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Sample records for eoreuma loftini dyar

  1. Phytosanitary irradiation of Diatraea saccharalis, D. grandiosella, and Eoreuma loftini (Lepidoptera: Crambinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytosanitary irradiation (PI) is increasingly being used to disinfest horticultural commodities of invasive quarantine pests. Most disinfestation is done with generic treatments, where one dose is scheduled for a group of pests and/or commodities. The current generic treatment that USDA-APHIS uses...

  2. Selected Abiotic and Biotic Environmental Stress Factors Affecting Two Economically Important Sugarcane Stalk Boring Pests in the United States

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    Allan T. Showler

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane, Saccharum spp., in the United States is attacked by a number of different arthropod pests. The most serious among those pests are two stalk boring moths in the Family Crambidae: the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F., and the Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar. The two species are affected by abiotic and biotic environmental stress factors. Water deficit and excessive soil nitrogen alter physical and physiochemical aspects of the sugarcane plant that make the crop increasingly vulnerable to E. loftini. Weed growth can be competitive with sugarcane but it also supports enhanced abundances and diversity of natural enemies that can suppress infestations of D. saccharalis. In an instance where the stalk borer is considered a stress factor, proximity of vulnerable crops to sugarcane can influence levels of E. loftini infestation of sugarcane. The adverse effects of each stress factor, in terms of stalk borer attack, can be reduced by adopting appropriate cultural practices, such as adequate irrigation, judicious use of nitrogen fertilizer, using noncompetitive weed growth, and not planting vulnerable crops near sugarcane fields. Understanding the relationships between stress factors and crop pests can provide valuable insights for plant breeders and tools for incorporation into integrated pest management strategies.

  3. Development of the immature stages of Culex (Culex saltanensis Dyar (Diptera, Culicidae under laboratory conditions

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    João Antonio C. Zequi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of the immature stages of Culex (Culex saltanensis Dyar (Diptera, Culicidae under laboratory conditions. Culex (Culex saltanensis Dyar, 1928 is becoming frequent and abundant in natural and artificial breeding sites in urban and rural areas of Brazil. This study contributes to the knowledge of the biology of a Brazilian strain of C. saltanensis. The development of specimens reared individually or grouped was observed. The study was conducted at a constant temperature of 27 ± 2°C, 14L:10D photoperiod and 80 ± 5% relative humidity. The immature stages were observed every 6 hours until adult emergence, which occurred in 12.29 days among individually reared specimens and in 13.12 days among group-reared specimens. Egg rafts for the experiment were obtained from the laboratory and field. Eggs hatched at a rate of 97.48 ± 2.32%. More eggs per egg raft were obtained from the field than from the laboratory. Males from individually reared specimens emerged in 12.29 ± 1.11 days and females in 13.12 ± 1.58 days. The male-female ratio was 1:1. Larval survival rate was higher than 85% for larvae reared isolated and higher than 95% for group-reared larvae. The Culex saltanensis life cycle was completed within 12 to 14 days, where larval instars I and IV took the most time to develop and the pupae, the shortest.

  4. Occurrence of Toxorhynchites guadeloupensis (Dyar and Knab) in oviposition trap of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honorio, Nildimar A.

    2007-01-01

    Toxorhynchites guadeloupensis (Dyar and Knab), a poorly known mosquito species, was observed preying upon Aedes aegypti (L.) larvae, in an oviposition trap placed for routine dengue entomological surveillance, during 2003-2004 in the urban area of Boa Vista, Roraima, Brazil. This is the first report for Tx. guadeloupensis using Ae. aegypti oviposition traps as breeding places. This finding may have important consequences in the epidemiology and local dengue control since Ae. aegypti density is a basic variable in dengue prediction. Whether predation of Ae aegypti by Tx. guadeloupensis in the Amazon is of significance, is a question to be examined. Also, larval predation may be a cause for underestimation of the actual Ae aegypti numbers. Together these hypotheses need to be better investigated as they are directly related to dengue epidemiology, to the success of any outbreak prediction and surveillance program. (author)

  5. Occurrence of Toxorhynchites guadeloupensis (Dyar and Knab) in oviposition trap of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honorio, Nildimar A. [Instituto Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Entomologia. Lab. de Transmissores de Hematozoarios; Barros, Fabio S.M. de [Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Biologicas e da Saude. Nucleo Avancado de Vetores; Tsouris, Pantelis; Rosa-Freitas, Maria G. [Freitas and Tsouris Consultants, Spata-Attikis (Greece)]. E-mail: maria@freitas-tsouris.com

    2007-09-15

    Toxorhynchites guadeloupensis (Dyar and Knab), a poorly known mosquito species, was observed preying upon Aedes aegypti (L.) larvae, in an oviposition trap placed for routine dengue entomological surveillance, during 2003-2004 in the urban area of Boa Vista, Roraima, Brazil. This is the first report for Tx. guadeloupensis using Ae. aegypti oviposition traps as breeding places. This finding may have important consequences in the epidemiology and local dengue control since Ae. aegypti density is a basic variable in dengue prediction. Whether predation of Ae aegypti by Tx. guadeloupensis in the Amazon is of significance, is a question to be examined. Also, larval predation may be a cause for underestimation of the actual Ae aegypti numbers. Together these hypotheses need to be better investigated as they are directly related to dengue epidemiology, to the success of any outbreak prediction and surveillance program. (author)

  6. Abdominal macrochaetae of female Hylesia oratex Dyar, 1913 (Insecta: Lepidoptera: Saturniidae: external morphology and medical significance

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    ROSÂNGELA BRITO

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The representatives of the genus Hylesia Hübner, [1820] are significant among the medically important Lepidoptera. Adult females use abdominal setae to wrap and protect the eggs that remain for months in nature. These setae, in contact with human skin, may cause allergic reactions including swelling, itching and local erythema, known as lepidopterism. The morphology of the abdominal scales and setae from the female H. oratex Dyar, 1913 is herein described and aspects related to their medical significance are discussed. Portions of each abdominal segment were examined through a scanning electron microscope. Two types of scales without medical importance, and two types of setae with medical importance, classified as "true setae" and "modified setae" were found. The true setae, which are slightly fusiform and have radially arranged lateral projections, are responsible for the allergic reactions caused by skin penetration. The modified setae, which are larger, curved, with the median enlarged and serrated margins, can be responsible for the release of chemical substances. This information provides a better understanding of the structure of the urticating setae, which are responsible for lepidopterism outbreaks in humans, and contributes towards the identification of the moth species involved.

  7. Life Cycle and Fecundity Analysis of Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar (Diptera: Psychodidae

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    Cristina Ferro

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle of Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar, was described for laboratory conditions with maximum daily temperatures of 27-30°C, minimum daily temperatures of 22-27°C and relative humidity between 87-99 %. Life cycle in each stage was as follows: egg 6-12 days (ave. 8.5 days; first stage larva 5-13 days (ave. 9.6 days; second stage larva 4-13 days (ave. 9.2 days ; third stage larva 5-19 days (ave. 11.8 days; fourth stage larva 7-37 days (ave. 19.9 days; pupa 7-32 days (ave. 15.2 days. The life expectancy of adults ranged from 4 to 15 days (ave. 8.6 days. The entire egg to adult period ranged from 36 to 74 days (ave. 54.6 days. On average, each female oviposited 22.7 eggs; the average egg retention per female was 24.3 eggs.

  8. Biología y Experimentación en el Control del Gusano Rosado de las Capsulas del Algodón (Sacadodes Pyralis Dyar

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    Marín Hernández Carlos

    1956-06-01

    Full Text Available 1°- Se ha estudiado el Sacadodes pyralis Dyar en sus diferentes estados señalando un ciclo promedio como sigue: 250 a 300 huevos por hembra. Incubación de 4 a 5 días. Período larvario 14 a 16 días. Precrisálida 3 a 4 días. Crisálida 14 a 30 días. Insecto adulto de 3 a 9 días. Se hizo un estudio de los diferentes métodos de control, una crítica más o menos aceptable al establecimiento control biológico para tratar de controlar el Sacadodes pyralis Dyar y las otras plagas en el algodón. 2° Las lámparas luminosas o atrayentes para controlar adultos del Sacadodes pymlis Dyar representan únicamente un suplementario en la destrucción de la plaga. 3° El autor considera que hay toda la razón para pensar en el control del Sacadodes pyralis Dyar por medio de insecticidas, especialmente cuando "se encuentre este insecto asociado otros igualmente dañinos en el algodón". Para tener una conclusión definitiva sobre insecticidas, se continúan las experimentaciones, agregando a los insecticidas estudiados, el Folidol Bayer E. 605, insecticida sistémico a base de fósforo y que en sus preliminares ha sido considerado de mucha importancia por lo se espera tener datos en las próximas cosechas. El Arseniato Calcio con el 50% de Azufre, el Nicotinum 10, el Dieldrex el Sulphurphene al 20 en Talco han dado resultados satisfactorios en la experimentación de septiembre de 1951 a enero de 1952. 4° Se considera el control biológico como un auxiliar control cultural pero aún no se ha establecido un método artificial para la cría de su parásito el Apanteles thurberiae Mues, en que aseguren su efectividad. 5° Es de gran importancia la destrucción de las socas residuos de las cosechas así como también el establecimiento un solo cultivo al año teniendo en cuenta esta prohibición áreas aparentemente unidas por factores topográficos idénticos. La rotación de cultivos juegan un papel de mucha importancia control de las plaga en

  9. Redescription of the Holotype of Culex (Culex) Peus Speiser and Taxonomy of Culex (Culex) Stigmatosoma Dyar and Thriambus Dyar (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-12

    Ver- teneuil, Brussels. 257 pp. + 5 pls. Forattini, 0. P. 1965. Entomologia Medica. 2” Vol- ume_ Editora da Universidade de Sao Paulo. 506 PP...Publica, Boletines T&r& cos, Serie A: Entomologia Medica y Parasitologia No. 1. 66 pp. Matheson, R. 1944. Handbook of the Mosquitoes of North America

  10. Genetic variability among populations of Lutzomyia (Psathyromyia) shannoni (Dyar 1929) (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, E; Munstermann, L E; Martínez, O; Corredor, D; Ferro, C

    2001-02-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to elucidate genetic variation at 13 isozyme loci among forest populations of Lutzomyia shannoni from three widely separated locations in Colombia: Palambí (Nariño Department), Cimitarra (Santander Department) and Chinácota (Norte de Santander Department). These samples were compared with a laboratory colony originating from the Magdalena Valley in Central Colombia. The mean heterozygosity ranged from 16 to 22%, with 2.1 to 2.6 alleles detected per locus. Nei's genetic distances among populations were low, ranging from 0.011 to 0.049. The estimated number of migrants (Nm=3.8) based on Wright's F-Statistic, F ST, indicated low levels of gene flow among Lu. shannoni forest populations. This low level of migration indicates that the spread of stomatitis virus occurs via infected host, not by infected insect. In the colony sample of 79 individuals, the Gpi locus was homozygotic (0.62/0.62) in all females and heterozygotic (0.62/0.72) in all males. Although this phenomenon is probably a consequence of colonization, it indicates that Gpi is linked to a sex determining locus.

  11. Genetic variability among populations of Lutzomyia (Psathyromyia shannoni (Dyar 1929 (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae in Colombia

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    Cárdenas Estrella

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to elucidate genetic variation at 13 isozyme loci among forest populations of Lutzomyia shannoni from three widely separated locations in Colombia: Palambí (Nariño Department, Cimitarra (Santander Department and Chinácota (Norte de Santander Department. These samples were compared with a laboratory colony originating from the Magdalena Valley in Central Colombia. The mean heterozygosity ranged from 16 to 22%, with 2.1 to 2.6 alleles detected per locus. Nei's genetic distances among populations were low, ranging from 0.011 to 0.049. The estimated number of migrants (Nm=3.8 based on Wright's F-Statistic, F ST, indicated low levels of gene flow among Lu. shannoni forest populations. This low level of migration indicates that the spread of stomatitis virus occurs via infected host, not by infected insect. In the colony sample of 79 individuals, the Gpi locus was homozygotic (0.62/0.62 in all females and heterozygotic (0.62/0.72 in all males. Although this phenomenon is probably a consequence of colonization, it indicates that Gpi is linked to a sex determining locus.

  12. Anthropophilic biting behaviour of Anopheles (Kerteszia neivai Howard, Dyar & Knab associated with Fishermen’s activities in a malaria-endemic area in the Colombian Pacific

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    Jesus Eduardo Escovar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available On the southwest Pacific Coast of Colombia, a field study was initiated to determine the human-vector association between Anopheles (Kerteszia neivai and fishermen, including their nearby houses. Mosquitoes were collected over 24-h periods from mangrove swamps, marshlands and fishing vessels in three locations, as well as in and around the houses of fishermen. A total of 6,382 mosquitoes were collected. An. neivai was most abundant in mangroves and fishing canoes (90.8%, while Anopheles albimanus was found indoors (82% and outdoors (73%. One An. neivai and one An. albimanus collected during fishing activities in canoes were positive for Plasmodium vivax , whereas one female An. neivai collected in a mangrove was positive for P. vivax . In the mangroves and fishing canoes, An. neivai demonstrated biting activity throughout the day, peaking between 06:00 pm-07:00 pm and there were two minor peaks at dusk and dawn. These peaks coincided with fishing activities in the marshlands and mangroves, a situation that places the fishermen at risk of contracting malaria when they are performing their daily activities. It is recommended that protective measures be implemented to reduce the risk that fishermen will contract malaria.

  13. The Susceptibility and Behavioral Response of Anopheles Albimanus Weidemann and Anopheles Vestitipennis Dyar and Knab (Diptera: Culicidae) to Insecticides in Northern Belize, Central America

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bangs, Michael J

    1999-01-01

    During a 9-month study (1995-1996) in Caledonia Village, northern Belize, anopheline mosquitoes collected off human-bait and from experimental huts were evaluated for their susceptibility and behavioral responses to DDT and deltamethrin...

  14. Variación en loci isoenzimáticos entre machos y hembras de Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar (Diptera: Psychodidae de Colombia

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    Estrella Cárdenas

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Se analizaron por sexo poblaciones silvestres de Lutzomyia shannoni de tres localidades distantes entre si: Palambi (Nariño, Cimitarra (Santander y Chinácota (Norte de Santander, con el fin de establecer la variación en 11 isoenzimas. Estas muestras se compararon con ejemplares de una colonia mantenida en el Laboratorio de Entomologia del INS desde 1992. Se utilizó el sistema de electroforesis vertical en geles de poliacrilarnida al 6%. Se encontró una heterocigosidad promedio entre 18.5 y 24,7% en las hembras silvestres y entre 13,5 y 19.4% entre los machos silvestres. La heterocigosidad promedio en las hembras de la colonia fue de 14,8% mientras que en los machos fue de 20.1%. Se detectaron entre 2,0 y 2,5 alelos por locus. La distancia genética de Nei entre las poblaciones fue baja y osciló entre 0,005 y 0,073. En la muestra de la colonia de 79 individuos. el locus Gpifue homocigoto en todas las hembras y heterocigoto en todos los machos. Aunque esta observación es probablemente una consecuencia de la colonización, indica que el locus Gpi está fuertemente unido a los cromosomas que determinan el sexo, con el alelo Gpi0,62 unido al locus que determina hembras y el alelo Gpi0,72 asociado con el locus que determina machos.

  15. Morphometric and Molecular Analyses of the Sand Fly Species Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar 1929) (Diptera:Psychodidae:Phlebotiminae) Collected from Seven Different Geographical Areas in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-05

    diet on development rates and survival of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti in north Queensland, Australia. Medical and Veterinary Entomology. 14...and Malaysian Borneo ranged from 0.3% to 1.1% yet the interpopulation variation showed a polymorphism of 5.1%. The authors were able to conclude

  16. The Susceptibility and Behavioral Response of Anopheles Albimanus Weidemann and Anopheles Vestitipennis Dyar and Knab (Diptera: Culicidae) to Insecticides in Northern Belize, Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    maintaining a village-level voluntary collaborator network (MOlL 1993). As of 1995, chloroquine remained effective for the treatment ofall malaria...exacerbating malaria transmission (Hamon et al. 1970; Roberts, 1993; Evans, 1993; Miller & Gibson, 1994; Roberts, et al. 1997a). Synthetic pyrethroid analogues ...Entomol. 39:356-359. Kaschef: A.H. 1970. Effects of temperature on the irritability caused by DDT and DDT analogues in anopheline mosquitoes. Bull

  17. Light Color Attraction and Dietary Sugar Composition for Several Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) Species Found in North Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-02

    Osten Sacken), 2,841 chaoborids (Corethrella spp.), and 26 Lutzomyia shannon: (Dyar) were collected respectively. Proportions of trap collections...for Cx. (melanoconion) spp. Although female Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar), were collected, no significant color differences were observed given the small

  18. Spatial and temporal abundance of three sylvatic yellow fever vectors in the influence area of the Manso hydroelectric power plant, Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, A L M; Miyazaki, R D; Silva, M; Zeilhofer, P

    2012-01-01

    Human biting catches of sylvatic yellow fever (SYF) vectors were conducted at eight stations in the influence area of the Manso hydroelectric power plant (Central Brazil) in sampling campaigns every 2 mo from July 2000 to November 2001. In total, 206 individuals were captured and classified as one of three species important for the transmission of SYF in Mato Grosso state: Haemagogus (Haemagogus) janthinomys (Dyar, 1921); Haemagogus (Conopostegus) leucocelaenus (Dyar & Shannon, 1924); and Sabethes (Sabethoides) chloropterus (Humboldt, 1819). The highest vector abundance was observed during the rainy season (November through March) and SYF vectors were present in all sampling points throughout the year, mainly in riparian and shadowed transitional forests at shadowed ramps.

  19. Expanding the distribution of two species of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae in Argentina and notes on their bionomics Ampliación de la distribución de dos especies de mosquitos (Diptera: Culicidae en Argentina y notas sobre su bionomía

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    Raúl E. Campos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the discovery of the mosquitoes Toxorhynchites haemorrhoidalis (Lynch Arribálzaga and Ochlerotatus milleri Dyar in Corrientes and Buenos Aires provinces respectively, thereby extending the geographical distribution of both species in Argentina.En esta nota, se informa el hallazgo de los mosquitos Toxorhynchites haemorrhoidalis (Lynch Arribálzaga y de Ochlerotatus milleri Dyar en la provincia de Corrientes y Buenos Aires respectivamente; con lo cual se amplía la distribución geográfica de ambas especies en Argentina.

  20. First record of Ectomyelois muriscis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) on physic nut (Jatropha curcas), a biofuel plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    The natural infestation of fruits and stems of Jatropha curcas L. (Euphorbiaceae) by larvae of the pyralid moth Ectomyelois muriscis (Dyar) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) is reported for the first time. Populations of E. muriscis on J. curcas were observed in various parts of the state of Chiapas, souther...

  1. Comparative anatomy of the female genitalia of generic-level taxa in tribe Aedini (Diptera: Culicidae). Part XXXI. Genus Sallumia Reinert, Harbach and Kitching

    Science.gov (United States)

    A morphological analysis of the female genitalia of species included in genus Sallumia Reinert, Harbach and Kitching was conducted. The genitalia of the type species of the genus, Sl. hortator (Dyar and Knab), are illustrated. Treatment of the genital morphology of the genus includes a description...

  2. Taxonomic study and redescription of Culex (Melanoconion theobaldi (Lutz, 1904 (Diptera: Culicidae

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    Oswaldo Paulo Forattini

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on type examination, Culex (Melanoconion theobaldi (Lutz, 1904 is redescribed. The species Cx. (Mel. chrysonotum Dyar & Knab, 1908, was put back as synonym of theobaldi. Besides, examination of Cx. (Mel. chrysothorax (Newstead & Thomas, 1910 type, leads to retiring as synonym of theobaldi and considered it as "species inquirenda".

  3. Comparative anatomy of the female genitalia of generic-level taxa in tribe Aedini (Diptera: Culicidae). Part XXXIII. Genus Lewnielsenius Reinert, Harbach and Kitching

    Science.gov (United States)

    A morphological analysis of the female genitalia of the species included in genus Lewnielsenius Reinert, Harbach and Kitching was conducted. The genitalia of the type species of the genus, Ln. muelleri (Dyar), are illustrated. Treatment of the genital morphology of the genus includes a detailed de...

  4. The Virginia pine sawfly in 1960 - a special cooperative report

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. McIntyre; R. C. Heller; C. L. Morris

    1961-01-01

    An outbreak of the pine sawfly, Neodiprion pratti pratti (Dyar), has existed in Maryland since 1955. By 1959 the insect had spread throughout 14 million acres in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont of Virginia and into several North Carolina counties. Because egg surveys conducted in the spring of 1960 indicated a continuation of the epidemic, an aerial survey was conducted...

  5. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for resistance to fall armyworm and southwestern corn borer leaf-feeding damage in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall armyworm (FAW), Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), and southwestern corn borer (SWCB), Diatraea grandiosella Dyar are damaging insect pests of maize resulting in significant yield and economic losses. A previous study identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contribute to reduced leaf-fe...

  6. A cohort study of epilepsy among 665,000 insured dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heske, L.; Nødtvedt, A.; Jäderlund, K. Hultin

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to estimate the incidence and mortality rates of epilepsy in a large population of insured dogs and to evaluate the importance of a variety of risk factors. Survival time after a diagnosis of epilepsy was also investigated. The Swedish animal insurance database...... used in this study has previously been helpful in canine epidemiological investigations. More than 2,000,000 dog-years at-risk (DYAR) were available in the insurance database. In total, 5013 dogs had at least one veterinary care claim for epilepsy, and 2327 dogs were euthanased or died because...... of epilepsy. Based on veterinary care claims the incidence rate of epilepsy (including both idiopathic and symptomatic cases) was estimated to be 18 per 10,000 DYAR. Dogs were followed up until they were 10 (for life insurance claims) or 12 years of age (veterinary care claims). Among the 35 most common...

  7. Ecologia de mosquitos (Diptera, Culicidae em criadouros naturais e artificiais de área rural do norte do Parana, Brasil: II. Coletas com isca humana Ecology of mosquitoes (Diptera, Culicidae in natural and artificial breeding sites of the rural area in north Paraná, Brazil: II. Capture of human bait

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    José Lopes

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available With then purpose of knowing the species of mosquitos that colonize an anthropogenic area in the North of Paraná, Brazil. 1496 specimens were captured by the humam bait method, accountig 23 species among them the following were predominam: Anopheles strodei Root, 1926; An. evansae Brethes, 1926; An. galvaoi Causey, Deane & Deane, 1943; An. albitarsis Lynch Arribalzaga, 1878; Coquillettidea juxtamansonia Chagas, 1907; Co. venezuelensis Theobaldi, 1912; Culex (Melanoconion sp. e Aedes fluviatilis (Lutz, 1904 and showed shong anthopophilia and a high degree of adaptation to humam environment. On the cantray, the species that showed lilth adaptation to such ambients or to the geoclimatic conditions of the region were: Anopheles triannulatus (Neiva & Pinto, 1922; An. parvus (Chagas, 1907; An. lutzii Cruzi, 1901, Culex amazonensis (Lutz, 1905; Cx. chidesteri; Psorophora confinnis (Linch Arribalzaga, 1891; Ps. discrucians (Walker, 1856; Ps. cingulata (Fabricius, 1805 e Aedes scapularis. Although Anopheles argyritarsis Robineau-Desvoidy, 1827; Culex coronator Dyar & Knab, 1906; Cx. mollis Dyar & Knab, 1906 and Cx. quinquefasciatus Say, 1823, were captured in little numbers, it is knowntht they an mosquito of human surroundings. These mosquitos showed a plak of feeding activity directly related to sunset bat did not have a bimodal behaviour. Anophelinae were in general more active in spring while Culex Linnaeus, 1758; Coquillettidia Dyar, 1905; Aedes Meigen, 1818; Mansonia Blanchard, 1901 e Psorophora Robineau-Desvoidy, 1827 were more active in summer.

  8. Tree hole mosquito species composition and relative abundances differ between urban and adjacent forest habitats in northwestern Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangudo, C; Aparicio, J P; Rossi, G C; Gleiser, R M

    2018-04-01

    Water-holding tree holes are main larval habitats for many pathogen vectors, especially mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae). Along 3 years, the diversity and composition of mosquito species in tree holes of two neighbouring but completely different environments, a city and its adjacent forest, were compared using generalized linear mixed models, PERMANOVA, SIMPER and species association indexes. The city area (Northwest Argentina) is highly relevant epidemiologically due to the presence of Aedes aegypti L. (main dengue vector) and occurrence of dengue outbreaks; the Yungas rainforests are highly biologically diverse. In total seven mosquito species were recorded, in descending order of abundance: Ae. aegypti, Haemagogus spegazzinii Brèthes, Sabethes purpureus (Theobald), Toxorhynchites guadeloupensis Dyar and Knab, Aedes terrens Walker, Haemagogus leucocelaenus Dyar & Shannon and Sabethes petrocchiae (Shannon and Del Ponte). The seven mosquito species were recorded in both city sites and forested areas; however, their mosquito communities significantly diverged because of marked differences in the frequency and relative abundance of some species: Tx. guadeloupensis and Ae. aegypti were significantly more abundant in forest and urban areas, respectively. Positive significant associations were detected between Ae. aegypti, Hg. spegazzinii and Hg. leucocelaenus. The combined presence of Ae. aegypti, Haemagogus and Sabethes in the area also highlight a potential risk of yellow fever epidemics. Overall results show an impoverished tree hole mosquito fauna in urban environments, reflecting negative effects of urbanization on mosquito diversity.

  9. Potential for North American mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) to transmit rift valley fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turell, Michael J; Wilson, William C; Bennett, Kristine E

    2010-09-01

    To determine which arthropods should be targeted for control should Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) be detected in North America, we evaluated Culex erraticus (Dyar and Knab), Culex erythrothorax Dyar, Culex nigripalpus Theobald, Culex pipiens L., Culex quinquefasciatus Say, Culex tarsalis Coquillett, Aedes dorsalis (Wiedemann), Aedes vexans (Meigen), Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say, and Culicoides sonorensis Wirth and Jones from the western, midwestern, and southern United States for their ability to transmit RVFV. Female mosquitoes were allowed to feed on adult hamsters inoculated with RVFV, after which engorged mosquitoes were incubated for 7-21 d at 260C, then allowed to refeed on susceptible hamsters, and tested to determine infection, dissemination, and transmission rates. Other specimens were inoculated intrathoracically, held for 7 d, and then allowed to feed on a susceptible hamster to check for a salivary gland barrier. When exposed to hamsters with viremias > or =10(8.8) plaque-forming units/ml blood, Cx. tarsalis transmitted RVFV efficiently (infection rate = 93%, dissemination rate = 56%, and estimated transmission rate = 52%). In contrast, when exposed to the same virus dose, none of the other species tested transmitted RVFV efficiently. Estimated transmission rates for Cx. erythrothorax, Cx. pipiens, Cx. erraticus, and Ae. dorsalis were 10, 8, 4, and 2%, respectively, and for the remaining species were feeding preference, longevity, and foraging behavior should be considered when determining the potential role that these species could play in RVFV transmission.

  10. Nuevos registros y distribución de mosquitos de la Argentina (Diptera: Culicidae New records and distribution of mosquitoes from Argentina (Diptera: Culicidae

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    Gustavo C. Rossi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan 21 nuevos registros de especies y se amplía la distribución de otras 12 especies de los géneros Anopheles Meigen, Coquillettidia Dyar, Culex L., Haemagogus Williston, Ochlerotatus Lynch Arribalzaga, Onirion Harbach y Peyton, Orthopodomyia Theobald, Psorophora Robineau-Desvoidy, Sabethes Robineau-Desvoidy, Stegomyia Theobald, Toxorhynchites Theobald. Se incluyen comentarios y cambios de estatus para especies de Howardina Theobald, Ochlerotatus y Lutzia (Theobald. Actualmente, en la Argentina se hallan presentes 226 especies distribuidas en 23 géneros.Twenty one new records and 12 new distributional records of species of the genus Anopheles Meigen, Coquillettidia Dyar, Culex L., Haemagogus Williston, Ochlerotatus Lynch Arribalzaga, Onirion Harbach & Peyton, Orthopodomyia Theobald, Psorophora Robineau-Desvoidy, Sabethes Robineau-Desvoidy, Stegomyia Theobald, Toxorhynchites Theobald are reported. Comments and changes in the status of species of Howardina Theobald, Ochelrotatus and Lutzia Theobald are included. Currently, in Argentina are present 226 species distributed in 23 genera.

  11. Naturally Occurring Adrenocortical Insufficiency--An Epidemiological Study Based on a Swedish-Insured Dog Population of 525,028 Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, J M; Tengvall, K; Bonnett, B N; Hedhammar, Å

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring adrenocortical insufficiency (NOAI) in dogs is considered an uncommon disease with good prognosis with hormonal replacement treatment. However, there are no epidemiological studies with estimates for the general dog population. To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of NOAI in a large population of insured dogs. Data were derived from 525,028 client-owned dogs insured by a Swedish insurance company representing 2,364,652 dog-years at risk (DYAR) during the period between 1995-2006. Retrospective cohort study. Incidence rates, prevalences, and relative risks for dogs with NOAI (AI with no previous claim for hypercortisolism), were calculated for the whole dog population, and for subgroups divided by breed and sex. Mortality rates were calculated and compared in dogs with NOAI and the remaining dogs overall. In total 534 dogs were identified with NOAI. The overall incidence was 2.3 cases per 10,000 DYAR. The relative risk of disease was significantly higher in the Portuguese Water Dog, Standard Poodle, Bearded Collie, Cairn Terrier, and Cocker Spaniel compared with other breeds combined. Female dogs overall were at higher risk of developing AI than male dogs (RR 1.85; 95% CI, 1.55-2.22; P dogs with NOAI than in dogs overall. The data supports the existence of breed-specific differences in incidence rates of NOAI in dogs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Ocorrência de flebotomíneos (Diptera: Psychodidae em matas de galeria no Distrito Federal, Brasil

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    Jônatas Ferreira

    2014-12-01

    Abstract. We analyzed the occurrence of phlebotomine sand flies in the gallery forests of the Federal District (FD, in different seasons, forest strata and conservation status. The samples were collected in three areas in the Água Limpa Farm, University of Brasília. In each area the occurrence data were analyzed in 20 collection sites visited on two months, November 2012 (rainy season and May 2013 (dry season. HP light traps were installed at 1.5 m and 10 m above the ground operating from 17:00 to 7:00 h, during three consecutive days. We set 359 trap-nights during the rainy season and 291 during the dry season. None sand fly was caught during the rainy season. In the dry season 250 sand flies were captured. The identified species were Psathyromyia runoides (Fairchild & Hertig (79.9%, Pintomyia monticola (Costa Lima (9.7%, Micropygomyia quinquefer (Dyar (3.7%, Psathyromyia shannoni (Dyar (3%, Bichromomyia flaviscutellata (Mangabeira (0.7%, Brumptomyia sp. (0.7%, Pintomyia kuscheli (Le Pont, Martinez, Torrez-Espejo & Dujardin (0.7%, Psathyromyia lutziana (Costa Lima (0.7%, and Sciopemyia sordellii (Shannon & Del Ponte (0.7%. The results indicated that in the gallery forests of the FD there is a higher occurrence of sand flies in the dry season, at ground level and in preserved areas. Pa runoides, Pi. kuscheli and Mi. quinquefer were recorded for the first time in the FD.

  13. First report of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Kansas and Missouri, and a PCR method to distinguish Lutzomyia shannoni from Lutzomyia vexator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Ju-Lin; Young, Samantha L; Gordon, David M; Claborn, David; Petersen, Christine; Ramalho-Ortigao, Marcelo

    2012-11-01

    Sand flies Lutzomyia (Psathyromyia) shannoni (Dyar) and Lu. (Helcocyrtomyia) vexator (Coquillet) were collected for the first time in southwest Missouri and southeast Kansas, expanding the known range of these species in North America. Altogether, 680 sand flies (356 males and 324 females) were collected during trapping from May through October 2011 and identified using morphological characters. Of the total sand flies collected, 315 were identified as Lu. shannoni, with 181 individuals (or 26.6% of all sand flies) trapped in Missouri and 134 individuals (or 19.7%) trapped in Kansas. Whereas 358 Lu. vexator were identified from southwest Missouri, only a single specimen was trapped in southeast Kansas. One male Lu. vexator with asymmetric gonostyli was trapped in Missouri. We also developed a polymerase chain reaction protocol to consistently and accurately distinguish Lu. shannoni from Lu. vexator based on presence or absence of a 416 bp fragment from the cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 gene.

  14. Circadian activity of Lutzomyia shannoni (Diptera: Psychodidae) during late season population peaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minter, Logan M; Brown, Grayson C

    2010-12-01

    The phlebotomine sand fly, Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar), is considered both zoophillic and anthropophillic and may be a potential vector of human and livestock pathogens. While the known range of this species in North America has recently been expanded, many aspects of its natural history, which are fundamental components for assessments of disease risk or development of integrated pest management programs for the vector, remain unclear. One is the time of day when individuals are active and searching for blood meals. Through the use of a rotating trap mechanism, male L. shannoni were found to be active earlier in the evening (1-4 h after sunset), whereas the majority of female activity occurred after midnight.

  15. Lutzomyia spp. (Diptera: Psychodidae) response to olfactory attractant- and light emitting diode-modified Mosquito Magnet X (MM-X) traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Rajinder S; Kaufman, Phillip E; Butler, Jerry F

    2009-09-01

    Mosquito Magnet-X traps were modified for use with blue, green, red, and blue-green-red light-emitting diodes and olfactory attractants to determine the response of Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar) and Lutzomyia vexator (Coquillett) (Diptera: Psychodidae) field populations to these attractants. Red and blue-green-red-baited traps captured the highest numbers of Lu. shannoni and Lu. vexator, respectively, although, there were no significant differences between the colors. Baiting the traps with CO, attracted significantly higher numbers of Lu. shannoni but showed no effect on Lu. vexator capture. In comparison with CO, alone, Lu. shannoni preferred 1-octen-3-ol and 1-hexen-3-ol (0.05 g per trap) in combination with CO.

  16. Phlebotomines (Diptera, Psychodidae in caves of the Serra da Bodoquena, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil

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    Eunice A. B. Galati

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the phlebotomine species captured during the period from January 1998 to June 2000 in 12 caves located in the Serra da Bodoquena, situated in the south central region of Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Three of the caves are situated further north (in Bodoquena county, seven in the central area (Bonito county and two in the south (Jardim county. These last two caves and three of those in Bonito are located at the west side of the ridge. Eighteen species of phlebotomines were captured within the caves: Brumptomyia avellari (Costa Lima, 1932, Brumptomyia brumpti (Larrousse, 1920, Brumptomyia cunhai (Mangabeira, 1942, Brumptomyia galindoi (Fairchild & Hertig, 1947, Evandromyia corumbaensis (Galati, Nunes, Oshiro & Rego, 1989, Lutzomyia almerioi Galati & Nunes, 1999, Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz & Neiva, 1912, Martinsmyia oliveirai (Martins, Falcão & Silva, 1970, Micropygomyia acanthopharynx (Martins, Falcão & Silva, 1962, Micropygomyia peresi (Mangabeira, 1942, Micropygomyia quinquefer (Dyar, 1929, Nyssomyia whitmani (Antunes & Coutinho, 1939, Psathyromyia campograndensis (Oliveira, Andrade-Filho, Falcão & Brazil, 2001, Psathyromyia punctigeniculata (Floch & Abonnenc, 1944, Psathyromyia shannoni (Dyar, 1929, Pintomyia kuscheli (Le Pont, Martinez, Torrez-Espejo & Dujardin, 1998, Sciopemyia sordellii (Shannon & Del Ponte, 1927 and Sciopemyia sp. A total of 29,599 phlebotomine sandflies was obtained. Lutzomyia almerioi was absolutely predominant (91.5% over the other species on both sides of the Bodoquena ridge, with the exception of the southern caves in which it was absent. It presents summer predominance, with nocturnal and diurnal activities. The species breeds in the caves and was captured during daytime both in the dark area and in the mouth of the caves. Martinsmyia oliveirai, the second most frequent sandfly, also presents a summer peak and only predominated over the other species in one cave, in which there

  17. Effect of Concussion on Performance of National Football League Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reams, Nicole; Hayward, Rodney A; Kutcher, Jeffrey S; Burke, James F

    2017-09-01

    Lingering neurologic injury after concussion may expose athletes to increased risk if return to play is premature. The authors explored whether on-field performance after concussion is a marker of lingering neurologic injury. Retrospective cohort study on 1882 skill-position players who played in the National Football League (NFL) during 2007-2010. Players with concussion based on the weekly injury report were compared with players with other head and neck injuries (controls) on measures of on-field performance using Football Outsiders' calculation of defense-adjusted yards above replacement (DYAR), a measure of a player's contribution controlling for game context. Changes in performance, relative to a player's baseline level of performance, were estimated before and after injury using fixed-effects models. The study included 140 concussed players and 57 controls. Players with concussion performed no better or worse than their baseline on return to play. However, a decline in DYAR relative to their prior performance was noted 2 wk and 1 wk before appearing on the injury report. Concussed players performed slightly better than controls in situations where they returned to play the same week as appearing on the injury report. On return, concussed NFL players performed at their baseline level of performance, suggesting that players have recovered from concussion. Decline in performance noted 2 wk and 1 wk before appearing on the injury report may suggest that concussion diagnosis was delayed or that concussion can be a multihit phenomenon. Athletic performance may be a novel tool for assessing concussion injury and recovery.

  18. Microhabitats de mosquitos (Diptera, Culicidae em internódios de taquara na Mata Atlântica, Paraná, Brasil Mosquitoes microhabitats (Diptera, Culicidae in bamboo internodes in Atlantic forest, Paraná, Brazil

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    Ana Leuch Lozovei

    Full Text Available During two consecutive years, from January 1985 to December 1986, a comparative study of mosquitoes preferences for breeding habitat was carried out in the Atlantic Forest of the Serra do Mar, Paraná State, Brazil. To achieve it, 1875 bamboo internodes aligned vertically in live green, bamboo plants Merostachys speciosa Munro and Merostachys sp. were used, in which metabolic water was exuded from the plant itself, and presenting different size/pattern holes at their lateral walls, bored by the local sylvan fauna. Another group of 1200 individual internode traps was used as comparative element, carved out with a transversal cut by a saw, filled with local stream water and held in branches at different heights in the vegetal strata nearby. At both microhabitat types, a total of 17 culicid species was registered. Culex (Microculex neglectus Lutz, 1904, Cx. (Carrollia soperi Antunes & Lane, 1937, Sabethes (Sabethes batesi Lane & Cerqueira, 1942 and Sa. (Sabethinus melanonymphe (Dyar, 1924colonized exclusively live plant internodes, while Culex (Microculex elongatus Rozeboom & Lane, 1950, Cx. (Carrollia iridescens (Lutz, 1905, Cx. (Carrollia kompi Valencia,1973and Trichoprosopon (Trichoprosopon soaresi Dyar & Knab, 1907 bred only in internode traps. The remaining nine species colonized both habitats indistinctly. Quantitatively, was detected the abundance of 60.1% at live green internodes, against 39.9% for internode traps. Concerning the different patterns of bored live internode holes, 40.3% of the total computed specimens were collected in square or rectangular holes, 31.9% in two hole internodes, one minute circular, the other wider, and the remaining 28.8% of specimens distributed in other pattern type internodes. The mosquitoes breeding at these microhabitats fall in the culicid entomofauna specialized at locating and detecting peculiar and propitious mesogen conditions for breeding purposes.

  19. Interactions between the invasive Burmese python, Python bivittatus Kuhl, and the local mosquito community in Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Lawrence E; Krysko, Kenneth L; Avery, Michael L; Gillett-Kaufman, Jennifer L; Kawahara, Akito Y; Connelly, C Roxanne; Kaufman, Phillip E

    2018-01-01

    The Burmese python, Python bivittatus Kuhl, is a well-established invasive species in the greater Everglades ecosystem of southern Florida, USA. Most research on its ecological impacts focuses on its role as a predator and its trophic interactions with native vertebrate species, particularly mammals. Beyond predation, there is little known about the ecological interactions between P. bivittatus and native faunal communities. It is likely that established populations of P. bivittatus in southern Florida serve as hosts for native mosquito communities. To test this concept, we used mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I DNA barcoding to determine the hosts of blood fed mosquitoes collected at a research facility in northern Florida where captive P. bivittatus and Argentine black and white tegu, Salvator merianae (Duméril and Bibron), are maintained in outdoor enclosures, accessible to local mosquitoes. We recovered python DNA from the blood meals of three species of Culex mosquitoes: Culex erraticus (Dyar and Knab), Culex quinquefasciatus Say, and Culex pilosus (Dyar and Knab). Culex erraticus conclusively (P = 0.001; Fisher's Exact Test) took more blood meals from P. bivittatus than from any other available host. While the majority of mosquito blood meals in our sample were derived from P. bivittatus, only one was derived from S. merianae. These results demonstrate that local mosquitoes will feed on invasive P. bivittatus, a recently introduced host. If these interactions also occur in southern Florida, P. bivittatus may be involved in the transmission networks of mosquito-vectored pathogens. Our results also illustrate the potential of detecting the presence of P. bivittatus in the field through screening mosquito blood meals for their DNA.

  20. Interactions between the invasive Burmese python, Python bivittatus Kuhl, and the local mosquito community in Florida, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence E Reeves

    Full Text Available The Burmese python, Python bivittatus Kuhl, is a well-established invasive species in the greater Everglades ecosystem of southern Florida, USA. Most research on its ecological impacts focuses on its role as a predator and its trophic interactions with native vertebrate species, particularly mammals. Beyond predation, there is little known about the ecological interactions between P. bivittatus and native faunal communities. It is likely that established populations of P. bivittatus in southern Florida serve as hosts for native mosquito communities. To test this concept, we used mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I DNA barcoding to determine the hosts of blood fed mosquitoes collected at a research facility in northern Florida where captive P. bivittatus and Argentine black and white tegu, Salvator merianae (Duméril and Bibron, are maintained in outdoor enclosures, accessible to local mosquitoes. We recovered python DNA from the blood meals of three species of Culex mosquitoes: Culex erraticus (Dyar and Knab, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, and Culex pilosus (Dyar and Knab. Culex erraticus conclusively (P = 0.001; Fisher's Exact Test took more blood meals from P. bivittatus than from any other available host. While the majority of mosquito blood meals in our sample were derived from P. bivittatus, only one was derived from S. merianae. These results demonstrate that local mosquitoes will feed on invasive P. bivittatus, a recently introduced host. If these interactions also occur in southern Florida, P. bivittatus may be involved in the transmission networks of mosquito-vectored pathogens. Our results also illustrate the potential of detecting the presence of P. bivittatus in the field through screening mosquito blood meals for their DNA.

  1. Determinação do número de ínstares larvais em Plutella xylostella (L. (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae Number of larval instars in Plutella xylostella (L. (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae

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    Marcelo Coutinho Picanço

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo determinar indiretamente o número de ínstares larvais em Plutella xylostella. No Laboratório de Biologia de Insetos da Universidade Federal de Viçosa, à temperatura de 24,5±4ºC, fotofase de 12 horas e UR de 70±5%, lagartas foram alimentadas em placas de Petri com folhas frescas de repolho. Diariamente uma quantidade variável de lagartas foi recolhida, fervida e conservada em álcool a 70%. As cápsulas cefálicas de noventa e seis (96 lagartas foram medidas sob lupa estereoscópica. A quantidade de ínstares e respectiva razão de crescimento foram determinadas pela análise de hipóteses. Na regra de decisão para a seleção da hipótese mais adequada, consideraram-se como pontos de rejeição da hipótese: i a sobreposição dos intervalos de confiança para médias da largura de cápsula cefálica entre ínstares sucessivos; ii o menor valor do coeficiente de determinação da regressão linear (R2; e iii a discordância do valor estimado da razão de crescimento (K em relação ao intervalo de variação de K proposto por Dyar. Lagartas de P. xylostella foram agrupadas e os ínstares descritos considerando-se que as larguras de cápsula cefálica, em média, estariam nos intervalos (p 2= 0,87. A distribuição dos valores da largura da cápsula cefálica seguiu a regra de Dyar.The present work was carried out to verify indirectly the number of larvae instars in Plutella xylostella. In the Insects Biology Laboratory of Universidade Federal de Viçosa, (temperature 24.5±4ºC; 12 hours photophase and 70±5% RU, larvae were fed in Petri dishes with fresh leaves of cabbage. Daily, they were picked up, boiled and conserved in 70% alcohol. Ninety six (96 cephalic capsules were measured through a magnifying glass estereoscopy. Both number of instars and respective growth rate were evaluated. To reject the hypothesis, the confidance limits for averages of the widths between successive cephalic

  2. A Synchrotron Mössbauer Spectroscopy Study of a Hydrated Iron-Sulfate at High Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, T. M.; Finkelstein, G. J.; Solomatova, N. V.; Jackson, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Szomolnokite is a monohydrated ferrous iron sulfate mineral, FeSO4*H2O, where the ferrous iron atoms are in octahedral coordination with four corners shared with SO4 and two with H2O. While somewhat rare on Earth, szomolnokite has been detected on the surface of Mars along with several other hydrated sulfates and suggested to occur near the surface of Venus [1,2]. It is not clear if these sulfates are a result of reactions occurring at depth driven by changes in the behavior of iron in the sulfate. To date, only a few high-pressure studies have been conducted on hydrated iron sulfates using Mössbauer spectroscopy. Our study represents a first step towards understanding of the electronic environment of iron in a monohydrated sulfate at pressure. Using a hydrostatic helium pressure-transmitting medium, the pressure dependence of iron's site-specific behavior in a synthetic szomolnokite powdered sample was explored up to about 100 GPa with time-resolved synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. At 1 bar, the Mössbauer spectrum is well described by three Fe2+-like sites, consistent with conventional Mössbauer spectra reported in Dyar et al. [3]. At pressures up to 20 GPa, changes in the hyperfine parameters are most likely due to a structural phase transition. Above this pressure, a fourth site is required to explain the time-spectra. Changes in the electronic configuration of iron, such as those due to a phase transition and/or a spin crossover, will affect the material's compressibility and transport properties. We will compare our high-pressure trends with those of other iron-bearing phases and discuss the relative influence on the dynamics of terrestrial planetary interiors. 1. Bishop et al. (2014) What Lurks in the Martian Rocks and Soil? Investigations of Sulfates, Phosphates, and Perchlorates. Spectral and thermal properties of perchlorate salts and implications for Mars. Am. Min. 99(8-9), 1580

  3. Venus surface peeking through the atmosphere - gaining a global perspective on the surface composition through near infrared observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbert, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Maturilli, A.; D'Amore, M.; Ferrari, S.; Mueller, N. T.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2017-12-01

    , especially including their temperature dependence. [1] Dyar M. D. et al. 2017 LPS XLVIII, #1512. [2] Helbert, J. et al. 2016. San Diego, CA: SPIE. [3] Smrekar, S.E., et al. Science, 2010 328(5978), 605-8. [4] Helbert, J., et al., GRL, 2008 35(11). [5] Mueller, N., et al., JGR, 2008 113[6] Dyar M. D. et al. 2017 LPS XLVIII, #3014.

  4. Isolation of yellow fever virus (YFV from naturally infectied Haemagogus (Conopostegus leucocelaenus (diptera, cukicudae in São Paulo State, Brazil, 2009

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    Renato Pereira de Souza

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available After detecting the death of Howlers monkeys (genus Alouatta and isolation of yellow fever virus (YFV in Buri county, São Paulo, Brazil, an entomological research study in the field was started. A YFV strain was isolated from newborn Swiss mice and cultured cells of Aedes albopictus - C6/36, from a pool of six Haemagogus (Conopostegus leucocelaenus (Hg. leucocelaenus mosquitoes (Dyar & Shannon collected at the study site. Virus RNA fragment was amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced. The MCC Tree generated showed that the isolated strain is related to the South American I genotype, in a monophyletic clade containing isolates from recent 2008-2010 epidemics and epizootics in Brazil. Statistical analysis commonly used were calculated to characterize the sample in relation to diversity and dominance and indicated a pattern of dominance of one or a few species. Hg. leucocelaenus was found infected in Rio Grande do Sul State as well. In São Paulo State, this is the first detection of YFV in Hg. leucocelaenus.

  5. El doctor Moreno Pérez y el anopheles crucians

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    Facultad de Medicina Revista

    1943-03-01

    Full Text Available En el año de 1933, con ocasión del conflicto del Amazonas, el doctor Ignacio Moreno·Pérez trabajó como médico de sanidad en la hoya del río Caquetá. Prosiguiendo sus estudios sobre paludismo y mosquitos transmisores a que dedicó gran parte de su meritoria vida, practicó una inspección entomológica de las cercanías de Florencia, capital de la comisaria del Caquetá, y encontró una raza en aguas salobres de Anopheles crucians. El hallazgo comunicado por él en el informe de 1934 de la comisión de paludismo del valle del Magdalena, (Estudios de Paludismo en el Valle del Magdalena, Departamento Nacional de Higiene, Sección de Sanidad Rural, Bogotá editorial de "Cromos", 1934, despertó mucho interés y fué objeto de controversias, porque conforme a los estudios de Howard, Dyar y Knab (1917, la localización del Anopheles crucians era casi hiperbórea, por encima del paralelo 25 en la América del Norte y solamente se había logrado ver además en Cuba y Jamaica.

  6. Blood-feeding ecology of mosquitoes in zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuten, H C; Bridges, W C; Paul, K S; Adler, P H

    2012-12-01

    To determine if the unique host assemblages in zoos influence blood-feeding by mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae), a sampling programme was conducted in Greenville and Riverbanks Zoos, South Carolina, U.S.A., from April 2009 to October 2010. A total of 4355 female mosquitoes of 14 species were collected, of which 106 individuals of nine species were blood-fed. The most common taxa were Aedes albopictus (Skuse), Aedes triseriatus (Say), Anopheles punctipennis (Say), Culex erraticus (Dyar & Knab), Culex pipiens complex (L.) and Culex restuans (Theobald). Molecular analyses (cytochrome b) of bloodmeals revealed that mosquitoes fed on captive animals, humans and wildlife, and took mixed bloodmeals. Host species included one amphibian, 16 birds, 10 mammals (including humans) and two reptiles. Minimum dispersal distances after feeding on captive hosts ranged from 15.5 m to 327.0 m. Mosquito-host associations generally conformed to previous accounts, indicating that mosquito behaviour inside zoos reflects that outside zoos. However, novel variation in host use, including new, exotic host records, warrants further investigation. Zoos, thus, can be used as experiment environments in which to study mosquito behaviour, and the findings extrapolated to non-zoo areas, while providing medical and veterinary benefits to zoo animals, employees and patrons. © 2012 The Authors. Medical and Veterinary Entomology © 2012 The Royal Entomological Society.

  7. Ecology of Culiseta Melanura and Other Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) from Walton County, FL, During Winter Period 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Bingham, Andrea M; Hunt, Brenda; Morse, Gary; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2015-09-01

    Winter ecology of putative vectors of eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus (EEEV) in northern Florida was investigated at field locations with evidence of historic EEEV winter transmission. Light traps and resting shelters were used to sample the mosquito community in the vicinity of eight sentinel flocks throughout the winter period (November-April) of 2013 and 2014 in Walton County, FL. Overall mosquito activity was relatively low, although mosquitoes were captured during each week of the study period. Mosquito activity was linked to morning temperature, and females were captured when ambient morning temperatures were quite low (1-5°C). Anopheles crucians Wiedemann, Culex erraticus (Dyar and Knab), Culex territans Walker, and Culiseta melanura (Coquillett) were the most commonly collected mosquito species (of 20 total species). Analysis of blood-engorged mosquitoes revealed a number of mosquito species feeding upon chickens, other birds, amphibians, and domestic and wild mammals. Cs. melanura fed primarily upon chickens and songbirds (Passeriformes), suggesting that this mosquito species is the likely winter vector of EEEV to sentinel chickens in northern Florida. Both resident and nonresident songbird species were fed upon, constituting 63.9 and 36.1% of total songbird meals, respectively. Our results suggest important roles for Cs. melanura and songbird hosts for the winter transmission of EEEV in northern Florida. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Feeding patterns of Haemagogus capricornii and Haemagogus leucocelaenus (Diptera: Culicidae) in two Brazilian states (Rio de Janeiro and Goiás).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Jeronimo; Marcondes, Carlos Brisola; Serra-Freire, Nicolau Maués; Lorosa, Elias Seixas; Pacheco, Juliana Barreto; Guimarães, Anthony Erico

    2008-09-01

    We present the identification of bloodfeeding sources of Haemagogus (Haemagogus) capricornii Lutz and Haemagogus (Conopostegus) leucocelaenus (Dyar & Shannon) (Diptera: Culicidae) from different regions of Brazil, as analyzed by precipitin tests. Anti-sera for bird, bovine, equine, human, opossum, and rodent were used. Two hundred one mosquitoes were examined (147 Hg. leucocelaenus and 54 Hg. capricornii), of which 177 reacted for some anti-serum. For Hg. leucocelaenus, 86 (68.3%) reacted to one blood source, 38 (30.2%) to two sources, and two (1.6%) to three sources; the combinations of bird + human (18.4%), bird + rodent (15.8%), and bird + marsupial (15.8%) were the most frequent. For Hg. capricornii, 34 (66.7%) reacted to one blood source; combinations bird + rodent (37.5%) and bird + marsupial (25%) were the most frequent combinations. Mosquito preference for bloodfeeding sources was different in these areas, possibly because of the availability of sources. This diversity of sources can have important epidemiological implications.

  9. Nesting bird "host funnel" increases mosquito-bird contact rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillouët, Kevin A; Riggan, Anna E; Bulluck, Lesley P; Carlson, John C; Sabo, Roy T

    2013-03-01

    Increases in vector-host contact rates can enhance arbovirus transmission intensity. We investigated weekly fluctuations in contact rates between mosquitoes and nesting birds using the recently described Nest Mosquito Trap (NMT). The number of mosquitoes per nestling increased from nesting season. Our evidence suggests the coincidence of the end of the avian nesting season and increasing mosquito abundances may have caused a "host funnel," concentrating host-seeking mosquitoes to the few remaining nestlings. The relative abundance of mosquitoes collected by the NMT suggests that significantly more Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and Culex pipiens (L.) /restuans (Theobald) sought nesting bird bloodmeals than were predicted by their relative abundances in CO2-baited Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light and gravid traps. Culex salinarius (Coquillett) and Culex erraticus Dyar and Knab were collected in NMTs in proportion to their relative abundances in the generic traps. Temporal host funnels and nesting bird host specificity may enhance arbovirus amplification and explain observed West Nile virus and St. Louis encephalitis virus amplification periods.

  10. Nymphal development and lerp construction of Glycaspis sp. (Hemiptera: Psylloidea) on Eucalyptus sideroxylon (Myrtaceae) in central-west New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anamika; Raman, Anantanarayanan; Taylor, Gary; Fletcher, Murray

    2013-11-01

    The ability to form lerps is common in Australian Psylloidea. Various species of Glycaspis Taylor (Aphalaridae) form conical lerps on different species of Eucalyptus. Lerps, being a rich sugar source, are preferentially fed by bell miners (Aves: Meliphagidae). In this paper we report the process of lerp construction by a purported new species of Glycaspis living on Eucalyptus sideroxylon. This taxon constructs lerps with anal sugary exudates first building the ribs of the lerps and later filling the space between the polymerized ribs with horizontal tractions of the same sugary substance. Developmental events in this taxon do not follow Dyar's rule strictly. Oviposition induces a non-lethal hypersensitive response in the host leaf. Population trends assessed in 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 showed distinct variations, which have been related to environmental factors. In the 2012-2013 sampling, oviposition occurred preferentially proximally to leaf cracks (possibly induced by intense frost events); we infer that this could be a strategy of this taxon to establish an 'easier' access to moisture. Sensillar designs vary between the nymphal instars and adults. The trichoid sensilla and sensillar cavities on the antennae perform mechanosensory and olfactory functions. The mouthpart complex includes a relatively long stylet bundle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Determining the Number of Instars in Simulium quinquestriatum (Diptera: Simuliidae) Using k-Means Clustering via the Canberra Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao Ming; Jia, Ruo; Xun, Hui; Yang, Jie; Chen, Qiang; Zeng, Xiang Guang; Yang, Ming

    2018-02-21

    Simulium quinquestriatum Shiraki (Diptera: Simuliidae), a human-biting fly that is distributed widely across Asia, is a vector for multiple pathogens. However, the larval development of this species is poorly understood. In this study, we determined the number of instars in this pest using three batches of field-collected larvae from Guiyang, Guizhou, China. The postgenal length, head capsule width, mandibular phragma length, and body length of 773 individuals were measured, and k-means clustering was used for instar grouping. Four distance measures-Manhattan, Euclidean, Chebyshev, and Canberra-were determined. The reported instar numbers, ranging from 4 to 11, were set as initial cluster centers for k-means clustering. The Canberra distance yielded reliable instar grouping, which was consistent with the first instar, as characterized by egg bursters and prepupae with dark histoblasts. Females and males of the last cluster of larvae were identified using Feulgen-stained gonads. Morphometric differences between the two sexes were not significant. Validation was performed using the Brooks-Dyar and Crosby rules, revealing that the larval stage of S. quinquestriatum is composed of eight instars.

  12. Crepuscular activity of culicids (Diptera, Culicidae in the peridomicile and in the remaining riparian forest in Tibagi river, State of Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson A. Müller

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Crepuscular activity of culicids (Diptera, Culicidae in the peridomicile and in the remaining riparian forest in Tibagi river, State of Paraná, Brazil. Human-attracted mosquitoes were collected for one hour, around sunset time (half hour before and half after, from April to December 2006, in two environments (riparian forest and near houses, in Tibagi river basin, Palmeira municipality, State of Paraná. Seven-hundred forty-nine mosquitoes, belonging to 13 species, were collected. Psorophora champerico Dyar & Knab, 1906 (42.86% and Psorophora discrucians (Walker, 1856 (40.59% were the most frequent species. No significant differences between quantities of Ps. champerico (t = -0.792; d.f. = 16; p = 0.43 and Ps. discrucians (t = 0.689; d.f. = 16; p = 0.49 obtained in riparian forest and near houses were observed, indicating similar conditions for crepuscular activity of these species in both environments. Psorophora champerico and Ps. discrucians responded (haematophagic activity to environmental stimuli associated with the twilight hours differently in distinct habitats studied. The former species is registered for the first time in the Atlantic forest biome.

  13. Número de ínstares larvais de Tuta absoluta (Meyrick em genótipos de tomateiro

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    Giustolin Teresinha Augusta

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A traça Tuta absoluta (Meyrick é uma das principais pragas do tomateiro no Brasil e tem sido controlada quase que exclusivamente com inseticidas, o que é indesejável tanto por motivos econômicos quanto ambientais. Esses problemas podem ser minimizados com métodos alternativos de controle, tal como a resistência varietal que é uma alternativa interessante, mas que ainda precisa ser mais estudada. Visando obter mais informações sobre a relação inseto-planta, estudou-se o número de instares da traça em dois genótipos de tomateiro Lycopersicon hirsutum f. glabratum (PI 134417 -- resistente e L. esculentum (`Santa Clara' - suscetível. O experimento foi desenvolvido em câmara climatizada em duas temperaturas (26 ± 0,5 e 30 ± 0,5ºC. As lagartas recém-eclodidas foram alimentadas com folhas dos dois genótipos. Diariamente foram retiradas 15 lagartas de cada tratamento para medições da largura da cápsula cefálica. O desenvolvimento do inseto seguiu a regra de Dyar e, em qualquer das situações testadas, apresentou quatro ínstares larvais.

  14. Ecological characterisation and infection of Anophelines (Diptera: Culicidae) of the Atlantic Forest in the southeast of Brazil over a 10 year period: has the behaviour of the autochthonous malaria vector changed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buery, Julyana Cerqueira; Rezende, Helder Ricas; Natal, Licia; Silva, Leonardo Santana da; Menezes, Regiane Maria Tironi de; Fux, Blima; Malafronte, Rosely Dos Santos; Falqueto, Aloisio; Cerutti Junior, Crispim

    2018-02-01

    BACKGROUND In southeastern Brazil, autochthonous cases of malaria can be found near Atlantic Forest fragments. Because the transmission cycle has not been completely clarified, the behaviour of the possible vectors in those regions must be observed. A study concerning the entomological aspects and natural infection of anophelines (Diptera: Culicidae) captured in the municipalities of the mountainous region of Espírito Santo state was performed in 2004 and 2005. Similarly, between 2014 and 2015, 12 monthly collections were performed at the same area of the study mentioned above. METHODS Center for Disease Control (CDC) light traps with CO2 were set in open areas, at the edge and inside of the forest (canopy and ground), whereas Shannon traps were set on the edge. FINDINGS A total of 1,414 anophelines were collected from 13 species. Anopheles (Kerteszia) cruzii Dyar and Knab remained the most frequently captured species in the CDC traps set in the forest canopy, as well as being the vector with the highest prevalence of Plasmodium vivax/simium infection, according to molecular polymerase chain reaction techniques. CONCLUSIONS P. vivax/simium was found only in abdomens of the mosquitoes of the subgenus Nyssorhynchus, weakening the hypothesis that this subgenus also plays a role in malaria transmission in this specific region.

  15. Divergence of Lutzomyia (Psathyromyia) shannoni (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) is indicated by morphometric and molecular analyses when examined between taxa from the southeastern United States and southern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, David A; Rebollar-Téllez, Eduardo A

    2013-11-01

    The medically important sand fly Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar 1929) was collected at eight different sites: seven within the southeastern United States and one in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico. A canonical discriminant analysis was conducted on 40 female L. shannoni specimens from each of the eight collection sites (n = 320) using 49 morphological characters. Four L. shannoni specimens from each of the eight collection sites (n = 32) were sent to the Barcode of Life Data systems where a 654-base pair segment of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) genetic marker was sequenced from each sand fly. Phylogeny estimation based on the COI segments, in addition to genetic distance, divergence, and differentiation values were calculated. Results of both the morphometric and molecular analyses indicate that the species has undergone divergence when examined between the taxa of the United States and Quintana Roo, Mexico. Although purely speculative, the arid or semiarid expanse from southern Texas to Mexico City could be an allopatric barrier that has impeded migration and hence gene flow, resulting in different morphology and genetic makeup between the two purported populations. A high degree of intragroup variability was noted in the Quintana Roo sand flies.

  16. Morphological anomalies in two Lutzomyia (Psathyromyia) shannoni (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) specimens collected from Fort Rucker, Alabama, and Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, David A; Lawyer, Phillip; Rowton, Edgar; Schultz, George; Wilkerson, Richard; Davies, Stephen J; Lipnick, Robert; Keep, Lisa

    2010-09-01

    This report describes two male specimens of the sand fly species Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar) (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) collected at Fort Rucker, AL, and Fort Campbell, KY, in dry ice-baited light traps during September 2005. The specimens were observed to have anomalies to the number of spines on the gonostyli. The taxonomic keys of Young and Perkins (Mosq. News 44: 263-285; 1984) use the number of spines on the gonostylus in the first couplet to differentiate two major groupings of North American sand flies. The two anomalous specimens were identified as L. shannoni based on the following criteria: (1) both specimens possess antennal ascoids with long, distinct proximal spurs (a near diagnostic character of L. shannoni in North America), (2) the sequences of the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene from both specimens indicated L. shannoni, and (3) the sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 2 molecular marker from both specimens indicated L. shannoni. The anomalous features are fundamentally different from each other as the Fort Rucker specimen possesses a fifth spine (basally located) on just one gonostylus, whereas the Fort Campbell specimen possesses five spines (extra spines subterminally located) on both gonostyli. Because the gonostyli are part of the external male genitalia, anomalies in the number of spines on the gonostyli may have serious biological consequences, such as reduced reproductive success, for the possessors. These anomalies are of taxonomic interest as the specimens could easily have been misidentified using available morphological keys.

  17. Morphometric and molecular analyses of the sand fly species Lutzomyia shannoni (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) collected from seven different geographical areas in the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, David A; Davies, Stephen J; Olsen, Cara; Lawyer, Phillip; Lipnick, Robert; Schultz, George; Rowton, Edgar; Wilkerson, Richard; Keep, Lisa

    2011-03-01

    A morphometric and molecular study of adult male and female Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar 1929) collected at seven different locations within the southeastern United States was conducted to assess the degree of divergence between the grouped specimens from each location. The collection locations were as follows: Fort Bragg, NC; Fort Campbell, KY; Fort Rucker, AL; Ossabaw Island, GA; Patuxent National Wildlife Research Refuge, MD; Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge, FL; and Baton Rouge, LA. Forty males and forty females from each location were analyzed morphometrically from 54 and 49 character measurements, respectively. In addition, the molecular markers consisting of the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (from 105 sand flies: 15 specimens/collection site) and the partial internal transcribed spacer 2 (from 42 sand flies: six specimens/collection site) were compared. Multivariate analyses indicate that the low degree of variation between the grouped specimens from each collection site prevents the separation of any collection site into an entity that could be interpreted as a distinct population. The molecular analyses were in concordance with the morphometric study as no collection location grouped into a separate population based on the two partial markers. The grouped specimens from each collection site appear to be within the normal variance of the species, indicating a single population in the southeast United States. It is recommended that additional character analyses of L. shannoni based on more molecular markers, behavioral, ecological, and physiological characteristics, be conducted before ruling out the possibility of populations or a cryptic species complex within the southeastern United States.

  18. Distribution of phlebotomine sand fly genotypes (Lutzomyia shannoni, Diptera: Psychodidae) across a highly heterogeneous landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, J; Ghosh, K; Ferro, C; Munstermann, L E

    2001-03-01

    Genetic variability of eight Colombian field populations and two laboratory colonies of a tropical forest sand fly, Lutzomyia shannoni Dyar, was assessed by comparing allozyme frequencies at 20 enzyme loci. Substantial genetic variability was noted in all strains, with mean heterozygosities of 13-21% and alleles per locus of 2.0-2.8. Four loci were monomorphic. Six populations in north and central Colombia showed close genetic similarity (Nei's distances, 0.01-0.09), despite mountainous environment, discontinuous forest habitat, and elevation differences from 125 to 1,220 m. Two samples representing the Orinoco (near Villavicencio) and Amazon (near Leticia) river basins were similar (Nei's distance, 0.08) but diverged substantially from the central six samples (Nei's distances, 0.26-0.40). Although the range of L. shannoni extends from the southeastern United States to northern Argentina, three genetically distinct, geographically discrete, groups were discerned by the current analysis: Orinoco-Amazon river basins, north-central Colombia, and eastern United States.

  19. Biting activity of Aedes scapularis (Rondani and Haemagogus mosquitoes in Southern Brazil (Diptera: Culicidae Atividade hematófaga de mosquitos Aedes scapularis (Rondani e Haemagogus no sul do Brasil (Diptera: Culicidae

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    Oswaldo Paulo Forattini

    1988-04-01

    Full Text Available The biting activity of a population of Aedes scapularis (Rondani, Haemagogus capricornii Lutz and Hg. leucocelaenus (Dyar and Shannon in Southern Brazil was studied between March 1980 and April 1983. Data were obtained with 25-hour human bait catches in three areas with patchy residual forests, named "Jacaré-Pepira", "Lupo" Farm, and "Sta. Helena" Farm, in the highland region of S. Paulo State (Brazil. Data obtained on Ae. scapularis were compared with those formerly gathered in the "Ribeira'' Valley lowlands, and were similar, except in the "Lupo" Farm study area, where a precrepuscular peak was observed, not recorded at the "Jacaré-Pepira" site or in the "Ribeira" Valley. In all the areas this mosquito showed diurnal and nocturnal activity, but was most active during the evening crepuscular period. These observations support the hypothesis about the successful adaptation of Ae. scapularis to man-made environments and have epidemiological implications that arise from it. As for Haemagogus, results obtained on the "Lupo" and "Sta. Helena" regions agree with previous data obtained in several other regions and show its diurnal activity. The proximity of "Lupo" Farm, where Hg. capricornii and Hg. leucocelaenus showed considerable activity, to "Araraquara" city where Aedes aegypti was recently found, raises some epidemiological considerations about the possibility of urban yellow fever resurgence.No período de março de 1980 a abril de 1983 foi estudada a atividade hematófaga de uma população de Aedes scapularis (Rondani, Haemagogus capricornii Lutz, Hg. leucocelaenus (Dyar e Shannon, na região sul do Brasil. Os dados foram obtidos com o emprego de isca humana, mediante captura de 25 horas de duração e correspondente a três áreas, contendo manchas de floresta residual, denominadas Jacaré-Pepira, Fazenda Lupo e Fazenda Santa Helena. Os resultados relativos a Ae. scapularis foram comparados com as coletas anteriormente feitas em áreas de

  20. Bromeliad-associated mosquitoes from Atlantic forest in Santa Catarina Island, southern Brazil (Diptera, Culicidae, with new records for the State of Santa Catarina Mosquitos associados a bromélias em Mata Atlântica na Ilha de Santa Catarina, sul do Brasil (Diptera, Culicidae, com novos registros para o Estado de Santa Catarina

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    Gerson Azulim Müller

    Full Text Available Bromeliad-associated mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae in Atlantic Forest in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, southern Brazil, were studied, examining plants of Vriesea philippocoburgi Wawra and Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii at secondary Atlantic rain forest, and A. lindenii and Vriesea friburgensis Mez var. paludosa (L. B. Smith at "restinga" per month, during 12 months. No immature forms of mosquitoes were collected from A. lindenii in the secondary forest. Collections obtained 368 immature mosquitoes, none of them from A. lindenii from rain forest. Culex (Microculex spp. constituted 79.8% of the total, Wyeomyia (Phoniomyia spp. 17.93%, and Anopheles (Kerteszia cruzii (Dyar & Knab, 1908 only 1.36%. The study shows the great predominance of species of medical importance not yet proved, and the small number of immature stages of anopheline mosquitoes. The rainfall, but not the mean temperatures, significantly influenced the quantity of mosquitoes from V. philippocoburgi. Significant differences between the quantities of immature forms of all the bromeliad species were found, and the shape of the plants could be important to the abundance of mosquitoes. All six species of Cx. (Microculex found are recorded for the first time in the State of Santa Catarina, and all six species of Wyeomyia (Phoniomyia are recorded for the first time in bromeliads in this state.Mosquitos (Diptera: Culicidae associados a bromélias em Mata Atlântica na Ilha de Santa Catarina, no Estado de Santa Catarina, foram estudados. Foram examinadas mensalmente plantas de Vriesea philippocoburgi Wawra e Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii de floresta atlântica pluvial ombrófila e A. lindenii e Vriesea friburgensis Mez var. paludosa (L. B. Smith de restinga, durante 12 meses. As coletas resultaram em 368 formas imaturas de mosquitos, sendo que nenhuma foi coletada em A. lindenii de mata ombrófila. Culex (Microculex spp. constituíram 79,8% do total

  1. EFECTO DE LA INFECCIÓN CON GRANULOVIRUS EN EL DESARROLLO DE Tecia solanivora (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae EFFECT OF GRANULO VIRUSES INFECTION ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF Tecia solanivora (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae

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    Carlos Espinel Correal

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El control biológico de Tecia solanivora mediante el uso del granulovirus de Phthorimaea operculella originario del Perú es uno de los principales componentes para su manejo a nivel mundial. Actualmente, Corpoica cuenta con cinco aislamientos nativos de granulovirus obtenidos a partir de larvas de T. solanivora. Considerando que estos aislamientos podrían estar mejor adaptados al insecto y por tal razón posiblemente ser más infectivos que el aislamiento peruano, el objetivo del presente trabajo fue el de estudiar el efecto de dichos virus sobre el desarrollo del insecto. Inicialmente se determinaron los estados de desarrollo de las larvas sanas y su duración bajo condiciones de laboratorio. Se determinó el desarrollo del ancho de la cápsula cefálica (ACC y los síntomas de la enfermedad, evaluando larvas recién emergidas, de 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 20 y 22 días pos-emergencia. El crecimiento de las larvas cumplió con la ley de Dyar, porque el crecimiento de la cápsula cefálica de ínstares sucesivos siguió una progresión geométrica regular. El análisis de distribución de frecuencias del ACC estableció en las larvas sanas la presencia de cuatro ínstares larvales. La infección por el granulovirus causó un aumento en la duración y traslapamiento de los estados larvales, ocasionando un retraso en su desarrollo. Se presentaron diferencias en la expresión de signos y síntomas entre los virus nativos y entre estos y el granulovirus del Perú, lo que sugiere diferencias en la patogenicidad de estos aislamientos, lo cual podría estar relacionado con diferencias genotípicas entre ellos.Biological control of Tecia solanivora by the granulovirus of Phthorimaea operculella from Peru is one of the main components for its management. Corpoica has five native isolates of granulovirus obtained from T. solanivora larvae. Taking into account that these isolates could be adapted to the insect and could have a differential infection

  2. Crepuscular activity of culicids (Diptera, Culicidae in the peridomicile and in the remaining riparian forest in Tibagi river, State of Paraná, Brazil

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    Gerson A. Müller

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Crepuscular activity of culicids (Diptera, Culicidae in the peridomicile and in the remaining riparian forest in Tibagi river, State of Paraná, Brazil. Human-attracted mosquitoes were collected for one hour, around sunset time (half hour before and half after, from April to December 2006, in two environments (riparian forest and near houses, in Tibagi river basin, Palmeira municipality, State of Paraná. Seven-hundred forty-nine mosquitoes, belonging to 13 species, were collected. Psorophora champerico Dyar & Knab, 1906 (42.86% and Psorophora discrucians (Walker, 1856 (40.59% were the most frequent species. No significant differences between quantities of Ps. champerico (t = -0.792; d.f. = 16; p = 0.43 and Ps. discrucians (t = 0.689; d.f. = 16; p = 0.49 obtained in riparian forest and near houses were observed, indicating similar conditions for crepuscular activity of these species in both environments. Psorophora champerico and Ps. discrucians responded (haematophagic activity to environmental stimuli associated with the twilight hours differently in distinct habitats studied. The former species is registered for the first time in the Atlantic forest biome.Atividade crepuscular de culicídeos (Diptera, Culicidae no peridomicílio e remanescentes de matas ciliares do Rio Tibagi. Estado do Paraná, Brasil. Mosquitos atraídos por humanos foram coletados por uma hora em torno do crepúsculo vespertino (meia hora antes e meia hora depois, de abril a dezembro de 2006, em dois locais (mata ciliar e peridomicílio na bacia do Rio Tibagi, município de Palmeira, Estado do Paraná. Foram capturados 749 mosquitos distribuídos em 13 espécies. Psorophora champerico Dyar & Knab, 1906 (42,86% e Ps. discrucians (Walker, 1856 (40,59% foram as espécies mais freqüentes. Não foram registradas diferenças significativas entre as médias de indivíduos capturados entre os pontos de mata ciliar e peridomicílio para Ps. champerico (t = -0,792; g.l. = 16; p = 0

  3. Notas sinonímicas sobre Hesperiidae neotropicais, com descrições de novos gêneros, espécies e subespécies (Lepidoptera

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    Olaf H. H. Mielke

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Celaenorrhinus shema mercedensis, ssp. n. de La Mercede e Rio Colorado, Peru e Cochabamba, Bolívia; Phocides pialia intermedia, ssp. n. de Minas Gerais, Brasil; Corticea diamantina, sp. n. de Minas Gerais, Brasil; Artines tobiasi sp. n. de Minas Gerais, Brasil; Cymaenes albiventris albiventris, sp. n. do Maranhão, Brasil; Cymaenes albiventris capixaba, ssp. n. do Espirito Santo, Brasil; Papias cascatona, sp. n. de Minas Geras, Brasil; Lerema caraca, sp. n. de Minas Gerais e Espirito Santo, Brasil; Vettius ploetzii morretesi, ssp. n. do Paraná e Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Propapias, gen. n., tipo: Rhinthon proximus Bell, 1934, única espécie incluída. Celaenorrhinus songoensis saroma Evans, 1952, comb. n.; Celaenorrhinus songoensis tonio Evans, 1952, comb. n. Lerema duroca duroca (Ploetz, 1883, comb. n. e sp. rev. Lerema duroca lenta Evans, 1955, stat. n. Eumesia eburones inornata (Bell, 1937, comb. n. e stat. n., Eprius veleda obrepta (Kivirikko, 1936, comb. n. e stat. n., Phocides zancleius 1932 syn. n. de Phocides pialia (Hewitson, 1857; Dalla eburones elna Evans, 1955 syn. n. de Eumesia eburones inornata (Bell, 1937; Staphylus holaphegges Dyar, 1913 syn. n. de Eprius veleda veleda (Godman, 1901; Eprius veleda palta Evans, 1955 syn. n. de Eprius veleda obrepta (Kivirikko, 1936; Lerema elgina Schaus, 1902 syn. n. de Lerema duroca duroca (Ploetz, 1883. Dalla Mabille, 1904 syn. n. de Eumesia Felder &. Felder, 1867, n. rev, Eumesiinae Felder & Felder, 1867, n. rev.Celaenorrhinus shema mercedensis, ssp. n. from La Merced and Rio Colorado, Peru, and Cochabamba, Bolívia; Phocides pialia intermedia, ssp. n. from Minas Gerais, Brazil; Corticea diamantina, sp. n. from Minas Gerais, Brazil; Artines tobiasi, sp. n. from Minas Gerais, Brazil; Cymaenes albiventris albiventris, sp. n. from Maranhão, Brazil; Cymaenes albiventris capixaba, ssp. n. from Espírito Santo, Brazil; Papias cascatona, sp. n. from Minas Gerais, Brazil; Lerema caraca, sp. n. from

  4. A Learner-Centered Spiral Knowledge Approach to Teaching Isotope Geology

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    Reid, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    Aided by the insights I gained by participation in the Arizona Board of Regents Tri-University Collaboration on Learner-Centered Practice, I made major changes to a graduate course in isotope geology (GLG617), including: 1) implementation of a spiral knowledge approach (e.g., Bruner, 1990; Dyar et al., 2004); 2) incorporation of more learner-centered in-class activities; and 3) more explicit emphasis on skills that I regarded as important for success in geochemistry. In the geosciences, the field of isotope geology is now an essential area of inquiry with implications for geologic timescales, climate information, tracing geochemical processes, and biological evolution, to name a few. The traditional approach to teaching isotope geology suffers from the fact that learning tends to be compartmentalized by technique/approach and one subfield (e.g., stable or radiogenic isotopes) is usually favored by appearing earlier in semester. To make learning more integrated, I employed a simplified spiral learning approach so that common principles could be revisited several times over the course of the semester and, in so doing, students' grasp of the fundamental principles could be scaffolded into greater understanding. Other learner-centered changes to the course included more explicit emphasis on helping students become comfortable with interpreting data displayed graphically and explicit emphasis on helping students give and evaluate oral presentations that rely on isotope data. I also developed a detailed grading rubric for the final paper and allowed students to have a draft of their final papers evaluated and graded (guided by Huba and Freed, 2000) A number of cooperative learning activities developed specifically for this course (19 in all) enabled me to gain a better appreciation for students' learning. Activities included pair share, round-robin, small group explorations of techniques and case studies (sometimes as introduction to, sometimes as review of material

  5. Spinosad as an effective larvicide for control of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti, vectors of dengue in southern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Carlos F; Bond, J Guillermo; Casas, Mauricio; Muñoz, José; Orozco, Arnoldo; Valle, Javier; Williams, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    Field trials were conducted during the wet and dry seasons in periurban and semi-rural cemeteries in southern Mexico to determine the efficacy of a suspension concentrate formulation of spinosad (Tracer 480SC) on the inhibition of development of Aedes albopictus L. and Ae. aegypti Skuse. For this, oviposition traps were treated with spinosad (1 or 5 mg L(-1)), Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti, VectoBac 12AS), a sustained release formulation of temephos and a water control. Ae. albopictus was subordinate to Ae. aegypti during the dry season, but became dominant or codominant during the wet season at both sites. The two species could not be differentiated in field counts on oviposition traps. Mean numbers of larvae + pupae of Aedes spp. in Bti-treated containers were similar to the control at both sites during both seasons. The duration of complete absence of aquatic stages varied from 5 to 13 weeks for the spinosad treatments and from 6 to 9 weeks for the temephos treatment, depending on site, season and product concentration. Predatory Toxorhynchites theobaldi Dyar and Knab suffered low mortality in control and Bti treatments, but high mortality in spinosad and temephos treatments. Egg counts and percentage of egg hatch of Aedes spp. increased significantly between the dry and wet seasons, but significant treatment differences were not detected. Temephos granules and a suspension concentrate formulation of spinosad were both highly effective larvicides against Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. These compounds merit detailed evaluation for inclusion in integrated control programs targeted at Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus in regions where they represent important vectors of human diseases. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Eficiência e Persistência de Três Produtos Comerciais à Base de Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis e Bacillus sphaericus no controle de Culicidae (Diptera em Lagoas de Tratamento de Efluentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Lopes

    2010-11-01

    Abstract. The hematofagic effect caused by females belonging to some species of Culicidae on humans and animals can be directly related to pathogen transmission, allergic reactions and uneasiness. The emergence of populations resistant to chemical insecticides has fostered the use of alternative methods, mainly biological control. The trials were conducted in three effluent treatment lagoons, on larvae of Culicidae to test the efficiency and persistence of commercial products whose active principles are based on Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis Berliner and Bacillus sphaericus Neide. The products tested were Vectolex (a granulated formulation of B. sphaericus, Sphaericus (a liquid formulation of B. sphaericus and Bt-horus (a liquid formulation of B. thuringiensis. The products were applied biweekly and evaluations were conducted 0, 24, 48, 72, and 120 hours after each application. The lagoons were colonized by Culex nigripalpus Theobald (1.5%, Culex saltanensis Dyar (2.25%, and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (96.25%. Bt-horus reduced larvae by 89.06%, 83.97% and 89.96% at 24, 48 and 72 hours after product application, respectively. The granulated and the liquid formulations containing B. sphaericus reduced larvae by 98.89 % and 98.34% 24 hours after application, and by 99.79% and 99.78% after 48 hours, respectively. The products and the different formulations were effective in controlling larvae of all three Culicidae species in lagoons with high levels of organic matter, but the persistence was recorded in two and three days for products containing respectively B. sphaericus and B. thuringiensis israelensis.

  7. Host-Feeding Patterns of Culex stigmatosoma (Diptera: Culicidae) in Southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhatter, Lee P; Su, Tianyun; Williams, Greg; Cheng, Min-Lee; Dhillon, Major; Gerry, Alec C

    2017-11-07

    Knowledge of the blood-feeding patterns exhibited by arthropod vectors is essential for understanding the complex dynamics of vector-borne disease transmission. Some species of mosquitoes belonging to the genus Culex have been implicated as having major roles in the transmission of arboviruses such as West Nile virus, Saint Louis encephalitis virus, and Western equine encephalitis virus. Although the host-feeding patterns for many of these Culex species are well studied, the host-feeding patterns of Culex stigmatosoma Dyar are relatively poorly studied, even though this species is suspected to be an important maintenance vector for West Nile virus and other arboviruses. In the current study, bloodmeals from 976 blood-engorged Cx. stigmatosoma, collected from 30 sites in southern California from 2009-2012, were processed for vertebrate host identification by nucleotide sequencing following polymerase chain reaction to amplify portions of the cytochrome oxidase I and cytochrome b genes of vertebrate animals. Vertebrate DNA was amplified, sequenced, and identified from a total of 647 Cx. stigmatosoma bloodmeals, revealing that 98.6% of bloodmeals were from birds, 1.2% from three mammal species, and a single bloodmeal was from a reptile species. In total, 40 different host species were identified. The greatest number of bloodmeals identified was from domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus L.) (38% of bloodmeals), house sparrow (Passer domesticus L.) (23%), house finch (Haemorhous mexicanus Müller) (17%), American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos L.) (4%), and mourning dove (Zenaida macroura L.) (3%). However, chicken bloodmeals were identified almost entirely from a single site where mosquito collection devices were placed in the near vicinity of confined domestic chickens. The strongly ornithophilic feeding behavior shown in this study for Cx. stigmatosoma supports the hypothesis that this mosquito species may be an important maintenance (or endemic) vector for

  8. El Alabama en la Zona Algodonera de Armero

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    Velasco Llanos Vicente

    1939-10-01

    Full Text Available El gusano cortador de la hoja del algodonero, comúnmente llamado Alabama por todos los plantadores de algodón de la región de Armero, ha merecido y seguirá mereciendo una especial atención, ya que constituye la plaga más importante de cuantas diezman los cultivos de algodón. Si bien es cierto que otros insectos como el gusano rosado colombiano de las cápsulas del algodonero (SacadodespyralisDyar (7; nuevo género y nueva especie, según W m. Schaus, y el pulgón (AphisgossypiiGlov. causan daños de consideración, ninguno de ellos ha mostrado, en esta zona, la enorme voracidad y por lo tanto la fuerza destructora del insecto que tratamos. El Alabama fue la causa de casi todos los fracasos que tuvieron los primeros cultivadores en algunas regiones del interior del país. En ese entonces no había facilidad para su control, como la hay ahora, y era muy común ver un cultivo devastado en pocos días por la plaga en mención, sin que hubiera manera de destruirla. El hecho indiscutible de haberse iniciado el cultivo del algodón en la región de Armero sobre bases técnicas, de haber recibido el apoyo irrestricto y entusiasta de los,gobiernos departamental y nacional, de crear entidades y centros de investigación al servicio de la economía del país, y de poseer vías accesibles a,los mercados de importancia, son las razones inmediatas del éxito rotundo y progresivo de la industria algodonera en esta zona. A pesar de todo esto, el Alabama se presentó desde el primer momento y ha continuado haciendo sus daños de cosecha en cosecha, obligando a,los cultivadores a equiparse con máquinas espolvoreadoras de diversos tipos y a usar los insecticidas aconsejados por la técnica que les dieron resultados positivos; yel insecto, que antes constituía un problema para el cultivo, pasó a ser solo objeto de una inversión en el presupuesto del cultivador.

  9. Advances in high-resolution synchrotron micro-XANES for constraining the redox evolution of terrestrial and extraterrestrial magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S. R.; Dyar, M. D.; McCanta, M. C.; Head, E.

    2017-12-01

    -132. [2] Dyar M. D et al. (2016) Amer. Mineral., 101, 744-748. [3] McCanta et al. (2017) Icarus, 285, 95-102.

  10. Cultivos celulares primarios de Lutzomyia shannoni (Diptera: psychodidae y estudio cariologico preliminar de la especie

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    Felio J. Bello

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Con el propósito de obtener una línea celular de Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar para estudios de susceptibilidad viral y mantenimiento de parásitos, se iniciaron cultivos celulares primarios de esta especie, vectora del virus de la estomatitis vesicular en los Estados Unidos y vectora sospechosa de leishmaniasis cutánea en las Américas. A partir de embriones y larvas neonatas del flebotomineo, se realizaron explantes de tejidos embrionarios en el medio MMIVP12, suplementado con 20% de suero fetal bovino y una mezcla de antibiótico y antimicótico, los cuales fueron incubados a una temperatura promedio de 2VC, sin atmósfera de CO,. El crecimiento celular comenzó en un periodo de 85 a 88 días después de efectuadas las siembras, mediante la presencia de vesículas compuestas de células epitelioides, flotando en el medio o adheridas a pequeños fragmentos de tejidos con células en división. Previa estimulación mecánica de los cultivos, se incrementó la proliferación celular a la semana siguiente de efectuado el procedimiento; sin embargo, el proceso mitótico de las células fue lento, similar al desarrollado con Lu. longipalpis, pero diferente a los cultivos celulares derivados de mosquitos. La formación de colonias individuales, dispersas en la superficie del frasco de cultivo, se observó a los 90 días de incubación, las cuales posteriormente evolucionaron a una monocapa semiconfluente. La morfología celular fue heterogénea con predominio de tipos epitelioides. Mediante la técnica de squash, se obtuvo el cariotipo de la especie, cuyo número diploide de cromosomas fue de 8, derivados de tejidos cerebrales de larvas de IV estadio.

  11. Dawn approaches Ceres: Analysis of first FC color data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Martin; Nathues, Andreas; Schäfer, Michael; Russell, Christopher T.; Schäfer, Tanja; Memgel, Kurt; Reddy, Vishnu; Thangjam, Guneshwar S.; Sierks, Holger; Christensen, Ulrich; Hiesinger, Harald; Le Corre, Lucille; Gutiérrez-Marqués, Pablo; Büttner, Irene; Hall, Ian; Ripken, Joachim; Sykes, Mark V.; Li, Jian-Yang

    2015-04-01

    scales can be discussed. They are related to presumed effects like relaxation associated with a potential subsurface water regime of Ceres. References Burbine, T. H., Rivkin, A. S., Noble, S. K., Mothe-Diniz, T., Bottke, W. F., McCoy, T. J., Dyar, M. D., Thomas, C. A. (2008). Oxygen and asteroids. Reviews in Mineralogy & Geochemistry 68, 273-343 Küppers, M., O'Rourke, L., Bocklee-Morvan, D., Zakharov, V., Lee, S., von Allmen, P., Carry, B., Teyssier, D., Marston, A., Müller, T., Crovisier, J., Barucci, M. A., Moreno, R. (2014). Localized sources of water vapour on the dwarf planet (1) Ceres. Nature 505, 525-527 Li, J.-Y., McFadden, L. A., Parker, J. Wm., Young, E. F., Stern, S. A., Thomas, P. C., Russell, C. T., Sykes, M. V. (2006). Photometric analysis of 1 Ceres and surface mapping from HST observations. Icarus 182, 143-160 Vilas, F., McFadden L. A. (1992) CCD reflectance spectra of selected asteroids. I. Presentation and data analysis considerations. Icarus 100, 85-94

  12. Between ice and gas: CO2 on the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbitts, C.

    2010-12-01

    , with the position of its ν3 fundament absorption band dependent on the cation composition and on the dosing temperature. It may also be that the presence of charge-compensating ions, and the resulting negative charge of the remaining structure, enables CO2 to adsorb through an induced dipole attraction. In general, the IR absorption band of CO2 in montmorillonite tends to shift toward longer wavelengths as the density of the electric field of the principle cation decreases, with the exception that the IR absorption band of the Na-rich endmember occurs at a shorter wavelength than for the Li-rich endmember. References: [1] Carlson et al., (1996) Science; [2] McCord et al., (1998) J. Geophys. Res.; [3] Buratti et al., (2005) Astrophys. J.; [4]Clark et al., (2005) Nature; [5] Brown et al., (2006) , Icarus; [6] Filacchione et al., (2006) , Icarus; [7] Cruikshank et al., (2010), Icarus, 206, 561-572; [9] Smythe et al., (1998),DPS,30, #55.P07, 1448; [9] Hansen and McCord, (2008), GRL, 35; [10] Hibbitts et al., (2000) J. Geophys. Res.; [11] Hibbitts et al., (2002) , J. Geophys. Res.; [12] Hibbitts et al., (2003) J. Geophys. Res.; [13] Moore et al., (2000), Icarus, 140, 294-312; [14] Hibbitts and Szanyi, (2007), Icarus. 191, 371-380; [15] Dyar et al., (2010), Icarus, 208, 425-437.