authors have applied a novel energy dependent parameter, called brachytherapy photon radiation quality index, defined as Q(BT)(E¯)=Dprim(r=2cm,θ0=90°)/Dprim(r0=1cm,θ0=90°), utilizing precise primary absorbed dose data, Dprim, from source reference databases, without additional MC-calculations. For BT photon sources used clinically, Q(BT)(E¯) enables to determine the effective mean linear attenuation coefficient μ¯(E) and thus the effective energy of the primary photons Eprim(eff)(r0,θ0) at the TG-43 reference position Pref(r0=1cm,θ0=90°), being close to the mean total photon energy E¯tot(r0,θ0). If one has calibrated detectors, published E¯tot(r) and the BT radiation quality correction factor [Formula: see text] for different BT radiation qualities Q and Q0, the detector's response can be determined and Dw(r,θ) measured in the vicinity of BT photon sources. This novel brachytherapy photon radiation quality indexQ(BT) characterizes sufficiently accurate and precise the primary photon's penetration probability and scattering potential. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. CT radiation dose and image quality optimization using a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarb, Francis; McEntee, Mark F; Rainford, Louise

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate potential radiation dose savings and resultant image quality effects with regard to optimization of commonly performed computed tomography (CT) studies derived from imaging a porcine (pig) model. Imaging protocols for 4 clinical CT suites were developed based on the lowest milliamperage and kilovoltage, the highest pitch that could be set from current imaging protocol parameters, or both. This occurred before significant changes in noise, contrast, and spatial resolution were measured objectively on images produced from a quality assurance CT phantom. The current and derived phantom protocols were then applied to scan a porcine model for head, abdomen, and chest CT studies. Further optimized protocols were developed based on the same methodology as in the phantom study. The optimization achieved with respect to radiation dose and image quality was evaluated following data collection of radiation dose recordings and image quality review. Relative visual grading analysis of image quality criteria adapted from the European guidelines on radiology quality criteria for CT were used for studies completed with both the phantom-based or porcine-derived imaging protocols. In 5 out of 16 experimental combinations, the current clinical protocol was maintained. In 2 instances, the phantom protocol reduced radiation dose by 19% to 38%. In the remaining 9 instances, the optimization based on the porcine model further reduced radiation dose by 17% to 38%. The porcine model closely reflects anatomical structures in humans, allowing the grading of anatomical criteria as part of image quality review without radiation risks to human subjects. This study demonstrates that using a porcine model to evaluate CT optimization resulted in more radiation dose reduction than when imaging protocols were tested solely on quality assurance phantoms.

  10. US EPA CARE Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a provisional dataset that contains point locations for the subset of Community Action for a Renewed Environment (CARE) grants given out by the US EPA. CARE...

  11. EPA User Personas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn how EPA's three web user personas (Information Consumer, Information Intermediary, and Information Interpreter) can help you identify appropriate top audiences and top tasks for a topic or web area.

  12. EPA's Efforts in Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has been collaborating with Russia, Central Asia, the Caucasus and Ukraine for over 20 years and continues to work with their governments and non-governmental organizations on environment, science and technology issues.

  13. US EPA EJ Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This is a provisional dataset that contains point locations for all Environmental Justice (EJ) grants given out by the US EPA. There are many limitations to the data...

  14. EPA Nanorelease Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPA Nanorelease Dataset. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Wohlleben, W., C. Kingston, J. Carter, E. Sahle-Demessie, S. Vazquez-Campos, B....

  15. Science Inventory | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Science Inventory is a searchable database of research products primarily from EPA's Office of Research and Development. Science Inventory records provide descriptions of the product, contact information, and links to available printed material or websites.

  16. EPA Recovery Mapper

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EPA Recovery Mapper is an Internet interactive mapping application that allows users to discover information about every American Recovery and Reinvestment Act...

  17. Quality image analysis and radiation protection in dental radiodiagnosis in Sobral city, BA, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, Francisca L.; Ferreira, Fernanda C.L.; Paschoal, Cinthia M.M.; Belinato, Walmir

    2015-01-01

    The radiographic processing is one of the steps to acquire radiographic images and requires appropriate quality control. The image should allow an accurate diagnosis and avoid repetition of examinations, which is consistent with the principles of radiation protection. This study aimed to verify the quality of periapical radiographic imaging and to investigate the suitability of dental X-ray equipment on the principles of radiation protection established by the Health Ministry Decree 453/98, by applying radiation field test and application questionnaires to dentists professionals. The result showed that it takes greater care professionals about the treatment radiographic and radiation protection, requiring that inspection agencies require compliance with the rules so that there is maintaining the quality of dental diagnostic radiology services. (author)

  18. The spectra of the standard x-ray qualities used in STUK's Radiation Metrology Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapiovaara, T.; Tapiovaara, M.; Siiskonen, T.; Hakanen, A.

    2008-02-01

    This report presents the fluence spectra of the standard x-radiation qualities used in the Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). The spectra were measured in August 2007. The radiation qualities characterised in the report are the ISO Narrow spectrum series (ISO N10-N200, ISO 4037-1:1996) and both of the RQR-spectrum series specified by the IEC (IEC 1267:1994 and IEC 61267:2005). The measurements were made using a high purity Ge-detector and the measured pulse height spectra were corrected to fluence spectra. Spectral characteristics were computed from the spectral data and compared to the requirements in the standards and to the values given in the quality manual of the laboratory. (orig.)

  19. Effects of radiation quality, intensity, and duration on photosynthesis and growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugbee, B. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Differences in radiation quality from the six most common electric lamps have little effect on photosynthetic rate. Radiation quality primarily alters growth because of changes in branching or internode elongation, which change radiation absorption. Growth and yield in wheat appear to be insensitive to radiation quality. Growth and yield in soybeans can be slightly increased under high pressure sodium lamps compared to metal halide lamps, in spite of greatly reduced chlorophyll concentrations under HPS lamps. Daily integrated photosynthetic photon flux (mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}) most directly determines leaf anatomy and growth. Photosynthetic photon flux levels of 800 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1} are adequate to simulate field daily-integrated PPF levels for both short and long day plants, but plant canopies can benefit from much higher PPF levels.

  20. Use of TANDEM methodology for quality control in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, O.A.; Oliveira, I.R.; Leyton, F.; Nogueira, M.S.; Borges, F.L.S.; Joana, G.S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated the increase of the incidence of lens opacities for low radiation doses. Considering epidemiological data, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued a statement that changed the absorbed dose threshold for the eye lens. The statement also recommends a reduction in the dose limits to the eye lens for occupationally exposed persons; now it is considered to be 20 mSv in a year averaged over five years. For this research two types of thermoluminescent dosimeters TL were used in the construction of the curve tandem. (LiF-100H e LiF-200). For system calibration three monitors were irradiated for each radiation beam. The monitors were irradiated with 4 mGy kerma at 1.5 m from the focal point. The Tandem curve was obtained by the ratio between the values of the energy dependence curves of each dosimeter. Data obtained for the corresponding x-ray beams to radiation reference N60 to N120 are more accurate for determining the energy - steepest part of the curve. The results are shown similar to similar studies and confirm the possibility of using the method for determining the unknown energy radiation fields. (author)

  1. EPA Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemistry Laboratory (ECL) is a national program laboratory specializing in residue chemistry analysis under the jurisdiction of the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs in Washington, D.C. At Stennis Space Center, the laboratory's work supports many federal anti-pollution laws. The laboratory analyzes environmental and human samples to determine the presence and amount of agricultural chemicals and related substances. Pictured, ECL chemists analyze environmental and human samples for the presence of pesticides and other pollutants.

  2. Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA's regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA's lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants

  3. Radiation safety and quality in diagnostic x-ray imaging 2001; Saeteilyturvallisuus ja laatu roentgendiagnostiikassa 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T. (eds.)

    2001-05-01

    The obligations of the medical exposure directive (97/43/Euratom) for hospitals dominate the current activities in radiation protection in medical radiology. The directive gives special emphasis to radiation exposure of children, to examinations with high radiation doses and to radiation exposure in health screening programmes. The most important examinations with high doses are radiological interventions, where even acute skin effects are possible, and the computed tomography where the number of CT examinations makes only about 5% from the total number of x-ray examinations but the collective effective dose about 40% from the combined collective effective dose of all x-ray examinations. In the research projects financed by the European Commission, radiation exposures to paediatric patients have been measured in radiography, fluoroscopy and CT, and various dose assessment methods have been compared to develop a method for national follow-up of patients' radiation dose. The newest research project is focused on dosimetry and quality assurance in interventional radiology and digital imaging. Other actual topics are the development of radiation protection regulations and quality systems, education and training programmes, and clinical audits. This report deals with new radiation protection guides and recommendations and the education and training of radiological staff in radiation protection. One important topic is the development of national follow-up method of radiation exposure to patients and comparison of various dose assessment methods. Quality assurance in health care and in paediatric radiology, and the acceptance test and quality assurance measurements of radiological equipment are also described. (orig.)

  4. Quality management status of national radiation environmental monitoring network and strategy for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Renjie; Zhang Rongsuo; Ni Shiying; Shen Gang

    2009-01-01

    During the period of 10th five-year plan, MEP has constructed a national radiation environmental monitoring network. In the running of the network, quality management on monitoring data is of vital importance. So all the members of the radiation environmental monitoring network are required to ensure the quality of monitoring method, equipment, reagent,quality of personnel, data processing and information management and so on. Thus the monitoring result would be typical and accuracy in science. The article introduced in detail the quality management status of the National Radiation Environmental Monitoring Network and put forward the strategy for development from the institutionalized and large-scale point of view of radioactive environmental monitoring work. (authors)

  5. About Region 3's Laboratory and Field Services at EPA's Environmental Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mission & contact information for EPA Region 3's Laboratory and Field Services located at EPA's Environmental Science Center: the Office of Analytical Services and Quality Assurance & Field Inspection Program

  6. Risks, radiation dose and image quality of mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menges, V.

    1979-01-01

    For some time to come, early detection of breast cancer will remain the only way to improve the therapeutical success. Mammography is an absolutely indispensible way to take advantage of this opportunity. Today, mammography is undoubtedly the most reliable method of examination for an early detection of breast cancer. Only mammography can detect carcinomas smaller than the critical tumour size of 1cm. If carried out properly and with present dose levels, it involves hardly any radiation risk. (orig.) [de

  7. Picture quality in mammography, and interrelation of radiation exposure. Invisible patient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, Takahide; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In these days when there are rumors about medical radiation exposure, it is the greatest keyword which it was inflicted with to radioactive ray's worker to secure radiation exposure reduction. I assume International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) BSS (Basic Safety Standards) guidance level, the medical radiation exposure reduction targeted value by JART (Japan Association of Radiological Technologists) a reasonable standard and, besides, must be able to tie equality and high quality medical care to an offer of security for a patient by getting rid of a difference in each institution. In mammography that needs is high in cancer death rate high rank of a woman as a background, authorization engineer system and institution authorization system establish it with a made guideline by a mammography precision management central committee, and not only an offer of a high quality picture depicting a minute mental change caused by a disease but also consideration of radiation exposure with the photography is done. Radiation exposure dose of radioactivity reduction by operation of a picture is nominated for possibility in digital system, but that radiation exposure dose of radioactivity increase than S/F system is felt uneasy about because actually I aim at the institution authorization acquisition. Maintain the high quality picture and to consider radiation exposure reduction are real invisible patient care, and I report the picture quality and interrelation of radiation exposure, and also speak a consideration method of the picture of the always equal tolerance level/tolerance level of the radiation exposure that a gap is not over in each institution. (author)

  8. Decreased sexual capacity after external radiation therapy for prostate cancer impairs quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgason, Asgeir R.; Fredrikson, Mats; Adolfsson, Jan; Steineck, Gunnar

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess to what extent patients treated with radiation therapy for prostate cancer experience change in sexual functioning and to what extent this effects quality of life. Methods and Materials: Information was provided by 53 men treated with radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. Assessment was made with the ''Radiumhemmets Scale of Sexual Functioning,'' which measures sexual desire, erectile capacity, orgasm, and to what extent a decrease in any of these aspects of sexual functioning affects quality of life. Function before treatment was assessed retrospectively. Results: Sexual desire diminished among 77% after treatment. The erection stiffness decreased in 77%. Before external radiation therapy, 66% had an erection usually sufficient for intercourse. Half of the men lost this ability after treatment. Of those retaining orgasm after treatment, 47% reported a decreased orgasmic pleasure and 91% a reduced ejaculation volume. Of all men, 50% reported that quality of life had decreased much or very much due to a decline in the erectile capacity following external radiation therapy. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that external radiation therapy for prostate cancer is associated with a reduction in sexual desire, erectile capacity, and orgasm functions. In a majority of patients this reduces quality of life. Previously, we may have underestimated the importance an intact sexual function has for the quality of life in this patient category of elderly men

  9. Maintenance and improvement of dairy feed quality by radiation for distribution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Ryoei; Kawamoto, Hidenori; Uegaki, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Osamu; Ando, Sada; Akiyama, Noriaki; Yamada, Akio

    1997-01-01

    With an aim to improve the quality of crude feed and its maintenance, γ-ray radiation was carried out during the steps of preparation and storage of feed and the effects on the fermentation of silage crude feed and mixed feed were investigated. Of the γ-ray radiation significant effects on general constituents in the silage were not observed immediately after the radiation, but it was clear that the contents of fibrous components were apt to increase one month later. The ratio, VBN/TN in the silage decreased with the elevation of radiation dose. Further it was found that radiation at 16 Gy or more is needed to prevent butyric acid fermentation in the silage and aerobic deterioration. In addition, the amount of peroxide lipids was not increased by the γ-radiation, suggesting that no adverse effects on the quality of the feed in silage might be caused by radiation. Thus, it was concluded that γ-radiation in appropriate conditions has favorable influence on silage fermentation. (M.N.)

  10. Radiation protection of patients and quality controls in teleradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermiglio, G.; Testagrossa, B.; Sansotta, C.; Tripepi, M.G. [Messina Univ., Dept. of Protezionistica Ambientale, Sanitaria, Sociale ed Industriale (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Nowadays, it is well-known that tele-radiology represents the new frontier of radiodiagnostic imaging. In this case, the continuous broadening of transmission bands and the more sophisticated procedures of information packaging constitute a no negligible inducement. Moreover, standards used to convert analogical signals into the digital ones, necessary to transfer via ether radiological images and information, involve a more limited loss of information. Nevertheless, unlike the common images, in case of the X-ray diagnostic images it must take into account that the EURATOM Council Directives give the health physicist all the procedures to be followed for checking the status of X-ray equipments. In particular, the EURATOM Council Directives provide minimum criteria of acceptance for parameters that characterised the correct working of the radiological equipments and the guide lines for standardised execution of X-ray images, in order to obtain high quality information. In addiction, for maintaining such level it is necessary to adopt adequate programs of Quality Assurance. Naturally, the high quality of radiological images must be conserved after the transmission of information. So, in order to evaluate the amount of losses that can be introduced after transferring the X-ray images from source to user, the authors have carried out specific procedures in order to evaluate the quality level of the images after transmission and to compare them with the correspondent ones acquired at the equipment console. To this aim, the AAs have identified all the parameters able to verify the quality level of the images and measured the values obtained for the directly acquired images and the transferred ones. They have also considered different kinds of transmission protocols to define suitable procedures of remote quality controls. (authors)

  11. Radiation protection of patients and quality controls in teleradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermiglio, G.; Testagrossa, B.; Sansotta, C.; Tripepi, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays, it is well-known that tele-radiology represents the new frontier of radiodiagnostic imaging. In this case, the continuous broadening of transmission bands and the more sophisticated procedures of information packaging constitute a no negligible inducement. Moreover, standards used to convert analogical signals into the digital ones, necessary to transfer via ether radiological images and information, involve a more limited loss of information. Nevertheless, unlike the common images, in case of the X-ray diagnostic images it must take into account that the EURATOM Council Directives give the health physicist all the procedures to be followed for checking the status of X-ray equipments. In particular, the EURATOM Council Directives provide minimum criteria of acceptance for parameters that characterised the correct working of the radiological equipments and the guide lines for standardised execution of X-ray images, in order to obtain high quality information. In addiction, for maintaining such level it is necessary to adopt adequate programs of Quality Assurance. Naturally, the high quality of radiological images must be conserved after the transmission of information. So, in order to evaluate the amount of losses that can be introduced after transferring the X-ray images from source to user, the authors have carried out specific procedures in order to evaluate the quality level of the images after transmission and to compare them with the correspondent ones acquired at the equipment console. To this aim, the AAs have identified all the parameters able to verify the quality level of the images and measured the values obtained for the directly acquired images and the transferred ones. They have also considered different kinds of transmission protocols to define suitable procedures of remote quality controls. (authors)

  12. Microfabrication of high quality polytetrafluoroethylene films by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, A.; Matsumoto, E.; Yamada, H.; Okada, H.; Wakahara, A.

    2003-01-01

    We deposited polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) thin films both from the PTFE target by using synchrotron radiation (SR) beam and from PTFE emulsion by spin-coat process. The X-ray diffraction analyses showed a sharp peak due to (1 0 0) PTFE crystalline part, and only C-F 2 bonding was found in Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer spectra. From electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis measurements, no impurities were found. The fabricated PTFE films were easily etched by SR beam on the limited area of the surface on a microscale through a suitably patterned mask

  13. Quality control in radiotherapy treatment: Radiation induced myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Vicioso, E.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.

    2001-01-01

    Direct injury of the spinal cord has been reported many times, particularly in cases of overexposures with radiotherapy of neoplasm that occurred outside the Central Nervous System. Permanent damage to the spinal cord is the most feared complication of radiation therapy treatments and one of the relatively common causes of litigation for medical malpractice in the context of cancer treatment. We have learned from clinical experience, data from randomized trials and animal experimentation, the dose tolerance as well as the interfraction interval for hyperfractionation regimes. We are still lacking precious clinical information, in particular the dose tolerance in combined modality treatments that represent the vast majority of modern treatments. (author)

  14. Accounting for radiation quality in heavy ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellerer, A.M.; Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung, Muenchen

    1997-01-01

    This introductory contribution outlines the need for models and their use in radiotherapy dose planning. The linear-quadratic dose relation is now predominantly used in therapy dose planning. In Section I it is linked to the earlier quantitative scheme for conventional radiotherapy. In Section II two major approaches are presented in a form that makes them comparable; the section can be read by itself, if this comparison alone is of interest. Models for therapy planning are tools, largely of empirical character; they do not need to elucidate unknown mechanisms of radiation action. The emphasis is, therefore, on the computational scheme, not on its interpretation. (orig.)

  15. Accounting for radiation quality in heavy ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellerer, A M [LMU, Muenchen (Germany). Radiobiological Inst.; [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Nuklearbiologie

    1997-09-01

    This introductory contribution outlines the need for models and their use in radiotherapy dose planning. The linear-quadratic dose relation is now predominantly used in therapy dose planning. In Section I it is linked to the earlier quantitative scheme for conventional radiotherapy. In Section II two major approaches are presented in a form that makes them comparable; the section can be read by itself, if this comparison alone is of interest. Models for therapy planning are tools, largely of empirical character; they do not need to elucidate unknown mechanisms of radiation action. The emphasis is, therefore, on the computational scheme, not on its interpretation. (orig.)

  16. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2014-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 4 février de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org. * * * * * Carte de membre de l'Association du personnel du CERN Les membres GAC-EPA qui souhaitent recevoir une carte de membre AP en 2014 doivent  en faire la demande par email à secretariat@gac-epa.org, ou par lettre au secrétaire ...

  17. Improvement of bacteriological quality of frozen chicken by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouchpramool, K.; Prachasitthisak, Y.; Charoen, S.; Kanarat, S.; Kanignunta, K.; Tangwongsupang, S.

    1986-12-01

    The possible use of gamma irradiation at doses of 1.6 to 4.0 kGy to improve bacteriological quality of frozen chicken was investigated. The effects of gamma irradiation on salmonella viability in frozen chicken and on sensory quality of frozen chicken were also evaluated. D 10 -values for different isolated strains of salmonella in frozen chicken varied from 0.41 to 0.57 kGy. A dose of 4 kGy is required for a seven log cycle reduction of salmonella contamination in frozen chicken. Approximately 21 per cent of frozen chicken examined were contaminated with salmonella. Salmonella typhimurium, salmonella virchow, and salmonella java were predominant. Irradiation of frozen chicken at a minimum dose of 3.2 kGy eliminated salmonella, coliform, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus and, in addition, reduced baterial load by 2 log cycles. Faecal streptococci was still present in a 3.2 kGy samples but in a very small percentage and the count was not over 100 colonies per g. Discoloring of chicken meat was noted after a 2 kGy treatment. The sensory quality of frozen chicken irradiated at 3 and 4 kGy tended to decrease during frozen storage but was within the acceptable range on a nine point hedonic scale even after eight months of frozen storage. Dosage at 3.2 kGy appeared to be sufficient for improving bacteriological quality of frozen chicken

  18. 76 FR 9780 - Notification of Deletion of System of Records; EPA Parking Control Office File (EPA-10) and EPA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... System of Records; EPA Parking Control Office File (EPA-10) and EPA Transit and Guaranteed Ride Home... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is deleting the systems of records for EPA Parking Control Office File... through the EPA Internet under the ``Federal Register'' listings at http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/ . Dated...

  19. Effect of Radiation Processing on Protein Quality of Certain Legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Niely, H.F.G

    2007-01-01

    The Effects of irradiation (dose levels of 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy) on nutritive characteristics of peas (Pisum satinum L), cow peas (Vigna unguiculata L.Walp), lentils (Lens culinaris Med), kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L), and chickpeas (Cicer arietinurn L) were examined. Analyses included proximate composition, levels of anti-nutrients (phytic acid, tannins), available lysine (AL), in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD), and protein efficiency ratio (PER) in the growing rat. The results showed that moisture, crude protein, crude fat, crude fiber, and ash were unchanged by the irradiation. Radiation processing significantly (p<0.05) reduced the levels of phytic acid (PA), tannins (TN), and available lysine (AE). IVPD and PER were significantly enhanced in a dose-dependent manner, relative to unirradiated control samples, for all legumes. The data sets for each legume exhibited high correlation coefficients between radiation dose and PA, TN, AE, IVPD, and PER. These results demonstrate the benefits of irradiation on the nutritional properties of these legumes

  20. Intercellular Communication of Tumor Cells and Immune Cells after Exposure to Different Ionizing Radiation Qualities

    OpenAIRE

    Diegeler, Sebastian; Hellweg, Christine E.

    2017-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can affect the immune system in many ways. Depending on the situation, the whole body or parts of the body can be acutely or chronically exposed to different radiation qualities. In tumor radiotherapy, a fractionated exposure of the tumor (and surrounding tissues) is applied to kill the tumor cells. Currently, mostly photons, and also electrons, neutrons, protons, and heavier particles such as carbon ions, are used in radiotherapy. Tumor elimination can be supported by an e...

  1. Quality keeping and upgrading technique on delivery of raw fodder and so forth by using radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Ryoei; Tanaka Osamu; Uegaki, Ryuichi; Ando, Sada; Akiyama, Fumiaki; Yamada, Akio

    1999-01-01

    This study aimed at examining chemical and microbiological changes of feed raw materials caused by γ-ray radiation and obtaining some fundamental informations for development of new preparation and storage technique using radiation. In previous results, it could be estimated that the γ-ray radiation showed an effect to protect quality decrease of the silage. In particular, a product with good chemical compositions and sheep fondness and excellent quality on blended silage with pasture and beer cake could be obtained. In 1997 fiscal year, on bean curd refuse with fast putrefaction, a relationship between time length from production to closed sealing for blended silage and quality after preparation was examined. (G.K.)

  2. Dosimetric systems developed in Brazil for the radiation processes quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galante, Ana Maria Sisti; Campos, Leticia Lucente

    2011-01-01

    In order to apply new technologies to the industrial processing of materials aiming economy, efficiency, speed and high quality, ionizing radiation has been used in medicine, archaeology, chemistry, food preservation and other areas. For this reason, the dosimetry area looks for improve current dosimeters and develop new materials for application on quality control of these processes. In Brazil, the research in the dosimetry area occurs with great speed providing many different dosimetric systems. The chemical dosimetry is the most used technique in routine dosimetry, which requires fast and accurate responses. This technique involves determination of absorbed dose by measuring chemical changes radiation induced in the materials. Different dosimetric systems were developed at IPEN for application on radiation process quality and all of them present excellent results; the low cost of these materials allows a more effective dose control, therefore, a larger area or volume can be monitored. (author).

  3. Response of TLD-100"T"M microtubes to two RQR3 quality radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, M.G.; Villani, D.; Almeida, S.B.; Vivolo, V.; Yoriyaz, H.; Louis, G.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    The present work compares the response of TLD-100"T"M microcubes to two RQR 3 diagnostic radiology reference quality radiation beams, defined by IEC-61267 norm, aiming to evaluate the detectability of TLD-100"T"M energy dependence reported in literature within the same reference quality radiation range. TLD-100"T"M microcubes reproducibility is assessed through the response of a second set of TLD-100"T"M microcubes, evaluated in a second thermoluminescence reader, to the RQR 3 diagnostic radiology reference quality radiation beam implemented at the Laboratorio de Calibracao de Instrumentos of IPEN, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. The dependence of TLD-100"T"M microcubes TL response was not detectable in these conditions and the reproducibility of the measurements is 90,2%. (author)

  4. USDA-EPA Collaborative Ammonia Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2014, a work group was formed between USDA and EPA to facilitate information exchange on ammonia emissions from agriculture, air quality impacts and emission mitigation options and to identify opportunities for collaboration. This document provides background on the work grou...

  5. Comments on EPA's LLW preproposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littleton, B.K.; Weinstock, L.

    1995-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently developing standards for the management, storage, and disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW). The Atomic Energy Act delegated EPA, among other provisions, the authority to establish generally applicable standards for the disposal of radioactive waste to ensure that the public and the environment are adequately protected from potential radiation impacts. As an initial effort to open communications on a standard for LLW, the Agency developed a preproposal draft (Preproposal Draft of 40 CFR Part 193 - 30 Nov 94) and circulated it to interested parties for review and comment. The extended comment period ended April 12, 1995. A summary of the comments received and analyzed to date follows. After all comments have been analyzed, the rule will undergo an Agency clearance process and be sent to the Office of Management and Budget for review. After that review, the formal process of publication of the proposed rule in the Federal Register and the formal public comment period will begin

  6. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2015-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 3 mars de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 7 avril, 5 mai, 2 juin, 1er septembre, 6 octobre, 3 novembre et 1er décembre 2013. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  7. GAC-EPA

    CERN Document Server

    GAC-EPA

    2013-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 1er octobre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 5 novembre et 3 décembre 2013. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  8. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 5 avril de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 3 mai, 7 juin, 6 septembre, 4 octobre, 1er et 29 novembre décembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  9. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : le mardi 29 novembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  10. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : le mardi 1er novembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel. La permanence suivante aura lieu le mardi 29 novembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  11. GAC-EPA

    CERN Document Server

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 3 mai de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 7 juin, 6 septembre, 4 octobre, 1er et 29 novembre décembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  12. GAC-EPA

    CERN Document Server

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 5 avril de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 3 mai, 7 juin, 6 septembre, 4 octobre, 1er et 29 novembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  13. GAC-EPA

    CERN Document Server

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 4 octobre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 1er et 29 novembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  14. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2015-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 1er décembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  15. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 2 février de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 1er mars, 5 avril, 3 mai, 7 juin, 6 septembre, 4 octobre, 1er et 29 novembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  16. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 1er mars de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 5 avril, 3 mai, 7 juin, 6 septembre, 4 octobre, 1er et 29 novembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  17. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2015-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 3 novembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel La permanence suivante aura lieu le mardi 1er décembre 2015. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  18. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2013-01-01

    Carte de membre de l'Association du personnel du CERN Comme cela a été précisé dans le bulletin d'automne n° 43, les membres GAC-EPA qui souhaitent recevoir une carte de membre AP en 2013 devront en faire la demande, avant le 31 janvier, par email à secretariat@gac-epa.org, ou par lettre au secrétaire du GAC-EPA, p/a Association du personnel CERN, CH-1211 GENEVE 23. Il n'y a pas de tacite reconduction de ces cartes et par conséquent une demande doit être faite chaque année par l'intéressé(e).

  19. Quality assurance study for dosimetry of Radiation Therapy equipment in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mokhlef, Jazi M.; Nabaz, Noori

    2003-01-01

    International standards address the accuracy of dose delivery for radiation therapy machines as well as quality assurance and staffing levels for radiation therapy centers. We performed absolute calibrations of gamma ,X-ray and electron radiotherapy beams in all radiation therapy centers in Saudi Arabia. We also assessed quality assurance and staffing levels Dosimetric measurements were made with a portable dosimetry system, which consisted of a calibrated Farmer ionization chamber and an electrometer, small water phantom, barometer and thermometer. Differences between the measured and the expected output (c Gy/MU or c Gy/min) were found to be in the range of -11%+5%. About 17% of radiotherapy beams were not within the acceptable tolerance level (+/-3%). Quality assurance in some radiation centers was poor and staffing levels were inadequate. We found poor compliance with internationally accepted tolerance levels for dose calibration of radiotherapy beams at radiation therapy centers in Saudi Arabia. Analysis of medical physics staffing revealed severe discrepancies from those recommended by international guidelines .We recommend that radiation therapy centers be adequately staffed with qualified medical physics personnel and that periodic audit programs be required a governmental body. (author)

  20. Establishment of an X radiation equipment quality control programme using non invasive meters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucena, Rodrigo Ferreira de

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the behavior of the mainly X ray equipment calibration laboratory of IPEN, operated in the range from 25 kV to 150 kV using a PTW non invasive meter, model Diavolt TM , and an ORTEC spectrometry system, model NOMAD-PLUS 92X, for the establishment of a quality control programme. The Diavolt meter was used for measurements of air kerma, peak voltage and practical peak voltage. The measurements were made varying parameters such as electrical current, X radiation quality for radiation diagnostic, angulations of the meter and its distance in relation to the focal spot of the X ray tube. The results were compared with data found in the literature. Several spectra were generated with the spectrometer system with the purpose of determine the peak voltage in function of the nominal voltage and to characterize the radiation qualities for radiation diagnostic previously determined. The established quality control programme enables the management of the appropriate functioning of the measurement instruments (ionization chambers, voltage and current meter and spectrometer) as well as of the X radiation system. This work also has proposed a time interval to run each one of the tests. (author)

  1. Ionizing radiation treatment to improve postharvest life and maintain quality of fresh guava fruit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.P.; Pal, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the potential of ionizing radiation for improving physiological responses, quality, and storage time of fresh guava fruit. Ionizing radiation treatment suppressed the respiration and ethylene production rates and thus retarded the process of fruit ripening during storage. Irradiation treatment also retarded the physical and biochemical changes associated with ripening such as firmness, titratable acidity, soluble solids content, and vitamin C during storage, but for doses higher than 0.25 kGy the vitamin C content decreased. The positive effects of ionizing radiation treatment on delayed fruit ripening and other quality attributes diminished during 22 days of storage at 10 deg. C. Thus, a combination of ionizing radiation with low-temperature storage (10 deg. C) did not have much synergistic effect on storage life and quality of guava fruit. In conclusion, ionizing radiation treatment of guava fruit with 0.25 kGy dose increased the postharvest life by 3-4 days, maintained fruit quality, and reduced the decay incidence. The optimal dose (0.25 kGy) for postharvest life extension of guava fruit may be exploited to provide phytosanitary security against many insect pests including fruit flies

  2. Radiation exposure and image quality in x-Ray diagnostic radiology physical principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aichinger, Horst; Joite-Barfuß, Sigrid; Säbel, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    The largest contribution to radiation exposure to the population as a whole arises from diagnostic X-rays. Protecting the patient from radiation is a major aim of modern health policy, and an understanding of the relationship between radiation dose and image quality is of pivotal importance in optimising medical diagnostic radiology. In this volume the data provided for exploring these concerns are partly based on X-ray spectra, measured on diagnostic X-ray tube assemblies, and are supplemented by the results of measurements on phantoms and simulation calculations.

  3. "Assessing the methodological quality of systematic reviews in radiation oncology: A systematic review".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Haroon; Muhammed, Taaha; Yu, Jennifer; Taguchi, Kelsi; Samargandi, Osama A; Howard, A Fuchsia; Lo, Andrea C; Olson, Robert; Goddard, Karen

    2017-10-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the methodological quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in Radiation Oncology. A systematic literature search was conducted for all eligible systematic reviews and meta-analyses in Radiation Oncology from 1966 to 2015. Methodological characteristics were abstracted from all works that satisfied the inclusion criteria and quality was assessed using the critical appraisal tool, AMSTAR. Regression analyses were performed to determine factors associated with a higher score of quality. Following exclusion based on a priori criteria, 410 studies (157 systematic reviews and 253 meta-analyses) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses were found to be of fair to good quality while systematic reviews were found to be of less than fair quality. Factors associated with higher scores of quality in the multivariable analysis were including primary studies consisting of randomized control trials, performing a meta-analysis, and applying a recommended guideline related to establishing a systematic review protocol and/or reporting. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses may introduce a high risk of bias if applied to inform decision-making based on AMSTAR. We recommend that decision-makers in Radiation Oncology scrutinize the methodological quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses prior to assessing their utility to inform evidence-based medicine and researchers adhere to methodological standards outlined in validated guidelines when embarking on a systematic review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Psychology and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jong Chul; Chung, Woong Ki [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    The object of this study is to investigate sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, psychology, self-esteem and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy and to provide useful information for therapeutic approach to cancer patients on radiation therapy. The subjects were 36 patients who had been treated with radiation therapy and 20 normal people. Sociodemographic information and clinical characteristics of cancer patients on radiation therapy were investigated, and symptom checklist-90-revised, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale for self esteem, World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Instrument for quality of life were administered to subjects. And Spearman's correlation analysis was used among these. The tendency of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility in cancer group were significantly higher than normal group. Self esteem and quality of life in cancer group were significantly lower than normal group. No significant difference was found in comparison of psychology, self esteem and quality of life according to sociodemographic variables. Among clinical characteristics, in the presence of metastasis in cancer patients, the scores of anxiety, phobia and paranoid ideation were higher. In patients with pain, the score of somatization was higher. And in case of weight loss, the score of somatization was higher. The higher score of depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower self-esteem. And higher score of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower quality of life. Understanding and management of psychological symptoms, such as somatization, depression, anxiety, and hostility, and pain control are necessary to improve quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy.

  5. Psychology and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jong Chul; Chung, Woong Ki

    2004-01-01

    The object of this study is to investigate sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, psychology, self-esteem and quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy and to provide useful information for therapeutic approach to cancer patients on radiation therapy. The subjects were 36 patients who had been treated with radiation therapy and 20 normal people. Sociodemographic information and clinical characteristics of cancer patients on radiation therapy were investigated, and symptom checklist-90-revised, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale for self esteem, World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Instrument for quality of life were administered to subjects. And Spearman's correlation analysis was used among these. The tendency of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility in cancer group were significantly higher than normal group. Self esteem and quality of life in cancer group were significantly lower than normal group. No significant difference was found in comparison of psychology, self esteem and quality of life according to sociodemographic variables. Among clinical characteristics, in the presence of metastasis in cancer patients, the scores of anxiety, phobia and paranoid ideation were higher. In patients with pain, the score of somatization was higher. And in case of weight loss, the score of somatization was higher. The higher score of depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower self-esteem. And higher score of somatization, depression, anxiety and hostility were significantly associated with lower quality of life. Understanding and management of psychological symptoms, such as somatization, depression, anxiety, and hostility, and pain control are necessary to improve quality of life in cancer patients on radiation therapy

  6. TH-E-19A-01: Quality and Safety in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, E [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Ezzell, G [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Miller, B [Henry Ford Health System, Clinton Township, MI (United States); Yorke, E [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Clinical radiotherapy data clearly demonstrate the link between the quality and safety of radiation treatments and the outcome for patients. The medical physicist plays an essential role in this process. To ensure the highest quality treatments, the medical physicist must understand and employ modern quality improvement techniques. This extends well beyond the duties traditionally associated with prescriptive QA measures. This session will review the current best practices for improving quality and safety in radiation therapy. General elements of quality management will be reviewed including: what makes a good quality management structure, the use of prospective risk analysis such as FMEA, and the use of incident learning. All of these practices are recommended in society-level documents and are incorporated into the new Practice Accreditation program developed by ASTRO. To be effective, however, these techniques must be practical in a resource-limited environment. This session will therefore focus on practical tools such as the newly-released radiation oncology incident learning system, RO-ILS, supported by AAPM and ASTRO. With these general constructs in mind, a case study will be presented of quality management in an SBRT service. An example FMEA risk assessment will be presented along with incident learning examples including root cause analysis. As the physicist's role as “quality officer” continues to evolve it will be essential to understand and employ the most effective techniques for quality improvement. This session will provide a concrete overview of the fundamentals in quality and safety. Learning Objectives: Recognize the essential elements of a good quality management system in radiotherapy. Understand the value of incident learning and the AAPM/ASTRO ROILS incident learning system. Appreciate failure mode and effects analysis as a risk assessment tool and its use in resource-limited environments. Understand the fundamental principles of good

  7. TH-E-19A-01: Quality and Safety in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, E; Ezzell, G; Miller, B; Yorke, E

    2014-01-01

    Clinical radiotherapy data clearly demonstrate the link between the quality and safety of radiation treatments and the outcome for patients. The medical physicist plays an essential role in this process. To ensure the highest quality treatments, the medical physicist must understand and employ modern quality improvement techniques. This extends well beyond the duties traditionally associated with prescriptive QA measures. This session will review the current best practices for improving quality and safety in radiation therapy. General elements of quality management will be reviewed including: what makes a good quality management structure, the use of prospective risk analysis such as FMEA, and the use of incident learning. All of these practices are recommended in society-level documents and are incorporated into the new Practice Accreditation program developed by ASTRO. To be effective, however, these techniques must be practical in a resource-limited environment. This session will therefore focus on practical tools such as the newly-released radiation oncology incident learning system, RO-ILS, supported by AAPM and ASTRO. With these general constructs in mind, a case study will be presented of quality management in an SBRT service. An example FMEA risk assessment will be presented along with incident learning examples including root cause analysis. As the physicist's role as “quality officer” continues to evolve it will be essential to understand and employ the most effective techniques for quality improvement. This session will provide a concrete overview of the fundamentals in quality and safety. Learning Objectives: Recognize the essential elements of a good quality management system in radiotherapy. Understand the value of incident learning and the AAPM/ASTRO ROILS incident learning system. Appreciate failure mode and effects analysis as a risk assessment tool and its use in resource-limited environments. Understand the fundamental principles of good

  8. Gamma radiation influence on internal quality factors of eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pombo, Carolina R.; Mano, Sergio B.

    2005-01-01

    Poultry egg is a fundamental item in the human diet due to its high nutritional value. Its treatment by irradiation in order to eliminate pathogenic bacteria has been authorized in the USA in 2000 limited to a dose of 3 kGy in contrast to the requirements of the Brazilian legislation that does not establish quantitative dose limits. However research on the sensory properties of irradiated eggs is still scarce in the literature. In this work, possible changes in the internal quality factors of eggs were investigated. The samples were irradiated with doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 kGy at an average dose rate of 1.7 kGy/h in the research Cesium-137 irradiation facility at the Technological Center of the Army (CTEx) situated in Guaratiba, Rio de Janeiro (RJ). A total of 300 eggs sorted in 6 lots, one for each dose, were kept at room temperature being periodically inspected up to 20 days. The samples were analyzed for the following indicators of the internal quality of the eggs: Haugh unity, air chamber, yolk index, pH of the white and pH of the yolk. The results indicated that irradiation damages the structure of the white of the eggs reducing its consistency in addition to changing other parameters related to their internal quality. Therefore, it has been concluded that irradiation is not appropriate for the treatment of whole eggs in the conditions studied in this work. (author)

  9. Digital imaging in diagnostic radiology. Image quality - radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.; Stieve, F.E.

    1996-01-01

    The publication contains the 37 lectures of the symposium on digital imaging in diagnostic radiology, held in November 1995 at Kloster Seeon, as well as contributions enhancing the information presented in the lectures. The publication reflects the state of the art in this subject field, discusses future trends and gives recommendations and information relating to current practice in radiology. In-depth information is given about R and D activities for the digitalisation of X-ray pictures and the image quality required to meet the purposes of modern diagnostics. Further aspects encompass radiological protection and dose optimization as well as optimization of examination methods. (vhe) [de

  10. Workshop on measurement quality assurance for ionizing radiation: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, J.A.; Swinth, K.L. [comps.

    1993-12-31

    This workshop was held to review the status of secondary level calibration accreditation programs, review related measurement accreditation programs, document lessons learned, and to present changes in programs due to new national priorities involving radioactivity measurements. Contents include: fundamentals of measurement quality assurance (MQA), standards for MQA programs; perspectives and policies; complete MQA programs; future MQA programs; QA/QC programs--radioactivity; QA/QC programs--dosimetry; laboratory procedures for QA/QC; in-house control of reference dosimetry laboratories; in-house controls of radioactivity laboratories; and poster session. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Workshop on measurement quality assurance for ionizing radiation: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, J.A.; Swinth, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This workshop was held to review the status of secondary level calibration accreditation programs, review related measurement accreditation programs, document lessons learned, and to present changes in programs due to new national priorities involving radioactivity measurements. Contents include: fundamentals of measurement quality assurance (MQA), standards for MQA programs; perspectives and policies; complete MQA programs; future MQA programs; QA/QC programs--radioactivity; QA/QC programs--dosimetry; laboratory procedures for QA/QC; in-house control of reference dosimetry laboratories; in-house controls of radioactivity laboratories; and poster session. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  12. Quality keeping and upgrading technique on delivery of raw fodder and so forth by using radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Ryoei; Tanaka, Osamu; Uegaki, Ryuichi; Ando, Sada; Akiyama, Fumiaki; Yamada, Akio [National Grassland Research Inst., Nishinasuno, Tochigi (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    As most of aerobic bacteria, anaerobic spore bacteria, molds and yeasts died owing to 8 to 16 kGy of {gamma}-ray irradiation, it was found that butyric acid fermentation and aerobic putrefaction in silage did not form. As the lactobacilli bringing good fermentation quality died as well at such radiation dose, on a case of a mixed silage using the dregs, in which lactic acid was present, quality of its fermentation was good. And, many informations on changes in fatty quality and yeast activity in the silage formed by irradiation could also be obtained. As the dregs had a large difference in physical and chemical components, quality after preparation of the silage was not uniform. Materials suitable for {gamma}-ray irradiation and radiation dose suitable for each material was found to be clarified. (G.K.)

  13. Quality keeping and upgrading technique on delivery of raw fodder and so forth by using radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Ryoei; Tanaka, Osamu; Uegaki, Ryuichi; Ando, Sada; Akiyama, Fumiaki; Yamada, Akio

    1998-01-01

    As most of aerobic bacteria, anaerobic spore bacteria, molds and yeasts died owing to 8 to 16 kGy of γ-ray irradiation, it was found that butyric acid fermentation and aerobic putrefaction in silage did not form. As the lactobacilli bringing good fermentation quality died as well at such radiation dose, on a case of a mixed silage using the dregs, in which lactic acid was present, quality of its fermentation was good. And, many informations on changes in fatty quality and yeast activity in the silage formed by irradiation could also be obtained. As the dregs had a large difference in physical and chemical components, quality after preparation of the silage was not uniform. Materials suitable for γ-ray irradiation and radiation dose suitable for each material was found to be clarified. (G.K.)

  14. Calibrations and evaluation of the quality assurance during 1999 at the National Laboratory for ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindborg, Jan-Erik; Israelsson, Karl-Erik; Kylloenen, Jan-Erik; Samuelson, Goeran

    2000-06-01

    The Swedish Radiation Protection Institute is the National Laboratory for the dosimetric quantities kerma, absorbed dose and dose equivalent. The activity is based on established calibration procedures and a quality assurance program for the used standards. This report gives a brief summary of the calibrations performed during 1999 and a more detailed description and analysis of the quality assurance during this year. The report makes it easier to draw conclusions about the long-term stability and possible malfunctions

  15. EPA Web Training Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheduled webinars can help you better manage EPA web content. Class topics include Drupal basics, creating different types of pages in the WebCMS such as document pages and forms, using Google Analytics, and best practices for metadata and accessibility.

  16. EPA's Green Roof Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a presentation on the basics of green roof technology. The presentation highlights some of the recent ORD research projects on green roofs and provices insight for the end user as to the benefits for green roof technology. It provides links to currently available EPA re...

  17. Application of the ROC method to assessment of image quality issues in mammography. Part 2. Comparative evaluation of image quality and radiation dose to thick body sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.; Saebel, M.

    2000-01-01

    For the experimental comparative assessment reported, the following radiation qualities were compared for radiation dose applied and image quality: molydenum anode, 30mum molybdenum filter, X-ray tube potential differences of 26-32 kV; molybdenum anode, 25 mum rhodium filter, X-ray tube potential differences of 26-32 kV; tungsten anode, 50 mum rhodium filter, X-ray tube potential differences of 26-32 kV. The results show that in the differentiated assessment according to the various radiation qualities, significant deviations in imaging quality of the different detail types are possible. (orig./CB) [de

  18. Late rectal symptoms and quality of life after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, Hans; Zimmermann, Frank B.; Thamm, Reinhard; Erber, Caroline; Mueller, Tobias; Keller, Monika; Busch, Raymonde; Molls, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study was carried out in order to analyze the prevalence of late rectal and anal symptoms after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer and to assess their association with quality of life. Patients and methods: Two-hundred and forty nine patients were interviewed at 24-111 months after definitive conformal radiation therapy of localized prostate cancer with a median dose of 70 Gy. Rectal symptoms and fecal incontinence were evaluated with standardized questionnaires. Quality of life was assessed with the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30 and the prostate cancer module PR25. Results: Rectal symptoms were mostly intermittent. Daily symptoms occurred in ≤5% of the patients. Incontinence was mostly mild with only 3% of the patients reporting daily incontinence episodes. Quality of life was comparable to that of the male German general population except that cognitive functioning and diarrhea were worse in the study population and pain was worse in the reference population. Global quality of life was associated with fecal incontinence, fecal urge, tenesmus, therapy for rectal symptoms and hormonal therapy for biochemical/clinical recurrence. Conclusions: Rectal symptoms and fecal incontinence after conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer are mostly intermittent. Fecal incontinence, fecal urge and tenesmus are associated with lower global quality of life levels

  19. Quality control and quality assurance in individual monitoring of ionising radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, J.C.; Lindborg, L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the programmes and approaches that are to be considered in developing and introducing quality assurance and quality control procedures in individual monitoring services. Quality assurance and quality control in individual monitoring services are essential to maintain quality and are of increasing importance in order to meet the requirements of national regulations and international standards and guidelines. It is recommended here that all organisations offering individual monitoring services should run their services based on the principles of Quality System as given in the European Standard EN45001 and maintain a property resources QA/QC programme as an integral part of their operations. All aspects of QA/QC in individual monitoring services starting from the initial selection, installation, calibration, and operation to the final products including dose reporting, dose record keeping, dealing with customers' complaints and product liability issues have been discussed. (Author)

  20. EPA Communications Stylebook: Writing Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the most part, EPA follows the Associated Press (AP) Stylebook. Other requirements of basic punctuation and grammar and usage in EPA writing modify, supplement, or in some cases reiterate AP style.

  1. EPA Alternative Dispute Resolution Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    The success of EPA's ADR efforts depends on a network of talented and experienced professionals in Headquarters offices and EPA Regions. For Agency-wide ADR information, please contact the Conflict Prevention and Resolution Center.

  2. Medical and physical problems of mammography. 2. Studies on optimum quality of radiation and on radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barke, R; Geissler, S; Rosenkranz, G [Medizinische Akademie, Dresden (German Democratic Republic). Radiologische Klinik

    1980-02-01

    Problems concerning the implications of the radiation energy in relation to the image contrast and the radiation exposure are discussed, and measurements of the energy distribution are described. The effects of the voltage and of the filter on the energy distribution were determined, with and without a molybdenum filter, in the voltage range of 25 - 50 kV. The form of the spectral energy distribution depends but slightly on the output voltage. On the other side, the radiation exposure can be expressed as a function of the radiographic kilovoltage. The effects of the quantum energy and of the scattered radiation on the contrast and the optimal energy were studied on a model. With regard to the importance of the detection of microcalcifications, the effects of the scattered radiation on the contrast behaviour of details of varying size were investigated. The direct proportionality of the contrast to the detail size is lost under the influence of the scattered radiation. For this reason, minimal kV values are required for imaging very small details. Studies on the imaging geometry of the DG 40 mammographical device permit to conclude that the necessary resolving power (..gamma.. = 5 mm/sup -1/) is reached with the TF 13 and XR 10 films. On the basis of the relevant literature, the present views on radiation exposure and especially on cancer induction by mammography are discussed. To estimate the risk, the radiation exposure must be determined in the own system. By means of thermoluminescent dosimetry in patients, using LiF and CaSO/sub 4/, the surface dose, the exit dose and the sternal exposure, adding the XR 10 and the TF 13 to the DG 40 (the mean values at 30 kV were 49 and 34 ..mu..Gy, respectively) were determined. An increase in voltage leads to a reduction of the dose, but impairs the quality of the image. The values obtained are compared with data from the literature. Conclusions are drawn as to the use of mammography in practice.

  3. EPA Biofuels Research: Biofuel Vapor Generation and Monitoring Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interest in renewable fuels and alternative energy sources has stimulated development of alternatives to traditional petroleum-based fuels. The EPA's Office of Transportation Air Quality (OTAQ) requires information regarding the potential health hazards ofthese fuels regardin...

  4. Paediatric x-ray radiation dose reduction and image quality analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L; Ruddlesden, R; Makepeace, C; Robinson, L; Mistry, T; Starritt, H

    2013-09-01

    Collaboration of multiple staff groups has resulted in significant reduction in the risk of radiation-induced cancer from radiographic x-ray exposure during childhood. In this study at an acute NHS hospital trust, a preliminary audit identified initial exposure factors. These were compared with European and UK guidance, leading to the introduction of new factors that were in compliance with European guidance on x-ray tube potentials. Image quality was assessed using standard anatomical criteria scoring, and visual grading characteristics analysis assessed the impact on image quality of changes in exposure factors. This analysis determined the acceptability of gradual radiation dose reduction below the European and UK guidance levels. Chest and pelvis exposures were optimised, achieving dose reduction for each age group, with 7%-55% decrease in critical organ dose. Clinicians confirmed diagnostic image quality throughout the iterative process. Analysis of images acquired with preliminary and final exposure factors indicated an average visual grading analysis result of 0.5, demonstrating equivalent image quality. The optimisation process and final radiation doses are reported for Carestream computed radiography to aid other hospitals in minimising radiation risks to children.

  5. Paediatric x-ray radiation dose reduction and image quality analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L; Ruddlesden, R; Mistry, T; Starritt, H; Makepeace, C; Robinson, L

    2013-01-01

    Collaboration of multiple staff groups has resulted in significant reduction in the risk of radiation-induced cancer from radiographic x-ray exposure during childhood. In this study at an acute NHS hospital trust, a preliminary audit identified initial exposure factors. These were compared with European and UK guidance, leading to the introduction of new factors that were in compliance with European guidance on x-ray tube potentials. Image quality was assessed using standard anatomical criteria scoring, and visual grading characteristics analysis assessed the impact on image quality of changes in exposure factors. This analysis determined the acceptability of gradual radiation dose reduction below the European and UK guidance levels. Chest and pelvis exposures were optimised, achieving dose reduction for each age group, with 7%–55% decrease in critical organ dose. Clinicians confirmed diagnostic image quality throughout the iterative process. Analysis of images acquired with preliminary and final exposure factors indicated an average visual grading analysis result of 0.5, demonstrating equivalent image quality. The optimisation process and final radiation doses are reported for Carestream computed radiography to aid other hospitals in minimising radiation risks to children. (paper)

  6. Improving CT quality with optimized image parameters for radiation treatment planning and delivery guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Pei Chen

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: CT image quality can be improved with the IQE protocols created in this study, to provide better soft tissue contrast, which would be beneficial for use in radiation therapy, e.g., for planning data acquisition or for IGRT for hypo-fractionated treatments.

  7. Quality in radiotherapy: the actions of the French society for radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeron, J.J.; Mornex, F.; Eschwege, F.; Lartigau, E.

    2009-01-01

    In response to recent accidents at external radiotherapy units, the t Minister of Health has set up an extensive programme to improve the quality and safety of this type of treatment. We give an account here of the activities carried out by the French Society of Radiation Oncology (SFRO) as part of this programme, commonly referred to as the 'road-map'. (authors)

  8. Quality of Life in Relation to Pain Response to Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westhoff, Paulien G.; De Graeff, Alexander; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Pomp, Jacqueline; Van Vulpen, Marco; Leer, Jan Willem H; Marijnen, Corrie A M; Van Der Linden, Yvette M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study quality of life (QoL) in responders and nonresponders after radiation therapy for painful bone metastases; and to identify factors predictive for a pain response. Patients and Methods: The prospectively collected data of 956 patients with breast, prostate, and lung cancer within

  9. Effect of enhanced UV-B radiation on yield and quality of rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Hong; Guo Wei; Mao Xiaoyan

    2009-01-01

    The effects of enhanced UV-B radiation on yield and quality of two rice cuhivars(ShenNong 6014 and ShenNong 265) are studied in potted method. There were three treatments including natural light (TCK), enhanced 5% UV-B radiation (T) and enhanced 10% (T). The results showed that enhanced UV-B radiation decreases yield components, the percentage of brown rice (0.66%-7.06%), head rice rate (5.65%-18.88%), the rate of white rice (22.17%-40.16%), grain area (2.61%-6.25%), fatty acid contents (1.23%-54.19%) and eating quality (1.07%-16.78%) but increasea protein content (4.65%-10.71%) and amylose content of rice (0.56%-4.81%). The effects of T2 was stronger than T1

  10. Development of a Quality and Safety Competency Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residency: An International Delphi Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adleman, Jenna; Gillan, Caitlin; Caissie, Amanda; Davis, Carol-Anne; Liszewski, Brian; McNiven, Andrea; Giuliani, Meredith

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an entry-to-practice quality and safety competency profile for radiation oncology residency. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive list of potential quality and safety competency items was generated from public and professional resources and interprofessional focus groups. Redundant or out-of-scope items were eliminated through investigator consensus. Remaining items were subjected to an international 2-round modified Delphi process involving experts in radiation oncology, radiation therapy, and medical physics. During Round 1, each item was scored independently on a 9-point Likert scale indicating appropriateness for inclusion in the competency profile. Items indistinctly ranked for inclusion or exclusion were re-evaluated through web conference discussion and reranked in Round 2. Results: An initial 1211 items were compiled from 32 international sources and distilled to 105 unique potential quality and safety competency items. Fifteen of the 50 invited experts participated in round 1: 10 radiation oncologists, 4 radiation therapists, and 1 medical physicist from 13 centers in 5 countries. Round 1 rankings resulted in 80 items included, 1 item excluded, and 24 items indeterminate. Two areas emerged more prominently within the latter group: change management and human factors. Web conference with 5 participants resulted in 9 of these 24 items edited for content or clarity. In Round 2, 12 participants rescored all indeterminate items resulting in 10 items ranked for inclusion. The final 90 enabling competency items were organized into thematic groups consisting of 18 key competencies under headings adapted from Deming's System of Profound Knowledge. Conclusions: This quality and safety competency profile may inform minimum training standards for radiation oncology residency programs.

  11. Development of a Quality and Safety Competency Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residency: An International Delphi Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adleman, Jenna [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gillan, Caitlin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Caissie, Amanda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, New Brunswick (Canada); Davis, Carol-Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Liszewski, Brian [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); McNiven, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Giuliani, Meredith, E-mail: Meredith.Giuliani@rmp.uhn.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an entry-to-practice quality and safety competency profile for radiation oncology residency. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive list of potential quality and safety competency items was generated from public and professional resources and interprofessional focus groups. Redundant or out-of-scope items were eliminated through investigator consensus. Remaining items were subjected to an international 2-round modified Delphi process involving experts in radiation oncology, radiation therapy, and medical physics. During Round 1, each item was scored independently on a 9-point Likert scale indicating appropriateness for inclusion in the competency profile. Items indistinctly ranked for inclusion or exclusion were re-evaluated through web conference discussion and reranked in Round 2. Results: An initial 1211 items were compiled from 32 international sources and distilled to 105 unique potential quality and safety competency items. Fifteen of the 50 invited experts participated in round 1: 10 radiation oncologists, 4 radiation therapists, and 1 medical physicist from 13 centers in 5 countries. Round 1 rankings resulted in 80 items included, 1 item excluded, and 24 items indeterminate. Two areas emerged more prominently within the latter group: change management and human factors. Web conference with 5 participants resulted in 9 of these 24 items edited for content or clarity. In Round 2, 12 participants rescored all indeterminate items resulting in 10 items ranked for inclusion. The final 90 enabling competency items were organized into thematic groups consisting of 18 key competencies under headings adapted from Deming's System of Profound Knowledge. Conclusions: This quality and safety competency profile may inform minimum training standards for radiation oncology residency programs.

  12. Quality assurance procedure for assessing mechanical accuracy of a radiation field center in stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, Daisaku; Ienaga, Akinori; Nakada, Ryosei; Yomoda, Akane; Inoue, Makoto; Ichida, Takao; Hosono, Masako

    2012-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy requires a quality assurance (QA) program that ensures the mechanical accuracy of a radiation field center. We have proposed a QA method for achieving the above requirement by conducting the Winston Lutz test using an electronic portal image device (EPID). An action limit was defined as three times the standard deviation. Then, the action limits for mean deviations of the radiation field center during collimator rotation, gantry rotation, and couch rotation in clockwise and counterclockwise resulted in 0.11 mm, 0.52 mm, 0.37 mm, and 0.41 mm respectively. Two years after the QA program was launched, the mean deviation of the radiation field center during gantry rotation exceeded the above action limit. Consequently, a mechanical adjustment for the gantry was performed, thereby restoring the accuracy of the radiation field center. A field center shift of 0.5 mm was also observed after a micro multi-leaf collimator was unmounted. (author)

  13. The role of nuclear factor κB in the cellular response to different radiation qualities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Kristina

    2013-04-11

    Radiation is currently one of the most important limiting factors for manned space flight. During such missions, there is a constant exposure to low doses of galactic cosmic radiation and in particular high-energy heavy ions. Together this is associated with an increased cancer risk which currently cannot be sufficiently reduced by shielding. As such, cellular radiation response needs to be further studied in order to improve risk estimation and develop appropriate countermeasures. It has been shown that exposure of human cells to accelerated heavy ions, in fluences that can be reached during long-term missions, leads to activation of the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. Heavy ions with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 90 to 300 keV/μm were most effective in activating NF-κB. NF-κB as an important modulating factor in the cellular radiation response could improve cellular survival after heavy ion exposure, thereby influencing the cancer risk of astronauts. The NF-κB pathway may be a potential pharmacological target in the mitigation of radiation response during space missions; such as the prevention of massive cell death after high dose irradiation (acute effects), in addition to neoplastic cell transformation during chronic low-dose exposure (late effects). The aim of this work was to examine the role of NF-κB in the cellular response to space-relevant radiation. Firstly, NF-κB activation in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK) after exposure to different radiation qualities and quantities was investigated. Key elements of different NF-κB sub-pathways were chemically inhibited to analyze their role in NF-κB activation induced by low and high LET ionizing radiation. Finally a cell line, stably transfected with a plasmid coding for a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) for a knockdown of the NF-κB subunit RelA, was established to assess the role of RelA in the cellular response to space-relevant radiation. The knockdown was verified on several levels and the cell

  14. The role of nuclear factor κB in the cellular response to different radiation qualities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Radiation is currently one of the most important limiting factors for manned space flight. During such missions, there is a constant exposure to low doses of galactic cosmic radiation and in particular high-energy heavy ions. Together this is associated with an increased cancer risk which currently cannot be sufficiently reduced by shielding. As such, cellular radiation response needs to be further studied in order to improve risk estimation and develop appropriate countermeasures. It has been shown that exposure of human cells to accelerated heavy ions, in fluences that can be reached during long-term missions, leads to activation of the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. Heavy ions with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 90 to 300 keV/μm were most effective in activating NF-κB. NF-κB as an important modulating factor in the cellular radiation response could improve cellular survival after heavy ion exposure, thereby influencing the cancer risk of astronauts. The NF-κB pathway may be a potential pharmacological target in the mitigation of radiation response during space missions; such as the prevention of massive cell death after high dose irradiation (acute effects), in addition to neoplastic cell transformation during chronic low-dose exposure (late effects). The aim of this work was to examine the role of NF-κB in the cellular response to space-relevant radiation. Firstly, NF-κB activation in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK) after exposure to different radiation qualities and quantities was investigated. Key elements of different NF-κB sub-pathways were chemically inhibited to analyze their role in NF-κB activation induced by low and high LET ionizing radiation. Finally a cell line, stably transfected with a plasmid coding for a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) for a knockdown of the NF-κB subunit RelA, was established to assess the role of RelA in the cellular response to space-relevant radiation. The knockdown was verified on several levels and the cell

  15. Comprehensive audits of radiotherapy practices: A tool for quality improvement: Quality Assurance Team for Radiation Oncology (QUATRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-10-01

    As part of a comprehensive approach to quality assurance (QA) in the treatment of cancer by radiation, an independent external audit (peer review) is important to ensure adequate quality of practice and delivery of treatment. Quality audits can be of various types and at various levels, either reviewing critical parts of the radiotherapy process (partial audits) or assessing the whole process (comprehensive audits). The IAEA has a long history of providing assistance for dosimetry (partial) audits in radiotherapy to its Member States. Together with the World Health Organization (WHO), it has operated postal audit programmes using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) to verify the calibration of radiotherapy beams since 1969. Furthermore, it has developed a set of procedures for experts undertaking missions to radiotherapy hospitals in Member States for on-site review of dosimetry equipment, data and techniques, measurements and training of local staff. This methodology involves dosimetry and medical radiation physics aspects of the radiotherapy process without entering into clinical areas. The IAEA, through its technical cooperation programme, has received numerous requests from developing countries to perform comprehensive audits of radiotherapy programmes to assess the whole process. including aspects such as organization, infrastructure, and clinical and medical physics components. The objective of a comprehensive clinical audit is to review and evaluate thc quality of all of the components of the practice of radiotherapy at an institution, including its professional competence, with a view to quality improvement. A multidisciplinary team, comprising a radiation oncologist, a medical physicist and a radiotherapy technologist, carries out the audit. The present publication has been field tested by IAEA teams performing audits in radiotherapy programmes in hospitals in Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America. Their comments, corrections and feedback have been taken

  16. Comprehensive audits of radiotherapy practices: A tool for quality improvement: Quality Assurance Team for Radiation Oncology (QUATRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    As part of a comprehensive approach to quality assurance (QA) in the treatment of cancer by radiation, an independent external audit (peer review) is important to ensure adequate quality of practice and delivery of treatment. Quality audits can be of various types and at various levels, either reviewing critical parts of the radiotherapy process (partial audits) or assessing the whole process (comprehensive audits). The IAEA has a long history of providing assistance for dosimetry (partial) audits in radiotherapy to its Member States. Together with the World Health Organization (WHO), it has operated postal audit programmes using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) to verify the calibration of radiotherapy beams since 1969. Furthermore, it has developed a set of procedures for experts undertaking missions to radiotherapy hospitals in Member States for on-site review of dosimetry equipment, data and techniques, measurements and training of local staff. This methodology involves dosimetry and medical radiation physics aspects of the radiotherapy process without entering into clinical areas. The IAEA, through its technical cooperation programme, has received numerous requests from developing countries to perform comprehensive audits of radiotherapy programmes to assess the whole process. including aspects such as organization, infrastructure, and clinical and medical physics components. The objective of a comprehensive clinical audit is to review and evaluate thc quality of all of the components of the practice of radiotherapy at an institution, including its professional competence, with a view to quality improvement. A multidisciplinary team, comprising a radiation oncologist, a medical physicist and a radiotherapy technologist, carries out the audit. The present publication has been field tested by IAEA teams performing audits in radiotherapy programmes in hospitals in Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America. Their comments, corrections and feedback have been taken

  17. Effect of radiation treatment on protein quality and vitamin content of animal feeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggum, B.O.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of autoclaving and irradiation on the protein quality and vitamin content of various nutrients of laboratory animal diets. The protein quality and its amino acid composition was not significantly affected by a radiation dose as high as 7.0 Mrad, whereas the protein quality of autoclaved diet (102 0 C for 5 minutes) was significantly affected. Vitamin B 1 , B 0 and α-tocopherol appeared to be affected by irradiation, whereas autoclaving reduced the levels of vitamins A, B 1 and E. (author)

  18. Existing condition assessment of radiation environment quality in dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jiaang; Li Fusheng; Chen Yingmin; Zhu Jianguo; Lu Feng; Song Gang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the radiactivity levels of Jinan dwellings and the indoor environment quality. Methods: Using the self made Measurement Cups of Indoor Environmental Radioactivity Evaluation (MCIERE) (ZL 200620082698.7) to measure the gamma ray dose rate, 222 Rn activity concentration, 220 Rn activity concentration and EECTn. Results: The geometric mean of 222 Rn activity concentrations that showed a clear lognoxmal distribution tendency in 411 rooms of Jinan was 45 Bq ·m -3 , the range which was from 18 to 203 Bq·m -3 . The geometric mean of 220 Rn activity concentration that was also nearly lognormal distribution in 203 rooms of Jinan was 16 Bq·m -3 and the range of the activity coneentratons was from 1 to 167 Bq· m -3 . The geometric mean of EECT, that was nearly lognormal distribution in 204 rooms of Jinan was 1.082 Bq ·m -3 , the range was from 0.015 to 10.230 Bq·m -3 . The arithmetic mean of the gamma ray dose rate that was nearly Gaussian distribution in 412 rooms of Jinan was 0.106 μSv·h -1 , the concentration range from 0.041 to 0.167 μSv·h -1 . Conclusion: The internal irradiation annual effective dose caused by 222 Rn and its progeny, 220 Rn and its progeny and of Jinan inhabitant was 1.189 mSv, the external irradiation annual effective close caused by the gamma ray from the ground and buildings was 0.743 mSv. The mean total annual effective dose was 2.187 mSv and the highest annual effective dose level was above 5 mSv. (authors)

  19. Quality assurance of the dose delivered by small radiation segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Vebeke N.; Evans, Philip M.; Budgell, Geoffrey J.; Mott, Judith H.L.; Williams, Peter C.; Brugmans, Marco J.P.; Wittkaemper, Frits W.; Mijnheer, Ben J.; Brown, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    The use of intensity modulation with multiple static fields has been suggested by many authors as a way to achieve highly conformal fields in radiotherapy. However, quality assurance of linear accelerators is generally done only for beam segments of 100 MU or higher, and by measuring beam profiles once the beam has stabilized. We propose a set of measurements to check the stability of dose delivery in small segments, and present measured data from three radiotherapy centres. The dose delivered per monitor unit, MU, was measured for various numbers of MU segments. The field flatness and symmetry were measured using either photographic films that are subsequently scanned by a densitometer, or by using a diode array. We performed the set of measurements at the three radiotherapy centres on a set of five different Philips SL accelerators with energies of 6 MV, 8 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV. The dose per monitor unit over the range of 1 to 100 MU was found to be accurate to within ±5% of the nominal dose per monitor unit as defined for the delivery of 100 MU for all the energies. For four out of the five accelerators the dose per monitor unit over the same range was even found to be accurate to within ±2%. The flatness and symmetry were in some cases found to be larger for small segments by a maximum of 9% of the flatness/symmetry for large segments. The result of this study provides the dosimetric evidence that the delivery of small segment doses as top-up fields for beam intensity modulation is feasible. However, it should be stressed that linear accelerators have different characteristics for the delivery of small segments, hence this type of measurement should be performed for each machine before the delivery of small dose segments is approved. In some cases it may be advisable to use a low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) to obtain more accurate dose delivery of small segments. (author)

  20. The quality of radiation care: the results of focus group interviews and concept mapping to explore the patient's perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, J.L.; Sixma, H.; Triest, B. van; Keus, R.B.; Hendriks, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: In this study, we explore the quality aspects of radiation care from the patient’s perspective in order to develop a draft Consumer Quality Index (CQI) Radiation Care instrument. Materials and methods: Four focus group discussions with (former) cancer patients were held to

  1. Quality assurance in military medical research and medical radiation accident management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, Mark E; Meineke, Viktor

    2012-08-01

    The provision of quality radiation-related medical diagnostic and therapeutic treatments cannot occur without the presence of robust quality assurance and standardization programs. Medical laboratory services are essential in patient treatment and must be able to meet the needs of all patients and the clinical personnel responsible for the medical care of these patients. Clinical personnel involved in patient care must embody the quality assurance process in daily work to ensure program sustainability. In conformance with the German Federal Government's concept for modern departmental research, the international standard ISO 9001, one of the relevant standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), is applied in quality assurance in military medical research. By its holistic approach, this internationally accepted standard provides an excellent basis for establishing a modern quality management system in line with international standards. Furthermore, this standard can serve as a sound basis for the further development of an already established quality management system when additional standards shall apply, as for instance in reference laboratories or medical laboratories. Besides quality assurance, a military medical facility must manage additional risk events in the context of early recognition/detection of health risks of military personnel on deployment in order to be able to take appropriate preventive and protective measures; for instance, with medical radiation accident management. The international standard ISO 31000:2009 can serve as a guideline for establishing risk management. Clear organizational structures and defined work processes are required when individual laboratory units seek accreditation according to specific laboratory standards. Furthermore, international efforts to develop health laboratory standards must be reinforced that support sustainable quality assurance, as in the exchange and comparison of test results within

  2. Regulatory decision with EPA/NRC/DOE/State Session (Panel)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Donnell, E.

    1995-12-31

    This panel will cover the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) proposed radiation limits in the Branch Technical Position on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Performance Assessment and the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) draft regulation in Part 193. Representatives from NRC and EPA will discuss the inconsistencies in these two regulations. DOE and state representatives will discuss their perspective on how these regulations will affect low-level radioactive waste performance assessments.

  3. Development of quality assurance programme for prescribed ionizing radiation source testing. Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document gives guidance to those applying for licence to perform ionizing radiation source acceptance tests and long-term stability tests and provides information which should be known when introducing quality assurance systems in compliance with legislative requirements. It is envisaged that this document ('Recommendations') will form a basis for final Safety Guides to be issued by the State Office for Nuclear Safety, the Czech nuclear regulatory authority. The setup of the publication is as follows. Part I gives a glossary of basic terms in quality systems. Part 2 explains quality system principles, paying special attention to radiation safety issues, and describes the structure and scope of quality system documentation. Part 3 explains the individual elements of the quality system and gives practical examples. Part 4 deals with the quality assurance programme; using instructions and practical examples, this part shows how the quality system elements should be applied to long-time stability testing and acceptance testing. A model structure of 2nd degree documentation (guidelines) and a model testing protocol are given in annexes. (P.A.)

  4. Optimisation of radiation dose and image quality in mobile neonatal chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojos-Armendáriz, V I; Mejía-Rosales, S J; Franco-Cabrera, M C

    2018-05-01

    To optimise the radiation dose and image quality for chest radiography in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) by increasing the mean beam energy. Two techniques for the acquisition of NICU AP chest X-ray images were compared for image quality and radiation dose. 73 images were acquired using a standard technique (56 kV, 3.2 mAs and no additional filtration) and 90 images with a new technique (62 kV, 2 mAs and 2 mm Al filtration). The entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was measured using a phantom and compared between the techniques and against established diagnostic reference levels (DRL). Images were evaluated using seven image quality criteria independently by three radiologists. Images quality and radiation dose were compared statistically between the standard and new techniques. The maximum ESAK for the new technique was 40.20 μGy, 43.7% of the ESAK of the standard technique. Statistical evaluation demonstrated no significant differences in image quality between the two acquisition techniques. Based on the techniques and acquisition factors investigated within this study, it is possible to lower the radiation dose without any significant effects on image quality by adding filtration (2 mm Al) and increasing the tube potential. Such steps are relatively simple to undertake and as such, other departments should consider testing and implementing this dose reduction strategy within clinical practice where appropriate. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2016-01-01

    Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 1er novembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel La permanence suivante aura lieu le mardi 29 novembre 2016. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/ Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php  

  6. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 31 octobre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel La permanence suivante aura lieu le mardi 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/ Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  7. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 29 août de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/ Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php  

  8. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 28 novembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/ Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  9. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 30 mai de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/ Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  10. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 26 septembre de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 31 octobre et 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/ Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  11. Characterization of radiation qualities used for the determination of characteristic in CT application according to IEC 61267:2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Daniel M.; Silva Junior, Iremar A. da; Potiens, Maria da Penha A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the standard RQT radiation qualities which represent simulations of the unattenuated beam used in Computed Tomography (CT). Thus, to avoiding excessive efforts for establishing a radiation quality by means of the spectral distribution of the photon fluence, the characterization of these standard radiation qualities was expressed in terms of the X-ray tube voltage, first and second half-value layer (HVL). To establishing the standard radiation beam, according to the IEC 61267 and the TRS 457 was measured first of all the correct values of the X ray tube voltages in terms of Practical Peak Voltage. The standard radiation qualities RQT were produced using the same set up mounted for the RQR qualities which had been early established, and for simulating the patient in order to achieve the standard RQT series, suitable thicknesses of layers of copper were used to obtain the values of the first HVL according to IEC 61267. (author)

  12. EORTC radiation proctitis-specific quality of life module - Pretesting in four European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halkett, Georgia; Aoun, Samar; Hayne, Dickon; Lund, Jo-Asmund; Gruen, Arne; Villa, Julie; Livi, Lorenzo; Arcangeli, Stefano; Velikova, Galina; Spry, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radiation proctitis is a side effect which can occur after pelvic radiation therapy. Currently available questionnaires do not comprehensively assess the range of problems, nor impact on quality of life associated with proctitis. This article reports on the cultural testing phase of an EORTC module (QLQ-PRT21) developed to assess radiation proctitis specific issues and designed to be used in conjunction with the EORTC core quality of life questionnaire (QLQ-C30). Methods: The previously developed 21-item module, pre-tested in Australia, was translated into Norwegian, German, French and Italian. Patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and module questionnaires towards the end of their radical pelvic radiation treatment to target acute side effects. Patients experiencing chronic proctitis were also surveyed. Patients also participated in structured interviews to determine issues of comprehensibility, coverage and relevance. Results were compared with Australian data. Results: Questionnaires were completed by 64 European patients. The module was found to be relevant and culturally acceptable to participants. Feedback has led to minor translation modifications and the inclusion of two additional questions. Conclusion: This module is ready for Phase IV testing which will consist of large scale field testing with the aim to perform psychometric analysis and finalise a module that will be suitable in the assessment of radiation induced proctitis.

  13. Liquid holding recovery kinetics in yeast cells with regard to radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Byoung Hun; Petin, Vladislav G.

    2004-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the RBE of ionizing radiation with a high linear energy transfer (LET) is dependent both on the increased probability of primary damage production (physical events) and the reduced ability of a cell for post-irradiation recovery (biological events). A relatively unexpected role of the specific repair pathways in the RBE of high-LET radiation was demonstrated for bacterial, yeast and mammalian cells. It seems to exist a common agreement that high-LET radiations produce more portion of damage that are considered to be irreversible compared with low-LET radiation such as photons. Cellular recovery and repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) could be also dependent upon radiation quality. Studies concerning the rate of the recovery and repair from radiation damage produced with low- and high-LET radiations in cells of various origins on the survival and macromolecular level have also revealed that in general at a high ionization density, these processes may be reduced or even absent. When irradiated yeast cells are held in a liquid non-nutrient media at 30 .deg. C before planting on to a growth medium, their survival increases. This phenomena is known as liquid holding recovery (LHR). A quantitative approach describing the LHR kinetics of the yeast cells was described, which enables the estimation of the probability of the recovery per unit time and the fraction of the irreversible damage. The main goals of this study were (i) to answer the question whether or not high-LET radiation affects the recovery process itself or if it only produces a higher level of severe irreversible damage that cannot be repaired at all; (ii) to elucidate the role of irreversible damage and the probability of recovery in some rad mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, the liquid-holing recovery will serve as an indicator of the cellular repair activity

  14. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 31 janvier de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 28 février, 28 mars, 25 avril, 30 mai, 29 août, 26 septembre, 31 octobre et 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. e-mail : gac-epa@gac-epa.org.

  15. Radiation safety requirements for radioactive waste management in the framework of a quality management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, M.M.; Benitez, J.C.; Pernas, R.; Gonzalez, N.

    2007-01-01

    The Center for Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) is the institution responsible for the management of radioactive wastes generated from nuclear applications in medicine, industry and research in Cuba. Radioactive Waste Management Service is provided at a national level and it includes the collection and transportation of radioactive wastes to the Centralized Waste Management Facilities, where they are characterized, segregated, treated, conditioned and stored. A Quality Management System, according to the ISO 9001 Standard has been implemented for the RWM Service at CPHR. The Management System includes the radiation safety requirements established for RWM in national regulations and in the Licence's conditions. The role of the Regulatory Body and the Radiation Protection Officer in the Quality Management System, the authorization of practices, training and personal qualification, record keeping, inspections of the Regulatory Body and internal inspection of the Radiation Protection Officer, among other aspects, are described in this paper. The Quality Management System has shown to be an efficient tool to demonstrate that adequate measures are in place to ensure the safety in radioactive waste management activities and their continual improvement. (authors)

  16. Discrimination of radiation quality through second harmonic out-of-phase cw-ESR detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Longo, Anna; Brai, Maria; Barbon, Antonio; Brustolon, Marina

    2014-02-01

    The ability to discriminate the quality of ionizing radiation is important because the biological effects produced in tissue strongly depends on both absorbed dose and linear energy transfer (LET) of ionizing particles. Here we present an experimental electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis aimed at discriminating the effective LETs of various radiation beams (e.g., 19.3 MeV protons, (60)Co photons and thermal neutrons). The measurement of the intensities of the continuous wave spectrometer signal channel first harmonic in-phase and the second harmonic out-of-phase components are used to distinguish the radiation quality. A computational analysis, was carried out to evaluate the dependence of the first harmonic in-phase and second harmonic out-of-phase components on microwave power, modulation amplitude and relaxation times, and highlights that these components could be used to point out differences in the relaxation times. On the basis of this numerical analysis the experimental results are discussed. The methodology described in this study has the potential to provide information on radiation quality.

  17. Set up and operation for medical radiation exposure quality control system of health promotion center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Su; Kim, Jung Min; Jung, Hae Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, standard model of medical radiation dosage quality control system will be suggested and the useful of this system in clinical field will be reviewed. Radiation dosage information of modalities are gathered from digital imaging and communications in medicine(DICOM) standard data(such as DICOM dose SR and DICOM header) and stored in database. One CT scan, two digital radiography modalities and two mammography modalities in one health promotion center in Seoul are used to derive clinical data for one month. After 1 months research with 703 CT scans, the study shows CT 357.9 mGy·cm in abdomen and pelvic CT, 572.4 mGy·cm in brain without CT, 55.9 mGy·cm in calcium score/heart CT, screening CT at 54 mGy·cm in chest screening CT(low dose screening CT scan), 284.99 mGy·cm in C-spine CT and 341.85 mGy·cm in L-spine CT as health promotion center reference level of each exam. And with 1955 digital radiography cases, it shows 274.0 mGy·cm"2 and for mammography 6.09 mGy is shown based on 536 cases. The use of medical radiation shall comply with the principles of justification and optimization. This quality management of medical radiation exposure must be performed in order to follow the principle. And the procedure to reduce the radiation exposure of patients and staff can be achieved through this. The results of this study can be applied as a useful tool to perform the quality control of medical radiation exposure

  18. Set up and operation for medical radiation exposure quality control system of health promotion center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Su; Kim, Jung Min [Korea University,Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hae Kyoung [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    In this study, standard model of medical radiation dosage quality control system will be suggested and the useful of this system in clinical field will be reviewed. Radiation dosage information of modalities are gathered from digital imaging and communications in medicine(DICOM) standard data(such as DICOM dose SR and DICOM header) and stored in database. One CT scan, two digital radiography modalities and two mammography modalities in one health promotion center in Seoul are used to derive clinical data for one month. After 1 months research with 703 CT scans, the study shows CT 357.9 mGy·cm in abdomen and pelvic CT, 572.4 mGy·cm in brain without CT, 55.9 mGy·cm in calcium score/heart CT, screening CT at 54 mGy·cm in chest screening CT(low dose screening CT scan), 284.99 mGy·cm in C-spine CT and 341.85 mGy·cm in L-spine CT as health promotion center reference level of each exam. And with 1955 digital radiography cases, it shows 274.0 mGy·cm{sup 2} and for mammography 6.09 mGy is shown based on 536 cases. The use of medical radiation shall comply with the principles of justification and optimization. This quality management of medical radiation exposure must be performed in order to follow the principle. And the procedure to reduce the radiation exposure of patients and staff can be achieved through this. The results of this study can be applied as a useful tool to perform the quality control of medical radiation exposure.

  19. Methods and Sources of Data Used to Develop Selected Water-Quality Indicators for Streams and Ground Water for EPA's 2007 Report on the Environment: Science Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nancy T.; Wilson, John T.; Moran, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was one of numerous governmental agencies, private organizations, and the academic community that provided data and interpretations for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s (USEPA) 2007 Report on the Environment: Science Report. This report documents the sources of data and methods used to develop selected water?quality indicators for the 2007 edition of the report compiled by USEPA. Stream and ground?water?quality data collected nationally in a consistent manner as part of the USGS?s National Water?Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) were provided for several water?quality indicators, including Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Streams in Agricultural Watersheds; Pesticides in Streams in Agricultural Watersheds; and Nitrate and Pesticides in Shallow Ground Water in Agricultural Watersheds. In addition, the USGS provided nitrate (nitrate plus nitrite) and phosphorus riverine load estimates calculated from water?quality and streamflow data collected as part of its National Stream Water Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) and its Federal?State Cooperative Program for the Nitrogen and Phosphorus Discharge from Large Rivers indicator.

  20. Assesment of longwave radiation effects on air quality modelling in street canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucasse, L.; Buchan, A.; Pain, C.

    2016-12-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics is widely used as a predictive tool to evaluate people's exposure to pollutants in urban street canyons. However, in low-wind conditions, flow and pollutant dispersion in the canyons are driven by thermal effects and may be affected by longwave (infrared) radiation due to the absorption and emission of water vapor contained in the air. These effects are mostly ignored in the literature dedicated to air quality modelling at this scale. This study aims at quantifying the uncertainties due to neglecting thermal radiation in air quality models. The Large-Eddy-Simulation of air flow in a single 2D canyon with a heat source on the ground is considered for Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers in the range of [10e8-10e10] and [5.10e3-5.10e4] respectively. The dispersion of a tracer is monitored once the statistically steady regime is reached. Incoming radiation is computed for a mid-latitude summer atmosphere and canyon surfaces are assumed to be black. Water vapour is the only radiating molecule considered and a global model is used to treat the spectral dependancy of its absorption coefficient. Flow and radiation fields are solved in a coupled way using the finite element solvers Fluidity and Fetch which have the capability of adapting their space and angular resolution according to an estimate of the solution error. Results show significant effects of thermal radiation on flow patterns and tracer dispersion. When radiation is taken into account, the air is heated far from the heat source leading to a stronger natural convection flow. The tracer is then dispersed faster out of the canyon potentially decreasing people's exposure to pollution within the street canyon.

  1. Intercellular Communication of Tumor Cells and Immune Cells after Exposure to Different Ionizing Radiation Qualities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Diegeler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation can affect the immune system in many ways. Depending on the situation, the whole body or parts of the body can be acutely or chronically exposed to different radiation qualities. In tumor radiotherapy, a fractionated exposure of the tumor (and surrounding tissues is applied to kill the tumor cells. Currently, mostly photons, and also electrons, neutrons, protons, and heavier particles such as carbon ions, are used in radiotherapy. Tumor elimination can be supported by an effective immune response. In recent years, much progress has been achieved in the understanding of basic interactions between the irradiated tumor and the immune system. Here, direct and indirect effects of radiation on immune cells have to be considered. Lymphocytes for example are known to be highly radiosensitive. One important factor in indirect interactions is the radiation-induced bystander effect which can be initiated in unexposed cells by expression of cytokines of the irradiated cells and by direct exchange of molecules via gap junctions. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the indirect effects observed after exposure to different radiation qualities. The different immune cell populations important for the tumor immune response are natural killer cells, dendritic cells, and CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. In vitro and in vivo studies have revealed the modulation of their functions due to ionizing radiation exposure of tumor cells. After radiation exposure, cytokines are produced by exposed tumor and immune cells and a modulated expression profile has also been observed in bystander immune cells. Release of damage-associated molecular patterns by irradiated tumor cells is another factor in immune activation. In conclusion, both immune-activating and -suppressing effects can occur. Enhancing or inhibiting these effects, respectively, could contribute to modified tumor cell killing after radiotherapy.

  2. Intercellular Communication of Tumor Cells and Immune Cells after Exposure to Different Ionizing Radiation Qualities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegeler, Sebastian; Hellweg, Christine E

    2017-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can affect the immune system in many ways. Depending on the situation, the whole body or parts of the body can be acutely or chronically exposed to different radiation qualities. In tumor radiotherapy, a fractionated exposure of the tumor (and surrounding tissues) is applied to kill the tumor cells. Currently, mostly photons, and also electrons, neutrons, protons, and heavier particles such as carbon ions, are used in radiotherapy. Tumor elimination can be supported by an effective immune response. In recent years, much progress has been achieved in the understanding of basic interactions between the irradiated tumor and the immune system. Here, direct and indirect effects of radiation on immune cells have to be considered. Lymphocytes for example are known to be highly radiosensitive. One important factor in indirect interactions is the radiation-induced bystander effect which can be initiated in unexposed cells by expression of cytokines of the irradiated cells and by direct exchange of molecules via gap junctions. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the indirect effects observed after exposure to different radiation qualities. The different immune cell populations important for the tumor immune response are natural killer cells, dendritic cells, and CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. In vitro and in vivo studies have revealed the modulation of their functions due to ionizing radiation exposure of tumor cells. After radiation exposure, cytokines are produced by exposed tumor and immune cells and a modulated expression profile has also been observed in bystander immune cells. Release of damage-associated molecular patterns by irradiated tumor cells is another factor in immune activation. In conclusion, both immune-activating and -suppressing effects can occur. Enhancing or inhibiting these effects, respectively, could contribute to modified tumor cell killing after radiotherapy.

  3. Radiation applications in industry and medicine: DAE fostering availability, quality and safety of products and service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamoorthy, N.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear and radiation applications play a significant role in aiding industrial process management, food security and safety, health care practices, manufacturing and value-addition to certain materials, treating pollutants/waste, etc. Most of these applications have contributed to improving the quality of life and industrial efficiency. India is among the large-scale producers cum users of radioisotope products and radiation technology applications over the past nearly five decades, thanks to the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) and its various units pioneering the development and deployment of the above-mentioned applications in our country

  4. Penetrating radiation as a tool for quality evaluation of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, J.K.; Panakkal, J.P.; Chandrasekharan, K.N.; Subramanian, A.; Roy, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    Radiography is a universally accepted non-destructive evaluation technique for checking internal details of sealed components. Imaging nuclear fuels pose problems because of the high radiation attenuation of fuel materials. Radiography of nuclear fuels by penetrating radiations viz. X-rays, gamma rays and neutron is employed in the quality control of such fuels. This paper records the experience gathered during the inspection of nuclear fuel elements of different types fabricated at Radiometallurgy Division, B.A.R.C. and presents a comparative study of these three techniques in revealing inner details of nuclear fuels. (author)

  5. Influence of different exposure modes on image quality and radiation dose in digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jie; Wang Xia; Li Xiaokang; Liu Peifang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of different exposure modes on radiation dose and image quality in digital mammography, and to explore how to reduce patient's radiation injury by choosing proper exposure mode and exposure conditions without sacrifice image quality. Methods: A breast phantom was exposed by using automatic exposure mode (60 mAs, 28 k/V) and manual exposure modes (37.5 to 70 mAs range, 24 to 32 kV range) respectively. Same oppression thickness and pressure were set for all modes. The average glandular dose (AGD), entrance surface dose (ESD), and image quality score according to American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria were recorded for each image. Kruskal Wallis test was used to compare the image quality scores between automatic and manual modes. All statistic analyses were performed by using SPSS17.0. Results: Compared to automatic exposure mode (60 mAs, 28 k/V), the overall score of image quality of manual modes (45 to 70 mAs range, 26 to 32 kV range) had no significant difference. Both ESD and ACD decreased 26.1% and increased 15.4% when the tube loading was changed from 60 mAs to 45 mAs and 70 mAs respectively. The ESD and ACD decreased 22.6%, 28.2% and increased 47.0%, 62.7% when the tube voltage was changed from 28 kV to 26 kV and 32 kV respectively. Conclusion: When the image quality reaches to a certain level, it will not be raised by a higher photographic condition. Without sacrifice image quality, the tube loading and tube voltage can be manually decreased to reduce radiation dose. (authors)

  6. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  7. Image quality and radiation exposure in digital storage plate mammography with magnification technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, E.; Aichinger, U.; Boehner, C.; Schulz-Wendtland, R.; Bautz, W.; Saebel, M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison of image quality between digital phosphor storage plate mammography in magnification technique and a conventional film screen system regarding the special aspect of radiation exposure. Materials and Methods: Radiograms of a RMI-mammography phantom were acquired using a conventional film screen system and two digital storage plate systems. Additionally, the radiograms of one digital system were postprocessed emphasizing contrast and included in the comparison. Results: The detectability of details in storage plate mammographies with magnification technique is almost equal to that of film screen mammographies. Thereby, lower radiation exposures were necessary using the digital systems. Conclusions: Based on these results, storage plate mammography in magnification technique is used in clinical routine at our institution. The correct parameters in image postprocessing are of elementary importance for detail detectability. Future studies must show, whether the lower radiation exposure in digital radiograms of the breast, revealing much higher background noise, will allow the same detail detectability as film screen mammographies. (orig.) [de

  8. Radiation protection and quality for medical exposures. Recommendations for its promotion and coordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.; Bezares, M.; Lopez, P.

    2003-01-01

    Relevant aspects on radiological protection for medical exposures are described taking into account the Spanish and European legal frameworks. Some specific topics will still require clarification or additional actions. The called special practices: exposures of children, health screening and high doses exposures to the patients need particular attention in the quality programmes. The need for coordination at local (Autonomous Communities), national and european level is highlighted. Safety and radiological protection aspects entail additional requirements to the quality programmes at the medical installations using ionizing radiations. Appropriate staffing and infrastructure are especially critical. Priorities from several international and european programmes and working groups are quoted. A proposal for actions to foster quality aspects in the medical exposures, with emphasis in resources, training and research is made. The impact of the introduction of digital radiology in the health system during the next years will require specific quality programmes to profit the advantages of this new technology. (Author) 19 refs

  9. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-d Cultures After Particle Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Z. S.; Kidane, Y. H.; Huff, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Reducing uncertainties in current risk models requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. We are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models that provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information. We identified 45 statistically significant gene sets at 0.05 q-value cutoff, including 14 gene sets common to gamma and titanium irradiation, 19 gene sets specific to gamma irradiation, and 12 titanium-specific gene sets. Common gene sets largely align with DNA damage, cell cycle, early immune response, and inflammatory cytokine pathway activation. The top gene set enriched for the gamma- and titanium-irradiated samples involved KRAS pathway activation and genes activated in TNF-treated cells, respectively. Another difference noted for the high-LET samples was an apparent enrichment in gene sets involved in cycle cycle/mitotic control. It is

  10. SU-E-T-211: Peer Review System for Ensuring Quality of Radiation Therapy Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, R; Kapur, P; Kumar, S A; Alex, D; Ranka, S; Palta, J

    2012-06-01

    To demonstrate a Web-based electronic peer review system that has the potential to improve quality of care for radiation therapy patients. The system provides tools that allow radiation oncologists to seek peer review of target and critical structure delineation, treatment plans, and share clinical data with peers to optimize radiation therapy treatments. Peer review of radiation therapy treatment planning data prior to its initiation improves the quality of radiation therapy and clinical outcomes. Web-based access to radiation therapy treatment planning data and medical records mitigate existing geographical and temporal constraints. With internet access, the healthcare provider can access the data from any location and review it in an interactive and collaborative manner. Interoperability standard like DICOM-RT and IHE-RO compliant RT Systems have facilitated the design and implementation of PRS with Silverlight Web technology, .net Framework and SQL Server. Local DICOM-RT archive and cloud based services are deployed to facilitate remote peer reviews. To validate the PRS system, we tested the system for 100 patients with Philips Pinnacle v 9.0 and Varian Eclipse v 8.9 treatment planning system (TPS). We transmitted the DICOM RT data from the TPS to the cloud based services via the PRS local DICOM RT Archive. Various CT simulation based parameters such as orientation of CT, properties of RT structures etc. were compared between the TPS and PRS system. Data integrity of other parameters such as patient demographics (patient name, ID, attending physician etc.) and dose volume related parameters were also evaluated. Such rigorous testing allowed us to optimize the functionalities and clinical implementation of the PRS. We believe that the PRS will improve the quality and safety of a broad spectrum of radiation therapy patients treated in underserved areas while discouraging the overutilization of expensive radiation treatment modalities. This research and

  11. Radiation safety and quality assurance in diagnostic x-ray imaging 1999; Saeteilyturvallisuus ja laadunvarmistus roentgendiagnostiikassa 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servonmaa, A. [ed.

    1999-04-01

    In the European Union, the Directive 97/43/Euratom concerning the medical use of radiation brings many new tasks to radiation users. Quality assurance, patient dose measurement, staff training and clinical audit are among the most essential of these tasks. The Finnish radiation legislation has been modified to comply with the Directive. Much work is still required for practical implementation of these rules. This report deals with applications of the medical radiation Directive. Most applications are still at the planning stage, and clear guidance is lacking. However, the users have to know in time about these plans and future duties concerning them. Experience on quality assurance and clinical audit in hospitals are especially valuable in providing practical information on benefits and problems of these practices. Other radiation related topics, such as radiation risks, radioactivity in foods, and use of radiation in other European countries, are also included in the report. (orig.)

  12. Radiation dose reduction without compromise to image quality by alterations of filtration and focal spot size in cerebral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Joon; Park, Min Keun; Jung, Da Eun; Kang, Jung Han; Kim, Byung Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Different angiographic protocols may influence the radiation dose and image quality. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of filtration and focal spot size on radiation dose and image quality for diagnostic cerebral angiography using an in-vitro model and in-vivo patient groups. Radiation dose and image quality were analyzed by varying the filtration and focal spot size on digital subtraction angiography exposure protocols (1, inherent filtration + large focus; 2, inherent + small; 3, copper + large; 4, copper + small). For the in-vitro analysis, a phantom was used for comparison of radiation dose. For the in-vivo analysis, bilateral paired injections, and patient cohort groups were compared for radiation dose and image quality. Image quality analysis was performed in terms of contrast, sharpness, noise, and overall quality. In the in-vitro analysis, the mean air kerma (AK) and dose area product (DAP)/frame were significantly lower with added copper filtration (protocols 3 and 4). In the in-vivo bilateral paired injections, AK and DAP/frame were significantly lower with filtration, without significant difference in image quality. The patient cohort groups with added filtration (protocols 3 and 4) showed significant reduction of total AK and DAP/patient without compromise to the image quality. Variations in focal spot size showed no significant differences in radiation dose and image quality. Addition of filtration for angiographic exposure studies can result in significant total radiation dose reduction without loss of image quality. Focal spot size does not influence radiation dose and image quality. The routine angiographic protocol should be judiciously investigated and implemented.

  13. Quality control beam of radiation through imaging system using a flat panel (ILD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez Serrano, J. A.; Gomez Barrado, A.; Sanchez-Reyes, A.

    2013-01-01

    The daily quality checks of the accelerator include, among others, checks of the daily calibration, symmetry and uniformity of the radiation beam. Usually verification systems daily are used for this purpose, which employ arrays of detectors of solid-state or ionization chambers. This paper intends to carry out the control of quality through the irradiation of a number of fields in the portal imaging system and its subsequent analysis in software's own creation, as well as the comparison of results with the daily verification system. (Author)

  14. Radiation doses and some aspects of image quality in mammography facilities in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, B.D.P.; Poletti, J.L.

    1990-02-01

    Until recently, mammography in New Zealand was performed largely with adapted conventional x-ray machines with tungsten anode x-ray tubes. Over the last several years these have virtually all been replaced by dedicated mammography machines with molybdenum anode x-ray tubes. To assess current trends in radiation doses to patients and central aspects of image quality, some 37 mammography x-ray machines were surveyed during 1988-89. The mean glandular dose per film for 30 and 45 mm thick breast-equivalent phantoms was determined using thermoluminescent dosimetry. Imagings of simulated microcalcifications (specks) and a contrast-detail phantom were assessed. Accuracy of calibration of the x-ray machines and quality of film processing were also tested. Details of the survey results are given. Mean glandular tissue doses per cranio-caudal films were generally well within the recommended guidelines. Mammography facilities differed in their ability to delete simulated calcification specks. Mammographic equipment was found to be generally well adjusted. Speed and contrast of film processing were found to vary widely implying that this is a major cause of the variations in dose and image quality. An annex outlines a quality assurance programme for maintenance of optimal physical image quality and control of radiation doses. 55 refs., 21 tabs., 17 figs., 2 ills

  15. Optimization of radio-therapeutic treatment and the program of quality assurance in ionizing radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosca, A.; Bahnarel, I.; Coretchi, L.

    2015-01-01

    The Program of Quality Assurance (PQA) in Ionizing Radiation Therapy (IRT) addresses the most important problems of assuring the quality of IRT utilization in the treatment of patients with neoplasm. In this context, the IRT value grows considerably, hence the implementation of PQA is of great significance. The study concentrates on a detailed description of the PQA as concerns the activity involving IRT devices applied in the IRT departments (rooms) of public medical/sanitary institutions, science research institutions etc., where IRT is employed using technogenic sources and ionizing radiation generators. For the performing of the study, annual statistics reports about the activity of the IRT, and data of Cancer Registry of the Oncologic Institute of the Republic of Moldova were analyzed. The work also includes an in-depth description of the personnel categories involved in PQA, possible errors in radiotherapy, the responsibilities of the bioengineer in this program, importance of source calibration, the impact of the quality control in PQA, the role of topometric training, the interaction between the medical and technical personnel and the patient. Optimization of IRT is very important and necessary in the Republic of Moldova. PQA incontestably contributes to reducing specialist's errors in planning correct treatment, dictates the need of team work and proper delegation of the responsibilities in co-optation of other professionals, performance of duty of bioengineering, the influence of quality control of profile installations, meaning accurate topographic planning, applying several methods of work, quality assurance program assuming the major importance. (authors)

  16. SU-E-T-222: How to Define and Manage Quality Metrics in Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, A; Cooper, K; DeGregorio, N; Doyle, L; Yu, Y

    2012-06-01

    Since the 2001 IOM Report Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, the need to provide quality metrics in health care has increased. Quality metrics have yet to be defined for the field of radiation oncology. This study represents one institutes initial efforts defining and measuring quality metrics using our electronic medical record and verify system(EMR) as a primary data collection tool. This effort began by selecting meaningful quality metrics rooted in the IOM definition of quality (safe, timely, efficient, effective, equitable and patient-centered care) that were also measurable targets based on current data input and workflow. Elekta MOSAIQ 2.30.04D1 was used to generate reports on the number of Special Physics Consults(SPC) charged as a surrogate for treatment complexity, daily patient time in department(DTP) as a measure of efficiency and timeliness, and time from CT-simulation to first LINAC appointment(STL). The number of IMRT QAs delivered in the department was also analyzed to assess complexity. Although initial MOSAIQ reports were easily generated, the data needed to be assessed and adjusted for outliers. Patients with delays outside of radiation oncology such as chemotherapy or surgery were excluded from STL data. We found an average STL of six days for all CT-simulated patients and an average DTP of 52 minutes total time, with 23 minutes in the LINAC vault. Annually, 7.3% of all patient require additional physics support indicated by SPC. Utilizing our EMR, an entire year's worth of useful data characterizing our clinical experience was analyzed in less than one day. Having baseline quality metrics is necessary to improve patient care. Future plans include dissecting this data into more specific categories such as IMRT DTP, workflow timing following CT-simulation, beam-on hours, chart review outcomes, and dosimetric quality indicators. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Key Performance Indicators in the Evaluation of the Quality of Radiation Safety Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Cheryl Culver; Shaffer, Sheila; Fink-Bennett, Darlene; Winokur, Kay

    2016-08-01

    Beaumont is a multiple hospital health care system with a centralized radiation safety department. The health system operates under a broad scope Nuclear Regulatory Commission license but also maintains several other limited use NRC licenses in off-site facilities and clinics. The hospital-based program is expansive including diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine (molecular imaging), interventional radiology, a comprehensive cardiovascular program, multiple forms of radiation therapy (low dose rate brachytherapy, high dose rate brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, and gamma knife), and the Research Institute (including basic bench top, human and animal). Each year, in the annual report, data is analyzed and then tracked and trended. While any summary report will, by nature, include items such as the number of pieces of equipment, inspections performed, staff monitored and educated and other similar parameters, not all include an objective review of the quality and effectiveness of the program. Through objective numerical data Beaumont adopted seven key performance indicators. The assertion made is that key performance indicators can be used to establish benchmarks for evaluation and comparison of the effectiveness and quality of radiation safety programs. Based on over a decade of data collection, and adoption of key performance indicators, this paper demonstrates one way to establish objective benchmarking for radiation safety programs in the health care environment.

  18. Influence of ionizing radiation and storage conditions upon some quality parameters of soybeans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beczner, J.; Kiss, I.; Peredi, J.

    1983-01-01

    Soyflour produced for animal feeding in a pilot plant was occasionally contaminated to an extent exceeding the microbiological standard set for human consumption. The suitability of ionizing radiation to reduce microbiological contamination was investigated. Soybeans of different moisture content (9 and 13%) were irradiated and stored in spaces of different relative humidity (55 and 75%) at 5-15 deg C or 20-25 deg C temperature. The soybeans samples were irradiated with 1 and 5 kGy, resp. The storage experiments have shown the humidity of the storage room to be of extreme importance to the propagation of moulds. The inhibitory effect of a temperature of 5-10 deg C in itself is not sufficient, neither is the effect of the radiation dose applied during a longer storage period. It was established that the moisture content of the seeds affected strongly the quality of the extracted oil. The unfavourable effects increase at higher temperatures. The radiation doses applied in the experiments did not affect the quality of the oil. It was concluded that the microbial contamination of soybeans can be kept at the initial low value by treatment with 1 kGy radiation dose, even under unfavourable storage conditions for a period of 2 months. Thus, irradiation may be applied as a temporary solution to stabilize the microbiological state of soybeans. (author)

  19. Virtual computed tomography colonoscopy: artifacts, image quality and radiation dose load in a cadaver study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, P.; Stoehr, B.; Giacomuzzi, S.M.; Bodner, G.; Jaschke, W.; Nedden, D. zur; Klingler, A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the interdependency of spatial resolution, image reconstruction artifacts, and radiation doses in virtual CT colonoscopy by comparing various CT scanning protocols. A pig's colon with several artificial polypoid lesions was imaged after air insufflation with helical CT scanning using 1-, 3-, and 5-mm collimation, and pitch values varying from 1.0 to 3.0. Virtual endoscopic images and ''fly through'' sequences were calculated on a Sun Sparc 20 workstation (Navigator Software, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wis.). Several reconstruction artifacts as well as overall image quality were evaluated by three independent reviewers. In addition, radiation doses for the different CT protocols were measured as multiple-scan average dose using a 10-cm ion chamber and a standard Plexiglass body phantom. Generally, image quality and reconstruction artifacts were less affected by pitch values than by beam collimation. Thus, narrow beam collimation at higher pitch values (e. g. 3 mm/2.0) seems to be a reasonable compromise between quality of virtual endoscopic images and radiation dose load. (orig.)

  20. Effect of gamma radiation on microbiological quality of shrimp paste (Kapi)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prachasitthisak, Y.; Pringsulaka, V.; Charoen, S.; Bunnak, J.; Ninbodee, T.; Wongsommart, D.

    1997-06-01

    Seven brands of shrimp paste (Kapi) sold in supermarkets were investigated for microbiological quality and quantity of salt. The effect of gamma radiation at dose 1 to 6 kGy on microbiological quality and on sensory quality of shrimp paste were also evaluated. Total viable bacterial counts of surveyed samples ranged from 1.20 x 10 4 to 4.00 x 10 5 colony forming unit (cfu) per gram and no detectable number of Enterobacteriaceae, coliforms, Faecal coliforms, Escherichia coil, Salmonella, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Staphylococcus aureus was found. The most probable number (MPN) per gram of Clostridium perfringens is ranged from 9 to 240. Percentage of salt in surveyed shrimp pastes was rather high (ranged from 19.08 to 25.08). Radiation with 4 kGy resulted in 2 log cycles reduction of total viable bacterial counts and 2-4 log cycles reduction of halophilic bacteria, but no decrease in the most probable number per gram of CI. perfringens. A dose of 6 kGy gamma radiation was adequate for decreasing the MPN per gram of C. perfringens. No significant change in sensory scores for odour and flavor was observed in irradiated shrimp paste. Only in irradiated at dose of 6 kGy was the significant change in colour observed

  1. International Perspectives on Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine: Outcomes of an IAEA Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortt, Ken; Davidsson, Lena; Hendry, Jolyon; Dondi, Maurizio; Andreo, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency organized an international conference called, 'Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine' (QANTRM). It dealt with quality assurance (QA) in all aspects of radiation medicine (diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy) at the international level. Participants discussed QA issues pertaining to the implementation of new technologies and the need for education and staff training. The advantage of developing a comprehensive and harmonized approach to QA covering both the technical and the managerial issues was emphasized to ensure the optimization of benefits to patient safety and effectiveness. The necessary coupling between medical radiation imaging and radiotherapy was stressed, particularly for advanced technologies. However, the need for a more systematic approach to the adoption of advanced technologies was underscored by a report on failures in intensity-modulated radiotherapy dosimetry auditing tests in the United States, which could imply inadequate implementation of QA for these new technologies. A plenary session addressed the socioeconomic impact of introducing advanced technologies in resource-limited settings. How shall the dual gaps, one in access to basic medical services and the other in access to high-quality modern technology, be addressed?

  2. International perspectives on quality assurance and new techniques in radiation medicine: outcomes of an IAEA conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortt, Ken; Davidsson, Lena; Hendry, Jolyon; Dondi, Maurizio; Andreo, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency organized an international conference called, "Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine" (QANTRM). It dealt with quality assurance (QA) in all aspects of radiation medicine (diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy) at the international level. Participants discussed QA issues pertaining to the implementation of new technologies and the need for education and staff training. The advantage of developing a comprehensive and harmonized approach to QA covering both the technical and the managerial issues was emphasized to ensure the optimization of benefits to patient safety and effectiveness. The necessary coupling between medical radiation imaging and radiotherapy was stressed, particularly for advanced technologies. However, the need for a more systematic approach to the adoption of advanced technologies was underscored by a report on failures in intensity-modulated radiotherapy dosimetry auditing tests in the United States, which could imply inadequate implementation of QA for these new technologies. A plenary session addressed the socioeconomic impact of introducing advanced technologies in resource-limited settings. How shall the dual gaps, one in access to basic medical services and the other in access to high-quality modern technology, be addressed?

  3. US EPA Region 4 Brownfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    To improve public health and the environment, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) collects information about facilities, sites, or places subject to environmental regulation or of environmental interest. Through the Geospatial Data Download Service, the public is now able to download the EPA Geodata shapefile containing facility and site information from EPA's national program systems. The file is Internet accessible from the Envirofacts Web site (https://www3.epa.gov/enviro/). The data may be used with geospatial mapping applications. (Note: The shapefile omits facilities without latitude/longitude coordinates.) The EPA Geospatial Data contains the name, location (latitude/longitude), and EPA program information about specific facilities and sites. In addition, the file contains a Uniform Resource Locator (URL), which allows mapping applications to present an option to users to access additional EPA data resources on a specific facility or site. This dataset shows Brownfields listed in the 2012 Facility Registry System.

  4. Radiographic quality and radiation protection in general medical practice and small hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, B.D.P.; Le Heron, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation protection and image quality were assessed in a survey of 22 general medical practices (GP) and the 24 smallest hospitals with x-ray facilities. Limited radiography, usually of extremities for trauma, was being performed in these facilities since access to regular radiology services was restricted, mainly for geographic reasons. An anthropomorphic phantom foot and ankle with two simulated fractures of the lateral and medical malleoli was presented at each facility for radiography, and the resulting films assessed for radiographic technique and basic diagnostic usefulness. The x-ray equipment was adequate for the range of procedures performed. While the standard of radiographic techniques was lower than in regular x-ray departments, most films of the phantom ankle were still diagnostically useful and only four were rejected entirely. The principal deficiency in general practice x-ray was in darkrooms and x-ray film processing. Consultation in this regard with registered medical radiation technologists is recommended. Generally, the x-ray equipment and working procedures complied with the National Radiation Laboratory Code of Safe Practice for the Use of X-rays in Diagnosis (Medical). Radiation doses to the phantom ankle ranged widely for effectively the same procedure, although none was excessive. Improved x-ray film processing, and tighter x-ray beam collimation, would result in a narrower range of doses to patients. Personnel exposures to radiation were satisfactorily low and special shieldings are not required in general practice. (author). 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  5. An automated DICOM database capable of arbitrary data mining (including radiation dose indicators) for quality monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Pavlicek, William; Roberts, Catherine C; Langer, Steve G; Zhang, Muhong; Hu, Mengqi; Morin, Richard L; Schueler, Beth A; Wellnitz, Clinton V; Wu, Teresa

    2011-04-01

    The U.S. National Press has brought to full public discussion concerns regarding the use of medical radiation, specifically x-ray computed tomography (CT), in diagnosis. A need exists for developing methods whereby assurance is given that all diagnostic medical radiation use is properly prescribed, and all patients' radiation exposure is monitored. The "DICOM Index Tracker©" (DIT) transparently captures desired digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) tags from CT, nuclear imaging equipment, and other DICOM devices across an enterprise. Its initial use is recording, monitoring, and providing automatic alerts to medical professionals of excursions beyond internally determined trigger action levels of radiation. A flexible knowledge base, aware of equipment in use, enables automatic alerts to system administrators of newly identified equipment models or software versions so that DIT can be adapted to the new equipment or software. A dosimetry module accepts mammography breast organ dose, skin air kerma values from XA modalities, exposure indices from computed radiography, etc. upon receipt. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine recommended a methodology for effective dose calculations which are performed with CT units having DICOM structured dose reports. Web interface reporting is provided for accessing the database in real-time. DIT is DICOM-compliant and, thus, is standardized for international comparisons. Automatic alerts currently in use include: email, cell phone text message, and internal pager text messaging. This system extends the utility of DICOM for standardizing the capturing and computing of radiation dose as well as other quality measures.

  6. A multileaf collimator phantom for the quality assurance of radiation therapy planning systems and CT simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNiven, Andrea; Kron, Tomas; Van Dyk, Jake

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The evolution of three-dimensional conformal radiation treatment has led to the use of multileaf collimators (MLCs) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and other treatment techniques to increase the conformity of the dose distribution. A new quality assurance (QA) phantom has been designed to check the handling of MLC settings in treatment planning and delivery. Methods and materials: The phantom consists of a Perspex block with stepped edges that can be rotated in all planes. The design allows for the assessment of several MLC and micro-MLC types from various manufacturers, and is therefore applicable to most radiation therapy institutions employing MLCs. The phantom is computed tomography (CT) scanned as is a patient, and QA assessments can be made of field edge display for a variety of shapes and orientations on both radiation treatment planning systems (RTPS) and computed tomography simulators. Results: The dimensions of the phantom were verified to be physically correct within an uncertainty range of 0-0.7 mm. Errors in leaf position larger than 1 mm were easily identified by multiple observers. Conclusions: The MLC geometry phantom is a useful tool in the QA of radiation therapy with application to RTPS, CT simulators, and virtual simulation packages with MLC display capabilities

  7. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  8. Impact of Quality Assurance Rounds in a Canadian Radiation Therapy Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefresne, Shilo; Olivotto, Ivo A.; Joe, Howard; Blood, Paul A. [Radiotherapy Department, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Radiotherapy Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Olson, Robert A., E-mail: rolson2@bccancer.bc.ca [Radiotherapy Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Radiotherapy Department, BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the North, Prince George, British Columbia (Canada)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Quality assurance (QA) programs aim to identify inconsistencies that may compromise patient care. Radiation treatment planning is a well-documented source of variation in radiation oncology, leading many organizations to recommend the implementation of QA rounds in which radiation therapy plans are peer reviewed. This study evaluates the outcome of QA rounds that have been conducted by a radiation therapy department since 2004. Methods and Materials: Prospectively documented records of QA rounds, from 2004 to 2010, were obtained. During rounds, randomly selected radiation therapy plans were peer reviewed and assigned a grade of A (adequate), B (minor suggestions of change to a plan for a future patient), or C (significant change required before the next fraction). The proportion of plans that received each recommendation was calculated, and the relationship between recommendations for each plan, tumor site, and mean years of experience of the radiation oncologist (RO) were explored. Chart reviews were performed for each plan that received a C. Results: During the study period, 1247 plans were evaluated; 6% received a B and 1% received a C. The mean RO years of experience were lower for plans graded C versus those graded A (P=.02). The tumor sites with the highest proportion of plans graded B or C were gastrointestinal (14%), lung (13%), and lymphoma (8%). The most common reasons for plans to receive a grade of C were inadequate target volume coverage (36%), suboptimal dose or fractionation (27%), errors in patient setup (27%), and overtreatment of normal tissue (9%). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that QA rounds are feasible and an important element of a radiation therapy department's QA program. Through peer review, plans that deviate from a department's expected standard can be identified and corrected. Additional benefits include identifying patterns of practice that may contribute to inconsistencies in treatment planning and the

  9. Impact of Quality Assurance Rounds in a Canadian Radiation Therapy Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefresne, Shilo; Olivotto, Ivo A.; Joe, Howard; Blood, Paul A.; Olson, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Quality assurance (QA) programs aim to identify inconsistencies that may compromise patient care. Radiation treatment planning is a well-documented source of variation in radiation oncology, leading many organizations to recommend the implementation of QA rounds in which radiation therapy plans are peer reviewed. This study evaluates the outcome of QA rounds that have been conducted by a radiation therapy department since 2004. Methods and Materials: Prospectively documented records of QA rounds, from 2004 to 2010, were obtained. During rounds, randomly selected radiation therapy plans were peer reviewed and assigned a grade of A (adequate), B (minor suggestions of change to a plan for a future patient), or C (significant change required before the next fraction). The proportion of plans that received each recommendation was calculated, and the relationship between recommendations for each plan, tumor site, and mean years of experience of the radiation oncologist (RO) were explored. Chart reviews were performed for each plan that received a C. Results: During the study period, 1247 plans were evaluated; 6% received a B and 1% received a C. The mean RO years of experience were lower for plans graded C versus those graded A (P=.02). The tumor sites with the highest proportion of plans graded B or C were gastrointestinal (14%), lung (13%), and lymphoma (8%). The most common reasons for plans to receive a grade of C were inadequate target volume coverage (36%), suboptimal dose or fractionation (27%), errors in patient setup (27%), and overtreatment of normal tissue (9%). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that QA rounds are feasible and an important element of a radiation therapy department's QA program. Through peer review, plans that deviate from a department's expected standard can be identified and corrected. Additional benefits include identifying patterns of practice that may contribute to inconsistencies in treatment planning and the continuing

  10. Influence of X-ray scatter radiation on image quality in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M.J.; Di Maria, S.; Baptista, M.; Belchior, A.; Afonso, J.; Venâncio, J.; Vaz, P.

    2017-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a quasi-three-dimensional imaging technique that was developed to solve the principal limitation of mammography, namely the overlapping tissue effect. This issue in standard mammography (SM) leads to two main problems: low sensitivity (difficulty to detect lesions) and low specificity (non-negligible percentage of false positives). Although DBT is now being introduced in clinical practice the features of this technique have not yet been fully and accurately assessed. Consequently, optimization studies in terms of choosing the most suitable parameters which maximize image quality according to the known limits of breast dosimetry are currently performing. In DBT, scatter radiation can lead to a loss of contrast and to an increase of image noise by reducing the signal-to-difference-noise ratio (SDNR) of a lesion. Moreover the use of an anti-scatter grid is a concern due to the low exposure of the photon flux available per projection. For this reason the main aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the scatter radiation on image quality and the dose delivered to the breast. In particular a detailed analysis of the scatter radiation on the optimal energy that maximizes the SDNR was performed for different monochromatic energies and voltages. To reach this objective the PenEasy Monte Carlo (MC) simulation tool imbedded in the general-purpose main program PENELOPE, was used. After a successful validation of the MC model with measurements, 2D projection images of primary, coherent and incoherent photons were obtained. For that, a homogeneous breast phantom (2, 4, 6, 8 cm) with 25%, 50% and 75% glandular compositions was used, including a 5 mm thick tumor. The images were generated for each monochromatic X-ray energies in the range from 16 keV to 32 keV. For each angular projection considered (25 angular projections covering an arc of 50°) the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), the mean glandular dose (MGD) and the signal

  11. Influence of tube voltage on CT attenuation, radiation dose, and image quality: phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fengtan; Li Dong; Zhang Yunting

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of tube current and tube voltage on the CT attenuation, radiation dose, and image quality. Methods: A total of 113 saline solutions with decreasing dilution of contrast medium (370 mg I/ml) was produced. MDCT scan was performed with 15 series of different settings of tube current and tube voltage. CT attenuations with 15 series of different settings were all measured, and influence of tube current and tube voltage on CT attenuations was analyzed. CT dose index (CTDIvol) was recorded. The CT attenuations with different tube voltage and current were compared with one-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. The correlation of CT attenuation with different tube voltage and the influence of tube voltage and current on radiation dose and image quality were tested by correlation analysis. Results: Tube current (250, 200, 150, 100, and 50 mA) had no significant effect on CT attenuation (F = 0.001, 0.008, 0.075, P > 0.05), while tube voltage (120, 100, and 80 kV) had significant effect (H = 17.906, 17.906, 13.527, 20.124, 23.563, P < 0.05). The correlation between CT attenuation and tube voltage was determined with equation: CT attenuatio N_1_0_0 _k_V = 1.561 × CT attenuatio N_1_2_0 _k_v + 4.0818, CT attenuatio N_8_0 _k_v = 1.2131 × CT attenuatio N_1_2_0 _k_v + 0.9283. The influence of tube voltage on radiation dose and image quality was also analyzed, and equations were also obtained: N_1_2_0 -k_v = -5.9771 Ln (D_1_2_0 kv) + 25.412, N_1_0_0 _k_v = -10.544 Ln (D_1_0_0 _k_v) + 36.262, N_8_0 _k_v = -25.326 Ln (D_8_0 _k_v) + 62.816. According to the results of relationship among CT attenuation, radiation dose, and image quality, lower tube voltage with higher tube current can reduce the radiation dose. Conclusions: Lower tube voltage can reduce the radiation dose. However, CT attenuation was influenced, and correction should be done with the equations. (authors)

  12. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 25 avril de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 30 mai, 29 août, 26 septembre, 31 octobre et 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  13. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 28 février de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 28 mars, 25 avril, 30 mai, 29 août, 26 septembre, 31 octobre et 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  14. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 28 mars de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 25 avril, 30 mai, 29 août, 26 septembre, 31 octobre et 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  15. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2017-01-01

    Le GAC organise des permanences avec entretiens individuels qui se tiennent le dernier mardi de chaque mois, sauf en juin, juillet et décembre. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 30 mai de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l’Association du personnel Les permanences suivantes auront lieu les mardis 29 août, 26 septembre, 31 octobre et 28 novembre 2017. Les permanences du Groupement des Anciens sont ouvertes aux bénéficiaires de la Caisse de pensions (y compris les conjoints survivants) et à tous ceux qui approchent de la retraite. Nous invitons vivement ces derniers à s’associer à notre groupement en se procurant, auprès de l’Association du personnel, les documents nécessaires. Informations : http://gac-epa.org/. Formulaire de contact : http://gac-epa.org/Organization/ContactForm/ContactForm-fr.php

  16. Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, John R.; Aston, Graeme

    1995-01-01

    The application of electric propulsion to communications satellites, however, has been limited to the use of hydrazine thrusters with electric heaters for thrust and specific impulse augmentation. These electrothermal thrusters operate at specific impulse levels of approximately 300 s with heater powers of about 500 W. Low power arcjets (1-3 kW) are currently being investigated as a way to increase specific impulse levels to approximately 500 s. Ion propulsion systems can easily produce specific impulses of 3000 s or greater, but have yet to be applied to communications satellites. The reasons most often given for not using ion propulsion systems are their high level of overall complexity, low thrust with long burn times, and the difficulty of integrating the propulsion system into existing commercial spacecraft busses. The Electrostatic Plasma Accelerator (EPA) is a thruster concept which promises specific impulse levels between low power arcjets and those of the ion engine while retaining the relative simplicity of the arcjet. The EPA thruster produces thrust through the electrostatic acceleration of a moderately dense plasma. No accelerating electrodes are used and the specific impulse is a direct function of the applied discharge voltage and the propellant atomic mass.

  17. Quality of Life After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Primary and Metastatic Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Romero, Alejandra; Wunderink, Wouter; Os, Rob M. van; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Brandwijk, Rene P.; Verhoef, Cornelis; IJzermans, Jan N.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a high local control rate for primary and metastatic liver tumors. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of this treatment on the patient's quality of life. This is the first report of quality of life associated with liver SBRT. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 to March 2007, a total of 28 patients not suitable for other local treatments and with Karnofsky performance status of at least 80% were entered in a Phase I-II study of SBRT for liver tumors. Quality of life was a secondary end point. Two generic quality of life instruments were investigated, EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) and EuroQoL-Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5D VAS), in addition to a disease-specific questionnaire, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ C-30). Points of measurement were directly before and 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Mean scores and SDs were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using paired-samples t-test and Student t-test. Results: The calculated EQ-5D index, EQ-5D VAS and QLQ C-30 global health status showed that mean quality of life of the patient group was not significantly influenced by treatment with SBRT; if anything, a tendency toward improvement was found. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy combines a high local control rate, by delivering a high dose per fraction, with no significant change in quality of life. Multicenter studies including larger numbers of patients are recommended and under development

  18. Quality of Life and Its Related Factors of Radiation Therapy Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ryung Mi; Jung, Won Seok; Oh, Byeong Heon; Jo, Jun Young; Kim, Gi Chul; Choi, Tae Gyu; Lee, Sok Goo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this master's thesis is to utilize basic data in order to improve the quality of life of cancer patients who received radiation therapy after analysing related factors that influence patient's quality of life and obtaining information about physical, mental problems of patients. By using a structured questionnaire about various characteristics and forms of support, I carried out a survey targeting 107 patients that experienced radiation therapy at a university hospital in the Daejeon metropolitan area from July 15 to August 15, 2010 and analysed the factors influencing quality of life. In case of pain due to disease, 65.15 and painless 81.87 showed a high grade quality of life. As body weight decreases, the quality of life become lower. When the grade of quality of life according to economic characteristics was compared, all items except treatment period showed a difference (P=0.000). When the score of social support, family support, medical support and self-esteem was low, the mark of quality of life showed respectively 61.71, 68.77, 71.31, and 69.39 on the basis of 128 points. When the score of support form was high, the mark of quality of life showed 90.47, 83.29, 90.40, and 90.36 (P<0.05). When analyzing the correlation between social support, family support, medical support and self-esteem and the degree of quality of life, social support was 0.768, family support 0.596, medical support 0.434, self-esteem 0.516. They indicated the correlation of meaningful quantity statistically (P<0.01). The factors that improved the quality of life were married state, having a job and painless status. As monthly income increases, the quality of life was also much improved (P<0.05). Among the factors related to quality of life, social support and medical support and higher self-esteem scores of the quality of life score increased 0.979 point, 0.508 points and 1.667 point, respectively. In conclusion, the quality of life of cancer patients that received

  19. Quality of Life and Its Related Factors of Radiation Therapy Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ryung Mi; Jung, Won Seok; Oh, Byeong Heon; Jo, Jun Young; Kim, Gi Chul; Choi, Tae Gyu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyunghee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sok Goo [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    The purpose of this master's thesis is to utilize basic data in order to improve the quality of life of cancer patients who received radiation therapy after analysing related factors that influence patient's quality of life and obtaining information about physical, mental problems of patients. By using a structured questionnaire about various characteristics and forms of support, I carried out a survey targeting 107 patients that experienced radiation therapy at a university hospital in the Daejeon metropolitan area from July 15 to August 15, 2010 and analysed the factors influencing quality of life. In case of pain due to disease, 65.15 and painless 81.87 showed a high grade quality of life. As body weight decreases, the quality of life become lower. When the grade of quality of life according to economic characteristics was compared, all items except treatment period showed a difference (P=0.000). When the score of social support, family support, medical support and self-esteem was low, the mark of quality of life showed respectively 61.71, 68.77, 71.31, and 69.39 on the basis of 128 points. When the score of support form was high, the mark of quality of life showed 90.47, 83.29, 90.40, and 90.36 (P<0.05). When analyzing the correlation between social support, family support, medical support and self-esteem and the degree of quality of life, social support was 0.768, family support 0.596, medical support 0.434, self-esteem 0.516. They indicated the correlation of meaningful quantity statistically (P<0.01). The factors that improved the quality of life were married state, having a job and painless status. As monthly income increases, the quality of life was also much improved (P<0.05). Among the factors related to quality of life, social support and medical support and higher self-esteem scores of the quality of life score increased 0.979 point, 0.508 points and 1.667 point, respectively. In conclusion, the quality of life of cancer patients that

  20. Development of a model web-based system to support a statewide quality consortium in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Jean M; Feng, Mary; Benedetti, Lisa A; Marsh, Robin; Griffith, Kent A; Matuszak, Martha M; Hess, Michael; McMullen, Matthew; Fisher, Jennifer H; Nurushev, Teamour; Grubb, Margaret; Gardner, Stephen; Nielsen, Daniel; Jagsi, Reshma; Hayman, James A; Pierce, Lori J

    A database in which patient data are compiled allows analytic opportunities for continuous improvements in treatment quality and comparative effectiveness research. We describe the development of a novel, web-based system that supports the collection of complex radiation treatment planning information from centers that use diverse techniques, software, and hardware for radiation oncology care in a statewide quality collaborative, the Michigan Radiation Oncology Quality Consortium (MROQC). The MROQC database seeks to enable assessment of physician- and patient-reported outcomes and quality improvement as a function of treatment planning and delivery techniques for breast and lung cancer patients. We created tools to collect anonymized data based on all plans. The MROQC system representing 24 institutions has been successfully deployed in the state of Michigan. Since 2012, dose-volume histogram and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine-radiation therapy plan data and information on simulation, planning, and delivery techniques have been collected. Audits indicated >90% accurate data submission and spurred refinements to data collection methodology. This model web-based system captures detailed, high-quality radiation therapy dosimetry data along with patient- and physician-reported outcomes and clinical data for a radiation therapy collaborative quality initiative. The collaborative nature of the project has been integral to its success. Our methodology can be applied to setting up analogous consortiums and databases. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Improved image quality and radiation dose reduction in liver dynamic CT scan with the protocol change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yu Jin; Cho, Pyong Kon [Radiological Science, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The purpose is reducing radiation dose while maintaining of image quality in liver dynamic CT(LDCT) scan, by protocols generally used and the tube voltage set at a low level protocol compared to the radiation dose and image quality. The target is body mass index, 18.5-24 patients out of 40 patients who underwent the ACT(abdominal CT). Group A(tube voltage : 120 kVp, SAFIRE strength 1) of 20 people among 40 people, to apply the general abdominal CT scan protocol, group B(tube voltage : 100 kVp, apply SAFIRE strength 0-5) was 20 people, set a lower tube voltage. Image quality evaluation was setting a region of interest(ROI) in the liver parenchyma, aorta, superior mesenteric artery (SMA), celiac trunk, visceral fat of arterial phase. In the ROI were compared by measuring the noise, signal to noise ratio(SNR), contrast to noise ratio(CNR), CT number. In addition, qualitative assessments to evaluate two people in the rich professional experience in Radiology by 0-3 points. We compared the total radiation dose, dose length product(DLP) and effective dose, volume computed tomography dose index(CTDIvol). The higher SAFIRE in the tube voltage 100 kVp, noise is reduced, CT number was increased. Thus, SNR and CNR was increased higher the SAFIRE step. Compared with the tube voltage 120 kVp, noise, SNR, CNR was most similar in SAFIRE strength 2 and 3. Qualitative assessment SAFIRE strength 2 is the most common SAFIRE strength 2 the most common qualitative assessment, if the tube voltage of 100 kVp when the quality of the images better evaluated was SAFIRE strength 1. Dose was reduced from 21.69%, in 100 kVp than 120 kVp. In the case of a relatively high BMI is not LDCT scan, When it is shipped from the factory tube voltage is set higher, unnecessary radiation exposure when considering the reality that is concerned, when according to the results of this study, set a lower tube voltage and adjust the SAFIRE strength to 1 or 2, the radiation without compromising image quality

  2. TH-A-16A-01: Image Quality for the Radiation Oncology Physicist: Review of the Fundamentals and Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibert, J; Imbergamo, P

    2014-01-01

    The expansion and integration of diagnostic imaging technologies such as On Board Imaging (OBI) and Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) into radiation oncology has required radiation oncology physicists to be responsible for and become familiar with assessing image quality. Unfortunately many radiation oncology physicists have had little or no training or experience in measuring and assessing image quality. Many physicists have turned to automated QA analysis software without having a fundamental understanding of image quality measures. This session will review the basic image quality measures of imaging technologies used in the radiation oncology clinic, such as low contrast resolution, high contrast resolution, uniformity, noise, and contrast scale, and how to measure and assess them in a meaningful way. Additionally a discussion of the implementation of an image quality assurance program in compliance with Task Group recommendations will be presented along with the advantages and disadvantages of automated analysis methods. Learning Objectives: Review and understanding of the fundamentals of image quality. Review and understanding of the basic image quality measures of imaging modalities used in the radiation oncology clinic. Understand how to implement an image quality assurance program and to assess basic image quality measures in a meaningful way

  3. Image Quality and Radiation Dose Assessment of a Digital Mammography System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isa, N. M.; Hassan, W. M. S. W.; Abdullah, W. A. K. W.; Othman, F.; Ramli, A. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Image quality and radiation dose of a direct amorphous selenium digital mammography system were considered in terms of contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and average glandular dose (AGD). They were measured for various qualities and breast phantom thicknesses with different types of breast tissue composition to determine optimal radiation quality and dose. Three sets of breast tissue equivalent slabs (30%:70%, 50%:50% and 70%:30% glandular-adipose) with thickness of 2 cm to 7 cm and 0.2 mm aluminum foil were used to provide certain CNR. Two different combinations of anode/ilter material and a wide range of tube voltages were employed for each phantom thickness. Phantom images with grid were acquired using automatic exposure control (AEC) mode for each thickness. Phantom images without grid were also obtained in manual exposure mode by selecting the same anode/filter combination and kVp as the image obtained with grid at the same thickness, but varying mAs of 10 to 200 mAs. Optimization indicated that relatively high energy beam qualities should be used with a greater dose to compensate for lower energy x-rays. The results also indicate that current AEC setting for a fixed detector is not optimal.

  4. Collimation effects on the radiation detectors in the iCT image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Diego Vergacas de Sousa; Kirita, Rodrigo; Mesquita, Carlos Henrique de; Hamada, Margarida Mizue; Ferreira, Erick Oliveira; Dantas, Carlos Costa

    2013-01-01

    This work studies the collimation effect in radiation detectors on the image quality of the iCT scanner, in which the path traversed by radiation beams is similar to a fan. The collimators were made of lead, 5 cm deep and 12 cm high, with rectangular holes (slits) of 2 x 5 mm, 4 x 10 mm (width x height) and circular hole of 5 mm diameter. The matrix images reconstructed from the data obtained with these collimation holes are presented. The spatial resolution of the image depends on the geometry of the collimator. One of the major advantages of narrow beam transmission tomography is the so-called hard field property. This property is capable of producing high quality images, though it decreases the count value and it takes a longer time. In contrast, a large collimation diameter produces a fuzzy image but with a faster scanning time. Moreover, the enlargement of the aperture from 2 x 5 mm to 4 x 10 mm barely affects the image quality. The aperture from 4 x 10 mm and 5 mm diameter presented similar quality image. (author)

  5. Collimation effects on the radiation detectors in the iCT image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Diego Vergacas de Sousa; Kirita, Rodrigo; Mesquita, Carlos Henrique de; Hamada, Margarida Mizue, E-mail: dvcarvalho@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferreira, Erick Oliveira; Dantas, Carlos Costa [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    This work studies the collimation effect in radiation detectors on the image quality of the iCT scanner, in which the path traversed by radiation beams is similar to a fan. The collimators were made of lead, 5 cm deep and 12 cm high, with rectangular holes (slits) of 2 x 5 mm, 4 x 10 mm (width x height) and circular hole of 5 mm diameter. The matrix images reconstructed from the data obtained with these collimation holes are presented. The spatial resolution of the image depends on the geometry of the collimator. One of the major advantages of narrow beam transmission tomography is the so-called hard field property. This property is capable of producing high quality images, though it decreases the count value and it takes a longer time. In contrast, a large collimation diameter produces a fuzzy image but with a faster scanning time. Moreover, the enlargement of the aperture from 2 x 5 mm to 4 x 10 mm barely affects the image quality. The aperture from 4 x 10 mm and 5 mm diameter presented similar quality image. (author)

  6. Reduction of occupational radiation exposure to staff - a quality management approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Positron Emission. Tomography (PET) imaging has expanded in Australia in recent years and is a recognised technique to diagnose cancer, neurological and heart disease. The high-energy gamma rays (51 I KeV) produced from the annihilation reaction in PET and their increased penetration compared to Tc- 99 m (HOKeV) emissions results in a higher radiation exposure to staff compared to other types of imaging such as X-Ray, CT (computer tomography) and MR1 (magnetic resonance imaging) and general nuclear medicine. The project scope was to reduce the occupational radiation exposure to staff working within the imaging section of the WA PET/Cyclotron Service by utilising a continuous quality improvement, process. According to the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS) continual quality improvement is critical for healthcare in Australia (The EQUIP Guide, 2002, p. 1-1 ). The continuous quality improvement approach selected is appropriate for the organisation and the PET imaging process based on the Evaluation and Quality Improvement Program (EQUIP) which is the recognised standard for the health care industry in Australia

  7. Effects of radiation quality and oxygen on clustered DNA lesions and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robert D; Yu, Victor K; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Koumenis, Constantinos; Park, Joo Han; Carlson, David J

    2011-11-01

    Radiation quality and cellular oxygen concentration have a substantial impact on DNA damage, reproductive cell death and, ultimately, the potential efficacy of radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. To better understand and quantify the effects of radiation quality and oxygen on the induction of clustered DNA lesions, we have now extended the Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) to account for reductions in the initial lesion yield arising from enhanced chemical repair of DNA radicals under hypoxic conditions. The kinetic energy range and types of particles considered in the MCDS have also been expanded to include charged particles up to and including (56)Fe ions. The induction of individual and clustered DNA lesions for arbitrary mixtures of different types of radiation can now be directly simulated. For low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, cells irradiated under normoxic conditions sustain about 2.9 times as many double-strand breaks (DSBs) as cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. New experiments performed by us demonstrate similar trends in the yields of non-DSB (Fpg and Endo III) clusters in HeLa cells irradiated by γ rays under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. The good agreement among measured and predicted DSBs, Fpg and Endo III cluster yields suggests that, for the first time, it may be possible to determine nucleotide-level maps of the multitude of different types of clustered DNA lesions formed in cells under reduced oxygen conditions. As particle LET increases, the MCDS predicts that the ratio of DSBs formed under normoxic to hypoxic conditions by the same type of radiation decreases monotonically toward unity. However, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of higher-LET radiations compared to (60)Co γ rays (0.24 keV/μm) tends to increase with decreasing oxygen concentration. The predicted RBE of a 1 MeV proton (26.9 keV/μm) relative to (60)Co γ rays for DSB induction increases from 1.9 to 2.3 as oxygen concentration

  8. Optimizing Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance in Clinical Trials: A TROG 08.03 RAVES Substudy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trada, Yuvnik, E-mail: yuvnik@gmail.com [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Kneebone, Andrew [Royal North Shore Hospital, St Lenoards, New South Wales (Australia); Paneghel, Andrea [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Pearse, Maria [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Sidhom, Mark [Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Tang, Colin [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Wiltshire, Kirsty; Haworth, Annette [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Fraser-Browne, Carol [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Martin, Jarad [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To explore site- and clinician-level factors associated with protocol violations requiring real-time-review (RTR) resubmission in a multicenter clinical trial to help tailor future quality assurance (QA) protocols. Methods and Materials: RAVES (Radiation Therapy–Adjuvant vs Early Salvage) (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 08.03) is a randomized trial comparing adjuvant with early salvage radiation therapy in men with positive surgical margins or pT3 disease after prostatectomy. Quality assurance in RAVES required each clinician and site to submit a credentialing dummy run (DR) and for each patient's radiation therapy plan to undergo external RTR before treatment. Prospectively defined major violations from trial protocol required remedy and resubmission. Site and clinician factors associated with RTR resubmission were examined using hierarchical modeling. Results: Data were collected from 171 consecutive patients, treated by 46 clinicians at 32 hospitals. There were 47 RTR resubmissions (27%) due to 65 major violations. The relative rate of resubmission decreased by 29% per year as the study progressed (odds ratio OR. 0.71, P=.02). The majority of resubmissions were due to contouring violations (39 of 65) and dosimetric violations (22 of 65). For each additional patient accrued, significant decreases in RTR resubmission were seen at both clinician level (OR 0.75, P=.02) and site level (OR 0.72, P=.01). The rate of resubmission due to dosimetric violations was only 1.6% after the first 5 patients. Use of IMRT was associated with lower rates of resubmission compared with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (OR 0.38, P=.05). Conclusion: Several low- and high-risk factors that may assist with tailoring future clinical trial QA were identified. Because the real-time resubmission rate was largely independent of the credentialing exercise, some form of RTR QA is recommended. The greatest benefit from QA was derived early in trial activation

  9. Radiation safety and quality control assurance in X-ray diagnostics 1998; Saeteilyturvallisuus ja laadunvarmistus roentgendiagnostiikassa 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servomaa, A [ed.

    1998-03-01

    The report is based on a seminar course of lectures `Radiation safety and quality assurance in X-ray diagnostics 1998` organized by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) in Finland. The lectures included actual information on X-ray examinations: methods of quality assurance, methods of measuring and calculating patient doses, examination frequencies, patient doses, occupational doses, and radiation risks. Paediatric X-ray examinations and interventional procedures were the most specific topics. The new Council Directive 97/43/Euratom on medical exposure, and the European Guidelines on quality criteria for diagnostic radiographic images, were discussed in several lectures. Lectures on general radiation threats and preparedness, examples of radiation accidents, and emergency preparedness in hospitals were also included. (editor)

  10. UV Tanning Equipment | Radiation Protection | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Sun lamps and tanning equipment emit ultraviolet (UV) rays. People who are exposed to UV rays over a long period of time are more likely to develop skin cancer. People with light skin are in more danger because their skin is more sensitive to UV rays.

  11. Evaluation of radiation therapy for bone metastases: pain relief and quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, H.A.; Kagan, A.R.; Nussbaum, H.; Rao, A.R.; Satzman, J.; Chan, P.; Allen, B.; Forsythe, A.

    1977-01-01

    The records of 158 patients irradiated for bone metastases were reviewed to evaluate the effectiveness of pain relief and to judge the effect of treatment on overall quality of life. Within 3 months 73% of the sites treated had pain relief, with 55 to 65% having sustained relief up to 1 year or death. Of patients surviving more than 3 months, 63% maintained a satisfactory quality of life and were able to take care of most personal needs. The median survival of all patients was 1 year from initial treatment for bone metastasis. Radiation dose and the primary tumor site do not seem to be significant prognostic factors for initial pain relief or quality of life

  12. Quality control methods for linear accelerator radiation and mechanical axes alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Becker, Nathan; Amin, Md Nurul; Norrlinger, Bernhard; Jaffray, David A

    2018-06-01

    The delivery accuracy of highly conformal dose distributions generated using intensity modulation and collimator, gantry, and couch degrees of freedom is directly affected by the quality of the alignment between the radiation beam and the mechanical axes of a linear accelerator. For this purpose, quality control (QC) guidelines recommend a tolerance of ±1 mm for the coincidence of the radiation and mechanical isocenters. Traditional QC methods for assessment of radiation and mechanical axes alignment (based on pointer alignment) are time consuming and complex tasks that provide limited accuracy. In this work, an automated test suite based on an analytical model of the linear accelerator motions was developed to streamline the QC of radiation and mechanical axes alignment. The proposed method used the automated analysis of megavoltage images of two simple task-specific phantoms acquired at different linear accelerator settings to determine the coincidence of the radiation and mechanical isocenters. The sensitivity and accuracy of the test suite were validated by introducing actual misalignments on a linear accelerator between the radiation axis and the mechanical axes using both beam steering and mechanical adjustments of the gantry and couch. The validation demonstrated that the new QC method can detect sub-millimeter misalignment between the radiation axis and the three mechanical axes of rotation. A displacement of the radiation source of 0.2 mm using beam steering parameters was easily detectable with the proposed collimator rotation axis test. Mechanical misalignments of the gantry and couch rotation axes of the same magnitude (0.2 mm) were also detectable using the new gantry and couch rotation axis tests. For the couch rotation axis, the phantom and test design allow detection of both translational and tilt misalignments with the radiation beam axis. For the collimator rotation axis, the test can isolate the misalignment between the beam radiation axis

  13. 75 FR 80420 - Reasonable Further Progress Requirements for the 1997 8-Hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ..., Environmental Protection Agency in the EPA Headquarters Library, Room Number 3334 in the EPA West Building... EPA's public docket, visit the EPA Docket Center homepage at http://www.epa.gov/epahome/dockets.htm... Air and Radiation Docket and Information Center is in the EPA Headquarters Library, Room Number 3334...

  14. Commissioning and quality assurance of computerized planning systems for radiation treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    radiation treatment centres. Many of these systems have both complex three dimensional (3-D) image manipulation and dose calculation capabilities. The purpose of this report is to describe the commissioning and quality assurance (QA) procedures that should be used with modern TPSs

  15. Optimization of dose radiation and image quality on computed tomography of thorax in adult women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, G. R.; Casian C, G. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico, Av. IPN No. 5160, 07760 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gaona, E.; Franco E, J. G.; Molina F, N., E-mail: gaen1310@correo.xoc.uam.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Xochimilco, Calz. del Hueso 1100, 04960 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The objective of the study is the optimization of the dose (Dlp) and image quality in the exploration of adult women in studies of thorax with computed tomography (CT). The CT is a technique of exploration with high radiation doses to patients with an increase of the risk factors of developing cancer in the future, but X-rays are a very important medical diagnostic tool. We performed a retrospective survey of 50 female patients who had thorax tomography using the automatic protocol established by the manufacturer, a database of dose (Dlp), measures of patient A P and radiological parameters such as kV and m A was obtained. Subsequently, we carry out the prospective study with 30 patients with prescription of thorax tomography, scans were conducted with CT with reduced doses using manual techniques protocol of exploration while maintaining diagnostic image quality. The results show that the prospective study patients received doses lower than 30% on average. In general the dose patients were within the confidence interval of 95% of the levels of diagnostic reference (DRL) adopted by the European Community for CT and the most common value is 400 Dlp for thorax. Comparative image quality study was conducted using the protocol of the manufacturer and the manual protocol and image quality was diagnostic after dose reduction up to 30%. The reduction of radiation dose in female patients in studies of thorax CT helps to reduce risk factors of developing cancer later in life. A thorax tomography study includes the fibro-glandular tissue of the breast which is very sensitive to stochastic effects of radiation. (Author)

  16. Radiation dose reduction in paediatric coronary computed tomography: assessment of effective dose and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib Geryes, Bouchra; Calmon, Raphael; Boddaert, Nathalie; Khraiche, Diala; Bonnet, Damien; Raimondi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of different protocols on radiation dose and image quality for paediatric coronary computed tomography (cCT). From January-2012 to June-2014, 140 children who underwent cCT on a 64-slice scanner were included. Two consecutive changes in imaging protocols were performed: 1) the use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR); 2) the optimization of acquisition parameters. Effective dose (ED) was calculated by conversion of the dose-length product. Image quality was assessed as excellent, good or with significant artefacts. Patients were divided in three age groups: 0-4, 5-7 and 8-18 years. The use of ASIR combined to the adjustment of scan settings allowed a reduction in the median ED of 58 %, 82 % and 85 % in 0-4, 5-7 and 8-18 years group, respectively (7.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.1 ± 0.7 mSv, 5.5 ± 1.6 vs 1 ± 1.9 mSv and 5.3 ± 5.0 vs 0.8 ± 2.0 mSv, all p < 0,05). Prospective protocol was used in 51 % of children. The reduction in radiation dose was not associated with reduction in diagnostic image quality as assessed by the frequency of coronary segments with excellent or good image quality (88 %). cCT can be obtained at very low radiation doses in children using ASIR, and prospective acquisition with optimized imaging parameters. (orig.)

  17. Optimization of dose radiation and image quality on computed tomography of thorax in adult women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Z, G. R.; Casian C, G.; Gaona, E.; Franco E, J. G.; Molina F, N.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: The objective of the study is the optimization of the dose (Dlp) and image quality in the exploration of adult women in studies of thorax with computed tomography (CT). The CT is a technique of exploration with high radiation doses to patients with an increase of the risk factors of developing cancer in the future, but X-rays are a very important medical diagnostic tool. We performed a retrospective survey of 50 female patients who had thorax tomography using the automatic protocol established by the manufacturer, a database of dose (Dlp), measures of patient A P and radiological parameters such as kV and m A was obtained. Subsequently, we carry out the prospective study with 30 patients with prescription of thorax tomography, scans were conducted with CT with reduced doses using manual techniques protocol of exploration while maintaining diagnostic image quality. The results show that the prospective study patients received doses lower than 30% on average. In general the dose patients were within the confidence interval of 95% of the levels of diagnostic reference (DRL) adopted by the European Community for CT and the most common value is 400 Dlp for thorax. Comparative image quality study was conducted using the protocol of the manufacturer and the manual protocol and image quality was diagnostic after dose reduction up to 30%. The reduction of radiation dose in female patients in studies of thorax CT helps to reduce risk factors of developing cancer later in life. A thorax tomography study includes the fibro-glandular tissue of the breast which is very sensitive to stochastic effects of radiation. (Author)

  18. Simple method for routine check of the constancy of radiation quality of bremsstrahlung emitted by therapeutic particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassow, J; Eipper, H H; Krause, K [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Klinische Strahlenphysik; Staedtisches Krankenhaus Koeln-Merheim (Germany, F.R.). Roentgeninstitut und Strahlenklinik)

    1977-05-01

    The constancy of the radiation quality of therapeutically employed particle accelerators has to be checked at weekly intervals. Any change in radiation quality may have considerable therapeutic effects owing to its influence on dose distribution. It is recommended that measurements be made instead of, or in addition to, the axial reference-point measurement at 5 and 15 cm depth in the phantom, at 5 cm depth in the beam axis and at a reference-point about 1 cm within the geometric edge of the field, for checking the constancy of the radiation quality of bremsstrahlung. Only then, if routine checks carried out for the axial and the lateral reference-point dose ratios do not show any deviations greater than e.g. +-2 %, radiation quality is deemed to have remained sufficiently constant for radiotherapeutical applications.

  19. Quality assurance in personal dosimetry of external radiation: present situation and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, N.

    2006-01-01

    Whole body personal dosimetry is well established for the individual monitoring of radiation workers. High quality radiation dosimetry is essential for workers who rely upon personal dosemeters to record the amount of radiation to which they are exposed. The mandate has been given to the Personal Dosimetry, (secondary standard dosimetry laboratories) S.S.D.L., (Malaysian institute for nuclear energy research) M.I.N.T. to assure the individual monitoring for radiation workers in Malaysia. In 2005, the S.S.D.L;-M.I.N.T. supply, process and read out of personal dosemeters of nearly 13,000 dosimeters monthly, whereby. 12,000 are films and 1,000 are T.L.D.s. The objective of individual monitoring is not limited to the measurement of doses delivered to individuals, but it should demonstrate that limits of exposure have not been exceeded and that working conditions have not unexpectedly deteriorated. Dosimetry measurements are an important component of radiation protection programs and must be of high quality. The exposure of workers to radiation must be controlled and monitored in order to comply with regulatory requirements. S.S.D.L.-M.I.N.T; demonstrates that its performance is at an acceptable level by implementing overall system performance, as evidenced by the ISO 9001 certification of the Personal Dosimetry Service in 2002 and ISO/I.E.C. 17025 accreditation to the calibration laboratory in 2004. The certification and accreditation processes achieved the goal by formalizing the recognition of satisfactory performance, and providing evidence of this performance. Overall performances are assessed, personnel operating the system will be trained and are well qualified and all actions will be documented. The paper describes the overview of the Q.M.S. carried out at the S.S. D.L.-M.I.N.T.. During the implementation of Q.M.S. a few areas has been identified for future consideration. These include performance specification and type testing of dosemeters, which provide a

  20. Quality assurance and management in radiation protection - burden and benefit; Qualitaetssicherung und -management im Strahlenschutz - Last und Nutzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baehrle, H.G.; Butterweck, G.; Habegger, R.; Schuler, C.; Wyser, U. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen PSI (CH). Abt. Strahlenschutz und Sicherheit (ASI); Beck, T. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandten Strahlenschutz; Buchholz, W. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany). AG-SG 2.4 - Inkorporationsueberwachung; Kuehne, J.; Tesch, J. [Landesamt fuer Umwelt, Naturschutz und Geologie Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Stralsund (Germany). Abt. Umweltanalytik und Strahlenschutz; Valbuena, A. [DAP Deutsches Akkreditierungssystem Pruefwesen GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Measurements of radiation for the purpose of Radiation Protection and Health Physics demand a high degree of quality and accuracy. Selected topics of quality management and control are presented. They vary from practical aspects of analytical quality control, from traceability and uncertainty of measurement results to quality of intralaboratory communication. Changes in the German system of accreditation due to European harmonization are also presented. Certification and accreditation of testing laboratories are being increasingly expected and have already been laid down by certain federal regulations. (orig.)

  1. Optimizing CT radiation dose based on patient size and image quality: the size-specific dose estimate method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, David B. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The principle of ALARA (dose as low as reasonably achievable) calls for dose optimization rather than dose reduction, per se. Optimization of CT radiation dose is accomplished by producing images of acceptable diagnostic image quality using the lowest dose method available. Because it is image quality that constrains the dose, CT dose optimization is primarily a problem of image quality rather than radiation dose. Therefore, the primary focus in CT radiation dose optimization should be on image quality. However, no reliable direct measure of image quality has been developed for routine clinical practice. Until such measures become available, size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) can be used as a reasonable image-quality estimate. The SSDE method of radiation dose optimization for CT abdomen and pelvis consists of plotting SSDE for a sample of examinations as a function of patient size, establishing an SSDE threshold curve based on radiologists' assessment of image quality, and modifying protocols to consistently produce doses that are slightly above the threshold SSDE curve. Challenges in operationalizing CT radiation dose optimization include data gathering and monitoring, managing the complexities of the numerous protocols, scanners and operators, and understanding the relationship of the automated tube current modulation (ATCM) parameters to image quality. Because CT manufacturers currently maintain their ATCM algorithms as secret for proprietary reasons, prospective modeling of SSDE for patient populations is not possible without reverse engineering the ATCM algorithm and, hence, optimization by this method requires a trial-and-error approach. (orig.)

  2. Developing Quality Assurance Processes for Image-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Di

    2008-01-01

    Quality assurance has long been implemented in radiation treatment as systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that the radiation oncology service will satisfy the given requirements for quality care. The existing reports from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Groups 40 and 53 have provided highly detailed QA guidelines for conventional radiotherapy and treatment planning. However, advanced treatment processes recently developed with emerging high technology have introduced new QA requirements that have not been addressed previously in the conventional QA program. Therefore, it is necessary to expand the existing QA guidelines to also include new considerations. Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) is a closed-loop treatment process that is designed to include the individual treatment information, such as patient-specific anatomic variation and delivered dose assessed during the therapy course in treatment evaluation and planning optimization. Clinical implementation of IGART requires high levels of automation in image acquisition, registration, segmentation, treatment dose construction, and adaptive planning optimization, which brings new challenges to the conventional QA program. In this article, clinical QA procedures for IGART are outlined. The discussion focuses on the dynamic or four-dimensional aspects of the IGART process, avoiding overlap with conventional QA guidelines

  3. Improved postharvest quality in patagonian squash (Cucurbita moschata) coated with radiation depolymerized chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, Maria Alicia; Goitia, Maria Teresa [Laboratorio de Investigaciones Basicas Aplicadas en Quitina, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Sur. Avenida Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Yossen, Mariana [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica (INTEC), CONICET-Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Ruta Nacional 168-Paraje ' El Pozo' , 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Cifone, Norma; Agullo, Enrique [Laboratorio de Investigaciones Basicas Aplicadas en Quitina, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Sur. Avenida Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Andreucetti, Noemi, E-mail: andreuce@criba.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avenida Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    Different molecular weight chitosans were evaluated on the decay of coated Anquito squashes (Cucurbita moschata) as well as the maintenance of the fruit quality along five storage months. The original chitosan (Mw=391 kDa, 83% DD), was depolymerized by gamma radiation. Apart from chain scission, other chemical changes were not detected by FTIR or UV-vis analyses. The molecular weight characterization of chitosans was done by size exclusion chromatography with dual light scattering and concentration detection (SEC-MALLS-RI). The coating effectiveness was evaluated on the following parameters: fungal decay incidence, weight loss, firmness, total reducing sugar, soluble solid, flesh color, carotene content, pH and titratable acidity. No sign of fungal decay was observed in squashes coated with 122 and 56 kDa chitosans, which were also the most effective treatments in reducing the weight loss. The chitosan with Mw=122 kDa was also the best treatment considering firmness, internal aspect, sugar and carotene content. Then, radiation degraded chitosan was better in C. moschata preservation than the original chitosan. - Highlights: > Original Chitosan was radiation depolymerized producing chitosans with lower molecular weights. > Gamma-irradiated chitosans only exhibit chain scission. > SEC-MALLS-RI chromatography is a useful tool in molecular weight analysis. > Depolymerized chitosans were the best in maintaining the quality and the storage life of coated squashes.

  4. Improved postharvest quality in patagonian squash (Cucurbita moschata) coated with radiation depolymerized chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugliese, Maria Alicia; Goitia, Maria Teresa; Yossen, Mariana; Cifone, Norma; Agullo, Enrique; Andreucetti, Noemi

    2011-01-01

    Different molecular weight chitosans were evaluated on the decay of coated Anquito squashes (Cucurbita moschata) as well as the maintenance of the fruit quality along five storage months. The original chitosan (Mw=391 kDa, 83% DD), was depolymerized by gamma radiation. Apart from chain scission, other chemical changes were not detected by FTIR or UV-vis analyses. The molecular weight characterization of chitosans was done by size exclusion chromatography with dual light scattering and concentration detection (SEC-MALLS-RI). The coating effectiveness was evaluated on the following parameters: fungal decay incidence, weight loss, firmness, total reducing sugar, soluble solid, flesh color, carotene content, pH and titratable acidity. No sign of fungal decay was observed in squashes coated with 122 and 56 kDa chitosans, which were also the most effective treatments in reducing the weight loss. The chitosan with Mw=122 kDa was also the best treatment considering firmness, internal aspect, sugar and carotene content. Then, radiation degraded chitosan was better in C. moschata preservation than the original chitosan. - Highlights: → Original Chitosan was radiation depolymerized producing chitosans with lower molecular weights. → Gamma-irradiated chitosans only exhibit chain scission. → SEC-MALLS-RI chromatography is a useful tool in molecular weight analysis. → Depolymerized chitosans were the best in maintaining the quality and the storage life of coated squashes.

  5. Quality Factor and Radiation Efficiency of Dual-Mode Self-Resonant Spherical Antennas With Lossy Magnetodielectric Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Troels Vejle; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2014-01-01

    For spherical antennas consisting of a solid magnetodielectric lossy core with an impressed surface current density exciting a superposition of the ${\\rm TE}_{mn}$ and ${\\rm TM}_{mn}$ spherical modes, we analytically determine the radiation quality factor $Q$ and radiation efficiency $e$ . Also, we...

  6. Quality assurance in medical radiation applications. The medical and dental appointment; Qualitaetssicherung bei medizinischen Strahlenanwendungen. Die aerztlichen und zahnaerztlichen Stellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst-Elz, Andreas [Ministerium fuer Energiewende, Landwirtschaft, Umwelt, Natur und Digitalisierung des Landes Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany)

    2017-07-01

    Medical radiation applications cause averaged over the German population an annual exposure of almost 2 mSv. Medical authorities have the assignment to assure and control the diagnostic and therapeutic quality of these applications and to provide recommendations for operators with respect to dose reductions and radiation protection, including guidance for radiotherapy planning aimed to questions of dose and therapy optimization.

  7. EPA's radon study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowd, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Last winter, in cooperation with agencies in 10 states and two metropolitan area counties, EPA measured the indoor air radon concentrations of 14,000 houses, some chosen statistically at random and some by request of the homeowner. Passive measurement methodologies were used, such as exposing a charcoal canister to the air for a few days and allowing the air to migrate in to the charcoal naturally. To reduce dilution of radon by the outside air, the protocol required that the house be shut up; therefore, the study was conducted during winter. The measuring device was placed in the lowest livable area (usually the basement) of each house to maximize potential concentration. It should be noted that these procedures are generally considered to be screening tests because they result in a worst-case measurement rather than a best value. The results of these findings are presented

  8. Radiation Exposure Decreases the Quantity and Quality of Cardiac Stem Cells in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lan; Urata, Yoshishige; Yan, Chen; Hasan, Al Shaimaa; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Tou, Fang-Fang; Xie, Yucai; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Radiation exposure may increase cardiovascular disease risks; however, the precise molecular/cellular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that radiation impairs cardiac stem cells (CSCs), thereby contributing to future cardiovascular disease risks. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 3 Gy γ-rays, and heart tissues were collected 24 hours later for further experiments. Although c-kit-positive cells were rarely found, radiation exposure significantly induced apoptosis and DNA damage in the cells of the heart. The ex vivo expansion of CSCs from freshly harvested atrial tissues showed a significantly lower production of CSCs in irradiated mice compared with healthy mice. The proliferative activity of CSCs evaluated by Ki-67 expression was not significantly different between the groups. However, compared to the healthy control, CSCs expanded from irradiated mice showed significantly lower telomerase activity, more 53BP1 foci in the nuclei, lower expression of c-kit and higher expression of CD90. Furthermore, CSCs expanded from irradiated mice had significantly poorer potency in the production of insulin-like growth factor-1. Our data suggest that radiation exposure significantly decreases the quantity and quality of CSCs, which may serve as sensitive bio-parameters for predicting future cardiovascular disease risks. PMID:27195709

  9. Radiation Exposure Decreases the Quantity and Quality of Cardiac Stem Cells in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Luo

    Full Text Available Radiation exposure may increase cardiovascular disease risks; however, the precise molecular/cellular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that radiation impairs cardiac stem cells (CSCs, thereby contributing to future cardiovascular disease risks. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 3 Gy γ-rays, and heart tissues were collected 24 hours later for further experiments. Although c-kit-positive cells were rarely found, radiation exposure significantly induced apoptosis and DNA damage in the cells of the heart. The ex vivo expansion of CSCs from freshly harvested atrial tissues showed a significantly lower production of CSCs in irradiated mice compared with healthy mice. The proliferative activity of CSCs evaluated by Ki-67 expression was not significantly different between the groups. However, compared to the healthy control, CSCs expanded from irradiated mice showed significantly lower telomerase activity, more 53BP1 foci in the nuclei, lower expression of c-kit and higher expression of CD90. Furthermore, CSCs expanded from irradiated mice had significantly poorer potency in the production of insulin-like growth factor-1. Our data suggest that radiation exposure significantly decreases the quantity and quality of CSCs, which may serve as sensitive bio-parameters for predicting future cardiovascular disease risks.

  10. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a 60Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooten, H. Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating 60 Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods and Materials: The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create 60 Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The 60 Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. Results: All 60 Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for 60 Co was within <1% and 3% of linac plans for 100% and 95% prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range <20 Gy, but comparable sparing for organs with mean doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all 60 Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. Conclusions: A commercial 60 Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system

  11. Impact of radiation treatment on chemical, biochemical and sensory properties, and microbiological quality of mackerel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Nino; Maltar-Strmečki, Nadica; Kozačinski, Lidija; Njari, Bela; Cvrtila Fleck, Željka

    2015-12-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on shelf-life of mackerel (Scomber scombrus) was studied. Changes in raw fish stored at 4 °C were investigated simultaneously, by performing sensory evaluation, chemical analysis (pH value and NH3 concentration), and biochemical analyses of histamine concentration and microbiological quality. Analyses showed that preservation by gamma irradiation prolonged the freshness and sustainability without any unintended sensory changes. Furthermore, increasing the dose during the 10 days of storage considerably reduced the concentration of histamine, but only slightly reduced the concentration of ammonia (NH3). Bacterial examinations showed that gamma radiation decreased the total number of bacteria. Our results indicated that the shelf-life of mackerel stored at 4 °C can be prolonged by irradiation with a dose of 3 kGy.

  12. Impact of Gamma Radiation Processing to Improve the Hygienic Quality of some Chicken Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, W.S.; El-Mossalami, I.I.; Nosier, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    For food to be entirely safe from the microbiological viewpoint, it must need to contain the least possible counts of microorganisms of hygienic importance. This investigation aims to study the possible use of gamma radiation for bacterial decontamination of chicken products which are produced in Egypt. One hundred and twenty samples of frozen chicken kofta and burgers (60 each) were purchased from retail markets at Cairo Governorate. They were surveyed for the hygienic quality as well as the effect of gamma radiation (dose levels of 1, 2 and 3 kGy) on the bacterial population, chemical and sensory quality of these products. The results indicated that the total aerobic bacterial counts (APC) ranged from 106 to 107 cfu/g in the examined samples. Moreover, some samples were contaminated with food borne pathogens such as Listeria species and Salmonella species. Gamma irradiation greatly reduced the microbial density of the studied food samples. The microbial reduction increased as the dose level of irradiation increase, whereas irradiation of chicken products at 3 kGy dose reduced aerobic counts and eliminated Salmonella and Listeria species, also it proved to be of great importance in increasing the safety and acceptability of ready to eat frozen chicken products with no adverse effect on their chemical or sensory quality

  13. Poster - Thur Eve - 54: A software solution for ongoing DVH quality assurance in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annis, S-L; Zeng, G; Wu, X; Macpherson, M

    2012-07-01

    A program has been developed in MATLAB for use in quality assurance of treatment planning of radiation therapy. It analyzes patient DVH files and compiles dose volume data for review, trending, comparison and analysis. Patient DVH files are exported from the Eclipse treatment planning system and saved according to treatment sites and date. Currently analysis is available for 4 treatment sites; Prostate, Prostate Bed, Lung, and Upper GI, with two functions for data report and analysis: patient-specific and organ-specific. The patient-specific function loads one patient DVH file and reports the user-specified dose volume data of organs and targets. These data can be compiled to an external file for a third party analysis. The organ-specific function extracts a requested dose volume of an organ from the DVH files of a patient group and reports the statistics over this population. A graphical user interface is utilized to select clinical sites, function and structures, and input user's requests. We have implemented this program in planning quality assurance at our center. The program has tracked the dosimetric improvement in GU sites after VMAT was implemented clinically. It has generated dose volume statistics for different groups of patients associated with technique or time range. This program allows reporting and statistical analysis of DVH files. It is an efficient tool for the planning quality control in radiation therapy. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Full-field digital mammography versus computed radiology mammography: comparison in image quality and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongxia; Song Shaojuan; Liu Chuanya; Qi Hengtao; Qin Weichang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the differences in image quality and radiation dose between full- field digital mammography (FFDM) system and compute radiology mammography (CRM) system. Methods: The ALVIM mammographic phantom was exposed by FFDM system with automatic exposure control (AEC) and then exposed by CRM system with the unique imaging plank on the same condition. The FFDM system applied the same kV value and the different mAs values (14, 16, 18, 22 and 24 mAs), and the emission skin dose (ESD) and the average gland dose (AGD) were recorded for the above-mentioned exposure factors. All images were read by five experienced radiologists under the same condition and judged based on 5-point scales. And then receive operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn and the probability (P det ) values were calculated. The data were statistically processed with ANOVA. Results: The P det values of calcifications and lesion lump were higher with FFDM system than with CRM system at the same dose (1.36 mGy). Especially, for microcalcifications and lesion lump, the largest difference of the P det value was 0.215, and that of lesion lump was 0.245. In comparison with CRM system, the radiation dose of FFDM system could be reduced at the same P det value. The ESD value was reduced by 26%, and the ACD value was reduced by 41%. When the mAs value exceed AEC value, the P det value almost had no change, though the radiation dose was increased. Conclusions: The detection rates of microcalcifications and lesion lump with FFDM system are proven to be superior to CRM system at the same dose. The radiation dose of FFDM system was less than CRM system for the same image quality. (authors)

  15. EPA's Information Architecture and Web Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Information Architecture creates a topical organization of our website, instead of an ownership-based organization. The EPA Web Taxonomy allows audiences easy access to relevant information from EPA programs, by using a common vocabulary.

  16. 40 CFR 130.10 - State submittals to EPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.10 State submittals to EPA. (a) The following must be submitted...)(1). (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 2040-0071) (3) Total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) (303(d)); and (4) Water quality management (WQM) plan and certified and...

  17. Radiation exposure and image quality in X-ray diagnostic radiology. Physical principles and clinical applications. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saebel, Manfred; Aichinger, Horst; Dierker, Joachim; Joite-Barfuss, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic X-rays are the largest contributor to radiation exposure to the general population, and protecting the patient from radiation damage is a major aim of modern health policy. Once the decision has been taken to use ionising radiation for imaging in a particular patient, it is necessary to optimize the image acquisition process taking into account the diagnostic quality of the images and the radiation dose to the patient. Both image quality and radiation dose are affected by a number of parameters, knowledge of which permits scientifically based decision making. The authors of this second edition of Radiation Exposure and Image Quality in X-ray Diagnostic Radiology have spent many years studying the optimization of radiological imaging. In this book they present in detail the basic physical principles of diagnostic radiology and their application to clinical problems. Particular attention is devoted to evaluation of the dose to the patient, the influence of scattered radiation on image quality, the use of antiscatter grids, and optimization of image quality and dose. The final section is a supplement containing tables of data and graphical depictions of X-ray spectra, interaction coefficients, characteristics of X-ray beams, and other aspects relevant to patient dose calculations. In addition, a complementary CD-ROM contains a user-friendly Excel file database covering these aspects that can be used in the reader's own programs. Since the first edition, the text, figures, tables, and references have all been thoroughly updated, and more detailed attention is now paid to image quality and radiation exposure when using digital imaging and computed tomography. This book will be an invaluable aid to medical physicists when performing calculations relating to patient dose and image quality, and will also prove useful for diagnostic radiologists and engineers. (orig.)

  18. 76 FR 31329 - EPA Radiogenic Cancer Risk Models and Projections for the U.S. Population (Blue Book)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... Models and Projections for the U.S. Population (Blue Book) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA...-11-001, April 2011), also known as the Blue Book, which provides radiation risk assessment methodology. EPA will use the scientific information on radiation risks provided in the Blue Book, together...

  19. Radiation safety management in health care - The application of Quality Function Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moores, B.M. [Integrated Radiological Services Ltd., Century Building, Unit 188, Tower Street, Brunswick Park, Liverpool L3 4BJ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mikemoores@irs-limited.com

    2006-11-15

    The paper presents a study of the potential for applying the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) method to the analysis of the framework for safety management contained in the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations (IRMER) of 2000. The QFD method has been successfully applied to many industrial and manufacturing processes in order to ensure that quality is built into products at the outset rather than tested for after their production. In this context, the term quality is used to describe the degree to which the needs and requirements of the customer are fulfilled. More frequently, now, the QFD approach is being applied to health care in order to engineer clinical processes that can best fulfil the needs of the patient. In the case of diagnostic radiology, safety management must not only be concerned with radiation protection but, more importantly, with the accuracy and consistency of any diagnostic outcome. Both are important patient needs. A first stage analysis of IRMER 2000 is presented that assesses how patients' needs are expressed by the individual IRMER components of justification, optimisation, clinical audit, expert advice, equipment and training. The analysis involved a QFD assessment by four radiation protection experts with over 100 man-years of experience. A second stage analysis assesses how the individual IRMER components have been engineered into a safety management framework through specific requirements embodied in IRMER 2000. The results of this assessment are discussed in terms of clinical, human, operational management and equipment related aspects of the radiological process. This study highlights how the QFD approach may be applied to engineer specific aspects of radiological practice that play a key role in ensuring that patients' needs are fully met. As an example, clinical audit requirements are analysed by means of the QFD method to indicate the design requirements of information and knowledge based systems that can

  20. Radiation safety management in health care - The application of Quality Function Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moores, B.M.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a study of the potential for applying the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) method to the analysis of the framework for safety management contained in the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations (IRMER) of 2000. The QFD method has been successfully applied to many industrial and manufacturing processes in order to ensure that quality is built into products at the outset rather than tested for after their production. In this context, the term quality is used to describe the degree to which the needs and requirements of the customer are fulfilled. More frequently, now, the QFD approach is being applied to health care in order to engineer clinical processes that can best fulfil the needs of the patient. In the case of diagnostic radiology, safety management must not only be concerned with radiation protection but, more importantly, with the accuracy and consistency of any diagnostic outcome. Both are important patient needs. A first stage analysis of IRMER 2000 is presented that assesses how patients' needs are expressed by the individual IRMER components of justification, optimisation, clinical audit, expert advice, equipment and training. The analysis involved a QFD assessment by four radiation protection experts with over 100 man-years of experience. A second stage analysis assesses how the individual IRMER components have been engineered into a safety management framework through specific requirements embodied in IRMER 2000. The results of this assessment are discussed in terms of clinical, human, operational management and equipment related aspects of the radiological process. This study highlights how the QFD approach may be applied to engineer specific aspects of radiological practice that play a key role in ensuring that patients' needs are fully met. As an example, clinical audit requirements are analysed by means of the QFD method to indicate the design requirements of information and knowledge based systems that can provide the

  1. Influence of different anode/filter combination on radiation dose and image quality in digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jie; Liu Peifang; Zhang Lianlian; Ma Wenjuan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of different anode/filter combination on radiation dose and image quality in digital mammography, so as to choose optimal anode/filter combination to reduce radiation injury without scarifying image quality. Methods: Mammography accredition phantoms with the thickness from 1.6 cm to 8.6 cm were used to simulate human breast tissue. The same exposure conditions, pressure, compression thickness. and different anode/filter combination were employed under the automatic and manual exposure modes. The image kV, mAs, pressure, filter, average glandular dose (ACD), contrast to noise ratio (CNR) were recorded and the figure of merit (FOM) was calculated. SPSS 17.0 and one-way analysis of variance were used in the statistical analysis. Results: As the phantom thickness increase, the ACD values which were acquired with Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, and W/Ag three different anode/filter combinations were increased, but CNR and FOM values were decreased, ACD, CNR, and FOM values which were acquired in the phantom with different thickness, and three different anode/filter combinations were statistically different (P=0.000, respectively). The ACD values of Mo/Mo were lowest. For 1.6 cm-2.6 cm phantom thicknesses, the FOMs of Mo/Rh were lowest, and for 3.6 cm-8.6 cm phantom thicknesses, the FOMs of W/Ag were lowest. Conclusion: Phantom thickness in 1.6 cm-2.6 cm and 3.6 cm-8.6 cm. Mo/Rh combination and W/Ag combination respectively can achieve the highest FOM, and can provide the best imaging quality with low radiation dose. (authors)

  2. Quality Control Quantification (QCQ): A Tool to Measure the Value of Quality Control Checks in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Eric C.; Terezakis, Stephanie; Souranis, Annette; Harris, Kendra; Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the error-detection effectiveness of commonly used quality control (QC) measures. Methods: We analyzed incidents from 2007-2010 logged into a voluntary in-house, electronic incident learning systems at 2 academic radiation oncology clinics. None of the incidents resulted in patient harm. Each incident was graded for potential severity using the French Nuclear Safety Authority scoring scale; high potential severity incidents (score >3) were considered, along with a subset of 30 randomly chosen low severity incidents. Each report was evaluated to identify which of 15 common QC checks could have detected it. The effectiveness was calculated, defined as the percentage of incidents that each QC measure could detect, both for individual QC checks and for combinations of checks. Results: In total, 4407 incidents were reported, 292 of which had high-potential severity. High- and low-severity incidents were detectable by 4.0 ± 2.3 (mean ± SD) and 2.6 ± 1.4 QC checks, respectively (P<.001). All individual checks were less than 50% sensitive with the exception of pretreatment plan review by a physicist (63%). An effectiveness of 97% was achieved with 7 checks used in combination and was not further improved with more checks. The combination of checks with the highest effectiveness includes physics plan review, physician plan review, Electronic Portal Imaging Device-based in vivo portal dosimetry, radiation therapist timeout, weekly physics chart check, the use of checklists, port films, and source-to-skin distance checks. Some commonly used QC checks such as pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy QA do not substantially add to the ability to detect errors in these data. Conclusions: The effectiveness of QC measures in radiation oncology depends sensitively on which checks are used and in which combinations. A small percentage of errors cannot be detected by any of the standard formal QC checks currently in broad use, suggesting that further

  3. Quality control quantification (QCQ): a tool to measure the value of quality control checks in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric C; Terezakis, Stephanie; Souranis, Annette; Harris, Kendra; Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-11-01

    To quantify the error-detection effectiveness of commonly used quality control (QC) measures. We analyzed incidents from 2007-2010 logged into a voluntary in-house, electronic incident learning systems at 2 academic radiation oncology clinics. None of the incidents resulted in patient harm. Each incident was graded for potential severity using the French Nuclear Safety Authority scoring scale; high potential severity incidents (score >3) were considered, along with a subset of 30 randomly chosen low severity incidents. Each report was evaluated to identify which of 15 common QC checks could have detected it. The effectiveness was calculated, defined as the percentage of incidents that each QC measure could detect, both for individual QC checks and for combinations of checks. In total, 4407 incidents were reported, 292 of which had high-potential severity. High- and low-severity incidents were detectable by 4.0 ± 2.3 (mean ± SD) and 2.6 ± 1.4 QC checks, respectively (P<.001). All individual checks were less than 50% sensitive with the exception of pretreatment plan review by a physicist (63%). An effectiveness of 97% was achieved with 7 checks used in combination and was not further improved with more checks. The combination of checks with the highest effectiveness includes physics plan review, physician plan review, Electronic Portal Imaging Device-based in vivo portal dosimetry, radiation therapist timeout, weekly physics chart check, the use of checklists, port films, and source-to-skin distance checks. Some commonly used QC checks such as pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy QA do not substantially add to the ability to detect errors in these data. The effectiveness of QC measures in radiation oncology depends sensitively on which checks are used and in which combinations. A small percentage of errors cannot be detected by any of the standard formal QC checks currently in broad use, suggesting that further improvements are needed. These data

  4. Quality Control Quantification (QCQ): A Tool to Measure the Value of Quality Control Checks in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Eric C., E-mail: eford@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Terezakis, Stephanie; Souranis, Annette; Harris, Kendra [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To quantify the error-detection effectiveness of commonly used quality control (QC) measures. Methods: We analyzed incidents from 2007-2010 logged into a voluntary in-house, electronic incident learning systems at 2 academic radiation oncology clinics. None of the incidents resulted in patient harm. Each incident was graded for potential severity using the French Nuclear Safety Authority scoring scale; high potential severity incidents (score >3) were considered, along with a subset of 30 randomly chosen low severity incidents. Each report was evaluated to identify which of 15 common QC checks could have detected it. The effectiveness was calculated, defined as the percentage of incidents that each QC measure could detect, both for individual QC checks and for combinations of checks. Results: In total, 4407 incidents were reported, 292 of which had high-potential severity. High- and low-severity incidents were detectable by 4.0 {+-} 2.3 (mean {+-} SD) and 2.6 {+-} 1.4 QC checks, respectively (P<.001). All individual checks were less than 50% sensitive with the exception of pretreatment plan review by a physicist (63%). An effectiveness of 97% was achieved with 7 checks used in combination and was not further improved with more checks. The combination of checks with the highest effectiveness includes physics plan review, physician plan review, Electronic Portal Imaging Device-based in vivo portal dosimetry, radiation therapist timeout, weekly physics chart check, the use of checklists, port films, and source-to-skin distance checks. Some commonly used QC checks such as pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy QA do not substantially add to the ability to detect errors in these data. Conclusions: The effectiveness of QC measures in radiation oncology depends sensitively on which checks are used and in which combinations. A small percentage of errors cannot be detected by any of the standard formal QC checks currently in broad use, suggesting that

  5. SSDL quality assurance for environmental dose/dose rate monitoring of photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Member states of IAEA have recently approved an expanded Nuclear Safety Programme and two International Conventions have been signed. One concerns early notification of a nuclear accident, and the other concerns assistance in the case of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency. In the course of the implementation of these conventions an international system will be established by the Agency for the reception and dissemination of data following a nuclear accident. Such data should include the results of radiation measurements obtained by radiation monitoring. These data must be reliable, and comparable. This assures that numerical values of measured quantities obtained at different times, sites and countries, and with different instruments, can be compared in order that the competent authorities may draw conclusions. Such measurements may also have legal consequences. This implies that the instruments used for the measurement should comply with the relevant international specifications, and that the readings of these instruments be traceable to the international measurement system. At a meeting of an expert working group on International Cooperation in Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection held in November 1986, a proposal to produce a technical document on ''The role of SSDLs in the quality assurance programme relating to the use of dose and dose rate meters for personal and environmental measurements'' received high priority, and at a subsequent meeting of the Board of Governors the proposal was approved. Prior to these proposals the SSDL Scientific Committee at its annual meeting in May 1986 also advised the IAEA to promote measures to ensure world wide reliability and traceability of dose measurements in the field of radiation protection. On 26-30 January 1987 an Advisory Group Meeting on ''The role of SSDLs in the dosimetry of unintentional radiation exposures'' was organized by the IAEA. This Advisory Group assisted the Agency in the formulation of a

  6. Radiation Dose and Image Quality from Coronary Angiography in 320-Detecor Row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thanomphudsa, J.; Krisanachinda, A.; Tumkosit, M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography examinations are increasing rapidly. New Computed Tomography has been developed to improve image quality with the patient dose reduction. The purpose of this study is to evaluate radiation dose and image quality of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in patients using 320-detector row CT. Methods: Forty-one patients referred for cardiac CT examinations at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital were included in this study. All coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) examinations were performed on the 320-detector row CT, Toshiba Aquilion One. Scanning protocol was investigated on dose estimates and image quality. Patients were scanned base on heart rate (HR) by HR 75 bpm use retrospective with dose modulation. Scanning parameters, kVp, mAs, HR, BMI, CTDIvol(mGy) and DLP(mGy.cm), were recorded to study the factors affecting the image quality and patient dose. And mA and kVp setting depend on BMI of the patient. Effective dose is calculated from DLP using specific conversion factor. The image quality was evaluated in 4 vessels by two radiologists. Noise assessment was also studied quantitatively. Results: The patient effective dose in prospective gating 70-80% was 3.6 ± 0.9 mSv, prospective gating 30-80% (1R-R) was 6.3 ± 1.9 mSv, and 30-80% (2R-R) was 10.8 ± 1.8 mSv and in retrospective with tube current modulation was 12.1± 7.7 mSv. Image noise was highest in PGT 70-80% 1R-R and decreased in RGT with tube current modulation, PGT 30-80% 1R-R and lowest in PGT 30-80% 2 R-R. And overall qualitative image quality was mostly good to excellent score. Discussion: The heart rate, heart rate variability and disease of the patient are affecting in the radiation dose and image quality so the suitable acquisition protocol used could be necessary. the effective dose and the image noise for the image quality. (author)

  7. International conference on quality assurance and new techniques in radiation medicine. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    During the last decade, technological innovations have been introduced into medical practice to support new diagnostic and treatment modalities that involve the use of radiation. These innovations frequently depend on advanced, high-speed computer systems that operate with digitally processed information right up to the analogue display presented to the decision maker. The safety and effectiveness of the diagnosis and treatment provided to patients demand multidisciplinary teams of health care professionals to develop and monitor the equipment and confirm the integrity of its output. Quality control (QC) of individual components is used to ensure these new devices are functioning properly at each step in the chain. Nevertheless, a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) system is required to guarantee to patients that these medical procedures will yield valuable information or provide needed treatment that can be implemented properly and used to achieve a positive impact on their health. This conference focused on the QC tests and QA systems used in radiation medicine, particularly for new and emerging technologies. The conference provided a unique opportunity to deal with QA within several disciplines: In radiation oncology, a systematic approach is being developed to examine the impact of introducing new technologies in terms of treatment outcomes. The evidence will be based on assessing improved quality of life due to fewer complications and increased longevity due to better local control of disease. In nuclear medicine, QA objectives are the improvement of the quality and reproducibility of diagnostic imaging and therapeutic treatments, which should bring the necessary information and therapeutic results with the smallest amount of administered activity. Overall, the system implemented should be customer (patient) oriented in order to guarantee a service that meets the highest achievable professional standards. Departmental organization should include QC

  8. International conference on quality assurance and new techniques in radiation medicine. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade, technological innovations have been introduced into medical practice to support new diagnostic and treatment modalities that involve the use of radiation. These innovations frequently depend on advanced, high-speed computer systems that operate with digitally processed information right up to the analogue display presented to the decision maker. The safety and effectiveness of the diagnosis and treatment provided to patients demand multidisciplinary teams of health care professionals to develop and monitor the equipment and confirm the integrity of its output. Quality control (QC) of individual components is used to ensure these new devices are functioning properly at each step in the chain. Nevertheless, a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) system is required to guarantee to patients that these medical procedures will yield valuable information or provide needed treatment that can be implemented properly and used to achieve a positive impact on their health. This conference focused on the QC tests and QA systems used in radiation medicine, particularly for new and emerging technologies. The conference provided a unique opportunity to deal with QA within several disciplines: In radiation oncology, a systematic approach is being developed to examine the impact of introducing new technologies in terms of treatment outcomes. The evidence will be based on assessing improved quality of life due to fewer complications and increased longevity due to better local control of disease. In nuclear medicine, QA objectives are the improvement of the quality and reproducibility of diagnostic imaging and therapeutic treatments, which should bring the necessary information and therapeutic results with the smallest amount of administered activity. Overall, the system implemented should be customer (patient) oriented in order to guarantee a service that meets the highest achievable professional standards. Departmental organization should include QC

  9. BACTERIAL MORTALITY DUE TO SOLAR RADIATION, COMPARING EXPERIMENTAL AND STATISTICAL EVIDENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many researchers report that sunlight is a primary stressor of beach indicator bacteria. Some water quality models include code that quantifies the effect of radiation on bacterial decay. For example, the EPA Visual Plumes model includes two coliform and one enterococcus submodel...

  10. Low index contrast heterostructure photonic crystal cavities with high quality factors and vertical radiation coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaochen; Minkov, Momchil; Fan, Shanhui; Li, Xiuling; Zhou, Weidong

    2018-04-01

    We report here design and experimental demonstration of heterostructure photonic crystal cavities resonating near the Γ point with simultaneous strong lateral confinement and highly directional vertical radiation patterns. The lateral confinement is provided by a mode gap originating from a gradual modulation of the hole radii. High quality factor resonance is realized with a low index contrast between silicon nitride and quartz. The near surface-normal directional emission is preserved when the size of the core region is scaled down. The influence of the cavity size parameters on the resonant modes is also investigated theoretically and experimentally.

  11. Evaluation gives productivity and quality gives fruit in Aguacate subjected has to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Cruz Torres, Eulogio; Garcia Andrade, Juan M.; Ibannez Palacios, Jorge; Mijares Oviedo, Pedro

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of productivity, post harvest behavior and fruit quality was performed on four years Has avocado trees irradiated with 60 Co gamma rays in doses of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 Gy, established in the La Labor Experimental Center of the Centro de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas del Aguacate en el Estado de Mexico (CICTAMEX) at Temascaltepec Mexico. Productivity had a significant increase in the dose of 15 Gy being the average number of fruits nearly 400 % more than the control at fruit setting, being such difference reduced at fruit harvesting to 300%. In regard to post harvest performance, the respiration index (mg CO2 /kg/hr) did not show significant differences among treatments. Also others variables such as physiological weight losses, texture, maturity pattern, and sensorial tests (color, flavor, aroma, texture) were not different in regard to the control. This means that radiation has altered productivity but not the quality and post harvest behavior of fruits

  12. Impact of coherent synchrotron radiation on beam qualities in a Chicane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Dao; Huang Wenhui; He Xiaozhong

    2004-01-01

    When the bunch goes through a Chicane, the energy will be redistributed within the bunch due to CSR (coherent synchrotron radiation), which would cause nonlinearity. Present theory states that this nonlinearity would add a huge amount to emittance growth. Based on simulation results, this paper would point out that the theory is only valid under an ideal condition that the bunch initially has no nonlinearity and under some given parameters there could be a cancellation between the nonlinearity caused by CSR and the initial nonlinearity. So under these circumstances authors can expect CSR to improve the beam quality. This paper provides a brief information about CSR and a full estimation of effects of CSR on beam qualities

  13. Evaluation of fruit productivity and quality in Hass avocado submitted to 60Co gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz T, E. De la; Ibanez P, J.; Mijares O, P.; Garcia A, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of productivity, postharvest behavior and fruit quality was performed on four years Hass avocado trees irradiated with 60 Co gamma rays in doses of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 Gy, established in the ''La Labor'' Experimental Center of the Centro de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologias del Aguacate en el Estado de Mexico (CICTAMEX) at Temascaltepec Mexico. Productivity had a significant increase in the dose of 15 Gy being the average number of fruits nearly 400 % more than the control at fruit setting, being such difference reduced at fruit harvesting to 300 %. In regard to postharvest performance, the respiration index (mg CO 2 /kg/hr) did not show significant differences among treatments. Also others variables such as physiological weight losses, texture, maturity pattern, and sensorial tests (color, flavor, aroma, texture) were not different in regard to the control. This mean that radiation has altered productivity but not the quality and postharvest behavior of fruits. (Author)

  14. Scatter radiation dose at height of the lens and image quality in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguees, Fernando A. Leyton

    2016-01-01

    Cardiologist and other staff members receive high doses of scattered radiation. Cases of radiation-induced cataract among cardiology professionals have been reported in studies, estimates for the dose to eye lens ranged from 450 to 900 mSv per year (without ceiling suspended screen), over several years. Recent surveys regarding high prevalence of lens changes likely induced by radiation exposure suggest an urgent need for improved radiation safety and training, use of eye protection during catheterization procedures, and improved occupational dosimetry. In view of the evidence of radiation injuries, the ICRP recommends limiting the radiation dose to the lens to 20 mSv per year for occupational exposure. A system for optimizing the radiation exposure is the measurement of entrance surface air kerma (K a,e ) and kerma-area product (P KA ) for patient and scattered dose or dose rate at the position for the staff, under clinical working conditions using phantoms and defined technical factors. Correlating K a,e and P KA with the scatter dose, applying the attenuation factors protective devices can enable estimation of the lens doses for operators. The purpose of this work is: to study the possibility of establishing a procedure which is useful for scientific societies and the regulatory authority in the prevention and control of IOE dose and to control and improve the quality of procedures in interventional cardiology as an initiative to raise awareness and optimization of radiological protection. Measurements were taken in different cardiac laboratories. Clinical working conditions were reproduced during the experiments for the different hemodynamic angiographic projections and operating modes used in fluoroscopy and cine. A first K a,e rate reference proposal for the characterization of angiography for the different acquisition modes were 16; 35; 40 and 220 (mGy/min), respectively. Considering the typical PKA values to patient in interventional cardiology procedures

  15. Quality control of calibration system for area monitors at National Laboratory of Metrology from Ionizing Radiations (LNMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, M.M.O.; Freitas, L.C. de

    1992-01-01

    The quality control of equipment used in calibration from the National Laboratory of Metrology on Ionizing Radiations is presented, with results of standard measure systems and irradiation system. Tables and graphics with the quality of systems are also shown. (C.G.C.)

  16. Sperm quality and DNA damage in men from Jilin Province, China, who are occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D D; Hao, J L; Guo, K M; Lu, C W; Liu, X D

    2016-03-22

    Long-term radiation exposure affects human health. Ionizing radiation has long been known to raise the risk of cancer. In addition to high doses of radiation, low-dose ionizing radiation might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, lens opacity, and some other non-cancerous diseases. Low- and high-dose exposures to ionizing radiation elicit different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. The health risks arising from exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation should be re-evaluated. Health workers exposed to ionizing radiation experience low-dose radiation and have an increased risk of hematological malignancies. Reproductive function is sensitive to changes in the physical environment, including ionizing radiation. However, data is scarce regarding the association between occupational radiation exposure and risk to human fertility. Sperm DNA integrity is a functional parameter of male fertility evaluation. Hence, we aimed to report sperm quality and DNA damage in men from Jilin Province, China, who were occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Sperm motility and normal morphology were significantly lower in the exposed compared with the non-exposed men. There was no statistically significant difference in sperm concentration between exposed and non-exposed men. The sperm DNA fragmentation index was significantly higher in the exposed than the non-exposed men. Chronic long-term exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation could affect sperm motility, normal morphology, and the sperm DNA fragmentation index in the Chinese population. Sperm quality and DNA integrity are functional parameters that could be used to evaluate occupational exposure to ionizing radiation.

  17. "I sleep better at night:" How peer review of radiation treatment plans indirectly improves quality of care across radiation treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, Michael D; Hart, Margaret; O'Donnell, Jennifer; Reddeman, Lindsay; Gutierrez, Eric; Foxcroft, Sophie; Warde, Padraig

    Peer review of radiation oncology treatment plans is increasingly recognized as an important component of quality assurance in radiation treatment planning and delivery. Peer review of treatment plans can directly improve the quality of those plans and can also have indirect effects on radiation treatment programs. We undertook a systematic, qualitative approach to describing the indirect benefits of peer review, factors that were seen to facilitate or act as barriers to the implementation of peer review, and strategies to address these barriers across a provincial jurisdiction of radiation oncology programs (ROPs). Semistructured qualitative interviews were held with radiation oncology department heads and radiation therapy managers (or delegates) in all 14 ROPs in Ontario, Canada. We used a theoretically guided phenomenological qualitative approach to design and analyze the interview content. Themes were recorded by 2 independent reviewers, and any discordance was resolved by consensus. A total of 28 interviews were completed with 32 interviewees. Twenty-two unique themes addressed perceived benefits of peer review, relating to either peer review structure (n = 3), process (n = 9), or outcome (n = 10). Of these 22 themes, 19 related to indirect benefits to ROPs. In addition, 18 themes related to factors that facilitated peer review activities and 30 themes related to key barriers to implementing peer review were identified. Findings were consistent with, and enhanced the understanding of, previous survey-based assessments of the benefits and challenges of implementing peer review programs. Although challenges and concerns regarding the implementation of peer review were evident, the indirect benefits to radiation programs are numerous, far outweigh the implementation challenges, and strongly complement the direct individual-patient benefits that result from peer review quality assurance of radiation treatment plans. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. SU-F-J-178: A Computer Simulation Model Observer for Task-Based Image Quality Assessment in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolly, S; Mutic, S; Anastasio, M; Li, H; Yu, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Traditionally, image quality in radiation therapy is assessed subjectively or by utilizing physically-based metrics. Some model observers exist for task-based medical image quality assessment, but almost exclusively for diagnostic imaging tasks. As opposed to disease diagnosis, the task for image observers in radiation therapy is to utilize the available images to design and deliver a radiation dose which maximizes patient disease control while minimizing normal tissue damage. The purpose of this study was to design and implement a new computer simulation model observer to enable task-based image quality assessment in radiation therapy. Methods: A modular computer simulation framework was developed to resemble the radiotherapy observer by simulating an end-to-end radiation therapy treatment. Given images and the ground-truth organ boundaries from a numerical phantom as inputs, the framework simulates an external beam radiation therapy treatment and quantifies patient treatment outcomes using the previously defined therapeutic operating characteristic (TOC) curve. As a preliminary demonstration, TOC curves were calculated for various CT acquisition and reconstruction parameters, with the goal of assessing and optimizing simulation CT image quality for radiation therapy. Sources of randomness and bias within the system were analyzed. Results: The relationship between CT imaging dose and patient treatment outcome was objectively quantified in terms of a singular value, the area under the TOC (AUTOC) curve. The AUTOC decreases more rapidly for low-dose imaging protocols. AUTOC variation introduced by the dose optimization algorithm was approximately 0.02%, at the 95% confidence interval. Conclusion: A model observer has been developed and implemented to assess image quality based on radiation therapy treatment efficacy. It enables objective determination of appropriate imaging parameter values (e.g. imaging dose). Framework flexibility allows for incorporation

  19. EPA Metadata Style Guide Keywords and EPA Organization Names

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following keywords and EPA organization names listed below, along with EPA’s Metadata Style Guide, are intended to provide suggestions and guidance to assist with the standardization of metadata records.

  20. EPA Office Points, Tutuila AS, 2009, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EPA office location in Tutila Island in American Samoa. American Samoa is an unincorporated and unorganized territory of the United States, and administered by...

  1. Quality control methodology and implementation of X-radiation standards beams, mammography level, following the standard IEC 61267

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Eduardo de Lima

    2010-01-01

    In this work it was developed and applied a quality control program of the X radiation system (160 kV, constant potential, target of tungsten) of the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN(LCI) in the energy range relative to mammography beams (from 25 kV to 35 kV). The X radiation standards beams, level mammography, using molybdenum and aluminum as additional filtration, were established after the application of this quality control program following national and international recommendations. The reference ionization chamber has traceability to PTB and was regularly submitted to quality control tests for evaluation and analysis of its performance. The radiation qualities emerging from the X-radiation assembly (RQR-M), based on a phantom made up of an aluminum added filter (RQA-M), narrow beam condition (RQN-M) and broad beam condition (RQB-M), following the recommendations of the international standard IEC 61267 (2005) and the IAEA code of practice, TRS 457 (2007) were established. For the implantation of RQN-M and RQB-M radiation qualities, two mammography phantoms were developed. The half-value layers found are those presented by the German primary laboratory PTB, and varied from 0.35 to 1.21 mm Al. The air kerma rates were obtained for all the 15 implanted qualities. (author)

  2. The indirect effect of radiation reduces the repair fidelity of NHEJ as verified in repair deficient CHO cell lines exposed to different radiation qualities and potassium bromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajinskis, Ainars; Olsson, Gunilla; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation is mainly dependent on radiation quality, where the indirect action of radiation may contribute to different extent depending on the type of radiation under study. The effect of indirect action of radiation can be investigated by using agents that induce oxidative DNA damage or by applying free radical scavengers. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the indirect effect of radiation for the repair fidelity of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination repair (HRR) and base excision repair (BER) when DNA damage of different complexity was induced by gamma radiation, alpha particles or from base damages (8-oxo-dG) induced by potassium bromate (KBrO 3 ). CHO cells lines deficient in XRCC3 (HRR) irs1SF, XRCC7 (NHEJ) V3-3 and XRCC1 (BER) EM9 were irradiated in the absence or presence of the free radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The endpoints investigated included rate of cell proliferation by the DRAG assay, clonogenic cell survival and the level of primary DNA damage by the comet assay. The results revealed that the indirect effect of low-LET radiation significantly reduced the repair fidelity of both NHEJ and HRR pathways. For high-LET radiation the indirect effect of radiation also significantly reduced the repair fidelity for the repair deficient cell lines. The results suggest further that the repair fidelity of the error prone NHEJ repair pathway is more impaired by the indirect effect of high-LET radiation relative to the other repair pathways studied. The response to bromate observed for the two DSB repair deficient cell lines strongly support earlier studies that bromate induces complex DNA damages. The significantly reduced repair fidelity of irs1SF and V3-3 suggests that NHEJ as well as HRR are needed for the repair, and that complex DSBs are formed after bromate exposure.

  3. The indirect effect of radiation reduces the repair fidelity of NHEJ as verified in repair deficient CHO cell lines exposed to different radiation qualities and potassium bromate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajinskis, Ainars, E-mail: ainars.bajinskis@gmt.su.se [Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Olsson, Gunilla; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-03-01

    The complexity of DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation is mainly dependent on radiation quality, where the indirect action of radiation may contribute to different extent depending on the type of radiation under study. The effect of indirect action of radiation can be investigated by using agents that induce oxidative DNA damage or by applying free radical scavengers. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the indirect effect of radiation for the repair fidelity of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination repair (HRR) and base excision repair (BER) when DNA damage of different complexity was induced by gamma radiation, alpha particles or from base damages (8-oxo-dG) induced by potassium bromate (KBrO{sub 3}). CHO cells lines deficient in XRCC3 (HRR) irs1SF, XRCC7 (NHEJ) V3-3 and XRCC1 (BER) EM9 were irradiated in the absence or presence of the free radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The endpoints investigated included rate of cell proliferation by the DRAG assay, clonogenic cell survival and the level of primary DNA damage by the comet assay. The results revealed that the indirect effect of low-LET radiation significantly reduced the repair fidelity of both NHEJ and HRR pathways. For high-LET radiation the indirect effect of radiation also significantly reduced the repair fidelity for the repair deficient cell lines. The results suggest further that the repair fidelity of the error prone NHEJ repair pathway is more impaired by the indirect effect of high-LET radiation relative to the other repair pathways studied. The response to bromate observed for the two DSB repair deficient cell lines strongly support earlier studies that bromate induces complex DNA damages. The significantly reduced repair fidelity of irs1SF and V3-3 suggests that NHEJ as well as HRR are needed for the repair, and that complex DSBs are formed after bromate exposure.

  4. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2013-01-01

    Dear GAC-EPA members, This year, owing to works in the main Auditorium, we have to hold our General assembly in the auditorium of the Globe on 27 March 2013 and we really hope that you can be present. We wish to give you some preliminary practical recommendations: Do not forget your CERN access card, the guards may carry out checks. As far as possible, use public transport because there is very limited parking. If you come by car, park your vehicle on the car parks inside CERN because the outside car park cannot be used by visitors. Refreshments cannot be organized in the Globe; they will be held in cafeteria n°1, which will force us to move by using CERN entrances A or B or via building 33 (access cards required here too). We thank you for your attention and hope to see you soon. Le GAC organise chaque mois des permanences avec entretiens individuels. La prochaine permanence se tiendra le : Mardi 2 avril de 13 h 30 à 16 h 00 Salle de réunion de l&rsquo...

  5. GAC-EPA

    CERN Multimedia

    GAC-EPA

    2013-01-01

    En tant que Président du GAC-EPA, je porte à votre connaissance ce communiqué émanant de la Direction du CERN. Le 2 juin 2013, le CERN inaugure le projet Passeport Big Bang, un parcours touristique et scientifique formé de dix plates-formes d'exposition devant dix sites du CERN dans le Pays de Gex et le Canton de Genève. Les plateformes sont reliées par des itinéraires balisés et par un jeu de piste. C'est un projet est mené en collaboration avec les communes du Pays de Gex, Meyrin et Genève Tourisme dans un souci de renforcer notre dialogue avec nos voisins : http://passeport-big-bang.web.cern.ch/fr. A l’occasion de cette inauguration, nous organisons un événement populaire et festif : le matin, les familles pourront participer à des randonnées à vélo tandis que les sportifs pourront tester les 5...

  6. Evaluation of quality of polaprezinc suppositories and their clinical effect on radiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikata, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Hikasa, Shinichi; Hamaguchi, Tsuneo; Doi, Hiroshi; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Kadobayashi, Muneo; Kimura, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    Polaprezinc (PZ) suppositories have been used for radiation proctitis in our hospital. In this study, we established methods to evaluate the quality of hospital-prepared PZ suppositories and investigated their stability. As PZ is dissociated at an acidic pH but not at a medium pH, the release of PZ from the suppository was carried out using chelatometric titration in weakly acidic buffer solutions (pH 3, pH 4, and pH 5). As the release of PZ from the suppository was fastest in the buffer solution at pH 3, we used this pH for the release test for PZ. Conducting this test in the stability investigation showed that the amount of PZ released from the suppository after 84 days was the same as that immediately after manufacture. We also examined the clinical efficacy of the PZ suppository in 5 patients with radiation proctitis, finding that efficacy was satisfactory in 3 patients. These results indicated that the PZ suppository is a good treatment for radiation proctitis. (author)

  7. Effects of the ionizing radiations, freezing and thawing duration on chicken liver cells quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, R.C.; Araujo, M.M.; Salum, D.C.; Marchioni, E.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    All food storage processes modify the food. Irradiation reduces and could stop cell division, avoid infestation, reduce contamination and delay food decomposition. The cold chain is a succession of steps which maintains the food at low temperature. Defrosted food shall never be frozen again, the best way being to consume it quickly then avoiding multiplication and acceleration of microbial growth, which causes decay and nutrients damage. The Comet Assay indicates DNA damage and can then be used to control the overall quality of the food and in a certain extent to evaluate the damage caused by irradiation and storage on liver chicken cells. In this work, different thawing temperatures and radiation doses were checked to establish a 'DNA damage index' by using the Comet Assay. Samples were irradiated in a 60 Co irradiator with 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 kGy radiation doses. Our results showed that no intact cells were detected in frozen samples: however, irradiated liver samples in natura showed some intact cells depending on the applied radiation doses.

  8. Prevention of radiation induced xerostomia and improved quality of life: Submandibular salivary gland transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, K.

    2003-01-01

    Over 60,000 new cases of head and neck cancers, and approximately 15,000 deaths occur every year in the United States (1). Head and neck cancers affect more men then women by a factor of 2:1, although the incidence of women is increasing as a result of increased tobacco use (2). Over 90% of all head and neck cancers are squamous cell carcinomas; most of the remaining cancers are adenocarcinomas. A combination of radiation therapy and surgery is used as the standard, primary treatment modality. Xerostomia occurs when the salivary glands are affected by irradiation. Patients experiencing xerostomia are at an increased risk for a wide variety of oral problems; all adversely affecting one's quality of life. Currently patients make lifestyle changes, dietary modifications, and use artificial salivas, sprays, gels, and lozenges to help mask their xerostomia. However, none of these products stimulate natural salivary production and act as a replacement therapy rather then a cure for xerostomia. A new protocol, RTOG 1083 has been approved by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, which involves a surgical transfer of a submandibular salivary gland to the submental space (where it can be easily shielded) as a method of prevention of radiation induced xerostomia. (author)

  9. Effect of gamma radiation and storage on cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale L.) quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Adriana Régia Marques de; Brazaca, Solange Guidolin Canniatti; Arthur, Valter; Oliveira, Anderson Giovani Cândico; Spoto, Marta Helena Fillet; Walder, Júlio Marcos Melges

    2009-01-01

    The non-efficiency or absence of techniques for adequate handling, transport, and storage of cashew stalks associated with a high level of perishability, generates high economic loss in the commercialization of these fruits, hence the development of conservation methods becomes a necessity in order to enhance the profitability. Cashew apples from precocious dwarf cashew tree were irradiated with doses of 0, 0.5, and 1.0 kGy and stored during nine days under refrigeration at 4 ºC for evaluation of the quality stability during storage. Chemical analyses were performed to verify changes in reducing sugars, Brix, vitamin C, and pH. Alterations in the firmness and color were also observed. The levels of vitamin C decreased as a function of storage as well as a function of the radiation doses employed. The firmness of the fruits was influenced by both the radiation doses and storage time, increasing during storage and decreasing as the radiation doses increased. Irradiation was shown to be efficient in the prolongation of the shelf-life of cashew stalks. (author) [pt

  10. Radiation Synthesis and Application of Absorbent Hydrogels to Enhance the Quality of Basadiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Duy Hang; Pham Thi Le Ha; Tran Thi Thuy; Le Hai; Nguyen Tan Man; Le Huu Tu; Nguyen Trong Hoanh Phong; Tran Thi Tam; Tran Thu Hong; Pham Thi Sam; Nguyen Tuong Li Lan

    2013-01-01

    Studying on the using ability of radiation synthesis hydrogels to enhance the quality of the biodiesel produced from Basa fish oil was implemented. Radiation synthesis of absorbent hydrogels and their application to removal of contaminants from biodiesel produced from fish oil were the major problems. The preparation of the super absorbent hydrogel obtained by radiation induced cross linking of polyacrylamide and polyacrylic was investigated and its application in removal of water, catalyst from the basadiesel emulsion is reported. The hydrogels were characterized in terms of gel content, swelling, character of water and mineral catalyst removal were studied. The effect of temperature, NaOH and KOH content of solution on the swelling degree of hydrogels was also determined. The results showed that the gel fraction of PAAm/PAAc hydrogel with PAAm/AAc (1/4) ratio and dose of 20 kGy was used to synthesized the Gel of A-311. Studies also made on the application of Gel A-311 during the refining process in Basadiesel industry. (author)

  11. Effects of the ionizing radiations, freezing and thawing duration on chicken liver cells quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, R.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242 Zip code, 05508-000 Cidade Universitaria Sao Paulo, SP-Brazil (Brazil)], E-mail: renatocduarte@yahoo.com.br; Araujo, M.M.; Salum, D.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242 Zip code, 05508-000 Cidade Universitaria Sao Paulo, SP-Brazil (Brazil); Marchioni, E. [IPHC-UMR 7178-Faculte de Pharmacie, 74 route du Rhin, 67400 Illkirch (France); Villavicencio, A.L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242 Zip code, 05508-000 Cidade Universitaria Sao Paulo, SP-Brazil (Brazil)], E-mail: villavic@ipen.br

    2009-07-15

    All food storage processes modify the food. Irradiation reduces and could stop cell division, avoid infestation, reduce contamination and delay food decomposition. The cold chain is a succession of steps which maintains the food at low temperature. Defrosted food shall never be frozen again, the best way being to consume it quickly then avoiding multiplication and acceleration of microbial growth, which causes decay and nutrients damage. The Comet Assay indicates DNA damage and can then be used to control the overall quality of the food and in a certain extent to evaluate the damage caused by irradiation and storage on liver chicken cells. In this work, different thawing temperatures and radiation doses were checked to establish a 'DNA damage index' by using the Comet Assay. Samples were irradiated in a {sup 60}Co irradiator with 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 kGy radiation doses. Our results showed that no intact cells were detected in frozen samples: however, irradiated liver samples in natura showed some intact cells depending on the applied radiation doses.

  12. Medical imaging using ionizing radiation: Optimization of dose and image quality in fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A. Kyle; Balter, Stephen; Rauch, Phillip; Wagner, Louis K.

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 Summer School of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) focused on optimization of the use of ionizing radiation in medical imaging. Day 2 of the Summer School was devoted to fluoroscopy and interventional radiology and featured seven lectures. These lectures have been distilled into a single review paper covering equipment specification and siting, equipment acceptance testing and quality control, fluoroscope configuration, radiation effects, dose estimation and measurement, and principles of flat panel computed tomography. This review focuses on modern fluoroscopic equipment and is comprised in large part of information not found in textbooks on the subject. While this review does discuss technical aspects of modern fluoroscopic equipment, it focuses mainly on the clinical use and support of such equipment, from initial installation through estimation of patient dose and management of radiation effects. This review will be of interest to those learning about fluoroscopy, to those wishing to update their knowledge of modern fluoroscopic equipment, to those wishing to deepen their knowledge of particular topics, such as flat panel computed tomography, and to those who support fluoroscopic equipment in the clinic

  13. F-value as a chromosomal fingerprint of the quality of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.

    1999-01-01

    Since the first proposal by Brenner and Sachs (Radiation Res. 140, 134-142, 1994), the F-value, the ratio of inter- to intra-chromosomal interchanges, as a biomarker for the quality of radiation has been a matter of repeated discussion. Controversies seem to stem from the selection of data which are heterogeneous in terms of chromosome scoring criteria and dose range. In the context of the critical evaluation of the validity of the F-value, the cytogenetic data obtained in our laboratory from the in vitro irradiation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes have been re-assessed for the F-value. The results were consistent with the original contention that the densely ionizing radiations showed lower F-value. The differential F-value was more pronounced in the low-dose range and disappeared with the increase of the dose, or more precisely with the number of charged particles passing through the cell nucleus. The range or charged particles also plays a role, which makes the F-value of neutrons insensitive to their energy due to a wide variation of the kinetic energy of recoil protons. (author)

  14. Quality control of radiation counting systems and measurement of minimum detectable activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Byoung Chul; Han, Sung Sim; Kim, Young Bok; Jee, Kwang Yong; Sohn, Se Chul

    2004-01-01

    Various radiation counters have been using to determine radioactivity of radwastes for disposal. A radiation counting system was set up using a radiation detector chosen in this study and its stability was investigated through the periodic determination of background and counting efficiencies in accordance with a quality control program to increase the confidence level. The average background level for the γ-spectrometer was 1.59 cps and the average counting level for the standard sample was 45248 dps within 20 confidence levels. The average alpha background level for the low background α/β counting system was 0.31 cpm and the efficiency for alpha counting was 34.38 %. The average beta background level for the α/β counting system was 1.30 cpm and the efficiency for beta counting was 46.5%. The background level in the region of 3H and 14C for the liquid scintillation counting system was 2.52 and 3.31 cpm and the efficiency for alpha counting was 58.5 and 95.6%, respectively. The minimum detectable activity for the γ-spectrometer was found to be 3.2 Bq/mL and 3.8 Bq/mL for the liquid scintillation counter, and 20.5 and 23.0 Bq/mL, respectively for the α and β counting system

  15. Radiation levels and image quality in patients undergoing chest X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos de Oliveira, Paulo Márcio; Carmo Santana, Priscila do; Sousa Lacerda, Marco Aurélio de; Silva, Teógenes Augusto da

    2017-01-01

    Patient dose monitoring for different radiographic procedures has been used as a parameter to evaluate the performance of radiology services; skin entrance absorbed dose values for each type of examination were internationally established and recommended aiming patient protection. In this work, a methodology for dose evaluation was applied to three diagnostic services: one with a conventional film and two with digital computerized radiography processing techniques. The x-ray beam parameters were selected and “doses” (specifically the entrance surface and incident air kerma) were evaluated based on images approved in European criteria during postero-anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) incidences. Data were collected from 200 patients related to 200 PA and 100 LAT incidences. Results showed that doses distributions in the three diagnostic services were very different; the best relation between dose and image quality was found in the institution with the chemical film processing. This work contributed for disseminating the radiation protection culture by emphasizing the need of a continuous dose reduction without losing the quality of the diagnostic image. - Highlights: • A methodology for dose evaluation was applied to three diagnostic services. • The doses in patients were evaluated when the images were adequate. • Data were collected from 200 patients. • Is possible doses optimization with digital system without an image quality reduction. • The best dose and image quality was found in chemical film processing.

  16. Does Quality of Radiation Therapy Predict Outcomes of Multicenter Cooperative Group Trials? A Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairchild, Alysa, E-mail: alysa.fairchild@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Straube, William [Advanced Technology Consortium, Imaged-Guided Therapy QA Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Laurie, Fran [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, Rhode Island (United States); Followill, David [Radiological Physics Center, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Central review of radiation therapy (RT) delivery within multicenter clinical trials was initiated in the early 1970s in the United States. Early quality assurance publications often focused on metrics related to process, logistics, and timing. Our objective was to review the available evidence supporting correlation of RT quality with clinical outcomes within cooperative group trials. A MEDLINE search was performed to identify multicenter studies that described central subjective assessment of RT protocol compliance (quality). Data abstracted included method of central review, definition of deviations, and clinical outcomes. Seventeen multicenter studies (1980-2012) were identified, plus one Patterns of Care Study. Disease sites were hematologic, head and neck, lung, breast, and pancreas. Between 0 and 97% of treatment plans received an overall grade of acceptable. In 7 trials, failure rates were significantly higher after inadequate versus adequate RT. Five of 9 and 2 of 5 trials reported significantly worse overall and progression-free survival after poor-quality RT, respectively. One reported a significant correlation, and 2 reported nonsignificant trends toward increased toxicity with noncompliant RT. Although more data are required, protocol-compliant RT may decrease failure rates and increase overall survival and likely contributes to the ability of collected data to answer the central trial question.

  17. Does Quality of Radiation Therapy Predict Outcomes of Multicenter Cooperative Group Trials? A Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, Alysa; Straube, William; Laurie, Fran; Followill, David

    2013-01-01

    Central review of radiation therapy (RT) delivery within multicenter clinical trials was initiated in the early 1970s in the United States. Early quality assurance publications often focused on metrics related to process, logistics, and timing. Our objective was to review the available evidence supporting correlation of RT quality with clinical outcomes within cooperative group trials. A MEDLINE search was performed to identify multicenter studies that described central subjective assessment of RT protocol compliance (quality). Data abstracted included method of central review, definition of deviations, and clinical outcomes. Seventeen multicenter studies (1980-2012) were identified, plus one Patterns of Care Study. Disease sites were hematologic, head and neck, lung, breast, and pancreas. Between 0 and 97% of treatment plans received an overall grade of acceptable. In 7 trials, failure rates were significantly higher after inadequate versus adequate RT. Five of 9 and 2 of 5 trials reported significantly worse overall and progression-free survival after poor-quality RT, respectively. One reported a significant correlation, and 2 reported nonsignificant trends toward increased toxicity with noncompliant RT. Although more data are required, protocol-compliant RT may decrease failure rates and increase overall survival and likely contributes to the ability of collected data to answer the central trial question

  18. Influence of X-ray scatter radiation on image quality in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M. J.; Di Maria, S.; Baptista, M.; Belchior, A.; Afonso, J.; Venâncio, J.; Vaz, P.

    2017-11-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a quasi-three-dimensional imaging technique that was developed to solve the principal limitation of mammography, namely the overlapping tissue effect. This issue in standard mammography (SM) leads to two main problems: low sensitivity (difficulty to detect lesions) and low specificity (non-negligible percentage of false positives). Although DBT is now being introduced in clinical practice the features of this technique have not yet been fully and accurately assessed. Consequently, optimization studies in terms of choosing the most suitable parameters which maximize image quality according to the known limits of breast dosimetry are currently performing. In DBT, scatter radiation can lead to a loss of contrast and to an increase of image noise by reducing the signal-to-difference-noise ratio (SDNR) of a lesion. Moreover the use of an anti-scatter grid is a concern due to the low exposure of the photon flux available per projection. For this reason the main aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the scatter radiation on image quality and the dose delivered to the breast. In particular a detailed analysis of the scatter radiation on the optimal energy that maximizes the SDNR was performed for different monochromatic energies and voltages. To reach this objective the PenEasy Monte Carlo (MC) simulation tool imbedded in the general-purpose main program PENELOPE, was used. After a successful validation of the MC model with measurements, 2D projection images of primary, coherent and incoherent photons were obtained. For that, a homogeneous breast phantom (2, 4, 6, 8 cm) with 25%, 50% and 75% glandular compositions was used, including a 5 mm thick tumor. The images were generated for each monochromatic X-ray energies in the range from 16 keV to 32 keV. For each angular projection considered (25 angular projections covering an arc of 50°) the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), the mean glandular dose (MGD) and the signal

  19. Blue Book: EPA Radiogenic Cancer Risk Models and Projections for the U.S. Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document presents EPA estimates of cancer incidence and mortality risk coefficients pertaining to low dose exposures to ionizing radiation for the U.S. population, as well as their scientific basis.

  20. A program on quality assurance and dose calibration for radiation therapy units in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla, M.C. de; Carrizales, L.; Diaz, J.; Gutt, F.; Cozman, A.

    1996-01-01

    The results of a five year program (1988-90-91-92-93) on quality assurance and dose calibration for 12 Cobalt-60 units from public hospitals, which represents 30% of total radiation therapy units in Venezuela, are presented. The remarkable improvement in the general performance of these units can be seen in the IAEA/WHO Postal TLD Intercomparison results which gave 100% within ± 5% in 1990 and 1992, while 63% in 1990 and 44% in 1992, with errors up to 37% were obtained for the participants not included in the program. The difference between the two groups lead the government to decrete through the Gaceta Oficial de la Republica de Venezuela, Resolution G-1397 on March 3, 1993, the quality assurance and dose calibration programs shall be established for all radiation therapy installations in Venezuela. The project for the standards was developed by the SSDL physicists and it was already approbated by the Health Ministry. It is expected that the Norms will enter into effect by the end of 1994. (author). 14 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  1. Statistical process control analysis for patient quality assurance of intensity modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rena; Kim, Kyubo; Cho, Samju; Lim, Sangwook; Lee, Suk; Shim, Jang Bo; Huh, Hyun Do; Lee, Sang Hoon; Ahn, Sohyun

    2017-11-01

    This study applied statistical process control to set and verify the quality assurances (QA) tolerance standard for our hospital's characteristics with the criteria standards that are applied to all the treatment sites with this analysis. Gamma test factor of delivery quality assurances (DQA) was based on 3%/3 mm. Head and neck, breast, prostate cases of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric arc radiation therapy (VMAT) were selected for the analysis of the QA treatment sites. The numbers of data used in the analysis were 73 and 68 for head and neck patients. Prostate and breast were 49 and 152 by MapCHECK and ArcCHECK respectively. C p value of head and neck and prostate QA were above 1.0, C pml is 1.53 and 1.71 respectively, which is close to the target value of 100%. C pml value of breast (IMRT) was 1.67, data values are close to the target value of 95%. But value of was 0.90, which means that the data values are widely distributed. C p and C pml of breast VMAT QA were respectively 1.07 and 2.10. This suggests that the VMAT QA has better process capability than the IMRT QA. Consequently, we should pay more attention to planning and QA before treatment for breast Radiotherapy.

  2. A program on quality assurance and dose calibration for radiation therapy units in Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, M.C. de; Carrizales, L; Diaz, J; Gutt, F; Cozman, A [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas (Venezuela). Lab. de Calibracion Dosimetrica

    1996-08-01

    The results of a five year program (1988-90-91-92-93) on quality assurance and dose calibration for 12 Cobalt-60 units from public hospitals, which represents 30% of total radiation therapy units in Venezuela, are presented. The remarkable improvement in the general performance of these units can be seen in the IAEA/WHO Postal TLD Intercomparison results which gave 100% within {+-} 5% in 1990 and 1992, while 63% in 1990 and 44% in 1992, with errors up to 37% were obtained for the participants not included in the program. The difference between the two groups lead the government to decrete through the Gaceta Oficial de la Republica de Venezuela, Resolution G-1397 on March 3, 1993, the quality assurance and dose calibration programs shall be established for all radiation therapy installations in Venezuela. The project for the standards was developed by the SSDL physicists and it was already approbated by the Health Ministry. It is expected that the Norms will enter into effect by the end of 1994. (author). 14 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Training courses for radiological technicians: radiation protection of the patient and control of image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateus Yoshimura, Elisabeth; Costa, Paulo Roberto; Furquim, Tania Aparecida; Freitas, Marcelo Baptista de; Valente, Marcelo; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2008-01-01

    Full text: As in other countries, life expectancy is increasing in Brazil, and the number of radiological examinations tends to increase. Old equipment and high technology ones cohabit, radiology technicians are not well prepared to conduct practices, images and doses to patients are not optimized. Digital techniques that began to be introduced in the last years are also an important issue, because, as it is possible to modify the image digitally, there is less concern about the choice of equipment parameters that produce the best-image/lowest-dose compromise. Pediatric radiology, CT and fluoroscopy require attention too, as they are of dosimetric interest or because the patient ages imply higher risks or because the techniques deliver higher doses than the conventional ones. In our opinion, the most important role that we can play is educating and forming people to work in this area: training programs and refreshing courses are a way of facing the problem. This way, we are organizing, in a technical cooperation with IAEA, two training courses in quality assurance and radiation protection in radiology, one designed to physicists (60 h), and the radiological technicians (40 h). An important cooperation with a paediatric and a general hospital made it possible to offer courses with 50% practical lessons, performed both in the University and in hospital equipment. Both courses cover a basic Radiation Physics program, radiation protection, image formation and quality control in conventional and digital equipment, and patient dosimetry. Equipment donated by IAEA facilitate the practical QA and dosimetry lessons. The rationale of our project is making it sustainable through the formation of physicists that will go on in the education process of technicians in technical schools. We present the results of the first two courses (physicists and technicians), considering the selection process, the development of the activities, and the assessment both of the students enrolled

  4. A System for Continual Quality Improvement of Normal Tissue Delineation for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breunig, Jennifer; Hernandez, Sophy; Lin, Jeffrey; Alsager, Stacy; Dumstorf, Christine; Price, Jennifer; Steber, Jennifer; Garza, Richard; Nagda, Suneel; Melian, Edward; Emami, Bahman [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Roeske, John C., E-mail: jroeske@lumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To implement the 'plan-do-check-act' (PDCA) cycle for the continual quality improvement of normal tissue contours used for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The CT scans of patients treated for tumors of the brain, head and neck, thorax, pancreas and prostate were selected for this study. For each scan, a radiation oncologist and a diagnostic radiologist, outlined the normal tissues ('gold' contours) using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. A total of 30 organs were delineated. Independently, 5 board-certified dosimetrists and 1 trainee then outlined the same organs. Metrics used to compare the agreement between the dosimetrists' contours and the gold contours included the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), and a penalty function using distance to agreement. Based on these scores, dosimetrists were re-trained on those organs in which they did not receive a passing score, and they were subsequently re-tested. Results: Passing scores were achieved on 19 of 30 organs evaluated. These scores were correlated to organ volume. For organ volumes <8 cc, the average DSC was 0.61 vs organ volumes {>=}8 cc, for which the average DSC was 0.91 (P=.005). Normal tissues that had the lowest scores included the lenses, optic nerves, chiasm, cochlea, and esophagus. Of the 11 organs that were considered for re-testing, 10 showed improvement in the average score, and statistically significant improvement was noted in more than half of these organs after education and re-assessment. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate the feasibility of applying the PDCA cycle to assess competence in the delineation of individual organs, and to identify areas for improvement. With testing, guidance, and re-evaluation, contouring consistency can be obtained across multiple dosimetrists. Our expectation is that continual quality improvement using the PDCA approach will ensure more accurate treatments and dose

  5. Radiation dose setting for sterilization of health care items in relation to product microbiological quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norimah Yusof; Nagi Marsit; Asnah Hassan

    1997-01-01

    Radiation dose of 25 k gray is no longer a generally accepted dose for sterilization. ISO document no. 11137 stated that a manufacturer can decide the dose to sterilize his product depending on the product's microbiological quality (number and type of the contaminants) and the sterility assurance level (SAL) should attain in relation to its usage. Five health care products were selected for the microbiological studies including bio burden counts, identification of most commonly found microorganisms and the radioresistance (D sub 10 value) of the selected isolates. Radiation dose was then determined by two methods, namely Method for Dose Validation of ISO 11137, and calculation based on log survival or population cycle reduction. At a given SAL of 10 sup -6 the radiation sterilization dose obtained by both methods was influenced by microbiological quality of the product. Sterilization dose set by the ISO Method I (Cotton Ball 19.4 kGy, Syringe 20.4 kGy, Suture 15. 0 kGy, Surgical Glove 24.9 kGy and Amnion 17.8 kGy) was higher than the dose calculated according to the log cycle reduction concept in all the products (Cotton Ball 14. 0 kGy, Syringe 15.5 kGy, Suture 11. 6 kGy, Surgical Glove 18. 0 kGy and Amnion 12.6 kGy). The ISO method has limitation on bio products such as amnion and other high valued products which are produced in small number with low bio burden and microorganism spectrum different from those commonly found on medical items

  6. Global Harmonization of Quality Assurance Naming Conventions in Radiation Therapy Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melidis, Christos, E-mail: christos.melidis@eortc.be [European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer–Radiation Oncology Group (EORTC-ROG), Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance (RTQA), Brussels (Belgium); Bosch, Walther R. [Washington University, representing Advanced Technology Consortium, Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Izewska, Joanna [Dosimetry Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Zubizarreta, Eduardo [Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Ulin, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Representing Quality Assurance Review Center, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Ishikura, Satoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University, Representing Japan Clinical Oncology Group, RTQA, Tokyo (Japan); Followill, David [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Representing Radiological Physics Center, RTQA, Houston, Texas (United States); Galvin, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Representing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, RTQA, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, representing TransTasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) Cancer Research, Newcastle (Australia); Besuijen, Deidre [North West Cancer Centre, Representing TROG Cancer Research, Newcastle (Australia); Clark, Clark H. [Department of Medical Physics, St. Luke' s Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey and National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex, representing Radiation Therapy Trials Quality Assurance (RTTQA) (United Kingdom); Miles, Elizabeth; Aird, Edwin [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood, Middlesex representing RTTQA (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To review the various radiation therapy quality assurance (RTQA) procedures used by the Global Clinical Trials RTQA Harmonization Group (GHG) steering committee members and present the harmonized RTQA naming conventions by amalgamating procedures with similar objectives. Methods and Materials: A survey of the GHG steering committee members' RTQA procedures, their goals, and naming conventions was conducted. The RTQA procedures were classified as baseline, preaccrual, and prospective/retrospective data capture and analysis. After all the procedures were accumulated and described, extensive discussions took place to come to harmonized RTQA procedures and names. Results: The RTQA procedures implemented within a trial by the GHG steering committee members vary in quantity, timing, name, and compliance criteria. The procedures of each member are based on perceived chances of noncompliance, so that the quality of radiation therapy planning and treatment does not negatively influence the trial measured outcomes. A comparison of these procedures demonstrated similarities among the goals of the various methods, but the naming given to each differed. After thorough discussions, the GHG steering committee members amalgamated the 27 RTQA procedures to 10 harmonized ones with corresponding names: facility questionnaire, beam output audit, benchmark case, dummy run, complex treatment dosimetry check, virtual phantom, individual case review, review of patients' treatment records, and protocol compliance and dosimetry site visit. Conclusions: Harmonized RTQA harmonized naming conventions, which can be used in all future clinical trials involving radiation therapy, have been established. Harmonized procedures will facilitate future intergroup trial collaboration and help to ensure comparable RTQA between international trials, which enables meta-analyses and reduces RTQA workload for intergroup studies.

  7. Effect of ultraviolet and far infrared radiation on microbial decontamination and quality of cumin seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğdu, S Belgin; Ekiz, H İbrahim

    2011-01-01

    Cumin seeds might be exposed to a high level of natural bacterial contamination, and this could potentially create a public health risk besides leading to problems in exportation. Ultraviolet (UVC) and far infrared (FIR) radiation has low penetration power, and due to that, there might be no detrimental defects to the products during a possible decontamination process. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of UVC and FIR treatment on microbial decontamination and quality of cumin seeds. For this purpose, FIR treatment at different exposure times and temperatures were applied followed by constant UVC treatment with an intensity of 10.5 mW/cm² for 2 h. Total mesophilic aerobic bacteria of the cumin seeds were decreased to the target level of 10⁴ CFU/g after 1.57, 2.8, and 4.8 min FIR treatment at 300, 250, and 200 °C, respectively, following a 2 h UVC treatment. Under the given conditions, a complete elimination for total yeast and molds were obtained while there were no significant changes in volatile oil content and color of the cumin seeds. Consequently, combined UVC and FIR treatment was determined to be a promising method for decontamination of the cumin seeds. This research attempts to apply UVC and far infrared (FIR) radiation for pasteurization of cumin seeds. The data suggested that combined UVC and FIR radiation treatments can become a promising new method for pasteurization of cumin seeds without causing any detrimental defect to the quality parameters. The results of this industry partnered (Kadioglu Baharat, Mersin, Turkey--http://www.kadioglubaharat.com) study were already applied in industrial scale production lines. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. A System for Continual Quality Improvement of Normal Tissue Delineation for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breunig, Jennifer; Hernandez, Sophy; Lin, Jeffrey; Alsager, Stacy; Dumstorf, Christine; Price, Jennifer; Steber, Jennifer; Garza, Richard; Nagda, Suneel; Melian, Edward; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To implement the “plan-do-check-act” (PDCA) cycle for the continual quality improvement of normal tissue contours used for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The CT scans of patients treated for tumors of the brain, head and neck, thorax, pancreas and prostate were selected for this study. For each scan, a radiation oncologist and a diagnostic radiologist, outlined the normal tissues (“gold” contours) using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. A total of 30 organs were delineated. Independently, 5 board-certified dosimetrists and 1 trainee then outlined the same organs. Metrics used to compare the agreement between the dosimetrists' contours and the gold contours included the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), and a penalty function using distance to agreement. Based on these scores, dosimetrists were re-trained on those organs in which they did not receive a passing score, and they were subsequently re-tested. Results: Passing scores were achieved on 19 of 30 organs evaluated. These scores were correlated to organ volume. For organ volumes <8 cc, the average DSC was 0.61 vs organ volumes ≥8 cc, for which the average DSC was 0.91 (P=.005). Normal tissues that had the lowest scores included the lenses, optic nerves, chiasm, cochlea, and esophagus. Of the 11 organs that were considered for re-testing, 10 showed improvement in the average score, and statistically significant improvement was noted in more than half of these organs after education and re-assessment. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate the feasibility of applying the PDCA cycle to assess competence in the delineation of individual organs, and to identify areas for improvement. With testing, guidance, and re-evaluation, contouring consistency can be obtained across multiple dosimetrists. Our expectation is that continual quality improvement using the PDCA approach will ensure more accurate treatments and dose assessment in

  9. System for verifiable CT radiation dose optimization based on image quality. part II. process control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David B; Malarik, Remo J; Hall, Seth M; Podberesky, Daniel J

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of an automated computed tomography (CT) radiation dose optimization and process control system on the consistency of estimated image noise and size-specific dose estimates (SSDEs) of radiation in CT examinations of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. This quality improvement project was determined not to constitute human subject research. An automated system was developed to analyze each examination immediately after completion, and to report individual axial-image-level and study-level summary data for patient size, image noise, and SSDE. The system acquired data for 4 months beginning October 1, 2011. Protocol changes were made by using parameters recommended by the prediction application, and 3 months of additional data were acquired. Preimplementation and postimplementation mean image noise and SSDE were compared by using unpaired t tests and F tests. Common-cause variation was differentiated from special-cause variation by using a statistical process control individual chart. A total of 817 CT examinations, 490 acquired before and 327 acquired after the initial protocol changes, were included in the study. Mean patient age and water-equivalent diameter were 12.0 years and 23.0 cm, respectively. The difference between actual and target noise increased from -1.4 to 0.3 HU (P process control chart identified several special causes of variation. Implementation of an automated CT radiation dose optimization system led to verifiable simultaneous decrease in image noise variation and SSDE. The automated nature of the system provides the opportunity for consistent CT radiation dose optimization on a broad scale. © RSNA, 2013.

  10. EPA scientific integrity policy draft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its draft scientific integrity policy on 5 August. The draft policy addresses scientific ethical standards, communications with the public, the use of advisory committees and peer review, and professional development. The draft policy was developed by an ad hoc group of EPA senior staff and scientists in response to a December 2010 memorandum on scientific integrity from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. The agency is accepting public comments on the draft through 6 September; comments should be sent to osa.staff@epa.gov. For more information, see http://www.epa.gov/stpc/pdfs/draft-scientific-integrity-policy-aug2011.pdf.

  11. EPA Nonregulatory Nonroad Duty Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA nonregulatory, nonroad duty cycles for equipment such as agricultural tractors, backhoe loaders,crawlers tractors, excavators, arc welding skid steer loaders, and wheel loaders. Also,test procedures, laboratory methods, and emissions for this equipmen

  12. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H [Chiayi Chang Gung Memorial Hospital of The C.G.M.F, Puzi City, Chiayi County, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  13. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle

  14. SU-E-T-89: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Phantom for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W [University of Massachusetts Lowell, MA (United States); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Korideck, H; Zygmanski, P; Berbeco, R; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Use of Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) systems for conducting state-of-the-art image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) research on small animals has become more common over the past years. The purpose of this work is to develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the SARRP. Methods: A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of nine (60×60×5 mm3) KV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs that can be employed for annual dosimetry QA with film. Three of the top slabs are replaceable with ones incorporating Mosfets or OSLDs arranged in a quincunx pattern, or a slab drilled to accommodate an ion chamber insert. These top slabs are designed to facilitate routine daily and monthly QA tasks such as output constancy, isocenter congruency test, treatment planning system (TPS) QA, etc. One slab is designed with inserts for image QA. A prototype of the phantom was applied to test the performance of the imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. Results: Output constancy test results showed daily variations within 3%. For isocenter congruency test, the phantom could be used to detect 0.3 mm deviations of the CBCT isocenter from the radiation isocenter. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Image-quality parameters could also be assessed in terms of geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity, etc. Conclusion: The developed phantom can be employed as a simple tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests.

  15. SU-E-T-89: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Phantom for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W; Korideck, H; Zygmanski, P; Berbeco, R; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Use of Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) systems for conducting state-of-the-art image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) research on small animals has become more common over the past years. The purpose of this work is to develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the SARRP. Methods: A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of nine (60×60×5 mm3) KV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs that can be employed for annual dosimetry QA with film. Three of the top slabs are replaceable with ones incorporating Mosfets or OSLDs arranged in a quincunx pattern, or a slab drilled to accommodate an ion chamber insert. These top slabs are designed to facilitate routine daily and monthly QA tasks such as output constancy, isocenter congruency test, treatment planning system (TPS) QA, etc. One slab is designed with inserts for image QA. A prototype of the phantom was applied to test the performance of the imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. Results: Output constancy test results showed daily variations within 3%. For isocenter congruency test, the phantom could be used to detect 0.3 mm deviations of the CBCT isocenter from the radiation isocenter. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Image-quality parameters could also be assessed in terms of geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity, etc. Conclusion: The developed phantom can be employed as a simple tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests

  16. Dental-CT: image quality and absorbed radiation dose of different scan protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schorn, C.; Alamo, L.; Funke, M.; Grabbe, E.; Visser, H.; Hermann, K.P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a scan protocol for dental-CT which guarantees good image quality at the lowest possible radiation dose. Methods: In an experimental investigation Dental-CT (HSA, GE, Milwaukee, USA) of the mandible of two human skeletons positioned in a water tank were performed in order to define the most advantageous scan protocol. Tube currents ranged from 40 to 200 mA and the scan technique was modified (axial mode or helical mode with pitches of 1 to 3 and corresponding increments of 0.4 to 1.0 mm). 39 patients underwent a dental-CT with decreased current (80 mA) in the helical scan mode (pitch 2, slice thickness 1 mm). Dose measurements were performed for two different scan protocols (A: axial, 130 mAs, B: helical, 80 mA, pitch 2). Results: The preliminary investigations of image quality showed only a minor effect of the applied current. For the helical scan mode, pitches of more than 2 impaired image quality. A low increment had no advantages. There were no disadvantages in clinical practice using protocol B with decreased tube current. Absorbed radiation dose of dental CT performed with protocol B was decreased to one third in comparison to protocol A. Conclusions: A scan protocol with a low tube current (e.g., 80 mA, for a rotation time of 1 s) and a helical scan mode (e.g., for a slice thickness of 1 mm with a pitch of 2 and an increment of 1 mm) is recommended for performing dental-CT. (orig.) [de

  17. Interactive effects of temperature, ultraviolet radiation and food quality on zooplankton alkaline phosphatase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinski, Laura; Modenutti, Beatriz; Souza, Maria Sol; Balseiro, Esteban

    2016-06-01

    Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR) is a stressor for aquatic organisms affecting enzyme activities in planktonic populations because of the increase in reactive oxygen species. In addition, UVR exposure combined with other environmental factors (i.e. temperature and food quality) could have even higher detrimental effects. In this work, we aimed to determine the effect of UVR on somatic Alkaline Phosphatase Activity (APA) and Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) activity on the cladoceran Daphnia commutata under two different temperatures (10 °C and 20 °C) and under three food qualities (carbon:phosphorus ratios: 1150, 850 and 550). APA is a biomarker that is considered as a P deficiency indicator in zooplankton. Since recovery from UVR damage under dark conditions is an ATP depending reaction we also measured APA during recovery phases. We carried out a laboratory experiment combining different temperatures and food qualities with exposition to UVR followed by luminic and dark phases for recovery. In addition, we exposed organisms to H2O2, to establish if the response on APA to UVR was a consequence of the reactive oxygen species produced these short wavelengths. Our results showed that somatic APA was negatively affected by UVR exposure and this effect was enhanced under high temperature and low food quality. Consistently, GST activity was higher when exposed to UVR under both temperatures. The H2O2 experiments showed the same trend as UVR exposure, indicating that APA is affected mainly by oxidative stress than by direct effect of UVR on the enzyme. Finally, APA was affected in the dark phase of recovery confirming the P demands. These results enlighten the importance of food quality in the interacting effect of UVR and temperature, showing that C:P food ratio could determine the success or failure of zooplanktonic populations in a context of global change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. EPA for Businesses and Non-Profits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information and links to EPA web pages that are meant to help businesses and non-profits adhere to EPA regulations and otherwise protect the environment, take advantage of opportunities to collaborate with the EPA, and find training EPA training programs.

  19. Web-based tools for quality assurance and radiation protection in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moores, B. M.; Charnock, P.; Ward, M.

    2010-01-01

    Practical and philosophical aspects of radiation protection in diagnostic radiology have changed very little over the past 50 y even though patient doses have continued to rise significantly in this period. This rise has been driven by technological developments, such as multi-slice computed tomography, that have been able to improve diagnostic accuracy but not necessarily provide the same level of risk-benefit to all patients or groups of patients given the dose levels involved. Can practical radiation protection strategies hope to keep abreast of these ongoing developments? A project was started in 1992 in Liverpool that aimed to develop IT driven quality assurance (QA)/radiation protection software tools based upon a modular quality assurance dose data system. One of the modules involved the assessment of the patient entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for an X-ray examination that was based upon the use of calibrated X-ray tube exposure factors to calculate ESAK as well as collecting appropriate patient details (age, sex, weight, thickness etc). The package also contained modules for logging all necessary equipment performance QA data. This paper will outline the experience gained with this system through its transition from a local application on a stand alone PC within the department to the current web-based approach. Advantages of a web-based approach to delivering such an application as well as centrally storing data originating on many hospital sites will be discussed together with the scientific support processes that can be developed with such a system. This will include local, national and international considerations. The advantages of importing radiographic examination details directly from other electronic storage systems such as a hospital's radiology information system will be presented together with practical outcomes already achieved. This will include the application of statistical techniques to the very large data sets generated. The development

  20. Web-based tools for quality assurance and radiation protection in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, B M; Charnock, P; Ward, M

    2010-01-01

    Practical and philosophical aspects of radiation protection in diagnostic radiology have changed very little over the past 50 y even though patient doses have continued to rise significantly in this period. This rise has been driven by technological developments, such as multi-slice computed tomography, that have been able to improve diagnostic accuracy but not necessarily provide the same level of risk-benefit to all patients or groups of patients given the dose levels involved. Can practical radiation protection strategies hope to keep abreast of these ongoing developments? A project was started in 1992 in Liverpool that aimed to develop IT driven quality assurance (QA)/radiation protection software tools based upon a modular quality assurance dose data system. One of the modules involved the assessment of the patient entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for an X-ray examination that was based upon the use of calibrated X-ray tube exposure factors to calculate ESAK as well as collecting appropriate patient details (age, sex, weight, thickness etc). The package also contained modules for logging all necessary equipment performance QA data. This paper will outline the experience gained with this system through its transition from a local application on a stand alone PC within the department to the current web-based approach. Advantages of a web-based approach to delivering such an application as well as centrally storing data originating on many hospital sites will be discussed together with the scientific support processes that can be developed with such a system. This will include local, national and international considerations. The advantages of importing radiographic examination details directly from other electronic storage systems such as a hospital's radiology information system will be presented together with practical outcomes already achieved. This will include the application of statistical techniques to the very large data sets generated. The development

  1. Dual energy CT intracranial angiography: image quality, radiation dose and initial application results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Xue; Zhang Longjiang; Lu Guangming; Zhou Changsheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of dual-energy intracranial CT angiography (CTA). Methods: Forty-one patients suspected of intracranial vascular diseases underwent dual-energy intracranial CT angiography, and 41 patients who underwent conventional subtraction CT were enrolled as the control group. Image quality of intracranial and skull base vessels and radiation dose between dual-energy CTA and conventional subtraction CTA were compared using two independent sample nonparametric test and independent-samples t test, respectively. Prevalence and size of lesions detected by dual-energy CTA and digital subtraction CTA were compared using paired-samples t test and Spearman correlative analysis. Results: The percentage of image quality scored 5 was 70.7% (29/41) for dual-energy CTA and 75.6% (31/41) for conventional subtraction CTA. There was no significant difference between the two groups (Z= -0.455, P=0.650). Image quality of vessels at the skull base in conventional subtraction CTA was superior to that in dual-energy CTA, especially for the petrosal and syphon segment (Z=-4.087, P=0.000). Radiation exposure of dual energy CTA and conventional CTA were (396.54±17.43) and (1090.95±114.29) mGy·cm respectively. Radiation exposure was decreased by 64% (t=-38.52, P=0.000) by dual energy CTA compared with conventional subtraction CTA. Out of the 41 patients, 19 patients were diagnosed as intracranial aneurysm, 2 patients as arteriovenous malformation (AVM), 3 patients with Moya-moya's disease, and the remaining 17 patients with negative results. Nine patients with intracranial aneurysm, 2 patients with AVM, 3 patients with Moya-moya's disease, and 2 patients with negative findings underwent DSA or operation, with concordant findings from both techniques. Diameter of aneurysm neck, long axis and minor axis by dual-energy CTA was (2.90±1.61), (5.23±1.68) and (3.83±1.69) mm, respectively; Diameter of aneurysm neck, long axis and minor axis by DSA was (2.95±1

  2. A study on image quality and exposure dose of hard radiation radiography of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Taro; Ishida, Yuji; Maeda, Mika; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Kim, Chung Woon; Hwang, Jong Sun

    1991-01-01

    Experiment was conducted on the image quality and exposure dose following replacement of CaWO 4 system screen BH - III and BX - III which have so far been used for high - voltage hard - radiation quality radiography, with rare earth system screen KO750, combined with high contrast film SRH, while additional filter was altered, Cu 0.8 mm + Al 1.4 mm(HVL : AI 8.8 mm), Cu 1.3 mm + AI 1.0mm(HVL: AI 10.6mm) and Cu 1.8mm + AI 1.5mm(HVL: AI 11.4mm). AS a result, visual evaluation did not detect extreme changes in image quality under the respective condition (HVL : Al 8.8 mm ∼ AI 11.4 mm). It was noted, however, that surface exposure dose declined with an increase in the thickness of the additional filter, as it was 18.9 μGy at HVL Al 8.8 mm, 17.5 μGy at Al 10.6 mm and 15.7 μGy at Al 11.4 mm. Considering the limited rating of X-ray equipment and wear of machinery, however, the range of Cu 1.3 mm ∼ l.8 mm + AI 1.0 mm ∼ 1.5 mm(1/16 VL ∼ 1/32 VL) seemed to be a limit

  3. Improved Satellite-based Photosysnthetically Active Radiation (PAR) for Air Quality Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour Biazar, A.; McNider, R. T.; Cohan, D. S.; White, A.; Zhang, R.; Dornblaser, B.; Doty, K.; Wu, Y.; Estes, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    One of the challenges in understanding the air quality over forested regions has been the uncertainties in estimating the biogenic hydrocarbon emissions. Biogenic volatile organic compounds, BVOCs, play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry, particularly in ozone and particulate matter (PM) formation. In southeastern United States, BVOCs (mostly as isoprene) are the dominant summertime source of reactive hydrocarbon. Despite significant efforts in improving BVOC estimates, the errors in emission inventories remain a concern. Since BVOC emissions are particularly sensitive to the available photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), model errors in PAR result in large errors in emission estimates. Thus, utilization of satellite observations to estimate PAR can help in reducing emission uncertainties. Satellite-based PAR estimates rely on the technique used to derive insolation from satellite visible brightness measurements. In this study we evaluate several insolation products against surface pyranometer observations and offer a bias correction to generate a more accurate PAR product. The improved PAR product is then used in biogenic emission estimates. The improved biogenic emission estimates are compared to the emission inventories over Texas and used in air quality simulation over the period of August-September 2013 (NASA's Discover-AQ field campaign). A series of sensitivity simulations will be performed and evaluated against Discover-AQ observations to test the impact of satellite-derived PAR on air quality simulations.

  4. A new verification film system for routine quality control of radiation fields: Kodak EC-L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, A; Bratengeier, K; Priske, A; Flentje, M

    2000-06-01

    The use of modern irradiation techniques requires better verification films for determining set-up deviations and patient movements during the course of radiation treatment. This is an investigation of the image quality and time requirement of a new verification film system compared to a conventional portal film system. For conventional verifications we used Agfa Curix HT 1000 films which were compared to the new Kodak EC-L film system. 344 Agfa Curix HT 1000 and 381 Kodak EC-L portal films of different tumor sites (prostate, rectum, head and neck) were visually judged on a light box by 2 experienced physicians. Subjective judgement of image quality, masking of films and time requirement were checked. In this investigation 68% of 175 Kodak EC-L ap/pa-films were judged "good", only 18% were classified "moderate" or "poor" 14%, but only 22% of 173 conventional ap/pa verification films (Agfa Curix HT 1000) were judged to be "good". The image quality, detail perception and time required for film inspection of the new Kodak EC-L film system was significantly improved when compared with standard portal films. They could be read more accurately and the detection of set-up deviation was facilitated.

  5. A new verification film system for routine quality control of radiation fields: Kodak EC-L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, A.; Bratengeier, K.; Priske, A.; Flentje, M.

    2000-01-01

    Background: The use of modern irradiation techniques requires better verification films for determining set-up deviations and patient movements during the course of radiation treatment. This is an investigation of the image quality and time requirement of a new verification film system compared to a conventional portal film system. Material and Methods: For conventional verifications we used Agfa Curix HT 1000 films which were compared to the new Kodak EC-L film system. 344 Agfa Curix HT 1000 and 381 Kodak EC-L portal films of different tumor sites (prostate, rectum, head and neck) were visually judged on a light box by 2 experienced physicians. Subjective judgement of image quality, masking of films and time requirement were checked. Results: In this investigation 68% of 175 Kodak EC-L ap/pa-films were judged 'good', only 18% were classified 'moderate' or 'poor' 14%, but only 22% of 173 conventional ap/pa verification films (Agfa Curix HT 1000) were judged to be 'good'. Conclusions: The image quality, detail perception and time required for film inspection of the new Kodak EC-L film system was significantly improved when compared with standard portal films. They could be read more accurately and the detection of set-up deviation was facilitated. (orig.) [de

  6. Automatic analysis of image quality control for Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) devices in external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torfeh, Tarraf

    2009-01-01

    On-board imagers mounted on a radiotherapy treatment machine are very effective devices that improve the geometric accuracy of radiation delivery. However, a precise and regular quality control program is required in order to achieve this objective. Our purpose consisted of developing software tools dedicated to an automatic image quality control of IGRT devices used in external radiotherapy: 2D-MV mode for measuring patient position during the treatment using high energy images, 2D-kV mode (low energy images) and 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) MV or kV mode, used for patient positioning before treatment. Automated analysis of the Winston and Lutz test was also proposed. This test is used for the evaluation of the mechanical aspects of treatment machines on which additional constraints are carried out due to the on-board imagers additional weights. Finally, a technique of generating digital phantoms in order to assess the performance of the proposed software tools is described. Software tools dedicated to an automatic quality control of IGRT devices allow reducing by a factor of 100 the time spent by the medical physics team to analyze the results of controls while improving their accuracy by using objective and reproducible analysis and offering traceability through generating automatic monitoring reports and statistical studies. (author) [fr

  7. Correlations between plastic deformation parameters and radiation detector quality in HgI2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgeson, G.; Milstein, F.; California Univ., Santa Barbara

    1989-01-01

    Mercuric iodide radiation detectors of various grades of quality were subjected to shearing forces in the (001) crystallographic planes using a specially designed micromechanical shear testing fixture. Experimental measurements were made of (001) shear stress versus shear strain. Each of the stress-strain curves was described by two empirically determined deformation parameters, s 0 and σ, where s 0 is a measure of 'bulk yielding' and σ indicates the 'sharpness of yielding' during plastic deformation. It was observed that the deformation parameters of many HgI 2 single crystal samples fit the relation s 0 =8σ 2/3 and that significant deviation from this relation, with s 0 >8σ 2/3 , indicates poor detector quality. Work hardening by prior plastic deformation was also found to cause s 0 to depart (in an increasing manner) from the 8σ 2/3 relation. For good quality material that has not previously been plastically deformed, the deformation parameter s c =s 0 -2σ<19 psi; this parameter can be interpreted as the 'onset of plastic yielding'. The results are discussed in terms of dislocation mechanisms for plastic deformation, work hardening, and recovery of work hardening. (orig.)

  8. Status and quality of radiation measurements. food and human urine. Preliminary report 1972-75

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterly, D.G.; Kinnison, R.R.; Jarvis, A.N.; Smiecinski, R.F.

    1977-10-01

    As part of the radiation quality assurance program conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, calibrated radionuclide solutions are distributed to participating laboratories for instrument calibration and yield determinations. Laboratory performance studies involving the analysis of radionuclides in environmental media are also conducted. A summary is given of the results for the food and human urine cross-check programs for 1972-1975. For tritium, which was the least difficult to analyze, eighty-two percent of the laboratories were within the control limits for accuracy and ninety-nine percent within the control limits for precision over the 3-year period. For strontium-89, and most difficult to analyze, thirty-three percent were within the accuracy control limits and seventy-seven percent within the precision control limits

  9. Effect of gamma radiations on some organoleptic qualities of mushroom (Agraricus Bisporus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahid, M.

    1985-01-01

    Edible mushrooms were picked at a stretched-veil stage and irradiated at 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.5 kGy. The samples were studied for the organileptic characteristics in function of storage time and irradiation doses. No significant difference of irradiation was observed immediately on the colour, odour, flavour or texture of mushrooms. During storage the colour and texture of irradiated lots were superior as compared to unirradiated samples. Higher doses of irradiation brought about significantly favourable results in these qualities during storage. Odour and flavour did not differ significantly in all the treatments. Irradiated mushrooms were found to be better (hard) in texture when the measurements were made with a texturometer. Ionizing radiation exerted a favourable influence upon the organoleptic properties of picked mushrooms. (author)

  10. The radiological examination standards of East Germany as a means of quality assurance and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angerstein, W.

    1988-01-01

    The standards (technical standards) define the minimum expenditure required for an X-ray examination. They must be reconfirmed about every 5 years. The regulations refer to basic care and do not restrict the possibility of carrying out additional examinations. Their observance ensures an optimum quality of the diagnosis and an optimum comparability of the pictures and a radiation burden that is as low as possible under realizable conditions (expenditure). The standards regulate the extent of the examinations (minimal number of the pictures to be taken) and also the periodic sequence of the pictures in the case of angiocardiographies. Some types of examinations require special standards for examinations of adults and children. (orig./DG) [de

  11. Radiation quality effects on pigment-protein complex of maize and pine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milivojevic, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    Maize hybrid ZP-704 and Pinus nigra seedlings were grown under the same low irradiance (2.0 µmol/s m²) of white (WR), blue (BR) or red (RR) irradiation and adapted similarly. Radiation quality differences during chloroplast development had a greater effect on the ratio of PSII:PSI complexes than on chlorophyll (Chl) a:b ratio. RR in mesophyll chloroplasts induced primarily an increased accumulation of Chl a, b, xanthophylls, light-harvesting complex proteins LHC1 and LHC3, and PSII-bound polypeptides. BR-treated plants were more efficient in the synthesis of β-carotene, Chl-proteins and PSI-bound polypeptides. BR resulted in the production of sun type chloroplasts while RR gave shade type chloroplasts and WR resulted in intermediate chloroplasts

  12. Quality profile of litchi ( Litchi chinensis) cultivars from India and effect of radiation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajare, Sachin N.; Saxena, Sudhanshu; Kumar, Sanjeev; Wadhawan, Surbhi; More, Varsha; Mishra, B. B.; Narayan Parte, Madan; Gautam, Satyendra; Sharma, Arun

    2010-09-01

    Litchi ( Litchi chinensis) is a non-climacteric tropical fruit. The fruit has a short shelf-life making its marketing difficult. Physical, biochemical, microbiological, and organoleptic properties of two major commercially grown Indian cultivars of litchi, 'Shahi' and 'China' were studied. The effect of gamma radiation processing and low temperature storage on the above parameters was evaluated to standardize the optimal process parameters for shelf-life extension of litchi. Physical and biochemical parameters analyzed included weight, moisture, pH, titratable acidity, texture, color, total and reducing sugar, total soluble solids, vitamin C, and flavonoid content. Weight, moisture content, and pH in the fresh fruit ranged between 21-26 g, 74-77%, and 3.7-4.4, respectively, whereas, total and reducing sugar ranged 10-15, and 10-13 g%, respectively. In 'Shahi' vitamin C content was found to be around 17-19 mg%, whereas, in 'China' it was 22-28 mg%. Flavonoid content was in the range of 26-34 μg catechin equivalents/g of fresh fruit. Total surface and internal bacterial load was around 4 and 3 log cfu/g, respectively. Surface yeast-mold count (YMC) was ˜3 log cfu/g whereas internal YMC was ˜2 log cfu/g. Radiation treatment reduced microbial load in a dose dependent manner. Treatment at 0.5 kGy did not significantly affect the quality parameters of the fruit. Treated fruits retained the "good" organoleptic rating during storage. Thus, radiation treatment (0.5 kGy) in combination with low temperature (4 °C) storage achieved a shelf-life of 28 days for litchi fruit.

  13. Quality profile of litchi (Litchi chinensis) cultivars from India and effect of radiation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajare, Sachin N.; Saxena, Sudhanshu; Kumar, Sanjeev; Wadhawan, Surbhi; More, Varsha; Mishra, B.B.; Narayan Parte, Madan; Gautam, Satyendra [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sharma, Arun, E-mail: ksarun@barc.gov.i [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2010-09-15

    Litchi (Litchi chinensis) is a non-climacteric tropical fruit. The fruit has a short shelf-life making its marketing difficult. Physical, biochemical, microbiological, and organoleptic properties of two major commercially grown Indian cultivars of litchi, 'Shahi' and 'China' were studied. The effect of gamma radiation processing and low temperature storage on the above parameters was evaluated to standardize the optimal process parameters for shelf-life extension of litchi. Physical and biochemical parameters analyzed included weight, moisture, pH, titratable acidity, texture, color, total and reducing sugar, total soluble solids, vitamin C, and flavonoid content. Weight, moisture content, and pH in the fresh fruit ranged between 21-26 g, 74-77%, and 3.7-4.4, respectively, whereas, total and reducing sugar ranged 10-15, and 10-13 g%, respectively. In 'Shahi' vitamin C content was found to be around 17-19 mg%, whereas, in 'China' it was 22-28 mg%. Flavonoid content was in the range of 26-34 {mu}g catechin equivalents/g of fresh fruit. Total surface and internal bacterial load was around 4 and 3 log cfu/g, respectively. Surface yeast-mold count (YMC) was {approx}3 log cfu/g whereas internal YMC was {approx}2 log cfu/g. Radiation treatment reduced microbial load in a dose dependent manner. Treatment at 0.5 kGy did not significantly affect the quality parameters of the fruit. Treated fruits retained the 'good' organoleptic rating during storage. Thus, radiation treatment (0.5 kGy) in combination with low temperature (4 {sup o}C) storage achieved a shelf-life of 28 days for litchi fruit.

  14. Chest CT using spectral filtration: radiation dose, image quality, and spectrum of clinical utility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Franziska M.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Meinel, Felix G. [University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To determine the radiation dose, image quality, and clinical utility of non-enhanced chest CT with spectral filtration. We retrospectively analysed 25 non-contrast chest CT examinations acquired with spectral filtration (tin-filtered Sn100 kVp spectrum) compared to 25 examinations acquired without spectral filtration (120 kV). Radiation metrics were compared. Image noise was measured. Contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) and figure-of-merit (FOM) were calculated. Diagnostic confidence for the assessment of various thoracic pathologies was rated by two independent readers. Effective chest diameters were comparable between groups (P = 0.613). In spectral filtration CT, median CTDI{sub vol}, DLP, and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) were reduced (0.46 vs. 4.3 mGy, 16 vs. 141 mGy*cm, and 0.65 vs. 5.9 mGy, all P < 0.001). Spectral filtration CT had higher image noise (21.3 vs. 13.2 HU, P < 0.001) and lower CNR (47.2 vs. 75.3, P < 0.001), but was more dose-efficient (FOM 10,659 vs. 2,231/mSv, P < 0.001). Diagnostic confidence for parenchymal lung disease and osseous pathologies was lower with spectral filtration CT, but no significant difference was found for pleural pathologies, pulmonary nodules, or pneumonia. Non-contrast chest CT using spectral filtration appears to be sufficient for the assessment of a considerable spectrum of thoracic pathologies, while providing superior dose efficiency, allowing for substantial radiation dose reduction. (orig.)

  15. Six sigma tools for a patient safety-oriented, quality-checklist driven radiation medicine department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Ajay; Potters, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and implement six sigma practices toward the enhancement of patient safety in an electronic, quality checklist-driven, multicenter, paperless radiation medicine department. A quality checklist process map (QPM), stratified into consultation through treatment-completion stages was incorporated into an oncology information systems platform. A cross-functional quality management team conducted quality-function-deployment and define-measure-analyze-improve-control (DMAIC) six sigma exercises with a focus on patient safety. QPM procedures were Pareto-sorted in order of decreasing patient safety risk with failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA). Quantitative metrics for a grouped set of highest risk procedures were established. These included procedural delays, associated standard deviations and six sigma Z scores. Baseline performance of the QPM was established over the previous year of usage. Data-driven analysis led to simplification, standardization, and refinement of the QPM with standard deviation, slip-day reduction, and Z-score enhancement goals. A no-fly policy (NFP) for patient safety was introduced at the improve-control DMAIC phase, with a process map interlock imposed on treatment initiation in the event of FMEA-identified high-risk tasks being delayed or not completed. The NFP was introduced in a pilot phase with specific stopping rules and the same metrics used for performance assessments. A custom root-cause analysis database was deployed to monitor patient safety events. Relative to the baseline period, average slip days and standard deviations for the risk-enhanced QPM procedures improved by over threefold factors in the NFP period. The Z scores improved by approximately 20%. A trend for proactive delays instead of reactive hard stops was observed with no adverse effects of the NFP. The number of computed potential no-fly delays per month dropped from 60 to 20 over a total of 520 cases. The fraction of computed

  16. The effect of aluminium screen on the quality of radiographic image using x-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azali Muhammad; Azhar Azmi; Mohd Soot Ahmad; Hafizul Abd Ghani

    2002-01-01

    The effect of different thickness of aluminium screen on the quality of radiographic image and the exposure time have been studied. The specimen used was based on the steel step wedge having thickness ranging from minimum 10 mm up to maximum 15 mm. The specimen was exposed to 100 kV up to 190 kV x-radiation by using single wall single image (SWSI) radiographic technique. The radiographic film D7 used in this study, which sandwiched with metallic screen made of aluminium, or lead was inserted into flexible cassette. The quality of the radiograph was then evaluated by observing the appearance of DIN wire type image quality indicator (IQI) 10ISO16 and the density difference (ΔD) of two adjacent steps on the radiograph, i.e. the subject contrast. The result shows that at a certain applied voltage (kV), the used of different thickness of aluminium screens give significant effect on the Δ D. Besides that the radiographic image quality in term of visibility of the smallest wire of IQI on radiograph also increases with decreasing kV for all types of aluminium screen. It is observed as well the effect of thickness of aluminium screen on subject contrast depends on the kV, i.e. for kV ranging from 100 up to 190 kV the subject contrast increases with increasing thickness of aluminium screen. The comparison of these results with radiograph using lead screen was also presented in this paper. (Author)

  17. Improved postharvest quality in patagonian squash ( Cucurbita moschata) coated with radiation depolymerized chitosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Maria Alicia; Goitia, Maria Teresa; Yossen, Mariana; Cifone, Norma; Agulló, Enrique; Andreucetti, Noemi

    2011-12-01

    Different molecular weight chitosans were evaluated on the decay of coated Anquito squashes ( Cucurbita moschata) as well as the maintenance of the fruit quality along five storage months. The original chitosan (Mw=391 kDa, 83% DD), was depolymerized by gamma radiation. Apart from chain scission, other chemical changes were not detected by FTIR or UV-vis analyses. The molecular weight characterization of chitosans was done by size exclusion chromatography with dual light scattering and concentration detection (SEC-MALLS-RI). The coating effectiveness was evaluated on the following parameters: fungal decay incidence, weight loss, firmness, total reducing sugar, soluble solid, flesh color, carotene content, pH and titratable acidity. No sign of fungal decay was observed in squashes coated with 122 and 56 kDa chitosans, which were also the most effective treatments in reducing the weight loss. The chitosan with Mw=122 kDa was also the best treatment considering firmness, internal aspect, sugar and carotene content. Then, radiation degraded chitosan was better in C. moschata preservation than the original chitosan.

  18. Influence of gamma radiation on the quality of some Egyptian honey types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, S.M.A.; Swailam, H.M.H.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of gamma radiation on the quality of different types of honey (clover, sweet marjoram and black cumin) was investigated. Samples were exposed to different doses of gamma radiation at 5, 10 and 25 KGy. The effect of treatments was investigated on several physicochemical and sensory properties and on amino acid compositions, mineral contents as well as on the antifungal activity of honeys. The results of the present study showed that the physicochemical properties (ph values, refractive index, moisture content, total protein, viscosity, total sugars and reducing sugars) and the sensory properties (colour, odour, taste and consistency) of 5 and 10 KGy irradiated honey types revealed non-significant difference as compared with the non-irradiated samples while gamma irradiation up to 25 KGy was found to cause significant changes in reducing sugars, viscosity and taste. Moreover, non-significant changes mineral contents between samples irradiated at 5, 10 and 25 KGy. At 5 KGy, there was non-significant change in the total amino acid, while by increasing the irradiation dose levels to 10 and 25 KGy, there was significant decrease in the total amino acids for all types of honey. Data exhibited that black cumin honey had the most antifungal activity while both sweet marjoram and clover honey were almost the same. The present results indicated that growth of Candida albicans was the most resistant to honey concentrations followed by Microsporum canis, Chrysosporium tropicum, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium chrysogenum and Trichophyton rubrum. The antifungal activity of raw and irradiated honey types was similar

  19. Cranial CT with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction: improved image quality with concomitant radiation dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapalino, O; Kamalian, Shervin; Kamalian, Shahmir; Payabvash, S; Souza, L C S; Zhang, D; Mukta, J; Sahani, D V; Lev, M H; Pomerantz, S R

    2012-04-01

    To safeguard patient health, there is great interest in CT radiation-dose reduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of an iterative-reconstruction algorithm, ASIR, on image-quality measures in reduced-dose head CT scans for adult patients. Using a 64-section scanner, we analyzed 100 reduced-dose adult head CT scans at 6 predefined levels of ASIR blended with FBP reconstruction. These scans were compared with 50 CT scans previously obtained at a higher routine dose without ASIR reconstruction. SNR and CNR were computed from Hounsfield unit measurements of normal GM and WM of brain parenchyma. A blinded qualitative analysis was performed in 10 lower-dose CT datasets compared with higher-dose ones without ASIR. Phantom data analysis was also performed. Lower-dose scans without ASIR had significantly lower mean GM and WM SNR (P = .003) and similar GM-WM CNR values compared with higher routine-dose scans. However, at ASIR levels of 20%-40%, there was no statistically significant difference in SNR, and at ASIR levels of ≥60%, the SNR values of the reduced-dose scans were significantly higher (P ASIR levels of ≥40% (P ASIR levels ≥60% (P ASIR in adult head CT scans reduces image noise and increases low-contrast resolution, while allowing lower radiation doses without affecting spatial resolution.

  20. Multicentre quality assurance of intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans: a precursor to clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M. J.; Bailey, M. J.; Forstner, D.; Metcalfe, P. E

    2007-01-01

    Full text: A multicentre planning study comparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for the treatment of a head and neck cancer has been carried out. Three Australian radiotherapy centres, each with a different planning system, were supplied a fully contoured CT dataset and requested to generate an IMRT plan in accordance with the requirements of an IMRT-based radiation therapy oncology group clinical trial. Plan analysis was carried out using software developed specifically for reviewing multicentre clinical trial data. Two out of the three plans failed to meet the prescription requirements with one misinterpreting the prescription and the third failed to meet one of the constraints. Only one plan achieved all of the dose objectives for the critical structures and normal tissues. Although each centre used very similar planning parameters and beam arrangements the resulting plans were quite different. The subjective interpretation and application of the prescription and planning objectives emphasize one of the many difficulties in carrying out multicentre IMRT planning studies. The treatment prescription protocol in a clinical trial must be both lucid and unequivocally stated to avoid misinterpretation. Australian radiotherapy centres must show that they can produce a quality IMRT plan and that they can adhere to protocols for IMRT planning before using it in a clinical trial

  1. Evaluation of the quality of hot air dehydrated onion coming from gamma radiated bulbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elman, L.; Pezzutti, A.; Croci, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the quality of hot air dehydrated onion, as regards physical and chemical characteristics, coming from the regional product that was gamma irradiated for sprout inhibition. We worked with the onion variety Valenciana Sintetica 14. Radio inhibition was made 30 days post harvest with gamma radiation from a 60 Co source at the Centro Atomico Ezeiza-CNEA, using a dose of 60 Gy. The skin of the bulbs was manually removed and the bulbs were cut in pieces 3 mm thick and between 1 and 3 cm long. The material was dehydrated in a rotating dryer with forced air circulation at 60 C degrees, between 0.8 and 1.7 m/s air speed and at ambient relative humidity. Dehydration was made 80 days after post-irradiation. The quality of the dehydrated onion was evaluated by the following physical- chemical analysis: total solids content, pungency (indirectly measured by pyruvic acid content assessment), color, pH, carbon hydrates and sensorial analysis. All analytical determinations were made in triplicate. The results obtained showed there are no significant changes between the averages of the physical-chemical properties of the control dehydrated samples and those coming from the radio-inhibited raw matter. According to the sensorial analysis, only the color of dehydrated onion was affected by the radio inhibition process. However, and according to the panel members comment, the greatest browning degree observed in ionizing radiation treated onion seemed to result more attractive to them. It may be concluded that radio inhibited regional onion can be useful as raw matter for hot air dehydrated product. It must be remarked that its use would extend the product use by dehydration plants, thus implying an increase of their processing capacity with the corresponding financial benefit. (author)

  2. QALMA: A computational toolkit for the analysis of quality protocols for medical linear accelerators in radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mushfiqur; Lei, Yu; Kalantzis, Georgios

    2018-01-01

    Quality Assurance (QA) for medical linear accelerator (linac) is one of the primary concerns in external beam radiation Therapy. Continued advancements in clinical accelerators and computer control technology make the QA procedures more complex and time consuming which often, adequate software accompanied with specific phantoms is required. To ameliorate that matter, we introduce QALMA (Quality Assurance for Linac with MATLAB), a MALAB toolkit which aims to simplify the quantitative analysis of QA for linac which includes Star-Shot analysis, Picket Fence test, Winston-Lutz test, Multileaf Collimator (MLC) log file analysis and verification of light & radiation field coincidence test.

  3. Contact Us About Managing the Quality of Environmental Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    The contact us form for the EPA Quality Program regarding quality management activities for all environmental data collection and environmental technology programs performed by or for the Agency and the EPA Information Quality Guidelines.

  4. Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Analysis of Clinical Performance Measures in the Management of Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, Karyn A.; Khalid, Najma; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Minsky, Bruce D.; Crozier, Cheryl; Owen, Jean B.; Devlin, Phillip M.; Thomas, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The specific aim was to determine national patterns of radiation therapy (RT) practice in patients treated for stage IB-IV (nonmetastatic) gastric cancer (GC). Methods and Materials: A national process survey of randomly selected US RT facilities was conducted which retrospectively assessed demographics, staging, geographic region, practice setting, and treatment by using on-site record review of eligible GC cases treated from 2005 to 2007. Three clinical performance measures (CPMs), (1) use of computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning; (2) use of dose volume histograms (DVHs) to evaluate RT dose to the kidneys and liver; and (3) completion of RT within the prescribed time frame; and emerging quality indicators, (i) use of intensity modulated RT (IMRT); (ii) use of image-guided tools (IGRT) other than CT for RT target delineation; and (iii) use of preoperative RT, were assessed. Results: CPMs were computed for 250 eligible patients at 45 institutions (median age, 62 years; 66% male; 60% Caucasian). Using 2000 American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria, 13% of patients were stage I, 29% were stage II, 32% were stage IIIA, 10% were stage IIIB, and 12% were stage IV. Most patients (43%) were treated at academic centers, 32% were treated at large nonacademic centers, and 25% were treated at small to medium sized facilities. Almost all patients (99.5%) underwent CT-based planning, and 75% had DVHs to evaluate normal tissue doses to the kidneys and liver. Seventy percent of patients completed RT within the prescribed time frame. IMRT and IGRT were used in 22% and 17% of patients, respectively. IGRT techniques included positron emission tomography (n=20), magnetic resonance imaging (n=1), respiratory gating and 4-dimensional CT (n=22), and on-board imaging (n=10). Nineteen percent of patients received preoperative RT. Conclusions: This analysis of radiation practice patterns for treating nonmetastatic GC indicates widespread adoption of CT

  5. Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Analysis of Clinical Performance Measures in the Management of Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Khalid, Najma [Quality Research in Radiation Oncology, American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Minsky, Bruce D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD, Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crozier, Cheryl; Owen, Jean B. [Quality Research in Radiation Oncology, American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Devlin, Phillip M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute at the Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Background: The specific aim was to determine national patterns of radiation therapy (RT) practice in patients treated for stage IB-IV (nonmetastatic) gastric cancer (GC). Methods and Materials: A national process survey of randomly selected US RT facilities was conducted which retrospectively assessed demographics, staging, geographic region, practice setting, and treatment by using on-site record review of eligible GC cases treated from 2005 to 2007. Three clinical performance measures (CPMs), (1) use of computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning; (2) use of dose volume histograms (DVHs) to evaluate RT dose to the kidneys and liver; and (3) completion of RT within the prescribed time frame; and emerging quality indicators, (i) use of intensity modulated RT (IMRT); (ii) use of image-guided tools (IGRT) other than CT for RT target delineation; and (iii) use of preoperative RT, were assessed. Results: CPMs were computed for 250 eligible patients at 45 institutions (median age, 62 years; 66% male; 60% Caucasian). Using 2000 American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria, 13% of patients were stage I, 29% were stage II, 32% were stage IIIA, 10% were stage IIIB, and 12% were stage IV. Most patients (43%) were treated at academic centers, 32% were treated at large nonacademic centers, and 25% were treated at small to medium sized facilities. Almost all patients (99.5%) underwent CT-based planning, and 75% had DVHs to evaluate normal tissue doses to the kidneys and liver. Seventy percent of patients completed RT within the prescribed time frame. IMRT and IGRT were used in 22% and 17% of patients, respectively. IGRT techniques included positron emission tomography (n=20), magnetic resonance imaging (n=1), respiratory gating and 4-dimensional CT (n=22), and on-board imaging (n=10). Nineteen percent of patients received preoperative RT. Conclusions: This analysis of radiation practice patterns for treating nonmetastatic GC indicates widespread adoption of CT

  6. Low Frequencies of Interference to EPA Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) Methods for Microbial Water Quality Monitoring in U.S. Rivers and Streams and Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    In collaboration with U.S States and Tribes, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducts periodic and rotating, statistically based surveys of U.S. rivers and streams (National Rivers and Streams Assessment, NRSA), estuarine and Great Lakes nearshore coastal ...

  7. Radiation processing to ensure the safety and quality of ethnic prepared meals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.; Chander, R.; Chawla, S.P.; Kanatt, S.R.; Dhokne, V.S.; Bawa, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on microbiological, chemical and sensory qualities of some Indian ethnic dishes, including items from a breakfast menu, meal components and complete meals, as well as some commercially available traditional Indian ready-to-eat meat products, were investigated. Initial total bacteria counts (TBCs) were in the range of 1-3 lg CFU/g in the case of samples prepared in the laboratory, while the counts were higher (3.5-5 lg CFU/g) in the commercial meat products. The TBC increased rapidly during storage at 0-3 deg. C in non-irradiated samples. Radiation processing resulted in a dose dependent reduction in the total bacterial counts. Staphylococcus spp. was completely eliminated by irradiation (1-2 kGy). A dose of 3 kGy was found to be optimal for extending the shelf life of the commercial products by more than 2 weeks at 0-3 deg. C compared with the corresponding non-irradiated controls. Lipid peroxidation monitored in terms of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances content increased marginally on irradiation and with storage. However, the sensory attributes of products were not significantly affected. The safety of irradiated chilled products was demonstrated by inoculated pack studies with Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus. The radiation sensitivity of S. aureus and B. cereus in the commercial meat products was initially investigated. The D 10 values of S. aureus in mutton shami kebabs and chicken chilli were 0.33 ± 0.03 and 0.37 ± 0.03 kGy, respectively. The D 10 values of B. cereus in mutton shami kebabs and chicken chilli were 0.47 ± 0.07 and 0.47 ± 0.08 kGy, respectively. S. aureus (inoculated 10 6 CFU/g) was eliminated at a dose of 2.5 kGy in both products, whereas B. cereus was eliminated at 3 kGy. The growth of both the test organisms inoculated into these products during storage at chilled temperatures (0-3 deg. C and 10 deg. C) was studied. No growth of the test organisms was observed at 0-3 deg C. However, at higher

  8. Quality assurance tool for organ at risk delineation in radiation therapy using a parametric statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Cheukkai B; Nourzadeh, Hamidreza; Watkins, William T; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Alonso, Clayton E; Dutta, Sunil W; Siebers, Jeffrey V

    2018-02-26

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) tool that identifies inaccurate organ at risk (OAR) delineations. The QA tool computed volumetric features from prior OAR delineation data from 73 thoracic patients to construct a reference database. All volumetric features of the OAR delineation are computed in three-dimensional space. Volumetric features of a new OAR are compared with respect to those in the reference database to discern delineation outliers. A multicriteria outlier detection system warns users of specific delineation outliers based on combinations of deviant features. Fifteen independent experimental sets including automatic, propagated, and clinically approved manual delineation sets were used for verification. The verification OARs included manipulations to mimic common errors. Three experts reviewed the experimental sets to identify and classify errors, first without; and then 1 week after with the QA tool. In the cohort of manual delineations with manual manipulations, the QA tool detected 94% of the mimicked errors. Overall, it detected 37% of the minor and 85% of the major errors. The QA tool improved reviewer error detection sensitivity from 61% to 68% for minor errors (P = 0.17), and from 78% to 87% for major errors (P = 0.02). The QA tool assists users to detect potential delineation errors. QA tool integration into clinical procedures may reduce the frequency of inaccurate OAR delineation, and potentially improve safety and quality of radiation treatment planning. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Impact of ultraviolet radiation treatments on the quality of freshly prepared tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Rajeev

    2016-12-15

    Impact of ultraviolet (UV-C) radiation treatments (0, 15, 30 and 60min) on freshly extracted tomato juice quality (physicochemical properties, antioxidant activity and microbial load) was evaluated. On exposure to UV-C, level of water activity, total soluble solids, and titratable acidity exhibited non-significant increase up to 30min of exposure time. Regarding colour analysis, L∗ value significantly increased with subsequent decrease in a∗ and b∗ values post UV-C treatments. Clarity, DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging activity and total phenolics content significantly increased, whereas ascorbic acid level significantly reduced at 60min of UV-C exposure time. So also, lycopene content exhibited a non-significant decrease after UV-C treatment. Microbial studies showed reduction in total plate count and total mould counts post UV-C treatment. Overall, UV-C treatment being a physical, non-thermal method of food preservation holds the ability to improve or preserve vital quality parameters in freshly prepared tomato juices, and henceforth possesses high scope for commercial exploration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation levels and image quality in patients undergoing chest X-ray examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Paulo Márcio Campos; do Carmo Santana, Priscila; de Sousa Lacerda, Marco Aurélio; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2017-11-01

    Patient dose monitoring for different radiographic procedures has been used as a parameter to evaluate the performance of radiology services; skin entrance absorbed dose values for each type of examination were internationally established and recommended aiming patient protection. In this work, a methodology for dose evaluation was applied to three diagnostic services: one with a conventional film and two with digital computerized radiography processing techniques. The x-ray beam parameters were selected and "doses" (specifically the entrance surface and incident air kerma) were evaluated based on images approved in European criteria during postero-anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) incidences. Data were collected from 200 patients related to 200 PA and 100 LAT incidences. Results showed that doses distributions in the three diagnostic services were very different; the best relation between dose and image quality was found in the institution with the chemical film processing. This work contributed for disseminating the radiation protection culture by emphasizing the need of a continuous dose reduction without losing the quality of the diagnostic image.

  11. Defects of a mammography quality control phantom visualized by synchrotron radiation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Keiko; Fukuda, Mamoru; Ehara, Norishige; Miyamoto, Keiko; Kanemaki, Yoshihide; Ogata, Haruki; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) imaging of an RMI 156 mammography quality control phantom, serial number 156-15330, revealed some defects which degraded the visibility of calcification specks. SR imaging was performed at SPring-8, in Harima, Japan by using a monochromatic energy of 20 keV with a field-of-view of 24 X 24 mm. Different kinds of images were obtained by changing sample-to-detector distances; absorption images and refraction-enhanced images. Specks were embedded in a wax matrix and were imaged as black in an absorption image. In a refraction-enhanced image, they were imaged as a black region with white margins. Foreign objects with opposite contrast were detected near, or overlapped with, some specks. As they were depicted as white in the absorption image and as white with a black margin in the refraction-enhanced image, it seemed that they had low X-ray attenuation and a low refraction index compared with the surrounding wax. They might presumable be air bubbles. Visibility of specks in an absorption image was seriously interfered with when those object(s) overlapped with specks. This kind of defect may cause a difficulty in meeting quality assurance specifications when a facility inadvertently purchases defective phantoms. (author)

  12. EORTC Radiation Oncology Group quality assurance platform: Establishment of a digital central review facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, Alysa; Aird, Edwin; Fenton, Paul A.; Gregoire, Vincent; Gulyban, Akos; Lacombe, Denis; Matzinger, Oscar; Poortmans, Philip; Ruyskart, Pascal; Weber, Damien C.; Hurkmans, Coen W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Quality assurance (QA) in clinical trials is essential to ensure treatment is safely and effectively delivered. As QA requirements have increased in complexity in parallel with evolution of radiation therapy (RT) delivery, a need to facilitate digital data exchange emerged. Our objective is to present the platform developed for the integration and standardization of QART activities across all EORTC trials involving RT. Methods: The following essential requirements were identified: secure and easy access without on-site software installation; integration within the existing EORTC clinical remote data capture system; and the ability to both customize the platform to specific studies and adapt to future needs. After retrospective testing within several clinical trials, the platform was introduced in phases to participating sites and QART study reviewers. Results: The resulting QA platform, integrating RT analysis software installed at EORTC Headquarters, permits timely, secure, and fully digital central DICOM-RT based data review. Participating sites submit data through a standard secure upload webpage. Supplemental information is submitted in parallel through web-based forms. An internal quality check by the QART office verifies data consistency, formatting, and anonymization. QART reviewers have remote access through a terminal server. Reviewers evaluate submissions for protocol compliance through an online evaluation matrix. Comments are collected by the coordinating centre and institutions are informed of the results. Conclusions: This web-based central review platform facilitates rapid, extensive, and prospective QART review. This reduces the risk that trial outcomes are compromised through inadequate radiotherapy and facilitates correlation of results with clinical outcomes.

  13. Net radiative forcing and air quality responses to regional CO emission reductions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Fry

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO emissions influence global and regional air quality and global climate change by affecting atmospheric oxidants and secondary species. We simulate the influence of halving anthropogenic CO emissions globally and individually from 10 regions on surface and tropospheric ozone, methane, and aerosol concentrations using a global chemical transport model (MOZART-4 for the year 2005. Net radiative forcing (RF is then estimated using the GFDL (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory standalone radiative transfer model. We estimate that halving global CO emissions decreases global annual average concentrations of surface ozone by 0.45 ppbv, tropospheric methane by 73 ppbv, and global annual net RF by 36.1 mW m−2, nearly equal to the sum of changes from the 10 regional reductions. Global annual net RF per unit change in emissions and the 100 yr global warming potential (GWP100 are estimated as −0.124 mW m−2 (Tg CO−1 and 1.34, respectively, for the global CO reduction, and ranging from −0.115 to −0.131 mW m−2 (Tg CO−1 and 1.26 to 1.44 across 10 regions, with the greatest sensitivities for regions in the tropics. The net RF distributions show widespread cooling corresponding to the O3 and CH4 decreases, and localized positive and negative net RFs due to changes in aerosols. The strongest annual net RF impacts occur within the tropics (28° S–28° N followed by the northern midlatitudes (28° N–60° N, independent of reduction region, while the greatest changes in surface CO and ozone concentrations occur within the reduction region. Some regional reductions strongly influence the air quality in other regions, such as East Asia, which has an impact on US surface ozone that is 93% of that from North America. Changes in the transport of CO and downwind ozone production clearly exceed the direct export of ozone from each reduction region. The small variation in CO GWPs among world regions suggests that future international

  14. Special address by the Director of the Federal Radiation Protection Service, Prof. Akin Ojo at the opening ceremony of the national workshop on radiation protection and quality control in medical and industrial practices FRPS, Ibadan on Monday 15 November 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo, A.

    1999-01-01

    A special address by the Director of the Federal Radiation Protection Service, Prof. Akin Ojo at the opening ceremony of the national workshop on radiation protection and quality control in medical and industrial practices held at the Federal Radiation Protection Service, Physics Dept. University of Ibadan from Monday 15 to Friday 19 November 1999

  15. A Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Exposure Between the Mini C-Arm and the Standard C-Arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Hummel, Willy A; de Jong, Tijmen; Mouës, Chantal M

    2018-04-01

    The use of intraoperative fluoroscopy has become mandatory in osseous hand surgery. Due to its overall practicality, the mini C-arm has gained popularity among hand surgeons over the standard C-arm. This study compares image quality and radiation exposure for patient and staff between the mini C-arm and the standard C-arm, both with flat panel technology. An observer-based subjective image quality study was performed using a contrast detail (CD) phantom. Five independent observers were asked to determine the smallest circles discernable to them. The results were plotted in a graph, forming a CD curve. From each curve, an image quality figure (IQF) was derived. A lower IQF equates to a better image quality. The patients' entrance skin dose was measured, and to obtain more information about the staff exposure dose, a perspex hand phantom was used. The scatter radiation was measured at various distances and angles relative to a central point on the detector. The IQF was significantly lower for the mini C-arm resulting in a better image quality. The patients' entrance dose was 10 times higher for the mini C-arm as compared with the standard C-arm, and the scatter radiation threefold. Due to its improved image quality and overall practicality, the mini C-arm is recommended for hand surgical procedures. To ensure that the surgeons' radiation exposure is not exceeding the safety limits, monitoring radiation exposure using mini C-arms with flat panel technology during surgery should be done in a future clinical study.

  16. The indirect effect of radiation reduces the repair fidelity of NHEJ as verified in repair deficient CHO cell lines exposed to different radiation qualities and potassium bromate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajinskis, Ainars; Olsson, Gunilla; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats

    2012-03-01

    The complexity of DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation is mainly dependent on radiation quality, where the indirect action of radiation may contribute to different extent depending on the type of radiation under study. The effect of indirect action of radiation can be investigated by using agents that induce oxidative DNA damage or by applying free radical scavengers. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the indirect effect of radiation for the repair fidelity of non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination repair (HRR) and base excision repair (BER) when DNA damage of different complexity was induced by gamma radiation, alpha particles or from base damages (8-oxo-dG) induced by potassium bromate (KBrO(3)). CHO cells lines deficient in XRCC3 (HRR) irs1SF, XRCC7 (NHEJ) V3-3 and XRCC1 (BER) EM9 were irradiated in the absence or presence of the free radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The endpoints investigated included rate of cell proliferation by the DRAG assay, clonogenic cell survival and the level of primary DNA damage by the comet assay. The results revealed that the indirect effect of low-LET radiation significantly reduced the repair fidelity of both NHEJ and HRR pathways. For high-LET radiation the indirect effect of radiation also significantly reduced the repair fidelity for the repair deficient cell lines. The results suggest further that the repair fidelity of the error prone NHEJ repair pathway is more impaired by the indirect effect of high-LET radiation relative to the other repair pathways studied. The response to bromate observed for the two DSB repair deficient cell lines strongly support earlier studies that bromate induces complex DNA damages. The significantly reduced repair fidelity of irs1SF and V3-3 suggests that NHEJ as well as HRR are needed for the repair, and that complex DSBs are formed after bromate exposure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Replanning During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Improved Quality of Life in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Haihua; Hu Wei; Wang Wei; Chen Peifang; Ding Weijun; Luo Wei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Anatomic and dosimetric changes have been reported during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of replanning on quality of life (QoL) and clinical outcomes during the course of IMRT for NPC patients. Methods and Materials: Between June 2007 and August 2011, 129 patients with NPC were enrolled. Forty-three patients received IMRT without replanning, while 86 patients received IMRT replanning after computed tomography (CT) images were retaken part way through therapy. Chinese versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and Head and Neck Quality of Life Questionnaire 35 were completed before treatment began and at the end of treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the completion of treatment. Overall survival (OS) data were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: IMRT replanning had a profound impact on the QoL of NPC patients, as determined by statistically significant changes in global QoL and other QoL scales. Additionally, the clinical outcome comparison indicates that replanning during IMRT for NPC significantly improved 2-year local regional control (97.2% vs 92.4%, respectively, P=.040) but did not improve 2-year OS (89.8% vs 82.2%, respectively, P=.475). Conclusions: IMRT replanning improves QoL as well as local regional control in patients with NPC. Future research is needed to determine the criteria for replanning for NPC patients undergoing IMRT.

  18. Automation and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Individualized High-Quality Tangent Breast Treatment Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Fyles, Anthony; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the large-scale clinical implementation and performance of an automated treatment planning methodology for tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Automated planning was used to prospectively plan tangential breast IMRT treatment for 1661 patients between June 2009 and November 2012. The automated planning method emulates the manual steps performed by the user during treatment planning, including anatomical segmentation, beam placement, optimization, dose calculation, and plan documentation. The user specifies clinical requirements of the plan to be generated through a user interface embedded in the planning system. The automated method uses heuristic algorithms to define and simplify the technical aspects of the treatment planning process. Results: Automated planning was used in 1661 of 1708 patients receiving tangential breast IMRT during the time interval studied. Therefore, automated planning was applicable in greater than 97% of cases. The time for treatment planning using the automated process is routinely 5 to 6 minutes on standard commercially available planning hardware. We have shown a consistent reduction in plan rejections from plan reviews through the standard quality control process or weekly quality review multidisciplinary breast rounds as we have automated the planning process for tangential breast IMRT. Clinical plan acceptance increased from 97.3% using our previous semiautomated inverse method to 98.9% using the fully automated method. Conclusions: Automation has become the routine standard method for treatment planning of tangential breast IMRT at our institution and is clinically feasible on a large scale. The method has wide clinical applicability and can add tremendous efficiency, standardization, and quality to the current treatment planning process. The use of automated methods can allow centers to more rapidly adopt IMRT and enhance access to the documented

  19. American Board of Radiology Maintenance of Certification-Part IV: Practice Quality Improvement for Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, Larry E.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Bosma, Jennifer; Strife, Janet L.; Hattery, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    Maintenance of Certification is a physician-based response to public concerns about the quality of medical care and physician competency in a rapidly evolving, technically demanding specialty. American Board of Radiology (ABR) has previously described the first three components of the Maintenance of Certification. The ABR is currently developing a program in practice performance, completing Part IV of the competencies. The Practice Quality Improvement (PQI) program is meant to critically evaluate meaningful aspects of a physician's practice in a simple manner, using identifiable metrics and self-assessment to include an action plan for quality improvement. Each diplomate will be expected to complete three PQI projects during a full 10-year Maintenance of Certification cycle. Current diplomates with time-limited certificates will find prorated requirements determined by their year of certification on the ABR Website. Diplomates will have the option of completing zero to two Type I PQI projects (assessing factors relevant to clinical practice by peer review and self-reporting) and one to three Type II projects (i.e., at least one Type II projects of the three required, assessing parameters of practice by comparison with evidence-based guidelines, consensus statements, or peer comparisons; Type II projects are initiated and managed by professional societies). Several examples of Type I projects that might be offered by societies or directly through the ABR are provided, as well as highlights of the two Type II projects that have sought ABR qualification: American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology's Performance Assessment for the Advancement of Radiation Oncology Treatment program and American College of Radiology's RO-PEER program. An additional objective of the PQI is to develop national databases for future reference using aggregate data from the PQI projects

  20. The effects of radiation dose-rate and quality on the induction of dominant lethals in mouse spermatids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searle, A.G.; Beechey, G.V.

    1981-01-01

    Hybrid male mice were given 3 Gy (300 rad) doses of X- or γ-irradiation at dose-rates of either 0.6 or 0.002 Gy/min for each radiation. Germ-cells treated as spermatids were tested for dominant lethality. Effects on spermatogonia were evaluated by studying testis-weight, sperm-count and sperm abnormalities. The rate of induction of dominant lethal mutations was 2.1 times as high after acute X-irradiation as after protracted γ-irradiation. Most of this difference resulted from the change in radiation quality, since the relative effectiveness of X- versus γ-irradiation was 1.9 at low and 1.6 at high dose rates. For each radiation, however, fewer dominant lethals were induced at low dose-rates than at high (low/high ratios of 0.8 and 0.9 respectively) although differences did not reach a significant level. There were no statistically significant effects of dose rate on testis-weight of sperm-count in the X-ray series, but there were significantly less severe effects on both with protraction of the γ-irradiation. Evidence for effects of radiation quality on these characters was conflicting. Frequencies of abnormal spermatozoa were markedly increased 7 weeks after irradiation but there were no consistent effects of radiation intensity or quality. (orig.)