WorldWideScience

Sample records for eortc genito-urinary group

  1. Psychological stress in geriatric patients with genito-urinary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dräger, Désirée Louise; Protzel, Chris; Hakenberg, Oliver W

    2017-05-01

    Two-thirds of all cancer cases affect patients who are older than 65years, yet the specific conditions of the treatment and supportive care in this age group are poorly studied. There are limited data on the specific psycho-oncological problems in elderly patients with genito-urinary cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial needs of elderly patients with genito-urinary tumors using screening questionnaires and to use such screening questionnaires for an in-patient psychosocial treatment program. Patients (≥65years, n=319) who underwent surgical (n=295) or medical treatment (n=24) for genito-urinary malignancies between 06/2014 and 11/2015 in our institution were included for prospective stress assessment. This was done with standardized questionnaires for stress screening and for the identification of need for care (NCCN Distress Thermometer and Hornheider Screening Instrument, HSI). The patients scored an average of 4.4 on the Distress Thermometer. According to the survey evaluation, 28% of patients had need for psychosocial care. However, only a minority of patients (4%) did actually communicate any need for psychosocial care. We also assessed the actual utilization of inpatient psychosocial support which is offered to all patients. There is a significant number of elderly patients with genito-urinary cancer with increased psychological stress and a consecutive need of psychosocial care. This is underreported and underused by the patients. Therefore, an easy low-threshold access system with an interdisciplinary and inter-professional collaborative support system would be desirable. Measuring psychological distress systematically can be helpful in treating older patients with malignant diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical evaluation of genito-urinary fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Companywala Rashida

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical evaluation of 50 cases of genito-urinary fistula from January 1969 to March 1917 is presented. In 84% of the cases the aetiological factor was obstetric injury while in 12% it followed hysterectomy. Sixty per cent of the patients had come within one year of the development of symptoms. Eighty per cent of the cases were operated upon by vaginal route while 14% were operated upon by abdominal route and 6% by pereineo-abdominal route. The operative management is discussed. The success rate was 72%. The literature on this subject is reviewed.

  3. Fetal MRI as complement to US in the diagnosis and characterization of anomalies of the genito-urinary tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo, Leonor, E-mail: leonor.alamo@chuv.ch [Unit of Pediatric Radiology, Department of diagnostic and interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitaliere Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Laswad, Tarek, E-mail: Tarek.laswad@chuv.ch [Unit of Pediatric Radiology, Department of diagnostic and interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitaliere Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Schnyder, Pierre, E-mail: Pierre.Schnyder@chuv.ch [Unit of Pediatric Radiology, Department of diagnostic and interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitaliere Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, Reto, E-mail: Meuli.Reto@chuv.ch [Unit of Pediatric Radiology, Department of diagnostic and interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitaliere Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Vial, Yvan, E-mail: Yvan.Vial@chuv.ch [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Centre Hospitaliere Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Osterheld, Maria-Chiara, E-mail: Maria-Chiara.Osterheld@chuv.ch [Department of Pathology, Centre Hospitaliere Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Gudinchet, Francois, E-mail: Francois.Gudinchet@chuv.ch [Unit of Pediatric Radiology, Department of diagnostic and interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitaliere Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare the accuracy of prenatal ultrasound (US) and prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis and characterization of congenital abnormalities of the genito-urinary tract and to determine if the additional information obtained by MRI may influence the management of the fetus. We retrospectively evaluate 15 cases of congenital genito-urinary tract anomalies detected by prenatal US and with echographic inconclusive diagnosis. We compare the MRI findings with the US findings and the final diagnosis, obtained from neonatal outcomes, imaging studies and pathology records. Fetal US diagnosis was correct in 9 cases (60%) and MRI in 13 cases (86.7%). Prenatal MRI revealed additional information to US in 9 cases (60%), which modified the initial US diagnosis in 5 cases (33.3%) and changed the therapeutic approach in 5 fetuses (33.3%). Fetal MRI was better than US in cases of oligoamnios and in fetuses with genito-urinary pathology concerning the pelvic and perineum region. We believe that MRI should be considered as a complementary diagnostic method in cases of echographic suspicion of congenital pathology of the genito-urinary tract and inconclusive prenatal US.

  4. Intraoperative radiotherapy in gynaecological and genito-urinary malignancies: focus on endometrial, cervical, renal, bladder and prostate cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krengli, Marco; Pisani, Carla; Deantonio, Letizia; Surico, Daniela; Volpe, Alessandro; Surico, Nicola; Terrone, Carlo

    2017-01-19

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) refers to the delivery of a single radiation dose to a limited volume of tissue during a surgical procedure. A literature review was performed to analyze the role of IORT in gynaecological and genito-urinary cancer including endometrial, cervical, renal, bladder and prostate cancers.Literature search was performed by Pubmed and Scopus, using the words "intraoperative radiotherapy/IORT", "gynaecological cancer", "uterine/endometrial cancer", "cervical/cervix cancer", "renal/kidney cancer", "bladder cancer" and "prostate cancer". Forty-seven articles were selected from the search databases, analyzed and briefly described.Literature data show that IORT has been used to optimize local control rate in genito-urinary tumours mainly in retrospective studies. The results suggest that IORT could be advantageous in the setting of locally advanced and recurrent disease although further prospective trials are needed to confirm this findings.

  5. Ultrasound diagnosis and perinatal management of fetal genito-urinary abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurjak, A; Latin, V; Mandruzzato, G; D'Addario, V; Rajhvajn, B

    1984-01-01

    Approximately 50% of fetal abdominal masses originate in the urinary system and those recognizable ultrasonically include renal dysplasia, renal agenesis and obstruction of the lower excretory channels. Fetal renal anomalies may be discovered co-incidentally during the course of sonographic evaluation of uterine size-dates discrepancy, because they are commonly associated with fetal growth retardation and/or oligohydramnios, or during a planned sonographic follow-up of pregnancies in patients who are at risk of recurrence of such anomalies. The sonographic demonstration of renal anomalies under these circumstances may allow for elective termination of pregnancy, may modify the obstetric management and/or facilitate pediatric and surgical care of the newborn. In the collaboration study at three ultrasonic centers there were 81 cases of genito-urinary tract anomalies detected antenatally in a five years period. Among the detected anomalies there were 30 hydronephrotic fetuses, 12 with multicystic disease, 15 with Potter's syndrome, 10 with polycystic kidney, 9 with Prune Belly syndrome, 4 with isolated renal cysts and 1 with an ovarian cyst. Perinatal management of the fetus with urinary tract abnormalities greatly depends on the accuracy of the diagnosis. It would be justifiable to suggest that an inexperienced observer should not make the final diagnosis. He could be of great help, if one kept a high index of suspicion in patients with a significant family history of oligohydramnios and of unexplained abnormal cystic structures in the fetal abdomen and seek the help of a special referral center where experience in related cases is concentrated. Once an accurate diagnosis is made, various alternatives are open to the obstetrician. This is primarily dependent upon the type and degree of the abnormality. Unilateral multicystic kidney and hydronephrosis due to obstruction above the level of the urethra appear to be compatible with extrauterine life and should be

  6. Paclitaxel for malignant pleural mesothelioma : A phase II study of the EORTC Lung Cancer Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanMeerbeeck, J; Debruyne, C; vanZandwijk, N; Postmus, PE; Pennucci, MC; vanBreukelen, F; Galdermans, D; Groen, H; Pinson, P; vanGlabbeke, M; vanMarck, E; Giaccone, G

    The EORTC Lung Cancer Cooperative Group undertook a phase II study of paclitaxel in 25 chemotherapy-naive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Paclitaxel was given intravenously at a dose of 200 mg m(-2), as a 3 h infusion every 3 weeks, after standard premedication with corticosteroids and

  7. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer approach to developing questionnaire modules: an update and overview. EORTC Quality of Life Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, M. A.; Cull, A.; Groenvold, M.; Bjordal, K.; Blazeby, J.; Aaronson, N. K.

    1998-01-01

    The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Study Group has adopted a modular approach to quality of life (QoL) assessment in cancer clinical trials. The core instrument (the EORTC QLQ-C30) covers a range of QoL issues relevant to a broad spectrum of

  8. Preventing invasive Group B Streptococcus (GBS) disease in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an encapsulated Gram-positive coccus that colonises the gastrointestinal and genito- urinary tracts. This organ ism belongs exclusively to Group B in Lancefield's grouping of Streptococcus species and therefore is referred to as Group B Streptococcus (GBS). Of the ten known serotypes, ...

  9. Polymerase chain reaction detection of circulating tumour cells. EORTC Melanoma Cooperative Group, Immunotherapy Subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilholz, U; Willhauck, M; Scheibenbogen, C; de Vries, T J; Burchill, S

    1997-08-01

    Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based assays to detect occult neoplastic cells offer the highest sensitivity for the study of tumour dissemination and minimal residual disease. The detection of small numbers of tumour cells in a clinical sample may result in a redefinition of what constitutes residual disease and relapse, affecting future patient management. However, there remains disparity in the published data on the clinical value of RT-PCR for the detection of circulating tumour cells. This most likely reflects differences in the methods for sample preparation, RNA extraction, and cDNA synthesis among laboratories. Consequently the need for implementation of standard quality control measures is pressing in order to facilitate meaningful assessment of the methodology and it's clinical value. A 2-day workshop organized by the immunotherapy subgroup of the EORTC Melanoma Cooperative Group was held on this topic at the Ludwig Institute in Epalinges-sur-Lausanne, Switzerland in January 1996, with Stefan Carrel as the local host. Many pertinent issues were discussed in great detail, covering every step from sample handling to quality control. This workshop resulted in a concerted action leading to the preparation of laboratory guidelines, which are summarized in this review.

  10. Prevalence and intensity of genito-urinary schistosomiasis and associated risk factors among junior high school students in two local government areas around Zobe Dam in Katsina State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalabi, Tolulope Ebenezer; Lawal, Umar; Ipinlaye, Simeon Johnson

    2016-07-07

    The national burden of genito-urinary schistosomiasis in Nigeria has been expressed by an estimate of 101.3 million people at risk with an alarming figure of 29 million infected. Report obtained from respondents about Praziquantel® distribution and the obviously prevalent haematuria without any control programme in place justified the need for data on the prevalence, intensity of infection and associated risk factors which were the objectives this cross-sectional survey sought to address. A total of 718 students aged 10-23 years from the study area were surveyed between May and August, 2015. Data on socio-demographic and risk factors were obtained using structured questionnaires. Clean universal bottles with corresponding labels were offered for sample collection between 10:00 am and 13:30 pm. Centrifuged samples were microscopically examined and intensity of infection was recorded per 10 ml of each sample. Prevalence of genito-urinary schistosomiasis was 22.7 % with a mean intensity of 25.05 (± standard deviation, ± 71.51) eggs/10 ml of urine. Higher prevalence (19.5 %) and mean intensity (28.7 eggs/10 ml of urine) was recorded among boys. Sex (χ (2) = 77.065, P Government Areas (LGA). Sex, altitude, unwholesome water sources and mothers' occupation were identified as the determining epidemiological factors in the prevalence of the disease. Sustainable chemotherapeutic intervention with Praziquantel®, good network of treated pipe-borne water, health education and waste disposal facilities are highly recommended to reduce its prevalence below the threshold of public health significance.

  11. Radiotherapy in breast-conserving treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ: first results of the EORTC randomised phase III trial 10853. EORTC Breast Cancer Cooperative Group and EORTC Radiotherapy Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, J P; Bijker, N; Fentiman, I S; Peterse, J L; Delledonne, V; Rouanet, P; Avril, A; Sylvester, R; Mignolet, F; Bartelink, H; Van Dongen, J A

    2000-02-12

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a disorder that has become more common since it may manifest as microcalcifications that can be detected by screening mammography. Since selected women with invasive cancer can be treated safely with breast conservation therapy it is paradoxical that total mastectomy has remained the standard treatment for DCIS. We did a randomised phase III clinical trial to investigate the role of radiotherapy after complete local excision of DCIS. Between 1986 and 1996, women with clinically or mammographically detected DCIS measuring less than or equal to 5 cm were treated by complete local excision of the lesion and then randomly assigned to either no further treatment (n=503) or to radiotherapy (n=507; 50 Gy in 5 weeks to the whole breast). The median duration of follow-up was 4.25 years (maximum 12.0 years). All analyses were by intention to treat. 500 patients were followed up in the no further treatment group and 502 in the radiotherapy group. In the no further treatment group 83 women had local recurrence (44 recurrences of DCIS, and 40 invasive breast cancer). In the radiotherapy group 53 women had local recurrences (29 recurrences of DCIS, and 24 invasive breast cancer). The 4-year local relapse-free was 84% in the group treated with local excision alone compared with 91% in the women treated by local excision plus radiotherapy (log rank p=0.005; hazard ratio 0.62). Similar reductions in the risk of invasive (40%, p=0.04) and non-invasive (35%, p=0.06) local recurrence were seen. Radiotherapy after local excision for DCIS, as compared with local excision alone, reduced the overall number of both invasive and non-invasive recurrences in the ipsilateral breast at a median follow-up of 4.25 years.

  12. The EORTC emotional functioning computerized adaptive test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamper, Eva-Maria; Grønvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aa

    2014-01-01

    The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group is currently developing computerized adaptive testing measures for the Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) scales. The work presented here describes the development of an EORTC item bank...

  13. A retrospective study on genito urinary Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M M; Siddiqui, T H; Amin, M R; Islam, K D; Hossain, M S

    2003-07-01

    A retrospective study was carried out on Genitourinary Rhabdomyosarcoma in the Department of Paediatric Surgery of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh during the period January 1990 to December 1999. Total thirteen patients were treated during this period, age ranging from 1 month to 12 years. Eight patients were male and five were female (M: F = 1.6: 1). Diagnosis was made by history, thorough physical examination, digital rectal examination, ultrasonography, intravenous urography, CT scan and biopsy. All the patients were treated with chemoradiation theraphy as a first line of management and surgical excision was done for local residual tumours. Eight children (61.5%) were asymptomatic after completion of chemo-radiation therapy. Three (23.07%) patients discontinued the chemo-radiation schedule. Residual mass was present in one (7.7%) case for which partial cystectomy was done and the patient died in the 5th post operative day. Another patient (7.7%) who had pulmonary metastasis at the time of diagnosis, died during chemo-radiation therapy.

  14. Sperm quality before treatment in patients with early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma enrolled in EORTC-GELA Lymphoma Group trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kaaij, Marleen A E; Heutte, Natacha; van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Raemaekers, John M M; Carde, Patrice; Noordijk, Evert M; Fermé, Christophe; Thomas, José; Eghbali, Houchingue; Brice, Pauline; Bonmati, Caroline; Henry-Amar, Michel; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C

    2009-12-01

    Although widely recommended, cryopreservation of sperm is sometimes not performed for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma because of presumed poor sperm quality related to the disease. We investigated sperm quality and factors determining it in untreated patients with early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. Of 2362 males who participated in EORTC H6-H9 trials, 474 (20%) had data available. Sperm quality was defined according to World Health Organization guidelines. Determining factors were studied by logistic regression analysis. The median sperm concentration was 40x10(6)/mL (range, 0-345x10(6)/mL) and the median motility 50% (range, 0-90%). Sperm quality was good (concentration >or=20x10(6)/mL and motility >or=50%), intermediate (concentration >or=5x10(6)/mL) and poor (concentration 0) in 41%, 49% and 7% of patients, respectively. Three percent of the patients were azoospermic. No relation was found between sperm quality and age or clinical stage of the Hodgkin's lymphoma, but B-symptoms and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate predicted poor sperm quality. The odds ratios for the association of poor sperm quality with the variables examined were: presence of B-symptoms, 2.77 (95% CI, 1.50-5.12; p=0.001); erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 50 mm/h or greater, 2.35 (95% CI, 1.24-4.43; p=0.009); fever, 3.22 (95% CI, 1.41-7.33; p=0.005), and night sweats, 3.78 (95% CI, 1.97-7.26; p<0.001). There was no relation between sperm quality and pre-treatment follicle stimulating hormone level. In this large study of males with Hodgkin's lymphoma, 90% had good or intermediate sperm quality. Three percent were azoospermic. There was an association between sperm quality and the presence or absence of B-symptoms, in particular fever and night sweats. With modern fertilization techniques, in most patients with early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma sperm quality before treatment is good enough for future fatherhood.

  15. Treatment influencing down-staging in EORTC Melanoma Group sentinel node histological protocol compared with complete step-sectioning: A national multicentre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber-Hansen, Rikke; Hastrup, Nina; Clemmensen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis size in melanoma sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) is an emerging prognostic factor. Two European melanoma treatment trials include SLN metastasis diameters as inclusion criteria. Whilst diameter estimates are sensitive to the number of sections examined, the level of this bias is largely un...... unknown. We performed a prospective multicentre study to compare the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) recommended protocol with a protocol of complete step-sectioning....

  16. Sperm quality before treatment in patients with early stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma enrolled in EORTC-GELA Lymphoma Group trials

    OpenAIRE

    van der Kaaij, Marleen A.E.; Heutte, Natacha; van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Raemaekers, John M.M.; Carde, Patrice; Noordijk, Evert M.; Fermé, Christophe; Thomas, José; Eghbali, Houchingue; Brice, Pauline; Bonmati, Caroline; Henry-Amar, Michel; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although widely recommended, cryopreservation of sperm is sometimes not performed for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma because of presumed poor sperm quality related to the disease. We investigated sperm quality and factors determining it in untreated patients with early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. DESIGN AND METHODS: Of 2362 males who participated in EORTC H6-H9 trials, 474 (20%) had data available. Sperm quality was defined according to World Health Organization guidelines. Determ...

  17. Exatecan in pretreated adult patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma: results of a phase II--study of the EORTC Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, P; Nielsen, O S; Bauer, S; Hartmann, J T; Schöffski, P; Christensen, T B; Pink, D; Daugaard, S; Marreaud, S; Van Glabbeke, M; Blay, J Y

    2007-04-01

    No standard treatment is established for patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma after previous chemotherapy with anthracyclines and ifosfamide, given either in combination or sequentially. Exatecan (DX-8951f) is a totally synthetic analogue of the topoisomerase I-inhibitor camptothecin, which was synthesised to impart increased aqueous solubility, greater tumour efficacy, and less toxicity than camptothecin itself, topotecan or irinotecan. Since some activity against soft tissue sarcomas, especially leiomyosarcomas, has been reported for topoisomerase I-inhibitors, a study with a new and more potent agent seemed justified. We report on a prospective multicentre phase II study of Exatecan in adult soft tissue sarcomas failing 1 or 2 lines of chemotherapy in advanced phase, performed within the STBSG of EORTC. Thirty-nine patients (16 leiomyosarcomas and 23 other histologies) were included in two independent strata and received a total of 141 cycles (median 2). Median age was 61 years, range 25-76. Exatecan was given as i.v. infusion over 30 min at a dose of 0.5mg/m2 every day for five consecutive days, repeated every 21 days. Seventy-four percentage of cycles could be given without dose or schedule modification. The main toxicity was haematotoxicity with grade 3/4 neutropenia in 49%, grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia in 23%, and grade 3/4 anaemia in 15% of patients, respectively. Non-haematological toxicity consisted mainly of grade 2/3 dyspnoea in 36% of patients and grade 2/3 fatigue in 28%. One treatment-related toxic death due to septic shock was reported. Best overall response was no change with 60% in the leiomyosarcoma group and 53% in the non-leiomysarcoma group, respectively. The 3 months progression-free survival estimates are 56% for leiomysarcomas and 26% for other histologies, respectively. Using a two-step statistical design, the trial was stopped after the first step in both strata, due to lack of activity. In pretreated soft tissue sarcoma patients

  18. Epirubicin is not Superior to Doxorubicin in the Treatment of Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcomas.The Experience of the EORTC Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Steen; Dombernowsky, Per; Mouridsen, Henning T

    2000-01-01

    studies the EORTC STBSG tested whether epirubicin (epi) is an alternative to standard dose dox in the treatment of chemonaive patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma. The present report gives the final results of these studies.Patients/Methods. In the first study 210 patients were randomized to receive......, epi is not superior to dox in the treatment of patients with advanced soft tissue sarcomas. In addition, the results illustrate that the data from small studies of single institutions should always be confirmed by large multi-institutional studies before being taken for granted....

  19. genito-urinary fistula patients at bugando medical centre

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-07

    Jul 7, 2010 ... Kegel exercises before discharge. We are also beginning to see more “fresh” fistula-that which has happened in the past 1-3 months. We are now attempting repair on these women at an earlier time. DISCUSSION. The most prominent feature of these patients is their low level of education (98% have low or ...

  20. Genito-Urinary Fistula Patients at Bugando Medical Centre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Information was collected on 1500 obstetric fistula patients attending Bugando Medical Centre (BMC) in Mwanza, Tanzania. Objectives: To identify high risk populations of fistula patients treated from 1998-2006. Design: A prospective description study of 1294 patients treated for urine and faecal incontinence ...

  1. Genito-urinary tuberculosis - experience with 52 urology inpatients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifty patients underwent excretory urography and the findings were very varied. Patients were treated primarily with anti-tuberculosis drugs, but 58% also required some form of surgery; nephrectomy was the commonest operation. Ureteral strictures developed in over 50% of cases with renal involvement. We conclude that ...

  2. Genito-urinary tuberculosis - experience with 52 urology inpatients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifty patients underwent excretory urography and the findings were very varied. Patients were treated priInarily with antituberculosis drugs, but. 58% also required some form. ofsurgery; nephrec- tomy was the commonest operation. Ureteral strictures developed in over 50% of cases with renal involvement. We conclude that ...

  3. Development of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) for the EORTC QLQ-C30 physical functioning dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Grønvold, Mogens; Aaronson, Neil K.

    2011-01-01

    Computerized adaptive test (CAT) methods, based on item response theory (IRT), enable a patient-reported outcome instrument to be adapted to the individual patient while maintaining direct comparability of scores. The EORTC Quality of Life Group is developing a CAT version of the widely used EORTC...

  4. International Psychometric Validation of an EORTC Quality of Life Module Measuring Cancer Related Fatigue (EORTC QLQ-FA12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Joachim; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Hammerlid, Eva; Ignacio Arraras, Juan; Conroy, Thierry; Lanceley, Anne; Schmidt, Heike; Wirtz, Markus; Singer, Susanne; Pinto, Monica; Alm El-Din, Mohamed; Compter, Inge; Holzner, Bernhard; Hofmeister, Dirk; Chie, Wei-Chu; Czeladzki, Marek; Harle, Amelie; Jones, Louise; Ritter, Sabrina; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Bottomley, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Group has developed a new multidimensional instrument measuring cancer-related fatigue to be used in conjunction with the quality of life core questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). The module EORTC QLQ-FA13 assesses physical, cognitive, and emotional aspects of cancer-related fatigue. The methodology follows the EORTC guidelines for phase IV validation of modules. This paper focuses on the results of the psychometric validation of the factorial structure of the module. For validation and cross-validation confirmatory factor analysis (maximum likelihood estimation), intraclass correlation and Cronbach alpha for internal consistency were employed. The study involved an international multicenter collaboration of 11 European and non-European countries. A total of 946 patients with various tumor diagnoses were enrolled. Based on the confirmatory factor analysis, we could approve the three-dimensional structure of the module. Removing one item and reassigning the factorial mapping of another item resulted in the EORTC QLQ-FA12. For the revised scale, we found evidence supporting good local (indicator reliability ≥ 0.60, factor reliability ≥ 0.82) and global model fit (GFI t1|t2 = 0.965/0.957, CFI t1|t2 = 0.976/0.972, RMSEA t1|t2 = 0.060/0.069) for both measurement points. For each scale, test-retest reliability proved to be very good (intraclass correlation: R t1-t2 = 0.905-0.921) and internal consistency proved to be good to high (Cronbach alpha = .79-.90). Based on the former phase III module, the multidimensional structure was revised as a phase IV module (EORTC FA12) with an improved scale structure. For a comprehensive validation of the EORTC FA12, further aspects of convergent and divergent validity as well as sensitivity to change should be determined.

  5. Prognostic significance of the initial cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) involvement of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) treated without cranial irradiation: results of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Children Leukemia Group study 58881.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirvent, Nicolas; Suciu, Stefan; Rialland, Xavier; Millot, Frédéric; Benoit, Yves; Plantaz, Dominique; Ferster, Alice; Robert, Alain; Lutz, Patrick; Nelken, Brigitte; Plouvier, Emmanuel; Norton, Lucilia; Bertrand, Yves; Otten, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of the initial cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) involvement of children with ALL enrolled from 1989 to 1996 in the EORTC 58881 trial. Patients (2025) were categorised according to initial central nervous system (CNS) status: CNS-1 (CNS negative, n=1866), CNS-2 (<5 leucocytes/mm(3), CSF with blasts, n=50), CNS-3 (CNS positive, n=49), TLP+ (TLP with blasts, n=60). CNS-directed therapy consisted in intravenous (i.v.) methotrexate (5 g/sqm) in 4-10 courses, and intrathecal methotrexate injections (10-20), according to CNS status. Cranial irradiation was omitted in all patients. In the CNS1, TLP+, CNS2 and CNS3 group the 8-year EFS rate (SE%) was 69.7% (1.1%), 68.8% (6.2%), 71.3% (6.5%) and 68.3% (6.2%), respectively. The 8-year incidence of isolated CNS relapse (SE%) was 3.4% (0.4%), 1.7% (1.7%), 6.1% (3.5%) and 9.4% (4.5%), respectively, whereas the 8-year isolated or combined CNS relapse incidence was 7.6% (0.6%), 3.5% (2.4%), 10.2% (4.4%) and 11.7% (5.0%), respectively. Patients with CSF blasts had a higher rate of initial bad risk features. Multivariate analysis indicated that presence of blasts in the CSF had no prognostic value: (i) for EFS and OS; (ii) for isolated and isolated or combined CNS relapse; WBC count<25 × 10(9)/L and Medac E-coli asparaginase treatment were each related to a lower CNS relapse risk. The presence of initial CNS involvement has no prognostic significance in EORTC 58881. Intensification of CNS-directed chemotherapy, without CNS radiation, is an effective treatment of initial meningeal leukaemic involvement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term prognostic value of the combination of EORTC risk group calculator and molecular markers in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients treated with intravesical Bacille Calmette-Guérin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan S Alkhateeb

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Molecular markers have a long-term prognostic value when combined with EORTC scoring system and they may be used to improve the predictive accuracy of currently existing scoring system. Larger series are needed to confirm these findings.

  7. Sperm quality before treatment in patients with early stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma enrolled in EORTC-GELA Lymphoma Group trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kaaij, Marleen A.E.; Heutte, Natacha; van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Raemaekers, John M.M.; Carde, Patrice; Noordijk, Evert M.; Fermé, Christophe; Thomas, José; Eghbali, Houchingue; Brice, Pauline; Bonmati, Caroline; Henry-Amar, Michel; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Although widely recommended, cryopreservation of sperm is sometimes not performed for patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma because of presumed poor sperm quality related to the disease. We investigated sperm quality and factors determining it in untreated patients with early stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Design and Methods Of 2362 males who participated in EORTC H6–H9 trials, 474 (20%) had data available. Sperm quality was defined according to World Health Organization guidelines. Determining factors were studied by logistic regression analysis. Results The median sperm concentration was 40×106/mL (range, 0–345×106/mL) and the median motility 50% (range, 0–90%). Sperm quality was good (concentration ≥20×106/mL and motility ≥50%), intermediate (concentration ≥5×106/mL) and poor (concentration 0) in 41%, 49% and 7% of patients, respectively. Three percent of the patients were azoospermic. No relation was found between sperm quality and age or clinical stage of the Hodgkin’s lymphoma, but B-symptoms and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate predicted poor sperm quality. The odds ratios for the association of poor sperm quality with the variables examined were: presence of B-symptoms, 2.77 (95% CI, 1.50–5.12; p=0.001); erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 50 mm/h or greater, 2.35 (95% CI, 1.24–4.43; p=0.009); fever, 3.22 (95% CI, 1.41–7.33; p=0.005), and night sweats, 3.78 (95% CI, 1.97–7.26; p<0.001). There was no relation between sperm quality and pre-treatment follicle stimulating hormone level. Conclusions In this large study of males with Hodgkin’s lymphoma, 90% had good or intermediate sperm quality. Three percent were azoospermic. There was an association between sperm quality and the presence or absence of B-symptoms, in particular fever and night sweats. With modern fertilization techniques, in most patients with early-stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma sperm quality before treatment is good enough for future fatherhood. PMID:19850901

  8. The EORTC computer-adaptive tests measuring physical functioning and fatigue exhibited high levels of measurement precision and efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersen, M.A.; Aaronson, N.K.; Arraras, J.I.; Chie, W.C.; Conroy, T.; Costantini, A.; Giesinger, J.M.; Holzner, B.; King, M.T.; Singer, S.; Velikova, G.; de Leeuw, I.M.; Young, T.; Groenvold, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group is developing a computer-adaptive test (CAT) version of the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30). We evaluated the measurement properties of the CAT versions of physical functioning (PF)

  9. The EORTC computer-adaptive tests measuring physical functioning and fatigue exhibited high levels of measurement precision and efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersen, M.A.; Aaronson, N.K.; Arraras, J.I.; Chie, W.C.; Conroy, T.; Constantini, A.; Giesinger, J.M.; Holzner, B.; King, M.T.; Singer, S.; Velikova, G.; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I.M.; Young, T.; Groenvold, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group is developing a computer-adaptive test (CAT) version of the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30). We evaluated the measurement properties of the CAT versions of physical functioning (PF)

  10. The EORTC computer-adaptive tests measuring physical functioning and fatigue exhibited high levels of measurement precision and efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten Aa; Aaronson, Neil K; Arraras, Juan I

    2013-01-01

    The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group is developing a computer-adaptive test (CAT) version of the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30). We evaluated the measurement properties of the CAT versions of physical functioning (PF) and fati...

  11. Exatecan in pretreated adult patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma: results of a phase II--study of the EORTC Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichardt, P; Nielsen, Ole Steen; Bauer, S

    2007-01-01

    was synthesised to impart increased aqueous solubility, greater tumour efficacy, and less toxicity than camptothecin itself, topotecan or irinotecan. Since some activity against soft tissue sarcomas, especially leiomyosarcomas, has been reported for topoisomerase I-inhibitors, a study with a new and more potent...... modification. The main toxicity was haematotoxicity with grade 3/4 neutropenia in 49%, grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia in 23%, and grade 3/4 anaemia in 15% of patients, respectively. Non-haematological toxicity consisted mainly of grade 2/3 dyspnoea in 36% of patients and grade 2/3 fatigue in 28%. One treatment......-related toxic death due to septic shock was reported. Best overall response was no change with 60% in the leiomyosarcoma group and 53% in the non-leiomysarcoma group, respectively. The 3 months progression-free survival estimates are 56% for leiomysarcomas and 26% for other histologies, respectively. Using...

  12. Efficacy outcomes in a randomised trial of liposomal amphotericin B based on revised EORTC/MSG 2008 definitions of invasive mould disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornely, O.A.; Maertens, J.; Bresnik, M.; Ebrahimi, R.; Dellow, E.; Herbrecht, R.; Donnelly, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) published revised definitions for diagnosing invasive fungal disease. A previous prospective trial of liposomal amphotericin B for invasive mould disease (AmBiLoad) used modified EORTC/MSG 2002

  13. Normative data for the EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC-sexuality items in the general Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poll-Franse, L.; Mols, F.; Gundy, C.; Creutzberg, C.L.; Nout, R.A.; de Leeuw, I.M.; Taphoorn, M.J.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to generate Dutch reference data for the EORTC QLQ-C30 and for five sexuality items from the EORTC QL-item bank. Furthermore, to evaluate the relative impact of self-reported health problems on these outcomes and compare the Dutch normative EORTC QLQ-C30 overall

  14. The use of EORTC measures in daily clinical practice—A synopsis of a newly developed manual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wintner, Lisa M; Sztankay, Monika; Aaronson, Neil

    2016-01-01

    implementation * electronic data assessment and telemonitoring, and * further use of EORTC measures and ethical considerations. Next to an extensive overview of currently available literature, the manual specifically focuses on knowledge about EORTC measures to give evidence-based recommendations whenever......Cancer has increasingly become a chronic condition and the routine collection of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) like quality of life is widely recommended for clinical practice. Nonetheless, the successful implementation of PROs is still a major challenge, although common barriers...... to and facilitators of their beneficial use are well known. To support health care professionals and other stakeholders in the implementation of the EORTC PRO measures, the EORTC Quality of Life Group provides guidance on issues considered important for their use in daily clinical practice. Herein, we present...

  15. Psychometric evaluation of the EORTC computerized adaptive test (CAT) fatigue item pool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten Aa; Giesinger, Johannes M; Holzner, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms associated with cancer and its treatment. To obtain a more precise and flexible measure of fatigue, the EORTC Quality of Life Group has developed a computerized adaptive test (CAT) measure of fatigue. This is part of an ongoing project developing a CAT...

  16. Development of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) for the EORTC QLQ-C30 physical functioning dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten Aa; Groenvold, Mogens; Aaronson, Neil K

    2011-01-01

    Computerized adaptive test (CAT) methods, based on item response theory (IRT), enable a patient-reported outcome instrument to be adapted to the individual patient while maintaining direct comparability of scores. The EORTC Quality of Life Group is developing a CAT version of the widely used EORT...

  17. Development of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) for the EORTC QLQ-C30 physical functioning dimension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersen, M.A.; Groenvold, M.; Aaronson, N.K.; Chie, W.C.; Conroy, T.; Constantini, A.; Fayers, P.; Helbostad, J.; Holzner, B.; Kaasa, S.; Singer, S.; Velikova, G.; Young, T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Computerized adaptive test (CAT) methods, based on item response theory (IRT), enable a patient-reported outcome instrument to be adapted to the individual patient while maintaining direct comparability of scores. The EORTC Quality of Life Group is developing a CAT version of the widely

  18. International development of four EORTC disease-specific quality of life questionnaires for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma, high- and low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke; Oerlemans, Simone; Bredart, Anne; Kyriakou, Charalampia; Sztankay, Monika; Pallua, Stephan; Daniëls, Laurien; Creutzberg, Carien L; Cocks, Kim; Malak, Sandra; Caocci, Giovanni; Molica, Stefano; Chie, Weichu; Efficace, Fabio

    2017-11-10

    This paper describes the international, cross-cultural development of four disease-specific EORTC QoL questionnaires, to supplement the EORTC QLQ-C30, for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), high- or low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (HG/LG-NHL), and CLL. Questionnaire development was conducted according to guidelines from the EORTC Quality of Life Group. Phase I comprised generation of QoL issues relevant to patients. Phase II included operationalization and assessment of item relevance. In phase III, items were pretested in a cross-cultural sample. In Phase I, 75 issues were identified through focus groups and systematic literature searches. Interviews with 80 health-care professionals and 245 patients resulted in a provisional module of 38 items (phase II) representing items relevant for all or at least one of the four malignancies. In Phase III, this was tested in 337 patients from five European countries and resulted in a questionnaire with 27 items for HL (EORTC QLQ-HL27), 29 items for HG-NHL (EORTC QLQ-NHL-HG29), 20 items for LG-NHL (EORTC QLQ-NHL-LG20) and 17 items for CLL (EORTC QLQ-CLL17). This study provides four new EORTC modules for use in clinical research and routine practice in conjunction with the EORTC QLQ-C30 for assessing QoL in patients with lymphoma and CLL.

  19. Decitabine versus best supportive care in older patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation (RAEBt) - results of a subgroup analysis of the randomized phase III study 06011 of the EORTC Leukemia Cooperative Group and German MDS Study Group (GMDSSG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, H.; Suciu, S.; Ruter, B.H.; Platzbecker, U.; Giagounidis, A.; Selleslag, D.; Labar, B.; Germing, U.; Salih, H.R.; Muus, P.; Pfluger, K.H.; Hagemeijer, A.; Schaefer, H.E.; Fiaccadori, V.; Baron, F.; Ganser, A.; Aul, C.; Witte, T.J. de; Wijermans, P.W.; Lubbert, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)/GMDSSG phase III trial 06011, we compared decitabine (15 mg/m(2) every 8 h for 3 days) with best supportive care (BSC) in patients >/=60 years with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) by French-American-British (FAB) criteria.

  20. Impact of beta blocker medication in patients with platinum sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer-a combined analysis of 2 prospective multicenter trials by the AGO Study Group, NCIC-CTG and EORTC-GCG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Harter, Philipp; Lubbe, Dirk; Kurzeder, Christian; Vergote, Ignace; Plante, Marie; Pfisterer, Jacobus

    2013-06-01

    Retrospective analyses suggest that the treatment with beta blocker improves survival in patients with breast cancer and melanoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of medication with beta blocker in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer. Included patients received treatment within two prospective clinical trials: AGO-OVAR 2.4 phase I trial (carboplatin/gemcitabine; N=25, protocol AGO-OVAR 2.4) and AGO led intergroup phase III trial (carboplatin vs carboplatin/gemcitabine; N=356, protocol AGO-OVAR 2.5, EORTC-GCG, NCIC CTG). Concurrent medication was documented after every cycle and thorough monitoring was conducted. During the studies 38 patients (9.97%) received a beta blocker as co-medication. Patients treated with beta blockers were significantly older than patients not treated with beta blockers. Response rates to chemotherapy were not different between patients treated with beta blockers and those who were not. After a median follow-up of 17 months, 349 (91.6%) patients had progressive disease and 267 (70.1%) patients had died. No difference in median progression-free survival (7.79 vs 7.62 months (p=0.95)) and overall survival (21.2 vs 17.3 months (p=0.18)) was recorded for patients treated with and without beta blocker. In multivariate analyses including age, platinum free-interval, study treatment and ECOG performance status beta blocker treatment was not associated with a significant impact on progression-free survival (HR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.65-1.31; p=0.65) and overall survival (HR:0.74; 95%CI: 0.49-1.11; p=0.15). In this series of recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer patients it could not be confirmed whether beta blocker treatment was associated with better or worse outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Decitabine versus best supportive care in older patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation (RAEBt) - results of a subgroup analysis of the randomized phase III study 06011 of the EORTC Leukemia Cooperative Group and German MDS Study Group (GMDSSG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Heiko; Suciu, Stefan; Rüter, Björn Hans; Platzbecker, Uwe; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; Germing, Ulrich; Salih, Helmut R; Muus, Petra; Pflüger, Karl-Heinz; Hagemeijer, Anne; Schaefer, Hans-Eckart; Fiaccadori, Valeria; Baron, Frédéric; Ganser, Arnold; Aul, Carlo; de Witte, Theo; Wijermans, Pierre W; Lübbert, Michael

    2015-12-01

    In the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)/GMDSSG phase III trial 06011, we compared decitabine (15 mg/m(2) every 8 h for 3 days) with best supportive care (BSC) in patients ≥60 years with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) by French-American-British (FAB) criteria. Here, we reinvestigate trial 06011 for the activity and efficacy specifically in patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation (RAEBt). Response rates in the decitabine arm (N = 40) were as follows: complete or partial remission, 15 %; hematologic improvement, 15 %; resistant disease, 30 %. RAEBt patients in the decitabine arm had longer progression-free survival (PFS; hazard ratio (HR) 0.30, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.18-0.51; median, 6.2 vs 2.8 months) and overall survival (OS; HR 0.68, 95 % CI 0.42-1.11; median, 8.0 vs 6.0 months) than in the BSC arm (N = 35). Censoring at allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the OS difference between the treatment groups increased, particularly among patients aged 60-74 years (HR 0.48, 95 % CI 0.26-0.89). After regrouping the study cohort according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (i.e., ≥20 % blasts) in the decitabine arm (N = 27) also had longer PFS than in the BSC arm (N = 23) (HR 0.46, 95 % CI 0.26-0.83; median, 6.2 vs 2.8 months). In conclusion, 3-day decitabine displays clinical activity and efficacy in MDS and/or AML with 5-30 % blood or 20-30 % marrow blasts.

  2. Emphysematous cystitis: An unusual disease of the Genito-Urinary system suspected on imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarna Pawanjit S

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Emphysematous cystitis is a rare disease entity caused by gas fermenting bacterial and fungal pathogens. Clinical symptoms are nonspecific and diagnostic clues often arise from the unanticipated imaging findings. We report a case of 52-year-old male who presented with fever, dysuria and gross hematuria who was found to have emphysematous cystitis.

  3. RADIOLOGICAL FEATURES OF GENITO-URINARY TUBERCULOSIS-A PICTORIAL ESSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Patnaik

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Genitourinary tuberculosis (GUTB is the most common extra-pulmonary TB accounting for 14-41% of all tubercular affections. Caseation, parenchymal loss, intra-renal scars and strictures at calyceal neck, pelvi-ureteral junction and ureterovesical junction are hall-marks of GUTB. Radiological diagnosis of GUTB is often a challenge due to the variable imaging features it can cause. Varying degrees of calcifications in KUB region is seen 21-44% of cases. High dose IVU is the gold standard for its evaluation. Loss of calyceal sharpness, fuzzy margin, calyceal dilatation, papillary necrosis, cavitation and moth eaten calyces due to erosion are common findings on IVP. There may be stricture at calyceal neck, in pelvis resulting in hydrocalycosis and hydronephrosis or contracted pelvis. Ureteric involvement (typically a beaded, saw tooth or pipe stem appearance mays seen in 50% of patients. One third of GUTB there is affection of the urinary bladder. ‘Thimble bladder’ may be a late manifestation. Our own observation of 25 proven cases, showed thimble bladder (n=16 followed by hydronephrosis (n=16, vesico-ureteric reflux (n=5, beaded ureter (n=7, scarred pelvis (n=8, infundibular stenosis (n=9 and non-functioning kidneys (n=4. Though uncommon, putty kidney (3, ghost calyx, granuloma/abscess and urethral diverticula were also observed. The most diagnostic radiological features of GUTB are lobar calcification, diffuse uneven caliectasis without pelvis dilatation, contracted pelvis with or without calcification, urothelial thickening and thimble bladder. Multiplicity of abnormal features in the same patient is very characteristic presentation. Knowledge of IVU features is important as CT Urography depicts the same features as IVU.

  4. European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Pathobiology Group standard operating procedure for the preparation of human tumour tissue extracts suited for the quantitative analysis of tissue-associated biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Manfred; Mengele, Karin; Schueren, Elisabeth; Sweep, Fred C G J; Foekens, John A; Brünner, Nils; Laabs, Juliane; Malik, Abha; Harbeck, Nadia

    2007-03-01

    With the new concept of 'individualized treatment and targeted therapies', tumour tissue-associated biomarkers have been given a new role in selection of cancer patients for treatment and in cancer patient management. Tumour biomarkers can give support to cancer patient stratification and risk assessment, treatment response identification, or to identifying those patients who are expected to respond to certain anticancer drugs. As the field of tumour-associated biomarkers has expanded rapidly over the last years, it has become increasingly apparent that a strong need exists to establish guidelines on how to easily disintegrate the tumour tissue for assessment of the presence of tumour tissue-associated biomarkers. Several mechanical tissue (cell) disruption techniques exist, ranging from bead mill homogenisation and freeze-fracturing through to blade or pestle-type homogenisation, to grinding and ultrasonics. Still, only a few directives have been given on how fresh-frozen tumour tissues should be processed for the extraction and determination of tumour biomarkers. The PathoBiology Group of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer therefore has devised a standard operating procedure for the standardised preparation of human tumour tissue extracts which is designed for the quantitative analysis of tumour tissue-associated biomarkers. The easy to follow technical steps involved require 50-300 mg of deep-frozen cancer tissue placed into small size (1.2 ml) cryogenic tubes. These are placed into the shaking flask of a Mikro-Dismembrator S machine (bead mill) to pulverise the tumour tissue in the capped tubes in the deep-frozen state by use of a stainless steel ball, all within 30 s of exposure. RNA is isolated from the pulverised tissue following standard procedures. Proteins are extracted from the still frozen pulverised tissue by addition of Tris-buffered saline to obtain the cytosol fraction of the tumour or by the Tris buffer supplemented with

  5. Translation and validation of the EORTC brain cancer module (EORTC QLQ-BN20) for use in Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshnevisan, A.; Yekaninejad, M.S.; Ardakani, S.K.; Pakpour, A.H.; Mardani, A.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to translate the EORTC quality of life questionnaire for brain cancer, the QLQ-BN20, into Persian, and to evaluate its psychometric properties when used among brain cancer patients in Iran. Methods A standard backward and forward translation procedure was used to

  6. Validation of the Danish version of the disease specific instrument EORTC QLQ-CR38 to assess Health-related quality of life in patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaysen Henriette

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC quality of life colorectal questionnaire module (QLQ-CR38 was developed in 1999, and an update, the QLQ CR29 was published recently. To date the Danish version of the questionnaire has not been validated. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Danish version of EORTC QLQ-CR38. Methods EORTC QLQ-CR38 was administered to 190 patients with colorectal cancer in two Danish hospitals, one month after their operation. A psychometric evaluation of the questionnaire’s structure, reliability, convergent, divergent and known-groups validity was performed. Results Data from 164 (86.3% patients were available for analysis. The Danish version of EORTC QLQ-CR38 showed satisfactory psychometric properties for the scales: body image, sexual functioning, male sexual problems and defecations problems. Suboptimal psychometric performances were found for the scales: micturition problems, symptoms of the gastrointestinal tract and weight loss. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of the scale chemotherapy side effects was limited by the low number of patients receiving chemotherapy. It was not possible to assess the psychometric properties of the scale female sexual problems and the single item sexual enjoyment due to a high number of missing values. The homogeneity of the study population made the evaluation of known-group validity difficult. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that the validity of the Danish version of EORTC QLQ-CR38 is acceptable. Furthermore, the results support the appropriateness of the updated version, the EORTC QLQ-CR29.

  7. Gonadal function in males after chemotherapy for early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma treated in four subsequent trials by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer: EORTC Lymphoma Group and the Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kaaij, Marleen A E; Heutte, Natacha; Le Stang, Nolwenn; Raemaekers, John M M; Simons, Arnold H M; Carde, Patrice; Noordijk, Evert M; Fermé, Christophe; Thomas, José; Eghbali, Houchingue; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C; Henry-Amar, Michel

    2007-07-01

    To analyze fertility in male patients treated with various combinations of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, with or without alkylating agents, or with radiotherapy alone for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were measured in patients with early-stage upper-diaphragmatic disease enrolled in four European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) trials (H6-H9). Median follow-up after therapy was 32 months. Patients with FSH measurement at least 12 months after end of treatment (n = 355) were selected to assess post-treatment fertility. Patients with FSH measurement 0 to 9 months after therapy (n = 349) were selected to analyze fertility recovery; of these, patients with elevated FSH (> 10 U/L; n = 101) were followed until recovery. Factors predictive for therapy-related infertility were assessed by logistic regression. The proportion of elevated FSH was 3% and 8% in patients treated with radiotherapy only or with nonalkylating chemotherapy (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine [ABVD], epirubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, prednisone [EBVP]); it was 60% (P < .001) after chemotherapy containing alkylating agents (mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone [MOPP], MOPP/doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine [ABV], bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone [BEACOPP]). After a median time of 19 months, recovery of fertility occurred in 82% of patients treated without alkylating chemotherapy. This proportion was 30%, statistically (P < .001) lower in those treated with alkylating chemotherapy, and median time to recovery was 27 months. The post-treatment proportion of elevated FSH increased significantly (P < .001) with the dose of alkylating chemotherapy administered, and recovery was less frequent and slower after higher doses. Age more than 50 years and stage II disease also contributed to poor outcome. Fertility can be secured after nonalkylating chemotherapy

  8. EORTC QLQ-COMU26: a questionnaire for the assessment of communication between patients and professionals. Phase III of the module development in ten countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arraras, Juan Ignacio; Wintner, Lisa M; Sztankay, Monika; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Hofmeister, Dirk; Costantini, Anna; Bredart, Anne; Young, Teresa; Kuljanic, Karin; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Kontogianni, Meropi; Chie, Wei-Chu; Kulis, Dagmara; Greimel, Eva

    2017-05-01

    Communication between patients and professionals is one major aspect of the support offered to cancer patients. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group (QLG) has developed a cancer-specific instrument for the measurement of different issues related to the communication between cancer patients and their health care professionals. Questionnaire development followed the EORTC QLG Module Development Guidelines. A provisional questionnaire was pre-tested (phase III) in a multicenter study within ten countries from five cultural areas (Northern and South Europe, UK, Poland and Taiwan). Patients from seven subgroups (before, during and after treatment, for localized and advanced disease each, plus palliative patients) were recruited. Structured interviews were conducted. Qualitative and quantitative analyses have been performed. One hundred forty patients were interviewed. Nine items were deleted and one shortened. Patients' comments had a key role in item selection. No item was deleted due to just quantitative criteria. Consistency was observed in patients' answers across cultural areas. The revised version of the module EORTC QLQ-COMU26 has 26 items, organized in 6 scales and 4 individual items. The EORTC COMU26 questionnaire can be used in daily clinical practice and research, in various patient groups from different cultures. The next step will be an international field test with a large heterogeneous group of cancer patients.

  9. Comparison of EORTC criteria and PERCIST for PET/CT response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan and cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skougaard, Kristin; Nielsen, Dorte; Jensen, Benny Vittrup; Hendel, Helle Westergren

    2013-07-01

    The study aim was to compare European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria with PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) for response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with a combination of the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan and the monoclonal antibody cetuximab. From 2006 to 2009, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were prospectively included in a phase II trial evaluating the combination of irinotecan and cetuximab every second week, as third-line treatment. (18)F-FDG PET/CT was performed between 1 and 14 d before the first treatment and after every fourth treatment cycle until progression was identified by CT with Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Response evaluation with (18)F-FDG PET/CT was retrospectively performed according to both EORTC criteria and PERCIST, classifying the patients into 4 response categories: complete metabolic response (CMR), partial metabolic response (PMR), stable metabolic disease (SMD), and progressive metabolic disease (PMD). Individual best overall metabolic response (BOmR) was registered with both sets of criteria, as well as survival within response categories, and compared. A total of 61 patients and 203 PET/CT scans were eligible for response evaluation. With EORTC criteria, 38 had PMR, 16 had SMD, and 7 had PMD as their BOmR. With PERCIST, 34 had PMR, 20 had SMD, and 7 had PMD as their BOmR. None of the patients had CMR. There was agreement between EORTC criteria and PERCIST in 87% of the patients, and the corresponding κ-coefficient was 0.76. Disagreements were confined to PMR and SMD. Median overall survival (OS) in months with EORTC criteria was 14.2 in the PMR group and 7.2 in the combined SMD + PMD group. With PERCIST, it was 14.5 in the PMR group and 7.9 in the SMD + PMD group. Response evaluation with EORTC criteria and PERCIST gave similar responses and OS outcomes with good agreement on BOmR (κ-coefficient, 0.76) and

  10. Further evaluation of the EORTC QLQ-C30 psychometric properties in a large Brazilian cancer patient cohort as a function of their educational status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Carneseca, Estela Cristina; Barroso, Eliane Marçon; de Camargos, Mayara Goulart; Alfano, Ana Camila Callado; Rugno, Fernanda Capella; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2014-08-01

    The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) is considered a valid instrument for use in Brazil. However, the previous Brazilian validation study included only 30 lung cancer patients and only measured test-retest reliability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the EORTC QLQ-C30 in a sample of cancer patients at different educational levels who completed the instrument administered by an interviewer. Data from six prospective studies conducted by the same group of researchers were combined in this study (N = 986). Reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient, all values of which were >0.7, with the exception of cognitive functioning, social functioning, and nausea and vomiting (α = 0.57, α = 0.69, and α = 0.68, respectively). In multi-trait scaling analysis, convergent and divergent validity were considered adequate (validity indices were 91.6 and 97.4%). In general, moderate to strong correlations were found between the subscales of the EORTC QLQ-C30 and its respective dimensions from the WHOQOL-bref, the hospital anxiety and depression scale, and the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) instruments. In addition, the EORTC QLQ-C30 was able to differentiate groups of patients with distinct performance statuses and types of treatment (known-group validation). Statistical analyses were also performed on educational status, yielding similar results. Detailed psychometric property data using the EORTC QLQ-C30 in Brazil are added by this study. In addition, we demonstrated that this instrument is in general reliable and valid regardless of the patient educational level.

  11. Validity of genito-urinary discharges, genital ulcers and genital rashes as indicators of seroincident HSV-2 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eziyi Iche Kalu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the validity of vaginal discharges, urethral discharges, genital rashes, and painful genital ulcers as indicators of early detection of incident herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 infection among pregnant women in Benin metropolis. Methods: Participants were antenatal clinic attendees of University of Benin Teaching Hospital and Central Hospital, Benin. Baseline sociodemographic, obstetric and HSV-2 serological data were collected. The HSV-2-seronegative returned for a repeat HSV-2 antibody assay before delivery date. Data on incidence of genital rashes, abnormal vaginal discharges, painful genital ulcers and urethral discharges were collected. Results: The sensitivities of abnormal vaginal discharges, genital rashes, urethral discharges and painful genital ulcers were 82.3%, 70.6%, 41.2% and 28.6% respectively; while their positive-predictive values were 53.8%, 60.0%, 58.3% and 66.7% respective. All the symptoms had >95% specificities and 95% negative-predictive values for seroincident HSV-2 infection. Conclusions: Abnormal vaginal discharge, genital rashes, urethral discharges and genital ulcers are valid indicators of seroincident HSV-2 infection and could be useful in formulation of screening tools in resource-limited settings.

  12. Development of an item bank for the EORTC Role Functioning Computer Adaptive Test (EORTC RF-CAT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamper, Eva-Maria; Petersen, Morten Aa.; Aaronson, Neil

    2016-01-01

    with good psychometric properties. The resulting item bank exhibits excellent reliability (mean reliability = 0.85, median = 0.95). Using the RF-CAT may allow sample size savings from 11 % up to 50 % compared to using the QLQ-C30 RF scale. CONCLUSIONS: The RF-CAT item bank improves the precision...... a computer-adaptive test (CAT) for RF. This was part of a larger project whose objective is to develop a CAT version of the EORTC QLQ-C30 which is one of the most widely used HRQOL instruments in oncology. METHODS: In accordance with EORTC guidelines, the development of the RF-CAT comprised four phases......, and evaluation of the psychometric performance of the RF-CAT. RESULTS: Phases I-III yielded a list of 12 items eligible for phase IV field-testing. The field-testing sample included 1,023 patients from Austria, Denmark, Italy, and the UK. Psychometric evaluation and item response theory analyses yielded 10 items...

  13. Organisation and management of the first clinical trial of BNCT in Europe (EORTC protocol 11961).EORTC BNCT study group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerwein, W; Moss, R; Rassow, J; Stecher-Rasmussen, F; Hideghéty, K; Wolbers, J G; Sack, H

    1999-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is based on the ability of the isotope 10B to capture thermal neutrons and to disintegrate instantaneously producing high LET particles. The only neutron beam available in Europe for such a treatment is based at the European High Flux Reactor HFR at Petten (The Netherlands). The European Commission, owners of the reactor, decided that the potential benefit of the facility should be opened to all European citizens and therefore insisted on a multinational approach to perform the first clinical trial in Europe on BNCT. This precondition had to be respected as well as the national laws and regulations. Together with the Dutch authorities actions were undertaken to overcome the obvious legal problems. Furthermore, the clinical trial at Petten takes place in a nuclear research reactor, which apart from being conducted in a non-hospital environment, is per se known to be dangerous. It was therefore of the utmost importance that special attention is given to safety, beyond normal rules, and to the training of staff. In itself, the trial is an unusual Phase I study, introducing a new drug with a new irradiation modality, with really an unknown dose-effect relationship. This trial must follow optimal procedures, which underscore the quality and qualified manner of performance.

  14. Validation of the Danish version of the disease specific instrument EORTC QLQ-CR38 to assess Health-related quality of life in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Henriette Vind; Jess, Per; Laurberg, Søren

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life colorectal questionnaire module (QLQ-CR38) was developed in 1999, and an update, the QLQ CR29 was published recently. To date the Danish version of the questionnaire has not been validated......, reliability, convergent, divergent and known-groups validity was performed. RESULTS: Data from 164 (86.3%) patients were available for analysis. The Danish version of EORTC QLQ-CR38 showed satisfactory psychometric properties for the scales: body image, sexual functioning, male sexual problems and defecations....... It was not possible to assess the psychometric properties of the scale female sexual problems and the single item sexual enjoyment due to a high number of missing values. The homogeneity of the study population made the evaluation of known-group validity difficult. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest...

  15. Trimodality therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma: Results from an EORTC phase II multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.Y. van Schil (Paul); P. Baas (Paul); R.M. Gaafar (Rabab); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); F. Van De Pol (Francien); B. Hasane (B.); H.M. Klomp (Houke); A.M. Abdelrahman (A.); J. Welche (J.); J.P. van Meerbeeck (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC; protocol 08031) phase II trial investigated the feasibility of trimodality therapy consisting of induction chemotherapy followed by extrapleural pneumonectomy and post-operative radiotherapy in patients with malignant

  16. Psychometric evaluation of an item bank for computerized adaptive testing of the EORTC QLQ-C30 cognitive functioning dimension in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirven, Linda; Groenvold, Mogens; Taphoorn, Martin J B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Organisation of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group is developing computerized adaptive testing (CAT) versions of all EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) scales with the aim to enhance measurement precision. Here we present the results....... This evaluation included an assessment of dimensionality, fit to the item response theory (IRT) model, differential item functioning (DIF), and measurement properties. RESULTS: A total of 1030 cancer patients completed the 44 candidate items on CF. Of these, 34 items could be included in a unidimensional IRT...... model, showing an acceptable fit. Although several items showed DIF, these had a negligible impact on CF estimation. Measurement precision of the item bank was much higher than the two original QLQ-C30 CF items alone, across the whole continuum. Moreover, CAT measurement may on average reduce study...

  17. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study : 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stupp, Roger; Hegi, Monika E.; Mason, Warren P.; van den Bent, Martin J.; Taphoorn, Martin J. B.; Janzer, Robert C.; Ludwin, Samuel K.; Allgeier, Anouk; Fisher, Barbara; Belanger, Karl; Hau, Peter; Brandes, Alba A.; Gijtenbeek, Johanna; Marosi, Christine; Vecht, Charles J.; Mokhtari, Karima; Wesseling, Pieter; Villa, Salvador; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth; Gorlia, Thierry; Weller, Michael; Lacombe, Denis; Cairncross, J. Gregory; Mirimanoff, Rene-Olivier

    Background In 2004, a randomised phase III trial by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group (NCIC) reported improved median and 2-year survival for patients with glioblastoma treated with concomitant and

  18. Quality assurance for prospective EORTC radiation oncology trials: the challenges of advanced technology in a multicenter international setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Damien C; Poortmans, Philip M P; Hurkmans, Coen W; Aird, Edwin; Gulyban, Akos; Fairchild, Alysa

    2011-07-01

    The European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) is a pan-European structure charged with improving cancer treatment through the testing of new therapeutic strategies in phases I-III clinical studies. Properly conducted trials in radiation oncology are required to demonstrate superiority of a new treatment over the current standard. The Radiation Oncology Group (ROG) has initiated a complex quality assurance (QA) program to ensure safe and effective treatment delivery. Most modern trials are multicenter and multidisciplinary, further increasing the importance of early, strict and consistent QA in radiotherapy (RT). QART measures confirm whether a site possesses minimum staff and equipment for participation. Dummy runs, reviews of patient treatment plans and complex dosimetry checks verify the ability of an institution to comply with the protocol. Data required for evaluation are increasingly exchanged digitally, allowing detailed plan reconstruction, evaluation of target volume delineation and recalculation of dose-volume parameters for comparison against predefined standards. The five tiers of QA implemented in EORTC trials are reviewed, along with past, current and future QART initiatives. As substantial human and financial resources are increasingly invested in QART, the importance of cost-benefit analysis of QA and its impact on clinical outcome cannot be overstated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Performance of the EORTC questionnaire for the assessment of quality of life in head and neck cancer patients EORTC QLQ-H&N35: a methodological review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singer, S.; Arraras, J.I.; Chie, W.C.; Fisher, S.E.; Galalae, R.; Hammerlid, E.; Nicolatou-Galitis, O.; Schmalz, C.; de Leeuw, I.M.; Gamper, E.; Keszte, J.; Hofmeister, D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The EORTC QLQ-H&N35 (H&N35) is widely used to measure quality of life in head and neck cancer patients. The aims of this study were to obtain insight into a) the languages in which the H&N35 has been used and the psychometric properties in those languages, b) the study designs, and c) its

  20. International development of an EORTC questionnaire for assessing health-related quality of life in chronic myeloid leukemia patients : The EORTC QLQ-CML24

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efficace, Fabio; Baccarani, Michele; Breccia, Massimo; Saussele, Susanne; Abel, Gregory; Caocci, Giovanni; Guilhot, Francois; Cocks, Kim; Naeem, Adel; Sprangers, Mirjam; Oerlemans, Simone; Chie, Weichu; Castagnetti, Fausto; Bombaci, Felice; Sharf, Giora; Cardoni, Annarita; Noens, Lucien; Pallua, Stephan; Salvucci, Marzia; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Rosti, Gianantonio; Mandelli, Franco

    Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is a key aspect for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients. The aim of this study was to develop a disease-specific HRQOL questionnaire for patients with CML to supplement the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)-QLQ

  1. International development of an EORTC questionnaire for assessing health-related quality of life in chronic myeloid leukemia patients: the EORTC QLQ-CML24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficace, Fabio; Baccarani, Michele; Breccia, Massimo; Saussele, Susanne; Abel, Gregory; Caocci, Giovanni; Guilhot, Francois; Cocks, Kim; Naeem, Adel; Sprangers, Mirjam; Oerlemans, Simone; Chie, Weichu; Castagnetti, Fausto; Bombaci, Felice; Sharf, Giora; Cardoni, Annarita; Noens, Lucien; Pallua, Stephan; Salvucci, Marzia; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Rosti, Gianantonio; Mandelli, Franco

    2014-04-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is a key aspect for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients. The aim of this study was to develop a disease-specific HRQOL questionnaire for patients with CML to supplement the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)-QLQ C30. The process followed a predefined and systematic stepwise iterative process as defined by the EORTC guidelines for questionnaire development. The process was divided into 3 phases: (1) generation of relevant HRQOL issues, (2) operationalization of the HRQOL issues into a set of items, and (3) pretesting the questionnaire for relevance and acceptability. Descriptive statistics and psychometric analyses were also performed. Overall, 655 CML patients were enrolled in 10 countries including the USA and countries in Europe and Asia. Interviews with health-care professionals experienced in CML (n = 59) were also conducted. Results from the interviews, clinical experiences, and statistical analyses were used to develop the EORTC QLQ-CML24. The final module consists of 24 items assessing the following aspects: symptom burden, impact on daily life and on worry/mood, body image problems, and satisfaction with care and with social life. Internal consistency, assessed with Cronbach's alpha coefficients, ranged from 0.73 to 0.83 for the proposed scales. The EORTC QLQ-CML24 is an internationally developed HRQOL questionnaire for CML patients, and its implementation in clinical research and practice can provide important information to facilitate clinical decision-making.

  2. Validity, reliability and understanding of the EORTC-C30 and EORTC-BR23, quality of life questionnaires specific for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Alessandra Silva Michels

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To validate and assess reliability and understanding of the EORTC–C30 quality of life questionnaire and its breast cancer specific module, the EORTC-BR23. Methods: This study was conducted at the AC Camargo Cancer Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil. A total of 100 women diagnosed with breast cancer were interviewed. Internal consistency, confirmatory factorial analysis, convergent validity, construct validity and degree of understanding were examined. Reliability was assessed by comparison of means at times 1 and 2, inter-class coefficient and Bland-Altman graphics. Results: Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.72 to 0.86 for the EORTC-C30 and from 0.78 to 0.83 for the EORTC-BR23 questionnaire. Most questions were confirmed in the confirmatory factorial analysis. In the construct validity analysis, the questionnaires were capable of differentiating patients with or without lymphedema, apart from the symptom scales of both questionnaires. Both questionnaires presented a significant correlation in most domains of the SF-36, in the convergent validity analysis. Only a few criticisms were reported concerning questions, and the mean grade of understanding was high (C30 = 4.91 and BR23 = 4.89. The questionnaires presented good rates of reliability, with the exception of the functional scale of the C30 and the symptom scale of the BR23. Conclusions: The EORTC-C30 and EORTC-BR23 quality of life questionnaires were validated, presented good rates of reliability and are easily understood, allowing them to be used in Brazil to assess quality of life among women with breast cancer.

  3. How to evaluate sexual health in cancer patients : Development of the EORTC sexual health questionnaire for cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagele, E.; den Oudsten, B.L.; Greimel, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study is to describe the development of a comprehensive European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) questionnaire to assess sexual health of female and male cancer patients and for cancer survivors. Methods: According to the EORTC guidelines, the

  4. Validation of the EORTC QLQ-INFO 25 questionnaire in Lebanese cancer patients: Is ignorance a Bliss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabchi, Samer; El Rassy, Elie; Khazaka, Aline; El Karak, Fadi; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Chebib, Ralph; Assi, Tarek; Ghor, Maya; Naamani, Lara; Richa, Sami; Ghosn, Marwan; Kattan, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Despite worldwide trends toward optimizing full disclosure of information (DOI), the prevailing belief that cancer diagnosis should be concealed from patients, for their own good, has endured for a substantial period of time in Middle Eastern communities. This study would assess the reliability of the Arabic translated version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-INFO 25). The study was also designed to quantify DOI to Lebanese cancer patients and determine patient satisfaction with this DOI. Moreover, we compared the differences in the level of information among groups based on clinical and biographical variables. A sample of patients, being treated for a variety of malignancies, was prospectively evaluated. A physician interviewed patients using the Arabic version of the EORTC QLQ-INFO 25, on the day of hospitalization for chemotherapy, before treatment was administered. In total 201 patients were interviewed. The translated version of the EORTC QLQ-INFO 25 showed high reliability when assessed using Cronbach's alpha coefficients for internal consistency with values scoring higher than 0.7 for all scales and the full questionnaire. There was a considerable lack of information provided to the participants with 38.8 % being unaware of their diagnosis and more than half being uninformed about the extent of their disease. Paradoxically, 86.5 % of patients expressed their satisfaction about the amount of information they received and 89.5 % believe the information provided was helpful. Further analysis showed no significant association between gender, marital status, cancer site and stage and the amount of information received. However, age and level of education were associated with DOI such as younger and more educated patients received more information. Older patients were also found to be the most satisfied with the information they received, despite having less access to information

  5. Do Standardised Prognostic Algorithms Reflect Local Practice? Application of EORTC Risk Tables for Non-Muscle Invasive (pTa/pT1 Bladder Cancer Recurrence and Progression in a Local Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Pillai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A risk calculator algorithm to allow prediction of probabilities of 1- and 5-year recurrence and progression rates in individuals with pTa/pT1 bladder cancer has been proposed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and was incorporated into the European Association of Urology guidelines in 2006. We attempted to validate this algorithm in a cohort of patients with known outcome. Prognostic data were collected from a consecutively presenting cohort of 109 patients with non-muscle invasive (pTa/pT1 transitional cell cancer (TCC at a single institution between 1983 and 1985. Using the same statistical models as in the EORTC original paper, predicted probabilities of 1- and 5-year recurrence and progression were calculated. Patients were divided into four risk groups for recurrence (Ir-IVr and progression (Ip-IVp, respectively, using six prognostic criteria. These were then compared to the probabilities predicted in the EORTC algorithm. The predicted 1- and 5-year probabilities of recurrence were significantly higher in the study population as compared to the original EORTC algorithm for all four risk groups. The predicted 1-year probabilities for progression in groups Ip/IIIp and at 5-years for groups Ip/IIp were in accordance with the original algorithm, but were higher for the other progression groups. The concordance for the model of prediction using the study group for recurrence at 1 and 5 years was 62 and 63%, respectively, and for progression was 65 and 67, respectively. We were unable to validate the proposed algorithm in our group of patients. Although our study has limitations that prevent firm conclusions on the validity of the algorithm, it does expose some of the drawbacks of standardised nomograms when applied to local clinical practice.

  6. Validation of the Arabic version of the EORTC quality of life questionnaire among cancer patients in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijer, Huda Abu-Saad; Sagherian, Knar; Tamim, Hani

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the translated Lebanese Arabic version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30 in a sample of adult cancer patients in Lebanon. The EORTC QLQ-C30 was translated into Lebanese Arabic and administered to a convenient sample of 200 adult patients diagnosed with cancer at a tertiary care center in Lebanon between 2009 and 2010. The psychometric indices assessed were reliability, multitrait scaling analysis, construct validity, and confirmatory factor analysis. Six out of nine subscales had Cronbach's alpha coefficients above 0.70. Multitrait scaling analysis showed that all item-scale correlation coefficients met the set standards of convergent validity with the exception of item 5 only (95.8 %). In addition, 79.7 % of the item-scale correlation coefficients met the criterion for discriminant validity. In inter-scale correlations, all conceptually related scales had correlation coefficients of ≥ 0.40 with the exception of role functioning and fatigue scales having an undesirable correlation coefficient of -0.76. In known-groups comparison, the instrument differentiated significantly between some of the subscales with respect to education, employment, and age. CFA showed an almost good fit (GFI = 0.87) with respect to our current data set. The translated Lebanese Arabic version of the EORTC QLQ-C30 is a reliable and valid instrument that can be used to assess the quality of life of Lebanese cancer patients.

  7. Establishing anchor-based minimally important differences (MID) with the EORTC quality-of-life measures: a meta-analysis protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musoro, Zebedee Jammbe; Hamel, Jean-Francois; Ediebah, Divine Ewane; Cocks, Kim; King, Madeleine T; Groenvold, Mogens; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Brandberg, Yvonne; Velikova, Galina; Maringwa, John; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Bottomley, Andrew; Coens, Corneel

    2018-01-10

    As patient assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in cancer clinical trials has increased over the years, so has the need to attach meaningful interpretations to differences in HRQOL scores between groups and changes within groups. Determining what represents a minimally important difference (MID) in HRQOL scores is useful to clinicians, patients and researchers, and can be used as a benchmark for assessing the success of a healthcare intervention. Our objective is to provide an evidence-based protocol to determine MIDs for the European Organisation for Research and Treatment for Cancer Quality of life Questionnaire core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30). We will mainly focus on MID estimation for group-level comparisons. Responder thresholds for individual-level change will also be estimated. Data will be derived from published phase II and III EORTC trials that used the QLQ-C30 instrument, covering several cancer sites. We will use individual patient data to estimate MIDs for different cancer sites separately. Focus is on anchor-based methods. Anchors will be selected per disease site from available data. A disease-oriented and methodological panel will provide independent guidance on anchor selection. We aim to construct multiple clinical anchors per QLQ-C30 scale and also to compare with several anchor-based methods. The effects of covariates, for example, gender, age, disease stage and so on, will also be investigated. We will examine how our estimated MIDs compare with previously published guidelines, hence further contributing to robust MID guidelines for the EORTC QLQ-C30. All patient data originate from completed clinical trials with mandatory written informed consent, approved by local ethical committees. Our findings will be presented at scientific conferences, disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and also compiled in a MID 'blue book' which will be made available online on the EORTC Quality of Life Group website as a free guideline document.

  8. Danish population-based reference data for the EORTC QLQ-C30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Therese; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Holzner, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: General population reference data are useful in the interpretation of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) results, but for the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), such data have been published for only seven...... countries. In 1992, Danish general population data were collected from women only for EORTC QLQ-C30 version 1. Since no Danish reference data exists for men and women for the QLQ-C30 version 3.0, the aims of this study were to generate such data and to investigate the associations between EORTC QLQ-C30...... outcomes and age, gender and morbidity, as well as trends over time. METHODS: An age- and gender-stratified random sample of 3,080 Danes was drawn from the Danish Civil Registration System. The EORTC QLQ-C30 was administered electronically and by mail along with a short questionnaire concerning socio...

  9. Psychometric Validation of the Bahasa Malaysia Version of the EORTC QLQ-CR29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaji, Bello Arkilla; Moy, Foong Ming; Roslani, April Camilla; Law, Chee Wei; Raduan, Farhana; Sagap, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Bahasa Malaysia (BM) version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Colorectal Cancer-specific Quality Of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-CR29). We studied 93 patients recruited from University Malaya and Universiti Kebangsaan Medical Centers, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia using a self-administered method. Tools included QLQ-C30, QLQ-CR29 and Karnofsky Performance Scales (KPS). Statistical analyses included Cronbach's alpha, test-retest correlations, multi-traits scaling and known-groups comparisons. A p value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. The internal consistency coefficients for body image, urinary frequency, blood and mucus and stool frequency scales were acceptable (Cronbach's alpha α ≥ 0.65). However, the coefficients were low for the blood and mucus and stool frequency scales in patients with a stoma bag (α = 0.46). Test-retest correlation coefficients were moderate to high (range: r = 0.51 to 1.00) for most of the scales except anxiety, urinary frequency, buttock pain, hair loss, stoma care related problems, and dyspareunia (r ≤ 0.49). Convergent and discriminant validities were achieved in all scales. Patients with a stoma reported significantly higher symptoms of blood and mucus in the stool, flatulence, faecal incontinence, sore skin, and embarrassment due to the frequent need to change the stoma bag (p < 0.05) compared to patients without stoma. None of the scales distinguished between patients based on the KPS scores. There were no overlaps between scales in the QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 (r < 0.40). the BM version of the QLQ-CR29 indicated acceptable psychometric properties in most of the scales similar to original validation study. This questionnaire could be used to complement the QLQ-C30 in assessing HRQOL among BM speaking population with colorectal cancer.

  10. Radiotherapy in breast-conserving treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ: first results of the EORTC randomised phase III trial 10853. EORTC Breast Cancer Cooperative Group and EORTC Radiotherapy Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Julien, J. P.; Bijker, N.; Fentiman, I. S.; Peterse, J. L.; Delledonne, V.; Rouanet, P.; Avril, A.; Sylvester, R.; Mignolet, F.; Bartelink, H.; van Dongen, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a disorder that has become more common since it may manifest as microcalcifications that can be detected by screening mammography. Since selected women with invasive cancer can be treated safely with breast conservation therapy it is

  11. Breast conserving therapy versus mastectomy for stage I-II breast cancer: 20 year follow-up of the EORTC 10801 phase 3 randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litière, Saskia; Werutsky, Gustavo; Fentiman, Ian S; Rutgers, Emiel; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Van Limbergen, Erik; Baaijens, Margreet H A; Bogaerts, Jan; Bartelink, Harry

    2012-04-01

    The EORTC 10801 trial compared breast-conserving therapy (BCT) with modified radical mastectomy (MRM) in patients with tumours 5 cm or smaller and axillary node negative or positive disease. Compared with BCT, MRM resulted in better local control, but did not affect overall survival or time to distant metastases. We report 20-year follow-up results. The EORTC 10801 trial was open for accrual between 1980 and 1986 in eight centres in the UK, the Netherlands, Belgium, and South Africa. 448 patients were randomised to BCT and 420 to MRM. Randomisation was done centrally, stratifying patients by institute, carcinoma stage (I or II), and menopausal status. BCT comprised of lumpectomy and complete axillary clearance, followed by breast radiotherapy and a tumour-bed boost. The primary endpoint was time to distant metastasis. This analysis was done on all eligible patients, as they were randomised. After a median follow-up of 22·1 years (IQR 18·5-23·8), 175 patients (42%) had distant metastases in the MRM group versus 207 (46%) in the BCT group. Furthermore, 506 patients (58%) died (232 [55%] in the MRM group and 274 [61%] in the BCT group). No significant difference was observed between BCT and MRM for time to distant metastases (hazard ratio 1·13, 95% CI 0·92-1·38; p=0·23) or for time to death (1·11, 0·94-1·33; 0·23). Cumulative incidence of distant metastases at 20 years was 42·6% (95% CI 37·8-47·5) in the MRM group and 46·9% (42·2-51·6) in the BCT group. 20-year overall survival was estimated to be 44·5% (95% CI 39·3-49·5) in the MRM group and 39·1% (34·4-43·9) in the BCT group. There was no difference between the groups in time to distant metastases or overall survival by age (time to distant metastases: breast cancer seems to be justified, since long-term follow-up in this trial showed similar survival to that after mastectomy. European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  12. International validation of the EORTC QLQ-ELD14 questionnaire for assessment of health-related quality of life elderly patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelwright, S; Darlington, A-S; Fitzsimmons, D; Fayers, P; Arraras, J I; Bonnetain, F; Brain, E; Bredart, A; Chie, W-C; Giesinger, J; Hammerlid, E; O'Connor, S J; Oerlemans, S; Pallis, A; Reed, M; Singhal, N; Vassiliou, V; Young, T; Johnson, C

    2013-08-20

    Older people represent the majority of cancer patients but their specific needs are often ignored in the development of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-ELD15 was developed to supplement the EORTC's core questionnaire, the QLQ-C30, for measuring HRQOL in patients aged >70 years in oncology studies. Patients (n=518) from 10 countries completed the QLQ-C30, QLQ-ELD15 and a debriefing interview. Eighty two clinically stable patients repeated the questionnaires 1 week later (test-retest analysis) and 107 others, with an expected change in clinical status, repeated the questionnaires 3 months later (response to change analysis, RCA). Information from the debriefing interview, factor analysis and item response theory analysis resulted in the removal of one item (QLQ-ELD15QLQ-ELD14) and revision of the proposed scale structure to five scales (mobility, worries about others, future worries, maintaining purpose and illness burden) and two single items (joint stiffness and family support). Convergent validity was good. In known-group comparisons, the QLQ-ELD14 differentiated between patients with different disease stage, treatment intention, number of comorbidities, performance status and geriatric screening scores. Test-retest and RCA analyses were equivocal. The QLQ-ELD14 is a validated HRQOL questionnaire for cancer patients aged 70 years. Changes in elderly patients' self-reported HRQOL may be related to both cancer evolution and non-clinical events.

  13. [Evaluation through the EORTC questionnaires of long-term quality of life in patients with breast cancer in initial stages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arraras Urdaniz, J I; Illarramendi Mañas, J J; Manterola Burgaleta, A; Tejedor Gutiérrez, M; Vera García, R; Valerdi Alvarez, J J; Domínguez Domínguez, M A

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the present work is to evaluate the quality of life of a group of patients with breast cancer after a long follow-up time. 104 patients with breast cancer in initial stages, of a total of 125 to whom the questionnaire was sent, have completed the general questionnaire QLQ-C30 and the module of the breast QLQ-BR23 of the EORTC in 2001, five years after their diagnosis. A subgroup of 48 patients had completed these questionnaires in 1996. The scorings of quality of life and the differences among the measurements of 2001 and 1996 have been evaluated, and groups organized according to the stage, the type of treatment, and the surgery have been compared. The scorings of quality of life are appropriate and similar in both periods (1996 and 2001). There are alterations in the sexual function and concern over the future. The differences between the type of surgery focus on the corporal image. There are not significant differences in the analyses according to the stage or according to the type of treatment. The scorings of quality of life indicate that the situation of these patients is satisfactory. The differences in the type of surgery are similar to the ones observed in the literature.

  14. Health-related Quality of Life as Studied by EORTC QLQ and Voice Handicap Index Among Various Patients With Laryngeal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Tom; Sandvik, Lorentz; Heimdal, John-Helge; Hjermstad, Marianne Jensen; Aarstad, Anne Kari Hersvik; Aarstad, Hans Jørgen

    2017-03-01

    Patients with voice-related disorders are often treated by a multidisciplinary team including assessment by patient-reported outcome measures. The present paper aims at documenting the importance of including general health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures to clinical investigations. The participants (N = 80 larynx cancer, N = 32 recurrent palsy, N = 23 dysfunctional, N = 75 degenerative/inflammation, N = 19 various) were included consecutively at the laryngology clinic at Haukeland University Hospital. In addition, HRQoL data were included from one national group with laryngectomies (N = 105), one group with various patients formerly treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (N = 96), and one population-based reference group (N = 1956). Obtained were the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ), the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) neuroticism scores. By analysis of variance, we have determined significant dependence of groups analyzing the sum global QoL/health index (F = 9.47; P <0.001), the functional HRQoL sum score (F 5,2373  = 7.14, P <0.001), and the symptom sum HRQoL scores (F 7,2381  = 8.13; P <0.001). In particular, patients with recurrent palsy and laryngeal cancer had lowered HRQoL. At the index levels, in particular dyspnea scores, were scored depending on larynx disease group (F 7,2288  = 24.4; P <0.001). The VHI score correlated with the EORTC H&N35 "speech" index with a common variance of 52%. VHI scores correlated with level of neuroticism with 8% common variance (P <0.001) and EORTC scores with 22% (P <0.001). In particular, among patients with voice-related disease, those with recurrent palsy and laryngeal cancer had lower HRQoL. Furthermore, the HRQoL and VHI scores were inversely tied to neuroticism. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc

  15. Psychometric Validation of the Malaysian Chinese Version of the EORTC QLQ-C30 in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaji, Bello Arkilla; Moy, Foong Ming; Roslani, April Camilla; Law, Chee Wei; Sagap, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most frequent cancer in Malaysia. We aimed to assess the validity and reliability of the Malaysian Chinese version of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire core (QLQ-C30) in patients with colorectal cancer. Translated versions of the QLQ-C30 were obtained from the EORTC. A cross sectional study design was used to obtain data from patients receiving treatment at two teaching hospitals in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The Malaysian Chinese version of QLQ-C30 was self-administered in 96 patients while the Karnofsky Performance Scales (KPS) was generated by attending surgeons. Statistical analysis included reliability, convergent, discriminate validity, and known-groups comparisons. Statistical significance was based on p value ≤0.05. The internal consistencies of the Malaysian Chinese version were acceptable [Cronbach's alpha (α≥ 0.70)] in the global health status/overall quality of life (GHS/QOL), functioning scales except cognitive scale (α≤0.32) in all levels of analysis, and social/family functioning scale (α=0.63) in patients without a stoma. All questionnaire items fulfilled the criteria for convergent and discriminant validity except question number 5, with correlation with role (r = 0.62) and social/family (r = 0.41) functioning higher than with physical functioning scales (r = 0.34). The test-retest coefficients in the GHS/QOL, functioning scales and in most of the symptoms scales were moderate to high (r = 0.58 to 1.00). Patients with a stoma reported statistically significant lower physical functioning (p=0.015), social/family functioning (p=0.013), and higher constipation (p=0.010) and financial difficulty (p=0.037) compared to patients without stoma. There was no significant difference between patients with high and low KPS scores. Malaysian Chinese version of the QLQ-C30 is a valid and reliable measure of HRQOL in patients with colorectal cancer.

  16. Pazopanib in advanced vascular sarcomas: an EORTC Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (STBSG) retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollar, A.; Jones, R.L.; Stacchiotti, S.; Gelderblom, H.; Guida, M.; Grignani, G.; Steeghs, N.; Safwat, A.; Katz, D.; Duffaud, F.; Sleijfer, S.; Graaf, W.T. van der; Touati, N.; Litiere, S.; Marreaud, S.; Gronchi, A.; Kasper, B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pazopanib is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of patients with selective subtypes of advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS) who have previously received standard chemotherapy including anthracyclines. Data on the efficacy in vascular sarcomas are limited.

  17. Etoposide in malignant pleural mesothelioma : Two phase II trials of the EORTC Lung Cancer Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sahmoud, T; Postmus, PE; van Pottelsberghe, C; Mattson, K; Tammilehto, L; Splinter, TAW; Planting, AST; Sutedja, T; van Pawel, J; van Zandwijk, N; Baas, P; Roozendaal, KJ; Schrijver, M; Kirkpatrick, A; Van Glabbeke, M; Ardizzoni, A; Giaccone, G

    1997-01-01

    Intravenous and oral etoposide (VP 16-213) were tested in two sequential phase II trials in chemotherapy-naive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. In the first trial, etoposide was given intravenously (i.v.) at a dose of 150 mg/m(2) on days 1, 3 and 5 every 3 weeks. The second trial

  18. Validation of the Polish version of the EORTC Head and Neck module (QLQ-H&N35).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharska, Ewa; Głowacki, Roman; Bereza, Krzysztof; Gładysz, Tomasz; Walocha, Ewa; Golec, Joanna; Tomaszewska, Iwona M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to psychometrically validate the EORTC translated, Polish version of the EORTC QLQ-H&N35 questionnaire to support using it in the Polish clinical setting in patients with head and neck malignancies. Patients with histologically confirmed head and neck malignancies were included in the study. All patients filled in the Polish version of the EORTC QLQ-C30, the EORTC QLQ-H&N35 module, and a demographic questionnaire. Standardized validity and reliability analyses were performed. During the recruitment period a total of 176 patients (82 females - 46.6%) were enrolled into the study, with a mean age of 54.3 ± 11.2 years. Cronbach alpha values ranged from 0.71 to 0.87. Satisfactory convergent and discriminant validity in multi-trait scaling analyses was seen. The Polish version of the EORTC QLQ-H&N35 module is a reliable and valid tool for measuring HRQoL in Polish patients with head and neck malignancies. It can be fully recommended for use in the Polish clinical setting.

  19. Quality of life assessment in patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer - psychometric validation of the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Karolina; Karrer, Sigrid; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Steinbauer, Julia; Kohl, Elisabeth; Steinbauer, Dominik; Zeman, Florian; Berneburg, Mark; Koller, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is a chronic and sometimes difficult-to-treat condition affecting the quality of life (QL). The present study was conducted to investigate whether the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core QL Questionnaire - Cancer (QLQ-C30) is a suitable tool for the assessment of QL in patients with NMSC. In order to define the psychometric properties of the questionnaire, the QLQ-C30 and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) were handed out to 172 patients of the Department of Dermatology at the University Hospital Regensburg, Germany. Internal consistencies of all multi-item scales (except one) were acceptable, with Cronbach's alpha ranging from 0.71 to 0.93. The hypothesized scale structure was supported by item/scale and interscale correlations within the QLQ-C30. Related scales of the QLQ-C30 and the DLQI correlated significantly, thus establishing construct validity. At the same time, the proportion of substantial correlations (6 % ≥ 0.40) indicated that the two questionnaires assessed distinct components of QL. The QLQ-C30 significantly differentiated between clinically distinct patient groups, indicating that severe clinical conditions were associated with greater impairment in physical, role, and cognitive functioning (p ≤ 0.030). These results confirm the QLQ-C30 to be a suitable tool for the assessment of QL in patients with NMSC. © 2017 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Determination of pesticide residues in blood samples of villagers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Such ill health effects are not limited only to those systems, but can cause a variety of dermatological, gastrointestinal, genito-urinary, respiratory, musculo- skeletal and cardiological problems (Hueser, 1992; Vial et al., 1996). Globally, various products of different pesticide groups have been investigated by environmental ...

  1. A prospective study to validate the Polish language version of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Colorectal Liver Metastases (QLQ-LMC21) module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska, Dominika; Bereza, Krzysztof; Sanna, Beatrice; Kucharska, Ewa; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Dudkiewicz, Zbigniew; Skotnicki, Piotr; Bottomley, Andrew; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2017-08-01

    This validation study was designed to assess the psychometric validity and quality of the Polish translation of the EORTC QLQ-LMC21 questionnaire in Polish colorectal patients suffering with liver metastases. Patients with either histopathological or imaging confirmation of colorectal cancer with liver metastases, with a minimum of three months survival, were eligible for this study. These patients completed the Polish version of the EORTC core QLQ-C30, the QLQ-LMC21 module, and a demographic data questionnaire. The questionnaires were completed twice, once before undergoing either hepatectomy (n = 63) or palliative treatment (n = 97) and three months after the primary treatment. Standardized analyses of validity and reliability were performed. One hundred and sixty patients were enrolled in this study with the mean age of the hepatectomy group 64.3 ± 14.1 and 66.1 ± 12.7 for the palliative treatment group. The QLQ-LMC21 exhibited positive internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranging from 0.72 to 0.90. The multi-trait scaling analysis demonstrated adequate convergent and discriminant validity. Test-retest reliability was undertaken with 40 patients (25%) with the ICCs for each item ranging from 0.64 to 0.88. The hepatectomy group had a significantly greater Karnofsky Performance Score than the palliative treatment group (p.Polish version of the QLQ-LMC21 proved to be a valid and reliable questionnaire to use in conjunction with the QLQ-C30 core questionnaire. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of an EORTC-8D utility algorithm for Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kularatna, Sanjeewa; Whitty, Jennifer A; Johnson, Newell W; Jayasinghe, Ruwan; Scuffham, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    Currently there are no reported cancer-specific health state valuations in low- and middle-income countries using a validated preference-based measure. The EORTC-8D, a cancer-specific preference-based measure, has 81,920 health states and is useful for economic evaluations in cancer care. The aim of this study was to develop a utility algorithm to value EORTC-8D health states using preferences derived from a representative population sample in Sri Lanka. The time-tradeoff method was used to elicit preferences from a general population sample of 780 in Sri Lanka. A block design of 85 health states, with a time horizon of 10 years, was used for the direct valuation. Data were analyzed using generalized least squares with random effects. All respondents with at least one logical inconsistency were excluded from the analysis. After logical inconsistencies were excluded, 4520 observations were available from 717 respondents for the analysis. The preferred model specified main effects with an interaction term for any level 4 or worse descriptor within a health state. Worsening of physical functioning had a substantially greater utility decrement than any other dimension in this population. Limitations are that the data collection could not include the whole country and that females formed a large part of the sample. Preference weights for EORTC-8D health states for Sri Lanka have been derived: These will be very useful in economic evaluations of cancer-related interventions in a range of low- and middle-income countries. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Conceptual structure of the Taiwan Chinese version of the EORTC QLQ-C30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Cheng; Tu, Shih-Hsin; Lien, Heng-Hui; Huang, Ching-Shui; Wang, Pa-Chun; Chie, Wei-Chu

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the conceptual structure of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core Questionnaire 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) by analyzing data collected from patients with major cancers in Taiwan. The conceptual structure underlying QLQ-C30, including higher-order factors, was explored by structural equation modeling (SEM). The Taiwan Chinese version of the EORTC QLQ-C30 was used as the measuring instrument. Higher-order models, including mental health/physical health, mental function/physical burden, symptom burden/function, single latent health-related quality of life, formative symptom burden/function, and formative health-related quality of life, were tested. Study subjects included 283 patients with breast, lung, and nasopharyngeal cancers. The original QLQ-C30 multi-factorial structure demonstrated poor composite reliability of the cognitive function subscale. The formative symptom/burden model was favored by model fit indices, further supporting causal-indicator duality, but was compromised by unexpected associations between symptomatic subscales and latent factors. The formative health-related quality of life was proposed with a single second-order latent factor where symptomatic subscales remained formative. Two additional symptom measures from the formal cognitive function subscale with the formative health-related quality-of-life model were proposed as the alterative conceptual structure for the Taiwan Chinese QLQ-C30. Results of the current study represent the complete SEM approach for the EORTC QLQ-C30. The formative health-related quality-of-life model with elimination of cognitive function enhances the conceptual structure of the Taiwan Chinese version with parsimonious fit and interpretability.

  4. Cutaneous malignant melanoma and exposure to sunlamps or sunbeds: an EORTC multicenter case-control study in Belgium, France and Germany. EORTC Melanoma Cooperative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autier, P; Doré, J F; Lejeune, F; Koelmel, K F; Geffeler, O; Hille, P; Cesarini, J P; Lienard, D; Liabeuf, A; Joarlette, M

    1994-09-15

    The study objective was to assess whether exposure to sunlamps and sunbeds represents a risk factor for cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). A 1-to-1 unmatched case-control study was conducted among subjects 20 years old or more with naturally non-pigmented skin in Germany, France and Belgium. A total of 420 consecutive patients with CMM diagnosed from 1 January 1991 onward were derived from hospital registers; 447 controls with no history of skin cancer were chosen at random in the same municipality as the cases. Exposure to sunlamps or sunbeds starting before 1980 is associated with a crude estimated risk of CMM of 2.71 (95% CI: 1.06-7.78) for at least 10 hr of accumulated exposure. This risk is of 2.12 (95% CI: 0.84-5.37) after adjustment for age, sex, hair colour and average number of holiday weeks each year in sunny resorts. Subjects who experienced skin-burn due to sunlamps or sunbeds, and who had accumulated at least 10 hr of exposure, displayed a crude estimated CMM risk of 4.47 (95% CI: 1.45-13.7), which rose to 8.97 (95% CI: 2.10-38.6) for those who exposed their skin for tanning purposes. The risk associated with skin-burn is only marginally modified after multiple adjustments for host characteristics and recreational exposure to sunlight. Apparently, sunlamps and sunbeds share the increased risk of CMM, which seems to concentrate in subjects exhibiting hazardous behaviour towards ultraviolet radiation sources. However, although it is reasonable to believe that high doses of pure ultraviolet A radiation can be dangerous, this is not firmly established by this study. Most exposures to ultraviolet A tanning devices began after 1980; therefore, epidemiologic studies have difficulty in revealing any increase in risk of CMM starting after 1980 because of the latent period between exposure and occurrence of melanoma. Public health authorities should have a cautious approach towards the rapidly developing fashion of tanning under sunlamps or sunbeds.

  5. Differential item functioning (DIF) in the EORTC QLQ-C30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Neil W; Fayers, Peter M; Aaronson, Neil K

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analyses can be used to explore translation, cultural, gender or other differences in the performance of quality of life (QoL) instruments. These analyses are commonly performed using "baseline" or pretreatment data. We previously reported DIF analyses to examine...... the pattern of item responses for translations of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 QoL instrument, using only data collected prior to cancer treatment. We now compare the consistency of these results with similar analyses of on-treatment and off...

  6. Measuring quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer: Update of the EORTC QLQ-H&N Module, Phase III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singer, Susanne; Araújo, Cláudia; Arraras, Juan Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    and neck cancer-specific items comprising the updated EORTC head and neck module and the core questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30. Debriefing interviews were conducted to identify any irrelevant items and confusing or upsetting wording. RESULTS: Interviews were performed with 330 patients from 17 countries...

  7. Psychometric validation of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Endometrial Cancer Module (EORTC QLQ-EN24)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greimel, Elfriede; Nordin, Andy; Lanceley, Anne

    2011-01-01

    A validation study was conducted to evaluate the psychometric properties of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire-Endometrial Cancer Module (EORTC QLQ-EN24). This module was designed to assess disease and treatment specific aspects of...

  8. Psychometric validation of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Endometrial Cancer Module (EORTC QLQ-EN24)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greimel, Elfriede; Nordin, Andy; Lanceley, Anne

    2011-01-01

    A validation study was conducted to evaluate the psychometric properties of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire-Endometrial Cancer Module (EORTC QLQ-EN24). This module was designed to assess disease and treatment specific aspects...... of the quality of life (QoL) of patients with endometrial cancer....

  9. Minimal clinically important differences in the EORTC QLQ-BM22 and EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL modules in patients with bone metastases undergoing palliative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Srinivas; Ding, Keyue; Chow, Edward; Meyer, Ralph M; Nabid, Abdenour; Chabot, Pierre; Coulombe, Genevieve; Ahmed, Shahida; Kuk, Joda; Dar, A Rashid; Mahmud, Aamer; Fairchild, Alysa; Wilson, Carolyn F; Wu, Jackson S Y; Dennis, Kristopher; DeAngelis, Carlo; Wong, Rebecca K S; Zhu, Liting; Brundage, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Validated tools for evaluating quality of life (QOL) in patients with bone metastases include the EORTC QLQ-BM22 and QLQ-C15-PAL modules. A statistically significant difference in metric scores may not be clinically significant. To aid in their interpretation, we performed analyses to determine the minimal clinically important differences (MCID) for these QOL instruments. Both anchor-based and distribution-based methods were used to determine the MCID among patients with bone metastases enrolled in a randomized phase III trial. For the anchor-based approach, overall QOL as measured by the QLQ-C15-PAL module was used as the anchor and only the subscales with moderate or better correlation were used for subsequent MCID analysis. In the anchor-based approach, patients were classified as improved, stable or deteriorated by the change in the overall QOL score from baseline to follow-up after 42 days. The MCID and confidence interval was then calculated for all subscales. In the distribution-based approach, the MCID was expressed as a proportion of the standard deviation and standard error measurement from the subscale score distribution. A total of 204 patients completed the questionnaires at baseline and follow-up. Only the dyspnea and insomnia subscales did not have at least moderate correlation with the overall QOL anchor. Using the anchor-based approach, 10/11 subscales had an MCID score significantly different than 0 for improvement and 3/11 subscales had a significant MCID score for deterioration. The magnitude of MCID scores was higher for improvement in comparison with deterioration. For improvement, the anchor-based approach showed good agreement with the distribution-based approach when using 0.5 SD as the MCID. However, there was greater lack of agreement between these approaches for deterioration. We present the MCID scores for the EORTC QLQ-BM22 and QLQ-C15-PAL QOL instruments. The results of this study can guide clinicians in the interpretation of these

  10. An international validation study of the EORTC brain cancer module (EORTC QLQ-BN20) for assessing health-related quality of life and symptoms in brain cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taphoorn, M.J.B.; Claassens, L.; Aaronson, N.K.; Coens, C.; Mauer, M.; Osoba, D.; Stupp, R.; Mirimanoff, R.O.; van den Bent, M.J.; Bottomley, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aims The psychometric properties of the EORTC QLQ-BN20, a brain cancer-specific HRQOL questionnaire, have been previously determined in an English-speaking sample of patients. This study examined the validity and reliability of the questionnaire in a multi-national, multi-lingual study. Methods

  11. Translation and validation of EORTC QLQ-H&N 35 into Moroccan Arabic for ENT head and neck cancer patients in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattassi, N; Benmansour, N; ElFakir, S; Nejjari, C; Alami, M N

    2016-09-01

    Disease-specific quality of life (QOL) measures have enhanced the capacity of outcome measures to evaluate subtle changes and differences between groups. As many of the QOL measures have been developed in English, they require translation to ensure their usefulness in a multi-cultural and/or international society. Published guidelines provide formal methods to achieve cross-culturally comparable versions of a QOL tool. The aim of this study was to adapt the head and neck specific module of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-H&N 35 questionnaire) into Moroccan Arabic and to determine its psychometric properties. After translation, back translation and pretesting of the pre-final version, the translated version was submitted to a committee of professionals composed by otolaryngologists and epidemiologists. The psychometric properties were tested in patients with ENT cancer. Internal consistency was tested using Cronbach's alpha and the test-retest reliability using interclass correlation coefficients. Construct validity was assessed by examining item convergent and divergent validity. It was also tested using Spearman's correlation between QLQ-H&N 35 scales and EQ-5D. The study was conducted in 120 patients. The Moroccan version was internally reliable, Cronbach's α ranged from 0.71 for "trouble with social contact" to 0.94 for "senses impairment", indicating good internal consistency. Test-retest reliability was assessed using the intra-class correlation coefficient, which ranged from 0.64 for "speech trouble" to 0.89 for "physical activities". The instrument demonstrated a good construct and concomitant validity. We have developed a semantically equivalent translation with cultural adaptation of EORTC QLQ-H&N 35 questionnaire. The assessment of its measurement properties showed that it is quite reliable and a valid measure of the effect of cancer on the quality of life in Moroccan patients.

  12. Test-retest reliability of an interactive voice response (IVR) version of the EORTC QLQ-C30

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundy, J.J.; Coons, S.J.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the test-retest reliability of an interactive voice response (IVR) version of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30. Methods: A convenience sample of outpatient cancer clinic patients (n = 127) was asked to

  13. Testing mapping algorithms of the cancer-specific EORTC QLQ-C30 onto EQ-5D in malignant mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.T. Arnold (David); D. Rowen (Donna); M.M. Versteegh (Matthijs); A. Morley (Anna); C.E. Hooper (Clare); N.A. Maskell (Nicholas)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ In order to estimate utilities for cancer studies where the EQ-5D was not used, the EORTC QLQ-C30 can be used to estimate EQ-5D using existing mapping algorithms. Several mapping algorithms exist for this transformation, however, algorithms tend to lose accuracy in

  14. Testing the measurement equivalence of paper and interactive voice response system versions of the EORTC QLQ-C30

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundy, J.J.; Coons, S.J.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate the measurement equivalence of an interactive voice response system (IVRS) version and the original paper-based version of the EORTC QLQ-C30. Methods: The QLQ-C30 is a cancer-specific, health-related quality of life questionnaire consisting of

  15. Cross-cultural differences in information disclosure evaluated through the EORTC questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arraras, Juan Ignacio; Greimel, Eva; Chie, Wei-Chu; Sezer, Orhan; Bergenmar, Mia; Costantini, Anna; Young, Teresa; Vlasic, Karin Kuljanic; Velikova, Galina

    2013-02-01

    Informational needs among cancer patients are similar, but the degree of information disclosure in different cultural areas varies. In this paper, we present the results of a cross-cultural study on information received. The EORTC information questionnaire, EORTC QLQ-INFO25, was administered during the treatment process. This questionnaire evaluates the information that patients report they have received. Cross-cultural differences in information have been evaluated using statistical tests such as Kruskall-Wallis and multivariate models with covariates to account for differences in clinical and demographic characteristics across areas. Four hundred and fifty-one patients from three cultural areas, North-Middle Europe, South Europe, and Taiwan, were included in the study. Significant differences among the three cultural areas appeared in eight QLQ-INFO25 dimensions: information about the disease; medical tests; places of care; written information; information on CD/tape/video; satisfaction; wish for more information; and information helpfulness. North-Middle Europe patients received more written information (mean = 67.2 (North) and 33.8 (South)) and South Europe patients received more information on different places of care (mean = 24.7 (North) and 35.0 (South)). Patients from North-Middle Europe and South Europe received more information than patients from Taiwan about the disease (mean = 57.9, 60.6, and 47.1, respectively) and medical tests (70.9, 70.4, and 54.5), showed more satisfaction (64.8, 70.2, and 35.0), and considered the information more helpful (71.9, 73.9, and 50.4). These results were confirmed when adjusting for age, education, and disease stage. There are cross-cultural differences in information received. Some of these differences are based on the characteristics of each culture. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Use of the lung cancer-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire EORTC QLQ-LC13 in clinical trials: A systematic review of the literature 20 years after its development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Michael; Warncke, Sophie; Hjermstad, Marianne J; Arraras, Juan; Pompili, Cecilia; Harle, Amelie; Johnson, Colin D; Chie, Wei-Chu; Schulz, Christian; Zeman, Florian; van Meerbeeck, Jan P; Kuliś, Dagmara; Bottomley, Andrew

    2015-12-15

    The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire-Lung Cancer 13 (QLQ-LC13) covers 13 typical symptoms of lung cancer patients and was the first module developed in conjunction with the EORTC core quality-of-life (QL) questionnaire. This review investigates how the module has been used and reported in cancer clinical trials in the 20 years since its publication. Thirty-six databases were searched with a prespecified algorithm. This search plus an additional hand search generated 770 hits, 240 of which were clinical studies. Two raters extracted data using a coding scheme. Analyses focused on the randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Of the 240 clinical studies that were identified using the LC13, 109 (45%) were RCTs. More than half of the RCTs were phase 3 trials (n = 58). Twenty RCTs considered QL as the primary endpoint, and 68 considered it as a secondary endpoint. QL results were addressed in the results section of the article (n = 89) or in the abstract (n = 92); and, in half of the articles, QL results were presented in the form of tables (n = 53) or figures (n = 43). Furthermore, QL results had an impact on the evaluation of the therapy that could be clearly demonstrated in the 47 RCTs that yielded QL differences between treatment and control groups. The EORTC QLQ-LC13 fulfilled its mission to be used as a standard instrument in lung cancer clinical trials. An update of the LC13 is underway to keep up with new therapeutic trends and to ensure optimized and relevant QL assessment in future trials. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  17. Reliability of an e-PRO Tool of EORTC QLQ-C30 for Measurement of Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients With Breast Cancer: Prospective Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallwiener, Markus; Matthies, Lina; Simoes, Elisabeth; Keilmann, Lucia; Hartkopf, Andreas D; Sokolov, Alexander N; Walter, Christina B; Sickenberger, Nina; Wallwiener, Stephanie; Feisst, Manuel; Gass, Paul; Fasching, Peter A; Lux, Michael P; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Taran, Florin-Andrei; Rom, Joachim; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Graf, Joachim; Brucker, Sara Y

    2017-09-14

    differences were found in 27 of 30 single items and in 14 of 15 scales, whereas a statistically significant correlation in the test of consistency was found in all 30 single items and all 15 scales. The evaluated e-PRO version of the EORTC QLQ-C30 is reliable for patients with both adjuvant and metastatic breast cancer, showing a high correlation in almost all questions (and in many scales). Thus, we conclude that the validated paper-based PRO assessment and the e-PRO tool are equally valid. However, the reliability should also be analyzed in other prospective trials to ensure that usability is reliable in all patient groups. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03132506; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03132506 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6tRcgQuou).

  18. Validation of EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires in the measurement of quality of life of breast cancer patients in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Leng Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To validate EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-BR23 questionnaires and to measure the health-related quality of life (HRQOL of women with breast cancer in Singapore during their first 4 years of post-diagnosis and treatments. Methods: A quantitative and cross-descriptive sectional study. All of 170 subjects were recruited in a Singapore tertiary cancer center. The European Organization for Research and Treatment-QOL questionnaire and breast cancer specific module (EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 were used to measure the HRQOL among women with breast cancer. All statistical tests were performed using SPSS Version 18. The reliability of the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires was examined using Cronbach′s alpha test. EORTC QLQ-C30 was validated against EuroQol Group′s 5-domain questionnaires (EQ5D by examining its concurrent validity using Pearson Product Moment Correlation to calculate the total scores. Results: The Cronbach′s alpha coefficient results for EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ BR-23 were 0.846 and 0.873 respectively which suggested relatively good internal consistency. The correlation between EORTC QLQ-C30 and EQ5D QOL instruments demonstrated a modest linear relationship (r=0.597; P<0.001 that indicated a moderately strong correlation between the two measures. The study showed that Singaporean women with breast cancer had enjoyed high levels of HRQOL during their first 4 years of survivorship but they had significant concern over the financial impact of breast cancer. One of the key findings was younger women had experienced more physical and psychosocial concerns than older women. Conclusion: The EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires are feasible and promising instruments to measure the levels of HRQOL in Singaporean women with breast cancer in future studies.

  19. Quality of life after radiation therapy of cerebral low-grade gliomas of the adult: results of a randomised Phase III trial on dose response (EORTC trial 22844)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiebert, G.M. [MEDTAP International, 27 Gilbert Street, London (United Kingdom); Curran, D. [EORTC Data Centre Brussels (Belgium); Aaronson, N.K. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bolla, M. [Centre Hospitalier Regional Universitaire, Grenoble (France); Menten, J. [University Hospital Gasthuisberg Leuven (Belgium); Rutten, E.H.J.M. [University Hospital St. Radboud, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nordman, E. [Turku University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland); Silvestre, M.E. [Hospital Santa Maria, Lisbon (Portugal); Pierart, M. [EORTC Data Centre, Brussels (Belgium); Karim, A.B.M.F. [Free University Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1998-11-01

    In 1985, the EORTC Radiotherapy Co-operative Group launched a randomised phase III study comparing high-dose (59.4 Gy in 6.5 weeks) versus low-dose (45 Gy in 5 weeks) radiotherapy with conventional techniques in patients diagnosed with low-grade cerebral glioma. The primary endpoint of the study was survival. No difference in survival was observed between the two treatment strategies. A quality of life (QoL) questionnaire consisting of 47 items assessing a range of physical, psychological, social, and symptom domains was included in the trial to measure the impact of treatment over time. Patients who received high-dose radiotherapy tended to report lower levels of functioning and more symptom burden following completion of radiotherapy. These group differences were statistically significant for fatigue/malaise and insomnia immediately after radiotherapy and in leisure time and emotional functioning at 7-15 months after randomisation. These findings suggest that for conventional radiotherapy for low-grade cerebral glioma, a schedule of 45 Gy in 5 weeks not only saves valuable resources, but also spares patients a prolonged treatment at no loss of clinical efficacy. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. Translation and pilot validation of Hindi translation of assessing quality of life in patients with primary brain tumours using EORTC brain module (BN-20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budrukkar Ashwini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To translate and validate the European Organisation for Research and Treatment for Cancer (EORTC brain cancer module (BN-20 into Hindi to make it available for patients and scientific community. Methods and Results: The EORTC BN-20 was translated into Hindi using standard guidelines by EORTC. The process included forward translation by two translators, discussion with the translators in case of discrepancies and formation of first intermediate questionnaire. This questionnaire was then given to two more translators who translated this questionnaire back into English. These 2 questionnaires were then compared with the original EORTC questionnaire and the second intermediate questionnaire was formed. The second intermediate questionnaire was subsequently administered in 10 patients with brain tumors who had never seen the questionnaire before, for pilot-testing. Each of these 10 patients after filling up the questionnaire themselves was then interviewed for any difficulty encountered during the filling up of the questionnaire. These were in the form of specific modules including difficulty in answering, confusion while answering and difficulty to understand, whether the questions were upsetting and if patients would have asked the question in any different way. There were major suggestions in three questions, which were incorporated into the second intermediate questionnaire to form the final Hindi BN-20 questionnaire. Conclusion: The final Hindi BN-20 has been approved by EORTC and can be used in clinical practice and studies for patients with brain tumors.

  1. Translation and pilot validation of Hindi translation of assessing quality of life in patients with primary brain tumours using EORTC brain module (BN-20).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budrukkar, Ashwini; Jalali, Rakesh; Kamble, Rashmi; Parab, Sachin

    2006-01-01

    To translate and validate the European Organisation for Research and Treatment for Cancer (EORTC) brain cancer module (BN-20) into Hindi to make it available for patients and scientific community. The EORTC BN-20 was translated into Hindi using standard guidelines by EORTC. The process included forward translation by two translators, discussion with the translators in case of discrepancies and formation of first intermediate questionnaire. This questionnaire was then given to two more translators who translated this questionnaire back into English. These 2 questionnaires were then compared with the original EORTC questionnaire and the second intermediate questionnaire was formed. The second intermediate questionnaire was subsequently administered in 10 patients with brain tumors who had never seen the questionnaire before, for pilot-testing. Each of these 10 patients after filling up the questionnaire themselves was then interviewed for any difficulty encountered during the filling up of the questionnaire. These were in the form of specific modules including difficulty in answering, confusion while answering and difficulty to understand, whether the questions were upsetting and if patients would have asked the question in any different way. There were major suggestions in three questions, which were incorporated into the second intermediate questionnaire to form the final Hindi BN-20 questionnaire. The final Hindi BN-20 has been approved by EORTC and can be used in clinical practice and studies for patients with brain tumors.

  2. Measuring quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer: Update of the EORTC QLQ-H&N Module, Phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Susanne; Araújo, Cláudia; Arraras, Juan Ignacio; Baumann, Ingo; Boehm, Andreas; Brokstad Herlofson, Bente; Castro Silva, Joaquim; Chie, Wei-Chu; Fisher, Sheila; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Hammerlid, Eva; Irarrázaval, María Elisa; Jensen Hjermstad, Marianne; Jensen, Kenneth; Kiyota, Naomi; Licitra, Lisa; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Pinto, Monica; Santos, Marcos; Schmalz, Claudia; Sherman, Allen C; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Verdonck de Leeuw, Irma; Yarom, Noam; Zotti, Paola; Hofmeister, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to pilot test an updated version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Head and Neck Module (EORTC QLQ-H&N60). Patients with head and neck cancer were asked to complete a list of 60 head and neck cancer-specific items comprising the updated EORTC head and neck module and the core questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30. Debriefing interviews were conducted to identify any irrelevant items and confusing or upsetting wording. Interviews were performed with 330 patients from 17 countries, representing different head and neck cancer sites and treatments. Forty-one of the 60 items were retained according to the predefined EORTC criteria for module development, for another 2 items the wording was refined, and 17 items were removed. The preliminary EORTC QLQ-H&N43 can now be used in academic research. Psychometrics will be tested in a larger field study. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Evaluation of health-related quality of life in Lithuanian brain tumor patients using the EORTC brain cancer module

    OpenAIRE

    Bunevičius, Adomas; Tamašauskas, Šarūnas; Tamašauskas, Arimantas; Deltuva, Vytenis Pranas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is considered an important outcome measure in neuro-oncology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the brain cancer-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-BN20) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) in Lithuanian brain tumor patients. Material and Methods. One hundred consecutive patients (71% of women; mean age, 58±14 years) admitted for elective brain tum...

  4. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality-of-Life questionnaire cervical cancer module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greimel, Elfriede R; Kuljanic Vlasic, Karin; Waldenstrom, Ann-Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors report on the development and validation of a cervical cancer module for the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality-of-Life (QoL) questionnaire (QLQ), which was designed to assess disease-specific and treatment-specific aspects of Qo...... with Cronbach alpha coefficients ranging from .72 to .87 (Symptom Experience, .72; Body Image, .86; Sexual/Vaginal Functioning, .87). Convergent and discriminant validity were fulfilled with scaling errors below 3%. The QLQ-CX24 was capable of discriminating between clinical subgroups. All items exhibited good...... compliance with validity and the reliability...

  5. EORTC recommended protocol for melanoma sentinel lymph node sectioning misclassifies up to 50% of the patients compared with complete step sectioning. Danish Society for Pathological Anatomy and Clinical Cytology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber-Hansen, Rikke; Hastrup, N; Clemmensen, O.

    2010-01-01

    EORTC recommended protocol for melanoma sentinel lymph node sectioning misclassifies up to 50% of the patients compared with complete step sectioning. Danish Society for Pathological Anatomy and Clinical Cytology......EORTC recommended protocol for melanoma sentinel lymph node sectioning misclassifies up to 50% of the patients compared with complete step sectioning. Danish Society for Pathological Anatomy and Clinical Cytology...

  6. Comparison of RECIST, EORTC criteria and PERCIST for evaluation of early response to chemotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Jingjie; Ling, Xueying; Zhang, Linyue; Tang, Yongjin; Xiao, Zeyu; Cheng, Yong; Guo, Bin; Gong, Jian; Huang, Li; Xu, Hao [The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT-MRI Centre, Guangzhou (China)

    2016-10-15

    To compare the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria and the Positron Emission Tomography Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) 1.0 using PET volume computer-assisted reading (PET VCAR) for response evaluation in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with chemotherapy. A total of 35 patients with NSCLC were included in this prospective study. All patients received standard chemotherapy and underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans before and after treatment. With the assistance of PET VCAR, the chemotherapeutic responses were evaluated according to the RECIST 1.1, EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0. Concordance among these protocols was assessed using Cohen's κ coefficient and Wilcoxon's signed-ranks test. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier test. RECIST 1.1 and EORTC response classifications were discordant in 20 patients (57.1 %; κ = 0.194, P < 0.05), and RECIST 1.1 and PERCIST 1.0 classifications were discordant in 22 patients (62.9 %; κ = 0.139, P < 0.05). EORTC and PERCIST 1.0 classifications were discordant in only 4 patients (11.4 %), resulting in better concordance (κ = 0.804, P > 0.05). Patients with a partial remission according to RECIST 1.1 had significantly longer PFS (P < 0.001) than patients with progressive disease, but not significantly longer than patients with stable disease (P = 0.855). According to both the EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0, patients with a partial metabolic response had a significantly longer PFS than those with stable metabolic disease and those with progressive metabolic disease (P = 0.020 and P < 0.001, respectively, for EORTC; both P < 0.001 for PERCIST 1.0). EORTC criteria and PERCIST 1.0 are more sensitive and accurate than RECIST 1.1 for the detection of an early therapeutic response to chemotherapy in patients with NSCLC. Although EORTC criteria and

  7. Prognosis after treatment for loco-regional recurrence after mastectomy or breast conserving therapy in two randomised trials (EORTC 10801 and DBCG-82TM). EORTC Breast Cancer Cooperative Group and the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tienhoven, G.; Voogd, A. C.; Peterse, J. L.; Nielsen, M.; Andersen, K. W.; Mignolet, F.; Sylvester, R.; Fentiman, I. S.; van der Schueren, E.; van Zijl, K.; Blichert-Toft, M.; Bartelink, H.; van Dongen, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the prognosis after treatment for loco-regional recurrences (LR) after (modified) radical mastectomy (MRM) or breast conserving therapy (BCT), in terms of overall survival and time to subsequent LR, in patients originally treated in two European

  8. Multicollinearity in prognostic factor analyses using the EORTC QLQ-C30: identification and impact on model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Steen, Kristel; Curran, Desmond; Kramer, Jocelyn; Molenberghs, Geert; Van Vreckem, Ann; Bottomley, Andrew; Sylvester, Richard

    2002-12-30

    Clinical and quality of life (QL) variables from an EORTC clinical trial of first line chemotherapy in advanced breast cancer were used in a prognostic factor analysis of survival and response to chemotherapy. For response, different final multivariate models were obtained from forward and backward selection methods, suggesting a disconcerting instability. Quality of life was measured using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire completed by patients. Subscales on the questionnaire are known to be highly correlated, and therefore it was hypothesized that multicollinearity contributed to model instability. A correlation matrix indicated that global QL was highly correlated with 7 out of 11 variables. In a first attempt to explore multicollinearity, we used global QL as dependent variable in a regression model with other QL subscales as predictors. Afterwards, standard diagnostic tests for multicollinearity were performed. An exploratory principal components analysis and factor analysis of the QL subscales identified at most three important components and indicated that inclusion of global QL made minimal difference to the loadings on each component, suggesting that it is redundant in the model. In a second approach, we advocate a bootstrap technique to assess the stability of the models. Based on these analyses and since global QL exacerbates problems of multicollinearity, we therefore recommend that global QL be excluded from prognostic factor analyses using the QLQ-C30. The prognostic factor analysis was rerun without global QL in the model, and selected the same significant prognostic factors as before. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Sperm quality before treatment in patients with early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma enrolled in EORTC-GELA Lymphoma Group trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kaalj, Marleen A. E.; Heutte, Natacha; van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Raemaekers, John M. M.; Carde, Patrice; Noordijk, Evert M.; Ferme, Christophe; Thomas, Jose; Eghbali, Houchingue; Brice, Pauline; Bonmati, Caroline; Henry-Amar, Michel; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Although widely recommended, cryopreservation of sperm is sometimes not performed for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma because of presumed poor sperm quality related to the disease. We investigated sperm quality and factors determining it in untreated patients with early stage Hodgkin's

  10. Sperm quality before treatment in patients with early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma enrolled in EORTC-GELA Lymphoma Group trials.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaij, M.A. van der; Heutte, N.; Echten-Arends, J. van; Raemaekers, J.M.M.; Carde, P.; Noordijk, E.M.; Ferme, C.; Thomas, J.; Eghbali, H.; Brice, P.; Bonmati, C.; Henry-Amar, M.; Kluin-Nelemans, H.C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although widely recommended, cryopreservation of sperm is sometimes not performed for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma because of presumed poor sperm quality related to the disease. We investigated sperm quality and factors determining it in untreated patients with early stage Hodgkin's

  11. Quality of life after successful treatment of early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma: 10-year follow-up of the EORTC-GELA H8 randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heutte, Natacha; Flechtner, Henning H; Mounier, Nicolas; Mellink, Wilhelmina A M; Meerwaldt, Jacobus H; Eghbali, Houchingue; van't Veer, Mars B; Noordijk, Evert M; Kluin-Nelemans, Johanna C; Lampka, Elzbieta; Thomas, José; Lugtenburg, Pieternella J; Viterbo, Luisa; Carde, Patrice; Hagenbeek, Anton; van der Maazen, Richard Wm; Smit, Wilma G J M; Brice, Pauline; van Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Baars, Johanna W; Poortmans, Philip; Tirelli, Umberto; Leeksma, Onno C; Tomsic, Radka; Feugier, Pierre; Salles, Gilles; Gabarre, Jean; Kersten, Marie José; Van Den Neste, Eric; Creemers, Geert-Jan M; Gaillard, Isabelle; Meijnders, Paul; Tertian, Gérard; Reman, Oumédaly; Muller, Hein P; Troncy, Jacques; Blanc, Michel; Schroyens, Wilfried; Voogt, Paul J; Wijermans, Pierre; Rieux, Chantal; Fermé, Christophe; Henry-Amar, Michel

    2009-12-01

    Little is known about the longitudinal course of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma during their post-treatment follow-up and re-adaptation to normal life. We report on the HRQoL of patients treated in the randomised H8 trial of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Lymphoma Group and the Groupe d'Etudes des Lymphomes de l'Adulte (GELA). We aimed to assess HRQoL and fatigue following treatment, to analyse relations with treatment, and to identify factors that predict persistent fatigue. Patients received HRQoL questionnaires at the end of primary therapy and during follow-up. The EORTC QLQ-C30 was used to assess HRQoL, and the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) was used to assess fatigue. Changes of mean HRQoL scores over time were analysed with mixed models. Multiple polytomic nominal logistic regression was done to identify independent baseline predictors of fatigue within MFI-20 dimensions. Analyses were done on an intention-to-treat basis. This study is registered with www.ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00379041. 2666 assessments from 935 patients were analysed. Mean follow-up was 90 months (range 52-118). Age affected all functioning and symptom scores except emotional functioning, with younger age associated with higher functioning and lower severity of symptoms; improvement with time showed similar patterns between age groups. Women reported lower HRQoL and higher symptom scores than did men. Overall, 3.2% (14/439 for role functioning) to 9.7% (43/442 for social functioning) and 5.8% (29/498 for reduced motivation) to 9.9% (49/498 for general fatigue) of patients reported impairments of 10 points or more (on a 0-100 scale) in QLQ-C30 and MFI-20 scores, respectively, independent of age and sex. Emotional domains were more affected than physical ones. There was no relation between HRQoL outcome and type of treatment. Fatigue (MFI-20 scores) at the end of treatment was the only

  12. Thresholds for clinical importance for four key domains of the EORTC QLQ-C30 : Physical functioning, emotional functioning, fatigue and pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giesinger, J.M.; Kuijpers, W.; Young, T.; Tomaszewski, K.A.; Friend, E.; Zabernigg, A.; Holzner, B.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background The EORTC QLQ-C30 is one of the most widely used quality of life questionnaires in cancer research. Availability of thresholds for clinical importance for the individual questionnaire domains could help to increase its interpretability. The aim of our study was to identify thresholds for

  13. Clinical and biological impact of TET2 mutations and expression in younger adult AML patients treated within the EORTC/GIMEMA AML-12 clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslanyan, M.G.; Kroeze, L.; Langemeijer, S.M.C.; Koorenhof-Scheele, T.N.; Massop, M.; Hoogen, P. van; Linders, E.H.P.; Locht, L.T.F. van de; Tonnissen, E.; Heijden, A. van der; Silva-Coelho, P.; Cilloni, D.; Saglio, G.; Marie, J.P.; Tang, R.; Labar, B.; Amadori, S.; Muus, P.; Willemze, R.; Marijt, E.W.; Witte, T.J. de; Reijden, B.A. van der; Suciu, S.; Jansen, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the prognostic impact of TET2 mutations and mRNA expression in a prospective cohort of 357 adult AML patients < 60 years of age enrolled in the European Organization For Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)/Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell' Adulto (GIMEMA) AML-12 06991

  14. Patients' and health professionals' understanding of and preferences for graphical presentation styles for individual-level EORTC QLQ-C30 scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, W.; Giesinger, J.M.; Zabernigg, A.; Young, T.; Friend, E.; Tomaszewska, I.M.; Aaronson, N.K.; Holzner, B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate patients’ and health professionals’ understanding of and preferences for different graphical presentation styles for individual-level EORTC QLQ-C30 scores. Methods: We recruited cancer patients (any treatment and diagnosis) in four European countries and health professionals

  15. Long-term efficacy of the CHVmP/BV regimen used for aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in three randomised EORTC trials.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, E.C.; Noordijk, E.M.; Glabbeke, M. van; Teodorovic, I.; Wolf-Peeters, C. de; Carde, P.; Baars, J.W.; Tirelli, U.; Raemaekers, J.M.M.; Kluin-Nelemans, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    We analysed data from 936 newly-diagnosed patients with advanced, aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) treated in three randomised European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) trials performed between 1980 and 1999 (median follow-up of 8.7 (0.2-20.4) years). The CHOP-like

  16. International validation of the EORTC QLQ-ELD14 questionnaire for assessment of health-related quality of life elderly patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wheelwright, S.; Darlington, A.S.; Fitzsimmons, D.; Fayers, P.; Arraras, J.I.; Bonnetain, F.; Brain, E.; Bredart, F.; Chie, W.C.; Giesinger, J.; Hammerlid, E.; O'Connor, S.J.; Oerlemans, S.; Pallis, A.; Reed, M.; Singhal, N.; Vassiliou, Y.; Young, T.; Johnson, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Older people represent the majority of cancer patients but their specific needs are often ignored in the development of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-ELD15 was developed to supplement the

  17. Comparison of EORTC criteria and PERCIST for PET/CT response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with irinotecan and cetuximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skougaard, Kristin; Nielsen, Dorte; Jensen, Benny Vittrup

    2013-01-01

    The study aim was to compare European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria with PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) for response evaluation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with a combination of the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan...

  18. Evaluation of health-related quality of life in Lithuanian brain tumor patients using the EORTC brain cancer module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunevičius, Adomas; Tamašauskas, Šarūnas; Tamašauskas, Arimantas; Deltuva, Vytenis

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is considered an important outcome measure in neuro-oncology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the brain cancer-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-BN20) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) in Lithuanian brain tumor patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS. One hundred consecutive patients (71% of women; mean age, 58 ± 14 years) admitted for elective brain tumor surgery were evaluated for HRQoL using the QLQ-BN20, QLQ-C30 (a core EORTC questionnaire for cancer patients), and SF-36 scale; for motor dysfunction (clinical examination); for cognitive dysfunction (Mini-Mental State Examination); and for disability (Barthel Index). RESULTS. The QLQ-BN20 subscales had an adequate internal consistency (Cronbach α, 0.75-0.90). Motor dysfunction on neurological examination was associated with greater motor dysfunction on the QLQ-BN20; greater disability, with greater future uncertainty, motor dysfunction, communication deficits, headaches, seizures, drowsiness, itchy skin, weakness of legs, and poor bladder control on the QLQ-BN20; and cognitive dysfunction, with greater future uncertainty, visual deficits, motor dysfunction, communication deficits, headaches, drowsiness, and weakness of legs symptoms on the QLQ-BN20, suggesting an adequate clinical validity of the QLQ-BN20. A score for motor dysfunction on the QLQ-BN20 correlated with a score for motor dysfunction on the QLQ-C30 and SF-36 scales; a score for headache on the QLQ-BN20, with a score for pain on the QLQ-C30 and SF-36 scales; and a score for drowsiness symptoms on the QLQ-BN20, with a score for fatigue on the QLQ-C30. CONCLUSIONS. The Lithuanian version of the EORTC-QLQ-BN20 scale has acceptable psychometric properties and can be reliably used for the assessment of HRQoL in brain tumor patients.

  19. Reliability of 95% confidence interval revealed by expected quality-of-life scores: an example of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients after radiotherapy using EORTC QLQ-C 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Tsair-Wei; Lin, Shun-Jin; Wang, Wen-Chung; Leung, Henry W C; Lai, Wen-Pin; Chan, Agnes L F

    2010-07-13

    Many researchers use observed questionnaire scores to evaluate score reliability and to make conclusions and inferences regarding quality-of-life outcomes. The amount of false alarms from medical diagnoses that would be avoided if observed scores were substituted with expected scores is interesting, and understanding these differences is important for the care of cancer patients. Using expected scores to estimate the reliability of 95% confidence intervals (CIs) is rarely reported in published papers. We investigated the reliability of patient responses to a quality-of-life questionnaire and made recommendations for future studies of the quality of life of patients. A total of 115 patients completed the EORTC core questionnaire QLQ-C30 (version 3) after radiotherapy. The observed response scores, assumed to be one-dimensional, were summed and transformed into expected scores using the Rasch rating scale model with WINSTEPS software. A series of simulations was performed using a unified bootstrap procedure after manipulating scenarios with different questionnaire lengths and patient numbers to estimate the reliability at 95% confidence intervals. Skewness analyses of the 95% CIs were compared to detect different effects between groups according to the two data sets of observed and expected response scores. We found that (1) it is necessary to report CIs for reliability and skewness coefficients in papers; (2) data derived from expected response scores are preferable to making inferences; and (3) visual representations displaying the 95% CIs of skewness values applied to item-by-item analyses can provide a useful interpretation of quality-of-life outcomes. Reliability coefficients can be reported with 95% CIs by statistical software to evaluate the internal consistency of respondent scores on questionnaire items. The SPSS syntax procedures for estimating the reliability of the 95% CI, expected score generation and visual skewness analyses are demonstrated in this

  20. Fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer: long-term results of the EORTC 22921 randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosset, Jean-François; Calais, Gilles; Mineur, Laurent; Maingon, Philippe; Stojanovic-Rundic, Suzana; Bensadoun, René-Jean; Bardet, Etienne; Beny, Alexander; Ollier, Jean-Claude; Bolla, Michel; Marchal, Dominique; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Klein, Vincent; Giralt, Jordi; Clavère, Pierre; Glanzmann, Christoph; Cellier, Patrice; Collette, Laurence

    2014-02-01

    EORTC trial 22921 examined the addition of preoperative or postoperative chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. After a median follow-up of 5 years, chemotherapy-irrespective of timing-significantly improved local control. Adjuvant chemotherapy did not improve survival, but the Kaplan-Meier curves diverged, suggesting possible delayed benefit. Here, we report the updated long-term results. We randomly assigned patients with clinical stage T3 or T4 resectable rectal cancer to receive preoperative radiotherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy before surgery followed by either adjuvant chemotherapy or surveillance. Randomisation was done using minimisation with factors of institution, sex, T stage, and distance from the tumour to the anal verge. Study coordinators, clinicians, and patients were aware of assignment. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy to the posterior pelvis in 25 fractions of 1·8 Gy over 5 weeks. Each course of chemotherapy consisted of fluorouracil (350 mg/m(2) per day intravenous bolus) and folinic acid (leucovorin; 20 mg/m(2) per day intravenous bolus). For preoperative chemotherapy, two courses were given (during weeks 1 and 5 of radiotherapy). Adjuvant chemotherapy was given in four cycles, every 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was overall survival. This analysis was done by intention to treat. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00002523. 1011 patients were randomly assigned to treatment between April, 1993, and March, 2003 (252 to preoperative radiotherapy and 253 to each of the other three groups). After a median follow-up of 10·4 years (IQR 7·8-13·1), 10-year overall survival was 49·4% (95% CI 44·6-54·1) for the preoperative radiotherapy group and 50·7% (45·9-55·2) for the preoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy group (HR 0·99, 95% CI 0·83-1·18; p=0·91). 10-year overall survival was 51·8% (95% CI 47·0-56·4) for the adjuvant chemotherapy group and 48·4% (43·6-53

  1. Therapeutic effect of Jinlongshe Granule () on quality of life of stage IV gastric cancer patients using EORTC QLQ-C30: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Da-zhi; Jiao, Jian-peng; Zhang, Xuan; Xu, Jing-yu; Ye, Min; Xiu, Li-juan; Zhao, Ying; Lu, Ye; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Jing; Shi, Jun; Qin, Zhi-feng; Wei, Pin-kang

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of Jinlongshe Granule (, JLSG) on quality of life (QOL) of stage IV gastric cancer patients. This randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trial included 50 patients with advanced gastric cancer. They were equally randomized into a JLSG group and a placebo group. Patients in both groups received routine Chinese herbal decoctions according to Chinese medicine (CM) treatment based on syndrome differentiation. Patients in JLSG group received additional JLSG, and those in the placebo group received an additional placebo. In the JLSG group, 19 patients who completed the study were used for analysis. In the placebo group, finally the data of 20 patients who completed the study were used for analysis. The treatment course was at least 3 months, and the follow-up duration was at least 6 months in 5 interviews. Repeated measurements of the subscale items and individual items in European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) obtained at the 5 interviews were compared using different patient groups, changes over time and changes within one group over time independently to observe the tendency of changes in the scores. Using time as the variant, there was signifificant difference in 4 functional scales (physical, role, emotional and social, P0.05), insomnia (P0.05) and financial difficulties (Pplacebo group and group over time were used as variants (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Additional use of JLSG on the basis of routine CM treatment could improve the somatic function, role function, emotional function, social function, cognitive function and general QOL of patients with advanced gastric cancer, and relieve the symptoms of fatigue, nausea and vomiting, pain, loss of appetite and constipation.

  2. Value of infliximab (Remicade®) in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome: final results of a randomized phase II trial (EORTC trial 06023) of the EORTC Leukemia Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Frédéric; Suciu, Stefan; Amadori, Sergio; Muus, Petra; Zwierzina, Heinz; Denzlinger, Claudio; Delforge, Michel; Thyss, Antoine; Selleslag, Dominik; Indrak, Karel; Ossenkoppele, Gert; de Witte, Theo

    2012-04-01

    Tumor-necrosis factor alpha activity has been correlated to ineffective erythropoiesis in lower risk myelodysplastic syndromes. Infliximab (Remicade(®)) is an anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha chimeric antibody that is used in the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn's disease. Forty-six patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and a relatively low risk of developing acute leukemia were included in a randomized phase II study assessing the therapeutic activity of two dosages of infliximab administration (3 mg/kg vs. 5 mg/kg). The primary end point was the response rate. Responses were observed in 3 of 22 patients (13.1%) randomized to the 3 mg/kg arm, versus 0 of 21 patients randomized in the 5 mg/kg arm. According to the statistical design of the current study, neither of the two infliximab dose schedules tested showed sufficient activity as a single agent in this cohort of unselected patients with early myelodysplastic syndrome.

  3. Value of infliximab (Remicade(R)) in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome: final results of a randomized phase II trial (EORTC trial 06023) of the EORTC Leukemia Group.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, F.; Suciu, S.; Amadori, S.; Muus, P.; Zwierzina, H.; Denzlinger, C.; Delforge, M.; Thyss, A.; Selleslag, D.; Indrak, K.; Ossenkoppele, G.; Witte, T.J. de

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-necrosis factor alpha activity has been correlated to ineffective erythropoiesis in lower risk myelodysplastic syndromes. Infliximab (Remicade((R))) is an anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha chimeric antibody that is used in the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn's disease.

  4. Reliability of 95% confidence interval revealed by expected quality-of-life scores: an example of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients after radiotherapy using EORTC QLQ-C 30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung Henry WC

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many researchers use observed questionnaire scores to evaluate score reliability and to make conclusions and inferences regarding quality-of-life outcomes. The amount of false alarms from medical diagnoses that would be avoided if observed scores were substituted with expected scores is interesting, and understanding these differences is important for the care of cancer patients. Using expected scores to estimate the reliability of 95% confidence intervals (CIs is rarely reported in published papers. We investigated the reliability of patient responses to a quality-of-life questionnaire and made recommendations for future studies of the quality of life of patients. Methods A total of 115 patients completed the EORTC core questionnaire QLQ-C30 (version 3 after radiotherapy. The observed response scores, assumed to be one-dimensional, were summed and transformed into expected scores using the Rasch rating scale model with WINSTEPS software. A series of simulations was performed using a unified bootstrap procedure after manipulating scenarios with different questionnaire lengths and patient numbers to estimate the reliability at 95% confidence intervals. Skewness analyses of the 95% CIs were compared to detect different effects between groups according to the two data sets of observed and expected response scores. Results We found that (1 it is necessary to report CIs for reliability and skewness coefficients in papers; (2 data derived from expected response scores are preferable to making inferences; and (3 visual representations displaying the 95% CIs of skewness values applied to item-by-item analyses can provide a useful interpretation of quality-of-life outcomes. Conclusion Reliability coefficients can be reported with 95% CIs by statistical software to evaluate the internal consistency of respondent scores on questionnaire items. The SPSS syntax procedures for estimating the reliability of the 95% CI, expected score

  5. Multidisciplinary quality assurance and control in oncological trials: Perspectives from European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Quality assurance (QA) programmes are one of the mainstays of clinical research and constitute the pillars on which European Organisation for Research Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) delivers multidisciplinary therapeutic progress. Changing practice treatments require solid evidence-based data, which can only be achieved if integral QA is part of the infrastructure sustaining research projects. Cancer treatment is a multimodality approach, which is often applied either in sequence and/or in combination. Each modality plays a key role in cancer control. The modalities by which QA is applied varies substantially within and across the disciplines. In addition, translational and diagnostic disciplines take an increasing role in the era of precision medicine. Building on the structuring effect of clinical research with fully integrated multidisciplinary QA programmes associated with the solutions addressing the chain of custody for biological material and data integrity as well as compliance ensure at the same time validity of clinical research output but also have a training effect on health care providers, who are more likely to apply such principles as routine. The principles of QA are therefore critical to be embedded in multidisciplinary infrastructure to guarantee therapeutic progress. These principles also provide the basis for the functioning of multidisciplinary tumour board. However, technical, operational and economic challenges which go with the implementation of such programmes require optimal know-how and the coordination of the multiple expertise and such efforts are best achieved through centralised infrastructure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cytotoxic/natural killer cell cutaneous lymphomas. Report of EORTC Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force Workshop.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santucci, M.; Pimpinelli, N; Massi, D; Kadin, ME; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Muller-Hermelink, HK; Paulli, M; Wechsler, J.; Willemze, R.; Audring, H; Bernengo, MG; Cerroni, L.; Chimenti, S.; Chott, A.; Diaz-Perez, J.L.; Dippel, E; Duncan, LM; Feller, AC; Geerts, M.L.; Hallermann, C; Kempf, W; Russell-Jones, R; Sander, C; Berti, E.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cutaneous lymphomas expressing a cytotoxic or natural killer (NK) cell phenotype represent a group of lymphoproliferative disorders for which there is currently much confusion and little consensus regarding the best nomenclature and classification. METHODS: This study analyzes 48 cases

  7. Quality of life of patients with oesophageal cancer in Taiwan: validation and application of the Taiwan Chinese (Mandarin) version of the EORTC QLQ-OES18: a brief communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chie, Wei-Chu; Tsai, Chia-Jih; Chiang, Chieh; Lee, Yung-Chie

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the reliability and validity, and the application of the Taiwan Chinese Version of the EORTC QLQ-OES18. The authors translated the questionnaire according to the guideline of the EORTC. Ninety-five patients with oesophageal cancer in National Taiwan University Hospital were interviewed using the questionnaire and the EORTC QLQ-C30 between October 2002 and September 2007. Answer distribution and psychometric properties of the EORTC QLQ-OES18 were examined. The mean age of the patients was 60 years (SD 12 years). Most of the patients were in advanced stages of disease, with two-thirds off-treatment. The Cronbach's alpha coefficients were satisfactory (0.77-0.82) or near-satisfactory (pain: 0.67). The item-to-own and item-to-other scale correlations showed satisfactory results. Patients who were on-treatment versus off-treatment had significantly poorer quality of life scores in dysphagia, dry mouth, and taste, and a borderline poorer score in cough. Opposite situations were seen in the scales of reflux and choking. The EORTC QLQ-OES18 is a valid instrument to assess quality of life issues in patients with oesophageal cancer in Taiwan.

  8. Histopathological and immunophenotypical criteria for the diagnosis of Sézary syndrome in differentiation from other erythrodermic skin diseases: a European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force Study of 97 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemke, C D; Booken, N; Weiss, C; Nicolay, J P; Goerdt, S; Felcht, M; Géraud, C; Kempf, W; Assaf, C; Ortonne, N; Battistella, M; Bagot, M; Knobler, R; Quaglino, P; Arheiliger, B; Santucci, M; Jansen, P; Vermeer, M H; Willemze, R

    2015-07-01

    Patients with erythrodermic disease are a diagnostic challenge regarding the clinical and histological differential diagnosis. To evaluate histopathological and immunohistochemical diagnostic markers for Sézary syndrome. Ninety-seven erythrodermic cases [Sézary syndrome (SS), n = 57; erythrodermic inflammatory dermatoses (EIDs), n = 40] were collected by the EORTC Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force histopathology group. Evaluation criteria were (i) epidermal and dermal changes; (ii) morphology of the infiltrate; (iii) immunohistochemical analysis of marker loss (CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5 and CD7); (iv) bystander infiltrate by staining for CD8, FOXP3 and CD25; and (v) expression of Ki-67, CD30, PD-1 and MUM-1. The workshop panel made a correct diagnosis of SS in 51% of cases (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma 81%) and of EID in 80% without clinical or laboratory data. Histology revealed a significantly increased degree of epidermotropism (P skin samples was found significantly to express PD-1 (P = 0.0053), MUM-1 (P = 0.0017) and Ki-67 (P diagnosis of SS. A number of different histological and immunophenotypical criteria are required to differentiate between SS and EIDs. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  9. Testing the measurement equivalence of paper and interactive voice response system versions of the EORTC QLQ-C30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, J Jason; Coons, Stephen Joel; Aaronson, Neil K

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the measurement equivalence of an interactive voice response system (IVRS) version and the original paper-based version of the EORTC QLQ-C30. The QLQ-C30 is a cancer-specific, health-related quality of life questionnaire consisting of nine multi-item scales (physical, role, emotional, cognitive and social functioning, fatigue, nausea/vomiting, pain, and quality of life) and six single item measures (dyspnea, insomnia, appetite loss, constipation, diarrhea, and financial problems). This study utilized a crossover design with subjects randomly assigned to one of two assessment orders: (1) paper then IVRS or (2) IVRS then paper. Equivalence between the two administration modes was established by comparing the 95% lower confidence interval (CI) of the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for each scale, with a critical value of 0.70. The ICCs for the nine multi-item scales were all above 0.79, ranging from 0.791 to 0.899 (ICC 95% lower CI range 0.726-0.865) and significantly different from our threshold reliability of 0.70. The ICCs for the six single items ranged from 0.689 to 0.896 (ICC 95% lower CI range 0.611-0.888). Two of the items, insomnia and appetite loss, were not statistically different from 0.70. When considered together, the per-protocol analysis results support the equivalence of the paper and IVRS versions of the QLQ-C30 for 13 of the 15 scores. This analysis provides evidence that the scores obtained from the IVRS version of the QLQ-C30 are equivalent to those obtained with the original paper version except for the insomnia and appetite loss items.

  10. TLG-S criteria are superior to both EORTC and PERCIST for predicting outcomes in patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma treated with erlotinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Kung-Chu [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Center for Advanced Molecular Imaging and Translation, Taoyuan (China); Fang, Yu-Hua Dean [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tainan (China); Chung, Hsiao-Wen [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); Liu, Yuan-Chang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Taoyuan (China); Chang, John Wen-Cheng; Hou, Ming-Mo [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Yang, Cheng-Ta [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Thoracic Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Cheng, Nai-Ming; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Center for Advanced Molecular Imaging and Translation, Taoyuan (China); Su, Tzu-Pei [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Keelung (China)

    2016-11-15

    In this retrospective review of prospectively collected data, we sought to investigate whether early FDG-PET assessment of treatment response based on total lesion glycolysis measured using a systemic approach (TLG-S) would be superior to either local assessment with EORTC (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) criteria or single-lesion assessment with PERCIST (PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors) for predicting clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma treated with erlotinib. We also examined the effect of bone flares on tumor response evaluation by single-lesion assessment with PERCIST in patients with metastatic bone lesions. We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data from 23 patients with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma treated with erlotinib. All participants underwent FDG-PET imaging at baseline and on days 14 and 56 after completion of erlotinib treatment. In addition, diagnostic CT scans were performed at baseline and on day 56. FDG-PET response was assessed with TLG-S, EORTC, and PERCIST criteria. Response assessment based on RECIST 1.1 (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) from diagnostic CT imaging was used as the reference standard. Two-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) served as the main outcome measures. We identified 13 patients with bone metastases. Of these, four (31 %) with persistent bone uptake due to bone flares on day 14 were erroneously classified as non-responders according to the PERCIST criteria, but they were correctly classified as responders according to both the EORTC and TLG-S criteria. Patients who were classified as responders on day 14 based on TLG-S criteria had higher rates of 2-year PFS (26.7 % vs. 0 %, P = 0.007) and OS (40.0 % vs. 7.7 %, P = 0.018). Similar rates were observed in patients who showed a response on day 56 based on CT imaging according to the RECIST criteria. Patients classified as responders on day 14

  11. Parenthood in survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma: an EORTC-GELA general population case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kaaij, Marleen A E; Heutte, Natacha; Meijnders, Paul; Abeilard-Lemoisson, Edwige; Spina, Michele; Moser, Lotte C; Allgeier, Anouk; Meulemans, Bart; Dubois, Brice; Simons, Arnold H M; Lugtenburg, Pieternella J; Aleman, Berthe M P; Noordijk, Evert M; Fermé, Christophe; Thomas, José; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Fruchart, Christophe; Brice, Pauline; Gaillard, Isabelle; Doorduijn, Jeanette K; Sebban, Catherine; Smit, Wilma G J M; Bologna, Serge; Roesink, Judith M; Ong, Francisca; André, Marc P E; Raemaekers, John M M; Henry-Amar, Michel; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the impact of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) on parenthood, including factors influencing parenthood probability, by comparing long-term HL survivors with matched general population controls. A Life Situation Questionnaire was sent to 3,604 survivors treated from 1964 to 2004 in successive clinical trials. Responders were matched with controls (1:3 or 4) for sex, country, education, and year of birth (10-year groups). Controls were given an artificial date of start of treatment equal to that of their matched case. The main end point was presence of biologic children after treatment, which was evaluated by using conditional logistic regression analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze factors influencing spontaneous post-treatment parenthood. In all, 1,654 French and Dutch survivors were matched with 6,414 controls. Median follow-up was 14 years (range, 5 to 44 years). After treatment, the odds ratio (OR) for having children was 0.77 (95% CI, 0.68 to 0.87; P < .001) for survivors compared with controls. Of 898 survivors who were childless before treatment, 46.7% achieved post-treatment parenthood compared with 49.3% of 3,196 childless controls (OR, 0.87; P = .08). Among 756 survivors with children before treatment, 12.4% became parents after HL treatment compared with 22.2% of 3,218 controls with children before treatment (OR, 0.49; P < .001). Treatment with alkylating agents, second-line therapy, and age older than 35 years at treatment appeared to reduce the chances of spontaneous post-treatment parenthood. Survivors of HL had slightly but significantly fewer children after treatment than matched general population controls. The difference concerned only survivors who had children before treatment and appears to have more personal than biologic reasons. The chance of successful post-treatment parenthood was 76%.

  12. The group matters: an explorative study of group cohesion and quality of life in cancer patients participating in physical exercise intervention during treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Julie Midtgaard; Rørth, Mikael Rahbek; Stelter, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    A series of studies have shown that physical activity improves cancer patients functional capacity and quality of life (QOL). Few of these studies have included physical exercise carried out in a group setting. However, patient's experience with the in-group processes remains unexplored. This study...... investigated group cohesion and changes in QOL in 55 cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy who participated in a 9 h weekly group exercise programme for 6 weeks. The study used a method triangulation component design. Seven qualitative group interviews were conducted post-intervention. QOL (SF-36; EORTC QLQ...

  13. Thresholds for clinical importance for four key domains of the EORTC QLQ-C30: physical functioning, emotional functioning, fatigue and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesinger, Johannes M; Kuijpers, Wilma; Young, Teresa; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Friend, Elizabeth; Zabernigg, August; Holzner, Bernhard; Aaronson, Neil K

    2016-06-07

    The EORTC QLQ-C30 is one of the most widely used quality of life questionnaires in cancer research. Availability of thresholds for clinical importance for the individual questionnaire domains could help to increase its interpretability. The aim of our study was to identify thresholds for clinical importance for four EORTC QLQ-C30 scales: Physical Functioning (PF), Emotional Functioning (EF), Pain (PA) and Fatigue (FA). We recruited adult cancer patients from Austria, the Netherlands, Poland and the UK. No restrictions were placed on diagnosis or type or stage of treatment. Patients completed the QLQ-C30 and three anchor items reflecting potential attributes of clinically important levels of PF, EF, PA and FA. We merged the anchor items assessing perceived burden, limitations in daily activities and need for help into a dichotomous external criterion to estimate thresholds for clinical importance using Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) analysis. In our sample of 548 cancer patients (mean age 60.6 years; 54 % female), the QLQ-C30 scales showed high diagnostic accuracy in identifying patients reporting burden, limitations and/or need for help related to PF, EF, PA and FA. All areas under the curve were above 0.86. We were able to estimate thresholds for clinical importance for four QLQ-C30 scales. When used in daily clinical practice, these thresholds can help to identify patients with clinically important problems requiring further exploration and possibly intervention by health care professionals.

  14. Differential item functioning (DIF) in the EORTC QLQ-C30: a comparison of baseline, on-treatment and off-treatment data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Neil W; Fayers, Peter M; Aaronson, Neil K; Bottomley, Andrew; de Graeff, Alexander; Groenvold, Mogens; Gundy, Chad; Koller, Michael; Petersen, Morten A; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2009-04-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analyses can be used to explore translation, cultural, gender or other differences in the performance of quality of life (QoL) instruments. These analyses are commonly performed using "baseline" or pretreatment data. We previously reported DIF analyses to examine the pattern of item responses for translations of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 QoL instrument, using only data collected prior to cancer treatment. We now compare the consistency of these results with similar analyses of on-treatment and off-treatment assessments and explore whether item relationships differ from those at baseline. Logistic regression DIF analyses were used to examine the translation of each item in each multi-item scale at the three time points, after controlling for the overall scale score and other covariates. The consistency of results at the three time points was explored. For most EORTC QLQ-C30 subscales, the DIF results were very consistent across the three time points. Results for the Nausea and Vomiting scale varied the most across assessments. The results indicated that DIF analyses were stable across each time point and that the same DIF effects were usually found regardless of the treatment status of the respondent.

  15. Immediate versus deferred chemotherapy after radical cystectomy in patients with pT3-pT4 or N+ M0 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (EORTC 30994): an intergroup, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sternberg, C.N.; Skoneczna, I.; Kerst, J.M.; Albers, P.; Fossa, S.D.; Agerbaek, M.; Dumez, H.; Santis, M. de; Theodore, C.; Leahy, M.G.; Chester, J.D.; Verbaeys, A.; Daugaard, G.; Wood, L.; Witjes, J.A.; Wit, R. de; Geoffrois, L.; Sengelov, L.; Thalmann, G.; Charpentier, D.; Rolland, F.; Mignot, L.; Sundar, S.; Symonds, P.; Graham, J.; Joly, F.; Marreaud, S.; Collette, L.; Sylvester, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder have poor survival after cystectomy. The EORTC 30994 trial aimed to compare immediate versus deferred cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy after radical cystectomy in patients with pT3-pT4 or N+ M0 urothelial carcinoma

  16. Evaluation of the impact of tumor HPV status on outcome in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) receiving cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil with or without docetaxel : a subset analysis of EORTC 24971 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Psyrri, A; Fortpied, C; Koutsodontis, G; Avgeris, M; Kroupis, C; Goutas, N; Menis, J; Herman, L; Giurgea, L; Remenar, E; Degardin, M; Pateras, I S; Langendijk, J A; van Herpen, C; Awada, A; Germà-Lluch, J R; Kienzer, H R; Licitra, L; Vermorken, J B

    Background: EORTC 24971 was a phase III trial demonstrating superiority of induction regimen TPF over PF, in terms of progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in locoregionally advanced unresectable HNSCC. We conducted a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data aiming to

  17. Evaluation of the impact of tumor HPV status on outcome in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) receiving cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil with or without docetaxel: a subset analysis of EORTC 24971 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Psyrri, A.; Fortpied, C.; Koutsodontis, G.; Avgeris, M.; Kroupis, C.; Goutas, N.; Menis, J.; Herman, L.; Giurgea, L.; Remenar, E.; Degardin, M.; Pateras, I.S.; Langendijk, J.A.; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Awada, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Kienzer, H.R.; Licitra, L.; Vermorken, J.B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: EORTC 24971 was a phase III trial demonstrating superiority of induction regimen TPF (docetaxel, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) over PF (cisplatin/5-fluorouracil), in terms of progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in locoregionally advanced unresectable head and neck squamous cell

  18. Quality assurance of EORTC trial 22922/10925 investigating the role of internal mammary--medial supraclavicular irradiation in stage I-III breast cancer: the individual case review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortmans, P.; Kouloulias, V. E.; Venselaar, J. L.; Struikmans, H.; Davis, J. B.; Huyskens, D.; van Tienhoven, G.; Hurkmans, C.; Mijnheer, B.; van den Bogaert, W.

    2003-01-01

    To assess consistency among participants in an European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) phase III trial randomising between irradiation and no irradiation of the internal mammary and medial supraclavicular (IM-MS) lymph nodes, all participating institutes were invited to

  19. The relationship between numbness, tingling and shooting/burning pain in patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) as measured by the EORTC QLQ-CIPN20 instrument, N06CA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, S.L.; Barton, D.L.; Qin, R.; Wos, E.J.; Sloan, J.A.; Liu, H.; Aaronson, N.K.; Satele, D.V.; Mattar, B.I.; Green, N.B.; Loprinzi, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is characterized by numbness, tingling, and shooting/burning pain. This analysis was performed to describe the relationship between numbness, tingling, and shooting/burning pain in patients with CIPN, as reported using the EORTC

  20. Distribution and prognostic value of histopathologic data and immunohistochemical markers in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs): an analysis of the EORTC phase III trial of treatment of metastatic GISTs with imatinib mesylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sciot, R.; biec-Rychter, M.; Daugaard, S.

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: The 62005 EORTC phase III trial, comparing two doses of imatinib in patients with advanced GIST, reported a median progression-free survival of 25 months with a trend towards dose dependency for progression-free survival. The current analysis of that study aimed to assess whether histo...

  1. Interobserver delineation uncertainty in involved-node radiation therapy (INRT) for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma: on behalf of the Radiotherapy Committee of the EORTC lymphoma group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Marianne C.; Girinsky, Theodore; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In early-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) the target volume nowadays consists of the volume of the originally involved nodes. Delineation of this volume on a post-chemotherapy CT-scan is challenging. We report on the interobserver variability in target volume definiti...

  2. Guidelines for target volume definition in post-operative radiotherapy for prostate cancer, on behalf of the EORTC Radiation Oncology Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortmans, Philip; Bossi, Alberto; Vandeputte, Katia; Bosset, Mathieu; Miralbell, Raymond; Maingon, Philippe; Boehmer, Dirk; Budiharto, Tom; Symon, Zvi; van den Bergh, Alfons C. M.; Scrase, Christopher; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Bolla, Michel

    The appropriate application of 3-D conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy or image guided radiotherapy for patients undergoing post-operative radiotherapy for prostate cancer requires a standardisation of the target volume definition and delineation as well as stanclardisation of

  3. Cryopreservation, semen use and the likelihood of fatherhood in male Hodgkin lymphoma survivors: an EORTC-GELA Lymphoma Group cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kaaij, M A E; van Echten-Arends, J; Heutte, N; Meijnders, P; Abeilard-Lemoisson, E; Spina, M; Moser, E C; Allgeier, A; Meulemans, B; Lugtenburg, P J; Aleman, B M P; Noordijk, E M; Fermé, C; Thomas, J; Stamatoullas, A; Fruchart, C; Eghbali, H; Brice, P; Smit, W G J M; Sebban, C; Doorduijn, J K; Roesink, J M; Gaillard, I; Coiffier, B; Lybeert, M L M; Casasnovas, O; André, M; Raemaekers, J M M; Henry-Amar, M; Kluin-Nelemans, J C

    2014-03-01

    How does the successful cryopreservation of semen affect the odds of post-treatment fatherhood among Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors? Among 334 survivors who wanted to have children, the availability of cryopreserved semen doubled the odds of post-treatment fatherhood. Cryopreservation of semen is the easiest, safest and most accessible way to safeguard fertility in male patients facing cancer treatment. Little is known about what proportion of patients achieve successful semen cryopreservation. To our knowledge, neither the factors which influence the occurrence of semen cryopreservation nor the rates of fatherhood after semen has been cryopreserved have been analysed before. This is a cohort study with nested case-control analyses of consecutive Hodgkin survivors treated between 1974 and 2004 in multi-centre randomized controlled trials. A written questionnaire was developed and sent to 1849 male survivors. Nine hundred and two survivors provided analysable answers. The median age at treatment was 31 years. The median follow-up after cryopreservation was 13 years (range 5-36). Three hundred and sixty-three out of 902 men (40%) cryopreserved semen before the start of potentially gonadotoxic treatment. The likelihood of semen cryopreservation was influenced by age, treatment period, disease stage, treatment modality and education level. Seventy eight of 363 men (21%) used their cryopreserved semen. Men treated between 1994 and 2004 had significantly lower odds of cryopreserved semen use compared with those treated earlier, whereas alkylating or second-line (chemo)therapy significantly increased the odds of use; no other influencing factors were identified. We found an adjusted odds ratio of 2.03 (95% confidence interval 1.11-3.73, P = 0.02) for post-treatment fatherhood if semen cryopreservation was performed. Forty-eight out of 258 men (19%) who had children after HL treatment became a father using cryopreserved semen. Data came from questionnaires and so this study potentially suffers from response bias. We could not perform an analysis with correction for duration of follow-up or provide an actuarial use rate due to lack of dates of semen utilization. We do not have detailed information on either the techniques used in cryopreserved semen utilization or the number of cycles needed. Lance Armstrong Foundation, Dutch Cancer Foundation, René Vogels Stichting, no competing interests.

  4. Cryopreservation, semen use and the likelihood of fatherhood in male Hodgkin lymphoma survivors: an EORTC-GELA Lymphoma Group cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaij, M.A. van der; Echten-Arends, J. van; Heutte, N.; Meijnders, P.; Abeilard-Lemoisson, E.; Spina, M.; Moser, E.C.; Allgeier, A.; Meulemans, B.; Lugtenburg, P.J.; Aleman, B.M.; Noordijk, E.M.; Ferme, C.; Thomas, J.; Stamatoullas, A.; Fruchart, C.; Eghbali, H.; Brice, P.; Smit, W.G.; Sebban, C.; Doorduijn, J.K.; Roesink, J.M.; Gaillard, I.; Coiffier, B.; Lybeert, M.L.; Casasnovas, O.; Andre, M.; Raemaekers, J.M.M.; Henry-Amar, M.; Kluin-Nelemans, J.C.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: How does the successful cryopreservation of semen affect the odds of post-treatment fatherhood among Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors? SUMMARY ANSWER: Among 334 survivors who wanted to have children, the availability of cryopreserved semen doubled the odds of post-treatment

  5. Cryopreservation, semen use and the likelihood of fatherhood in male Hodgkin lymphoma survivors : an EORTC-GELA Lymphoma Group cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kaaij, M. A. E.; van Echten-Arends, J.; Heutte, N.; Meijnders, P.; Abeilard-Lemoisson, E.; Spina, M.; Moser, E. C.; Allgeier, A.; Meulemans, B.; Lugtenburg, P. J.; Aleman, B. M. P.; Noordijk, E. M.; Ferme, C.; Thomas, J.; Stamatoullas, A.; Fruchart, C.; Eghbali, H.; Brice, P.; Smit, W. G. J. M.; Sebban, C.; Doorduijn, J. K.; Roesink, J. M.; Gaillard, I.; Coiffier, B.; Lybeert, M. L. M.; Casasnovas, O.; Andre, M.; Raemaekers, J. M. M.; Henry-Amar, M.; Kluin-Nelemans, J. C.

    STUDY QUESTION: How does the successful cryopreservation of semen affect the odds of post-treatment fatherhood among Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors? SUMMARY ANSWER: Among 334 survivors who wanted to have children, the availability of cryopreserved semen doubled the odds of post-treatment

  6. Strategies to promote translational research within the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Head and Neck Cancer Group : a report from the Translational Research Subcommittee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Psyrri, A.; Licitra, L.; Lacombe, D.; Schuuring, E.; Budach, W.; Ozsahin, M.; Knecht, R.; Vermorken, J. B.; Langendijk, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. These tumors are commonly diagnosed at advanced stages and mortality rates remain high. Even cured patients suffer the consequences of aggressive treatment that includes surgery, chemotherapy,

  7. TOPGEAR: a randomised phase III trial of perioperative ECF chemotherapy versus preoperative chemoradiation plus perioperative ECF chemotherapy for resectable gastric cancer (an international, intergroup trial of the AGITG/TROG/EORTC/NCIC CTG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Trevor; Smithers, B Mark; Michael, Michael; Gebski, Val; Boussioutas, Alex; Miller, Danielle; Simes, John; Zalcberg, John; Haustermans, Karin; Lordick, Florian; Schuhmacher, Christoph; Swallow, Carol; Darling, Gail; Wong, Rebecca

    2015-07-21

    surgical technique. TOPGEAR is an international, intergroup collaboration led by the Australasian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Group (AGITG), in collaboration with the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG), European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and the NCIC Clinical Trials Group. It addresses a globally significant question that will help inform future international standards for clinical practice in resectable gastric cancer. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12609000035224 . Registered 30 May 2009.

  8. Histologic Appearance After Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Assessment of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer–Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group Response Score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Hornick, Jason L. [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Barysauskas, Constance M. [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Raut, Chandrajit P. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Patel, Sagar A.; Royce, Trevor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fletcher, Christopher D.M. [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Baldini, Elizabeth H., E-mail: ebaldini@partners.org [Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To critically assess the prognostic value of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer–Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (EORTC-STBSG) response score and define histologic appearance after preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: For a cohort of 100 patients with STS of the extremity/trunk treated at our institution with preoperative RT followed by resection, 2 expert sarcoma pathologists evaluated the resected specimens for percent residual viable cells, necrosis, hyalinization/fibrosis, and infarction. The EORTC response score and other predictors of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier and proportional hazard models. Results: Median tumor size was 7.5 cm; 92% were intermediate or high grade. Most common histologies were unclassified sarcoma (34%) and myxofibrosarcoma (25%). Median follow-up was 60 months. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 5%, 5-year RFS was 68%, and 5-year OS was 75%. Distribution of cases according to EORTC response score tiers was as follows: no residual viable tumor for 9 cases (9% pathologic complete response); <1% viable tumor for 0, ≥1% to <10% for 9, ≥10% to <50% for 44, and ≥50% for 38. There was no association between EORTC-STBSG response score and RFS or OS. Conversely, hyalinization/fibrosis was a significant independent favorable predictor for RFS (hazard ratio 0.49, P=.007) and OS (hazard ratio 0.36, P=.02). Conclusion: Histologic evaluation after preoperative RT for STS showed a 9% pathologic complete response rate. The EORTC-STBSG response score and percent viable cells were not prognostic. Hyalinization/fibrosis was associated with favorable outcome, and if validated, may become a valid endpoint for neoadjuvant trials.

  9. Cyberknife Radioablation of Prostate Cancer – Preliminary Results for 400 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszczyk, Leszek; Namysł Kaletka, Agnieszka; Napieralska, Aleksandra; Woźniak, Grzegorz; Stąpór Fudzińska, Małgorzata; Głowacki, Grzegorz; Tukiendorf, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the tolerance and effectiveness of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) applied in the treatment of low and intermediate risk (LR & IR) prostate cancer patients (PCP) and provide an evaluation of the level of risk group impact on treatment results. In addition, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) usage and prostatic specific antigen (PSA) decline after SABR were assessed. Material and Methods: A total of 400 PCP (213 LR and 187 IR, including T2c) were irradiated with a CyberKnife using fd 7.25 Gy to TD 36.25 Gy. At the start of treatment, 60.3% of patients were undergoing ADT and this gradually decreased to 0% after 38 months. Follow-up was for a median of 15.0 months. Patients were monitored on SABR completion and 1, 4, 8 months later and then subsequently every 6 months. GI (Gastro-Intestinal) and GU (Genito-Urinary) acute and late adverse effects, PSA and ADT usage were evaluated. Results: Failure was noted in 9 patients (2.25%) (5 in LR and 4 in IR groups) - 4 relapses and 5 nodal metastases. No G3/4 late adverse effects (EORTC/RTOG) were observed. Some 0.5% of G3 GU and 0.3% of G3 GI acute reactions were noted respectively on the SABR completion day and one month later. The median of PSA declined 1.5 ng/ml during the first month and 0.6 ng/ml during the next three months. No impact of risk groups on treatment results was found. An impact of ADT on PSA decline was only confirmed for time point interactions. Conclusions: SABR for LR and IR PCP is a safe and effective treatment. The inclusion of T2c patients and the low percentage of IR patient failure permit us the assumption that this procedure could be utilized in the treatment of more advanced cases. The results do not allow clear definition of the impact of ADT on radioablation results in LR and IR+ T2c cases. Creative Commons Attribution License

  10. Immediate versus deferred chemotherapy after radical cystectomy in patients with pT3-pT4 or N+ M0 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (EORTC 30994): an intergroup, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Skoneczna, Iwona; Kerst, J Martijn; Albers, Peter; Fossa, Sophie D; Agerbaek, Mads; Dumez, Herlinde; de Santis, Maria; Théodore, Christine; Leahy, Michael G; Chester, John D; Verbaeys, Antony; Daugaard, Gedske; Wood, Lori; Witjes, J Alfred; de Wit, Ronald; Geoffrois, Lionel; Sengelov, Lisa; Thalmann, George; Charpentier, Danielle; Rolland, Frédéric; Mignot, Laurent; Sundar, Santhanam; Symonds, Paul; Graham, John; Joly, Florence; Marreaud, Sandrine; Collette, Laurence; Sylvester, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Patients with muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder have poor survival after cystectomy. The EORTC 30994 trial aimed to compare immediate versus deferred cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy after radical cystectomy in patients with pT3-pT4 or N+ M0 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. This intergroup, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial recruited patients from hospitals across Europe and Canada. Eligible patients had histologically proven urothelial carcinoma of the bladder, pT3-pT4 disease or node positive (pN1-3) M0 disease after radical cystectomy and bilateral lymphadenectomy, with no evidence of any microscopic residual disease. Within 90 days of cystectomy, patients were centrally randomly assigned (1:1) by minimisation to either immediate adjuvant chemotherapy (four cycles of gemcitabine plus cisplatin, high-dose methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin [high-dose MVAC], or MVAC) or six cycles of deferred chemotherapy at relapse, with stratification for institution, pT category, and lymph node status according to the number of nodes dissected. Neither patients nor investigators were masked. Overall survival was the primary endpoint; all analyses were by intention to treat. The trial was closed after recruitment of 284 of the planned 660 patients. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00028756. From April 29, 2002, to Aug 14, 2008, 284 patients were randomly assigned (141 to immediate treatment and 143 to deferred treatment), and followed up until the data cutoff of Aug 21, 2013. After a median follow-up of 7.0 years (IQR 5.2-8.7), 66 (47%) of 141 patients in the immediate treatment group had died compared with 82 (57%) of 143 in the deferred treatment group. No significant improvement in overall survival was noted with immediate treatment when compared with deferred treatment (adjusted HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.56-1.08; p=0.13). Immediate treatment significantly prolonged progression-free survival compared with

  11. Revised definitions of invasive fungal disease from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) Consensus Group.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, B.E. de; Walsh, T.J.; Donnelly, J.P.; Stevens, D.A.; Edwards, J.E.; Calandra, T; Pappas, P.G.; Maertens, J.; Lortholary, O.; Kauffman, C.A.; Denning, D.W.; Patterson, T.F.; Maschmeyer, G.; Bille, J.; Dismukes, W.E.; Herbrecht, R.; Hope, W.W.; Kibbler, C.C.; Kullberg, B.J.; Marr, K.A.; Munoz, P.; Odds, F.C.; Perfect, J.R.; Restrepo, A.; Ruhnke, M.; Segal, B.H.; Sobel, J.D.; Sorrell, T.C.; Viscoli, C.; Wingard, J.R.; Zaoutis, T.; Bennett, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Invasive fungal diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Clarity and uniformity in defining these infections are important factors in improving the quality of clinical studies. A standard set of definitions strengthens the consistency and reproducibility of such studies.

  12. High-dose cytarabine in induction treatment improves the outcome of adult patients younger than age 46 years with acute myeloid leukemia: results of the EORTC-GIMEMA AML-12 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemze, Roelof; Suciu, Stefan; Meloni, Giovanna; Labar, Boris; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Halkes, Constantijn J M; Muus, Petra; Mistrik, Martin; Amadori, Sergio; Specchia, Giorgina; Fabbiano, Francesco; Nobile, Francesco; Sborgia, Marco; Camera, Andrea; Selleslag, Dominik L D; Lefrère, Francois; Magro, Domenico; Sica, Simona; Cantore, Nicola; Beksac, Meral; Berneman, Zwi; Thomas, Xavier; Melillo, Lorella; Guimaraes, Jose E; Leoni, Pietro; Luppi, Mario; Mitra, Maria E; Bron, Dominique; Fillet, Georges; Marijt, Erik W A; Venditti, Adriano; Hagemeijer, Anne; Mancini, Marco; Jansen, Joop; Cilloni, Daniela; Meert, Liv; Fazi, Paola; Vignetti, Marco; Trisolini, Silvia M; Mandelli, Franco; de Witte, Theo

    2014-01-20

    Cytarabine plays a pivotal role in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Most centers use 7 to 10 days of cytarabine at a daily dose of 100 to 200 mg/m(2) for remission induction. Consensus has not been reached on the benefit of higher dosages of cytarabine. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche dell' Adulto (GIMEMA) Leukemia Groups conducted a randomized trial (AML-12; Combination Chemotherapy, Stem Cell Transplant and Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia) in 1,942 newly diagnosed patients with AML, age 15 to 60 years, comparing remission induction treatment containing daunorubicin, etoposide, and either standard-dose (SD) cytarabine (100 mg/m(2) per day by continuous infusion for 10 days) or high-dose (HD) cytarabine (3,000 mg/m(2) every 12 hours by 3-hour infusion on days 1, 3, 5, and 7). Patients in complete remission (CR) received a single consolidation cycle containing daunorubicin and intermediate-dose cytarabine (500 mg/m(2) every 12 hours for 6 days). Subsequently, a stem-cell transplantation was planned. The primary end point was survival. At a median follow-up of 6 years, overall survival was 38.7% for patients randomly assigned to SD cytarabine and 42.5% for those randomly assigned to HD cytarabine (log-rank test P = .06; multivariable analysis P = .009). For patients younger than age 46 years, survival was 43.3% and 51.9%, respectively (P = .009; multivariable analysis P = .003), and for patients age 46 to 60 years, survival was 33.9% and 32.9%, respectively (P = .91). CR rates were 72.0% and 78.7%, respectively (P < .001) and were 75.6% and 82.4% for patients younger than age 46 years (P = .01) and 68.3% and 74.8% for patients age 46 years and older (P = .03). Patients of all ages with very-bad-risk cytogenetic abnormalities and/or FLT3-ITD (internal tandem duplication) mutation, or with secondary AML benefitted from HD

  13. Dummy run and conformity indices in the ongoing EORTC low-grade glioma trial 22033-26033: First evaluation of quality of radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musat, Elena; Roelofs, Erik; Bar-Deroma, Raquel; Fenton, Paul; Gulyban, Akos; Collette, Laurence; Stupp, Roger; Weber, Damien C; Bernard Davis, J; Aird, Edwin; Baumert, Brigitta G

    2010-05-01

    Early assessment of radiotherapy (RT) quality in the ongoing EORTC trial comparing primary temozolomide versus RT in low-grade gliomas. RT plans provided for dummy cases were evaluated and compared against expert plans. We analysed: (1) tumour and organs-at-risk delineation, (2) geometric and dosimetric characteristics, (3) planning parameters, compliance with dose prescription and Dmax for OAR (4) indices: RTOG conformity index (CI), coverage factor (CF), tissue protection factor (PF); conformity number (CN = PF x CF); dose homogeneity in PTV (U). Forty-one RT plans were evaluated. Only two (5%) centres were requested to repeat CTV-PTV delineations. Three (7%) plans had a significant under-dosage and dose homogeneity in one deviated > 10%. Dose distribution was good with mean values of 1.5, 1, 0.68, and 0.68 (ideal values = 1) for CI, CF, PF, and CN, respectively. CI and CN strongly correlated with PF and they correlated with PTV. Planning with more beams seems to increase PTV(Dmin), improving CF. U correlated with PTV(Dmax). Preliminary results of the dummy run procedure indicate that most centres conformed to protocol requirements. To quantify plan quality we recommend systematic calculation of U and either CI or CN, both of which measure the amount of irradiated normal brain tissue. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evidence-Based Diagnostic Algorithm for Glioma: Analysis of the Results of Pathology Panel Review and Molecular Parameters of EORTC 26951 and 26882 Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kros, Johan M; Huizer, Karin; Hernández-Laín, Aurelio; Marucci, Gianluca; Michotte, Alex; Pollo, Bianca; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Ribalta, Teresa; French, Pim; Jaminé, David; Bekka, Nawal; Lacombe, Denis; van den Bent, Martin J; Gorlia, Thierry

    2015-06-10

    With the rapid discovery of prognostic and predictive molecular parameters for glioma, the status of histopathology in the diagnostic process should be scrutinized. Our project aimed to construct a diagnostic algorithm for gliomas based on molecular and histologic parameters with independent prognostic values. The pathology slides of 636 patients with gliomas who had been included in EORTC 26951 and 26882 trials were reviewed using virtual microscopy by a panel of six neuropathologists who independently scored 18 histologic features and provided an overall diagnosis. The molecular data for IDH1, 1p/19q loss, EGFR amplification, loss of chromosome 10 and chromosome arm 10q, gain of chromosome 7, and hypermethylation of the promoter of MGMT were available for some of the cases. The slides were divided in discovery (n = 426) and validation sets (n = 210). The diagnostic algorithm resulting from analysis of the discovery set was validated in the latter. In 66% of cases, consensus of overall diagnosis was present. A diagnostic algorithm consisting of two molecular markers and one consensus histologic feature was created by conditional inference tree analysis. The order of prognostic significance was: 1p/19q loss, EGFR amplification, and astrocytic morphology, which resulted in the identification of four diagnostic nodes. Validation of the nodes in the validation set confirmed the prognostic value (P < .001). We succeeded in the creation of a timely diagnostic algorithm for anaplastic glioma based on multivariable analysis of consensus histopathology and molecular parameters. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Clinicopathologic studies underlying the WHO-EORTC classification and new guidelines for the treatment of cutaneous lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkenk, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphoma form a seperate group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Apart from the usual nodal presentation of a lymphoma, less frequently a lymphoma develops in an extranodal site. The skin is, after the gastrointestinal tract, the most frequent site of extranodal lymphoma. If the skin is the

  16. Standard chemotherapy with or without high-dose chemotherapy for aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma : Randomized phase III EORTC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluin-Nelemans, HC; Zagonel, [No Value; Anastasopoulou, A; Bron, D; Roozendaal, KJ; Noordijk, EM; Musson, H; Teodorovic, [No Value; Maes, B; Carbone, A; Carde, P

    2001-01-01

    Background: The long-term outcome for patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is poor. Consequently; the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Lymphoma Group designed a prospective randomized trial to investigate whether high-dose chemotherapy plus autologous bone

  17. Health-related quality of life with adjuvant ipilimumab versus placebo after complete resection of high-risk stage III melanoma (EORTC 18071): secondary outcomes of a multinational, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coens, Corneel; Suciu, Stefan; Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna

    2017-01-01

    . HRQoL was assessed with the EORTC QLQ-C30 quality-of-life instrument at baseline, weeks 4, 7, 10, and 24, and every 12 weeks thereafter up to 2 years, irrespective of disease progression. Results were summarised by timepoint and in a longitudinal manner in the intention-to-treat population. Two summary...... show that treatment with ipilimumab results in longer recurrence-free survival compared with that for treatment with placebo, with little impairment in HRQoL despite grade 3-4 investigator-reported adverse events....

  18. Mobile App Delivery of the EORTC QLQ-C30 Questionnaire to Assess Health-Related Quality of Life in Oncological Patients: Usability Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kerstin A; Vogel, Marco Me; Alles, Anna; Dobiasch, Sophie; Fischer, Hanna; Combs, Stephanie E

    2018-02-20

    Mobile apps are evolving in the medical field. However, ongoing discussions have questioned whether such apps are really valuable and whether patients will accept their use in day-to-day clinical life. Therefore, we initiated a usability study in our department. We present our results of the first app prototype and patient testing of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) assessment in oncological patients. We developed an app prototype for the iOS operating system within eight months in three phases: conception, initial development, and pilot testing. For the HRQoL assessment, we chose to implement only the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (QLQ-C30; German version 3). Usability testing was conducted for three months. Participation was voluntary and pseudonymized. After completion of the QLQ-C30 questionnaire using iPads provided by our department, we performed a short survey with 10 questions. This survey inquired about patients' opinions regarding general aspects, including technical advances in medicine, mobile and app assistance during cancer treatment, and the app-specific functions (eg, interface and navigation). After logging into the app, the user can choose between starting a questionnaire, reviewing answers (administrators only), and logging out. The questionnaire is displayed with the same information, questions, and answers as on the original QLQ-C30 sheet. No alterations in wording were made. Usability was tested with 81 patients; median age was 55 years. The median time for completing the HRQoL questionnaire on the iPad was 4.0 minutes. Of all participants, 84% (68/81) owned a mobile device. Similarly, 84% (68/81) of participants would prefer a mobile version of the HRQoL questionnaire instead of a paper-based version. Using the app in daily life during and after cancer treatment would be supported by 83% (67/81) of participants. In the prototype version of the app, data were

  19. The effectiveness of a psycho-educational group after early-stage breast cancer treatment: results of a randomized French study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolbeault, S; Cayrou, S; Brédart, A; Viala, A L; Desclaux, B; Saltel, P; Gauvain-Piquard, A; Hardy, P; Dickes, P

    2009-06-01

    Many women with breast cancer need psychological help to cope more effectively after treatment. Cognitive and behavioural techniques are not yet well established in France. A multi-site randomized study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a psycho-educational group intervention in this population. Two hundred and three patients, recruited after primary treatment, were randomly assigned either to a treatment group (psycho-educational intervention) or to a waiting-list control group. The 8-week programme of 2 h sessions comprised of thematic discussions, information and training in stress management techniques. Evaluation at baseline, after 8 sessions, and 1 month after programme completion, included evaluations using the STAI, POMS, MAC, EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-BR23 breast module scales. We observed a significant reduction in anxiety (STAI, POMS) among group participants, a reduction in anger, depression and fatigue (POMS), a significant improvement in vigor and interpersonal relationships (POMS), in emotional and role functioning, in health status and fatigue level (EORTC QLQ-C30). In contrast, coping strategies (MAC) were not significantly different between groups. No group-related negative effects were observed and the global satisfaction levels were very high. This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of a psycho-educational intervention, which can accelerate the reduction of those negative affects which are present at the end of treatment. It represents an excellent complement or an alternative to individual psycho-oncologic therapeutic support, widely proposed in France, and should now be tested in groups with other types of cancer and at other disease phases.

  20. Secular trend of the leading causes of death in China from 2003 to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Injury and poisoning in urban or rural areas represented the fifth leading cause of death. In 2006, endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic diseases were the sixth main cause of death, with 3.3% in urban areas. The role of genito-urinary, respiratory, and digestive system diseases in urban areas and genito-urinary system ...

  1. Psychosocial group intervention for patients with primary breast cancer: A randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, E. H.; Karlsen, R.; Christensen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effectiveness of a psycho-educational group intervention to improve psychological distress measured by POMS TMD, Quality of Life measured by European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), the core and breast cancer module, Mental Adjustment measured by MAC...... improved over time, in both the control and intervention groups. Conclusion: Psycho-education and group psychotherapy did not decrease psychological distress or increase Quality of Life, Mental Adjustment or improve marital relationship among patients with primary breast cancer. (C) 2011 Published...... were offered two weekly 6-h sessions of psycho-education and eight weekly 2-h sessions of group psychotherapy. All participants were followed up for Quality of Life, coping ability and social relations 1, 6 and 12 months after the intervention and on survival 4 years after surgical treatment. Results...

  2. Minimal clinically important differences in the EORTC QLQ-C30 and brief pain inventory in patients undergoing re-irradiation for painful bone metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Srinivas; Ding, Keyue; Chow, Edward; Meyer, Ralph M; van der Linden, Yvette M; Roos, Daniel; Hartsell, William F; Hoskin, Peter; Wu, Jackson S Y; Nabid, Abdenour; Haas, Rick; Wiggenraad, Ruud; Babington, Scott; Demas, William F; Wilson, Carolyn F; Wong, Rebecca K S; Zhu, Liting; Brundage, Michael

    2017-11-29

    The EORTC QLQ-C30 and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) are validated tools for measuring quality of life (QOL) and the impact of pain in patients with advanced cancer. Interpretation of these instrument scores can be challenging and it is difficult to know what numerical changes translate to clinically significant impact in patients' lives. To address this issue, our study sought to establish the minimal clinically important differences (MCID) for these two instruments in a prospective cohort of patients with advanced cancer and painful bone metastases. Both anchor-based and distribution-based methods were used to estimate the MCID scores from patients enrolled in a randomized phase III trial evaluating two different re-irradiation treatment schedules. For the anchor-based method, the global QOL item from the QLQ-C30 was chosen as the anchor. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated for all items and only those items with moderate or better correlation (|r| ≥ 0.30) with the anchor were used for subsequent analysis. A 10-point difference in the global QOL score was used to classify improvement and deterioration, and the MCID scores were calculated for each of these categories. These results were compared with scores obtained by the distribution-method, which estimates the MCID purely from the statistical characteristics of the sample population. A total of 375 patients were included in this study with documented pain responses and completed QOL questionnaires at 2 months. 9/14 items in the QLQ-C30 and 6/10 items in the BPI were found to have moderate or better correlation with the anchor. For deterioration, statistically significant MCID scores were found in all items of the QLQ-C30 and BPI. For improvement, statistically significant MCID scores were found in 7/9 items of the QLQ-C30 and 2/6 items of the BPI. The MCID scores for deterioration were uniformly higher than the MCIDs for improvement. Using the distribution-based method, there was good

  3. Quality assurance of radiotherapy in the ongoing EORTC 1219-DAHANCA-29 trial for HPV/p16 negative squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: Results of the benchmark case procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiaens, Melissa; Collette, Sandra; Overgaard, Jens

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The phase III EORTC 1219-DAHANCA 29 intergroup trial evaluates the influence of nimorazole in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer when treated with accelerated radiotherapy (RT) in combination with chemotherapy. This article describes the results of the RT...... Benchmark Case (BC) performed before patient inclusion. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The participating centers were asked to perform a 2-step BC, consisting of (1) a delineation and (2) a planning exercise according to the protocol guidelines. Submissions were prospectively centrally reviewed and feedback....... No unacceptable variations could be found for the planning exercise. CONCLUSIONS: These BC-results highlight the need for effective and prospective RTQA in clinical trials. Even with clearly defined protocol guidelines, delineation and not planning remain the main reason for unacceptable protocol variations...

  4. 'Mind the gap' between the development of therapeutic innovations and the clinical practice in oncology: A proposal of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) to optimise cancer clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Emmanuelle; Bogaerts, Jan; Lacombe, Denis; Liu, Lifang

    2017-11-01

    In Europe, most of the cancer clinical research dedicated to therapeutic innovations aims primarily at regulatory approval. Once an anticancer drug enters the common market, each member state determines its real-world use based on its own criteria: pricing, reimbursement and clinical indications. Such an innovation-centred clinical research landscape might neglect patient-relevant issues in real-world setting, such as comparative effectiveness of distinct treatment options or long-term safety monitoring. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) advocates reforming the current 'innovation-centred' system to a truly 'patient-centred' paradigm with systematically coordinated applied clinical research in conjunction with drug development, featuring the following strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Late xerostomia after intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy of upper aero-digestive tract cancers: study 2004-03 by the head and neck oncology and radiotherapy Group (Gortec); Xerostomie tardive apres radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite des cancers des voies aero-digestives superieures: etude 2004-03 du Groupe oncologie et radiotherapie de la tete et du cou (Gortec)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledano, I.; Lapeyre, M. [Centre Jean-Perrin, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Graff, P. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Serre, C. [Centre Val d' Aurelle, 34 - Montpellier (France); Bensadoun, R.J. [CHU La Miletrie, 86 - Poitiers (France); Bensadoun, R.J.; Ortholan, C. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Calais, G. [CHU Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Alfonsi, M. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France); Giraud, P. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Racadot, S. [Centre Leon-Berrard, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a retrospective assessment of late xerostomia according to the RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) classification of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) among patients treated by intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) and suffering from upper aero-digestive tract carcinomas of different stages. Some of these patients have bee operated, and some have been treated by chemotherapy. It appears that the IMRT results in a reduction of late xerostomia, and even in an absence of salivary toxicity. Short communication

  6. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    identity. It is a remarkable fact that simple. Lie groups can be completely classified; they are the special linear groups, orthogonal groups and symplectic groups. Apart from these, the list is a finite one (the so-called exceptional groups). This is the Cartan–Killing classification, which nowadays, is described in terms of the.

  7. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  8. Predisposing factors in childhood masturbation in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, F

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this prospective, referral-based study was to assess demographical and developmental features associated with childhood masturbation in Turkey. A total of 61 children with childhood masturbation who were referred for the first time to the Department of Child Psychiatry were examined from demographical, psychosocial and medical aspects and compared with two control groups consisting of 61 age and gender matched children who were brought to the paediatric outpatient clinics and 43 children and adolescents who were the biological siblings of the study group. In children with masturbation, sleep difficulties were more frequent (P masturbation was often associated with a genito-urinary disorder or a stressful life event like weaning, the birth of a sibling, or separation from the parents. This is the first controlled study investigating the clinical and the developmental features of childhood masturbation. These findings may help identify children who could be at risk for this condition.

  9. Group Flow and Group Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  10. Development of a disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaire intended to be used in conjunction with the general European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ) in renal cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisland, Elisabeth; Aarstad, Hans J; Aarstad, Anne K H; Bakke, August; Bostad, Leif; Beisland, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Studying health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following cancer treatment has become part of a growing number of standardized treatment protocols. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) has developed HRQoL questionnaires aimed at cancer patients. A disease-specific part is not available for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients, and the present aim was to develop an EORTC-compatible RCC-specific HRQoL questionnaire. In total 413 RCC patients were treated with radical or partial nephrectomies in Western Norway during the period from 1997 to 2010. Three hundred and nine patients with histologically proven cancer were still alive at the inclusion time point and 185 RCC patients (71% response rate) returned the questionnaires. We determined HRQoL by the EORTC-QLQ C30 questionnaire. We also asked 13 candidates questions aimed at constituting a disease-specific part. Furthermore, we tested parts of personality by the Eysenck Personality Inventory and coping by the COPE questionnaire. Given tumor treatment, TNM stage, alcohol consumption level and smoking levels were also determined from the hospital records. A factor analysis showed that five factors were formed: one general symptomatic, one general functional, one with disease-specific questions (flank pain, blood in the urine, flank edema, urinary tract infection), one about sexuality and one about weight loss or gain. Ten RCC-specific HRQoL questions were derived from a factor analysis, including four questions related particularly to pain, mobility and social functioning, also representing a short version of the EORTC C30. The psychometric properties and the relation to other psychological and clinical variables were further determined to be satisfactory. The suggested disease-specific EORTC-QLQ-style RCC10 version adds important information about the HRQoL of RCC patients, providing additional apparent value to the general questionnaire and personality variables, as well as being

  11. The relationship between numbness, tingling, and shooting/burning pain in patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) as measured by the EORTC QLQ-CIPN20 instrument, N06CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sherry L; Barton, Debra L; Qin, Rui; Wos, Edward J; Sloan, Jeff A; Liu, Heshan; Aaronson, Neil K; Satele, Daniel V; Mattar, Bassam I; Green, Nathan B; Loprinzi, Charles L

    2012-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is characterized by numbness, tingling, and shooting/burning pain. This analysis was performed to describe the relationship between numbness, tingling, and shooting/burning pain in patients with CIPN, as reported using the EORTC QLQ-CIPN20 (CIPN20). Baseline CIPN20 data were provided for all patients on a prospective trial designed to treat patients with bothersome CIPN. Baseline frequencies for the items on the CIPN20 are primarily described by descriptive statistics and histograms, with correlational analyses between individual items. A majority of the 199 patients accrued to this study reported "quite a bit" to "very much" numbness (57%) or tingling (63%) in the hands compared to "a little" or "not at all" (numbness (43%), tingling (38%)). Fewer patients reported "quite a bit" to "very much" shooting/burning pain in the hands (18%). Numbness and tingling in the hands were highly correlated (r = 0.69), while neither were highly correlated with shooting/burning pain. Similar results were observed in the feet. More severe ratings for tingling and shooting/burning pain were ascribed to the lower extremities, as opposed to the upper extremities. In patients with CIPN, severe sensory neuropathy symptoms (numbness, tingling) commonly exist without severe neuropathic pain symptoms (shooting/burning pain), while the reverse is not common. Symptoms in the feet should be evaluated distinctly from those in the hands as the experience of symptoms is not identical, for individual patients, in upper versus lower extremities.

  12. Evaluation of Patient Satisfaction Using the EORTC IN-PATSAT32 Questionnaire and Surgical Outcome in Single-Port Surgery for Benign Adnexal Disease: Observational Comparison with Traditional Laparoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Buda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic surgery has been demonstrated as a valid approach in almost all gynaecologic procedures including malignant diseases. Benefits of the minimally invasive approach over traditional open surgery have been well demonstrated in terms of minimal perioperative morbidity and reduced postoperative pain and hospital stay duration, with consequent quick postoperative recovery (Medeiros et al. (2009. Single-port surgery resurfaced in gynaecology surgery in recent years and renewed interest among other surgeons and within the industry to develop this field (Podolsky et al. (2009. Patient satisfaction is emerging as an increasingly important measure of quality which represents a complex entity that is dependent on patient demographics, comorbidities, disease, and, to a large extent, patient expectations (Tomlinson and Ko (2006. It can be broadly thought to refer to all relevant experiences and processes associated with health care delivery (Jackson et al. (2001. In this study we aim to compare single-port surgery (SPS with conventional laparoscopy in terms of patient satisfaction using the EORTC IN-PATSAT32 questionnaire. We also evaluate the main surgical outcomes of both minimally invasive approaches.

  13. Patient satisfaction with inpatient care provided by the Sydney Gynecological Oncology Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Arora

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Vivek Arora, Shannon Philp, Kathryn Nattress, Selvan Pather, Christopher Dalrymple, Kenneth Atkinson, Sofia Smirnova, Stephen Cotterell, Jonathan CarterSydney Gynecological Oncology Group, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, AustraliaPurpose: Patient satisfaction with the provision of hospital oncology services can have a significant impact on their overall treatment experience.Aims: To assess patient satisfaction with the inpatient hospital services in the gynecological oncology setting using the IN-PATSAT32 questionnaire developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC.Methods: A modified version of the IN-PATSAT32 questionnaire with additional 16 items was administered to 52 adult surgical inpatients admitted with the Sydney Gynecological Oncology Group. All participants were provided with an information leaflet regarding the survey and written consent obtained.Results: A high response rate (100% from patients with varied social, ethnic, and educational backgrounds confirmed the acceptability of the survey. Standard of medical care provided, frequency of doctors’ visits, exchange of information with doctors, friendliness of the staff, and state of the room ranked highly (>95% on the patient satisfaction scales. Problems were identified with ease of access to and within the hospital, quality of food, and exchange of information with other hospital staff.Conclusions: Overall the satisfaction with inpatient care was rated very highly in most areas. Deficiencies in certain elements of provision of medical care to the patients were identified and steps have been taken to improve upon these shortcomings.Keywords: patient satisfaction, EORTC, IN-PATSAT32, gynecological oncology, survey

  14. Quality assurance in conservative treatment of early breast cancer. Report on a consensus meeting of the EORTC Radiotherapy and Breast Cancer Cooperative Groups and the EUSOMA (European Society of Mastology)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelink, H.; Garavaglia, G.; Johansson, K. A.; Mijnheer, B. J.; van den Bogaert, W.; van Tienhoven, G.; Yarnold, J.

    1991-01-01

    A consensus on a quality assurance programme of the treatment of early breast cancer was reached in a multidisciplinary meeting of surgeons, pathologists, radiotherapists, physicists and radiographers. Guidelines for treatment preparation and execution have been set up, including careful location

  15. An update on the management of sporadic desmoid-type fibromatosis: a European Consensus Initiative between Sarcoma PAtients EuroNet (SPAEN) and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)/Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (STBSG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasper, B.; Baumgarten, C.; Garcia, J.; Bonvalot, S.; Haller, F.; Hohenberger, P.; Penel, N.; Messiou, C.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Gronchi, A.

    2017-01-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis is a rare and locally aggressive monoclonal, fibroblastic proliferation characterized by a variable and often unpredictable clinical course. Currently, there is no established or evidence-based treatment approach available for this disease. Therefore, in 2015 the European

  16. An update on the management of sporadic desmoid-type fibromatosis: A European Consensus Initiative between Sarcoma PAtients EuroNet (SPAEN) and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)/Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (STBSG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Kasper (B.); Baumgarten, C. (C.); Garcia, J. (J.); S. Bonvalot (S.); R.L.M. Haas (Rick L. M.); Haller, F. (F.); P. Hohenberger (Peter); N. Penel (Nicolas); Messiou, C. (C.); W.T.A. van der Graaf (Winette); Gronchi, A. (Alessandro); S. Bauer (Sebastian); J-Y. Blay (Jean Yves); F. van Coevorden (Frits); Dileo, P. (P.); H.R. Dürr; P.P. di Fiore; Grünwald, V. (V.); Jones, R. (R.); I.R. Judson (Ian); C. Kettelhack; Kopeckova, K. (K.); Lazar, A. (A.); L.H. Lindner (Lars); J. Martin-Broto (Javier); P. Rutkowski (Piotr); Stacchiotti, S. (S.); M. Stoeckle; Valverde, C. (C.); Verhoef, K. (K.); Wardelmann, E. (E.); Wartenberg, M. (M.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractDesmoid-type fibromatosis is a rare and locally aggressive monoclonal, fibroblastic proliferation characterized by a variable and often unpredictable clinical course. Currently, there is no established or evidence-based treatment approach available for this disease. Therefore, in 2015

  17. European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Pathobiology Group standard operating procedure for the preparation of human tumour tissue extracts suited for the quantitative analysis of tissue-associated biomarkers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, M.; Mengele, K.; Schueren, E. van der; Sweep, C.G.J.; Foekens, J.A.; Brunner, N.; Laabs, J.; Malik, A.; Harbeck, N.

    2007-01-01

    With the new concept of 'individualized treatment and targeted therapies', tumour tissue-associated biomarkers have been given a new role in selection of cancer patients for treatment and in cancer patient management. Tumour biomarkers can give support to cancer patient stratification and risk

  18. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  19. Net clinical benefit analysis of radiation therapy oncology group 0525: a phase III trial comparing conventional adjuvant temozolomide with dose-intensive temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Terri S; Wefel, Jeffrey S; Wang, Meihua; Gilbert, Mark R; Won, Minhee; Bottomley, Andrew; Mendoza, Tito R; Coens, Corneel; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Brachman, David G; Choucair, Ali K; Mehta, Minesh

    2013-11-10

    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 0525 tested whether dose-intensifying temozolomide versus standard chemoradiotherapy improves overall survival (OS) or progression-free survival (PFS) in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Tests of neurocognitive function (NCF) and symptoms (using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Brain Tumor module; MDASI-BT) and of quality of life (European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire [EORTC QLQ] -C30/BN20) examined the net clinical benefit (NCB) of therapy. NCF tests (Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised, Trail Making Test, and Controlled Oral Word Association), MDASI-BT, and EORTC QLQ-C30/BN20 were completed in a subset of patients. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression modeling determined the prognostic value of baseline and early change from baseline to cycle 1 for OS and PFS. Two-sample proportional test statistic was used to evaluate differences between treatments (dose-dense v standard-dose) on NCB measures from baseline to cycle 4 in stable patients. Overall, 182 patients participated in the study. Baseline NCF tests and the physical functioning quality of life scale were associated with OS and PFS. Baseline to cycle 1 in all NCB components were associated with OS and PFS. There was greater deterioration in the dose-dense arm from baseline to cycle 4 in the Global Health and Motor Function subscales (EORTC QLQ-C30/BN20) as well as in overall symptom burden, overall symptom interference, and activity-related symptom interference subscales (MDASI-BT). There were no between-arm differences in NCF. Longitudinal collection of NCB measures is feasible in cooperative group studies and provides an added dimension to standard outcome measures. Greater adverse symptom burden and functional interference, as well as decreased global health and motor function were observed in patients randomly assigned to the dose-dense arm. Baseline and early change in NCB measures were associated with

  20. Microflora composition of urogenital tracts of women with nonspecific vulvo-vaginitis and vaginosis in Dnipropetrovsk region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ponedilok

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of causative agents of nonspecific infections of the women urogenital tracts is studied. It is established that the typical etiological agents of the vaginosis are yeast-like fungi Candida albicans (35.7 % and Escherichia coli (30.2 %, and the clinical isolates of E. coli (47.3 % and Proteus mirabilis (15.8 % are usual for vulvovaginitis. The frequency of detection of the causative agents of inflammatory genito-urinary diseases in women of different age groups varies: strains of E. coli are often found in patients of 1–12 years (47.3 % and in women of 43–66 years old (36.0 %, but C. albicans – in patients of 18–42 years (39.0 %. High levels of the resistance to penicilline, tetracycline and fluoroquinolone antibiotics in selected clinical isolates of opportunistic microorganisms are determined.

  1. Group devaluation and group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, C.W.; Rodriguez Mosquera, P.M.; Vliek, M.L.W.; Hirt, E.

    2010-01-01

    In three studies, we showed that increased in-group identification after (perceived or actual) group devaluation is an assertion of a (preexisting) positive social identity that counters the negative social identity implied in societal devaluation. Two studies with real-world groups used order

  2. Adjuvant therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b versus observation alone in resected stage III melanoma: final results of EORTC 18991, a randomised phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermont, Alexander M M; Suciu, Stefan; Santinami, Mario; Testori, Alessandro; Kruit, Wim H J; Marsden, Jeremy; Punt, Cornelis J A; Salès, François; Gore, Martin; Mackie, Rona; Kusic, Zvonko; Dummer, Reinhard; Hauschild, Axel; Musat, Elena; Spatz, Alain; Keilholz, Ulrich

    2008-07-12

    Any benefit of adjuvant interferon alfa-2b for melanoma could depend on dose and duration of treatment. Our aim was to determine whether pegylated interferon alfa-2b can facilitate prolonged exposure while maintaining tolerability. 1256 patients with resected stage III melanoma were randomly assigned to observation (n=629) or pegylated interferon alfa-2b (n=627) 6 mug/kg per week for 8 weeks (induction) then 3 mug/kg per week (maintenance) for an intended duration of 5 years. Randomisation was stratified for microscopic (N1) versus macroscopic (N2) nodal involvement, number of positive nodes, ulceration and tumour thickness, sex, and centre. Randomisation was done with a minimisation technique. The primary endpoint was recurrence-free survival. Analyses were done by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00006249. All randomised patients were included in the primary efficacy analysis. 608 patients in the interferon group and 613 patients in the observation group were included in safety analyses. The median length of treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2b was 12 (IQR 3.8-33.4) months. At 3.8 (3.2-4.2) years median follow-up, 328 recurrence events had occurred in the interferon group compared with 368 in the observation group (hazard ratio 0.82, 95% CI 0.71-0.96; p=0.01); the 4-year rate of recurrence-free survival was 45.6% (SE 2.2) in the interferon group and 38.9% (2.2) in the observation group. There was no difference in overall survival between the groups. Grade 3 adverse events occurred in 246 (40%) patients in the interferon group and 60 (10%) in the observation group; grade 4 adverse events occurred in 32 (5%) patients in the interferon group and 14 (2%) in the observation group. In the interferon group, the most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were fatigue (97 patients, 16%), hepatotoxicity (66, 11%), and depression (39, 6%). Treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2b was discontinued because of toxicity in

  3. Group morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    In its original form, mathematical morphology is a theory of binary image transformations which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This paper surveys and extends constructions of morphological operators which are invariant under a more general group TT, such as the motion

  4. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  5. Algebraic Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    -theorists, and to stimulate contacts between participants. Each of the first four days was dedicated to one area of research that has recently seen decisive progress: \\begin{itemize} \\item structure and classification of wonderful varieties, \\item finite reductive groups and character sheaves, \\item quantum cohomology......The workshop continued a series of Oberwolfach meetings on algebraic groups, started in 1971 by Tonny Springer and Jacques Tits who both attended the present conference. This time, the organizers were Michel Brion, Jens Carsten Jantzen, and Raphaël Rouquier. During the last years, the subject...... of algebraic groups (in a broad sense) has seen important developments in several directions, also related to representation theory and algebraic geometry. The workshop aimed at presenting some of these developments in order to make them accessible to a "general audience" of algebraic group...

  6. Group theory

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, W R

    2010-01-01

    Here is a clear, well-organized coverage of the most standard theorems, including isomorphism theorems, transformations and subgroups, direct sums, abelian groups, and more. This undergraduate-level text features more than 500 exercises.

  7. Group Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristy J; Brickman, Peggy; Brame, Cynthia J

    2018-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics faculty are increasingly incorporating both formal and informal group work in their courses. Implementing group work can be improved by an understanding of the extensive body of educational research studies on this topic. This essay describes an online, evidence-based teaching guide published by CBE-Life Sciences Education ( LSE ). The guide provides a tour of research studies and resources related to group work (including many articles from LSE ). Instructors who are new to group work, as well as instructors who have experienced difficulties in implementing group work, may value the condensed summaries of key research findings. These summaries are organized by teaching challenges, and actionable advice is provided in a checklist for instructors. Education researchers may value the inclusion of empirical studies, key reviews, and meta-analyses of group-work studies. In addition to describing key features of the guide, this essay also identifies areas in which further empirical studies are warranted. © 2018 K. J. Wilson et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2018 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  9. [Invasive fungal disease in hemato-oncological and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients from Hospital Clinico Universidad Católica, Santiago-Chile using revised EORTC/MSG diagnostic criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabagliati B, Ricardo; Fuentes L, Gino; Guzmán D, Ana María; Orellana U, Eric; Oporto C, Jorge; Aedo C, Igor; Garrido S, Marcelo; Nervi N, Bruno

    2009-06-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) is a severe complication occurring mostly in haematooncological (H-O) patients and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) receptors. Our aim was to describe the IFD occurring in our H-O and HSCT patients according to the EORTC/MSG revised criteria. IFD surveillance was performed in adult patients of the Hospital Clínico Universidad Catolica, Santiago, Chile, from January 2004 to January 2008. A total of 41 IFD episodes were identified in 39 patients; mean age was 46.6 +/- 9.9 years, and 87.8% and 12.2% occurred in H-O and HCTS patients respectively. 15/41(36.6%) episodes were proven, 36.6% probable and 11/41 (26.8%) possible. In 26 (63.4%) episodes aspergillosis was diagnosed (20 pulmonary, 3 sinus, 1 laryngeal and 1 case with pulmonary and cerebral involvement). In 7 patients (17.1%) candidiasis was diagnosed, 5 with a proven bloodstream infection and 2 with possible hepatosplenic candidiasis; mucormyeosis was diagnosed in 4 (9.8%) Fusarium infection was demonstrated in 2 patients (4.9%), and Mucor and Aspergillus pulmonary coinfection and Alternaria sp rhino-sinusitis in one patient each. The frequency of IFD among febrile neutropenic patients was 26.2% and 6.4% in H-O and HSCT receptors respectively. The overall mortality was 36%. Aspergillosis is the most common IFD infection among H-O patients and HSCT receptors in our center. Candidiasis followed although only in H-O patients most probably because of routine use of antifungal prophylaxis in HSCT recipients. Continuous surveillance is required to develop local guidelines and to evaluate antifungal strategies in different clinical scenarios.

  10. Pathological complete response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy is an independent predictive factor irrespective of simplified breast cancer intrinsic subtypes: a landmark and two-step approach analyses from the EORTC 10994/BIG 1-00 phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoi, H; Litière, S; Piccart, M; MacGrogan, G; Fumoleau, P; Brain, E; Petit, T; Rouanet, P; Jassem, J; Moldovan, C; Bodmer, A; Zaman, K; Cufer, T; Campone, M; Luporsi, E; Malmström, P; Werutsky, G; Bogaerts, J; Bergh, J; Cameron, D A

    2014-06-01

    Pathological complete response (pCR) following chemotherapy is strongly associated with both breast cancer subtype and long-term survival. Within a phase III neoadjuvant chemotherapy trial, we sought to determine whether the prognostic implications of pCR, TP53 status and treatment arm (taxane versus non-taxane) differed between intrinsic subtypes. Patients were randomized to receive either six cycles of anthracycline-based chemotherapy or three cycles of docetaxel then three cycles of eprirubicin/docetaxel (T-ET). pCR was defined as no evidence of residual invasive cancer (or very few scattered tumour cells) in primary tumour and lymph nodes. We used a simplified intrinsic subtypes classification, as suggested by the 2011 St Gallen consensus. Interactions between pCR, TP53 status, treatment arm and intrinsic subtype on event-free survival (EFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were studied using a landmark and a two-step approach multivariate analyses. Sufficient data for pCR analyses were available in 1212 (65%) of 1856 patients randomized. pCR occurred in 222 of 1212 (18%) patients: 37 of 496 (7.5%) luminal A, 22 of 147 (15%) luminal B/HER2 negative, 51 of 230 (22%) luminal B/HER2 positive, 43 of 118 (36%) HER2 positive/non-luminal, 69 of 221(31%) triple negative (TN). The prognostic effect of pCR on EFS did not differ between subtypes and was an independent predictor for better EFS [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.40, P analysis. EORTC 10994/BIG 1-00 Trial registration number NCT00017095. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  12. Isometry groups among topological groups

    OpenAIRE

    Niemiec, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that a topological group G is topologically isomorphic to the isometry group of a (complete) metric space iff G coincides with its G-delta-closure in the Rajkov completion of G (resp. if G is Rajkov-complete). It is also shown that for every Polish (resp. compact Polish; locally compact Polish) group G there is a complete (resp. proper) metric d on X inducing the topology of X such that G is isomorphic to Iso(X,d) where X = l_2 (resp. X = Q; X = Q\\{point} where Q is the Hilbert cu...

  13. Tectaria group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holttum, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Polypodiaceae subfam. Dryopteridoideae section A, auct.: C. Chr. in Verdoorn, Man. Pteridol. (1938) 543, p.p. Aspidiaceae tribe Aspidieae auct.: Ching, Sunyatsenia 5 (1940) 250, excl. Lomariopsis and related genera. — Aspidiaceae, group of Ctenitis Copel., Gen. Fil. (1947) 153. Aspidiaceae auct.:

  14. Love machine

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2011-01-01

    This poster provides advice on the use of condoms as a method of protection from unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). It also provides contact details for the�Genito Urinary Medicine (GUM) clinics in Northern Ireland.

  15. 49 CFR 39.3 - What do the terms in this rule mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., respiratory including speech organs, cardiovascular, reproductive, digestive, genito-urinary, hemic and... and conditions as orthopedic, visual, speech, and hearing impairments; cerebral palsy, epilepsy..., voyeurism, gender identity disorders not resulting from physical impairments, or other sexual behavior...

  16. Drug: D04454 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nanthate - estradiol valerate mixt Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification [BR:br08303] G GENITO URINARY SYSTEM AND SEX... HORMONES G03 SEX HORMONES AND MODULATORS OF THE GENITAL SYSTEM G03E ANDROGENS AND FEMALE SEX

  17. Drug: D04453 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l valerate mixt Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification [BR:br08303] G GENITO URINARY SYSTEM AND SEX HORMONES G03 SEX... HORMONES AND MODULATORS OF THE GENITAL SYSTEM G03E ANDROGENS AND FEMALE SEX

  18. Drug: D04451 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 303] G GENITO URINARY SYSTEM AND SEX HORMONES G03 SEX HORMONES AND MODULATORS OF ...THE GENITAL SYSTEM G03E ANDROGENS AND FEMALE SEX HORMONES IN COMBINATION G03EA Androgens and estrogens G03EA

  19. THE POPLITEAL PTERYGIUM SYNDROME - AN ANALYSIS OF 2 FAMILIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPAUWEN, PHM; COBBEN, JM; GARDENIERS, JWM

    1994-01-01

    The popliteal pterygium syndrome is characterized by multiple anomalies of the face, genito-urinary system and extremities with autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expression. Also sporadic cases probably based upon spontaneous mutation can be recognized. The plastic, orthopaedic, and

  20. Drug: D09535 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al (ATC) classification [BR:br08303] G GENITO URINARY SYSTEM AND SEX HORMONES G04 UROLOGICALS G04B UROLOGICALS G04BD Urinary...br08302] Genitourinary Agents Antispasmodics, Urinary Mirabegron D09535 Mirabegro

  1. Drug: D03347 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BR:br08303] G GENITO URINARY SYSTEM AND SEX HORMONES G01 GYNECOLOGICAL ANTIINFECTIVES AND ANTISEPTICS G01A A...NTIINFECTIVES AND ANTISEPTICS, EXCL. COMBINATIONS WITH CORTICOSTEROIDS G01AA Anti

  2. Drug: D10461 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tion [BR:br08303] G GENITO URINARY SYSTEM AND SEX HORMONES G03 SEX HORMONES AND MODULATORS OF THE GENITAL SYSTEM... G03A HORMONAL CONTRACEPTIVES FOR SYSTEMIC USE G03AB Progestogens and estroge

  3. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  4. Group learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel, Ricardo; Noguira, Eloy Eros da Silva; Elkjær, Bente

    The article presents a study that aims at the apprehension of the group learning in a top management team composed by teachers in a Brazilian Waldorf school whose management is collective. After deciding to extend the school, they had problems recruiting teachers who were already trained based...... on the Steiner´s ideas, which created practical problems for conducting management activities. The research seeks to understand how that group of teachers collectively manage the school, facing the lack of resources, a significant heterogeneity in the relationships, and the conflicts and contradictions...... with which they coexist. To achieve this, the research adopted phenomenology as a method and ethnography as strategy, using participant observation, in-depth interviews, and interviews-to-the-double. The results show that the collective management practice is a crossroad of other practices...

  5. Quality of Life After Palliative Radiation Therapy for Patients With Painful Bone Metastases: Results of an International Study Validating the EORTC QLQ-BM22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Liang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: edward.chow@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bedard, Gillian; Zhang, Liying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Vassiliou, Vassilios [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus); Alm El-Din, Mohamed A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta Faculty of Medicine, Tanta (Egypt); Jesus-Garcia, Reynaldo [Department of Orthopedic Oncology, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kumar, Aswin [Division of Gynaecology and Genitourinary Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Regional Cancer Center, Trivandrum (India); Forges, Fabien [Inserm CIE3, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint-Etienne (France); Unit of Clinical Research, Innovation, and Pharmacology, Saint Etienne University Hospital, Saint-Etienne (France); Tseng, Ling-Ming [Department of Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hou, Ming-Feng [Department of Gastroenterologic Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chie, Wei-Chu [Department of Public Health and Institute of Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Bottomley, Andrew [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, EORTC Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is an effective method of palliating painful bone metastases and can improve function and reduce analgesic requirements. In advanced cancer patients, quality of life (QOL) is the primary outcome of interest over traditional endpoints such as survival. The purpose of our study was to compare bone metastasis-specific QOL scores among patients who responded differently to palliative RT. Methods and Materials: Patients receiving RT for bone metastases across 6 countries were prospectively enrolled from March 2010-January 2011 in a trial validating the QLQ-BM22 and completed the QLQ-BM22 and the core measure (QLQ-C30) at baseline and after 1 month. Pain scores and analgesic intake were recorded, and response to RT was determined according to the latest published guidelines. The Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric and Wilcoxon rank sum tests compared changes in QOL among response groups. A Bonferroni-adjusted P<.003 indicated statistical significance. Results: Of 79 patients who received palliative RT, 59 were assessable. Partial response, pain progression, and indeterminate response were observed in 22, 8, and 29 patients, respectively; there were no patients with a complete response. Patients across all groups had similar baseline QOL scores apart from physical functioning (patients who progressed had better initial functioning). One month after RT, patients who responded had significant improvements in 3 of 4 QLQ-BM22 domains (painful site, P<.0001; painful characteristic, P<.0001; and functional interference, P<.0001) and 3 QLQ-C30 domains (physical functioning, P=.0006; role functioning, P=.0026; and pain, P<.0001). Patients with progression in pain had significantly worse functional interference (P=.0007) and pain (P=.0019). Conclusions: Patients who report pain relief after palliative RT also have better QOL with respect to bone metastasis-specific issues. The QLQ-BM22 and QLQ-C30 are able to discriminate among patients with varying

  6. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  7. Group play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea

    2008-01-01

    Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects of the v......Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects...... of the various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...... of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in multiplayer...

  8. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  9. Validation of gene signatures that predict the response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a substudy of the EORTC 10994/BIG 00-01 clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoi, Hervé; Potti, Anil; Delorenzi, Mauro; Mauriac, Louis; Campone, Mario; Tubiana-Hulin, Michèle; Petit, Thierry; Rouanet, Philippe; Jassem, Jacek; Blot, Emmanuel; Becette, Véronique; Farmer, Pierre; André, Sylvie; Acharya, Chaitanya R; Mukherjee, Sayan; Cameron, David; Bergh, Jonas; Nevins, Joseph R; Iggo, Richard D

    2007-12-01

    We have previously described gene-expression signatures that predict growth inhibitory and cytotoxic effects of common chemotherapeutic drugs in vitro. The aim of this study was to confirm the validity of these gene-expression signatures in a large series of patients with oestrogen-receptor-negative breast tumours who were treated in a phase III neoadjuvant clinical trial. This trial compares a non-taxane regimen (fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide [FEC] for six cycles) with a taxane regimen (docetaxel for three cycles followed by epirubicin plus docetaxel [TET] for three cycles) in women with oestrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer. The primary endpoint of the study is the difference in progression-free survival based on TP53 status and will be reported later. Predicting response with gene signatures was a planned secondary endpoint of the trial and is reported here. Pathological complete response, defined as complete disappearance of the tumour with no more than a few scattered tumour cells detected by the pathologist in the resection specimen, was used to assess chemosensitivity. RNA was prepared from sections of frozen biopsies taken at diagnosis and hybridised to Affymetrix X3P microarrays. In-vitro single-agent drug sensitivity signatures were combined to obtain FEC and TET regimen-specific signatures. This study is registered on the clinical trials site of the US National Cancer Institute website http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00017095. Of 212 patients with oestrogen-receptor-negative tumours assessed, 87 patients were excluded. 125 oestrogen-receptor-negative tumours (55 that showed pathological complete responses) were tested: 66 in the FEC group (28 that showed pathological complete responses) and 59 in the TET group (27 that showed pathological complete responses). The regimen-specific signatures significantly predicted pathological complete response in patients treated with the appropriate regimen (p<0.0001). The FEC predictor

  10. Comparing the RTOG/EORTC and LENT-SOMA scoring systems for the evaluation of late skin toxicity after (125)I seed brachytherapy for parotid gland cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ming-Hui; Feng, Zhien; Li, Hua; Qin, Li-Zheng; Li, Jian-Hua; Huang, Xin; Xing, Ru-Dong; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Han, Zheng-Xue

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force-Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scoring systems were compared for grading late skin effects after iodine-125 seed brachytherapy in parotid gland cancer patients. A total of 109 patients diagnosed with parotid gland carcinoma were treated postoperatively with iodine-125 seed brachytherapy at a dose of 100-120 Gy. After 6-24 months of followup, telangiectasia, skin pigmentation, atrophy, fibrosis, and ulceration were scored according to both RTOG and LENT-SOMA scale criteria. The strength of correlation between the scores and the interobserver variability were calculated. Of 109 patients, 22.9% had telangiectasia; 78.9%, pigmentation; 28.4%, fibrosis; 4.6%, edema; 0.9%, ulceration; 37.6%, retraction and/or atrophy; 22.9%, sensation change; and 11%, scaliness and/or roughness. Compared with RTOG, LENT-SOMA criteria resulted in the upgrading of pigmentation in 17% of cases, the downgrading of all instances of telangiectasia and the downgrading of one instance of Grade 4 ulceration to Grade 3. Between the two scales, fibrosis and atrophy correlated well (Spearman ρ, 0.992, 0.986). An additional 229 side effects were observed using LENT-SOMA criteria. The LENT-SOMA scale was more accurate than the RTOG scale for the evaluation of late skin and subcutaneous toxicity. The downgrading of telangiectasia and upgrading of pigmentation with the LENT-SOMA scale reflected the patients' conditions better than the scores obtained with the RTOG scale. The assessment of fibrosis and atrophy correlated well between the two scales. The use of the sum of the individual scores of the LENT-SOMA is therefore advocated. The addition of decreased sweating and the removal of the alopecia (scalp) metric should be considered to standardize the reporting of late radiation morbidity. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lego Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2010-01-01

    of the production in high cost countries. Confident with the prospects of the new partnership, the company signed a long-term contract with Flextronics. This decision eventually proved itself to have been too hasty, however. Merely three years after the contracts were signed, LEGO management announced that it would......The last years’ rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence...... phase out the entire sourcing collaboration with Flextronics. This sudden change in its sourcing strategy posed LEGO management with a number of caveats. Despite the bright forecasts, the collaboration did not fulfill the initial expectations, and the company needed to understand why this had happened...

  12. Validación para la utilización en Colombia de la escala EORTC QLQ-STO22 para la evaluación de la calidad de vida de pacientes con cáncer de estómago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ibáñez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To validate the EORTC QLQ-STO22 for measuring quality of life in patients with gastric cancer in Colombia. Method: Factor analysis (exploratory and confirmatory was used to evaluate content validity. Concurrent validity was evaluated measuring the correlation between QLQ-STO22 and FACIT-Ga. Cronbach’s alpha was used to evaluate internal consistency. Test-retest reliability was measured using the Lin concordance-correlation coefficient. Sensitivity to change was evaluated comparing the medians pre-and post-treatment. Results: The QLQ-STO22 was responded by 442 patients with diagnostic of gastric cancer. Exploratory factor analysis revealed five domains and confirmatory factor analysis indicated an acceptable fit to the data. A high internal consistency with Cronbach’s alpha of .897was found. Stronger correlations were found between QLQ-STO22 (general health status and FACIT-Ga (specific subscale of gastric symptoms and related problems. For test-retest reliability Lin coefficients between .656 and .851 were found. Differences between pre-and post-therapy scores were significant for some of the domains of the scale (dysphagia, restrictions on feeding. Conclusion: The EORTC QLQ-STO22 is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring quality of life in Colombian patients. Further studies aimed at evaluating sensitivity to change are recommended.

  13. The relationship between observer-based toxicity scoring and patient assessed symptom severity after treatment for head and neck cancer. A correlative cross sectional study of the DAHANCA toxicity scoring system      and the EORTC quality of life questionnaires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Grau, Cai

    2006-01-01

          toxicity scoring systems it has not been formally validated. Conversely,       the EORTC quality of life questionnaire (QLQ) has been validated as a tool       for collecting information about the consequences of disease and treatment       on the well being of cancer patients. The purpose of this study...... was to       examine the relationship between the two methods of side effect recording.       PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred and sixteen recurrence free patients       with laryngeal (n=44), pharyngeal (n=34) and oral cavity (n=38) cancer       attending follow-up after radiotherapy (n=83) or surgery (n=33...... toxicity scoring system       and the EORTC QLQ correlated with several clinical endpoints. The       conceptually similar endpoints of the two methods correlated       significantly. The objective endpoints of the DAHANCA scoring system were       only correlated with quality of life endpoints to a very...

  14. Portuguese Version of the EORTC QLQ-OES18 and QLQ-OG25 for Health-Related Quality of Life Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relvas-Silva, Miguel; Silva, Rui Almeida; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário

    2017-01-31

    Health-related quality of life assessment is increasingly important as it can help both clinical research and care for patients, particularly among oncological patients. Quality of Life Questionnaire - OES18 (esophageal module) and Quality of Life Questionnaire - OG25 (esophagogastric module) are the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer modules for the evaluation of quality of life in patients with esophageal and esophagogastric cancers, respectively. The aim of our study was to translate, to culturally adapt and to perform a pilot testing to create the Portuguese version of both questionnaires. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines were followed for translation, cultural adaptation and pilot testing of Quality of Life Questionnaire - OES18 (esophageal module) and Quality of Life Questionnaire - OG25 (esophagogastric module). The Quality of Life Questionnaire - OG25 (esophagogastric module) went through a process of forward (English → Portuguese) and backward (Portuguese → English) translation, by independent native speaker translators. After review, a preliminary version was created to be pilot tested among Portuguese patients. As a Brazilian version was already available for Quality of Life Questionnaire - OES18 (esophageal module), the questionnaire was simply culturally adapted and pilot tested. Both cancer and non-cancer patients were included. Overall, 30 patients completed the Portuguese version of each questionnaire. Afterwards, a structured interview was conducted to find and report any problematic items. Troublesome items and wording were changed according to the pilot testing results. The final versions were sent to the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Group and approved. The Portuguese versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire - OES18 (esophageal module) and OG25

  15. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Document Server

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  16. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  17. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  18. Which Questionnaire Should Be Used to Measure Quality-of-Life Utilities in Patients with Acute Leukemia? An Evaluation of the Validity and Interpretability of the EQ-5D-5L and Preference-Based Questionnaires Derived from the EORTC QLQ-C30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen-Leunis, Annemieke; Redekop, W Ken; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity and interpretability of different preference-based questionnaires (generic 5-level EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire [EQ-5D-5L], cancer-specific Quality of Life Questionnaire Preference-Based Measure, and European Organization of Randomized Controlled Trials 8 Dimension [EORTC-8D]) in patients with acute leukemia. Patients who participated in Hemato-Oncologie voor Volwassenen Nederland (HOVON - the Haemato Oncology Foundation for Adults in the Netherlands) clinical trials between 1999 and 2011 at a single hospital were invited to complete the questionnaires. Interpretability was evaluated by the frequency of incomplete data and highest and lowest possible scores. Content validity was evaluated by exploring the health-related quality-of-life domains included in the questionnaires. Construct validity was assessed using correlations with other quality-of-life scales (EQ-visual analogue scale score and global quality-of-life scale of the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire) and ability to distinguish between patients with different health statuses. Questionnaires were returned by 89% (111 of 125) of the patients. Six to seven respondents did not return full questionnaires. Perfect health on the EQ-5D-5L was reported by 32 respondents and many of them (N = 17) did report health problems on other questionnaires. All questionnaires were strongly correlated (range 0.61-0.78) with other quality-of-life scales and yielded substantially different utility values for patients with different health statuses. Nevertheless, the disease-specific preference-based questionnaires showed greater discriminatory power. Although the Quality of Life Questionnaire Preference-Based Measure and the EORTC-8D appear to have better validity, this study does not provide any strong evidence against the use of the EQ-5D-5L for measuring quality-of-life utilities in acute leukemia. However, our findings need to be confirmed in larger longitudinal

  19. Validation of Progression-Free Survival as a Surrogate Endpoint for Overall Survival in Malignant Mesothelioma: Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B and North Central Cancer Treatment Group (Alliance) Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Xiaoyi; Hodgson, Lydia; George, Stephen L; Sargent, Daniel J; Foster, Nate R; Ganti, Apar Kishor; Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Crawford, Jeffrey; Kratzke, Robert; Adjei, Alex A; Kindler, Hedy L; Vokes, Everett E; Pang, Herbert

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether progression-free survival (PFS) can be considered a surrogate endpoint for overall survival (OS) in malignant mesothelioma. Individual data were collected from 15 Cancer and Leukemia Group B (615 patients) and 2 North Central Cancer Treatment Group (101 patients) phase II trials. The effects of 5 risk factors for OS and PFS, including age, histology, performance status (PS), white blood cell count, and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) risk score, were used in the analysis. Individual-level surrogacy was assessed by Kendall's tau through a Clayton bivariate Copula survival (CBCS) model. Summary-level surrogacy was evaluated via the association between logarithms of the hazard ratio (log HR)-log HR OS and log HR PFS -measured in R 2 from a weighted least-square (WLS) regression model and the CBCS model. The median PFS for all patients was 3.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8-3.5 months) and the median OS was 7.2 months (95% CI, 6.5-8.0 months). Moderate correlations between PFS and OS were observed across all risk factors at the individual level, with Kendall's tau ranging from 0.46 to 0.47. The summary-level surrogacy varied among risk factors. The Copula R 2 ranged from 0.51 for PS to 0.78 for histology. The WLS R 2 ranged from 0.26 for EORTC and PS to 0.67 for age. The analyses demonstrated low to moderate individual-level surrogacy between PFS and OS. At the summary level, the surrogacy between PFS and OS varied significantly across different risk factors. With a short postprogression survival and a moderate correlation between PFS and OS, there is no evidence that PFS is a valid surrogate endpoint for OS in malignant mesothelioma. The Oncologist 2017;22:189-198 Implications for Practice: For better disease management and for more efficient clinical trial designs, it is important to know if progression-free survival (PFS) is a good surrogate endpoint for overall survival

  20. Quality of life in Arab Muslim cancer survivors following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: comparison with matched healthy group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaloul, Fawwaz; Brockopp, Dorothy Y; Andrykowski, Michael A; Hall, Lynne A; Al Nusairat, Taghreed S

    2015-07-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if quality of life (QOL) among Arab Muslim hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) survivors differs from that of a healthy matched comparison group and to examine the relationships of demographic and medical variables and perceived social support with post-HSCT QOL. HSCT survivors (n = 63) were recruited from the King Hussein Cancer Center outpatient clinic. A matched (age, gender, education), healthy comparison group (n = 63) was recruited through public advertisements. Participants completed the EORTC-30 QOL scale and the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey. Differences were found between the Arab Muslim HSCT survivor and healthy comparison groups for physical functioning (p Arab Muslim HSCT and comparison groups in emotional and cognitive QOL domains. Higher overall symptom scores were significantly associated with poorer QOL across all QOL domains. Similar to prior research with HSCT survivors, results suggest that HSCT has a significant negative impact on QOL. However, despite this general similarity, results suggest that the needs and experience of Muslim Arab HSCT survivors might differ from those of Western HSCT survivors in the social and emotional QOL domains. Given growing numbers of Arab and Muslim cancer survivors in the USA and other Western countries, future research is warranted.

  1. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur...... as unit groups. We deduce this classification from a more general result, which holds for groups G with no non-trivial normal 2-subgroup....

  2. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  3. Gonadal function in males after chemotherapy for early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma treated in four subsequent trials by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer: EORTC Lymphoma Group and the Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaij, M.A. van der; Heutte, N.; Stang, N. Le; Raemaekers, J.M.M.; Simons, A.H.; Carde, P.; Noordijk, E.M.; Ferme, C.; Thomas, J.; Eghbali, H.; Kluin-Nelemans, H.C.; Henry-Amar, M.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze fertility in male patients treated with various combinations of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, with or without alkylating agents, or with radiotherapy alone for Hodgkin's lymphoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were measured in patients with

  4. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended.

  5. Group typicality, group loyalty and cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Meagan M

    2014-09-01

    Over the course of childhood, children's thinking about social groups changes in a variety of ways. Developmental Subjective Group Dynamics (DSGD) theory emphasizes children's understanding of the importance of conforming to group norms. Abrams et al.'s study, which uses DSGD theory as a framework, demonstrates the social cognitive skills underlying young elementary school children's thinking about group norms. Future research on children's thinking about groups and group norms should explore additional elements of this topic, including aspects of typicality beyond loyalty. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  6. Focus group research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Michael

    2015-05-13

    A focus group is usually understood as a group of people brought together by a researcher to interact as a group. Focus group research explicitly uses interaction as part of its methodology. This article summarises the practice of running focus groups, explores the nature of focus group data and provides an example of focus group analysis.

  7. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  8. AREVA group overview; Presentation du groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-08

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  9. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Boya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  10. Experience with Group Supervision

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Weiqin

    2006-01-01

    Supervision can take a few different forms. For example, it can be one-to-one supervision and it can also be group supervision. Group supervision is an important process within the scientific community. Many research groups use this form to supervise doctoral- and master students in groups. Some efforts have been made to study this process. For example, Samara (2002) studied the group supervision process in group writing. However, group supervision has not been studied thorough...

  11. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  12. Small Group Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizes research on small group processes by giving a comprehensive account of the types of variables primarily studied in the laboratory. These include group structure, group composition, group size, and group relations. Considers effects of power, leadership, conformity to social norms, and role relationships. (Author/AV)

  13. TOPGEAR: A Randomized, Phase III Trial of Perioperative ECF Chemotherapy with or Without Preoperative Chemoradiation for Resectable Gastric Cancer: Interim Results from an International, Intergroup Trial of the AGITG, TROG, EORTC and CCTG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Trevor; Smithers, B Mark; Haustermans, Karin; Michael, Michael; Gebski, Val; Miller, Danielle; Zalcberg, John; Boussioutas, Alex; Findlay, Michael; O'Connell, Rachel L; Verghis, Jaclyn; Willis, David; Kron, Tomas; Crain, Melissa; Murray, William K; Lordick, Florian; Swallow, Carol; Darling, Gail; Simes, John; Wong, Rebecca

    2017-08-01

    Postoperative chemoradiation and perioperative chemotherapy using epirubicin/cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (ECF) represent two standards of care for resectable gastric cancer. In the TOPGEAR (Trial Of Preoperative therapy for Gastric and Esophagogastric junction AdenocaRcinoma) trial, we hypothesized that adding preoperative chemoradiation to perioperative ECF will improve survival; however, the safety and feasibility of preoperative chemoradiation have yet to be determined. TOPGEAR is an international phase III trial in which patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were randomized to perioperative ECF alone or with preoperative chemoradiation. The ECF-alone group received three preoperative cycles of ECF, while the chemoradiation group received two cycles of preoperative ECF followed by chemoradiation. Both groups received three postoperative cycles of ECF. A planned interim analysis of the first 120 patients was conducted, and was reviewed by the Independent Data Safety Monitoring Committee to assess treatment compliance, toxicity/safety, and response rates. The proportion of patients who received all cycles of preoperative chemotherapy was 93% (ECF group) and 98% (chemoradiation group), while 65 and 53%, respectively, received all cycles of postoperative chemotherapy. Overall, 92% of patients allocated to preoperative chemoradiation received this treatment. The proportion of patients proceeding to surgery was 90% (ECF group) and 85% (chemoradiation group). Grade 3 or higher surgical complications occurred in 22% of patients in both groups. Furthermore, grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 32% (ECF group) and 30% (chemoradiation group) of patients, while hematologic toxicity occurred in 50 and 52% of patients. These results demonstrate that preoperative chemoradiation can be safely delivered to the vast majority of patients without a significant increase in treatment toxicity or surgical morbidity.

  14. Profinite graphs and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Ribes, Luis

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a detailed introduction to graph theoretic methods in profinite groups and applications to abstract groups. It is the first to provide a comprehensive treatment of the subject. The author begins by carefully developing relevant notions in topology, profinite groups and homology, including free products of profinite groups, cohomological methods in profinite groups, and fixed points of automorphisms of free pro-p groups. The final part of the book is dedicated to applications of the profinite theory to abstract groups, with sections on finitely generated subgroups of free groups, separability conditions in free and amalgamated products, and algorithms in free groups and finite monoids. Profinite Graphs and Groups will appeal to students and researchers interested in profinite groups, geometric group theory, graphs and connections with the theory of formal languages. A complete reference on the subject, the book includes historical and bibliographical notes as well as a discussion of open quest...

  15. Group B Strep Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... org editorial staff Home Diseases and Conditions Group B Strep Infection Condition Group B Strep Infection Share Print Group B Strep Infection Table of Contents1. Overview2. Symptoms3. Diagnosis4. ...

  16. Ordered groups and infinite permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    The subjects of ordered groups and of infinite permutation groups have long en­ joyed a symbiotic relationship. Although the two subjects come from very different sources, they have in certain ways come together, and each has derived considerable benefit from the other. My own personal contact with this interaction began in 1961. I had done Ph. D. work on sequence convergence in totally ordered groups under the direction of Paul Conrad. In the process, I had encountered "pseudo-convergent" sequences in an ordered group G, which are like Cauchy sequences, except that the differences be­ tween terms of large index approach not 0 but a convex subgroup G of G. If G is normal, then such sequences are conveniently described as Cauchy sequences in the quotient ordered group GIG. If G is not normal, of course GIG has no group structure, though it is still a totally ordered set. The best that can be said is that the elements of G permute GIG in an order-preserving fashion. In independent investigations around that t...

  17. Interdependence and Group Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wageman, Ruth

    1995-01-01

    Investigated the differential effects of task design and reward system design on group functioning in a large U.S. corporation; the effectiveness of "hybrid" groups (having tasks and rewards with both individual and group elements); and how individuals' autonomy preferences moderate their responses to interdependence. Groups performed…

  18. Group Psychotherapy in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ívarsson, Ómar

    2015-10-01

    In this overview of group psychotherapy in Iceland, an attempt will be made to describe how it is practiced today, give some glimpses into its earlier history, and clarify seven issues: (1) the standing of group psychotherapy in Iceland, its previous history, and the theoretical orientation of dynamic group therapy in the country; (2) the role of group therapy in the health care system; (3) how training in group therapy is organized; (4) the relationship between group psychotherapy research and clinical practice; (5) which issues/processes can be identified as unique to therapy groups in Iceland; and (6) how important are group-related issues within the social background of the country; and (7) what group work holds for the future.

  19. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000511.htm Group B streptococcus - pregnancy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that some ...

  20. MSUD Family Support Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Treatment Of MSUD The MSUD Family Support Group has provided funds to Buck Institute for its ... of the membership of the MSUD Family Support Group, research for improved treatments and potential cure was ...

  1. Informal group discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans Nienstaedt; Dean W. Einspahr; J. Douglas Brodie

    1973-01-01

    Editor's note: The morning's presentations were discussed during the afternoon by three groups, each group discussing one of the morning's three topics. Summaries of the discussions, prepared by the discussion leaders, follow.

  2. Group Decision Process Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, John; Hijikata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists.......Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists....

  3. Soft Neutrosophic Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shabir

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we extend the neutrosophic group and subgroup to soft neutrosophic group and soft neutrosophic subgroup respectively. Properties and theorems related to them are proved and many examples are given.

  4. Anxiety Disorders: Support Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ages) Palm Beach Gardens OCD Support Group for Kids & Teens Center for Psychological & Behavioral Science Palm Beach Gardens ... Science Palm Beach Gardens OCD Support Group for Kids & Teens Palm Beach Gardens, FL Palm Beach Gardens OCD ...

  5. Multicultural group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds.......Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds....

  6. Practice and Group Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Although learning has always been a central topic for philosophy of education, little attention has been paid to the notion of group learning. This article outlines and discusses some plausible examples of group learning. Drawing on these examples, various principles and issues that surround the notion of group learning are identified and…

  7. Asymmetry within social groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker, Jessie; Loope, Kevin J.; Reeve, H. Kern

    2016-01-01

    Social animals vary in their ability to compete with group members over shared resources and also vary in their cooperative efforts to produce these resources. Competition among groups can promote within-group cooperation, but many existing models of intergroup cooperation do not explicitly account...

  8. Groups, combinatorics and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, A A; Saxl, J

    2003-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the theory of groups in particular simplegroups, finite and algebraic has influenced a number of diverseareas of mathematics. Such areas include topics where groups have beentraditionally applied, such as algebraic combinatorics, finitegeometries, Galois theory and permutation groups, as well as severalmore recent developments.

  9. Change through Group Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllan, Les; Friedman, Amy; Spears, Evans

    Perhaps the most well known treatment modalities in the field of prevention and treatment of addiction are groups. Group settings serve to bring individuals with addictions together at one time in one place to work on relevant issues together. Groups may serve as a safe environment for learning new social and relationship skills, gaining…

  10. Quantum isometry groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotishman Bhowmick

    2015-11-07

    Nov 7, 2015 ... NONcommutative spaces. 2. Banica and Bichon defined quantum symmetry groups for finite metric spaces, finite graphs, etc. 3. Lots of examples computed leading to discovery of completely new kinds of quantum groups. Jyotishman Bhowmick (Indian Statistical Institute). Quantum isometry groups. 07.11.

  11. TP53 status for prediction of sensitivity to taxane versus non-taxane neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer (EORTC 10994/BIG 1-00): a randomised phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoi, Hervé; Piccart, Martine; Bogaerts, Jan; Mauriac, Louis; Fumoleau, Pierre; Brain, Etienne; Petit, Thierry; Rouanet, Philippe; Jassem, Jacek; Blot, Emmanuel; Zaman, Khalil; Cufer, Tanja; Lortholary, Alain; Lidbrink, Elisabet; André, Sylvie; Litière, Saskia; Lago, Lissandra Dal; Becette, Véronique; Cameron, David A; Bergh, Jonas; Iggo, Richard

    2011-06-01

    TP53 has a crucial role in the DNA damage response. We therefore tested the hypothesis that taxanes confer a greater advantage than do anthracyclines on breast cancers with mutated TP53 than in those with wild-type TP53. In an open-label, phase 3 study, women (age <71 years) with locally advanced, inflammatory, or large operable breast cancers were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either a standard anthracycline regimen (six cycles of intravenous fluorouracil 500 mg/m², epirubicin 100 mg/m², and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m² every 21 days [FEC100], or fluorouracil 600 mg/m², epirubicin 75 mg/m², cyclophosphamide 900 mg/m² [tailored FEC] starting on day 1 and then every 21 days) or a taxane-based regimen (three cycles of docetaxel 100 mg/m², intravenously infused over 1 h on day 1 every 21 days, followed by three cycles of intravenous epirubicin 90 mg/m² and docetaxel 75 mg/m² on day 1 every 21 days [T-ET]) at 42 centres in Europe. Randomisation was by use of a minimisation method that stratified patients by institution and initial tumour stage. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) according to TP53 status. Analysis was by intention to treat. This is the final analysis of this trial. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00017095. 928 patients were enrolled in the FEC group and 928 in the T-ET group. TP53 status was not assessable for 183 (20%) patients in the FEC group and 204 (22%) patients in the T-ET group mainly because of low tumour-cell content in the biopsy. 361 primary endpoint events were recorded in the FEC group and 314 in the T-ET group. In patients with TP53-mutated tumours, 5-year PFS was 59·5% (95% CI 53·4-65·1) in the T-ET group (n=326) and 55·3% (49·2-60·9) in the FEC group (n=318; hazard ratio 0·84, 98% CI 0·63-1·14; p=0·17). In patients with TP53 wild-type tumours, 5-year PFS was 66·8% (95% CI 61·4-71·6) in the T-ET group (n=398) and 64·7% (59·6-69·4) in the FEC group (n=427; 0·89

  12. Group theory I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Group Theory I includes sets and mapping, groupoids and semi-groups, groups, isomorphisms and homomorphisms, cyclic groups, the Sylow theorems, and finite p-groups.

  13. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, MY); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  14. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Coit, William George [Bellaire, TX; Griffin, Peter Terry [Brixham, GB; Hamilton, Paul Taylor [Houston, TX; Hsu, Chia-Fu [Granada Hills, CA; Mason, Stanley Leroy [Allen, TX; Samuel, Allan James [Kular Lumpar, ML; Watkins, Ronnie Wade [Cypress, TX

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  15. Quality of life in colorectal cancer patients: an Izmir Oncology Group (IZOG) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyol, Murat; Ulger, Eda; Alacacioglu, Ahmet; Kucukzeybek, Yuksel; Bayoglu, Vedat; Yildiz, Yasar; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Salman, Tarik; Varol, Umut; Demir, Lutfiye; Dirican, Ahmet; Gumus, Zehra; Oktay Tarhan, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the variables of quality of life (QoL) among Turkish patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). In this prospective study we investigated the QoL of Turkish CRC patients. Two hundred and twenty two patients with CRC were included. The sociodemographic form and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) were used. The study group consisted of 142 males (64%) and 80 females (36%). The mean patient age was 55.68±11.387 years. The majority of the patients (36.9%) had local disease while advanced-stage disease and locally advanced stage disease had 32.2% and 28.8% of the patients; respectively. The mean QoL score was moderate (62.81± 27.0). The most common complaints were fatigue, economic difficulties and constipation. Gender, education level and disease stage were associated with QoL. Physical, role and social functioning were more adversely affected in female patients. Compared to women, men had significantly more favorable global QoL (p=0.044). Some functional scales were worse in advanced disease compared to other stages.These outcomes were statistically significant in the functional scales of global health (p=0.007), physical (p=0.03), cognitive (p=0.01) and emotional function (p=0.007). Patients with advanced disease had worse outcomes in some symptoms (nausea, vomiting, dyspnea, loss of appetite and financial distress). Female gender and advanced disease were strongly associated with poorer QoL among Turkish CRC patients.

  16. Lectures on Chevalley groups

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Robert Steinberg's Lectures on Chevalley Groups were delivered and written during the author's sabbatical visit to Yale University in the 1967-1968 academic year. The work presents the status of the theory of Chevalley groups as it was in the mid-1960s. Much of this material was instrumental in many areas of mathematics, in particular in the theory of algebraic groups and in the subsequent classification of finite groups. This posthumous edition incorporates additions and corrections prepared by the author during his retirement, including a new introductory chapter. A bibliography and editorial notes have also been added. This is a great unsurpassed introduction to the subject of Chevalley groups that influenced generations of mathematicians. I would recommend it to anybody whose interests include group theory. -Efim Zelmanov, University of California, San Diego Robert Steinberg's lectures on Chevalley groups were given at Yale University in 1967. The notes for the lectures contain a wonderful exposition of ...

  17. E-groups training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    There will be an e-groups training course on 16 March 2012 which will cover the main e-groups functionalities i.e.: creating and managing e-groups, difference between static and dynamic e-groups, configuring posting restrictions and archives, examples of where e-groups can be used in daily work. Even if you have already worked with e-groups, this may be a good opportunity to learn about the best practices and security related recommendations when using e-groups. You can find more details as well as enrolment form for the training (it’s free) here. The number of places is limited, so enrolling early is recommended.   Technical Training Tel. 72844

  18. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of meaning-centered group psychotherapy in cancer survivors: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Spek, Nadia; Vos, Joël; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Breitbart, William; Cuijpers, Pim; Knipscheer-Kuipers, Kitty; Willemsen, Vincent; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; van Asperen, Christi J; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2014-01-28

    Meaning-focused coping may be at the core of adequate adjustment to life after cancer. Cancer survivors who experience their life as meaningful are better adjusted, have better quality of life and psychological functioning. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy for Cancer Survivors (MCGP-CS) was designed to help patients to sustain or enhance a sense of meaning and purpose in their lives. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MCGP-CS. Survivors diagnosed with cancer in the last 5 years and treated with curative intent, are recruited via several hospitals in the Netherlands. After screening, 168 survivors are randomly assigned to one of the three study arms: 1. Meaning-Centered Group Psychotherapy (MCGP-CS) 2. Supportive group psychotherapy (SGP) 3. Care as usual (CAU). Baseline assessment takes place before randomisation, with follow up assessments post-intervention and at 3, 6 and 12 months follow-up. Primary outcome is meaning making (PMP, PTGI, SPWB). Secondary outcome measures address quality of life (EORTC-30), anxiety and depression (HADS), hopelessness (BHS), optimism (LOT-R), adjustment to cancer (MAC), and costs (TIC-P, EQ-5D, PRODISQ). Meaning-focused coping is key to adjustment to life after cancer, however, there is a lack of evidence based psychological interventions in this area. Many cancer survivors experience feelings of loneliness and alienation, and have a need for peer support, therefore a group method in particular, can be beneficial for sustaining or enhancing a sense of meaning. If this MCGP-CS is effective for cancer survivors, it can be implemented in the practice of psycho-oncology care. Netherlands Trial Register, NTR3571.

  19. Immersive group-to-group telepresence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Stephan; Kunert, André; Kulik, Alexander; Froehlich, Bernd

    2013-04-01

    We present a novel immersive telepresence system that allows distributed groups of users to meet in a shared virtual 3D world. Our approach is based on two coupled projection-based multi-user setups, each providing multiple users with perspectively correct stereoscopic images. At each site the users and their local interaction space are continuously captured using a cluster of registered depth and color cameras. The captured 3D information is transferred to the respective other location, where the remote participants are virtually reconstructed. We explore the use of these virtual user representations in various interaction scenarios in which local and remote users are face-to-face, side-by-side or decoupled. Initial experiments with distributed user groups indicate the mutual understanding of pointing and tracing gestures independent of whether they were performed by local or remote participants. Our users were excited about the new possibilities of jointly exploring a virtual city, where they relied on a world-in-miniature metaphor for mutual awareness of their respective locations.

  20. Quantum isometry groups

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, Debashish

    2016-01-01

    This book offers an up-to-date overview of the recently proposed theory of quantum isometry groups. Written by the founders, it is the first book to present the research on the “quantum isometry group”, highlighting the interaction of noncommutative geometry and quantum groups, which is a noncommutative generalization of the notion of group of isometry of a classical Riemannian manifold. The motivation for this generalization is the importance of isometry groups in both mathematics and physics. The framework consists of Alain Connes’ “noncommutative geometry” and the operator-algebraic theory of “quantum groups”. The authors prove the existence of quantum isometry group for noncommutative manifolds given by spectral triples under mild conditions and discuss a number of methods for computing them. One of the most striking and profound findings is the non-existence of non-classical quantum isometry groups for arbitrary classical connected compact manifolds and, by using this, the authors explicitl...

  1. Geometric group theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bestvina, Mladen; Vogtmann, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Geometric group theory refers to the study of discrete groups using tools from topology, geometry, dynamics and analysis. The field is evolving very rapidly and the present volume provides an introduction to and overview of various topics which have played critical roles in this evolution. The book contains lecture notes from courses given at the Park City Math Institute on Geometric Group Theory. The institute consists of a set of intensive short courses offered by leaders in the field, designed to introduce students to exciting, current research in mathematics. These lectures do not duplicate standard courses available elsewhere. The courses begin at an introductory level suitable for graduate students and lead up to currently active topics of research. The articles in this volume include introductions to CAT(0) cube complexes and groups, to modern small cancellation theory, to isometry groups of general CAT(0) spaces, and a discussion of nilpotent genus in the context of mapping class groups and CAT(0) gro...

  2. CLASSIFICATION OF CRIMINAL GROUPS

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Romanova

    2013-01-01

    New types of criminal groups are emerging in modern society.  These types have their special criminal subculture. The research objective is to develop new parameters of classification of modern criminal groups, create a new typology of criminal groups and identify some features of their subculture. Research methodology is based on the system approach that includes using the method of analysis of documentary sources (materials of a criminal case), method of conversations with themembers of the...

  3. Presentations of groups

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, D L

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide an introduction to combinatorial group theory. Any reader who has completed first courses in linear algebra, group theory and ring theory will find this book accessible. The emphasis is on computational techniques but rigorous proofs of all theorems are supplied. This new edition has been revised throughout, including new exercises and an additional chapter on proving that certain groups are infinite.

  4. Conformal Carroll groups

    OpenAIRE

    Duval, C.; Gibbons, G W; Horvathy, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Conformal extensions of Levy-Leblond's Carroll group, based on geometric properties analogous to those of Newton-Cartan space-time are proposed. The extensions are labelled by an integer $k$. This framework includes and extends our recent study of the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) and Newman-Unti (NU) groups. The relation to Conformal Galilei groups is clarified. Conformal Carroll symmetry is illustrated by "Carrollian photons". Motion both in the Newton-Cartan and Carroll spaces may be related t...

  5. Study Groups in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions.......Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions....

  6. Lie groups for pedestrians

    CERN Document Server

    Lipkin, Harry J

    2002-01-01

    According to the author of this concise, high-level study, physicists often shy away from group theory, perhaps because they are unsure which parts of the subject belong to the physicist and which belong to the mathematician. However, it is possible for physicists to understand and use many techniques which have a group theoretical basis without necessarily understanding all of group theory. This book is designed to familiarize physicists with those techniques. Specifically, the author aims to show how the well-known methods of angular momentum algebra can be extended to treat other Lie group

  7. Group I intron ribozymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Group I intron ribozymes constitute one of the main classes of ribozymes and have been a particularly important model in the discovery of key concepts in RNA biology as well as in the development of new methods. Compared to other ribozyme classes, group I intron ribozymes display considerable......, the intronic products of these pathways have the potential to integrate into targets and to form various types of circular RNA molecules. Thus, group I intron ribozymes and associated elements found within group I introns is a rich source of biological phenomena. This chapter provides a strategy and protocols...

  8. Explosive Technology Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  9. Factoring groups into subsets

    CERN Document Server

    Szabo, Sandor

    2009-01-01

    Decomposing an abelian group into a direct sum of its subsets leads to results that can be applied to a variety of areas, such as number theory, geometry of tilings, coding theory, cryptography, graph theory, and Fourier analysis. Focusing mainly on cyclic groups, Factoring Groups into Subsets explores the factorization theory of abelian groups. The book first shows how to construct new factorizations from old ones. The authors then discuss nonperiodic and periodic factorizations, quasiperiodicity, and the factoring of periodic subsets. They also examine how tiling plays an important role in n

  10. Toleration, Groups, and Multiculturalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2014-01-01

    to the political and social relationship between the subject and the objects of toleration. Finally, toleration is often argued to be a normative requirement on the basis of the way it affects the object or receiver of toleration, e.g. on the basis of the good of or right to freedom from non-interference which....... The chapter relates the different possible meanings of groups toleration to widespread criticisms of multiculturalism for being excessively 'groupist' (e.g. to essentialise or reify groups), to promote group rights over individual rights, or to deny or ignore the internal heterogeneity of groups...

  11. Isotropy in group cohomology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben David, Nir; Ginosar, Yuval; Meir, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    groups of central type from such quotients, known as Involutive Yang–Baxter groups. Another motivation for the search of normal Lagrangians comes from a non-commutative generalization of Heisenberg liftings that require normality. Although it is true that symplectic forms over finite nilpotent groups...... always admit Lagrangians, we exhibit an example where none of these subgroups is normal. However, we prove that symplectic forms over nilpotent groups always admit normal Lagrangians if all their p  -Sylow subgroups are of order less than p 8   ....

  12. Improved outcome with pulses of vincristine and corticosteroids in continuation therapy of children with average risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and lymphoblastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL): report of the EORTC randomized phase 3 trial 58951.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moerloose, Barbara; Suciu, Stefan; Bertrand, Yves; Mazingue, Françoise; Robert, Alain; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Yakouben, Karima; Ferster, Alice; Margueritte, Geneviève; Lutz, Patrick; Munzer, Martine; Sirvent, Nicolas; Norton, Lucilia; Boutard, Patrick; Plantaz, Dominique; Millot, Frederic; Philippet, Pierre; Baila, Liliana; Benoit, Yves; Otten, Jacques

    2010-07-08

    The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer 58951 trial for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) addressed 3 randomized questions, including the evaluation of dexamethasone (DEX) versus prednisolone (PRED) in induction and, for average-risk patients, the evaluation of vincristine and corticosteroid pulses during continuation therapy. The corticosteroid used in the pulses was that assigned at induction. Overall, 411 patients were randomly assigned: 202 initially randomly assigned to PRED (60 mg/m(2)/d), 201 to DEX (6 mg/m(2)/d), and 8 nonrandomly assigned to PRED. At a median follow-up of 6.3 years, there were 19 versus 34 events for pulses versus no pulses; 6-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 90.6% (standard error [SE], 2.1%) and 82.8% (SE, 2.8%), respectively (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.94; P = .027). The effect of pulses was similar in the PRED (HR = 0.56) and DEX groups (HR = 0.59) but more pronounced in girls (HR = 0.24) than in boys (HR = 0.71). Grade 3 to 4 hepatic toxicity was 30% versus 40% in pulses versus no pulses group and grade 2 to 3 osteonecrosis was 4.4% versus 2%. For average-risk patients treated according to Berlin-Frankfurt-Muenster-based protocols, pulses should become a standard component of therapy.

  13. The Changing Pattern of Hospital Admission to Medical Wards; Burden of non-communicable diseases at a hospital in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufian K. Noor

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to determine the pattern of hospital admissions and patient outcomes in medical wards at Atbara Teaching Hospital in River Nile State, Sudan. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from August 2013 to July 2014 and included all patients admitted to medical wards at the Atbara Teaching Hospital during the study period. Morbidity and mortality data was obtained from medical records. Diseases were categorised using the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Diseases (ICD coding system. Results: A total of 2,614 patient records were analysed. The age group with the highest admissions was the 56‒65-year-old age group (19.4% and the majority of patients were admitted for one week or less (86.4%. Non-communicable diseases constituted 71.8% of all cases. According to ICD classifications, patients were admitted most frequently due to infectious or parasitic diseases (19.7%, followed by diseases of the circulatory (16.4%, digestive (16.4% and genito-urinary (13.8% systems. The most common diseases were cardiovascular disease (16.4%, malaria (11.3%, gastritis/peptic ulcer disease (9.8%, urinary tract infections (7.2% and diabetes mellitus (6.9%. The mortality rate was 4.7%. Conclusion: The burden of non-communicable diseases was found to exceed that of communicable diseases among patients admitted to medical wards at the Atbara Teaching Hospital.

  14. Trajectory grouping structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maike Buchin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The collective motion of a set of moving entities like people, birds, or other animals, is characterized by groups arising, merging, splitting, and ending. Given the trajectories of these entities, we define and model a structure that captures all of such changes using the Reeb graph, a concept from topology. The trajectory grouping structure has three natural parameters that allow more global views of the data in group size, group duration, and entity inter-distance. We prove complexity bounds on the maximum number of maximal groups that can be present, and give algorithms to compute the grouping structure efficiently. We also study how the trajectory grouping structure can be made robust, that is, how brief interruptions of groups can be disregarded in the global structure, adding a notion of persistence to the structure. Furthermore, we showcase the results of experiments using data generated by the NetLogo flocking model and from the Starkey project. The Starkey data describe the movement of elk, deer, and cattle. Although there is no ground truth for the grouping structure in this data, the experiments show that the trajectory grouping structure is plausible and has the desired effects when changing the essential parameters. Our research provides the first complete study of trajectory group evolvement, including combinatorial,algorithmic, and experimental results.

  15. Prescriptive Group Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcin, Douglas L.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews literature on group leadership from various theoretical orientations and maintains that variable group leadership functions are necessary to address needs of different client populations and to adapt to different clinical settings. Describes four leadership functions found to be related to outcome in research by Lieberman, Yalom, and Miles…

  16. Talking to armed groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Bangerter

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To persuade fighters to respect the rules of warfare, one must understand why violations occur, how armed groups operate, what can be done to prevent violations and how to engage in dialogue with these groups. This article reflects the ICRC’s many years of experience in this area....

  17. Group Work. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    According to Johnson and Johnson, group work helps increase student retention and satisfaction, develops strong oral communication and social skills, as well as higher self-esteem (University of Minnesota, n.d.). Group work, when planned and implemented deliberately and thoughtfully helps students develop cognitive and leadership skills as well as…

  18. Supervision and group dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2004-01-01

     An important aspect of the problem based and project organized study at Aalborg University is the supervision of the project groups. At the basic education (first year) it is stated in the curriculum that part of the supervisors' job is to deal with group dynamics. This is due to the experience ...

  19. Agribusiness Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-21

    Washington, DC U.S. Coast Guard Air Station, Cape Cod , MA U.S. Coast Guard Group, Portland, ME U.S. Coast Guard Group/Air Station Astoria, Warrenton...firms are also concerned about trade barriers EU nations have erected with respect to GMOs. Barriers include moratoriums on the import of GMOs and

  20. Improved outcome with pulses of vincristine and corticosteroids in continuation therapy of children with average risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and lymphoblastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL): report of the EORTC randomized phase 3 trial 58951

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Stefan; Bertrand, Yves; Mazingue, Françoise; Robert, Alain; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Yakouben, Karima; Ferster, Alice; Margueritte, Geneviève; Lutz, Patrick; Munzer, Martine; Sirvent, Nicolas; Norton, Lucilia; Boutard, Patrick; Plantaz, Dominique; Millot, Frederic; Philippet, Pierre; Baila, Liliana; Benoit, Yves; Otten, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer 58951 trial for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) addressed 3 randomized questions, including the evaluation of dexamethasone (DEX) versus prednisolone (PRED) in induction and, for average-risk patients, the evaluation of vincristine and corticosteroid pulses during continuation therapy. The corticosteroid used in the pulses was that assigned at induction. Overall, 411 patients were randomly assigned: 202 initially randomly assigned to PRED (60 mg/m2/d), 201 to DEX (6 mg/m2/d), and 8 nonrandomly assigned to PRED. At a median follow-up of 6.3 years, there were 19 versus 34 events for pulses versus no pulses; 6-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 90.6% (standard error [SE], 2.1%) and 82.8% (SE, 2.8%), respectively (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.94; P = .027). The effect of pulses was similar in the PRED (HR = 0.56) and DEX groups (HR = 0.59) but more pronounced in girls (HR = 0.24) than in boys (HR = 0.71). Grade 3 to 4 hepatic toxicity was 30% versus 40% in pulses versus no pulses group and grade 2 to 3 osteonecrosis was 4.4% versus 2%. For average-risk patients treated according to Berlin-Frankfurt-Muenster–based protocols, pulses should become a standard component of therapy. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00003728. PMID:20407035

  1. Ordered groups and topology

    CERN Document Server

    Clay, Adam

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with the connections between topology and ordered groups. It begins with a self-contained introduction to orderable groups and from there explores the interactions between orderability and objects in low-dimensional topology, such as knot theory, braid groups, and 3-manifolds, as well as groups of homeomorphisms and other topological structures. The book also addresses recent applications of orderability in the studies of codimension-one foliations and Heegaard-Floer homology. The use of topological methods in proving algebraic results is another feature of the book. The book was written to serve both as a textbook for graduate students, containing many exercises, and as a reference for researchers in topology, algebra, and dynamical systems. A basic background in group theory and topology is the only prerequisite for the reader.

  2. Phase III trial (EORTC 10994/BIG 1-00) assessing the value of p53 using a functional assay to predict sensitivity to a taxane versus non taxane primary chemotherapy in breast cancer: final analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoi, Hervé; Piccart, Martine; Bogaerts, Jan; Mauriac, Louis; Fumoleau, Pierre; Brain, Etienne; Petit, Thierry; Rouanet, Philippe; Jassem, Jacek; Blot, Emmanuel; Zaman, Khalil; Cufer, Tanja; Lortholary, Alain; Lidbrink, Elisabet; André, Sylvie; Litière, Saskia; Lago, Lissandra Dal; Becette, Véronique; Cameron, David A.; Bergh, Jonas; Iggo, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Background This study tested the hypothesis that docetaxel confers a greater advantage over anthracyclines in p53 mutant compared to p53 wild type breast cancers. Methods Patients with locally advanced, inflammatory or large operable breast cancers were randomised to receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of either a standard anthracycline regimen (FEC 100 or tailored FEC) or a taxane-based regimen (docetaxel for 3 cycles, followed by epirubicin and docetaxel for 3 cycles). In this open label study, randomisation was performed using a minimisation method that stratified by institution and initial tumour stage (large operable versus locally advanced or inflammatory breast cancer). p53 status was assessed with a yeast functional assay on tumour biopsies taken before chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was a comparison of progression-free survival in the two arms according to p53 status and in the entire trial population (by intention to treat). We report the final analysis of the trial. The study is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00017095. Findings 1856 patients were enrolled and 370 were unassessable for p53 tumour status (the main reason being low tumour cell content in the biopsy). 675 events for the primary endpoint were registered. The hazard ratio (HR) between the two arms for progression-free survival (PFS) was 0.84 (98% CI: 0.63–1.14; p=0.17) in the p53 mutant group and 0.89 (98% CI: 0.68–1.18; p=0.35) in the p53 wild type group. In the entire population, the HR was 0.85 (98% CI: 0.71–1.02; p=0.035) for the use of docetaxel. The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia in 1598 patients (86.6%), febrile neutropenia in 284 (15.4%), fatigue in 136 (7.4%), infection in 121 (6.6%) and nausea or vomiting in 89 (4.8%). Two patients died of toxicity during or within 30 days of chemotherapy completion and without disease relapse (one in each arm). Interpretation Although p53 status is prognostic for overall survival, it was not

  3. Interferon alfa-2a versus combination therapy with interferon alfa-2a, interleukin-2, and fluorouracil in patients with untreated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRC RE04/EORTC GU 30012): an open-label randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Martin E; Griffin, Clare L; Hancock, Barry; Patel, Poulam M; Pyle, Lynda; Aitchison, Michael; James, Nicholas; Oliver, Roderick T D; Mardiak, Jozef; Hussain, Tahera; Sylvester, Richard; Parmar, Mahesh K B; Royston, Patrick; Mulders, Peter F A

    2010-02-20

    In metastatic renal cell carcinoma combinations of interferon alfa-2a, interleukin-2, and fluorouracil produce higher response rates and longer progression-free survival than do single agents. We aimed to compare overall survival in patients receiving combination treatment or interferon alfa-2a. RE04/30012 was an open-label randomised trial undertaken in 50 centres across eight countries. 1006 treatment-naive patients diagnosed with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma were randomly allocated (1 to 1) by minimisation to receive interferon alfa-2a alone or combination therapy with interferon alfa-2a, interleukin-2, and fluorouracil. Treatment was not masked. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Treatment groups were compared with a non-stratified log-rank test. Analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered, number ISRCTN 46518965. 502 patients were randomly assigned to receive interferon alfa-2a and 504 to receive combined treatment. Median follow-up was 37.2 months (24.8-52.3). Median overall survival was 18.8 months (17.0-23.2) for patients receiving interferon alfa-2a versus 18.6 months (16.5-20.6) for those receiving combination therapy. Overall survival did not differ between the two groups (hazard ratio 1.05 [95% CI 0.90-1.21], p=0.55; absolute difference 0.3% (-5.1 to 5.6) at 1 year and 2.7% (-8.2 to 2.9) at 3 years). Serious adverse events were reported in 113 (23%) patients receiving interferon alfa-2a and 131 (26%) of those receiving combined treatment. Although combination therapy does not improve overall or progression-free survival compared with interferon alfa-2a alone, immunotherapy might still have a role because it can produce remissions that are of clinically relevant length in some patients. Identification of patients who will benefit from immunotherapy is crucial. UK Medical Research Council. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Group key management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  5. Group therapy for adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Hribar

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The group included adolescents from secondary school and some students. The group had weekly sessions or twice on mounth. The adolescents had varied simptoms: depressive, anxiety, psychosomatic disorders, learning difficulties, cunduct problems. All of adolescents were common on many problems in social interactions. The goal of therapeutic work were: to increase assertiveness skills and to reduce the anxious in social situations. The adolescents in group raised a self-esteem and developed some assertiveness skills: eye contact" and effective communication skills, persistence, refusing and requesting, giving and receiving critism, etc. The methods of work and techniques were based on principles of cognitive-behaviour therapy.

  6. Point-of-care testing for HIV in an Irish prison setting: results from three major Irish prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannan, Ciaran L; Lynch, Pamela A; Conroy, Emmett P; O'Dea, Siobhan; Surah, Saloni; Betts-Symonds, Graham; Lyons, Fiona E

    2016-10-01

    HIV is more prevalent in the prison population compared to the general population. Prison inmates are at an increased risk of blood-borne infections. Considerable stigma has been documented amongst inmates with HIV infection. In collaboration with the schools, healthcare facilities, prison authorities and inmate Irish Red Cross groups in Wheatfield, Cloverhill and Mountjoy prisons in Dublin, Ireland, the Department of Genito Urinary Medicine and Infectious Diseases at St James' Hospital in Dublin developed a campaign for raising awareness of HIV, educating inmates about HIV and tackling HIV stigma. Following this campaign, large-scale point-of-care testing for HIV was offered over a short period. In total, 741 inmates were screened for HIV. One inmate tested positive for HIV. We experienced a large number of invalid test results, requiring formal laboratory serum testing, and a small number of false positive results. Large-scale point-of-care testing in the Irish prison setting is acceptable and achievable. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Homogenous finitary symmetric groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto‎. ‎H‎. Kegel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We characterize strictly diagonal type of embeddings of finitary symmetric groups in terms of cardinality and the characteristic. Namely, we prove the following. Let kappa be an infinite cardinal. If G=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupG i , where G i =FSym(kappan i , (H=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupH i , where H i =Alt(kappan i , is a group of strictly diagonal type and xi=(p 1 ,p 2 ,ldots is an infinite sequence of primes, then G is isomorphic to the homogenous finitary symmetric group FSym(kappa(xi (H is isomorphic to the homogenous alternating group Alt(kappa(xi , where n 0 =1,n i =p 1 p 2 ldotsp i .

  8. UnitedHealth Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    UnitedHealth Group provides accessible and affordable services, improved quality of care, coordinated health care efforts, and a supportive environment for shared decision making between patients and their physicians.

  9. What? Women Mariachi Groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carlos D Conde

    2013-01-01

      It's difficult to picture an all-female group serenading a love-struck couple w'hen the dimensions don't fit but unbeknownst to many, the distaff side has for some time now been playing mariachi...

  10. Radiation Protection Group

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Section of the Radiation Protection Group wishes to inform you that the Radioactive Waste Treatment Centre will be closed on the afternoon of Tuesday 19 December 2006. Thank-you for your understanding.

  11. Groups – Additive Notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We translate the articles covering group theory already available in the Mizar Mathematical Library from multiplicative into additive notation. We adapt the works of Wojciech A. Trybulec [41, 42, 43] and Artur Korniłowicz [25].

  12. Homogeneous group, research, institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Natascia Vasta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The work outlines the complex connection among empiric research, therapeutic programs and host institution. It is considered the current research state in Italy. Italian research field is analyzed and critic data are outlined: lack of results regarding both the therapeutic processes and the effectiveness of eating disorders group analytic treatment. The work investigates on an eating disorders homogeneous group, led into an eating disorder outpatient service. First we present the methodological steps the research is based on including the strong connection among theory and clinical tools. Secondly clinical tools are described and the results commented. Finally, our results suggest the necessity of validating some more specifical hypothesis: verifying the relationship between clinical improvement (sense of exclusion and painful emotions reduction and specific group therapeutic processes; verifying the relationship between depressive feelings, relapses and transition trough a more differentiated groupal field.Keywords: Homogeneous group; Eating disorders; Institutional field; Therapeutic outcome

  13. Symmetry groups of automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, Edgardo; Urías, Jesús

    1994-01-01

    Symmetry transformations on the input and output code spaces of deterministic finite automata (DFA) are introduced. We show that the symmetry groups of transformations are produced by group DFA (gDFA) whose set of states and set of inputs are subgroups of the symmetric groups S q and S k, respectively ( q is the number of states and k the number of input symbols). The set of transitions of a gDFA is also a group. The symmetries of the n-moment delay DFA, relevant for cellular automata, are studied in detail. In particular, we show that the n-moment delay DFA on two symbols are self-symmetric. The symmetry gDFA of the 2-moment delay DFA on two symbols is displayed in detail. An algorithm to construct the symmetry gDFA of arbitrary DFA is given. An application of gDFA to cellular automata dynamics is mentioned.

  14. Interocular grouping without awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, San-Yuan; Yeh, Su-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Interocular grouping occurs when different parts of an image presented to each eye bound into a coherent whole. Previous studies anticipated that these parts are visible to both eyes simultaneously (i.e., the images altered back and forth). Although this view is consistent with the general consensus of binocular rivalry (BR) that suppressed stimuli receive no processing beyond rudimentary level (i.e., adaptation), it is actually inconsistent with studies that use continuous flash suppression (CFS). CFS is a form of interocular suppression that is more stable and causes stronger suppression of stimuli than BR. In the present study, we examined whether or not interocular grouping needs to occur at a conscious level as prior studies suggested. The modified double-rectangle paradigm used by Egly, Driver, and Rafal (1994) was adopted, and object-based attention was directed for successful grouping. To induce interocular grouping, we presented complementary parts of two rectangles dichoptically for possible interocular grouping and a dynamic Mondrian in front of one eye (i.e., CFS). Two concurrent targets were presented after one of the visible parts of the rectangles was cued. Participants were asked to judge which target appeared first. We found that the target showed on the cued rectangle after interocular grouping was reported to appear first more frequently than the target on the uncued rectangle. This result was based on the majority of trials where the suppressed parts of the objects remained invisible, which indicates that interocular grouping can occur without all the to-be-grouped parts being visible and without awareness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Groups, rings, modules

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This classic monograph is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The treatment presupposes some familiarity with sets, groups, rings, and vector spaces. The four-part approach begins with examinations of sets and maps, monoids and groups, categories, and rings. The second part explores unique factorization domains, general module theory, semisimple rings and modules, and Artinian rings. Part three's topics include localization and tensor products, principal ideal domains, and applications of fundamental theorem. The fourth and final part covers algebraic field extensions

  16. Fuzzy Soft Topological Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nazmul

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Notions of Lowen type fuzzy soft topological space are introduced and some of their properties are established in the present paper. Besides this, a combined structure of a fuzzy soft topological space and a fuzzy soft group, which is termed here as fuzzy soft topological group is introduced. Homomorphic images and preimages are also examined. Finally, some definitions and results on fuzzy soft set are studied.

  17. Group Capability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  18. Cyclic Soft Groups and Their Applications on Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacı Aktaş

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In crisp environment the notions of order of group and cyclic group are well known due to many applications. In this paper, we introduce order of the soft groups, power of the soft sets, power of the soft groups, and cyclic soft group on a group. We also investigate the relationship between cyclic soft groups and classical groups.

  19. Coordinating Group report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup.

  20. Facilities removal working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  1. Matrix groups for undergraduates

    CERN Document Server

    Tapp, Kristopher

    2016-01-01

    Matrix groups touch an enormous spectrum of the mathematical arena. This textbook brings them into the undergraduate curriculum. It makes an excellent one-semester course for students familiar with linear and abstract algebra and prepares them for a graduate course on Lie groups. Matrix Groups for Undergraduates is concrete and example-driven, with geometric motivation and rigorous proofs. The story begins and ends with the rotations of a globe. In between, the author combines rigor and intuition to describe the basic objects of Lie theory: Lie algebras, matrix exponentiation, Lie brackets, maximal tori, homogeneous spaces, and roots. This second edition includes two new chapters that allow for an easier transition to the general theory of Lie groups. From reviews of the First Edition: This book could be used as an excellent textbook for a one semester course at university and it will prepare students for a graduate course on Lie groups, Lie algebras, etc. … The book combines an intuitive style of writing w...

  2. Wealth, Groups, Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana R. Herrera

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, many scientists, many disciplines focused on how people make decisions. These approaches tend to be incompatible, if not orthogonal most case. In this article we attempt to give guidelines to a modeling approach, that will allow the description of a human “state vector”, which can be the basis for many decision making algorithms.First we will introduce a categorization of the things that determine the decisions of the individuals, and describe their characteristics and trade. Since the trade of things in separate groups is done in different fashion, they form groups on different grounds. These groups, formed by interaction among individuals, adhere to governing ethics – which serve the purpose of defining the rules of exchange where these have not been explicitly stated. And finally, we take a look how the two dominant ethics, the Commercial and the Guardian dominate the Teacher.

  3. Focus group discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Hennink, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    The Understanding Research series focuses on the process of writing up social research. The series is broken down into three categories: Understanding Statistics, Understanding Measurement, and Understanding Qualitative Research. The books provide researchers with guides to understanding, writing, and evaluating social research. Each volume demonstrates how research should be represented, including how to write up the methodology as well as the research findings. Each volume also reviews how to appropriately evaluate published research. Focus Group Discussions addresses the challenges associated with conducting and writing focus group research. It provides detailed guidance on the practical and theoretical considerations in conducting focus group discussions including: designing the discussion guide, recruiting participants, training a field team, moderating techniques and ethical considerations. Monique Hennink describes how a methodology section is read and evaluated by others, such as journal reviewers or ...

  4. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  5. Deliberative Discussion Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Erin; Anderson, Rebecca; Botkin, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    This article discusses a new approach for the conduct of focus groups in health research. Identifying ways to educate and inform participants about the topic of interest prior to the focus group discussion can promote more quality data from informed opinions. Data on this deliberative discussion approach are provided from research within three federally funded studies. As healthcare continues to improve from scientific and technological advancements, educating the research participants prior to data collection about these complexities is essential to gather quality data. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Hierarchies in student groups

    OpenAIRE

    Güntert, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    This is a research about hierarchies in student groups. It shows how they are built und what sense they have. The position of a student in his student peer group is evaluated. The influence of the look, the style, the behaviour of the other sex, the gender, the origin, the prehistory, the appearance, achievement and their effect on hierarchies is analysed and the impact of charisma and organisation are compared. The meaning of this research is to indicate how a student must be to get the lead...

  7. Value Attribution in Encounter Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawver, Lois; Pines, Ayala

    1978-01-01

    This study examines value-attribution found in encounter groups. Group members tend to refer to themselves in neutralizing negative valuations. Group leaders were negative in describing group members. Published group transcripts are more positive than unpublished, private transcripts. (MFD)

  8. Working Group Report: Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Gouvea, A.; Pitts, K.; Scholberg, K.; Zeller, G. P. [et al.

    2013-10-16

    This document represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Neutrino Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of neutrino physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of neutrinos and for addressing important physics and astrophysics questions with neutrinos.

  9. Special Interest Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degi, Bruce J.

    1999-01-01

    Offers a reflection on the shootings at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, on April 20, 1999. Notes how every special-interest group has used the tragedy to support its own point of view, and concludes that teachers have become bystanders in the education of America's children. (SR)

  10. With the Radiobiology Group

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The Radiobiology Group carries out experiments to study the effect of radiation on living cells. The photo shows the apparatus for growing broad beans which have been irradiated by 250 GeV protons. The roots are immersed in a tank of running water (CERN Weekly Bulletin 26 January 1981 and Annual Report 1980 p. 160). Karen Panman, Marilena Streit-Bianchi, Roger Paris.

  11. Between-group metrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gower, John C.; Albers, Casper J.

    2011-01-01

    In canonical analysis with more variables than samples, it is shown that, as well as the usual canonical means in the range-space of the within-groups dispersion matrix, canonical means may be defined in its null space. In the range space we have the usual Mahalanobis metric; in the null space

  12. Hunting in Groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Handique Girls' College,. Guwahati, Assam (India). His current research interest is on nonlinear ... Coopera- tive hunting in groups has a long and fascinating history with a special place in poetry, art and literature. A suc- .... representation of Kamimura and Ohira's result for the life- time of final (T) and typical targets (τ) for ...

  13. Lectures on Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Hsiang, Wu-Yi

    2017-01-01

    This volume consists of nine lectures on selected topics of Lie group theory. We provide the readers a concise introduction as well as a comprehensive 'tour of revisiting' the remarkable achievements of S Lie, W Killing, É Cartan and H Weyl on structural and classification theory of semi-simple Lie groups, Lie algebras and their representations; and also the wonderful duet of Cartans' theory on Lie groups and symmetric spaces.With the benefit of retrospective hindsight, mainly inspired by the outstanding contribution of H Weyl in the special case of compact connected Lie groups, we develop the above theory via a route quite different from the original methods engaged by most other books.We begin our revisiting with the compact theory which is much simpler than that of the general semi-simple Lie theory; mainly due to the well fittings between the Frobenius-Schur character theory and the maximal tori theorem of É Cartan together with Weyl's reduction (cf. Lectures 1-4). It is a wonderful reality of the Lie t...

  14. Teaching Badminton to Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonathan E.

    1980-01-01

    Numerous ideas for teaching badminton to large groups are presented. The focus is on drills and techniques for off the court instructional stations. Instead of having students waiting their turn to play, more students can participate actively as they rotate from one station to another. (JN)

  15. Unclonable Group Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Dupont, Kasper; Pedersen, Michael Østergaard

    2006-01-01

    We introduce and motivate the concept of unclonable group identification, that provides maximal protection against sharing of identities while still protecting the anonymity of users. We prove that the notion can be realized from any one-way function and suggest a more efficient implementation...

  16. The OMERACT Ultrasound Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terslev, Lene; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Bruyn, George A W

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update from the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound Working Group on the progress for defining ultrasound (US) minimal disease activity threshold at joint level in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and for standardization of US application in juvenile idiopathic...

  17. Abandoning wells working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  18. GROUPS IN PEPTIDE SYNTHESIS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to improve the synthesis of peptides with asparagine and glutamine residues, various carboxamide ... protecting groups in solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This method eliminates all .... to the filtrate, the solution was washed with three 9 mL portions of 5% aqueous citric acid, three 12 mL portions of 5% ...

  19. GROUPS IN PEPTIDE SYNTHESIS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    carboxamide protecting group in peptide synthesis. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION l-Tetralinylamines used as precursors to prepare the carboxamide derivatives of asparagine and glutamine are shown in Table 1: Table 1. Summary of l-tetralinyl amines. Amines Aromatic ring NHZ. X Y Z Z. 1 H H H. 2 OCH; H H. 3 H OCH ...

  20. Group Formation in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Gabrielle; Wooders, Myrna

    2005-01-01

    Broad and diverse ranges of activities are conducted within and by organized groups of individuals, including political, economic and social activities. These activities have recently become a subject of intense interest in economics and game theory. Some of the topics investigated in this collection are models of networks of power and privilege, trade networks, co-authorship networks, buyer-seller networks with differentiated products, and networks of medical innovation and the adaptation of new information. Other topics are social norms on punctuality, clubs and the provision of club goods and public goods, research and development and collusive alliances among corporations, and international alliances and trading agreements. While relatively recent, the literature on game theoretic studies of group formation in economics is already vast. This volume provides an introduction to this important literature on game-theoretic treatments of situations with networks, clubs, and coalitions, including some applications.

  1. Mindfulness for group facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Krohn, Simon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that mindfulness techniques can be used for enhancing the outcome of group performance. The word mindfulness has different connotations in the academic literature. Broadly speaking there is ‘mindfulness without meditation’ or ‘Western’ mindfulness which involves active...... thinking and ‘Eastern’ mindfulness which refers to an open, accepting state of mind, as intended with Buddhist-inspired techniques such as meditation. In this paper, we are interested in the latter type of mindfulness and demonstrate how Eastern mindfulness techniques can be used as a tool for facilitation....... A brief introduction to the physiology and philosophy of Eastern mindfulness constitutes the basis for the arguments of the effect of mindfulness techniques. The use of mindfulness techniques for group facilitation is novel as it changes the focus from individuals’ mindfulness practice...

  2. Optimized renormalization group flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litim, Daniel F.

    2001-11-01

    We study the optimization of exact renormalization group (ERG) flows. We explain why the convergence of approximate solutions towards the physical theory is optimized by appropriate choices of the regularization. We consider specific optimized regulators for bosonic and fermionic fields and compare the optimized ERG flows with generic ones. This is done up to second order in the derivative expansion at both vanishing and nonvanishing temperature. We find that optimized flows at finite temperature factorize. This corresponds to the disentangling of thermal and quantum fluctuations. A similar factorization is found at second order in the derivative expansion. The corresponding optimized flow for a ``proper-time renormalization group'' is also provided to leading order in the derivative expansion.

  3. Communication from ST Group

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    Please note that owing the preparations for the Open Days, the FM Group will not able to handle specific requests for waste collection from 2nd to 6th of April, nor removal or PC transport requests between the 31 March and 11 April. We kindly ask you to plan the collection of all types of waste and any urgent transport of office furniture or PCs before 31 March. Waste collection requests must be made by contacting FM Support on 77777 or at the e-mail address mailto:Fm.Support@cern.ch; removal of office furniture or PC transport requests must be made using the EDH ‘Transport request’ form (select "Removals" or "PC transport" from the drop-down menu). For any question concerning the sorting of waste, please consult the following web site: http://dechets-waste.web.cern.ch/dechets-waste/ Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. TS/FM Group

  4. The Ombudperson Initiative Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Laura Stewart

    Following many discussions that took place at some of the ATLAS Women's Network lunch gatherings, a few ATLAS women joined forces with similarly concerned CERN staff women to form a small group last Fall to discuss the need for a CERN-wide Ombudsperson. This has since evolved into the Ombudsperson Initiative Group (OIG) currently composed of the following members: Barbro Asman, Stockholm University; Pierre Charrue, CERN AB; Anna Cook, CERN IT; Catherine Delamare, CERN and IT Ombudsperson; Paula Eerola, Lund University; Pauline Gagnon, Indiana University; Eugenia Hatziangeli, CERN AB; Doreen Klem, CERN IT; Bertrand Nicquevert, CERN TS and Laura Stewart, CERN AT. On June 12, members of the OIG met with representatives of Human Resources (HR) and the Equal Opportunity Advisory Panel (EOAP) to discuss the proposal drafted by the OIG. The meeting was very positive. Everybody agreed that the current procedures at CERN applicable in the event of conflict required a thorough review, and that a professionnally trai...

  5. Group and representation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vergados, J D

    2017-01-01

    This volume goes beyond the understanding of symmetries and exploits them in the study of the behavior of both classical and quantum physical systems. Thus it is important to study the symmetries described by continuous (Lie) groups of transformations. We then discuss how we get operators that form a Lie algebra. Of particular interest to physics is the representation of the elements of the algebra and the group in terms of matrices and, in particular, the irreducible representations. These representations can be identified with physical observables. This leads to the study of the classical Lie algebras, associated with unitary, unimodular, orthogonal and symplectic transformations. We also discuss some special algebras in some detail. The discussion proceeds along the lines of the Cartan-Weyl theory via the root vectors and root diagrams and, in particular, the Dynkin representation of the roots. Thus the representations are expressed in terms of weights, which are generated by the application of the elemen...

  6. Focus Group Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    clarification.  Determine demographics and number needed for focus groups (all male, all female, mixed gender , by rank, by section, etc.; 8–15...members (based on section, rank, race, gender , etc.) view an issue? Are the concerns focused in a single section or do they seem to be unit-wide...Sexual Harassment (C) Sex Harassment Retaliation (D) Discrimination - Sex (E) Discrimination - Race (F) Discrimination - Disability (G

  7. Group Size and Conformity

    OpenAIRE

    Bond, Rod

    2005-01-01

    Abstract This paper reviews theory and research on the relationship between group size and conformity and presents a meta-analysis of 125 Asch-type conformity studies. It questions the assumption of a single function made in formal models of social influence and proposes instead that the function will vary depending on which social influence process predominates. It is argued that normative influence is lik...

  8. Combinatorial group theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lyndon, Roger C

    2001-01-01

    From the reviews: "This book (...) defines the boundaries of the subject now called combinatorial group theory. (...)it is a considerable achievement to have concentrated a survey of the subject into 339 pages. This includes a substantial and useful bibliography; (over 1100 ÄitemsÜ). ...the book is a valuable and welcome addition to the literature, containing many results not previously available in a book. It will undoubtedly become a standard reference." Mathematical Reviews, AMS, 1979.

  9. Summaries of group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, L. D.

    1972-01-01

    Group discussions following the presentations of reports on the remote sensing of Chesapeake Bay resources are presented. The parameters to be investigated by the remote sensors and the specifications of the sensors are described. Specific sensors for obtaining data on various aspects of the ecology are identified. Recommendations for establishing a data bank and additional efforts to obtain increased understanding of the ecology are submitted.

  10. Formal groups and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hazewinkel, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive treatment of the theory of formal groups and its numerous applications in several areas of mathematics. The seven chapters of the book present basics and main results of the theory, as well as very important applications in algebraic topology, number theory, and algebraic geometry. Each chapter ends with several pages of historical and bibliographic summary. One prerequisite for reading the book is an introductory graduate algebra course, including certain familiarity with category theory.

  11. Multibunch working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The goal of this working group was to foment discussions about the use and limitations of multi-bunch, representatives from most operating or in-project synchrotron radiation sources (ALS, SPEAR, BESSY-2, SPRING-8, ANKA, DELTA, PEP-2, DIAMOND, ESRF...) have presented their experience. The discussions have been led around 3 topics: 1) resistive wall instabilities and ion instabilities, 2) higher harmonic cavities, and 3) multibunch feedback systems.

  12. End Group Modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Rasmus O; Sandberg-Schaal, Anne; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2015-01-01

    modification with hydrophobic moieties led to increased activity towards the Gram-negative Acinetobacter baumannii. Despite increased cytotoxicity against murine fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, the optimized peptide analogues exhibited significantly improved cell selectivity. Overall......, the most favorable hydrophobic activity-inducing moieties were found to be cyclohexylacetyl and pentafluorophenylacetyl groups, while the presence of a short PEG-like chain had no significant effect on activity. Introduction of cationic moieties conferred no effect or merely a moderate activity...

  13. Caelyx (TM) in malignant mesothelioma : A phase II EORTC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P; van Meerbeeck, J; Groen, H; Schouwink, H; Burgers, S; Daamen, S; Giaccone, G

    Background: The use of doxorubicin has shown some activity in malignant mesothelioma but prolonged administration is hampered by cardiotoxicity. Caelyx(TM), a new liposomal and pegylated form of doxorubicin has shown a better pharmacokinetic and toxic profile then doxorubicin. In a phase II study,

  14. 76 FR 12125 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project (GUDMAP) Date...

  15. Grinding machine: Friend or Foe | Adigun | West African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many of them have fallen victims of various genito-urinary injuries from grinding machine. Treating a child for complete traumatic loss of penis is rare and challenging any where in the world. A 12 years old boy presented to the emergency unit of our hospital with penile amputation 18 hours after the injury was sustained.

  16. Development of a Phase I/II Clinical Trial Using Sterotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    with renal and genito-urinary function will include cystitis , fistula, urinary incontinence, urinary obstruction, stricture/stenosis, hemorrhage , and...incontinence, stricture/stenosis, hemorrhage , and ulcer. The consequences of gastro-intestinal toxicity should all be graded according to the

  17. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genito-urinary tract infections among males: implications for infertility problems in Aba, Abia State, Nigeria Abstract · Vol 9, No 1 (2014) - Articles Survey of Hepatitis B and C infections in an unselected population of members of a sports club in Aba, Abia State, Nigeria Abstract · Vol 9, No 1 (2014) - Articles Insecticidal net ...

  18. Ward Round: A 43-year-old diabetic man with multiple joint pains

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eye symptoms, skin rash or genito-urinary symptoms. He denied weight loss ... alcohol. However, this is unlikely in our patient as this tends to present with asymmetrical arthritis. Further investigations should include erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) ... with the history of morning stiffness of his joints makes RA likely to be ...

  19. Renal cancer in Maiduguri: an 8-year review of clinico-pathological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Primary renal cancer accounts for 10 – 20% of all genito-urinary tract malignancies. The present study determined its clinico-pathological pattern and outcome of management. Methods: All patients with malignancies of the kidney seen between January 1999 and December 2007 were included in the study.

  20. Appendix duplication in association with persistent cloaca and type 2 pouch colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boleken ME

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of the vermiform appendix is extremely rare, and it may be associated with gastrointestinal and genito-urinary anomalies in childhood. Presented herein is a case of association of appendix duplication, pouch colon, and persistent cloaca. Pathogenesis of this association is discussed.

  1. Drug: D04472 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available C) classification [BR:br08303] G GENITO URINARY SYSTEM AND SEX HORMONES G03 SEX H...ORMONES AND MODULATORS OF THE GENITAL SYSTEM G03E ANDROGENS AND FEMALE SEX HORMONES IN COMBINATION G03EA And

  2. Outcomes of reconstructive surgery of tuberculosis affecting the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This was retrospective analysis of all patients treated for tuberculous stricture of the ureter and scarring of the bladder from January 2001 to December 2005. Outcome of interventions were assessed using IVU, TC-DTPA renogram and serum creatinine level. Results: Among the 160 genito-urinary tuberculosis ...

  3. 170 pattern of microbial colonization of the vagina of diabetics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    The pattern of microbial flora of the vagina of diabetics was studied, to advise on empirical regimen for the ... quinolones should be reserved for the treatment of sepsis in diabetics where lower genital tract is the likely source of infection. KEYWORDS: Microbes, vagina ... features of lower genito-urinary tract infection.

  4. Drug: D08522 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (ATC) classification [BR:br08303] G GENITO URINARY SYSTEM AND SEX HORMONES G04 UROLOGICALS G04B UROLOGICALS G04BD Urinary...ug classification [BR:br08302] Genitourinary Agents Antispasmodics, Urinary Solifenacin D08522 Solifenacin (

  5. Drug: D07226 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fication [BR:br08303] G GENITO URINARY SYSTEM AND SEX HORMONES G04 UROLOGICALS G04B UROLOGICALS G04BD Urinary...cation [BR:br08302] Genitourinary Agents Antispasmodics, Urinary Fesoterodine D07226 Fesoterodine (INN) Targ

  6. Drug: D00718 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l (ATC) classification [BR:br08303] G GENITO URINARY SYSTEM AND SEX HORMONES G04 UROLOGICALS G04B UROLOGICALS G04BD Urinary...ication [BR:br08302] Genitourinary Agents Antispasmodics, Urinary Flavoxate D0071

  7. Drug: D03654 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (USAN/INN) USP drug classification [BR:br08302] Genitourinary Agents Antispasmodics, Urinary Darifenacin D0...utic Chemical (ATC) classification [BR:br08303] G GENITO URINARY SYSTEM AND SEX HORMONES G04 UROLOGICALS G04B UROLOGICALS G04BD Urina...ry antispasmodics G04BD10 Darifenacin D03654 Darifenacin

  8. Dec 2011 NJS for Prof Anyanwu

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    feet);Polydactyly(multiple digits), syndactyly. (fusion of digits which may be simple or compound/complex), gigantism, clinodactyly, camptodactyly and combinations of these. On the genito-urinary system;Hypospadias, epispadias, bladder exostrophy, ambiguous genitalia and gender re assignment. On the breast several ...

  9. 170 pattern of microbial colonization of the vagina of diabetics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    of symptoms and signs of genital tract infections were exclusion criteria. The age, duration of diabetes, type of anti- diabetic drug, history of vaginal discharge and itching were recorded. Clinical examination for features of lower genito-urinary tract infection was done. High vaginal swab (HVS) was collected with sterile ...

  10. Anaesthesia for prune belly syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    scoliosis and pectus carinatum or pectus excavatum.4 These defects support a mesenchymal defect. Genito-urinary manifestations: Distal urinary tract ob- struction is usually not detectable clinically, suggesting a func- tional rather than a physical cause for the obstruction. This may lead to severe dilatation of the bladder ...

  11. Drug: D03260 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2N6O4S. 3H2O. HCl 578.2289 579.1098 D03260.gif Treatment of erectile dysfunction [PDE 5 inhibitor] Therapeut...br08303] G GENITO URINARY SYSTEM AND SEX HORMONES G04 UROLOGICALS G04B UROLOGICALS G04BE Drugs used in erectile

  12. Drug: D02008 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 389.404 D02008.gif Treatment of male erectile and female sexual dysfunction Therapeutic category: 2190 2590...sification [BR:br08303] G GENITO URINARY SYSTEM AND SEX HORMONES G04 UROLOGICALS G04B UROLOGICALS G04BE Drugs used in erectile

  13. Unusual bladder outflow obstruction: case report | Ndaguatha | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydatid disease, the parasitic infestation caused by the cestode, echinococcus granulosus involves mainly the liver and the lungs though no organ is immune. Genito urinary involvement has been found mainly in the kidneys and rarely in other structures such as, bladder and epididymis. Isolated retrovesical location of the ...

  14. Successful penile reimplantation and systematic review of world ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.E. Mensah

    2017-08-30

    Aug 30, 2017 ... web page of the journal www.ees.elsevier.com/afju · www.sciencedirect.com. Genito-Urinary Trauma. Case report. Successful penile ... and dealing with deep distress, anger, dissociation, and emotional pain in order to have self-purification [5]. However, self-purification by self-mutilation does not last very ...

  15. Social group utility maximization

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Xiaowen; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Junshan

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief explains how to leverage mobile users' social relationships to improve the interactions of mobile devices in mobile networks. It develops a social group utility maximization (SGUM) framework that captures diverse social ties of mobile users and diverse physical coupling of mobile devices. Key topics include random access control, power control, spectrum access, and location privacy.This brief also investigates SGUM-based power control game and random access control game, for which it establishes the socially-aware Nash equilibrium (SNE). It then examines the critical SGUM-b

  16. STEAM GENERATOR GROUP PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, R. A.; Lewis, M

    1985-09-01

    This report is a summary of progress in the Surry Steam Generator Group Project for 1984. Information is presented on the analysis of two baseline eddy current inspections of the generator. Round robin series of tests using standard in-service inspection techniques are described along with some preliminary results. Observations are reported of degradation found on tubing specimens removed from the generator, and on support plates characterized in-situ. Residual stresses measured on a tubing specimen are reported. Two steam generator repair demonstrations are described; one for antivibration bar replacement, and one on tube repair methods. Chemical analyses are shown for sludge samples removed from above the tube sheet.

  17. Renormalization Group Functional Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Curtright, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {\\sigma} functions, and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {\\beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {\\sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale, and zeroes of {\\beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow, but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

  18. Systems special investigation group

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    An interim report concerning the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is presented by a Boeing Systems special investigation group (SIG). The SIG activities were divided into five engineering disciplines: electrical, mechanical, optics, thermal, and batteries/solar cells. The responsibilities of the SIG included the following areas: support de-integration at Kennedy Space Center (KSC); testing of hardware at Boeing; review of principal investigator (PI) test plans and test results; support of test activities at PI labs; and collation of all test results into the SIG database.

  19. Statistical Group Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Tim Futing

    2011-01-01

    An incomparably useful examination of statistical methods for comparisonThe nature of doing science, be it natural or social, inevitably calls for comparison. Statistical methods are at the heart of such comparison, for they not only help us gain understanding of the world around us but often define how our research is to be carried out. The need to compare between groups is best exemplified by experiments, which have clearly defined statistical methods. However, true experiments are not always possible. What complicates the matter more is a great deal of diversity in factors that are not inde

  20. Group theoretic cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    González Vasco, Maria Isabel

    2015-01-01

    PRELIMINARIES Mathematical background Algebraic structures in a nutshellFinite groupsSummary and further readingExercisesBasics on complexity Complexity classesAsymptotic notation and examplesSummary and further readingExercisesCryptology: An introductionA short historical overview     Historical encryption schemes     Public-key cryptographyModern cryptologySummary and further readingExercisesPUBLIC-KEY ENCRYPTIONProvable security guarantees Public-key encryption revisitedCharacterizing secure public-key encryptionOne-way functions and random oraclesThe general Bellare-Rogaway constructionIND

  1. Theory and modeling group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of the Theory and Modeling Group meeting was to identify scientists engaged or interested in theoretical work pertinent to the Max '91 program, and to encourage theorists to pursue modeling which is directly relevant to data which can be expected to result from the program. A list of participants and their institutions is presented. Two solar flare paradigms were discussed during the meeting -- the importance of magnetic reconnection in flares and the applicability of numerical simulation results to solar flare studies.

  2. Grouping Notes Through Nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dove, Graham; Abildgaard, Sille Julie; Biskjær, Michael Mose

    2017-01-01

    , both individually and when grouped, and their role in categorisation in semantic long-term memory. To do this, we adopt a multimodal analytical approach focusing on interaction between humans, and between humans and artefacts, alongside language. We discuss in detail examples of four different...... externalisation functions served by Post-ItTM notes, and show how these functions are present in complex overlapping combinations rather than being discrete. We then show how the temporal development of Post-ItTM note interactions supports categorisation qualities of semantic long-term memory....

  3. Grouping Notes Through Nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dove, Graham; Abildgaard, Sille Julie Jøhnk; Biskjær, Michael Mose

    , both individually and when grouped, and their role in categorisation in semantic long-term memory. To do this, we adopt a multimodal analytical approach focusing on interaction between humans, and between humans and artefacts, alongside language. We discuss in detail examples of four different...... externalisation functions served by Post-ItTM notes, and show how these functions are present in complex overlapping combinations rather than being discrete. We then show how the temporal development of Post-ItTM note interactions supports categorisation qualities of semantic long-term memory....

  4. Notes on quantum groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pressley, A.; Chari, V. (King' s Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Mathematics Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Bombay (India). School of Mathematics)

    1990-12-01

    The authors presents an introduction to quantum groups defined as a deformation of the universal enveloping algebra of a Lie algebra. After the description of Hopf algebras with some examples the approach of Drinfel'd and Jimbo is described, where the quantization of a Lie algebra represents a Hopf algebra, defined over the algebra of formal power series in an indetermined h. The authors show that this approach arises from a r-matrix, which satisfies the classical Yang-Baxter equation. As example quantum sl{sub 2} is considered. Furthermore the approaches of Manin and Woroniwicz and the R-matrix approach are described. (HSI).

  5. Groups and symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Farmer, David W

    1995-01-01

    In most mathematics textbooks, the most exciting part of mathematics-the process of invention and discovery-is completely hidden from the reader. The aim of Groups and Symmetry is to change all that. By means of a series of carefully selected tasks, this book leads readers to discover some real mathematics. There are no formulas to memorize; no procedures to follow. The book is a guide: Its job is to start you in the right direction and to bring you back if you stray too far. Discovery is left to you. Suitable for a one-semester course at the beginning undergraduate level, there are no prerequ

  6. Moderators of the effects of group-based physical exercise on cancer survivors' quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalter, Joeri; Buffart, Laurien M; Korstjens, Irene; van Weert, Ellen; Brug, Johannes; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Mesters, Ilse; van den Borne, Bart; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E H M; Ros, Wynand J G; May, Anne M

    2015-09-01

    This study explored demographic, clinical, and psychological moderators of the effect of a group-based physical exercise intervention on global quality of life (QoL) among cancer survivors who completed treatment. Cancer survivors were assigned to a 12-week physical exercise (n = 147) or a wait-list control group (n = 62). The main outcome measure was global QoL, assessed with the EORTC QLQ-C30 at baseline and 12 weeks later. Potential moderators were age, gender, education level, marital status, employment status, type of treatment, time since treatment, the presence of comorbidities, fatigue, general self-efficacy, depression, and anxiety. Linear regression analyses were used to test effect modification of the intervention by each moderator variable using interaction tests (p ≤ 0.10). The physical exercise intervention effect on global QoL was larger for cancer survivors who received radiotherapy (β = 10.3, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 4.4; 16.2) than for cancer survivors who did not receive radiotherapy (β = 1.8, 95 % CI = -5.9; 9.5, p interaction = 0.10), larger for cancer survivors who received a combination of chemoradiotherapy (β = 13.0, 95 % CI = 6.0; 20.1) than for those who did not receive this combination of treatments (β = 2.5, 95 % CI = -3.7; 8.7, p interaction = 0.02), and larger for cancer survivors with higher baseline levels of fatigue (β = 12.6, 95 % CI = 5.7; 19.6) than for those with lower levels (β = 2.4, 95 % CI = -3.9; 8.7, p interaction = 0.03). No other moderating effects were found. This study suggests that cancer treatment modality and baseline fatigue levels moderate the effect of a physical exercise program on cancer survivors'global QoL.

  7. AO Group Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, S

    2005-10-04

    The Adaptive Optics (AO) Group in I Division develops and tests a broad range of advanced wavefront control technologies. Current applications focus on: Remote sensing, High power lasers, Astronomy, and Human vision. In the area of remote sensing, the AO Group leads a collaborative effort with LLNL's Nonproliferation, Arms Control & International Security (NAI) Directorate on Enhanced Surveillance Imaging. The ability to detect and identify individual people or vehicles from long-range is an important requirement for proliferation detection and homeland security. High-resolution imaging along horizontal paths through the atmosphere is limited by turbulence, which blurs and distorts the image. For ranges over {approx}one km, visible image resolution can be reduced by over an order of magnitude. We have developed an approach based on speckle imaging that can correct the turbulence-induced blurring and provide high resolution imagery. The system records a series of short exposure images which freeze the atmospheric effects. We can then estimate the image magnitude and phase using a bispectral estimation algorithm which cancels the atmospheric effects while maintaining object information at the diffraction limit of the imaging system.

  8. Social group and mobbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltezarević Vesna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Our reality, having been subject to the numerous social crises during the last decades of the 20th century, is characterized by frequent incidences of powerlessness and alienation. The man is more frequently a subject to loneliness and overcomes the feeling of worthlessness, no matter whether he considers himself an individual or a part of a whole larger social. Such an environment leads to development of aggression in all fields of ones life. This paper has as an objective the pointing out of the mental harassment that is manifested in the working environment. There is a prevalence of mobbing cases, as a mode of pathological communication. The result of this is that a person, subjected to this kind of abuse, is soon faced with social isolation. This research also aspires to initiate the need for social groups self-organization of which victims are part of. The reaction modality of a social group directly conditions the outcome of the deliberate social drama, one is subjected to it as a result of mobbing.

  9. ATLAS Detector Interface Group

    CERN Multimedia

    Mapelli, L

    Originally organised as a sub-system in the DAQ/EF-1 Prototype Project, the Detector Interface Group (DIG) was an information exchange channel between the Detector systems and the Data Acquisition to provide critical detector information for prototype design and detector integration. After the reorganisation of the Trigger/DAQ Project and of Technical Coordination, the necessity to provide an adequate context for integration of detectors with the Trigger and DAQ lead to organisation of the DIG as one of the activities of Technical Coordination. Such an organisation emphasises the ATLAS wide coordination of the Trigger and DAQ exploitation aspects, which go beyond the domain of the Trigger/DAQ project itself. As part of Technical Coordination, the DIG provides the natural environment for the common work of Trigger/DAQ and detector experts. A DIG forum for a wide discussion of all the detector and Trigger/DAQ integration issues. A more restricted DIG group for the practical organisation and implementation o...

  10. Communication from ST Group

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    In order to prepare the organization of the Open Days, please note that FM Group will not able to take into account either specific requests for waste collection from 2nd to 6th of April, either removal or PC transport requests between the 31st and the 11th of March. We kindly ask you to plan the collection of any type of waste and the urgent transport of office furniture or PC before the 31st of March. Waste collection requests shall be formulated contacting FM Support at 77777 or at the email address mailto:Fm.Support@cern.ch; removal of office furniture or PC transport requests must be made using the EDH ‘Transport request’ form selecting the "Removals" or the "PC transport" category from the drop-down menu. For any question concerning the waste sorting, please consult the following web address: http://dechets-waste.web.cern.ch/dechets-waste/. Thank you for your understanding and collaboration. TS/FM Group

  11. Group Life Insurance

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration would like to remind you that staff members and fellows have the possibility to take out a life insurance contract on favourable terms through a Group Life Insurance.   This insurance is provided by the company Helvetia and is available to you on a voluntary basis. The premium, which varies depending on the age and gender of the person insured, is calculated on the basis of the amount of the death benefit chosen by the staff member/fellow and can be purchased in slices of 10,000 CHF.    The contract normally ends at the retirement age (65/67 years) or when the staff member/fellow leaves the Organization. The premium is deducted monthly from the payroll.   Upon retirement, the staff member can opt to maintain his membership under certain conditions.   More information about Group Life Insurance can be found at: Regulations (in French) Table of premiums The Pension Fund Benefit Service &...

  12. Optimised Renormalisation Group Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F

    2001-01-01

    Exact renormalisation group (ERG) flows interpolate between a microscopic or classical theory and the corresponding macroscopic or quantum effective theory. For most problems of physical interest, the efficiency of the ERG is constrained due to unavoidable approximations. Approximate solutions of ERG flows depend spuriously on the regularisation scheme which is determined by a regulator function. This is similar to the spurious dependence on the ultraviolet regularisation known from perturbative QCD. Providing a good control over approximated ERG flows is at the root for reliable physical predictions. We explain why the convergence of approximate solutions towards the physical theory is optimised by appropriate choices of the regulator. We study specific optimised regulators for bosonic and fermionic fields and compare the optimised ERG flows with generic ones. This is done up to second order in the derivative expansion at both vanishing and non-vanishing temperature. An optimised flow for a ``proper-time ren...

  13. Doing focus group research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Laura Bang

    2014-01-01

    that interview data can be of some use if the distinction between natural and contrived data is given up and replaced with a distinction between interview data as topic or as resource. In greater detail, such scholars argue that interview data are perfectly adequate if the researcher wants to study the topic......Scholars of ethnomethodologically informed discourse studies are often sceptical of the use of interview data such as focus group data. Some scholars quite simply reject interview data with reference to a general preference for so-called naturally occurring data. Other scholars acknowledge...... of interview interaction, but inadequate as data for studying phenomena that go beyond the phenomenon of interview interaction. Neither of these more and less sceptical positions are, on the face of it, surprising due to the ethnomethodological commitment to study social order as accomplished in situ...

  14. Working Group Report: Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  15. Graphs, groups and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    White, AT

    1985-01-01

    The field of topological graph theory has expanded greatly in the ten years since the first edition of this book appeared. The original nine chapters of this classic work have therefore been revised and updated. Six new chapters have been added, dealing with: voltage graphs, non-orientable imbeddings, block designs associated with graph imbeddings, hypergraph imbeddings, map automorphism groups and change ringing.Thirty-two new problems have been added to this new edition, so that there are now 181 in all; 22 of these have been designated as ``difficult'''' and 9 as ``unsolved''''. Three of the four unsolved problems from the first edition have been solved in the ten years between editions; they are now marked as ``difficult''''.

  16. [Group A streptococcal meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhadi, Z; Sadiki, H; Lehlimi, M; Honsali, Z; Najib, J; Zerouali, K; Belabess, H; Mdaghri, N

    2012-12-01

    An increased incidence and severity of invasive group A streptococcus (GAS) infections over the past decade have been reported by several authors, but GAS remains an uncommon cause of bacterial meningitis. The aim of this study was to describe and analyze the clinical and biological data of GAS meningitis by reporting 10 new cases of pediatric GAS meningitis and making a literature review. The mean age of patients, seven girls and three boys, was 3 years. There was a history of preexisting or concomitant community-acquired infection in five patients over 10. The outcome was fatal in two cases. All patients received an initial empirical antimicrobial therapy with a third generation cephalosporin switched in six cases to amoxicillin. The prognosis for this type of streptococcal meningitis is usually good, but death may occur even in children without any identified risk factor for severe infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Group life insurance

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration wishes to inform staff members and fellows having taken out optional life insurance under the group contract signed by CERN that the following changes to the rules and regulations entered into force on 1 January 2013:   The maximum age for an active member has been extended from 65 to 67 years. The beneficiary clause now allows insured persons to designate one or more persons of their choice to be their beneficiary(-ies), either at the time of taking out the insurance or at a later date, in which case the membership/modification form must be updated accordingly. Beneficiaries must be clearly identified (name, first name, date of birth, address).   The membership/modification form is available on the FP website: http://fp.web.cern.ch/helvetia-life-insurance For further information, please contact: Valentina Clavel (Tel. 73904) Peggy Pithioud (Tel. 72736)

  18. Emotional collectives : How groups shape emotions and emotions shape groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kleef, G.A.; Fischer, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Group settings are epicentres of emotional activity. Yet, the role of emotions in groups is poorly understood. How do group-level phenomena shape group members’ emotional experience and expression? How are emotional expressions recognised, interpreted and shared in group settings? And how do such

  19. Decline in Tested and Self-Reported Cognitive Functioning After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation for Lung Cancer: Pooled Secondary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Randomized Trials 0212 and 0214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondi, Vinai, E-mail: vgondi@chicagocancer.org [Central Dupage Hospital Cancer Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States); University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bruner, Deborah W. [Nell Hodgson Woodfull School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Meyers, Christina A. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gore, Elizabeth M. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Wolfson, Aaron [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sun, Alexander Y. [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern Moncreif Cancer Center, Fort Worth, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on self-reported cognitive functioning (SRCF), a functional scale on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0214 randomized patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer to PCI or observation; RTOG 0212 randomized patients with limited-disease small cell lung cancer to high- or standard-dose PCI. In both trials, Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT)-Recall and -Delayed Recall and SRCF were assessed at baseline (after locoregional therapy but before PCI or observation) and at 6 and 12 months. Patients developing brain relapse before follow-up evaluation were excluded. Decline was defined using the reliable change index method and correlated with receipt of PCI versus observation using logistic regression modeling. Fisher's exact test correlated decline in SRCF with HVLT decline. Results: Of the eligible patients pooled from RTOG 0212 and RTOG 0214, 410 (93%) receiving PCI and 173 (96%) undergoing observation completed baseline HVLT or EORTC QLQ-C30 testing and were included in this analysis. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was associated with a higher risk of decline in SRCF at 6 months (odds ratio 3.60, 95% confidence interval 2.34-6.37, P<.0001) and 12 months (odds ratio 3.44, 95% confidence interval 1.84-6.44, P<.0001). Decline on HVLT-Recall at 6 and 12 months was also associated with PCI (P=.002 and P=.002, respectively) but was not closely correlated with decline in SRCF at the same time points (P=.05 and P=.86, respectively). Conclusions: In lung cancer patients who do not develop brain relapse, PCI is associated with decline in HVLT-tested and self-reported cognitive functioning. Decline in HVLT and decline in SRCF are not closely correlated, suggesting that they may represent distinct elements of the cognitive spectrum.

  20. Disputing deindividuation : Why negative group behaviours derive from group norms, not group immersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reicher, Stephen David; Spears, Russell; Postmes, Tom; Kendec, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Strong social identity does not lead to lack of accountability and "bad" behavior in groups and crowds but rather causes group behavior to be driven by group norms. The solution to problematic group behavior is therefore not to individualize the group but rather to change group norms, as underlined

  1. The trophic groups in Coleoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Marinoni, Renato C.

    2001-01-01

    The beetles are a useful group for studies on trophic structure of communities, mainly in forested areas. These kind of studies are based on food habits of species groups. The different terms applied to nomminated these groups (trophic category, ecologic group, trophic group, guild, trophic guild) are discussed. The term trophic group, a natural unity, is proposed to form a group of species with the same food habits, not considering the trophic level. The guild, an artificial unity, is recogn...

  2. Reflexive Analysis of Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Vladimir A.

    This chapter develops further a model I previously introduced, of an agent facing a choice between the positive and the negative poles. Here I will consider agents whose individual behavior depends on a ‘society’ compounded by all of them. Four ideas underlie the theory. The first idea is to consider relationships between the subgroups of agents, not just pairs of agents; this idea allows us to represent a decomposable graph corresponding to an agent or a group of agents as a tree of subgraphs. The second idea is to establish a correspondence between decomposable graphs and polynomials, allowing us to replace a tree of subgraphs with a tree of polynomials representing a computational process. The third idea consists of the interpretation of the tree of polynomials as an agent who has images of the self, which can have images of the self, etc. Finally, the fourth idea is putting an equation into correspondence to the agent, allowing us to find out the agent’s state. The theory is illustrated here with several examples from modern geopolitics, including scenarios of current interest.

  3. Naive Theories of Social Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    Four studies examined children's (ages 3-10, Total N = 235) naive theories of social groups, in particular, their expectations about how group memberships constrain social interactions. After introduction to novel groups of people, preschoolers (ages 3-5) reliably expected agents from one group to harm members of the other group (rather than…

  4. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beier, Eugene; /Pennsylvania U.; Butler, Joel; /Fermilab; Dawson, Sally; /Brookhaven; Edwards, Helen; /Fermilab; Himel, Thomas; /SLAC; Holmes, Stephen; /Fermilab; Kim, Young-Kee; /Fermilab /Chicago U.; Lankford, Andrew; /UC, Irvine; McGinnis, David; /Fermilab; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOVA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the

  5. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steering Group, Fermilab; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOvA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the

  6. Group B Streptococcus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... B Strep and Pregnancy • What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? • What does it mean to be colonized ... planned cesarean birth? •Glossary What is group B streptococcus (GBS)? Group B streptococcus is one of the ...

  7. BLOOD GROUPS AND AFFECTIVE DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, P. Lakshmi; Puttaram, Sowbhagya; Rao, B.S. Sridhara Rama; Khanna, Sumant; Channabasavanna, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    SUMMARY An analysis was made of the distribution of various blood groups in subjects with affective disorders. A group of healthy subjects served as controls. The distribution showed lack of association of affective disorder and any blood groups.

  8. On surjectively universal Polish groups

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Longyun

    2012-01-01

    A Polish group is surjectively universal if it can be continuously homomorphically mapped onto every Polish group. Making use of a type of new metrics on free groups \\cite{DG}, we prove the existence of surjectively universal Polish groups, answering in the positive a question of Kechris. In fact, we give several examples of surjectively universal Polish groups. We find a sufficient condition to guarantee that the new metrics on free groups can be computed directly. We also compare this condi...

  9. Harmonic Analysis and Group Representation

    CERN Document Server

    Figa-Talamanca, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    This title includes: Lectures - A. Auslander, R. Tolimeri - Nilpotent groups and abelian varieties, M Cowling - Unitary and uniformly bounded representations of some simple Lie groups, M. Duflo - Construction de representations unitaires d'un groupe de Lie, R. Howe - On a notion of rank for unitary representations of the classical groups, V.S. Varadarajan - Eigenfunction expansions of semisimple Lie groups, and R. Zimmer - Ergodic theory, group representations and rigidity; and, Seminars - A. Koranyi - Some applications of Gelfand pairs in classical analysis.

  10. The path group construction of Lie group extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizman, Cornelia

    2008-07-01

    We present an explicit realization of abelian extensions of infinite dimensional Lie groups using abelian extensions of path groups, by generalizing Mickelsson's approach to loop groups and the approach of Losev-Moore-Nekrasov-Shatashvili to current groups. We apply our method to coupled cocycles on current Lie algebras and to Lichnerowicz cocycles on the Lie algebra of divergence free vector fields.

  11. Group Development and Situational Leadership: A Model for Managing Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carew, Donald K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    An integration of the concepts of situational leadership with what is known about group development and functioning of work groups is discussed as a tool in helping managers, trainers, and group members understand group development and determine the appropriate leader behaviors to use in various situations to build unified, cohesive, and…

  12. Group Leader Development: Effects of Personal Growth and Psychoeducational Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt, Jonathan H.; Robinson, E. H., III; Hagedorn, W. Bryce

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to compare the effects of personal growth groups and psychoeducational groups on counselor education students' (n = 74) empathy and group leader self-efficacy. Additionally, we compared the degree to which participants in each group valued: (a) cohesion, (b) catharsis, and (c) insight. There were no…

  13. Emotional collectives: How groups shape emotions and emotions shape groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Gerben A; Fischer, Agneta H

    2016-01-01

    Group settings are epicentres of emotional activity. Yet, the role of emotions in groups is poorly understood. How do group-level phenomena shape group members' emotional experience and expression? How are emotional expressions recognised, interpreted and shared in group settings? And how do such expressions influence the emotions, cognitions and behaviours of fellow group members and outside observers? To answer these and other questions, we draw on relevant theoretical perspectives (e.g., intergroup emotions theory, social appraisal theory and emotions as social information theory) and recent empirical findings regarding the role of emotions in groups. We organise our review according to two overarching themes: how groups shape emotions and how emotions shape groups. We show how novel empirical approaches break important new ground in uncovering the role of emotions in groups. Research on emotional collectives is thriving and constitutes a key to understanding the social nature of emotions.

  14. Platinum-group elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Michael L.; Loferski, Patricia J.; Parks, Heather L.; Schulte, Ruth F.; Seal, Robert R.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    The platinum-group elements (PGEs)—platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and osmium—are metals that have similar physical and chemical properties and tend to occur together in nature. PGEs are indispensable to many industrial applications but are mined in only a few places. The availability and accessibility of PGEs could be disrupted by economic, environmental, political, and social events. The United States net import reliance as a percentage of apparent consumption is about 90 percent.PGEs have many industrial applications. They are used in catalytic converters to reduce carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and nitrous oxide emissions in automobile exhaust. The chemical industry requires platinum or platinum-rhodium alloys to manufacture nitric oxide, which is the raw material used to manufacture explosives, fertilizers, and nitric acid. In the petrochemical industry, platinum-supported catalysts are needed to refine crude oil and to produce aromatic compounds and high-octane gasoline. Alloys of PGEs are exceptionally hard and durable, making them the best known coating for industrial crucibles used in the manufacture of chemicals and synthetic materials. PGEs are used by the glass manufacturing industry in the production of fiberglass and flat-panel and liquid crystal displays. In the electronics industry, PGEs are used in computer hard disks, hybridized integrated circuits, and multilayer ceramic capacitors.Aside from their industrial applications, PGEs are used in such other fields as health, consumer goods, and finance. Platinum, for example, is used in medical implants, such as pacemakers, and PGEs are used in cancer-fighting drugs. Platinum alloys are an ideal choice for jewelry because of their white color, strength, and resistance to tarnish. Platinum, palladium, and rhodium in the form of coins and bars are also used as investment commodities, and various financial instruments based on the value of these PGEs are traded on major exchanges

  15. Qualitative research. Introducing focus groups.

    OpenAIRE

    Kitzinger, J

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces focus group methodology, gives advice on group composition, running the groups, and analysing the results. Focus groups have advantages for researchers in the field of health and medicine: they do not discriminate against people who cannot read or write and they can encourage participation from people reluctant to be interviewed on their own or who feel they have nothing to say.

  16. A Typology for Finite Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tou, Erik R

    2013-01-01

    This project classifies groups of small order using a group's center as the key feature. Groups of a given order "n" are typed based on the order of each group's center. Students are led through a sequence of exercises that combine proof-writing, independent research, and an analysis of specific classes of finite groups…

  17. Anomaly-safe discrete groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu-Chun Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that there is a class of finite groups, the so-called perfect groups, which cannot exhibit anomalies. This implies that all non-Abelian finite simple groups are anomaly-free. On the other hand, non-perfect groups generically suffer from anomalies. We present two different ways that allow one to understand these statements.

  18. Exotic group C*-algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Wiersma, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Let $\\Gamma$ be a discrete group. When $\\Gamma$ is nonamenable, the reduced and full group $C$*-algebras differ and it is generally believed that there should be many intermediate $C$*-algebras, however few examples are known. In this paper we give new constructions and compare existing constructions of intermediate group $C$*-algebras for both generic and specific groups $\\Gamma$.

  19. On orderability of topological groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rangan

    1985-01-01

    can be induced by a total order compatible with the group structure is given and such groups are called ordered or orderable topological groups. A separable totally disconnected ordered topological group is proved to be non-archimedean metrizable while the converse is shown to be false by means of an example. A necessary and sufficient condition for a no-totally disconnected locally compact abelian group to be orderable is also given.

  20. Does group efficacy increase group identification? Resolving their paradoxical relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zomeren, Martijn; Leach, Colin Wayne; Spears, Russell

    2010-01-01

    Although group identification and group efficacy are both important predictors of collective action against collective disadvantage, there is mixed evidence for their (causal) relationship. Meta-analytic and correlational evidence suggests an overall positive relationship that has been interpreted

  1. Group recommendation with automatic detection and classification of groups

    OpenAIRE

    Boratto, Ludovico

    2012-01-01

    This PhD thesis presents ART (Automatic Recommendation Technologies), a set of group recommendation algorithms that detect groups of users with similar preferences. With respect to classic group recommendation, the first step that such systems have to compute is the detection of groups of people with similar preferences, in order to respect the constraint on the number of recommendations that can be produced and maximize users’ satisfaction.

  2. Structuring the Group Experience: A Format for Designing Psychoeducational Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, Susan R.

    2000-01-01

    Presents six-step model for moving from a general statement of purpose to a psychoeducational group design that includes didactic content, experiential activities, and processing. By following this model the group facilitator will be able to develop a psychoeducational group that provides a logical sequence of learning activities fostering…

  3. How Much "Group" Is There in Online Group Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The ability to work in groups across time and space has become a frequent requirement for the workplace and is increasingly common in higher education, but there is a surprising lack of research on how online groups work. This research applies analytic approaches used in studies of face-to-face classroom "talk" to multiple groups in two…

  4. Quantization on nilpotent Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a consistent development of the Kohn-Nirenberg type global quantization theory in the setting of graded nilpotent Lie groups in terms of their representations. It contains a detailed exposition of related background topics on homogeneous Lie groups, nilpotent Lie groups, and the analysis of Rockland operators on graded Lie groups together with their associated Sobolev spaces. For the specific example of the Heisenberg group the theory is illustrated in detail. In addition, the book features a brief account of the corresponding quantization theory in the setting of compact Lie groups. The monograph is the winner of the 2014 Ferran Sunyer i Balaguer Prize.

  5. Group analysis of differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ovsiannikov, L V

    1982-01-01

    Group Analysis of Differential Equations provides a systematic exposition of the theory of Lie groups and Lie algebras and its application to creating algorithms for solving the problems of the group analysis of differential equations.This text is organized into eight chapters. Chapters I to III describe the one-parameter group with its tangential field of vectors. The nonstandard treatment of the Banach Lie groups is reviewed in Chapter IV, including a discussion of the complete theory of Lie group transformations. Chapters V and VI cover the construction of partial solution classes for the g

  6. Saving Face and Group Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor; Mao, Lei; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    2015-01-01

    Are people willing to sacrifice resources to save one's and others' face? In a laboratory experiment, we study whether individuals forego resources to avoid the public exposure of the least performer in their group. We show that a majority of individuals are willing to pay to preserve not only...... their self- but also other group members' image. This behavior is frequent even in the absence of group identity. When group identity is more salient, individuals help regardless of whether the least performer is an in-group or an out-group. This suggests that saving others' face is a strong social norm....

  7. group

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    communities and tradition of communities that farours having a larger number of children (3). Traditional family planning methods constitute a considerable proportion of thecontraceptive methods used in both urban and rural Ethiopia. The socio- cultural factors that affect decisions regarding fertility and fertility regulation in ...

  8. Cognitive Development and Group Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidla, Debie D.

    1990-01-01

    Attempts to integrate Perry's (1970) scheme of the cognitive development of college students with a model of group development adapted by Waldo (1985) based on Tuckman's (1965) formulation of developmental group stages. (Author)

  9. Group discussion improves lie detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nadav Klein; Nicholas Epley

    2015-01-01

    ... identify when a person is lying. These experiments demonstrate that the group advantage in lie detection comes through the process of group discussion, and is not a product of aggregating individual opinions...

  10. Group performance and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Norbert L; Tindale, R Scott

    2004-01-01

    Theory and research on small group performance and decision making is reviewed. Recent trends in group performance research have found that process gains as well as losses are possible, and both are frequently explained by situational and procedural contexts that differentially affect motivation and resource coordination. Research has continued on classic topics (e.g., brainstorming, group goal setting, stress, and group performance) and relatively new areas (e.g., collective induction). Group decision making research has focused on preference combination for continuous response distributions and group information processing. New approaches (e.g., group-level signal detection) and traditional topics (e.g., groupthink) are discussed. New directions, such as nonlinear dynamic systems, evolutionary adaptation, and technological advances, should keep small group research vigorous well into the future.

  11. Visual grouping in menu interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Brumby, D. P.; Zhuang, S

    2015-01-01

    Menu interfaces often arrange options into semantic groups. This semantic structure is then usually conveyed to the user by supplementary visual grouping cues. We investigate whether these visual grouping cues actually help users locate items in menus faster, and whether there is potential for these powerful grouping cues to impede search when used inappropriately. Thirty-six participants performed known-item searches of word menus. These menus differed along three dimensions: (1) whether vis...

  12. Chermak-Delgado Simple Groups

    OpenAIRE

    McCulloch, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides the first steps in classifying the finite solvable groups having Property A, which is a property involving abelian normal subgroups. We see that this classification is reduced to classifying the solvable Chermak-Delgado simple groups, which the author defines. The author completes a classification of Chermak-Delgado simple groups under certain restrictions on the primes involved in the group order.

  13. Costs of Control in Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Riener, Gerhard; Wiederhold, Simon

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the role of social groups in explaining the reaction to control.We propose a simple model with a principal using control devices and a controlledagent, which incorporates the existence of social groups. Testing experimentally theconjectures derived from the model and related literature, we find that agents in socialgroups (i) perform more than other (no-group) agents; (ii) expect less control thanno-group agents; (iii) decrease their performance substantially when actual c...

  14. Stereotypes of Norwegian Social Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Bye, Hege Høivik; Herrebrøden, Henrik; Hjetland, Gunnhild J; Røyset, Guro Ø.; Westby, Linda L.

    2014-01-01

    We present a pilot study and two main studies that address the nature of stereotypes of social groups in Norway within the framework of the Stereotype Content Model (SCM). The first study focused on stereotypes of a wide range of groups across categories such as gender, age, religious conviction, socioeconomic and health status. The second study focused on stereotypes of immigrant groups. Participants (n?=?244 and n?=?63, respectively) rated the groups on perceived warmth, competence, status,...

  15. Criminal groups and criminal subculture

    OpenAIRE

    Romanova N.M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a classification of criminal groups, structured by the following parameters: a) operation mode (secret/open), b) law-enforcement and administrative support (presence/absence). We describe four types of criminal groups: a) legitimized criminal organization, b) secret criminal organization engaged in illegal business, c) secret general crime group, and d) general crime group operating openly. The four types differ in the content of criminal subculture. Modern criminal subcult...

  16. Strategies for Successful Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipp, Mary Beth; Palenque, Stephanie Maher

    2017-01-01

    The thought of group work, or CLC Groups often strikes fear and loathing in the hearts and minds of both students and instructors. According to Swan, Shen, and Hiltz (2006) collaborative work presents the possibilities of many difficulties including a largely unequal contribution of group participants, an inability of the students to manage the…

  17. Conceptualizing Group Flow: A Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Jana; West, Richard E.

    2018-01-01

    This literature review discusses the similarities in main themes between Csikszentmihályi theory of individual flow and Sawyer theory of group flow, and compares Sawyer's theory with existing concepts in the literature on group work both in education and business. Because much creativity and innovation occurs within groups, understanding group…

  18. The Ethics of Group Contingencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapon-Shevin, Mara

    Group contingencies structure situations which link individual behavior with group outcomes, attempting to change behavior through peer pressure. As such, group contingencies raise numerous methodological and ethical problems, and illuminate the relationship between what data is collected and what subsequent decisions can be made. Over 100…

  19. Relationship Groups in SNOMED CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornet, Ronald; Schulz, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Relationship groups are a construct which is particular for the representation of concepts in SNOMED CT. In this paper, the July 2008 version of SNOMED CT is analyzed to determine the usage of relationship groups. Relationship groups are used with 36 out of 65 relations, playing a role in 28% of all

  20. Communication Factors of Group Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Sanford; And Others

    In order to determine the communication factors of group leadership, 500 undergraduates enrolled in an introductory communication theory course at a large New England university were randomly assigned to laboratory sections of 25 students each. Over an eight week period the students in each group redistributed into different groups varying in size…

  1. Designing for informed group formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh; Juel Jacobsen, Alice; Riis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    A new design ―project preparation‖ preparing for the group formation in problem based project work is proposed and investigated. The main problem is to overcome group formation based on existing relations. The hypothesis is that theme development and group formation are somewhat counterproductive...

  2. Group Process: A Systematic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, Albert E.; Radl, Myrna C.

    1984-01-01

    Identifies components of group process and describes leader functions. Discusses personal elements, focus of interaction/psychological distance, group development, content, quality of interaction, and self-reflective/meaning attribution, illustrated by a case study of a group of persons (N=5) arrested for drunk driving. (JAC)

  3. Ultrafilters and topologies on groups

    CERN Document Server

    Zelenyuk, Yevhen

    2011-01-01

    This book presents the relationship between ultrafilters and topologies on groups. It shows how ultrafilters are used in constructing topologies on groups with extremal properties and how topologies on groups serve in deriving algebraic results aboutultrafilters. Topics covered include: topological and left topological groups, ultrafilter semigroups, local homomorphisms and automorphisms, subgroups and ideal structure of ßG, almost maximal spaces and projectives of finite semigroups, resolvability of groups. This is a self-contained book aimed at graduate students and researchers working in to

  4. Concave 1-norm group selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dingfeng; Huang, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Grouping structures arise naturally in many high-dimensional problems. Incorporation of such information can improve model fitting and variable selection. Existing group selection methods, such as the group Lasso, require correct membership. However, in practice it can be difficult to correctly specify group membership of all variables. Thus, it is important to develop group selection methods that are robust against group mis-specification. Also, it is desirable to select groups as well as individual variables in many applications. We propose a class of concave [Formula: see text]-norm group penalties that is robust to grouping structure and can perform bi-level selection. A coordinate descent algorithm is developed to calculate solutions of the proposed group selection method. Theoretical convergence of the algorithm is proved under certain regularity conditions. Comparison with other methods suggests the proposed method is the most robust approach under membership mis-specification. Simulation studies and real data application indicate that the [Formula: see text]-norm concave group selection approach achieves better control of false discovery rates. An R package grppenalty implementing the proposed method is available at CRAN. © Published by Oxford University Press 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  5. Group marginalization: extending research on interpersonal rejection to small groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Kevin R; Hinsz, Verlin B

    2013-11-01

    An extensive research literature has examined the reactions of individuals facing interpersonal rejection. Small groups can also be rejected, but current research tells us little about the experiences of groups and their members directly. We integrate findings from various literatures to gain insight into shared rejection experiences and their outcomes. Of most practical importance, we argue that groups can be expected to react with more hostility than individuals when rejected. Four existing models that account for how group processes might alter such reactions are examined: a need-threat model, a rejection-identification model, a multimotive model, and a dual attitudes model. Aspects of these models are then integrated into a unifying framework that is useful for understanding hostile reactions to group marginalization. Implications for natural groups such as terrorist cells, school cliques, racial and ethnic minorities, and gangs are discussed.

  6. Risk behaviour and group formation in microcredit groups in Eritrea

    OpenAIRE

    Lensink, B.W.; Mehrteab, H.T.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a survey in 2001 among members and group leaders of borrowers who accessed loans from two microcredit programs in Eritrea. Using the results from this survey, this paper aims to provide new insights into the empirical relevance of the homogeneous matching hypothesis for microcredit groups in Eritrea. Since the methodology to test for homogeneous matching needs estimating risk behaviour, the paper also provides new evidence on risk behaviour of members of microcredit groups in Eri...

  7. A product for permutation groups and topological groups

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Simon M.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new product for permutation groups. It takes as input two permutation groups, $M$ and $N$ and produces an infinite group $M\\boxtimes N$ which carries many of the permutational properties of $M$ . Under mild conditions on $M$ and $N$ the group $M\\boxtimes N$ is simple. ¶ As a permutational product, its most significant property is the following: $M\\boxtimes N$ is primitive if and only if $M$ is primitive but not regular, and $N$ is transitive. Despite this remarkable simil...

  8. Neutrosophic Duplet Semi-Group and Cancellable Neutrosophic Triplet Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The notions of the neutrosophic triplet and neutrosophic duplet were introduced by Florentin Smarandache. From the existing research results, the neutrosophic triplets and neutrosophic duplets are completely different from the classical algebra structures. In this paper, we further study neutrosophic duplet sets, neutrosophic duplet semi-groups, and cancellable neutrosophic triplet groups. First, some new properties of neutrosophic duplet semi-groups are funded, and the following important result is proven: there is no finite neutrosophic duplet semi-group. Second, the new concepts of weak neutrosophic duplet, weak neutrosophic duplet set, and weak neutrosophic duplet semi-group are introduced, some examples are given by using the mathematical software MATLAB (MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA, USA, and the characterizations of cancellable weak neutrosophic duplet semi-groups are established. Third, the cancellable neutrosophic triplet groups are investigated, and the following important result is proven: the concept of cancellable neutrosophic triplet group and group coincide. Finally, the neutrosophic triplets and weak neutrosophic duplets in BCI-algebras are discussed.

  9. A product for permutation groups and topological groups

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Simon M

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new product for permutation groups. It takes as input two permutation groups, $M$ and $N$ and produces an infinite group $M\\boxtimes N$ which carries many of the permutational properties of $M$ . Under mild conditions on $M$ and $N$ the group $M\\boxtimes N$ is simple. ¶ As a permutational product, its most significant property is the following: $M\\boxtimes N$ is primitive if and only if $M$ is primitive but not regular, and $N$ is transitive. Despite this remarkable similarity ...

  10. Learning Groups: The Effects of Group Diversity on The Quality of Group Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelopo, Ismail; Asante, Joseph; Dart, Eleanor; Rufai, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the quality of reflection, and how group diversity affects group reflection by final-year accounting and finance undergraduates using Mezirow's [(1991). "Transformative dimensions of adult learning." San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass] reflection model. Group work and reflective writing are now common assessment features…

  11. Small group discussion: Students perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-08-01

    Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through self-learning. To develop soft skills, to understand principles of group dynamics, and adopt a new teaching learning methodology. Experimental study design was conducted in Phase I 1(st) year medical students of 2014-2015 batch (n = 120). On the day of the session, the students were grouped into small groups (15 each). The session started with the facilitator starting off the discussion. Feedback forms from five students in each group was taken (n = 40). A five point Likert scale was used ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Our results show that 70% of the students opined that small group discussion were interactive, friendly, innovative, built interaction between teacher and student. Small group discussion increased their thought process and helped them in better communication. The small group discussion was interactive, friendly, and bridged the gap between the teacher and student. The student's communication skills are also improved. In conclusion, small group discussion is more effective than the traditional teaching methods.

  12. Duality group actions on fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantev, Tony [Department of Mathematics, University of Pennsylvania,David Rittenhouse Laboratory, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6395 (United States); Sharpe, Eric [Department of Physics MC 0435, Virginia Tech,850 West Campus Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2016-11-29

    In this short paper we look at the action of T-duality and string duality groups on fermions, in maximally-supersymmetric theories and related theories. Briefly, we argue that typical duality groups such as SL(2,ℤ) have sign ambiguities in their actions on fermions, and propose that pertinent duality groups be extended by ℤ{sub 2}, to groups such as the metaplectic group. Specifically, we look at duality groups arising from mapping class groups of tori in M theory compactifications, T-duality, ten-dimensional type IIB S-duality, and (briefly) four-dimensional N=4 super Yang-Mills, and in each case, propose that the full duality group is a nontrivial ℤ{sub 2} extension of the duality group acting on bosonic degrees of freedom, to more accurately describe possible actions on fermions. We also walk through U-duality groups for toroidal compactifications to nine, eight, and seven dimensions, which enables us to perform cross-consistency tests of these proposals.

  13. Matching with Multiple Control Groups with Adjustment for Group Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Rubin, Donald B.

    2008-01-01

    When estimating causal effects from observational data, it is desirable to approximate a randomized experiment as closely as possible. This goal can often be achieved by choosing a subsample from the original control group that matches the treatment group on the distribution of the observed covariates. However, sometimes the original control group…

  14. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics sub-group

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    group. Coordinator: ASMITA MUKHERJEE7,∗. Working group members: R Basu1, H Dahiya2, L Gamberg3, R Godbole10,. S Gupta4, M C Kumar5, L Magnea6, P Mathews5, N Mathur4, A Mukherjee7,. P J Mulders8, V Ravindran9 and A Tripathi9.

  15. Working with Group-Tasks and Group Cohesiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Khoirul

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at exploring the connection between the use of group task and group cohesiveness. This study is very important because the nature of the learner's success is largely determined by the values of cooperation, interaction, and understanding of the learning objectives together. Subjects of this study are 28 students on the course…

  16. Group reports. The recommendations proposed by the seven discussion groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1989-01-01

    GROUP 1 — Discussion leader S.H. Sohmer — Organization and the ideal format of a large Flora (over 10,000 species) The Working Group first recognized that there are really two major categories of Flora projects serving quite different needs in the Malesian region: the local/national projects that

  17. Good for the group? Explaining apparent group-level selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smallegange, I.M.; Egas, M.

    2015-01-01

    The idea that group selection can explain adaptive trait evolution is still controversial. Recent empirical work proposes evidence for group-level adaptation in a social spider, but the findings can also be explained from an individual-level perspective. The challenge remains to identify situations

  18. Group Journaling: A Tool for Reflection, Fun and Group Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfeldt, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Personal journaling is common practice in outdoor programs and is an important means of reflection and meaning-making. For over 20 years the author has used group journals to promote reflection and understanding, raise important questions, explore difficult issues, develop writing and speaking skills, and enhance group development. In this…

  19. Pride, Shame and Group Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salice, Alessandro; Montes Sanchez, Alba

    2016-01-01

    of group identification. In particular, it generates evidence for the idea that group identification is a psychological process that the subject does not have to carry out intentionally in the sense that it is not necessarily triggered by the subject’s conative states like desires or intentions....... scenarios of shame and pride induced by others can be accommodated by taking seriously the consideration that, in such cases, the subject “group-identifies” with the other. This is the idea that, in feeling these forms of shame or pride, the subject is conceiving of herself as a member of the same group...... as the subject acting shamefully or in an admirable way. In other words, these peculiar emotive responses are elicited in the subject insofar as, and to the extent that, she is (or sees herself as being) a member of a group – the group to which those who act shamefully or admirably also belong. By looking...

  20. Geometric group theory an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Löh, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by classical geometry, geometric group theory has in turn provided a variety of applications to geometry, topology, group theory, number theory and graph theory. This carefully written textbook provides a rigorous introduction to this rapidly evolving field whose methods have proven to be powerful tools in neighbouring fields such as geometric topology. Geometric group theory is the study of finitely generated groups via the geometry of their associated Cayley graphs. It turns out that the essence of the geometry of such groups is captured in the key notion of quasi-isometry, a large-scale version of isometry whose invariants include growth types, curvature conditions, boundary constructions, and amenability. This book covers the foundations of quasi-geometry of groups at an advanced undergraduate level. The subject is illustrated by many elementary examples, outlooks on applications, as well as an extensive collection of exercises.

  1. Group discussion improves lie detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Nadav; Epley, Nicholas

    2015-06-16

    Groups of individuals can sometimes make more accurate judgments than the average individual could make alone. We tested whether this group advantage extends to lie detection, an exceptionally challenging judgment with accuracy rates rarely exceeding chance. In four experiments, we find that groups are consistently more accurate than individuals in distinguishing truths from lies, an effect that comes primarily from an increased ability to correctly identify when a person is lying. These experiments demonstrate that the group advantage in lie detection comes through the process of group discussion, and is not a product of aggregating individual opinions (a "wisdom-of-crowds" effect) or of altering response biases (such as reducing the "truth bias"). Interventions to improve lie detection typically focus on improving individual judgment, a costly and generally ineffective endeavor. Our findings suggest a cheap and simple synergistic approach of enabling group discussion before rendering a judgment.

  2. Statistics of sunspot group clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getko Ryszarda

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Zubrzycki method is utilized to find all sunspot groups which are close to each other during each Carrington rotation. The sunspot group areas and their positions for the years 1874–2008 are used. The descending, the ascending and the maximum phases of solar cycles for each solar hemisphere are considered separately. To establish the size of the region D where the clusters are searched, the correlation function dependent on the distance between two groups is applied. The method estimates the weighted area of each cluster. The weights dependent on the correlation function of distances between sunspot groups created each cluster. For each cluster the weighted position is also evaluated. The weights dependent on the areas of sunspot groups created a given cluster. The number distribution of the sunspot groups created each cluster and the cluster statistics within different phases of the 11-year cycle and within all considered solar cycles are also presented.

  3. Groups, graphs and random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Salvatori, Maura; Sava-Huss, Ecaterina

    2017-01-01

    An accessible and panoramic account of the theory of random walks on groups and graphs, stressing the strong connections of the theory with other branches of mathematics, including geometric and combinatorial group theory, potential analysis, and theoretical computer science. This volume brings together original surveys and research-expository papers from renowned and leading experts, many of whom spoke at the workshop 'Groups, Graphs and Random Walks' celebrating the sixtieth birthday of Wolfgang Woess in Cortona, Italy. Topics include: growth and amenability of groups; Schrödinger operators and symbolic dynamics; ergodic theorems; Thompson's group F; Poisson boundaries; probability theory on buildings and groups of Lie type; structure trees for edge cuts in networks; and mathematical crystallography. In what is currently a fast-growing area of mathematics, this book provides an up-to-date and valuable reference for both researchers and graduate students, from which future research activities will undoubted...

  4. Group theory and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Patra, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Every molecule possesses symmetry and hence has symmetry operations and symmetry elements. From symmetry properties of a system we can deduce its significant physical results. Consequently it is essential to operations of a system forms a group. Group theory is an abstract mathematical tool that underlies the study of symmetry and invariance. By using the concepts of symmetry and group theory, it is possible to obtain the members of complete set of known basis functions of the various irreducible representations of the group. I practice this is achieved by applying the projection operators to linear combinations of atomic orbital (LCAO) when the valence electrons are tightly bound to the ions, to orthogonalized plane waves (OPW) when valence electrons are nearly free and to the other given functions that are judged to the particular system under consideration. In solid state physics the group theory is indispensable in the context of finding the energy bands of electrons in solids. Group theory can be applied...

  5. Intergenerational Groups: Rediscovering our Legacy

    OpenAIRE

    Scott P. Anstadt; Deb Byster

    2009-01-01

    Intergenerational groups are a community-based group concept designed to engage and mobilize often untapped resources of older adults in effective interaction with younger populations. These groups support an atmosphere of synergistic interaction. Members of each generation share reflections on interpersonal strengths and capacities and rediscover emotional and spiritual anchors and bonding. Illustrated here is Community Connections (CC), developed using the phase driven participatory culture...

  6. Nondisclosure in psychotherapy group supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichelt, Sissel; Gullestad, Siri Erika; Hansen, Bjørg Røed

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate aspects of nondisclosure in a sample of 55 student therapists, working within a group format of supervision. The study constituted one part of a larger study, with the other, parallel part addressing nondisclosure in supervisors. The participants were...... of students experienced that the groups became more closed throughout the supervision, and blamed their supervisors for inadequate handling of the group process. This is an issue that needs further exploration....

  7. Membership Rules - LHCRRB Scrutiny Group

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The LHC Resources Scrutiny Group was created in 2001 to review and scrutinize the M&O cost estimates of the LHC Collaborations. The Scrutiny Group first met on 23 August 2001 and reported to the RRBs at its 13th Plenary meeting, in October 2001 (RRB-D-2001-8). The Scrutiny Group operates according to the procedures set out in Annex 12 of the MoUs for the M&O of the LHC experiments. This document lists the Rules of Procedure that apply to the M&O Scrutiny Group

  8. Code–checkable group rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Abdelghany

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A code over a group ring is defined to be a submodule of that group ring. For a code $C$ over a group ring $RG$, $C$ is said to be checkable if there is $v\\in RG$ such that {$C=\\{x\\in RG: xv=0\\}$}. In \\cite{r2}, Jitman et al. introduced the notion of code-checkable group ring. We say that a group ring $RG$ is code-checkable if every ideal in $RG$ is a checkable code. In their paper, Jitman et al. gave a necessary and sufficient condition for the group ring $\\mathbb{F}G$, when $\\mathbb{F}$ is a finite field and $G$ is a finite abelian group, to be code-checkable. In this paper, we give some characterizations for code-checkable group rings for more general alphabet. For instance, a finite commutative group ring $RG$, with $R$ is semisimple, is code-checkable if and only if $G$ is $\\pi'$-by-cyclic $\\pi$; where $\\pi$ is the set of noninvertible primes in $R$. Also, under suitable conditions, $RG$ turns out to be code-checkable if and only if it is pseudo-morphic.

  9. Extensions of the Poincare group

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Savvidy, George

    2011-01-01

    We construct an extension of the Poincare group which involves a mixture of internal and space-time supersymmetries. The resulting group is an extension of the superPoincare group with infinitely many generators which carry internal and space-time indices. It is a closed algebra since all Jacobi identities are satisfied and it has therefore explicit matrix representations. We investigate the massless case and construct the irreducible representations of the extended symmetry. They are divided into two sets, longitudinal and transversal representations. The transversal representations involve an infinite series of integer and half-integer helicities. Finally we suggest an extension of the conformal group along the same line.

  10. Strategic Groups and Banks’ Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorz Halaj

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The theory of strategic groups predicts the existence of stable groups of companies that adopt similar business strategies. The theory also predicts that groups will differ in performance and in their reaction to external shocks. We use cluster analysis to identify strategic groups in the Polish banking sector. We find stable groups in the Polish banking sector constituted after the year 2000 following the major privatisation and ownership changes connected with transition to the mostly-privately-owned banking sector in the late 90s. Using panel regression methods we show that the allocation of banks to groups is statistically significant in explaining the profitability of banks. Thus, breaking down the banks into strategic groups and allowing for the different reaction of the groups to external shocks helps in a more accurate explanation of profits of the banking sector as a whole.Therefore, a more precise ex ante assessment of the loss absorption capabilities of banks is possible, which is crucial for an analysis of banking sector stability. However, we did not find evidence of the usefulness of strategic groups in explaining the quality of bank portfolios as measured by irregular loans over total loans, which is a more direct way to assess risks to financial stability.

  11. Group theory and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Loebl, Ernest M

    1971-01-01

    Group Theory and its Applications, Volume II covers the two broad areas of applications of group theory, namely, all atomic and molecular phenomena, as well as all aspects of nuclear structure and elementary particle theory.This volume contains five chapters and begins with the representation and tensor operators of the unitary groups. The next chapter describes wave equations, both Schrödinger's and Dirac's for a wide variety of potentials. These topics are followed by discussions of the applications of dynamical groups in dealing with bound-state problems of atomic and molecular physics. A c

  12. Leadership in Moving Human Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, Margarete; Pritz, Johannes; Lange, Simon; Belz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    How is movement of individuals coordinated as a group? This is a fundamental question of social behaviour, encompassing phenomena such as bird flocking, fish schooling, and the innumerable activities in human groups that require people to synchronise their actions. We have developed an experimental paradigm, the HoneyComb computer-based multi-client game, to empirically investigate human movement coordination and leadership. Using economic games as a model, we set monetary incentives to motivate players on a virtual playfield to reach goals via players' movements. We asked whether (I) humans coordinate their movements when information is limited to an individual group member's observation of adjacent group member motion, (II) whether an informed group minority can lead an uninformed group majority to the minority's goal, and if so, (III) how this minority exerts its influence. We showed that in a human group – on the basis of movement alone – a minority can successfully lead a majority. Minorities lead successfully when (a) their members choose similar initial steps towards their goal field and (b) they are among the first in the whole group to make a move. Using our approach, we empirically demonstrate that the rules of swarming behaviour apply to humans. Even complex human behaviour, such as leadership and directed group movement, follow simple rules that are based on visual perception of local movement. PMID:24699264

  13. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Blackwell, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    , to date, practical statistical methods which can include group dynamics in animal movement models have been lacking. We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level model, describing the movement of the group's centre, and an individual-level model, such that each individual...... makes its movement decisions relative to the group centroid. The basic idea is framed within the flexible class of hidden Markov models, extending previous work on modelling animal movement by means of multi-state random walks. While in simulation experiments parameter estimators exhibit some bias...

  14. Stick with your group: young children's attitudes about group loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, Antonia; Over, Harriet; Carpenter, Malinda

    2014-10-01

    For adults, loyalty to the group is highly valued, yet little is known about how children evaluate loyalty. We investigated children's attitudes about loyalty in a third-party context. In the first experiment, 4- and 5-year-olds watched a video of two groups competing. Two members of the losing group then spoke. The disloyal individual said she wanted to win and therefore would join the other group. The loyal individual said she also wanted to win but would stay with her group. Children were then asked five forced-choice questions about these two individuals' niceness, trustworthiness, morality, and deservingness of a reward. The 5-year-olds preferred the loyal person across all questions; results for the 4-year-olds were considerably weaker but in the same direction. The second experiment investigated the direction of the effect in 5-year-olds. In this experiment, children answered questions about either a loyal individual, a disloyal individual, or a neutral individual. Children rated both the loyal and neutral individuals more positively than the disloyal individual across a number of measures. Thus, whereas disloyal behavior is evaluated unfavorably by children, loyal behavior is the expected norm. These results suggest that, at least from 5 years of age, children understand that belonging to a group entails certain commitments. This marks an important step in their own ability to negotiate belonging and become trustworthy and reliable members of their social groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 2002 annual report EDF group; 2002 rapport annuel groupe EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is the 2002 annual report of Electricite de France (EdF) group, the French electric utility. Content: Introductory section (EDF at a glance, Chairman's message, 2002 Highlights); Corporate governance and Group strategy (Corporate governance, sustainable growth strategy, EDF branches); Financial performance (Reaching critical mass, Margins holding up well, Balance sheet); Human resources (Launching Group-wide synergies, Optimising human resources); Customers (Major customers, SMEs and professional customers, Local authorities, Residential customers, Ensuring quality access to electricity); Generation (A balanced energy mix, Nuclear generation, Fossil-fuelled generation, Renewable energies); Corporate social responsibility (Global and local partnerships, Promoting community development)

  16. Energy Innovation. IVO Group`s Research and Development Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salminen, P.; Laiho, Y.; Kaikkonen, H.; Leisio, C.; Hinkkanen, S. [eds.

    1996-11-01

    This annual booklet of the IVO Group`s research and development activities presents a number of articles, written by experts from IVO. The products described are examples of the environmentally-oriented selection made available by the IVO Group. In fact, the entire energy technology developed in Finland is environmentally oriented, if seen from the international perspective. The new business potential of environmental technology is great, and it is believed that in the year 2000, exportation of Finnish know-how in the field of energy-saving and efficiency will exceed the value of out energy imports

  17. Energy Innovation. IVO group`s research and development report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salminen, P.; Laiho, Y.; Kaikkonen, H.; Leisio, C.; Hinkkanen, S.; Fletcher, R. [eds.

    1997-11-01

    This annual booklet of the IVO Group`s research and development activities presents a number of articles, written by experts from IVO. The products described are examples of the environmentally-oriented selection made available by the IVO Group. In fact, the entire energy technology developed in Finland is environmentally oriented, if seen from the international perspective. The new business potential of environmental technology is great, and it is believed that in the year 2000, exportation of Finnish know-how in the field of energy-saving and efficiency will exceed the value of out energy imports

  18. Group Work with Transgender Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Lore M.; Loewy, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the existing literature, the authors' research and clinical experiences, and the first author's personal journey as a member and leader of the transgender community, this article offers a brief history of group work with transgender clients followed by suggestions for group work with transgender clients from a social justice…

  19. Understanding Nomadic Collaborative Learning Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Davidsen, Jacob; Hodgson, Vivien

    2018-01-01

    The paper builds on the work of Rossitto "et al." on collaborative nomadic work to develop three categories of practice of nomadic collaborative learning groups. Our study is based on interviews, workshops and observations of two undergraduate student's group practices engaged in self-organised, long-term collaborations within the frame…

  20. Group Activities for Math Enthusiasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdener, J.; Milnikel, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we present three group activities designed for math students: a balloon-twisting workshop, a group proof of the irrationality of p, and a game of Math Bingo. These activities have been particularly successful in building enthusiasm for mathematics and camaraderie among math faculty and students at Kenyon College.

  1. Social Disaffection Among Deprived Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Daniel; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Examines groups of individuals of differing income, education, occupation, age and sex and investigates the extent of differences between these groups on three levels: nationalism, support for the political system and satisfaction with aspects of every day living. Available from: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Transaction…

  2. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The participants of the QCD working sub-group are: Rahul Basu, D Indumathi,. E Laenen, Swapan Majhi, Prakash Mathews, Anuradha Misra, Asmita Mukherjee,. R Ratabole, V Ravindran and W Vogelsang. The main focus of this working group had been to concentrate on some issues in resummation which are essential to ...

  3. Play and Positive Group Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Pam; White, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    Play is an important part of a child's life and essential to learning and development (Vygotsky, 1978). It is vital that students participate in play and that play be conducted in a restorative manner. Play allows a variety of group dynamics to emerge. Irvin Yalom (1995) identifies 11 curative factors of the group experience. These factors include…

  4. Group theoretical methods in Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmo, M.A. del; Santander, M.; Mateos Guilarte, J.M. (eds.) (Universidad de Valladolid. Facultad de Ciencias. Valladolid (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    The meeting had 102 papers. These was distributed in following areas: -Quantum groups,-Integrable systems,-Physical Applications of Group Theory,-Mathematical Results,-Geometry, Topology and Quantum Field Theory,-Super physics,-Super mathematics,-Atomic, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics. Nuclear and Particle Physics,-Symmetry and Foundations of classical and Quantum mechanics.

  5. Working group report: Neutrino physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Working group report: Neutrino physics. Coordinators: SANDHYA CHOUBEY1,∗ and D INDUMATHI2. Working group members: S Agarwalla1, A Bandyopadhyay1, G Bhattacharyya3,. E J Chun4, B Dasgupta5, A Dighe5, P Ghoshal5, A K Giri6, S Goswami1,. M Hirsch7, T Kajita8, M Kaplinghat9, H S Mani10, R Mohanta11,.

  6. Challenges Facing Group Work Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bo; Kang, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Online group work can be complicated because of its asynchronous characteristics and lack of physical presence, and its requirements for skills in handling technology, human relationships, and content-related tasks. This study focuses on the administrative, logistical and relationship-related challenges in online group work. Challenges in areas…

  7. Population Density and Group Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, James; Friedman, S. Thomas

    1972-01-01

    This study looks at the relationship between the size of the small interacting group (in numbers of persons) and its environment; in this case, the density of its immediate population. Results indicated a significant inverse relationship between population density and the size of small interacting groups. (Author)

  8. Social Maturation: Work Group Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Michael D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The work group's discussion centers on seven factors affecting disabled adolescents' social development. Each of the following factors is addressed in terms of potentially important research, service, and policy initiatives: self esteem, peer groups, parenting, family, services, enforced dependency, and positive sexual socialization. (CL)

  9. The Globalization of Cooperative Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivieso, Manuel; Corn, Benjamin W; Dancey, Janet E; Wickerham, D Lawrence; Horvath, L Elise; Perez, Edith A; Urton, Alison; Cronin, Walter M; Field, Erica; Lackey, Evonne; Blanke, Charles D

    2015-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-supported adult cooperative oncology research groups (now officially Network groups) have a longstanding history of participating in international collaborations throughout the world. Most frequently, the US-based cooperative groups work reciprocally with the Canadian national adult cancer clinical trial group, NCIC CTG (previously the National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group). Thus, Canada is the largest contributor to cooperative groups based in the United States, and vice versa. Although international collaborations have many benefits, they are most frequently utilized to enhance patient accrual to large phase III trials originating in the United States or Canada. Within the cooperative group setting, adequate attention has not been given to the study of cancers that are unique to countries outside the United States and Canada, such as those frequently associated with infections in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Global collaborations are limited by a number of barriers, some of which are unique to the countries involved, while others are related to financial support and to US policies that restrict drug distribution outside the United States. This article serves to detail the cooperative group experience in international research and describe how international collaboration in cancer clinical trials is a promising and important area that requires greater consideration in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Measuring group climate in prison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.J.M Stams; P.H. van der Laan; G.H.P. van der Helm PhD

    2011-01-01

    The present study examines the construct validity and reliability of the Prison Group Climate Instrument (PGCI) in a sample of 77 adolescents placed in a Dutch youth prison and 49 adult prisoners living in a Dutch psychiatric prison with a therapeutic living group structure. Confirmatory factor

  11. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is the report of the subgroup QCD of Working Group-4 at WHEPP-9. We present the activities that had taken place in the subgroup and report some of the partial results arrived at following the discussion at the working group meetings. Keywords. Quantum chromodynamics; resummation; extra dimensions; multi-leg.

  12. All About the Grains Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Take the Fruit Quiz Vegetables All About the Vegetable Group Nutrients and Health Benefits TIPS: Vary Your Veggies Beans and Peas ... Take the Fruit Quiz Vegetables All About the Vegetable Group Nutrients and Health Benefits TIPS: Vary Your Veggies Beans and Peas ...

  13. Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peer; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jensen, Maj-Britt

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), with an associated database, was introduced as a nationwide multidisciplinary group in 1977 with the ultimate aim to improve the prognosis in breast cancer. Since then, the database has registered women diagnosed with primary invasive...

  14. Lie groups and invariant theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vinberg, Ernest

    2005-01-01

    This volume, devoted to the 70th birthday of A. L. Onishchik, contains a collection of articles by participants in the Moscow Seminar on Lie Groups and Invariant Theory headed by E. B. Vinberg and A. L. Onishchik. The book is suitable for graduate students and researchers interested in Lie groups and related topics.

  15. Quantum Groups from Path Integrals

    OpenAIRE

    Freed, Daniel S.

    1995-01-01

    Lecture notes from the 1994 CRM-CAP Summer School ``Particles and Fields '94''. Covers material written elsewhere in a more leisurely fashion, including many exercises. Describes derivation of quantum groups from the Chern-Simons lagrangian for the case of a finite gauge group.

  16. The didactics of group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    will take its point of departure in pedagogical textbook introductions where group work is often presented as a means to learning social skills and co-workability. However, as most students and teachers know, this is not always the case. Observations of long-term group work show that this can be a tough...

  17. Group Work in Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Debbie; Tolmie, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article considers how students might work together in small groups, from two to eight, in either a primary or secondary science classroom. The nature of group work can vary widely and could include, for example, a pair carrying out an illustrative experiment, a trio or quad debating climate change, or six or seven rehearsing how they will…

  18. Group Music Therapy for Prisoners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xi Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Xu, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of psychological problems is high in prisons. Many prisoners have unmet needs for appropriate treatments. Although previous studies have suggested music therapy to be a successful treatment modality for prisoners, more rigorous evidence is needed. This parallel randomised controlled...... study aims to investigate the effectiveness of group music therapy to reduce anxiety and depression, and raise self-esteem in prisoners. One hundred and ninety two inmates from a Chinese prison will be allocated to two groups through randomisation. The experimental group will participate in biweekly...... group music therapy for 10 weeks (20 sessions) while the control group will be placed on a waitlist. Anxiety, depression and self-esteem will be measured by self-report scales three times: before, at the middle, and at the end of the intervention. Logs by the participants and their daily routine...

  19. Stereotypes of Norwegian social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Hege H; Herrebrøden, Henrik; Hjetland, Gunnhild J; Røyset, Guro Ø; Westby, Linda L

    2014-10-01

    We present a pilot study and two main studies that address the nature of stereotypes of social groups in Norway within the framework of the Stereotype Content Model (SCM). The first study focused on stereotypes of a wide range of groups across categories such as gender, age, religious conviction, socioeconomic and health status. The second study focused on stereotypes of immigrant groups. Participants (n = 244 and n = 63, respectively) rated the groups on perceived warmth, competence, status, and competition. Results from both studies support the applicability of the SCM in Norway and provides a unique insight into stereotypes of Norwegian social groups. © 2014 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology published by Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Group supervision for general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galina Nielsen, Helena; Sofie Davidsen, Annette; Dalsted, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    to the communication with local community psychiatry centres. Furthermore, the GPs experienced that supervision had a positive 'spill-over effect' on everyday consultations, and that the supervision group became a forum for coping with other difficulties in their professional life as well. Trust and continuity were......AIM: Group supervision is a sparsely researched method for professional development in general practice. The aim of this study was to explore general practitioners' (GPs') experiences of the benefits of group supervision for improving the treatment of mental disorders. METHODS: One long......-established supervision group was studied closely for six months by observing the group sessions, and by interviewing GPs and their supervisors, individually and collectively. The interviews were recorded digitally and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed using systematic text condensation. RESULTS: The GPs found...

  1. Resistance to group clinical supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Delgado, Cynthia; Traynor, Michael

    2018-01-01

    This present study is a report of an interview study exploring personal views on participating in group clinical supervision among mental health nursing staff members who do not participate in supervision. There is a paucity of empirical research on resistance to supervision, which has...... between group members. Many informants perceived group clinical supervision as an unacceptable intrusion, which could indicate a need for developing more acceptable types of post-registration clinical education and reflective practice for this group....... traditionally been theorized as a supervisee's maladaptive coping with anxiety in the supervision process. The aim of the present study was to examine resistance to group clinical supervision by interviewing nurses who did not participate in supervision. In 2015, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24...

  2. Decision Dynamics in Group Evacuation

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Fangqiu; Schlesinger, Kimberly J; Gür, Izzeddin; Carlson, Jean M

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors that affect human decision making and quantifying their influence remain essential and challenging tasks for the design and implementation of social and technological communication systems. We report results of a behavioral experiment involving decision making in the face of an impending natural disaster. In a controlled laboratory setting, we characterize individual and group evacuation decision making influenced by several key factors, including the likelihood of the disaster, available shelter capacity, group size, and group decision protocol. Our results show that success in individual decision making is not a strong predictor of group performance. We use an artificial neural network trained on the collective behavior of subjects to predict individual and group outcomes. Overall model accuracy increases with the inclusion of a subject-specific performance parameter based on laboratory trials that captures individual differences. In parallel, we demonstrate that the social media activit...

  3. Understanding nomadic collaborative learning groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Davidsen, Jacob; Hodgson, Vivien

    2017-01-01

    The paper builds on the work of Rossitto et al. on collaborative nomadic work to develop three categories of practice of nomadic collaborative learning groups. Our study is based on interviews, workshops and observations of two undergraduate student's group practices engaged in self-organised, long......-term collaborations within the frame of Problem and Project Based Learning. By analysing the patterns of nomadic collaborative learning we identify and discuss how the two groups of students incorporate mobile and digital technologies as well as physical and/or non-digital technologies into their group work....... Specifically, we identify the following categories of nomadic collaborative learning practices: “orchestration of work phases, spaces and activities,” “the orchestration of multiple technologies” and “orchestration of togetherness.” We found that for both groups of students there was a fluidity, situatedness...

  4. Groups and Geometries : Siena Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Kantor, William; Lunardon, Guglielmo; Pasini, Antonio; Tamburini, Maria

    1998-01-01

    On September 1-7, 1996 a conference on Groups and Geometries took place in lovely Siena, Italy. It brought together experts and interested mathematicians from numerous countries. The scientific program centered around invited exposi­ tory lectures; there also were shorter research announcements, including talks by younger researchers. The conference concerned a broad range of topics in group theory and geometry, with emphasis on recent results and open problems. Special attention was drawn to the interplay between group-theoretic methods and geometric and combinatorial ones. Expanded versions of many of the talks appear in these Proceedings. This volume is intended to provide a stimulating collection of themes for a broad range of algebraists and geometers. Among those themes, represented within the conference or these Proceedings, are aspects of the following: 1. the classification of finite simple groups, 2. the structure and properties of groups of Lie type over finite and algebraically closed fields of f...

  5. Defining and Classifying Interest Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroni, Laura; Carroll, Brendan; Chalmers, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The interest group concept is defined in many different ways in the existing literature and a range of different classification schemes are employed. This complicates comparisons between different studies and their findings. One of the important tasks faced by interest group scholars engaged...... in large-N studies is therefore to define the concept of an interest group and to determine which classification scheme to use for different group types. After reviewing the existing literature, this article sets out to compare different approaches to defining and classifying interest groups with a sample...... of lobbying actors coded according to different coding schemes. We systematically assess the performance of different schemes by comparing how actor types in the different schemes differ with respect to a number of background characteristics. This is done in a two-stage approach where we first cluster actors...

  6. Quantum Groups and Lie Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Andrew

    2002-02-01

    To take stock and to discuss the most fruitful directions for future research, many of the world's leading figures met at the Durham Symposium on Quantum Groups in the summer of 1999, and this volume provides an excellent overview of the material presented there. It includes important surveys of both cyclotomic Hecke algebras and the dynamical Yang-Baxter equation. Plus contributions which treat the construction and classification of quantum groups or the associated solutions of the quantum Yang-Baxter equation. The representation theory of quantum groups is discussed, as is the function algebra approach to quantum groups, and there is a new look at the origins of quantum groups in the theory of integrable systems.

  7. Small group discussion: Students perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-01-01

    Context: Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. Aims: The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through self-learning. To develop soft skills, to understand principles of group dynamics, and adopt a new teaching learning methodology. Subjects and Methods: Experimental study design was conducted in Phase I 1st year medical students of 2014–2015 batch (n = 120). On the day of the session, the students were grouped into small groups (15 each). The session started with the facilitator starting off the discussion. Feedback forms from five students in each group was taken (n = 40). A five point Likert scale was used ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Results: Our results show that 70% of the students opined that small group discussion were interactive, friendly, innovative, built interaction between teacher and student. Small group discussion increased their thought process and helped them in better communication. Conclusions: The small group discussion was interactive, friendly, and bridged the gap between the teacher and student. The student's communication skills are also improved. In conclusion, small group discussion is more effective than the traditional teaching methods. PMID:26380202

  8. EDF group - annual report 2003; Groupe EDF - rapport annuel 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This document contains the magazine, the financial statements and the sustainable development report of Electricite de France (EdF) group for 2003: 1 - the magazine (chairman's statement, group profile, vision and strategy); 2 - the consolidated financial statements for the period ended 31 December 2003 (statutory auditors' report on the consolidated financial statements, EDF's summary annual financial statements); 3 - sustainable development report (transparency and dialogue, responsibility, commitment, partnerships for progress). (J.S.)

  9. Bayesian Hierarchical Grouping: perceptual grouping as mixture estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyen, Vicky; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel framework for perceptual grouping based on the idea of mixture models, called Bayesian Hierarchical Grouping (BHG). In BHG we assume that the configuration of image elements is generated by a mixture of distinct objects, each of which generates image elements according to some generative assumptions. Grouping, in this framework, means estimating the number and the parameters of the mixture components that generated the image, including estimating which image elements are “owned” by which objects. We present a tractable implementation of the framework, based on the hierarchical clustering approach of Heller and Ghahramani (2005). We illustrate it with examples drawn from a number of classical perceptual grouping problems, including dot clustering, contour integration, and part decomposition. Our approach yields an intuitive hierarchical representation of image elements, giving an explicit decomposition of the image into mixture components, along with estimates of the probability of various candidate decompositions. We show that BHG accounts well for a diverse range of empirical data drawn from the literature. Because BHG provides a principled quantification of the plausibility of grouping interpretations over a wide range of grouping problems, we argue that it provides an appealing unifying account of the elusive Gestalt notion of Prägnanz. PMID:26322548

  10. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  11. MODELLING OF ONLINE GROUP DISCOUNTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlo Kotarac

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Web pages for group discounts have become very popular in the past few years. In this paper we concentrate on the group discounts for the service industry in which a quality of the service plays an important role in retaining customers which in return affects business profitability. We present a model of the group discount offer from a merchant’s point view. A merchant decides about the size of the discount offered, having in mind quality of the service offered which is affected by the number of customers who use the service. Finally, we derive the first order optimality conditions.

  12. groups by their Schur multiplier

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    22

    A CHARACTERIZATION OF FINITE p-GROUPS BY THEIR SCHUR MULTIPLIER. 7. Now consider groups of order p7 of exponent p. By [14] it follows that there is only one capable group. G = 〈x1, ··· ,x5,c1,c2 | [x2,x1]=[x5,x3] = c1, [x3,x1]=[x5,x4] = c2〉 upto isomorphism. By Theorem 2.3 we have |M(G)| = p9 as |X| = |X1| = p9 ...

  13. Impact of Ialuril Soft Gels in reducing urinary toxicity during radical hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer: a preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fersino, Sergio; Fiorentino, Alba; Giaj Levra, Niccolò; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Di Paola, Gioacchino; Cavalleri, Stefano; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Ialuril Soft Gels in reducing acute genito-urinary (GU) toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy. Forty patients were prospectively recruited. A moderate hypofractionation in 28 fractions ("hypo-moderate") was prescribed in 20 patients, while an extreme hypofractionation ("hypo-extreme") in 5 fractions was prescribed in 20 patients. The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire was administered in all cases before and after radiotherapy (RT). GU toxicity was evaluated according to CTCAE v4.0. Patients of each group ("hypo-moderate" and "hypo-extreme") were randomized (1:1) to receive RT alone or RT combined with Ialuril Soft Gels. In "hypo-moderate" patients treated with Ialuril Soft Gels the following GU toxicity was reported: G0 3, G1 6, G2 1, G3 0. In the arm treated without Ialuril Soft Gels: G0 0, G1 7, G2 2, G3 1. In "hypo-extreme" arm treated with Ialuril Soft Gels the following GU toxicity was recorded: G0 7, G1 2, G2 1, G3 in 0; while in the arm treated without Ialuril Soft Gels: G0 5, G1 2, G2 2, G3 1. IPSS was unchanged in "hypo-moderate" and "hypo-extreme" groups and patients treated with Ialuril Soft Gels, with a median value of 6 and 5 respectively. In patients treated without Ialuril Soft Gels an increased IPSS was reported in "hypo-moderate" and "hypo-extreme" from 6 to 8 and from 3.5 to 4.5, respectively. At statistical analysis (Fisher's exact text) Ialuril Soft Gels was associated with IPSS improvement (P=0.03). Ialuril Soft Gels seems to have a beneficial role in reducing GU toxicity without worsening the IPSS.

  14. Dual identity, in-group projection, and out-group feelings among ethnic minority groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuyten, Maykel; Martinovic, Borja

    2016-01-01

    This study extends research on dual identity and in-group projection by considering category prototypicality and indispensability, and by focusing on ethnic minority members and their attitudes towards the native majority and minority out-groups. Among a sample of 491 participants of the three

  15. Some Less Commonly Used Forms of Grouping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Wilma H.

    1971-01-01

    This article describes some of the less commonly used forms of grouping; namely, needs groups, interest groups, research groups, tutorial groups, the Joplin Plan, departmentalized teaching, the ungraded primary plan, multigrade and multiage grouping, and the dual progress plan. (Author)

  16. Linear algebra and group theory

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, VI

    2011-01-01

    This accessible text by a Soviet mathematician features material not otherwise available to English-language readers. Its three-part treatment covers determinants and systems of equations, matrix theory, and group theory. 1961 edition.

  17. Refugee groups in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edith Dourleijn; Jaco Dagevos

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Vluchtelingengroepen in Nederland This report describes for the first time the socioeconomic and sociocultural position of the four largest refugee groups in the Netherlands, originating from Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran and Somalia. Virtually nothing is known about these migrants,

  18. On characters of finite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Broué, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the classical and beautiful character theory of finite groups. It does it by using some rudiments of the language of categories. Originally emerging from two courses offered at Peking University (PKU), primarily for third-year students, it is now better suited for graduate courses, and provides broader coverage than books that focus almost exclusively on groups. The book presents the basic tools, notions and theorems of character theory (including a new treatment of the control of fusion and isometries), and introduces readers to the categorical language at several levels. It includes and proves the major results on characteristic zero representations without any assumptions about the base field. The book includes a dedicated chapter on graded representations and applications of polynomial invariants of finite groups, and its closing chapter addresses the more recent notion of the Drinfeld double of a finite group and the corresponding representation of GL_2(Z).

  19. A service dog in group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberg, Brian; Collins, Emily

    2015-04-01

    Service dogs are sanctioned by the Americans with Disabilities Act as having protected rights allowing them to assist owners with disabilities. These dogs are appearing with increasing frequency in healthcare settings, and it is important for healthcare providers to understand the rules and regulations given to service animals and owners. We discuss processes that transpired when a service dog was brought into a psychodynamic psychotherapy group. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the unintended consequences of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 2010 as it concerns service dogs and the impact on the group process. Problems resulting from the introduction of service dogs into therapy groups should be anticipated and explicitly discussed in the course of the group's transactions.

  20. Encounter Group Research: No Joy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, John

    1975-01-01

    This article is an expanded version of a book review which originally appeared in "Self & Society." In it the author criticizes the methodology and findings of Lieberman, Yalom, and Miles on their book about encounter groups. (Editor/RK)