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Sample records for eol care processes

  1. Association between education in EOL care and variability in EOL practice: a survey of ICU physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Daniel Neves; Vincent, Jean Louis; Velasco, Irineu Tadeu; Park, Marcelo

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated the association between physician education in EOL and variability in EOL practice, as well as the differences between beliefs and practices regarding EOL in the ICU. Physicians from 11 ICUs at a university hospital completed a survey presenting a patient in a vegetative state with no family or advance directives. Questions addressed approaches to EOL care, as well physicians' personal, professional and EOL educational characteristics. The response rate was 89%, with 105 questionnaires analyzed. Mean age was 38 ± 8 years, with a mean of 14 ± 7 years since graduation. Physicians who did not apply do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders were less likely to have attended EOL classes than those who applied written DNR orders [0/7 vs. 31/47, OR = 0.549 (0.356-0.848), P = 0.001]. Physicians who involved nurses in the decision-making process were more likely to be ICU specialists [17/22 vs. 46/83, OR = 4.1959 (1.271-13.845), P = 0.013] than physicians who made such decisions among themselves or referred to ethical or judicial committees. Physicians who would apply "full code" had less often read about EOL [3/22 vs. 11/20, OR = 0.0939 (0.012-0.710), P = 0.012] and had less interest in discussing EOL [17/22 vs. 20/20, OR = 0.210 (0.122-0.361), P EOL is associated with variability in EOL decisions in the ICU. Moreover, actual practice may differ from what physicians believe is best for the patient.

  2. Reaching common ground: a patient-family-based conceptual framework of quality EOL care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Doris; Brazil, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Improvement in the quality of end-of-life (EOL) care is a priority health care issue since serious deficiencies in quality of care have been reported across care settings. Increasing pressure is now focused on Canadian health care organizations to be accountable for the quality of palliative and EOL care delivered. Numerous domains of quality EOL care upon which to create accountability frameworks are now published, with some derived from the patient/family perspective. There is a need to reach common ground on the domains of quality EOL care valued by patients and families in order to develop consistent performance measures and set priorities for health care improvement. This paper describes a meta-synthesis study to develop a common conceptual framework of quality EOL care integrating attributes of quality valued by patients and their families.

  3. What evidence is available on end-of-life (EOL) care and Latino elders? A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Oliver, Dulce M; Talamantes, Melissa; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra

    2014-02-01

    Low-income and minority persons, such as Latinos, encounter substantial barriers in accessing effective end-of-life (EOL) care. This study intends to review current evidence on how to deliver EOL care to Latino elders. Literature search in PubMed and Ovid Web sites of articles indexed in Medline (1948-2011), Cochrane (2005-2011), Embase, and PsychInfo (1967-2011) databases. Articles were included if they contained (1) study participants' race/ethnicity, (2) adults or population older than 60 years, and (3) information related to EOL care. A total of 64 abstracts were reviewed, and 38 articles met the inclusion criteria. After reviewing the quality of evidence, 4 themes were identified and summarized: EOL preferences, hospice, Latino culture, and caregiving. Latino elders have traditional acculturation practices, face EOL decisions with family support, and, if educated, are receptive toward hospice and caregiver support.

  4. Eole 2005; Eole 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Eole 2005 programme is a french development programme of wind power plants joined up to the power distribution system. It has been launched in february 1996 by the ministry of Industry. The aim is to install in France a power of 250 to 500 Mw in wind power from now until 2005. Electricite de France is implied in other kind of renewable energies: hydroelectric power, biomass, solar energy, and geothermal energy. (N.C.)

  5. Patient-reported assessment of quality care at end of life: development and validation of Quality Care Questionnaire-End of Life (QCQ-EOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Young Ho; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Lee, Kyoung-Min; Park, Sang Min; Lee, Chang Geol; Choi, Youn Seon; Lee, Won Sup; Kim, Si-Young; Heo, Dae Seog

    2006-09-01

    Our goal was to validate an instrument with which terminally ill patients could evaluate the quality of care they receive at the end of life (EOL). Questionnaire development followed a four-phase process: item generation and reduction, construction, pilot testing, and field-testing. Using relevance and priority criteria and pilot testing, we developed a 16-item questionnaire. Factor analyses of data from 235 patients resulted in the Quality Care Questionnaire-End of Life (QCQ-EOL) covering dignity-conserving care, care by health care professionals, individualised care, and family relationships. All subscales and total scores showed high internal consistency (Cronbach alpha range, 0.73-0.89). The ability of total score and selective subscale scores clearly differentiated patients on the basis of clinical situation, sense of dignity, and general rating of care quality. Correlations of scores between patients and caregivers were substantial. The QCQ-EOL can be adopted to assess the quality of care received by terminally ill patients.

  6. Using Social Network Analysis to Investigate Positive EOL Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiayun; Yang, Rumei; Wilson, Andrew; Reblin, Maija; Clayton, Margaret F; Ellington, Lee

    2018-04-30

    End of life (EOL) communication is a complex process involving the whole family and multiple care providers. Applications of analysis techniques that account for communication beyond the patient and patient/provider, will improve clinical understanding of EOL communication. To introduce the use of social network analysis to EOL communication data, and to provide an example of applying social network analysis to home hospice interactions. We provide a description of social network analysis using social network analysis to model communication patterns during home hospice nursing visits. We describe three social network attributes (i.e. magnitude, directionality, and reciprocity) in the expression of positive emotion among hospice nurses, family caregivers, and hospice cancer patients. Differences in communication structure by primary family caregiver gender and across time were also examined. Magnitude (frequency) in the expression of positive emotion occurred most often between nurses and caregivers or nurses and patients. Female caregivers directed more positive emotion to nurses, and nurses directed more positive emotion to other family caregivers when the primary family caregiver was male. Reciprocity (mutuality) in positive emotion declined towards day of death, but increased on day of actual patient death. There was variation in reciprocity by the type of positive emotion expressed. Our example demonstrates that social network analysis can be used to better understand the process of EOL communication. Social network analysis can be expanded to other areas of EOL research, such as EOL decision-making and health care teamwork. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Development and Pilot Evaluation of a Novel Dignity-Conserving End-of-Life (EoL) Care Model for Nursing Homes in Chinese Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Andy H Y; Dai, Annie A N; Lam, Shu-Hang; Wong, Sandy W P; Tsui, Amy L M; Tang, Jervis C S; Lou, Vivian W Q

    2016-06-01

    The provision of end-of-life (EoL) care in long-term-care settings remains largely underdeveloped in most Chinese societies, and nursing home residents often fail to obtain good care as they approach death. This paper systematically describes the development and implementation mechanisms of a novel Dignity-Conserving EoL Care model that has been successfully adopted by three nursing homes in Hong Kong and presents preliminary evidence of its effectiveness on enhancing dignity and quality of life (QoL) of terminally ill residents. Nine terminally ill nursing home residents completed the McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Nursing Facilities Quality of Life Questionnaire at baseline and 6 months post-EoL program enrollment. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to detect significance changes in each QoL domains across time. Although significant deterioration was recorded for physical QoL, significant improvement was observed for social QoL. Moreover, a clear trend toward significant improvements was identified for the QoL domains of individuality and relationships. A holistic and compassionate caring environment, together with the core principles of family-centered care, interagency and interdisciplinary teamwork, as well as cultural-specific psycho-socio-spiritual support, are all essential elements for optimizing QoL and promoting death with dignity for nursing home residents facing morality. This study provides a useful framework to facilitate the future development of EoL care in long-term-care settings in the Chinese context. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. ENVIRONMENTS and EOL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pafilis, Evangelos; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Schnetzer, Julia

    2015-01-01

    are needed to facilitate large-scale analyses. Therefore, we developed ENVIRONMENTS, a fast dictionary-based tagger capable of identifying Environment Ontology (ENVO) terms in text. We evaluate the accuracy of the tagger on a new manually curated corpus of 600 Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) species pages. We use...... the tagger to associate taxa with environments by tagging EOL text content monthly, and integrate the results into the EOL to disseminate them to a broad audience of users. Availability and implementation: The software and the corpus are available under the open-source BSD and the CC-BY-NC-SA 3.0 licenses...

  9. How Older Adults and Their Families Perceive Family Talk about Aging-Related EOL Issues: A Dialectical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, Nichole; Child, Jeffrey T; Lin, Mei-Chen; Savery, Carol; Bosley, Tammy

    2017-04-17

    For older adults, approaching end-of-life (EOL) brings unique transitions related to family relationships. Unfortunately, most families greatly underestimate the need to discuss these difficult issues. For example, parents approaching EOL issues often struggle with receiving assistance from others, avoiding family conflict, and maintaining their sense of personhood. In addition, discussions of EOL issues force family members to face their parents' mortality, which can be particularly difficult for adult children to process emotionally. This study explored aging issues identified by aging parents and their families as they traverse these impending EOL changes. Ten focus groups of seniors ( n = 65) were conducted. Focus groups were organized according to race (African-American/European-American), gender, and whether the older adult was living independently or in an assisted care facility. When asked open-ended questions about discussing aging and EOL issues with family members, participants revealed tensions that led us to consider Relational Dialectics Theory as a framework for analysis. The predominant tension highlighted in this report was certainty versus uncertainty, with the two sub-themes of sustained life versus sustained personhood and confronting versus avoiding EOL issues. For these data, there were more similarities than differences as a result of gender, race, or living situation than one might expect, although culture and financial status were found to be influential in the avoidance of EOL discussions. The results of this study help to provide additional insight into relational dialectics related to aging, EOL, and the importance of communication in facilitating family coping.

  10. Patient-family EoL communication and its predictors: Reports from caregivers of Latino patients in the rural U.S.-Mexico border region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eunjeong; Lee, Jaehoon; Ramirez, Carlos; Lopez, Denicka; Martinez, Stephanie

    2017-10-26

    Family caregivers play an important role in end-of-life (EoL) decision making when the patient is unable to make his/her own decisions. While communication about EoL care between patients and family is perhaps a first step toward advance care planning (ACP)/EoL decisions, not every culture puts great value on open communication about this topic. The aims of the present study were to explore EoL communication and the aspects of communication among caregivers of Latino patients in the rural United States (U.S.)-Mexico border region. This study analyzed data from a hospice needs assessment collected from 189 family caregivers of Latino patients at a home health agency in a rural U.S.-Mexico border region. Bivariate tests and logistic regression were used to address our aims. About half of the family caregivers (n = 96, 50.8%) reported to have ever engaged in EoL discussion with patients. Significant predictors of EoL discussion included life-sustaining treatment preference (odds ratio [OR] = 0.44, p EoL communication. Also, caregivers who worried that physicians might want to stop treatments (i.e., "pull the plug") too soon were less likely to do so. Conversely, caregivers who had knowledge about ADs were more likely to engage in EoL communication. EoL communication is a complex process influenced by individual, social, and cultural values and the beliefs of both the patient and his/her family. Inclusion of family caregivers in the ACP process and facilitating culturally tailored EoL communication between patients and family caregivers is important.

  11. Emotional Numbness Modifies the Effect of End-of-Life Discussions on End-of-Life Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Paul K.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2012-01-01

    Context Overall, end-of-life (EOL) discussions are unrelated to psychological distress and associated with lower rates of aggressive care near death. Nevertheless, patients who report they feel emotionally numb about their illness might encounter difficulties cognitively processing an EOL discussion. Objectives We hypothesized that emotional numbness would modify the influence of EOL discussions on the receipt of less aggressive EOL care. Methods Data were derived from structured interviews with 290 participants in the federally-funded Coping with Cancer Study, a multisite, prospective cohort study of advanced cancer patients followed through their death. Patients’ reports of EOL discussions with their physician and emotional numbness were assessed a median of 4.6 months before death. Information about aggressive EOL care (i.e., ventilation, resuscitation in the last week of life, death in the Intensive Care Unit) was obtained from postmortem caregiver interviews and medical charts. Main and interactive effects of EOL discussions and emotional numbness on aggressive EOL care, adjusting for potential confounds, were evaluated using multiple logistic regression. Results The likelihood of aggressive EOL care associated with having EOL discussions increased by a factor of nine (adjusted odds ratio=9.02, 95% confidence interval 1.37, 59.6, P=0.022) for every unit increase in a patient’s emotional numbness score. Conclusion Emotional numbness diminishes a patient’s capacity to benefit from EOL discussions. EOL decision making may be more effective if clinical communications with emotionally numb patients are avoided. PMID:22926093

  12. An integrated TSP-GA with EOL cost model for selecting the best EOL option

    OpenAIRE

    Zakri Ghazalli; Atsuo Murata

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents our research works on integrating design for disassembly with cost model for end-of-life (EOL) product. This paper has two objectives. The first objective is to optimize disassembly sequence of the EOL product. We integrate a traveling salesman problem approach with genetic algorithm in finding the optimal disassembly sequence for disassembling the EOL product. Based on this optimal sequence, the second objective is to identify the best EOL option. We employ EOL profits an...

  13. An integrated TSP-GA with EOL cost model for selecting the best EOL option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakri Ghazalli

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents our research works on integrating design for disassembly with cost model for end-of-life (EOL product. This paper has two objectives. The first objective is to optimize disassembly sequence of the EOL product. We integrate a traveling salesman problem approach with genetic algorithm in finding the optimal disassembly sequence for disassembling the EOL product. Based on this optimal sequence, the second objective is to identify the best EOL option. We employ EOL profits and net present value of parts and subassemblies of the EOL product to determine the best EOL option of components and parts of the EOL product. The predicted results showed that the developed cost model has reached a good correspondence with the established methods.

  14. Emergency Nurses' Perceptions of Providing End-of-Life Care in a Hong Kong Emergency Department: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Johnson Wai Keung; Hung, Maria Shuk Yu; Pang, Samantha Mei Che

    2016-05-01

    Provision of end-of-life (EOL) care in the emergency department has improved globally in recent years and has a different scope of interventions than traditional emergency medicine. In 2010, a regional hospital established the first ED EOL service in Hong Kong. The aim of this study was to understand emergency nurses' perceptions regarding the provision of EOL care in the emergency department. A qualitative approach was used with purposive sampling of 16 nurses who had experience in providing EOL care. Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted from May to October, 2014. All the interviews were transcribed verbatim for content analysis. Four themes were identified: (1) doing good for the dying patients, (2) facilitating family engagement and involvement, (3) enhancing personal growth and professionalism, and (4) expressing ambiguity toward resource deployment. Provision of EOL care in the emergency department can enhance patients' last moment of life, facilitate the grief and bereavement process of families, and enhance the professional development of staff in emergency department. It is substantiated that EOL service in the emergency department enriches EOL care in the health care system. Findings from this study integrated the perspectives on ED EOL services from emergency nurses. The integration of EOL service in other emergency departments locally and worldwide is encouraged. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. End-of-Life Care for Blood Cancers: A Series of Focus Groups With Hematologic Oncologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odejide, Oreofe O.; Salas Coronado, Diana Y.; Watts, Corey D.; Wright, Alexi A.; Abel, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Hematologic cancers are associated with aggressive cancer-directed care near death and underuse of hospice and palliative care services. We sought to explore hematologic oncologists' perspectives and decision-making processes regarding end-of-life (EOL) care. Methods: Between September 2013 and January 2014, 20 hematologic oncologists from the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center participated in four focus groups regarding EOL care for leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Focus groups employed a semistructured format with case vignettes and open-ended questions and were followed by thematic analysis. Results: Many participants felt that identifying the EOL phase for patients with hematologic cancers was challenging as a result of the continuing potential for cure with advanced disease and the often rapid pace of decline near death. This difficulty was reported to result in later initiation of EOL care. Barriers to high-quality EOL care were also reported to be multifactorial, including unrealistic expectations from both physicians and patients, long-term patient-physician relationships resulting in difficulty conducting EOL discussions, and inadequacy of existing home-based EOL services. Participants also expressed concern that some EOL quality measures developed for solid tumors may be unacceptable for patients with blood cancers given their unique needs at the EOL (eg, palliative transfusions). Conclusion: Our analysis suggests that hematologic oncologists need better clinical markers for when to initiate EOL care. In addition, current quality measures may be inappropriate for identifying overly aggressive care for patients with blood cancers. Further research is needed to develop effective interventions to improve EOL care for this patient population. PMID:25294393

  16. Minimal and careful processing

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Thorkild

    2004-01-01

    In several standards, guidelines and publications, organic food processing is strongly associated with "minimal processing" and "careful processing". The term "minimal processing" is nowadays often used in the general food processing industry and described in literature. The term "careful processing" is used more specifically within organic food processing but is not yet clearly defined. The concept of carefulness seems to fit very well with the processing of organic foods, especially if it i...

  17. Hardships of end-of-life care with court-appointed guardians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Kylie B

    2014-02-01

    In the United States, the court-appointed guardians do not have the ability to make decisions regarding end-of-life (EOL) care for their clients. Additionally, the process of initiating EOL care measures can be slow and cumbersome, despite an existing process of getting approval for such care. This process has the potential to prolong suffering and delay imperative decisions. This article reviews the hardships that patients, court-appointed guardians, and health care staff endure while moving through the oppressive process of obtaining EOL care orders through the court. This article also proposes ways of tuning up the laws, regulations, and communications to make it easier and faster to obtain orders regarding EOL care to preserve the dignity of our patients and loved ones. "A guardianship is a legal relationship created when a person or institution named in a will or assigned by the court to take care of minor children or incompetent adults."

  18. End-of-Life Care for People With Cancer From Ethnic Minority Groups: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresti, Melissa A; Dement, Fritz; Gold, Heather T

    2016-04-01

    Ethnic/racial minorities encounter disparities in healthcare, which may carry into end-of-life (EOL) care. Advanced cancer, highly prevalent and morbid, presents with worsening symptoms, heightening the need for supportive and EOL care. To conduct a systematic review examining ethnic/racial disparities in EOL care for cancer patients. We searched four electronic databases for all original research examining EOL care use, preferences, and beliefs for cancer patients from ethnic/racial minority groups. Twenty-five studies were included: 20 quantitative and five qualitative. All had a full-text English language article and focused on the ethnic/racial minority groups of African Americans, Hispanics Americans, or Asian Americans. Key themes included EOL decision making processes, family involvement, provider communication, religion and spirituality, and patient preferences. Hospice was the most studied EOL care, and was most used among Whites, followed by use among Hispanics, and least used by African and Asian Americans. African Americans perceived a greater need for hospice, yet more frequently had inadequate knowledge. African Americans preferred aggressive treatment, yet EOL care provided was often inconsistent with preferences. Hispanics and African Americans less often documented advance care plans, citing religious coping and spirituality as factors. EOL care differences among ethnic/racial minority cancer patients were found in the processes, preferences, and beliefs regarding their care. Further steps are needed to explore the exact causes of differences, yet possible explanations include religious or cultural differences, caregiver respect for patient autonomy, access barriers, and knowledge of EOL care options. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Use of Simulation in End-of-Life Care Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabow, Debra

    Death and dying encompasses the period when individuals present with a limited prognosis and are near death or have recently died. Using simulation to educate nurses on end-of-life (EOL) care helps focus more on the needs of the learner rather than the patient, and allows the learner to process feelings in preparation for a real experience. Incorporating simulation with a spiritual perspective is essential and needed in EOL nursing care.

  20. Factors related to the provision of home-based end-of-life care among home-care nursing, home help, and care management agencies in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Ayumi; Kurinobu, Takeshi; Ko, Ayako; Okamoto, Yuko; Matsuura, Shino; Feng, Mei; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko

    2015-09-12

    To promote home death, it is necessary to clarify the institutional barriers to conducting end-of-life (EOL) care and consider strategies to deal with this process. This study aims to clarify institution-related factors associated with the provision of home-based EOL care cases, and to compare them among three different types of home-care agencies. We administered a cross-sectional survey throughout Japan to investigate the number and characteristics of EOL cases of home-care nursing (HN), home-help (HH) and care management (CM) agencies. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed for each type of agency to examine factors related to the provision of EOL care. 378 HN agencies, 274 HH agencies, and 452 CM agencies responded to the distributed questionnaire. HN agencies had on average 2.1 (SD = 4.0; range 0-60) home-based EOL cases in the last 3 months, while HH agencies had 0.9 (SD = 1.3; range 0-7) and CM agencies had 1.5 (SD = 2.2; range 0-18) in the last 6 months. In a multivariable analysis of HN agencies, a large number of staff (OR: 1.52; p EOL care; in HH agencies, accepting EOL clients in the agency (OR: 3.29; p EOL care; in CM agencies, the number of staff (OR: 1.21; p = 0.037), the number of collaborating HH agencies (OR: 1.07; p = 0.032), and whether home-care nurses and home helpers visit clients together (OR: 1.89; p = 0.007) were positively associated with the provision of EOL care. The agency's size and the inter-agency collaborative system seemed most important among HN agencies and CM agencies, while institutional preparedness for EOL was most important for HH agencies. These findings represent important new information for targeting different effective strategies in the promotion of home-based EOL care, depending on the agency type.

  1. End-of-Life Care in Nunavik, Quebec: Inuit Experiences, Current Realities, and Ways Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordyk, Shawn Renee; Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Brassard, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Increasing longevity for Inuit living in Nunavik, northern Quebec, has resulted in heightened rates of cancers and chronic diseases necessitating complex treatments. Consequently, end-of-life (EOL) care, once the domain of Inuit families and communities, has come to include professionalized healthcare providers with varying degrees of awareness of factors to consider in providing care to Inuit populations. To better understand the factors shaping EOL care in Nunavik to support the development of a sustainable model of care. Using focused ethnography, we conducted participant observations and informal and semistructured interviews with 103 participants (community members, healthcare practitioners, and administrators) across Nunavik and in Montreal, the affiliated tertiary care center. Data domains included the following: care trajectories; patient and family experiences receiving and providing EOL care; local and urban resources and challenges; and ways forward. Sociocultural, historical, and geographic factors shape EOL care in Nunavik, presenting a complex set of challenges for Inuit patients, families, and healthcare providers. A sustainable model of EOL care requires building on shared initiatives, capitalizing on the existing strengths in communities, and attending to the multiple bereavement needs in the region. Building a sustainable model of EOL care requires respectful collaboration among governing structures, healthcare institutions, and community members. It must centrally value local knowledge and initiatives. To ensure Inuit families and patients are supported throughout the dying process, future initiatives must centrally include local stakeholders in both the design and evaluation of any changes to the current healthcare system.

  2. A knowledge synthesis of culturally- and spiritually-sensitive end-of-life care: findings from a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Mei Lan; Sixsmith, Judith; Sinclair, Shane; Horst, Glen

    2016-05-18

    Multiple factors influence the end-of-life (EoL) care and experience of poor quality services by culturally- and spiritually-diverse groups. Access to EoL services e.g. health and social supports at home or in hospices is difficult for ethnic minorities compared to white European groups. A tool is required to empower patients and families to access culturally-safe care. This review was undertaken by the Canadian Virtual Hospice as a foundation for this tool. To explore attitudes, behaviours and patterns to utilization of EoL care by culturally and spiritually diverse groups and identify gaps in EoL care practice and delivery methods, a scoping review and thematic analysis of article content was conducted. Fourteen electronic databases and websites were searched between June-August 2014 to identify English-language peer-reviewed publications and grey literature (including reports and other online resources) published between 2004-2014. The search identified barriers and enablers at the systems, community and personal/family levels. Primary barriers include: cultural differences between healthcare providers; persons approaching EoL and family members; under-utilization of culturally-sensitive models designed to improve EoL care; language barriers; lack of awareness of cultural and religious diversity issues; exclusion of families in the decision-making process; personal racial and religious discrimination; and lack of culturally-tailored EoL information to facilitate decision-making. This review highlights that most research has focused on decision-making. There were fewer studies exploring different cultural and spiritual experiences at the EoL and interventions to improve EoL care. Interventions evaluated were largely educational in nature rather than service oriented.

  3. Simulation of Phenix EOL Asymmetric Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Kwi Seok; Lee, Kwi Lim; Choi, Chi Woong; Kang, Seok Hun; Chang, Won Pyo; Jeong, Hae Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The asymmetric test of End-Of-Life (EOL) tests on the Phenix plant was used for the evaluation of the MARS-LMR in the Generation IV frame as a part of the code validation. The purpose of the test is to evaluate the ability of the system code to describe asymmetric situations and to identify important phenomena during asymmetrical transient such as a three dimensional effect, buoyancy influence, and thermal stratification in the hot and cold pools. 3-dimensional sodium coolant mixing in the pools has different characteristics from the one dimensional full instantaneous mixing. The velocities and temperatures at the core outlet level differ at each sub-assembly and the temperature in the center of the hot pool may be high because the driver fuels are located at the center region. The temperatures in the hot pool are not the same in the radial and axial locations due to the buoyancy effect. The temperatures in the cold pool also differ along with the elevations and azimuthal directions due to the outlet location of IHX and the thermal stratification

  4. Synthesis of the IRSN report on the second safety re-examination of the EOLE and MINERVE research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This synthesis briefly discusses the results of the second safety re-examination of the EOLE and MINERVE research reactors which are operated by the CEA in a same building in Cadarache, and are presented in appendix. It addresses the seismic behaviour diagnosis of the EOLE and MINERVE installations, other possible external aggressions (plane crash, rising of underground water sheet, thunder, heat or cold wave, effects of wind and snow), the organisational processes, measures regarding radiation protection, the reactor operation safety, the safety of handling operations, the safety of warehousing sites, possible internal aggressions (fire, explosion), the confinement with respect to the environment

  5. Evaluation of Maintenance and EOL Operation Performance of Sensor-Embedded Laptops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Talha Dulman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensors are commonly employed to monitor products during their life cycles and to remotely and continuously track their usage patterns. Installing sensors into products can help generate useful data related to the conditions of products and their components, and this information can subsequently be used to inform EOL decision-making. As such, embedded sensors can enhance the performance of EOL product processing operations. The information collected by the sensors can also be used to estimate and predict product failures, thereby helping to improve maintenance operations. This paper describes a study in which system maintenance and EOL processes were combined and closed-loop supply chain systems were constructed to analyze the financial contribution that sensors can make to these procedures by using discrete event simulation to model and compare regular systems and sensor-embedded systems. The factors that had an impact on the performance measures, such as disassembly cost, maintenance cost, inspection cost, sales revenues, and profitability, were determined and a design of experiments study was carried out. The experiment results were compared, and pairwise t-tests were executed. The results reveal that sensor-embedded systems are significantly superior to regular systems in terms of the identified performance measures.

  6. How Community Clergy Provide Spiritual Care: Toward a Conceptual Framework for Clergy End-of-Life Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBaron, Virginia T; Smith, Patrick T; Quiñones, Rebecca; Nibecker, Callie; Sanders, Justin J; Timms, Richard; Shields, Alexandra E; Balboni, Tracy A; Balboni, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Community-based clergy are highly engaged in helping terminally ill patients address spiritual concerns at the end of life (EOL). Despite playing a central role in EOL care, clergy report feeling ill-equipped to spiritually support patients in this context. Significant gaps exist in understanding how clergy beliefs and practices influence EOL care. The objective of this study was to propose a conceptual framework to guide EOL educational programming for community-based clergy. This was a qualitative, descriptive study. Clergy from varying spiritual backgrounds, geographical locations in the U.S., and race/ethnicities were recruited and asked about optimal spiritual care provided to patients at the EOL. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed, and analyzed following principles of grounded theory. A final set of themes and subthemes were identified through an iterative process of constant comparison. Participants also completed a survey regarding experiences ministering to the terminally ill. A total of 35 clergy participated in 14 individual interviews and two focus groups. Primary themes included Patient Struggles at EOL and Clergy Professional Identity in Ministering to the Terminally Ill. Patient Struggles at EOL focused on existential questions, practical concerns, and difficult emotions. Clergy Professional Identity in Ministering to the Terminally Ill was characterized by descriptions of Who Clergy Are ("Being"), What Clergy Do ("Doing"), and What Clergy Believe ("Believing"). "Being" was reflected primarily by manifestations of presence; "Doing" by subthemes of religious activities, spiritual support, meeting practical needs, and mistakes to avoid; "Believing" by subthemes of having a relationship with God, nurturing virtues, and eternal life. Survey results were congruent with interview and focus group findings. A conceptual framework informed by clergy perspectives of optimal spiritual care can guide EOL educational programming for clergy. Copyright

  7. EOL3 M0 X-ray Tomography Test Results

    CERN Document Server

    Avramidou, R; Bozhko, N; Borisov, A; Goriatchev, V; Goriatchev, S; Gushin, V; Fakhroutdinov, R; Kojine, A; Kononov, A; Larionov, A; Salomatin, Yu I; Schuh, S; Sedykh, Yu; Tchougouev, A

    2001-01-01

    Results of X-ray tomography test of EOL3 module 0 chamber is presented in the note. Peculiarities of the X-ray tomography of the chamber are discussed. Comparison of the tomography results with predictions of the production site measurements is made.

  8. EOL-1, the homolog of the mammalian Dom3Z, regulates olfactory learning in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, J; Calarco, JA; Shen, Y; Zhang, Y

    2014-01-01

    Learning is an essential function of the nervous system. However, our understanding of molecular underpinnings of learning remains incomplete. Here, we characterize a conserved protein EOL-1 that regulates olfactory learning in Caenorhabditis elegans. A recessive allele of eol-1 (enhanced olfactory learning) learns better to adjust its olfactory preference for bacteria foods and eol-1 acts in the URX sensory neurons to regulate learning. The mammalian homolog of EOL-1, Dom3Z, which regulates ...

  9. Diversity in Defining End of Life Care: An Obstacle or the Way Forward?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gysels, M.; Evans, N.C.; Menaca, A.; Higginson, I.J.; Harding, R.; Pool, R.

    2013-01-01

    Aim:The terms used to describe care at the end of life (EoL), and its definitions, have evolved over time and reflect the changes in meaning the concept has undergone as the field develops. We explore the remit of EoL care as defined by experts in EoL care, from across Europe and beyond, to

  10. Diversity in defining end of life care: an obstacle or the way forward?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gysels, M.; Evans, N.; Meñaca, A.; Higginson, I.J.; Harding, R; Pool, R.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The terms used to describe care at the end of life (EoL), and its definitions, have evolved over time and reflect the changes in meaning the concept has undergone as the field develops. We explore the remit of EoL care as defined by experts in EoL care, from across Europe and beyond, to

  11. Impact of Oncologists’ Attitudes Toward End-of-Life Care on Patients’ Access to Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerana, Maria Agustina; Park, Minjeong; Hess, Kenneth; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is unclear how oncologists’ attitudes toward end-of-life (EOL) care affect the delivery of care. The present study examined the association between oncologists’ EOL care attitudes and (a) timely specialist palliative care referral, (b) provision of supportive care, and (c) EOL cancer treatment decisions. Methods. We randomly surveyed 240 oncology specialists at our tertiary care cancer center to assess their attitudes toward EOL care using a score derived from the Jackson et al. qualitative conceptual framework (0 = uncomfortable and 8 = highly comfortable with EOL care). We determined the association between this score and clinicians’ report of specialist palliative care referral, provision of supportive care, and EOL cancer treatment decisions. Results. Of the 182 respondents (response rate of 76%), the median composite EOL care score was 6 (interquartile range, 5–7). A higher EOL score was significantly associated with solid tumor oncology (median 7 vs. 6 for hematologic oncology; p = .003), a greater willingness to refer patients with newly diagnosed cancer to specialist palliative care (median, 7 vs. 6; p = .01), greater comfort with symptom management (median, 6 vs. 5; p = .01), and provision of counseling (median, 7 vs. 4; p EOL care was associated with higher rates of specialist palliative care referral and self-reported primary palliative care delivery. More support and education are needed for oncologists who are less comfortable with EOL care. Implications for Practice: In the present survey of oncology specialists, most reported that they were comfortable with end-of-life (EOL) care, which was in turn, associated with greater provision of primary palliative care and higher rates of referral to specialist palliative care. The results of the present study highlight the need for more support and education for oncologists less comfortable with EOL care because their patients might receive lower levels of both primary and secondary

  12. The effect of rapid response teams on end-of-life care: A retrospective chart review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Benjamin; Salib, Mary; Fox-Robichaud, Alison

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A subset of critically ill patients have end-of-life (EOL) goals that are unclear. Rapid response teams (RRTs) may aid in the identification of these patients and the delivery of their EOL care. OBJECTIVES: To characterize the impact of RRT discussion on EOL care, and to examine how a preprinted order (PPO) set for EOL care influenced EOL discussions and outcomes. METHODS: A single-centre retrospective chart review of all RRT calls (January 2009 to December 2010) was performed. The effect of RRT EOL discussions and the effect of a hospital-wide PPO set on EOL care was examined. Charts were from the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care Critical Care Information Systemic database, and were interrogated by two reviewers. RESULTS: In patients whose EOL status changed following RRT EOL discussion, there were fewer intensive care unit (ICU) transfers (8.4% versus 17%; PEOL status following the introduction of an EOL PPO, from 20% (before) to 31% (after) (PEOL status following RRT-led EOL discussion was associated with reduced ICU transfers and enhanced access to palliative care services. Further study is required to identify and deconstruct barriers impairing timely and appropriate EOL discussions. PMID:25299222

  13. French wind power generation programme EOLE 2005 - first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laali, A.R. [Electricite de France (EDF), Chatou (France); Benard, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    EOLE 2005 has been launched in July 1996 by the French Ministry of Industry, Electricite de France and ADEME (Agency for Environment and Energy Management). The Ministries of Research and Environment are participating also in this programme. The purpose is to create an initial market in France for wind power generation in order to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and the competitiveness of the wind energy compared to other energy sources by 2005. The installed capacity will reach at least 250 MW and possibly 500 MW.

  14. EOL-1, the homolog of the mammalian Dom3Z, regulates olfactory learning in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu; Zhang, Jiangwen; Calarco, John A; Zhang, Yun

    2014-10-01

    Learning is an essential function of the nervous system. However, our understanding of molecular underpinnings of learning remains incomplete. Here, we characterize a conserved protein EOL-1 that regulates olfactory learning in Caenorhabditis elegans. A recessive allele of eol-1 (enhanced olfactory learning) learns better to adjust its olfactory preference for bacteria foods and eol-1 acts in the URX sensory neurons to regulate learning. The mammalian homolog of EOL-1, Dom3Z, which regulates quality control of pre-mRNAs, can substitute the function of EOL-1 in learning regulation, demonstrating functional conservation between these homologs. Mutating the residues of Dom3Z that are critical for its enzymatic activity, and the equivalent residues in EOL-1, abolishes the function of these proteins in learning. Together, our results provide insights into the function of EOL-1/Dom3Z and suggest that its activity in pre-mRNA quality control is involved in neural plasticity. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413364-07$15.00/0.

  15. Caring Decisions: The Development of a Written Resource for Parents Facing End-of-Life Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xafis, Vicki; Gillam, Lynn; Hynson, Jenny; Sullivan, Jane; Cossich, Mary; Wilkinson, Dominic

    2015-11-01

    Written resources in adult intensive care have been shown to benefit families facing end of life (EoL) decisions. There are few resources for parents making EoL decisions for their child and no existing resources addressing ethical issues. The Caring Decisions handbook and website were developed to fill these gaps. We discuss the development of the resources, modification after reviewer feedback and findings from initial pilot implementation. A targeted literature review-to identify resources and factors that impact on parental EoL decision-making; development phase-guided by the literature and the researchers' expertise; consultation process-comprised a multi-disciplinary panel of experts and parents; pilot evaluation study-hard-copy handbook was distributed as part of routine care at an Australian Children's Hospital. Twelve experts and parents formed the consultation panel. Eight parents of children with life-limiting conditions and clinicians were interviewed in the pilot study. Numerous factors supporting/impeding EoL decisions were identified. Caring Decisions addressed issues identified in the literature and by the multidisciplinary research team. The consultation panel provided overwhelmingly positive feedback. Pilot study parents found the resources helpful and comforting. Most clinicians viewed the resources as very beneficial to parents and identified them as ideal for training purposes. The development of the resources addressed many of the gaps in existing resources. The consultation process and the pilot study suggest these resources could be of significant benefit to parents and clinicians.

  16. Decision Making Regarding the Place of End-of-Life Cancer Care: The Burden on Bereaved Families and Related Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Sena; Arao, Harue; Masutani, Eiko; Aoki, Miwa; Kishino, Megumi; Morita, Tatsuya; Shima, Yasuo; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Aoyama, Maho; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2017-05-01

    Decision making regarding the place of end-of-life (EOL) care is an important issue for patients with terminal cancer and their families. It often requires surrogate decision making, which can be a burden on families. To explore the burden on the family of patients dying from cancer related to the decisions they made about the place of EOL care and investigate the factors affecting this burden. This was a cross-sectional mail survey using a self-administered questionnaire. Participants were 700 bereaved family members of patients with cancer from 133 palliative care units in Japan. The questionnaire covered decisional burdens, depression, grief, and the decision-making process. Participants experienced emotional pressure as the highest burden. Participants with a high decisional burden reported significantly higher scores for depression and grief (both P decision making without knowing the patient's wishes and values (P making the decision because of a due date for discharge from a former facility or hospital (P = 0.005). Decision making regarding the place of EOL care was recalled as burdensome for family decision makers. An early decision-making process that incorporates sharing patients' and family members' values that are relevant to the desired place of EOL care is important. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Specifying process requirements for holistic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulymenopoulou, M; Malamateniou, F; Vassilacopoulos, G

    2013-09-01

    Holistic (health and social) care aims at providing comprehensive care to the community, especially to elderly people and people with multiple illnesses. In turn, this requires using health and social care resources more efficiently through enhanced collaboration and coordination among the corresponding organizations and delivering care closer to patient needs and preferences. This paper takes a patient-centered, process view of holistic care delivery and focuses on requirements elicitation for supporting holistic care processes and enabling authorized users to access integrated patient information at the point of care when needed. To this end, an approach to holistic care process-support requirements elicitation is presented which is based on business process modeling and places particular emphasis on empowering collaboration, coordination and information sharing among health and social care organizations by actively involving users and by providing insights for alternative process designs. The approach provides a means for integrating diverse legacy applications in a process-oriented environment using a service-oriented architecture as an appropriate solution for supporting and automating holistic care processes. The approach is applied in the context of emergency medical care aiming at streamlining and providing support technology to cross-organizational health and social care processes to address global patient needs.

  18. "End-of-Life Care? I'm not Going to Worry About That Yet." Health Literacy Gaps and End-of-Life Planning Among Elderly Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladin, Keren; Buttafarro, Katie; Hahn, Emily; Koch-Weser, Susan; Weiner, Daniel E

    2018-03-19

    Between 2000 and 2012, the incident dialysis population in the United States increased by nearly 60%, most sharply among adults 75 years and older. End-of-life (EOL) conversations among dialysis patients are associated with better patient-centered outcomes and lower use of aggressive interventions in the last month of life. This study examined how health literacy may affect engagement, comprehension, and satisfaction with EOL conversations among elderly dialysis patients. Qualitative/descriptive study with semi-structured interviews about health literacy, EOL conversations, and goals of care with 31 elderly dialysis patients at 2 centers in Boston. Themes were interpreted in the context of Nutbeam's health literacy framework. Despite high mortality risk in this population, only 13% of patients had discussed EOL preferences with physicians, half had discussed EOL with their social network, and 25% of participants explicitly stated that they had never considered EOL preferences. Less than 30% of participants could correctly define terminology commonly used in EOL conversations. Analyses yielded 5 themes: (1) Misunderstanding EOL terminology; (2) Nephrologists reluctant to discuss EOL; (3) Patients conforming to socially constructed roles; (4) Discordant expectations and dialysis experiences; and (5) Reconciling EOL values and future care. Patients had limited understanding of EOL terminology, lacked of opportunities for meaningful EOL discussion with providers and family, resulting in uncertainty about future care. Limited health literacy presents a substantial barrier to communication and could lead to older adults committing to an intensive pattern of care without adequate information. Clinicians should consider health literacy when discussing dialysis initiation.

  19. Differentiation of eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells into eosinophils induced by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kenji; Takahashi, Aki; Kaneko, Motoko; Sugeno, Hiroki; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Hong, JangJa; Zee, OkPyo; Ohuchi, Kazuo

    2007-03-06

    EoL-1 cells differentiate into eosinophils in the presence of n-butyrate, but the mechanism has remained to be elucidated. Because n-butyrate can inhibit histone deacetylases, we hypothesized that the inhibition of histone deacetylases induces the differentiation of EoL-1 cells into eosinophils. In this study, using n-butyrate and two other histone deacetylase inhibitors, apicidin and trichostatin A, we have analyzed the relationship between the inhibition of histone deacetylases and the differentiation into eosinophils in EoL-1 cells. It was demonstrated that apicidin and n-butyrate induced a continuous acetylation of histones H4 and H3, inhibited the proliferation of EoL-1 cells without attenuating the level of FIP1L1-PDGFRA mRNA, and induced the expression of markers for mature eosinophils such as integrin beta7, CCR1, and CCR3 on EoL-1 cells, while trichostatin A evoked a transient acetylation of histones and induced no differentiation into eosinophils. These findings suggest that the continuous inhibition of histone deacetylases in EoL-1 cells induces the differentiation into mature eosinophils.

  20. Mechanism for the differentiation of EoL-1 cells into eosinophils by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Motoko; Ishihara, Kenji; Takahashi, Aki; Hong, Jangja; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Zee, Okpyo; Ohuchi, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    EoL-1 cells have a FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene which causes the transformation of eosinophilic precursor cells into leukemia cells. Recently, we suggested that the induction of differentiation of EoL-1 cells into eosinophils by the HDAC inhibitors apicidin and n-butyrate is due to the continuous inhibition of HDACs. However, neither apicidin nor n-butyrate inhibited the expression of FIP1L1-PDGFRA mRNA, although both these inhibitors suppressed cell proliferation. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed whether the levels of FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha protein and phosphorylated-Stat5 involved in the signaling for the proliferation of EoL-1 cells are attenuated by HDAC inhibitors. EoL-1 cells were incubated in the presence of apicidin, TSA or n-butyrate. FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha and phosphorylated-Stat5 were detected by Western blotting. Treatment of EoL-1 cells with apicidin at 100 nM or n-butyrate at 500 microM decreased the levels of FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha protein and phosphorylated-Stat5, while that with trichostatin A at 30 nM did not. The decrease in the level of FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha protein caused by apicidin and n-butyrate might be one of the mechanisms by which EoL-1 cells are induced to differentiate into eosinophils by these HDAC inhibitors.

  1. Informatization of home care processes

    OpenAIRE

    Vidmar, Miha

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the complete server side system for computerisation of home care service. The solution is built as an intermediate layer between the mobile application and the existing backend of the health institution. It consists of three main applications: custody application, web service for integration with the mobile application, and web service for integration with the backend of the health institution. It supports working with the users (nurses in home care) and work orders whic...

  2. End-of-life care in pediatric neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallero, Stefano Gabriele; Lijoi, Stefano; Bertin, Daniele; Pittana, Laura Stefania; Bellini, Simona; Rossi, Francesca; Peretta, Paola; Basso, Maria Eleonora; Fagioli, Franca

    2014-11-01

    The management of children with cancer during the end-of-life (EOL) period is often difficult and requires skilled medical professionals. Patients with tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) with relapse or disease progression might have additional needs because of the presence of unique issues, such as neurological impairment and altered consciousness. Very few reports specifically concerning the EOL period in pediatric neuro-oncology are available. Among all patients followed at our center during the EOL, we retrospectively analyzed data from 39 children and adolescents with brain tumors, in order to point out on their peculiar needs. Patients were followed-up for a median time of 20.1 months. Eighty-two percent were receiving only palliative therapy before death. Almost half the patients (44%) died at home, while 56% died in a hospital. Palliative sedation with midazolam was performed in 58% of cases; morphine was administered in 51.6% of cases. No patient had uncontrolled pain. The EOL in children with advanced CNS cancer is a period of active medical care. Patients may develop complex neurological symptoms and often require long hospitalization. We organized a network-based collaboration among the reference pediatric oncology center, other pediatric hospitals and domiciliary care personnel, with the aim to ameliorate the quality of care during the EOL period. In our cohort, palliative sedation was widely used while no patients died with uncontrolled pain. A precise process of data collection and a better sharing of knowledge are necessary in order to improve the management of such patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Intensive Care Nurses' Attitude on Palliative and End of Life Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Swagata; Routray, Pragyan K; Mishra, Jagdish C

    2017-10-01

    Intensive Care Unit (ICU) nurses have a vital role in the implementation of end of life (EOL) care. There is limited data on the attitude of ICU nurses toward EOL and palliation. This study aimed to investigate knowledge, attitude, and beliefs of intensive care nurses in eastern India toward EOL. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to delegates in two regional critical care nurses' training programs. Of 178 questionnaires distributed, 138 completed, with a response rate of 75.5*. About half (48.5*) had more than 1 year ICU experience. A majority (81.9*) agreed that nurses should be involved in and initiate (62.3*) EOL discussions. Terms "EOL care or palliative care in ICU" were new for 19.6*; 21* and 55.8* disagreed with allowing peaceful death in terminal patients and unrestricted family visits, respectively. Work experience was associated with wanting unrestricted family visitation, discontinuing monitoring and investigations at EOL, equating withholding and withdrawal of treatment, and being a part of EOL team discussions ( P = 0.005, 0.01, 0.01, and 0.001), respectively. Religiousness was associated with a greater desire to initiate EOL discussions ( P = 0.001). Greater emphasis on palliative care in critical care curriculum may improve awareness among critical care nurses.

  4. Redesigning ambulatory care business processes supporting clinical care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C; Sinkewich, M; Short, J; Callas, E

    1997-04-01

    The first step in redesigning the health care delivery process for ambulatory care begins with the patient and the business processes that support the patient. Patient-related business processes include patient access, service documentation, billing, follow-up, collection, and payment. Access is the portal to the clinical delivery and care management process. Service documentation, charge capture, and payment and collection are supporting processes to care delivery. Realigned provider networks now demand realigned patient business services to provide their members/customers/patients with improved service delivery at less cost. Purchaser mandates for cost containment, health maintenance, and enhanced quality of care have created an environment where every aspect of the delivery system, especially ambulatory care, is being judged. Business processes supporting the outpatient are therefore being reexamined for better efficiency and customer satisfaction. Many health care systems have made major investments in their ambulatory care environment, but have pursued traditional supporting business practices--such as multiple access points, lack of integrated patient appointment scheduling and registration, and multiple patient bills. These are areas that are appropriate for redesign efforts--all with the customer's needs and convenience in mind. Similarly, setting unrealistic expectations, underestimating the effort required, and ignoring the human elements of a patient-focused business service redesign effort can sabotage the very sound reasons for executing such an endeavor. Pitfalls can be avoided if a structured methodology, coupled with a change management process, are employed. Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group has been involved in several major efforts, all with ambulatory care settings to assist with the redesign of their business practices to consider the patient as the driver, instead of the institution providing the care.

  5. Diversity in Defining End of Life Care: An Obstacle or the Way Forward?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysels, Marjolein; Evans, Natalie; Meñaca, Arantza; Higginson, Irene J.; Harding, Richard; Pool, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Aim The terms used to describe care at the end of life (EoL), and its definitions, have evolved over time and reflect the changes in meaning the concept has undergone as the field develops. We explore the remit of EoL care as defined by experts in EoL care, from across Europe and beyond, to understand its current usage and meanings. Method A qualitative survey attached to a call for expertise on cultural issues in EoL care was sent to experts in the field identified through the literature, European EoL care associations, and conferences targeted at EoL care professionals. Respondents were asked to identify further contacts for snowball recruitment.The responses were analysed using content and discourse analysis. Results Responses were received from 167 individuals (33% response rate), mainly from academics (39%) and clinical practitioners working in an academic context (23%) from 19 countries in Europe and beyond. 29% of respondents said explicitly that there was no agreed definition of EoL care in practice and only 14% offered a standard definition (WHO, or local institution). 2% said that the concept of EoL care was not used in their country, and 5% said that there was opposition to the concept for religious or cultural reasons. Two approaches were identified to arrive at an understanding of EoL care: exclusively by drawing boundaries through setting time frames, and inclusively by approaching its scope in an integrative way. This led to reflections about terminology and whether defining EoL care is desirable. Conclusion The global expansion of EoL care contributes to the variety of interpretations of what it means. This complicates the endeavour of defining the field. However, when diversity is taken seriously it can open up new perspectives to underpin the ethical framework of EoL care. PMID:23844145

  6. Danish general practitioners? self-reported competences in end-of-life care

    OpenAIRE

    Winthereik, Anna; Neergaard, Mette; Vedsted, Peter; Jensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Objective General practitioners (GPs) are pivotal in end-of-life (EOL) care. This study aimed to assess GP-reported provision of EOL care and to assess associations with GP characteristics. Design Population-based questionnaire study. Setting Central Denmark Region with approximately 1.3 million inhabitants. Subjects All 843 active GPs in the Central Denmark Region were sent a questionnaire by mail. Main outcome measures Responses to 18 items concerning four aspects: provision of EOL care to ...

  7. Let's Talk About It: Supporting Family Communication during End-of-Life Care of Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, Meghan L; Kindler, Christine; Weiss, Danielle; Ragsdale, Lindsay

    2018-05-18

    Communication is key in optimizing medical care when a child is approaching end of life (EOL). Research is yet to establish best practices for how medical teams can guide intrafamily communication (including surviving siblings) when EOL care is underway or anticipated for a pediatric patient. While recommendations regarding how medical teams can facilitate communication between the medical team and the family exist, various barriers may prevent the implementation of these recommendations. This review aims to provide a summary of research-to-date on family and medical provider perceptions of communication during pediatric EOL care. Systematic review. Findings from a review of 65 studies suggest that when a child enters EOL care, many parents try to protect their child and/or themselves by avoiding discussions about death. Despite current recommendations, medical teams often refrain from discussing EOL care with pediatric patients until death is imminent for a variety of reasons (e.g., family factors and discomfort with EOL conversations). Parents consistently report a need for honest complete information, delivered with sensitivity. Pediatric patients often report a preference to be informed of their prognosis, and siblings express a desire to be involved in EOL discussions. Families may benefit from enhanced communication around EOL planning, both within the family and between the family and medical team. Future research should investigate a potential role for medical teams in supporting intrafamily communication about EOL challenges and should examine how communication between medical teams and families can be facilitated as EOL approaches.

  8. End-of-life (EoL) mobile phone management in Hong Kong households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wen-Jing; Giesy, John P; So, C S; Zheng, Hai-Long

    2017-09-15

    A questionnaire survey and interviews were conducted in households and end-of-life (EoL) mobile phone business centres in Hong Kong. Widespread Internet use, combined with the rapid evolution of modern social networks, has resulted in the more rapid obsolescence of mobile phones, and thus a tremendous increase in the number of obsolete phones. In 2013, the volume of EoL mobile phones generated in Hong Kong totalled at least 330 tonnes, and the amount is rising. Approximately 80% of electronic waste is exported to Africa and developing countries such as mainland China or Pakistan for recycling. However, the material flow of the large number of obsolete phones generated by the territory's households remains unclear. Hence, the flow of EoL mobile phones in those households was analysed, with the average lifespan of a mobile phone in Hong Kong found to be just under two years (nearly 23 months). Most EoL mobile phones are transferred to mainland China for disposal. Current recycling methods are neither environmentally friendly nor sustainable, with serious implications for the environment and human health. The results of this analysis provide useful information for planning the collection system and facilities needed in Hong Kong and mainland China to better manage EoL mobile phones in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Danish general practitioners’ self-reported competences in end-of-life care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winthereik, Anna; Neergaard, Mette; Vedsted, Peter; Jensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Objective General practitioners (GPs) are pivotal in end-of-life (EOL) care. This study aimed to assess GP-reported provision of EOL care and to assess associations with GP characteristics. Design Population-based questionnaire study. Setting Central Denmark Region with approximately 1.3 million inhabitants. Subjects All 843 active GPs in the Central Denmark Region were sent a questionnaire by mail. Main outcome measures Responses to 18 items concerning four aspects: provision of EOL care to patients with different diagnosis, confidence with being a key worker, organisation of EOL care and EOL skills (medical and psychosocial). Results In total, 573 (68%) GPs responded. Of these, 85% often/always offered EOL care to cancer patients, which was twice as often as to patients with non-malignancies (34–40%). Moreover, 76% felt confident about being a key worker, 60% had a proactive approach, and 58% talked to their patients about dying. Only 9% kept a register of patients with EOL needs, and 19% had specific EOL procedures. GP confidence with own EOL skills varied; from 55% feeling confident using terminal medications to 90% feeling confident treating nausea/vomiting. Increasing GP age was associated with increased confidence about being a key worker and provision of EOL care to patients with non-malignancies. In rural areas, GPs were more confident about administering medicine subcutaneously than in urban areas. Conclusion We found considerable diversity in self-reported EOL care competences. Interventions should focus on increasing GPs’ provision of EOL care to patients with non-malignancies, promoting better EOL care concerning organisation and symptom management. KEY POINTSGPs are pivotal in end-of-life (EOL) care, but their involvement has been questioned. Hence, GPs’ perceived competencies were explored.GPs were twice as likely to provide EOL care for patients with cancer than for patients with non-malignancies.EOL care was lacking clear organisation in

  10. Establishing end-of-life boards for palliative care of patients with advanced diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Eva K; Unseld, Matthias; Adamidis, Feroniki; Roider-Schur, Sophie; Watzke, Herbert H

    2018-04-01

    Interdisciplinary tumor board decisions improve the quality of oncological therapies, while no such boards exist for end-of-life (EOL) decisions. The aim of this study was to assess the willingness of hemato-oncological and palliative care professionals to develop and participate in EOL boards. An aim of an EOL board would be to establish an interdisciplinary and comprehensive care for the remaining lifetime of patients suffering from advanced incurable diseases. Staff from the interdisciplinary teams of all hemato-oncological and palliative care wards in Vienna were invited to anonymously participate in an online survey. 309 professionals responded. 91% respondents reported a need to establish an EOL board, 63% expressed their willingness to actively participate in an EOL board, and 25% were indecisive. Regarding patient presence, 50% voted for an EOL board in the presence of the patients, and 36% voted for an EOL board in the absence of the patients. 95% had the opinion that an EOL board could improve patient care in the last phase of life. 64% stated that the development of an EOL board would be worthwhile, while 28% did not see enough resources available at their institutions. Regarding the desired type of documentation, 61% voted for a centrally available EOL decision, and 31% supported an in-house-based documentation. 94% voted for the availability of an information folder about EOL care. The willingness of professionals to establish an EOL board was very high. Further steps should be taken to implement such boards to improve EOL care.

  11. Automatic detection and classification of EOL-concrete and resulting recovered products by hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Roberta; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of materials from Demolition Waste (DW) represents one of the main target of the recycling industry and the its characterization is important in order to set up efficient sorting and/or quality control systems. End-Of-Life (EOL) concrete materials identification is necessary to maximize DW conversion into useful secondary raw materials, so it is fundamental to develop strategies for the implementation of an automatic recognition system of the recovered products. In this paper, HyperSpectral Imaging (HSI) technique was applied in order to detect DW composition. Hyperspectral images were acquired by a laboratory device equipped with a HSI sensing device working in the near infrared range (1000-1700 nm): NIR Spectral Camera™, embedding an ImSpector™ N17E (SPECIM Ltd, Finland). Acquired spectral data were analyzed adopting the PLS_Toolbox (Version 7.5, Eigenvector Research, Inc.) under Matlab® environment (Version 7.11.1, The Mathworks, Inc.), applying different chemometric methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for exploratory data approach and Partial Least Square- Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) to build classification models. Results showed that it is possible to recognize DW materials, distinguishing recycled aggregates from contaminants (e.g. bricks, gypsum, plastics, wood, foam, etc.). The developed procedure is cheap, fast and non-destructive: it could be used to make some steps of the recycling process more efficient and less expensive.

  12. Development, Qualification and Production of Space Solar Cells with 30% EOL Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guter, Wolfgang; Ebel, Lars; Fuhrmann, Daniel; Kostler, Wolfgang; Meusel, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    AZUR SPACE's latest qualified solar cell product 3G30-advanced provides a high end-of-life (EOL) efficiency of 27.8% for 5E14 (1 MeV e-/cm2) at low production costs. In order to further reduce the mass, the 3G30-advanced was thinned down to as thin as 20 μm and tested in space. Next generation solar cells must exceed the EOL efficiency of the 3G30-advanced and therefore will utilize the excess current of the Ge subcell. This can be achieved by a metamorphic cell concept. While average beginning-of-life efficiencies above 31% have already been demonstrated with upright metamorphic triple-junction cells, AZUR's next generation product will comprise a metamorphic 4- junction device targeting 30% EOL.

  13. Palliative care at the end-of-life in glioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekkoek, Johan A F; Chang, Susan; Taphoorn, Martin J B

    2016-01-01

    The end-of-life (EOL) phase of patients with a glioma starts when symptom prevalence increases and antitumor treatment is no longer effective. During the EOL phase, care is primarily aimed at reducing symptom burden while maintaining quality of life as long as possible without inappropriate prolongation of life. Palliative care during the EOL phase also involves complex medical decisions for the prevention and relief of suffering. We discuss the prevalence and treatment of the most common EOL symptoms, decision making in the EOL phase, the organization of EOL care, and the role of the patient's caregiver. Treating disease-specific symptoms, such as impaired consciousness, seizures, focal neurologic deficits and cognitive disturbances, is a major concern during the EOL phase, as these symptoms may interfere with EOL decision making. Advance care planning is aimed at reaching consensus about possible EOL decisions between all participants, respecting the values of patients and their informal caregivers. In order to prevent the possibility that the patient becomes incompetent to make informed decisions, we recommend initiating EOL conversations at a relatively early stage in the disease course. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Escalating Health Care Expenditures in Cancer Decedents' Last Year of Life: A Decade of Evidence from a Retrospective Population‐Based Cohort Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yen‐Ni; Liu, Tsang‐Wu; Wen, Fur‐Hsing; Chou, Wen‐Chi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. No population‐based longitudinal studies on end‐of‐life (EOL) expenditures were found for cancer decedents. Methods. This population‐based, retrospective cohort study examined health care expenditures from 2001 to 2010 among 339,546 Taiwanese cancer decedents' last year of life. Individual patient‐level data were linked from administrative datasets. Health care expenditures were converted from Taiwan dollars to U.S. dollars by health‐specific purchasing power parity conversions to account for different health‐purchasing powers. Associations of patient, physician, hospital, and regional factors with EOL care expenditures were evaluated by multilevel linear regression model by generalized estimating equation method. Results. Mean annual EOL care expenditures for Taiwanese cancer decedents increased from 2000 to 2010 from U.S. $49,591 to U.S. $68,773, respectively, with one third of spending occurring in the patients' last month. Increased EOL care expenditures were associated with male gender, younger age, being married, diagnosed with hematological malignancies and cancers other than lung, gastric, and hepatic‐pancreatic cancers, and dying within 7–24 months of diagnosis. Patients spent less at EOL when they had higher comorbidities and metastatic disease, died within 6 months of diagnosis, were under care of oncologists, gastroenterologists, and intensivists, and received care at a teaching hospital with more terminally ill cancer patients. Higher EOL care expenditures were associated with greater EOL care intensity at the primary hospital and regional levels. Conclusion. Taiwanese cancer decedents consumed considerable National Health Insurance disbursements at EOL, totaling more than was consumed in six developed non‐U.S. countries surveyed in 2010. To slow increasing cost and improve EOL cancer care quality, interventions to ensure appropriate EOL care provision should target hospitals and clinicians less experienced in

  15. Associations Between End-of-Life Discussion Characteristics and Care Received Near Death: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Jennifer W.; Cronin, Angel; Keating, Nancy L.; Taback, Nathan; Huskamp, Haiden A.; Malin, Jennifer L.; Earle, Craig C.; Weeks, Jane C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose National guidelines recommend that discussions about end-of-life (EOL) care planning happen early for patients with incurable cancer. We do not know whether earlier EOL discussions lead to less aggressive care near death. We sought to evaluate the extent to which EOL discussion characteristics, such as timing, involved providers, and location, are associated with the aggressiveness of care received near death. Patients and Methods We studied 1,231 patients with stage IV lung or colorectal cancer in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium, a population- and health system–based prospective cohort study, who died during the 15-month study period but survived at least 1 month. Our main outcome measure was the aggressiveness of EOL care received. Results Nearly half of patients received at least one marker of aggressive EOL care, including chemotherapy in the last 14 days of life (16%), intensive care unit care in the last 30 days of life (9%), and acute hospital-based care in the last 30 days of life (40%). Patients who had EOL discussions with their physicians before the last 30 days of life were less likely to receive aggressive measures at EOL, including chemotherapy (P = .003), acute care (P EOL discussions are prospectively associated with less aggressive care and greater use of hospice at EOL. PMID:23150700

  16. Optimized collection of EoL electronic products for Circular economy: A techno-economic assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angouria-Tsorochidou, Elisavet; Cimpan, Ciprian; Parajuly, Keshav

    2018-01-01

    The relevance of a circular model is widely accepted for the lifecycle management of electrical and electronic products (e-products), given the low recovery rates of valuable resources in current end-of-life (EoL) practices focused on recycling. However, missing insight into the technical...... and business potential for alternative EoL options (reuse, repair and remanufacturing) holds stakeholders from implementing circular strategies. In this context, our study first mapped by means of material flow analysis (MFA) the life cycle stages of e-products in Denmark and then performed a preliminary...

  17. Study examines trends for Medicare patients at EOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Patients are more likely to be treated by 10 doctors or more. Researcher says that great intensity of care does not necessarily mean higher quality of care. Physicians must listen more carefully to wishes of patients at the end of life, researcher says.

  18. A retrospective study of end-of-life care decisions in the critically Ill in a surgical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lin Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Progress in medical care and technology has led to patients with more advanced illnesses being admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. The practice of approaching end-of-life (EOL care decisions and limiting care is well documented in Western literature but unknown in Singapore. We performed a retrospective cohort study to describe the practice of EOL care in patients dying in a Singapore surgical ICU (SICU. The surgical critical care population was chosen as it is unique because surgeons are frequently involved in the EOL process. Methods: All consecutive patients aged 21 and above admitted to the SICU from July 2011 to March 2012, and who passed away in the ICU or within 7 days of discharge from the ICU (to account for transferred patients out of the ICU after end-of life care decisions were made and subsequently passed away were included in the study. Results: There were 473 SICU admissions during this period, out of which 53 were included with a mean age of 67.2 ± 11.1 years. EOL discussions were held in 81.1% of patients with a median time from admission to first discussion at 1 day (IQR 0–2.75 and a median number of ICU discussion of 1 (IQR 1–2. As most patients lacked decision-making capacity (inability to retain and process information secondary to the underlying disease pathology or sedative use, a surrogate was involved: group decision in 27.9%, child in 25.6% and an unclear family nominated member in 20.9%. 28.3% of patients were managed as for full active with resuscitation, 39.6% nonescalation of care, and 32.1% for withdrawal. The main reasons for conservative management (nonescalation and withdrawal of care were certain death in 52.3%, medical futility with minimal response to maximal care (27.3%, and the presence of underlying malignancy (18.2%. There was no significant difference between race or religion among patients for active or conservative management. Conclusion: 71.7% of patients who passed away in the ICU or

  19. Clinical priorities, barriers and solutions in end-of-life cancer care research across Europe. Report from a workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdardottir, Katrin Ruth; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg; van der Rijt, Carin C D

    2010-01-01

    The PRISMA project is aiming to co-ordinate research priorities, measurement and practice in end-of-life (EOL) care in Europe. As part of PRISMA we undertook a questionnaire survey and a subsequent workshop to (1) identify clinical priorities for EOL care research in Europe and propose a future...... research agenda and (2) identify barriers to EOL care research, and possibilities and solutions to improve the research....

  20. Accurate Prognostic Awareness Facilitates, Whereas Better Quality of Life and More Anxiety Symptoms Hinder End-of-Life Care Discussions: A Longitudinal Survey Study in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients' Last Six Months of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Siew Tzuh; Chen, Chen Hsiu; Wen, Fur-Hsing; Chen, Jen-Shi; Chang, Wen-Cheng; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Chou, Wen-Chi; Hou, Ming-Mo

    2018-04-01

    Terminally ill cancer patients do not engage in end-of-life (EOL) care discussions or do so only when death is imminent, despite guidelines for EOL care discussions early in their disease trajectory. Most studies on patient-reported EOL care discussions are cross sectional without exploring the evolution of EOL care discussions as death approaches. Cross-sectional studies cannot determine the direction of association between EOL care discussions and patients' prognostic awareness, psychological well-being, and quality of life (QOL). We examined the evolution and associations of accurate prognostic awareness, functional dependence, physical and psychological symptom distress, and QOL with patient-physician EOL care discussions among 256 terminally ill cancer patients in their last six months by hierarchical generalized linear modeling with logistic regression and by arranging time-varying modifiable variables and EOL care discussions in a distinct time sequence. The prevalence of physician-patient EOL care discussions increased as death approached (9.2%, 11.8%, and 18.3% for 91-180, 31-90, and 1-30 days before death, respectively) but only reached significance in the last month. Accurate prognostic awareness facilitated subsequent physician-patient EOL care discussions, whereas better patient-reported QOL and more anxiety symptoms hindered such discussions. The likelihood of EOL care discussions was not associated with levels of physical symptom distress, functional dependence, or depressive symptoms. Physician-patient EOL care discussions for terminally ill Taiwanese cancer patients remain uncommon even when death approaches. Physicians should facilitate EOL care discussions by cultivating patients' accurate prognostic awareness early in their cancer trajectory when they are physically and psychologically competent, with better QOL, thus promoting informed and value-based EOL care decision making. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative

  1. Framework of care: communicating the structure and processes of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson-Malt, Suzanne; Norton-Westwood, Deborah

    2017-09-01

    This article attempts to present a 'macro view' of the role and nature of an organization's Framework of Care (FrOC). This 'view' arises from a critical reflection on the available literature and the combined professional experience of the authors, who have worked in a variety of healthcare systems and settings in Australia, North America, United Kingdom, and the Middle East. FrOC can be defined as the systems and processes within an organization that structure the delivery of care. These systems and processes are made evident in a series of documents, such as the Mission and Vision statement, Policies and Procedures, Standards of Care, Clinical Practice Guidelines, Clinical Pathways, and Protocols. These frameworks can provide structure for important organizational activities such as clinical audits, quality management and clinical information system (CIS) 'decision support', thereby supporting clinicians in their efforts to deliver high-quality, evidence-based care. How a healthcare organization structures its systems and processes of care directly impacts the patient and caregiver experience - made evident in patient and staff satisfaction with the services provided. Mapping out and understanding an organization's FrOC is a critical first step for interprofessional teams attempting to implement evidence into practice and/or accreditation teams and expert consultants critiquing the performance of an organization.

  2. Male-female patient differences in association between end-of-life discussions and receipt of intensive care near death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rashmi K.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Penedo, Frank J.; Maciejewski, Paul K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient gender plays a significant role in patient-physician communication, patient illness understanding and aggressiveness of end of life (EoL) care. However, little is known about the extent to which gender differences in the effects of EoL discussions on EoL care contribute to gender differences in EoL care. The present study aims to determine if gender differences exist in receipt of intensive care unit (ICU) care near death and in the association between EoL discussions and receipt of ICU EoL care. Methods Multi-site, prospective, cohort study of patients (N=353) with metastatic cancers, identified as terminally ill at study enrollment and interviewed a median of 4.1 months before their deaths. Postmortem chart reviews and caregiver interviews documented ICU stays in the last week of life. Results Patients who received ICU care at the EoL were more likely to be male than those who did not (73% male vs. 52% male, p=0.02). Adjusting for potential confounds, male patients reporting an EoL discussion were less likely to have an ICU stay in the last week of life than male patients with no EoL discussion (AOR=0.26, 95% CI 0.07–0.91; p=0.04). There was no association between EoL discussions and ICU stays near death among female patients. Conclusions Men with advanced cancers are more likely than women to receive aggressive, non-beneficial, ICU care near death. Gender differences in effects of EoL discussions on EoL care likely contribute to, and may even explain, gender differences in receipt of ICU care in the last week of life. PMID:25975179

  3. The Next Generation of Airborne Polarimetric Doppler Weather Radar: NCAR/EOL Airborne Phased Array Radar (APAR) Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James; Lee, Wen-Chau; Loew, Eric; Vivekanandan, Jothiram; Grubišić, Vanda; Tsai, Peisang; Dixon, Mike; Emmett, Jonathan; Lord, Mark; Lussier, Louis; Hwang, Kyuil; Ranson, James

    2017-04-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth observing Laboratory (EOL) is entering the third year of preliminary system design studies, engineering prototype testing and project management plan preparation for the development of a novel Airborne Phased Array Radar (APAR). This system being designed by NCAR/EOL will be installed and operated on the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. The APAR system will consist of four removable C-band Active Electronically Scanned Arrays (AESA) strategically placed on the fuselage of the aircraft. Each AESA measures approximately 1.5 x 1.9 m and is composed of 3000 active radiating elements arranged in an array of line replaceable units (LRU) to simplify maintenance. APAR will provide unprecedented observations, and in conjunction with the advanced radar data assimilation schema, will be able to address the key science questions to improve understanding and predictability of significant and high-impact weather APAR, operating at C-band, allows the measurement of 3-D kinematics of the more intense portions of storms (e.g. thunderstorm dynamics and tornadic development, tropical cyclone rainband structure and evolution) with less attenuation compared with current airborne Doppler radar systems. Polarimetric measurements are not available from current airborne tail Doppler radars. However, APAR, with dual-Doppler and dual polarization diversity at a lesser attenuating C-band wavelength, will further advance the understanding of the microphysical processes within a variety of precipitation systems. The radar is sensitive enough to provide high resolution measurements of winter storm dynamics and microphysics. The planned APAR development that would bring the system to operational readiness for research community use aboard the C-130 is expected to take 8 years once major funding support is realized. The authors will review the overall APAR design and provide new details of the system based on our Technical Requirements Document

  4. Critical Care Nurses' Suggestions to Improve End-of-Life Care Obstacles: Minimal Change Over 17 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstrand, Renea L; Hadley, Kacie Hart; Luthy, Karlen E; Macintosh, Janelle L B

    Critical-care nurses (CCNs) provide end-of-life (EOL) care on a daily basis as 1 in 5 patients dies while in intensive care units. Critical-care nurses overcome many obstacles to perform quality EOL care for dying patients. The purposes of this study were to collect CCNs' current suggestions for improving EOL care and determine if EOL care obstacles have changed by comparing results to data gathered in 1998. A 72-item questionnaire regarding EOL care perceptions was mailed to a national, geographically dispersed, random sample of 2000 members of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. One of 3 qualitative questions asked CCNs for suggestions to improve EOL care. Comparative obstacle size (quantitative) data were previously published. Of the 509 returned questionnaires, 322 (63.3%) had 385 written suggestions for improving EOL care. Major themes identified were ensuring characteristics of a good death, improving physician communication with patients and families, adjusting nurse-to-patient ratios to 1:1, recognizing and avoiding futile care, increasing EOL education, physicians who are present and "on the same page," not allowing families to override patients' wishes, and the need for more support staff. When compared with data gathered 17 years previously, major themes remained the same but in a few cases changed in order and possible causation. Critical-care nurses' suggestions were similar to those recommendations from 17 years ago. Although the order of importance changed minimally, the number of similar themes indicated that obstacles to providing EOL care to dying intensive care unit patients continue to exist over time.

  5. Culture and end of life care: a scoping exercise in seven European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gysels, M.; Evans, N.; Meñaca, A.; Andrew, E.; Toscani, F.; Finetti, S.; Pasman, H.R.; Higginson, I.; Harding, R.; Pool, R.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Culture is becoming increasingly important in relation to end of life (EoL) care in a context of globalization, migration and European integration. We explore and compare socio-cultural issues that shape EoL care in seven European countries and critically appraise the existing research evidence

  6. Culture and End of Life Care: A Scoping Exercise in Seven European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gysels, M.; Evans, N.C.; Menaca, A.; Andrew, E.; Toscani, F.; Finetti, S.; Pasman, H.R.W.; Higginson, I.; Harding, R.; Pool, R.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Culture is becoming increasingly important in relation to end of life (EoL) care in a context of globalization, migration and European integration. We explore and compare socio-cultural issues that shape EoL care in seven European countries and critically appraise the existing research evidence

  7. Associations between Race and Dementia Status and the Quality of End-of-Life Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luth, Elizabeth A; Prigerson, Holly G

    2018-04-05

    Non-Hispanic black and dementia patients receive more invasive and futile treatment at end of life (EOL) relative to others. Little is known about the relationship between race/ethnicity, dementia, and EOL care quality. Identify the relationship between race/ethnicity, dementia, and proxy reporters' evaluation of EOL care quality in older adults. Latent class analysis (LCA) of national survey data. 1588 deceased Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (2011-2016). LCA identified three types of quality EOL care using nine measures of symptom management, quality of healthcare encounters, and dignified treatment. Race and dementia were primary predictors of EOL care quality type. Adjusted models controlled for decedent education, sex, marital status, age, number of illnesses, number of hospitalizations, self-rated health, place of death, hospice involvement, and proxy relationship to decedent and familiarity with care. Over 20% of proxies report that dying individuals experienced suboptimal EOL care quality, characterized by pain, sadness, poor communication, and inattention to personal care needs. In adjusted analyses, proxies for non-Hispanic black decedents were less likely to provide negative care assessments than proxies for non-Hispanic white decedents (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.40-0.86). Proxies for decedents with dementia were less likely to provide negative assessments than proxies for decedents without dementia (AOR: 0.70; 95% CI: 0.51-0.97). Efforts to improve EOL care quality are needed. More positive EOL care quality assessments for non-Hispanic Black and dementia decedents appear counterintuitive given research demonstrating that these groups of individuals are likely to have received suboptimal EOL care. Because caregiver expectations for care may differ by decedent race and dementia status, research is needed to explore the role of caregiver expectations for EOL care

  8. Occupational Variation in End-of-Life Care Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Joseph A; Haring, R Sterling; Sturgeon, Daniel; Gazarian, Priscilla K; Jiang, Wei; Cooper, Zara; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Prigerson, Holly G; Weissman, Joel S

    2018-03-01

    End-of-life (EOL) care intensity is known to vary by secular and geographic patterns. US physicians receive less aggressive EOL care than the general population, presumably the result of preferences shaped by work-place experience with EOL care. We investigated occupation as a source of variation in EOL care intensity. Across 4 states, we identified 660 599, nonhealth maintenance organization Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥66 years who died between 2004 and 2011. Linking death certificates, we identified beneficiaries with prespecified occupations: nurses, farmers, clergy, mortuary workers, homemakers, first-responders, veterinary workers, teachers, accountants, and the general population. End-of-life care intensity over the last 6 months of life was assessed using 5 validated measures: (1) Medicare expenditures, rates of (2) hospice, (3) surgery, (4) intensive care, and (5) in-hospital death. Occupation was a source of large variation in EOL care intensity across all measures, before and after adjustment for sex, education, age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index, race/ethnicity, and hospital referral region. For example, absolute and relative adjusted differences in expenditures were US$9991 and 42% of population mean expenditure ( P EOL care intensity measures, teachers (5 of 5), homemakers (4 of 5), farmers (4 of 5), and clergy (3 of 5) demonstrated significantly less aggressive care. Mortuary workers had lower EOL care intensity (4 of 5) but small numbers limited statistical significance. Occupations with likely exposure to child development, death/bereavement, and naturalistic influences demonstrated lower EOL care intensity. These findings may inform patients and clinicians navigating choices around individual EOL care preferences.

  9. The effect of tributyltin on human eosinophilic [correction of eosinophylic] leukemia EoL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Jolanta; Włosiak, Przemysław; Wilk, Anna; Antonik, Justyna; Czyz, Jarosław; Madeja, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    Organotin compounds are chemicals that are widely used in industry and agriculture as plastic stabilizers, catalysts and biocides. Many of them, including tributyltin (TBT), have been detected in human food and, as a consequence, detectable levels have been found in human blood. As organotin compounds were shown to possess immunotoxic activity, we focused our attention on the effect of TBT on the basic determinants of the function of eosinophils, i.e. cell adhesiveness and motility. We used human eosinophylic leukemia EoL-1 cells, a common in vitro cellular model of human eosinophils. Here, we demonstrate that TBT causes a dose-dependent decrease in the viability of EoL-1 cells. When administered at sub-lethal concentrations, TBT significantly decreases the adhesion of EoL-1 cells to human fibroblasts (HSFs) and inhibits their migration on fibroblast surfaces. Since the basic function of eosinophils is to invade inflamed tissues, our results indicate that TBT, and possibly other organotin compounds, may affect major cellular properties involved in the determination of in vivo eosinophil function.

  10. ICT-powered Health Care Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Marco; Christensen, Anders Skovbo; Nielson, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The efficient use of health care ressources requires the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). During a treatment process, patients have often been tested and partially treated with different diagnoses in mind before the precise diagnosis is identified. To use resources well it b...... of medical specialists and the adaptation of treatments, and through the evaluation of the trustworthiness of models taking account of test results and actual treatments compared to the clinical guidelines....

  11. Reflections on using biographical approaches in end-of-life care: dignity therapy as example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Olav; Threlkeld, Guinever; Street, Annette F; Tishelman, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of nonpharmacologic interventions using biographical approaches at the end of life (EoL) is being increasingly recognized, but less attention is paid to processes impeding realization of this potential. In this article, Swedish and Australian researchers reflect on and problematize experiences using one biographical approach, dignity therapy (DT), in EoL care in Sweden. We use this as an example, focusing on critical examination of the process of applying DT in practice, examining frictions experienced in recruiting participants, collecting the data, and creating a biography. We discuss issues regarding agency, which became evident in the recruitment process and choices made about participation, and the power differentials manifested in the interactive process of eliciting stories and crafting them into a final product. We also raise salient questions about how research and practice with biographical approaches in EoL care might better build on and further existing knowledge to better reflect the complexities of everyday life. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Social-cultural factors in end-of-life care in Belgium: A scoping of the research literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrew, E.V.; Cohen, J.; Evans, N.C.; Menaca, A.; Harding, R.; Higginson, I.; Pool, R.; Gysels, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: As end-of-life (EoL) care expands across Europe and the world, service developments are increasingly studied. The sociocultural context in which such changes take place, however, is often neglected in research. Aim: To explore sociocultural factors in EoL care in Belgium as represented

  13. A Comparison of the Influence of Anticipated Death Trajectory and Personal Values on End-of-Life Care Preferences: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supiano, Katherine P; McGee, Nancy; Dassel, Kara B; Utz, Rebecca

    2017-08-17

    We examined anticipated preferences for end-of-life (EOL) care in healthy older adults in the context of various terminal disease scenarios to explore the relationship between personal values and diseases and conditions that would influence EOL care choices. Qualitative Descriptive Analysis was used to derive themes and the relationship between EOL preference themes and personal value themes in 365 respondents in a national sample of healthy older adults who completed a survey on their anticipated preferences for end-of-life (EOL) care. Reluctance to burden close others was the most frequently voiced personal value across all conditions affecting EOL preferences, followed by the personal value of quality of life. Concern about whether one's wishes would be honored was more commonly voiced in the context of hypothetical, prospective terminal cancer than in neurological conditions. Respondents who voiced desire for autonomy in how they would die clearly attributed extreme pain as the primary influence on EOL preferences. Comprehensive assessment of patient personal values should include consideration of particular chronic disease scenarios and death trajectories to fully inform EoL preferences. Because personal values do influence EOL preferences, care should be taken to ascertain patient values when presenting diagnoses, prognoses, and treatment options. In particular, patients and families of patients with progressive neurological diseases will likely face a time when the patient cannot self-represent EOL wishes. Early discussion of values and preferences, particularly in the context of cognitive disease is vital to assure patient-directed care.

  14. End-of-Life Care and Discussions in Japanese Geriatric Health Service Facilities: A Nationwide Survey of Managing Directors' Viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoh, Asako; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Yokoya, Shoji

    2018-01-01

    Geriatric health service facilities (GHSFs) play important roles as intermediate care facilities for elderly individuals temporarily when they need rehabilitation before returning home. However, the number of residents spending their end-of-life (EOL) period in such facilities is increasing. To improve the quality of EOL care, end-of-life discussions (EOLDs) are recommended by some guidelines and studies. This study aimed to clarify the current practice of EOL care and EOLDs in GHSFs in Japan. We conducted a nationwide cross-sectional survey by mailing questionnaires about EOL care and EOLDs to 3437 GHSF managing directors. The questionnaire was developed through a literature review and discussion among the researchers and experts. Descriptive statistics summarized the data. We also analyzed the factors related to GHSFs conducting EOLDs using Fisher exact tests. The response rate was 20.7% (713 of 3437). Among the respondents, 75.2% (536 of 713) of GHSFs provided EOL care and 73.1% (521 of 713) conducted EOLDs. The most common reasons for difficulties in providing EOL care included the lack of EOL education for nurses and care workers, and their fear about caring for dying residents. End-of-life discussions were mostly initiated after the deterioration of a resident's condition and were conducted with families by physicians. Statistically significant factors of GHSFs conducting EOLDs included providing EOL education for nurses and care workers, availability of private room for critically ill residents, emergency on-call doctors, and EOL care. Adequate practical staff education programs for EOL care including EOLDs may be crucial for quality of end-of-life care in aged care facilities.

  15. End-of-life chemotherapy is associated with poor survival and aggressive care in patients with small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingming; Tang, Ke; Zhao, Fen; Zang, Yuanwei; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Zhenxiang; Sun, Xindong; Yu, Jinming

    2018-05-29

    Concerns regarding end-of-life (EOL) chemotherapy are being increasingly raised. Tumor chemosensitivity may influence the decision for aggressive chemotherapy near the EOL. Data on EOL chemotherapy in highly chemosensitive tumors, such as small cell lung cancer (SCLC), are scarce. A total of 143 SCLC decedents were consecutively included. Data about clinical factors and treatment modalities were obtained from the electronic medical records. The relationships among EOL chemotherapy, clinical features, overall survival (OS), and aggressive care were investigated. About 64% of patients had chemosensitive disease. In total, 30.8 and 16.1% of patients received EOL chemotherapy within the last 1 and 2 months of life, respectively. Younger age was associated with a higher rate of EOL chemotherapy. We determined that EOL chemotherapy was related to inferior OS not only in the entire group, but also in the chemosensitive subgroup. Furthermore, more intensive care was observed among patients who underwent EOL chemotherapy compared with those who did not. EOL chemotherapy was correlated with shorter survival and more aggressive care in patients with SCLC. More research is needed to develop indications for terminating palliative chemotherapy, to help physicians and patients with their difficult choices.

  16. Self-Perceived End-of-Life Care Competencies of Health-Care Providers at a Large Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnini, Marcos; Smith, Heather M; Price, Deborah M; Ghosh, Bidisha; Strodtman, Linda

    2018-01-01

    In the United States, most deaths occur in hospitals, with approximately 25% of hospitalized patients having palliative care needs. Therefore, the provision of good end-of-life (EOL) care to these patients is a priority. However, research assessing staff preparedness for the provision of EOL care to hospitalized patients is lacking. To assess health-care professionals' self-perceived competencies regarding the provision of EOL care in hospitalized patients. Descriptive study of self-perceived EOL care competencies among health-care professionals. The study instrument (End-of-Life Questionnaire) contains 28 questions assessing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to the provision of EOL care. Health-care professionals (nursing, medicine, social work, psychology, physical, occupational and respiratory therapist, and spiritual care) at a large academic medical center participated in the study. Means were calculated for each item, and comparisons of mean scores were conducted via t tests. Analysis of variance was used to identify differences among groups. A total of 1197 questionnaires was completed. The greatest self-perceived competency was in providing emotional support for patients/families, and the least self-perceived competency was in providing continuity of care. When compared to nurses, physicians had higher scores on EOL care attitudes, behaviors, and communication. Physicians and nurses had higher scores on most subscales than other health-care providers. Differences in self-perceived EOL care competencies were identified among disciplines, particularly between physicians and nurses. The results provide evidence for assessing health-care providers to identify their specific training needs before implementing educational programs on EOL care.

  17. End of life care in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of the qualitative literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pool Robert

    2011-03-01

    -specific approaches to symptoms and illness, and the bereavement process. Conclusions The data support or complement the findings from quantitative research. The review prompts a reconsideration of the assumption that in Africa the extended family care for the sick, and that people prefer home-based care. The review identifies areas relevant for a research agenda on socio-cultural issues at the EoL in sub-Saharan Africa.

  18. Wellness in Sickness and Health (The W.I.S.H. Project): Advance Care Planning Preferences and Experiences Among Elderly Latino Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Lauren Y; Goodson, Ruth B; Mulroy, Matthew C; Johnson, Emily M; Reilly, Jo M; Homeier, Diana C

    2017-10-25

    To assess advance care planning (ACP) preferences, experiences, and comfort in discussing end-of-life (EOL) care among elderly Latinos. Patients aged 60 and older from the Los Angeles County and University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical Center Geriatrics Clinic (n = 41) participated in this intervention. Trained staff conducted ACP counseling with participants in their preferred language, which included: (a) pre-counseling survey about demographics and EOL care attitudes, (b) discussion of ACP and optional completion of an advance directive (AD), and (c) post-session survey. Patients were primarily Spanish speaking with an average of 2.7 chronic medical conditions. Most had not previously documented (95%) or discussed (76%) EOL wishes. Most were unaware they had control over their EOL treatment (61%), but valued learning about EOL options (83%). Post-counseling, 85% reported comfort discussing EOL goals compared to 66% pre-session, and 88% elected to complete an AD. Nearly half of patients reported a desire to discuss EOL wishes sooner. Elderly Latino patients are interested in ACP, given individualized, culturally competent counseling in their preferred language. Patients should be offered the opportunity to discuss and document EOL wishes at all primary care appointments, regardless of health status. Counseling should be completed in the patient's preferred language, using culturally competent materials, and with family members present if this is the patient's preference. Cultural-competency training for providers could enhance the impact of EOL discussions and improve ACP completion rates for Latino patients.

  19. Rural-Urban Differences in End-of-Life Nursing Home Care: Facility and Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan Tracy; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the study: This study examines urban-rural differences in end-of-life (EOL) quality of care provided to nursing home (NH) residents. Data and Methods: We constructed 3 risk-adjusted EOL quality measures (QMs) for long-term decedent residents: in-hospital death, hospice referral before death, and presence of severe pain. We used…

  20. End of life care in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of the qualitative literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gysels, M.H.; Pell, C.; Straus, L.; Pool, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background End of life (EoL) care in sub-Saharan Africa still lacks the sound evidence-base needed for the development of effective, appropriate service provision. It is essential to make evidence from all types of research available alongside clinical and health service data, to ensure that EoL

  1. Comparative Analysis of Dibutyric cAMP and Butyric Acid on the Differentiation of Human Eosinophilic Leukemia EoL-1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, YunJae

    2015-12-01

    Purification of enough numbers of circulating eosinophils is difficult because eosinophils account for less than 5% peripheral blood leukocytes. Human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells have been considered an in vitro source of eosinophils as they can differentiate into mature eosinophil-like cells when incubated with dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) or butyric acid. In this study, the viability and phenotypic maturation of EoL-1 cells stimulated by either dbcAMP or butyric acid were comparatively analyzed. After treatment with 100 µM dbcAMP or 0.5 µM butyric acid, EoL-1 cells showed morphological signs of differentiation, although the number of nonviable EoL-1 cells was significantly increased following butyric acid treatment. Stimulation of EoL-1 cells with 0.5 µM butyric acid more effectively induced the expression of mature eosinophil markers than stimulation with dbcAMP. These results suggest that treatment of EoL-1 cells with 0.5 µM butyric acid for limited duration could be an effective strategy for inducing their differentiation. Considering that expression of CCR3 was not sufficient in EoL-1 cells stimulated with 0.5 µM butyric acid, treatment of the chemically stimulated EoL-1 cells with cytokines, which primarily support eosinophil maturation, would help to obtain differentiated EoL-1 cells with greater functional maturity.

  2. House dust mite induces expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in EoL-1 human eosinophilic leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Byoung Chul; Sohn, Myung Hyun; Kim, Kyung Won; Kim, Eun Soo; Kim, Kyu-Earn; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2007-10-01

    The house dust mite (HDM) is considered to be the most common indoor allergen associated with bronchial asthma. In this study, we investigated whether crude extract of the HDM Dermatophagoides farinae could activate human eosinophilic leukemic cells (EoL-1) to induce upregulation of cell-surface adhesion molecules. When EoL-1 cells were incubated with D. farinae extract, expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) significantly increased on the cell surfaces compared to cells incubated with medium alone. In contrast, surface expression of CD11b and CD49d in EoL-1 cells was not affected by D. farinae extract. In addition, pretreatment of cells with NF-kappaB inhibitor (MG-132) or JNK inhibitor (SP600125) significantly inhibited ICAM-1 expression promoted by HDM extract. However, neither p38 MAP kinase inhibitor nor MEK inhibitor prevented HDM-induced ICAM-1 expression in EoL-1 cells. These results suggest that crude extract of D. farinae induces ICAM-1 expression in EoL-1 cells through signaling pathways involving both NF-kappaB and JNK.

  3. End-of-life care across Southern Europe: a critical review of cultural similarities and differences between Italy, Spain and Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meñaca, A.; Evans, N.; Andrew, E.V.W.; Toscani, F.; Finetti, S.; Gómez-Batiste, X.; Higginson, I.J.; Harding, R.; Pool, R.; Gysels, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from a range of sources demonstrates that end-of-life (EoL) care practices and preferences vary across countries; culture is consistently one of the main explanations given for this. In order to understand how cultural factors are used to explain similarities and differences in EoL care

  4. Simulation for ward processes of surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucher, Philip H; Darzi, Ara; Aggarwal, Rajesh

    2013-07-01

    The role of simulation in surgical education, initially confined to technical skills and procedural tasks, increasingly includes training nontechnical skills including communication, crisis management, and teamwork. Research suggests that many preventable adverse events can be attributed to nontechnical error occurring within a ward context. Ward rounds represent the primary point of interaction between patient and physician but take place without formalized training or assessment. The simulated ward should provide an environment in which processes of perioperative care can be performed safely and realistically, allowing multidisciplinary assessment and training of full ward rounds. We review existing literature and describe our experience in setting up our ward simulator. We examine the facilities, equipment, cost, and personnel required for establishing a surgical ward simulator and consider the scenario development, assessment, and feedback tools necessary to integrate it into a surgical curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Changing the Care Process: A New Concept in Iranian Rural Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Abbaszadeh, RN, BSCN, PhD

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that the process of health care in Iranian rural society is changing rapidly with community health workers encountering new challenges. There is diminished efficiency in responding to the changing care process in Iran's rural society. Considering this change in process of care, therefore, the health care system should respond to these new challenges by establishing new health care models.

  6. Rumex L. species induce apoptosis in 1301, EOL-1 and H-9 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegiera, Magdalena; Smolarz, Helena D; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The Rumex L. (dock) species for many centuries have been used in medical treatment, through their adstringent, spasmolitic or cholagogic action. In the present study, the in vitro screening of cytotoxic activities of ethanol extract from roots, leaves and fruits of six Rumex species: R. acetosa L., R. acetosella L., R. confertus Willd., R. crispus L., R. hydrolapathum Huds. and R. obtusifolius L. were performed. We found remarkable cytotoxic activities on leukemic 1301 and EOL-1 cell lines and T cell line at concentration dependent manners. Cytotoxic activity was determined in two ways: trypan blue test and annexin-V FITC and propidium iodide assay. Received IC50 values of investigated extracts on 1301, EOL-1 and H-9 cell lines ranged from 0.22, 0.17 and 0.04 to 2.56, 1.91 and 1.83 mg/mL, respectively. Analysis of morphological changes demonstrated that the extract exerted cell-death via apoptosis. The overall activities of Rumex species support the traditional use of the extract from the fruits of R. confertus, R. crispus, R. hydrolapathum and R. obtusifolius in the treatment of cancer.

  7. EOL performance comparison of GaAs/Ge and Si BSF/R solar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woike, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    EOL power estimates for solar array designs are significantly influenced by the predicted degradation due to charged particle radiation. New radiation-induced power degradation data for GaAs/Ge solar arrays applicable to missions ranging from low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) and compares these results to silicon BSF/R arrays. These results are based on recently published radiation damage coefficients for GaAs/Ge cells. The power density ratio (GaAs/Ge to Si BSF/R) was found to be as high as 1.83 for the proton-dominated worst-case altitude of 7408 km medium Earth orbit (MEO). Based on the EOL GaAs/Ge solar array power density results for MEO, missions which were previously considered infeasible may be reviewed based on these more favorable results. The additional life afforded by using GaAs/Ge cells is an important factor in system-level trade studies when selecting a solar cell technology for a mission and needs to be considered. The data presented supports this decision since the selected orbits have characteristics similar to most orbits of interest.

  8. ENVIRONMENTS and EOL: identification of Environment Ontology terms in text and the annotation of the Encyclopedia of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafilis, Evangelos; Frankild, Sune P; Schnetzer, Julia; Fanini, Lucia; Faulwetter, Sarah; Pavloudi, Christina; Vasileiadou, Katerina; Leary, Patrick; Hammock, Jennifer; Schulz, Katja; Parr, Cynthia Sims; Arvanitidis, Christos; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-06-01

    The association of organisms to their environments is a key issue in exploring biodiversity patterns. This knowledge has traditionally been scattered, but textual descriptions of taxa and their habitats are now being consolidated in centralized resources. However, structured annotations are needed to facilitate large-scale analyses. Therefore, we developed ENVIRONMENTS, a fast dictionary-based tagger capable of identifying Environment Ontology (ENVO) terms in text. We evaluate the accuracy of the tagger on a new manually curated corpus of 600 Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) species pages. We use the tagger to associate taxa with environments by tagging EOL text content monthly, and integrate the results into the EOL to disseminate them to a broad audience of users. The software and the corpus are available under the open-source BSD and the CC-BY-NC-SA 3.0 licenses, respectively, at http://environments.hcmr.gr. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Communication for end-of-life care planning among Korean patients with terminal cancer: A context-oriented model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Su Jin; Kim, Shinmi; Kim, Jinshil

    2016-02-01

    In Korea, patients with terminal cancer are often caught out of the loop in end-of-life (EoL) care discussions. Healthcare professionals also have difficulty engaging in such communication in a variety of healthcare contexts. Therefore, the objective of our study was to develop a communication model for EoL care decision making compatible with the clinical environment in Korea. Using focus-group interview methodology, participants included eight doctors and five nurses who provide EoL care for terminal cancer patients in acute hospital settings or hospice care facilities in various provinces of Korea. Five themes emerged regarding EoL care discussion, which included: (1) timing, (2) responsible professionals, (3) disclosure of bad news, (4) content areas of EoL care discussion, and (5) implementing strategies for EoL care discussions. These themes were based on development of a communication algorithm for EoL discussion among patients with terminal cancer. A structural communication step for delivery of a terminal prognosis was specified at the phase of disclosure of bad news: beginning with determination of a patient's decision-making capability, followed by a patient's perception of his/her condition, a patient's wish to know, family dynamics, and a patient's and/or family's readiness for EoL discussions. The proposed context-oriented communication algorithm could provide a helpful guideline for EoL communication and, accordingly, facilitate meaningful improvements in EoL care in Korean clinical practice. The feasibility of this algorithm has not yet been determined, and its validation in a larger sample of patients with terminal cancers, using a quantitative research methodology, is a priority of research.

  10. From vulnerability to passion in the end-of-life care: The lived experience of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying-Chun; Chiang, Hsien-Hsien

    2017-12-01

    End-of-life (EOL) care is considered to be inherently difficult and vulnerable for patients and nurses. It also seems hard to develop passion for care during these problematic times. This study elucidates how EOL nurses interpret their care experience and how they transform their experience and mindset. This study was conducted by organizing a reflective group based on the concept of group analysis for oncology and hospice nurses to share their experience. Thirteen registered nurses were enrolled from a medical center in northern Taiwan. Data drawn from the group dialogue was derived from six digitally recorded sessions and then analysed alone with the researcher's diaries and participants' feedback sheets. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used to analyze the data. The results showed that nurses who provide EOL care actually experience suffering by witnessing patients' suffering. However, the suffering authentically drives the nurses to encounter their own inner selves, to induce the shift of mindset, and then allow them to continuously provide and maintain the passion in EOL care. This study provides a new viewpoint for understanding of EOL nurses' experiences, indicating that this line of work may be recognized as a privilege. We recommend that the setting of a nurse reflective group is important and it may be considered in providing EOL care training for nurses. Hopefully the study results could shed lights for future policies regarding EOL care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving performance on core processes of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, John Matthew; Pronovost, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    This article describes the recent literature on using extrinsic and intrinsic motivators to improve performance on core processes of care, highlighting literature that describes general frameworks for quality improvement work. The literature supporting the effectiveness of extrinsic motivators to improve quality is generally positive for public reporting of performance, with mixed results for pay-for-performance. A four-element quality improvement framework developed by The Armstrong Institute at Johns Hopkins Medicine was developed with intrinsic motivation in mind. The clear definition and communication of goals are important for quality improvement work. Training clinicians in improvement science, such as lean sigma, teamwork, or culture change provides clinicians with the skills they need to drive the improvement work. Peer learning communities offer the opportunity for clinicians to engage with each other and offer support in their work. The transparent reporting of performance helps ensure accountability of performance ranging from individual clinicians to governance. Quality improvement work that is led by and engages clinicians offers the opportunity for the work to be both meaningful and sustainable. The literature supports approaching quality improvement work in a systematic way, including the key elements of communication, infrastructure building, training, transparency, and accountability.

  12. Impacts of care-giving and sources of support: a comparison of end-of-life and non-end-of-life caregivers in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison M; Wang, Li; Kitchen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    This is the second in a series of papers that deal with care-giving in Canada, as based on data available from the Canadian General Social Survey (2007). Building on the first paper, which reviewed the differences between short-term, long-term and end-of-life (EOL) caregivers, this paper uniquely examines the caregiver supports employed by EOL caregivers when compared to non-EOL caregivers (short-term and long-term caregivers combined). Both papers employ data from Statistics Canada's General Social Survey (GSS Cycle 21: 2007). The GSS includes three modules, where respondents were asked questions about the unpaid home care assistance that they had provided in the last 12 months to someone at EOL or with either a long-term health condition or a physical limitation. The objective of this research paper was to investigate the link between the impact of the care-giving experience and the caregiver supports received, while also examining the differences in these across EOL and non-EOL caregivers. By way of factor analysis and regression modelling, we examine differences between two types of caregivers: (i) EOL and (ii) non-EOL caregivers. The study revealed that with respect to socio-demographic characteristics, health outcomes and caregiver supports, EOL caregivers were consistently worse off. This suggests that although all non-EOL caregivers are experiencing negative impacts from their care-giving role, comparatively greater supports are needed for EOL caregivers. © 2015 The Authors. Health and Social Care in the Community Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Beyond the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process: Cultivating Patient Care Practitioners by Utilizing the Pharmaceutical Care Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Kolar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of a standard pharmacists’ patient care process (PPCP for the profession, and inclusion of the PPCP in the ACPE Standards 2016, are positive steps for pharmacy education and creates consistency among pharmacy practitioners, regardless of practice setting. The PPCP, and its implications for practice, needs to continue to be embraced by educators and emphasized with students. The PPCP should be the patient care process taught to students and integrated throughout didactic courses and experiential experiences. However, teaching the PPCP or a particular service, such as Medication Therapy Management (MTM or Comprehensive Medication Management (CMM, is not enough. The patient care process must be taught as one component of pharmaceutical care. Without also learning the philosophy of practice and practice management systems, student pharmacists will not be prepared for the realities of practice. Pharmacists are taking on new roles, getting paid in new ways, and in positions to take responsibility for a patient’s medication-related needs. Student pharmacists need to be in a position to take advantage of these opportunities as they progress throughout their careers. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties.   Type: Idea Paper

  14. Culture and end of life care: a scoping exercise in seven European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysels, Marjolein; Evans, Natalie; Meñaca, Arantza; Andrew, Erin; Toscani, Franco; Finetti, Sylvia; Pasman, H Roeline; Higginson, Irene; Harding, Richard; Pool, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Culture is becoming increasingly important in relation to end of life (EoL) care in a context of globalization, migration and European integration. We explore and compare socio-cultural issues that shape EoL care in seven European countries and critically appraise the existing research evidence on cultural issues in EoL care generated in the different countries. We scoped the literature for Germany, Norway, Belgium, The Netherlands, Spain, Italy and Portugal, carrying out electronic searches in 16 international and country-specific databases and handsearches in 17 journals, bibliographies of relevant papers and webpages. We analysed the literature which was unearthed, in its entirety and by type (reviews, original studies, opinion pieces) and conducted quantitative analyses for each country and across countries. Qualitative techniques generated themes and sub-themes. A total of 868 papers were reviewed. The following themes facilitated cross-country comparison: setting, caregivers, communication, medical EoL decisions, minority ethnic groups, and knowledge, attitudes and values of death and care. The frequencies of themes varied considerably between countries. Sub-themes reflected issues characteristic for specific countries (e.g. culture-specific disclosure in the southern European countries). The work from the seven European countries concentrates on cultural traditions and identities, and there was almost no evidence on ethnic minorities. This scoping review is the first comparative exploration of the cultural differences in the understanding of EoL care in these countries. The diverse body of evidence that was identified on socio-cultural issues in EoL care, reflects clearly distinguishable national cultures of EoL care, with differences in meaning, priorities, and expertise in each country. The diverse ways that EoL care is understood and practised forms a necessary part of what constitutes best evidence for the improvement of EoL care in the future.

  15. Culture and End of Life Care: A Scoping Exercise in Seven European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysels, Marjolein; Evans, Natalie; Meñaca, Arantza; Andrew, Erin; Toscani, Franco; Finetti, Sylvia; Pasman, H. Roeline; Higginson, Irene; Harding, Richard; Pool, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Aim Culture is becoming increasingly important in relation to end of life (EoL) care in a context of globalization, migration and European integration. We explore and compare socio-cultural issues that shape EoL care in seven European countries and critically appraise the existing research evidence on cultural issues in EoL care generated in the different countries. Methods We scoped the literature for Germany, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain, Italy and Portugal, carrying out electronic searches in 16 international and country-specific databases and handsearches in 17 journals, bibliographies of relevant papers and webpages. We analysed the literature which was unearthed, in its entirety and by type (reviews, original studies, opinion pieces) and conducted quantitative analyses for each country and across countries. Qualitative techniques generated themes and sub-themes. Results A total of 868 papers were reviewed. The following themes facilitated cross-country comparison: setting, caregivers, communication, medical EoL decisions, minority ethnic groups, and knowledge, attitudes and values of death and care. The frequencies of themes varied considerably between countries. Sub-themes reflected issues characteristic for specific countries (e.g. culture-specific disclosure in the southern European countries). The work from the seven European countries concentrates on cultural traditions and identities, and there was almost no evidence on ethnic minorities. Conclusion This scoping review is the first comparative exploration of the cultural differences in the understanding of EoL care in these countries. The diverse body of evidence that was identified on socio-cultural issues in EoL care, reflects clearly distinguishable national cultures of EoL care, with differences in meaning, priorities, and expertise in each country. The diverse ways that EoL care is understood and practised forms a necessary part of what constitutes best evidence for the improvement of EoL

  16. Culture and end of life care: a scoping exercise in seven European countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein Gysels

    Full Text Available AIM: Culture is becoming increasingly important in relation to end of life (EoL care in a context of globalization, migration and European integration. We explore and compare socio-cultural issues that shape EoL care in seven European countries and critically appraise the existing research evidence on cultural issues in EoL care generated in the different countries. METHODS: We scoped the literature for Germany, Norway, Belgium, The Netherlands, Spain, Italy and Portugal, carrying out electronic searches in 16 international and country-specific databases and handsearches in 17 journals, bibliographies of relevant papers and webpages. We analysed the literature which was unearthed, in its entirety and by type (reviews, original studies, opinion pieces and conducted quantitative analyses for each country and across countries. Qualitative techniques generated themes and sub-themes. RESULTS: A total of 868 papers were reviewed. The following themes facilitated cross-country comparison: setting, caregivers, communication, medical EoL decisions, minority ethnic groups, and knowledge, attitudes and values of death and care. The frequencies of themes varied considerably between countries. Sub-themes reflected issues characteristic for specific countries (e.g. culture-specific disclosure in the southern European countries. The work from the seven European countries concentrates on cultural traditions and identities, and there was almost no evidence on ethnic minorities. CONCLUSION: This scoping review is the first comparative exploration of the cultural differences in the understanding of EoL care in these countries. The diverse body of evidence that was identified on socio-cultural issues in EoL care, reflects clearly distinguishable national cultures of EoL care, with differences in meaning, priorities, and expertise in each country. The diverse ways that EoL care is understood and practised forms a necessary part of what constitutes best evidence for

  17. [Care and anthropology: a thinking process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbach Viadas, Cécilia

    2007-09-01

    Caring for human beings, calls for relating unity and diversity in order to respect the equality of cultures and to recognize their cultural differences. Cultural difference is, however, privileged by recent publications within the culture caring domain, based on cultural relativism and disregarding the unity of humanity, transcultu-ral nursing theory is the case. For this reason, some historical elements related to the two original anthropological theories are included in this text to understand the philosophical and ethical implications of transcultural nursing theory. The objective of this article is to analyse six recent publications within the caring and anthropology field, through a reflexive method identifying two different caring traditions and demonstrating their philosophical and ethical reach for caring practice.

  18. Helios1A EoL: A Success. For the first Time a Long Final Thrust Scenario, Respecting the French Law on Space Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerry, Agnes; Moussi, Aurelie; Sartine, Christian; Beaumet, Gregory

    2013-09-01

    HELIOS1A End Of Live (EOL) operations occurred in the early 2012. Through this EOL operation, CNES wanted to make an example of French Space Act compliance. Because the satellite wasn't natively designed for such an EOL phase, the operation was touchy and risky. It was organized as a real full project in order to assess every scenario details with dedicated Mission Analysis, to secure the operations through detailed risk analysis at system level and to consider the major failures that could occur during the EOL. A short scenario allowing to reach several objectives with benefits was eventually selected. The main objective of this project was to preserve space environment. The operations were led on a "best effort" basis. The French Space Operations Act (FSOA) requirements were met: HELIOS-1A EOL operations had been led successfully.

  19. Commentary on a participatory inquiry paradigm used to assess EOL simulation participant outcomes and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Jane M

    2017-11-20

    Care at the end-of-life has attracted global attention, as health care workers struggle with balancing cure based care with end-of-life care, and knowing when to transition from the former to the latter. Simulation is gaining in popularity as an education strategy to facilitate health care provider decision-making by improving communication skills with patients and family members. This commentary focuses on the authors' simulation evaluation process. When data were assessed using a participatory inquiry paradigm, the evaluation revealed far more than a formative or summative evaluation of participant knowledge and skills in this area of care. Consequently, this assessment strategy has ramifications for best practices for simulation design and evaluation.

  20. Certainty and uncertainty about end of life care nursing practices in New Zealand Intensive Care Units: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen; Fulbrook, Paul; Donovan, Sarah; Tester, Rachel; deVries, Kay

    2015-05-01

    With end-of-life (EOL) central to the nursing role in intensive care, few studies have been undertaken to explore EOL care in the context of New Zealand (NZ) intensive care nursing. To investigate NZ intensive care nurses' experiences of, and attitudes towards EOL care. Sequential mixed methods study using cross sectional survey with follow-on focus groups. NZ intensive care nurses (N=465) across four large tertiary intensive care units (ICUs) were contacted to complete a 43-item web-based survey. A follow-on focus group was conducted in each of the sites to explore specific aspects of the survey findings. 203 fully completed surveys were returned (response rate 44%) from the four ICUs. Over half of nurses surveyed (55%, n=111) disagreed that withholding and withdrawing life support treatment were ethically the same. 78% (n=159) of nurses stated that withholding treatment was ethically more acceptable than withdrawing it. Whilst nurses generally supported reducing inspired oxygen to air for ventilated patients at EOL (71%, n=139) this was also an area that demonstrated one of the highest levels of uncertainty (21%, n=41). Just under a quarter of respondents were also uncertain about the use of continued nutritional support, continued passive limb exercises and use of deep sedation during EOL. The 18 nurses who participated in follow-on focus groups detailed the supportive, culturally sensitive, collaborative environment that EOL was conducted in. However diverse opinions and understandings were held on the use of passive limb and use of fluids at EOL. Whilst results from this NZ study broadly align with European studies, uncertainty about specific areas of EOL practices highlight that further guidance for nurses is required. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Escalating Health Care Expenditures in Cancer Decedents' Last Year of Life: A Decade of Evidence from a Retrospective Population-Based Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yen-Ni; Liu, Tsang-Wu; Wen, Fur-Hsing; Chou, Wen-Chi; Tang, Siew Tzuh

    2017-04-01

    No population-based longitudinal studies on end-of-life (EOL) expenditures were found for cancer decedents. This population-based, retrospective cohort study examined health care expenditures from 2001 to 2010 among 339,546 Taiwanese cancer decedents' last year of life. Individual patient-level data were linked from administrative datasets. Health care expenditures were converted from Taiwan dollars to U.S. dollars by health-specific purchasing power parity conversions to account for different health-purchasing powers. Associations of patient, physician, hospital, and regional factors with EOL care expenditures were evaluated by multilevel linear regression model by generalized estimating equation method. Mean annual EOL care expenditures for Taiwanese cancer decedents increased from 2000 to 2010 from U.S. $49,591 to U.S. $68,773, respectively, with one third of spending occurring in the patients' last month. Increased EOL care expenditures were associated with male gender, younger age, being married, diagnosed with hematological malignancies and cancers other than lung, gastric, and hepatic-pancreatic cancers, and dying within 7-24 months of diagnosis. Patients spent less at EOL when they had higher comorbidities and metastatic disease, died within 6 months of diagnosis, were under care of oncologists, gastroenterologists, and intensivists, and received care at a teaching hospital with more terminally ill cancer patients. Higher EOL care expenditures were associated with greater EOL care intensity at the primary hospital and regional levels. Taiwanese cancer decedents consumed considerable National Health Insurance disbursements at EOL, totaling more than was consumed in six developed non-U.S. countries surveyed in 2010. To slow increasing cost and improve EOL cancer care quality, interventions to ensure appropriate EOL care provision should target hospitals and clinicians less experienced in providing EOL care and those who tend to provide aggressive EOL care to

  2. Trends in advance care planning in cancer patients: Results from a national, longitudinal survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Amol K.; Wright, Alexi A.; Nicholas, Lauren H.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Advance care planning (ACP) may prevent end-of-life (EOL) care that is non-beneficial and discordant with patient wishes. Despite long-standing recognition of the merits of ACP in oncology, it is unclear whether cancer patients’ participation in ACP has increased over time. Objective To characterize trends in durable power of attorney (DPOA) assignment, living will creation, and participation in discussions of EOL care preferences, and to explore associations between ACP subtypes and EOL treatment intensity, as reflected in EOL care decisions and terminal hospitalizations. Design Prospectively collected survey data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), including data from in-depth “exit” interviews conducted with next-of-kin surrogates following the death of an HRS participant. Trends in ACP subtypes were tested, and multivariable logistic regression models examined associations between ACP subtypes and measures of treatment intensity. Setting HRS, a nationally representative, biennial, longitudinal panel study of U.S. residents over age 50. Participants 1,985 next-of-kin surrogates of HRS participants with cancer who died between 2000 and 2012. Main Outcome and Measures Trends in the surrogate-reported frequency of DPOA assignment, living will creation, and participation in discussions of EOL care preferences, as well as associations between ACP subtypes and surrogate-reported EOL care decisions/terminal hospitalizations. Results From 2000-2012, there was an increase in DPOA assignment (52% to 74%, p=0.03), without change in use of living wills (49% to 40%, p=0.63) or EOL discussions (68% to 60%, p=0.62). Surrogates increasingly reported that patients received “all care possible” at EOL (7% to 58%, p=0.004), and rates of terminal hospitalizations were unchanged (29% to 27%, p=0.70). Both living wills and EOL discussions were associated with limiting/withholding treatment [living will: adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=2.51, 95% confidence

  3. Dasatinib inhibits the growth and survival of neoplastic human eosinophils (EOL-1) through targeting of FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Christian; Gleixner, Karoline V; Peter, Barbara; Ferenc, Veronika; Gruze, Alexander; Remsing Rix, Lily L; Bennett, Keiryn L; Samorapoompichit, Puchit; Lee, Francis Y; Pickl, Winfried F; Esterbauer, Harald; Sillaber, Christian; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Valent, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by molecular and/or cytogenetic evidence of clonality of eosinophils, marked eosinophilia, and organ damage. In many patients, the transforming mutation FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha and the related CHIC2 deletion are found. The respective oncoprotein, FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha, is considered to play a major role in malignant cell growth in CEL. The tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitor imatinib (STI571) has been described to counteract the TK activity of FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha in most patients. However, not all patients with CEL show a response to imatinib. Therefore, several attempts have been made to identify other TK inhibitors that counteract growth of neoplastic eosinophils. We provide evidence that dasatinib, a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, blocks the growth and survival of EOL-1, an eosinophil leukemia cell line carrying FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha. The effects of dasatinib on proliferation of EOL-1 cells were dose-dependent, with an IC50 of 0.5 to 1 nM, which was found to be in the same range when compared to IC50 values produced with imatinib. Dasatinib was also found to induce apoptosis in EOL-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner (IC50: 1-10 nM). The apoptosis-inducing effects of dasatinib on EOL-1 cells were demonstrable by light microscopy, flow cytometry, and in a TUNEL assay. In Western blot experiments, dasatinib completely blocked the phosphorylation of FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha in EOL-1 cells. Dasatinib inhibits the growth of leukemic eosinophils through targeting of the disease-related oncoprotein FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha. Based on this observation, dasatinib may be considered as a new interesting treatment option for patients with CEL.

  4. The roles of MCP-1 and protein kinase C delta activation in human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Sook; Yang, Eun Ju; Kim, In Sik

    2009-12-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilc syndrome is a disorder associated with clonally eosinophilic proliferation. The importance of FIP1-like-1-platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (FIP1L1-PDGFRA) in the pathogenesis and classification of HES has been recently reported. In this study, we investigated the contribution of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 to chemotactic activity and protein kinase C delta (PKC delta in the human eosinophilic leukemia cell line EoL-1. These cells express CCR2 protein among the CC chemokine receptors (CCR1-5). MCP-1 induces strong migration of EoL-1 cells and the chemotaxis signal in response to MCP-1 involves a G(i)/G(o) protein, phospholipase C (PLC), PKC delta, p38 MAPK and NF-kappaB. MCP-1 activates p38 MAPK via G(i)/G(o) protein, PLC and PKC delta cascade. MCP-1 also induces NF-kappaB translocation and the activation is inhibited by PKC delta activation. The increase in the basal expression and activity of PKC delta in EoL-1 cells, compared to normal eosinophils, inhibits apoptosis in EoL-1 cells. Anti-apoptotic mechanism of PKC delta is related to inhibition of caspase 3 and caspase 9, but not to FIP1L1-PDGFRA. PKC delta functions as an anti-apoptotic molecule, and is involved in EoL-1 cell movement stimulated by MCP-1. This study contributes to an understanding of MCP-1 in eosinophil biology and pathogenic mechanism of eosinophilic disorders.

  5. Healthcare professionals' perspectives on delivering end-of-life care within acute hospital trusts: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Colette; Gibbins, Jane; Bloor, Sophia; Burcombe, Melanie; McCoubrie, Rachel; Forbes, Karen

    2015-12-01

    The quality of end-of-life (EOL) care in acute hospitals is variable and interventions to improve this care, such as EOL care pathways, are not always used. The underlying reasons for this variability are not fully understood. We explored healthcare professionals' views on delivering EOL care within an acute hospital trust in the South West of England. We employed qualitative methods (focus groups, in-depth interviews and questerviews) within a study investigating the impact of a simple EOL tool on the care of dying patients. We invited a range of staff of all grades with experience in caring for dying patients from medicine, surgery and care of the elderly teams to participate. Six focus groups, seven interviews and five questerviews were conducted. Two main themes emerged: (a) delays (difficulties and avoidance) in diagnosing dying and (b) the EOL tool supporting staff in caring for the dying. Staff acknowledged that the diagnosis of dying was often made late; this was partly due to prognostic uncertainty but compounded by a culture that did not acknowledge death as a possible outcome until death was imminent. Both the medical and nursing staff found the EOL tool useful as a means of communicating ceilings of care, ensuring appropriate prescribing for EOL symptoms, and giving nurses permission to approach the bedside of a dying patient. The culture of avoiding death and dying in acute hospitals remains a significant barrier to providing EOL care, even when EOL tools are available and accepted by staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Health care management modelling: a process perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, J.M.H.

    1998-01-01

    Modelling-based health care management ought to become just as popular as evidence based medicine. Making managerial decisions based on evidence by modelling efforts is certainly a step forward. Examples can be given of many successful applications in different areas of decision making: disease

  7. Seeking Humanizing Care in Patient-Centered Care Process: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Esmaeili, Maryam; Salsali, Mahvash

    Patient-centered care is both a goal in itself and a tool for enhancing health outcomes. The application of patient-centered care in health care services globally however is diverse. This article reports on a study that sought to introduce patient-centered care. The aim of this study is to explore the process of providing patient-centered care in critical care units. The study used a grounded theory method. Data were collected on 5 critical care units in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Purposive and theoretical sampling directed the collection of data using 29 semistructured interviews with 27 participants (nurses, patients, and physician). Data obtained were analyzed according to the analysis stages of grounded theory and constant comparison to identify the concepts, context, and process of the study. The core category of this grounded theory is "humanizing care," which consisted of 4 interrelated phases, including patient acceptance, purposeful patient assessment and identification, understanding patients, and patient empowerment. A core category of humanizing care integrated the theory. Humanizing care was an outcome and process. Patient-centered care is a dynamic and multifaceted process provided according to the nurses' understanding of the concept. Patient-centered care does not involve repeating routine tasks; rather, it requires an all-embracing understanding of the patients and showing respect for their values, needs, and preferences.

  8. Processes of early stroke care and hospital costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Marie Louise; Ehlers, Lars H; Hundborg, Heidi H

    2014-01-01

    Background: The relationship between processes of early stroke care and hospital costs remains unclear. Aims: We therefore examined the association in a population-based cohort study. Methods: We identified 5909 stroke patients who were admitted to stroke units in a Danish county between 2005...... of hospitalization were $23352 (standard deviation 27827). The relationship between receiving more relevant processes of early stroke care and lower hospital costs followed a dose-response relationship. The adjusted costs were $24566 (95% confidence interval 19364-29769) lower for patients who received 75......-100% of the relevant processes of care compared with patients receiving 0-24%. All processes of care were associated with potential cost savings, except for early catheterization and early thromboembolism prophylaxis. Conclusions: Early care in agreement with key guidelines recommendations for the management...

  9. Factors influencing the provision of End of Life care for adolescents and young adults with advanced cancer: a scoping review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Deborah Jayne; Carrier, Judith Angela Kathryn; Gillen, Elizabeth; Hawker, Clare; Sutton, Joanne; Kelly, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this review is to locate and describe literature relating to EoL care provision to adolescents and young adults with cancer. The specific areas of investigation will include:\\ud - Care service provision in adolescents and young adults with cancer during the EoL phase of care\\ud - Experiences and perceptions of adolescents and young adults with cancer during the EoL phase of care\\ud - Experience and perceptions of the health professionals and family members involved in their c...

  10. End-of-life care for advanced dementia patients in residential care home-a Hong Kong perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, James K H; Chan, Felix H W

    2017-08-28

    Dementia will become more common as the population ages. Advanced dementia should be considered as a terminal illnesses and end-of-life (EOL) care is very much needed for this disease group. Currently, the EOL services provided to this vulnerable group in Hong Kong, especially those living in residential care homes, is limited. The usual practice of residential care homes is to send older residents with advanced dementia to acute hospitals when they are sick, irrespective of their wish, premorbid status, diagnoses and prognosis. This may not accord with what the patients perceive to be a "good death". There are many barriers for older people to die in place, both at home and at the residential care home. In the community, to enhance EOL care to residential care home for the elderly (RCHE) residents, pilot EOL program had been carried out by some Community Geriatric Assessment Teams. Since 2015, the Hospital Authority funded program "Enhance Community Geriatric Assessment Team Support to End-of-life Patients in Residential Care Homes for the Elderly" has been started. In the program, advance care planning (ACP), Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) (non-hospitalized) order will be established and the program will be expected to cover all clusters in Hong Kong by 2018/2019. In hospital setting, EOL clinical plan and EOL ward in geriatric step-down hospitals may be able to improve the quality of death of older patients. In Sep 2015, the Hospital Authority Guidelines on Life-Sustaining Treatment in the Terminally Ill was updated. Amongst other key EOL issues, careful (comfort) hand feeding was mentioned in the guideline. Other new developments include the possible establishment of enduring power of attorney for health care decision and enhancement of careful hand feeding amongst advanced dementia patients in RCHEs.

  11. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  12. Nursing Home Physicians' Assessments of Barriers and Strategies for End-of-Life Care in Norway and The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosse, Anette; Zuidema, Sytse; Boersma, Froukje; Malterud, Kirsti; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Ruths, Sabine

    2017-08-01

    Working conditions in nursing homes (NHs) may hamper teamwork in providing quality end-of-life (EOL) care, especially the participation of NH physicians. Dutch NH physicians are specialists or trainees in elderly care medicine with NHs as the main workplace, whereas in Norway, family physicians usually work part time in NHs. Thus, we aimed at assessing and comparing NH physicians' perspectives on barriers and strategies for providing EOL care in NHs in Norway and in The Netherlands. A cross-sectional study using an electronic questionnaire was conducted in 2015. All NH physicians in Norway (approximately 1200-1300) were invited to participate; 435 participated (response rate approximately 35%). Of the total 1664 members of the Dutch association of elderly care physicians approached, 244 participated (response rate 15%). We explored NH physicians' perceptions of organizational, educational, financial, legal, and personal prerequisites for quality EOL care. Differences between the countries were compared using χ 2 test and t-test. Most respondents in both countries reported inadequate staffing, lack of skills among nursing personnel, and heavy time commitment for physicians as important barriers; this was more pronounced among Dutch respondents. Approximately 30% of the respondents in both countries reported their own lack of interest in EOL care as an important barrier. Suggested improvement strategies were routines for involvement of patients' family, pain- and symptom assessment protocols, EOL care guidelines, routines for advance care planning, and education in EOL care for physicians and nursing staff. Inadequate staffing levels, as well as lack of competence, time, and interest emerge as important barriers to quality EOL care according to Dutch and Norwegian NH physicians. Their perspectives were mostly similar, despite large educational and organizational differences. Key strategies for improving EOL care in their facilities comprise education and

  13. BOL and EOL Characterization of Azur 3G Lilt Solar Cells for ESA Juice Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorenko Victor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we describe the results of electrical characterization of AZUR SPACE triple-junction solar cells at a sun light intensity of 3.7% AM0 and temperatures down to −150°C. At these conditions, which are relevant for the anticipated ESA JUICE mission, the cell efficiency reaches 33.5 % at BOL. Special attention has been paid to the establishing of an in-situ characterization procedure for defining EOL cell characteristics after electron and proton irradiation at low temperature low intensity condition. It was shown that solar cells irradiated at low temperature exhibit a strong recovery effect within short time after stopping the irradiation whereas the absolute value of the recovery depends on the irradiation fluence and particle type. Further on, it was demonstrated that the degradation of the maximum power, Pmp, is much stronger than the degradation of Isc and Voc values. Experimentally defined remaining factors for electron and proton irradiation and the quantification of the observed recovery effects allow a realistic prediction of the solar cell performance at JUICE mission conditions and are essential for the planned solar cell qualification activities.

  14. Integrity assessment of TAPS reactor pressure vessel at extended EOL using surveillance test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Shah, Priti Kotak

    2008-05-01

    Integrity assessment of pressure vessels of nuclear reactors (RPV) primarily concentrates on the prevention of brittle failure and conditions are defined under which brittle failure can be excluded. Accordingly, two approaches based on Transition Temperature Concept and Fracture Mechanics Concept were adopted using the impact test results of three credible surveillance data sets obtained from the surveillance specimens of Tarapur Atomic Power Station. RT NDT data towards end of life (EOL) were estimated from the impact test results in accordance with the procedures of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2 and were used as primary input for assessment of the vessel integrity. SA302B (nickel modified) steel cladded with stainless steel is used as the pressure vessel material for the two 210 MWe boiling water reactors of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS). The reactors were commissioned during the year 1969. The chemical compositions of SA302B (modified) steel used in fabricating the vessel and the specified tensile property and the Charpy impact property requirements of the steel broadly meet ASME specified requirements. Therefore, the pressure temperature limit curves prescribed by General Electric (G.E.) were compared with those as obtained using procedures of ASME Section XII, Appendix G. The tensile and the Charpy impact properties at 60 EFPY of vessel operation as derived from the surveillance specimens even fulfilled the specified requirements for the virgin material of ASME. Integrity assessment carried out using the two approaches indicated the safety of the vessel for continued operation up to 60 EFPY. (author)

  15. Large-scale kinetic energy spectra from Eulerian analysis of EOLE wind data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, M.

    1975-01-01

    A data set of 56,000 winds determined from the horizontal displacements of EOLE balloons at the 200 mb level in the Southern Hemisphere during the period October 1971-February 1972 is utilized for the computation of planetary- and synoptic-scale kinetic energy space spectra. However, the random distribution of measurements in space and time presents some problems for the spectral analysis. Two different approaches are used, i.e., a harmonic analysis of daily wind values at equi-distant points obtained by space-time interpolation of the data, and a correlation method using the direct measurements. Both methods give similar results for small wavenumbers, but the second is more accurate for higher wavenumbers (k above or equal to 10). The spectra show a maximum at wavenumbers 5 and 6 due to baroclinic instability and then decrease for high wavenumbers up to wavenumber 35 (which is the limit of the analysis), according to the inverse power law k to the negative p, with p close to 3.

  16. High burnup fuel onset conditions in dry storage. Prediction of EOL rod internal pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L.E.

    2015-07-01

    During dry storage, cladding resistance to failure can be affected by several degrading mechanisms like creep or hydrides radial reorientation. The driving force of these effects is the stress at which the cladding is submitted. The maximum stress in the cladding is determined by the end-of-reactor-life (EOL) rod internal pressure, PEOL, at the maximum temperature attained during dry storage. Thus, PEOL sets the initial conditions of storage for potential time-dependent changes in the cladding. Based on FRAPCON-3.5 calculations, the aim of this work is to analyse the PEOL of a PWR fuel rod irradiated to burnups greater than 60 GWd/tU, where limited information is available. In order to be conservative, demanding irradiation histories have been used with a peak linear power of 44 kW/m. FRAPCON-3.5 results show an increasing exponential trend of PEOL with burnup, from which a simple correlation has been derived. The comparison with experimental data found in the literature confirms the enveloping nature of the predicted curve. Based on that, a conservative prediction of cladding stress in dry storage has been obtained. The comparison with a critical stress threshold related to hydrides embrittlement seems to point out that this issue should not be a concern at burnups below 65 GWd/tU. (Author)

  17. Membrane receptor-mediated apoptosis and caspase activation in the differentiated EoL-1 eosinophilic cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rabia, Mohammed W; Blaylock, Morgan G; Sexton, Darren W; Walsh, Garry M

    2004-06-01

    Caspases are key molecules in the control of apoptosis, but relatively little is known about their contribution to eosinophil apoptosis. We examined caspase-3, -8, and -9 activities in receptor ligation-dependent apoptosis induction in the differentiated human eosinophilic cell line EoL-1. Differentiated EoL-1 exhibited bi-lobed nuclei, eosinophil-associated membrane receptors, and basic granule proteins. Annexin-V fluorescein isothiocyanate binding to EoL-1 revealed significant (PEoL-1 but had no effect on constitutive (baseline) apoptosis at 16 and 20 h. Caspase activity was analyzed using the novel CaspaTag trade mark technique and flow cytometry. EoL-1 treated with pan-CD45, CD45RA, CD45RB, and CD95 mAb exhibited caspase-3 and -9 activation at 12 h post-treatment, which increased at 16 and 20 h. Activated caspase-8 was detected 12 and 16 h after ligation with CD45, CD45RA, CD45RB, and CD95 mAb followed by a trend toward basal levels at 20 h. CD69 ligation resulted in caspase-3 activation, a modest but significant activation of caspase-8, and a loss in mitochondrial transmembrane potential but had no significant effect on activation of caspase-9. Thus, the intrinsic and extrinsic caspase pathways are involved in controlling receptor ligation-mediated apoptosis induction in human eosinophils, findings that may aid the development of a more targeted, anti-inflammatory therapy for asthma.

  18. Preparing Health Care Processes for IT Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walley, Paul; Laursen, Martin Lindgård

    2005-01-01

    effectiveness and efficiency of the system. Using data from two countries and involving 200 hospitals, the paper addresses the current state of determinacy of processes and explores the potential route towards standardisation. We hypothesise that management paradigms such as “lean thinking...

  19. Trends in Advance Care Planning in Patients With Cancer: Results From a National Longitudinal Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Amol K; Wright, Alexi A; Nicholas, Lauren H

    2015-08-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) may prevent end-of-life (EOL) care that is nonbeneficial and discordant with patient wishes. Despite long-standing recognition of the merits of ACP in oncology, it is unclear whether participation in ACP by patients with cancer has increased over time. To characterize trends in durable power of attorney (DPOA) assignment, living will creation, and participation in discussions of EOL care preferences and to explore associations between ACP subtypes and EOL treatment intensity as reflected in EOL care decisions and terminal hospitalizations. We analyzed prospectively collected survey data from 1985 next-of-kin surrogates of Health and Retirement Study (HRS) participants with cancer who died between 2000 and 2012, including data from in-depth "exit" interviews conducted with the surrogates after the participant's death. The HRS is a nationally representative, biennial, longitudinal panel study of US residents older than 50 years. Trends in ACP subtypes were tested, and multivariable logistic regression models examined for associations between ACP subtypes and measures of treatment intensity. Trends in the surrogate-reported frequency of DPOA assignment, living will creation, and participation in discussions of EOL care preferences; associations between ACP subtypes and both surrogate-reported EOL care decisions and terminal hospitalizations. From 2000 to 2012, there was an increase in DPOA assignment (52% to 74%, P = .03), without significant change in use of living wills (49% to 40%, P = .63) or EOL discussions (68% to 60%, P = .62). Surrogate reports that patients received "all care possible" at EOL increased during the period (7% to 58%, P = .004), and rates of terminal hospitalizations were unchanged (29% to 27%, P = .70). Limiting or withholding treatment was associated with living wills (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.51; 95% CI, 1.53-4.11; P EOL discussions (AOR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.53-3.14; P = .002) but not with

  20. Trisubstituted purine inhibitors of PDGFRα and their antileukemic activity in the human eosinophilic cell line EOL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malínková, Veronika; Řezníčková, Eva; Jorda, Radek; Gucký, Tomáš; Kryštof, Vladimír

    2017-12-15

    Inhibition of protein kinases is a validated concept for pharmacological intervention in cancers. Many kinase inhibitors have been approved for clinical use, but their practical application is often limited. Here, we describe a collection of 23 novel 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine derivatives with nanomolar inhibitory activities against PDGFRα, a receptor tyrosine kinase often found constitutively activated in various tumours. The compounds demonstrated strong and selective cytotoxicity in the human eosinophilic leukemia cell line EOL-1, whereas several other cell lines were substantially less sensitive. The cytotoxicity in EOL-1, which is known to express the FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene encoding an oncogenic kinase, correlated significantly with PDGFRα inhibition. EOL-1 cells treated with the compounds also exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of PDGFRα autophosphorylation and suppression of its downstream signaling pathways with concomitant G 1 phase arrest, confirming the proposed mechanism of action. Our results show that substituted purines can be used as platforms for preparing tyrosine kinase inhibitors with specific activity towards eosinophilic leukemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Advance care planning in CKD/ESRD: an evolving process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Jean L

    2012-06-01

    Advance care planning was historically considered to be simply the completion of a proxy (health care surrogate designation) or instruction (living will) directive that resulted from a conversation between a patient and his or her physician. We now know that advance care planning is a much more comprehensive and dynamic patient-centered process used by patients and families to strengthen relationships, achieve control over medical care, prepare for death, and clarify goals of care. Some advance directives, notably designated health care proxy documents, remain appropriate expressions of advance care planning. Moreover, although physician orders, such as do-not-resuscitate orders and Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment, may not be strictly defined as advance directives, their completion, when appropriate, is an integral component of advance care planning. The changing health circumstances and illness trajectory characteristic of ESRD mandate that advance care planning discussions adapt to a patient's situation and therefore must be readdressed at appropriate times and intervals. The options of withholding and withdrawing dialysis add ESRD-specific issues to advance care planning in this population and are events each nephrologist will at some time confront. Advance care planning is important throughout the spectrum of ESRD and is a part of nephrology practice that can be rewarding to nephrologists and beneficial to patients and their families.

  2. The european primary care monitor: structure, process and outcome indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Andrew

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scientific research has provided evidence on benefits of well developed primary care systems. The relevance of some of this research for the European situation is limited. There is currently a lack of up to date comprehensive and comparable information on variation in development of primary care, and a lack of knowledge of structures and strategies conducive to strengthening primary care in Europe. The EC funded project Primary Health Care Activity Monitor for Europe (PHAMEU aims to fill this gap by developing a Primary Care Monitoring System (PC Monitor for application in 31 European countries. This article describes the development of the indicators of the PC Monitor, which will make it possible to create an alternative model for holistic analyses of primary care. Methods A systematic review of the primary care literature published between 2003 and July 2008 was carried out. This resulted in an overview of: (1 the dimensions of primary care and their relevance to outcomes at (primary health system level; (2 essential features per dimension; (3 applied indicators to measure the features of primary care dimensions. The indicators were evaluated by the project team against criteria of relevance, precision, flexibility, and discriminating power. The resulting indicator set was evaluated on its suitability for Europe-wide comparison of primary care systems by a panel of primary care experts from various European countries (representing a variety of primary care systems. Results The developed PC Monitor approaches primary care in Europe as a multidimensional concept. It describes the key dimensions of primary care systems at three levels: structure, process, and outcome level. On structure level, it includes indicators for governance, economic conditions, and workforce development. On process level, indicators describe access, comprehensiveness, continuity, and coordination of primary care services. On outcome level, indicators

  3. Nursing Home Physicians' Assessments of Barriers and Strategies for End-of-Life Care in Norway and The Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosse, Anette; Zuidema, Sytse; Boersma, Froukje

    2017-01-01

    of patients’ family, pain- and symptom assessment protocols, EOL care guidelines, routines for advance care planning, and education in EOL care for physicians and nursing staff. Conclusions: Inadequate staffing levels, as well as lack of competence, time, and interest emerge as important barriers to quality...... physicians usually work part time in NHs. Thus, we aimed at assessing and comparing NH physicians’ perspectives on barriers and strategies for providing EOL care in NHs in Norway and in The Netherlands. Design: A cross-sectional study using an electronic questionnaire was conducted in 2015. Setting...... physicians’ perceptions of organizational, educational, financial, legal, and personal prerequisites for quality EOL care. Differences between the countries were compared using χ2 test and t-test. Results: Most respondents in both countries reported inadequate staffing, lack of skills among nursing personnel...

  4. Measuring health care process quality with software quality measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Ozkan; Demirörs, Onur

    2012-01-01

    Existing quality models focus on some specific diseases, clinics or clinical areas. Although they contain structure, process, or output type measures, there is no model which measures quality of health care processes comprehensively. In addition, due to the not measured overall process quality, hospitals cannot compare quality of processes internally and externally. To bring a solution to above problems, a new model is developed from software quality measures. We have adopted the ISO/IEC 9126 software quality standard for health care processes. Then, JCIAS (Joint Commission International Accreditation Standards for Hospitals) measurable elements were added to model scope for unifying functional requirements. Assessment (diagnosing) process measurement results are provided in this paper. After the application, it was concluded that the model determines weak and strong aspects of the processes, gives a more detailed picture for the process quality, and provides quantifiable information to hospitals to compare their processes with multiple organizations.

  5. Caring Decisions: The Development of a Written Resource for Parents Facing End-of-Life Decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Xafis, Vicki; Gillam, Lynn; Hynson, Jenny; Sullivan, Jane; Cossich, Mary; Wilkinson, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Background: Written resources in adult intensive care have been shown to benefit families facing end of life (EoL) decisions. There are few resources for parents making EoL decisions for their child and no existing resources addressing ethical issues. TheCaring Decisionshandbook and website were developed to fill these gaps. Aim: We discuss the development of the resources, modification after reviewer feedback and findings from initial pilot implementation. Design: A targeted...

  6. Practice and Perceived Importance of Advance Care Planning and Difficulties in Providing Palliative Care in Geriatric Health Service Facilities in Japan: A Nationwide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoya, Shoji; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Maeno, Takami

    2018-03-01

    The provision of end-of-life (EOL) care by geriatric health service facilities (GHSFs) in Japan is increasing. Advance care planning (ACP) is one of the most important issues to provide quality EOL care. This study aimed to clarify the practice and perceived importance of ACP and the difficulties in providing palliative care in GHSFs. A self-report questionnaire was mailed to head nurses at 3437 GHSFs nationwide. We asked participants about their practices regarding ACP, their recognition of its importance, and their difficulties in providing palliative care. We also analyzed the relationship between these factors and EOL care education. Among 844 respondents (24.5% response rate), approximately 69% to 81% of head nurses confirmed that GHSF residents and their families understood disease conditions and goals of care. There was a large discrepancy between the actual practice of ACP components and the recognition of their importance (eg, asking residents about existing advance directive [AD; 27.5% practiced it, while 79.6% considered it important]; recommending completion of an AD [18.1% vs 68.4%], and asking for designation of a health-care proxy [30.4% vs 76.8%]). The EOL care education was provided at 517 facilities (61.3%). Head nurses working at EOL care education-providing GHSFs practiced ACP significantly more frequently and had significantly fewer difficulties in providing palliative care. A large discrepancy was found between GHSF nurses' practice of ACP and their recognition of its importance. Providing EOL care education in GHSFs may increase ACP practices and enhance respect for resident's preferences concerning EOL care.

  7. Systems and processes that ensure high quality care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Sally; Westmore, Kathryn

    2012-10-01

    This is the second in a series of articles examining the components of good corporate governance. It considers how the structures and processes for quality governance can affect an organisation's ability to be assured about the quality of care. Complex information systems and procedures can lead to poor quality care, but sound structures and processes alone are insufficient to ensure good governance, and behavioural factors play a significant part in making sure that staff are enabled to provide good quality care. The next article in this series looks at how the information reporting of an organisation can affect its governance.

  8. Strategic Review Process for an Accountable Care Organization and Emerging Accountable Care Best Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Sarah J; Himmelrich, Sarah; Feeser, Scott A; Flynn, John A; Kravet, Steven J; Bailey, Jennifer; Hebert, Lindsay C; Donovan, Susan H; Kachur, Sarah G; Brown, Patricia M C; Baumgartner, William A; Berkowitz, Scott A

    2018-02-02

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), like other care entities, must be strategic about which initiatives they support in the quest for higher value. This article reviews the current strategic planning process for the Johns Hopkins Medicine Alliance for Patients (JMAP), a Medicare Shared Savings Program Track 1 ACO. It reviews the 3 focus areas for the 2017 strategic review process - (1) optimizing care coordination for complex, at-risk patients, (2) post-acute care, and (3) specialty care integration - reviewing cost savings and quality improvement opportunities, associated best practices from the literature, and opportunities to leverage and advance existing ACO and health system efforts in each area. It then reviews the ultimate selection of priorities for the coming year and early thoughts on implementation. After the robust review process, key stakeholders voted to select interventions targeted at care coordination, post-acute care, and specialty integration including Part B drug and imaging costs. The interventions selected incorporate a mixture of enhancing current ACO initiatives, working collaboratively and synergistically on other health system initiatives, and taking on new projects deemed targeted, cost-effective, and manageable in scope. The annual strategic review has been an essential and iterative process based on performance data and informed by the collective experience of other organizations. The process allows for an evidence-based strategic plan for the ACO in pursuit of the best care for patients.

  9. Processes of early stroke care and hospital costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Marie Louise; Ehlers, Lars H; Hundborg, Heidi H; Ingeman, Annette; Johnsen, Søren P

    2014-08-01

    The relationship between processes of early stroke care and hospital costs remains unclear. We therefore examined the association in a population based cohort study. We identified 5909 stroke patients who were admitted to stroke units in a Danish county between 2005 and 2010.The examined recommended processes of care included early admission to a stroke unit, early initiation of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, early computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) scan, early physiotherapy and occupational therapy, early assessment of nutritional risk, constipation risk and of swallowing function, early mobilization,early catheterization, and early thromboembolism prophylaxis.Hospital costs were assessed for each patient based on the number of days spent in different in-hospital facilities using local hospital charges. The mean costs of hospitalization were $23 352 (standard deviation 27 827). The relationship between receiving more relevant processes of early stroke care and lower hospital costs followed a dose–response relationship. The adjusted costs were $24 566 (95% confidence interval 19 364–29 769) lower for patients who received 75–100% of the relevant processes of care compared with patients receiving 0–24%. All processes of care were associated with potential cost savings, except for early catheterization and early thromboembolism prophylaxis. Early care in agreement with key guidelines recommendations for the management of patients with stroke may be associated with hospital savings.

  10. The process of implementation of emergency care units in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Gisele; Konder, Mariana Teixeira; Reciputti, Luciano Pereira; Lopes, Mônica Guimarães Macau; Agostinho, Danielle Fernandes; Alves, Gabriel Farias

    2017-12-11

    To analyze the process of implementation of emergency care units in Brazil. We have carried out a documentary analysis, with interviews with twenty-four state urgency coordinators and a panel of experts. We have analyzed issues related to policy background and trajectory, players involved in the implementation, expansion process, advances, limits, and implementation difficulties, and state coordination capacity. We have used the theoretical framework of the analysis of the strategic conduct of the Giddens theory of structuration. Emergency care units have been implemented after 2007, initially in the Southeast region, and 446 emergency care units were present in all Brazilian regions in 2016. Currently, 620 emergency care units are under construction, which indicates expectation of expansion. Federal funding was a strong driver for the implementation. The states have planned their emergency care units, but the existence of direct negotiation between municipalities and the Union has contributed with the significant number of emergency care units that have been built but that do not work. In relation to the urgency network, there is tension with the hospital because of the lack of beds in the country, which generates hospitalizations in the emergency care unit. The management of emergency care units is predominantly municipal, and most of the emergency care units are located outside the capitals and classified as Size III. The main challenges identified were: under-funding and difficulty in recruiting physicians. The emergency care unit has the merit of having technological resources and being architecturally differentiated, but it will only succeed within an urgency network. Federal induction has generated contradictory responses, since not all states consider the emergency care unit a priority. The strengthening of the state management has been identified as a challenge for the implementation of the urgency network.

  11. The process of implementation of emergency care units in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele O'Dwyer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the process of implementation of emergency care units in Brazil. METHODS We have carried out a documentary analysis, with interviews with twenty-four state urgency coordinators and a panel of experts. We have analyzed issues related to policy background and trajectory, players involved in the implementation, expansion process, advances, limits, and implementation difficulties, and state coordination capacity. We have used the theoretical framework of the analysis of the strategic conduct of the Giddens theory of structuration. RESULTS Emergency care units have been implemented after 2007, initially in the Southeast region, and 446 emergency care units were present in all Brazilian regions in 2016. Currently, 620 emergency care units are under construction, which indicates expectation of expansion. Federal funding was a strong driver for the implementation. The states have planned their emergency care units, but the existence of direct negotiation between municipalities and the Union has contributed with the significant number of emergency care units that have been built but that do not work. In relation to the urgency network, there is tension with the hospital because of the lack of beds in the country, which generates hospitalizations in the emergency care unit. The management of emergency care units is predominantly municipal, and most of the emergency care units are located outside the capitals and classified as Size III. The main challenges identified were: under-funding and difficulty in recruiting physicians. CONCLUSIONS The emergency care unit has the merit of having technological resources and being architecturally differentiated, but it will only succeed within an urgency network. Federal induction has generated contradictory responses, since not all states consider the emergency care unit a priority. The strengthening of the state management has been identified as a challenge for the implementation of the

  12. Culturally Relevant Palliative and End-of-Life Care for U.S. Indigenous Populations: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Mary J; Lynch, Anna R

    2018-03-01

    American Indians/Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) have higher rates of chronic illness and lack access to palliative/end-of-life (EOL) care. This integrative review ascertained the state of the science on culturally acceptable palliative/EOL care options for Indigenous persons in the United States. Databases searched: CINAHL, PubMed/MEDLINE, SocINDEX, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, ERIC, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, and EBSCO Discovery Service 1880s-Present. Key terms used: palliative care, EOL care, and AI/AN. peer-reviewed articles published in English. Findings/Results: Twenty-nine articles were identified, 17 remained that described culturally specific palliative/EOL care for AIs/ANs. Synthesis revealed four themes: Communication, Cultural Awareness/Sensitivity, Community Guidance for Palliative/EOL Care Programs, Barriers and two subthemes: Trust/Respect and Mistrust. Limitations are lack of research funding, geographic isolation, and stringent government requirements. Palliative/EOL care must draw on a different set of skills that honor care beyond cure provided in a culturally sensitive manner.

  13. Diagnosis of compliance of health care product processing in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Eugenia Roseira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: identify the compliance of health care product processing in Primary Health Care and assess possible differences in the compliance among the services characterized as Primary Health Care Service and Family Health Service. Method: quantitative, observational, descriptive and inferential study with the application of structure, process and outcome indicators of the health care product processing at ten services in an interior city of the State of São Paulo - Brazil. Results: for all indicators, the compliance indices were inferior to the ideal levels. No statistically significant difference was found in the indicators between the two types of services investigated. The health care product cleaning indicators obtained the lowest compliance index, while the indicator technical-operational resources for the preparation, conditioning, disinfection/sterilization, storage and distribution of health care products obtained the best index. Conclusion: the diagnosis of compliance of health care product processing at the services assessed indicates that the quality of the process is jeopardized, as no results close to ideal levels were obtained at any service. In addition, no statistically significant difference in these indicators was found between the two types of services studied.

  14. Documentation of pain care processes does not accurately reflect pain management delivered in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Erin E; Bair, Matthew J; Carey, Timothy S; Weinberger, Morris

    2010-03-01

    Researchers and quality improvement advocates sometimes use review of chart-documented pain care processes to assess the quality of pain management. Studies have found that primary care providers frequently fail to document pain assessment and management. To assess documentation of pain care processes in an academic primary care clinic and evaluate the validity of this documentation as a measure of pain care delivered. Prospective observational study. 237 adult patients at a university-affiliated internal medicine clinic who reported any pain in the last week. Immediately after a visit, we asked patients to report the pain treatment they received. Patients completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) to assess pain severity at baseline and 1 month later. We extracted documentation of pain care processes from the medical record and used kappa statistics to assess agreement between documentation and patient report of pain treatment. Using multivariable linear regression, we modeled whether documented or patient-reported pain care predicted change in pain at 1 month. Participants' mean age was 53.7 years, 66% were female, and 74% had chronic pain. Physicians documented pain assessment for 83% of visits. Patients reported receiving pain treatment more often (67%) than was documented by physicians (54%). Agreement between documentation and patient report was moderate for receiving a new pain medication (k = 0.50) and slight for receiving pain management advice (k = 0.13). In multivariable models, documentation of new pain treatment was not associated with change in pain (p = 0.134). In contrast, patient-reported receipt of new pain treatment predicted pain improvement (p = 0.005). Chart documentation underestimated pain care delivered, compared with patient report. Documented pain care processes had no relationship with pain outcomes at 1 month, but patient report of receiving care predicted clinically significant improvement. Chart review measures may not accurately

  15. Cultural safety as an ethic of care: a praxiological process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEldowney, Rose; Connor, Margaret J

    2011-10-01

    New writings broadening the construct of cultural safety, a construct initiated in Aotearoa New Zealand, are beginning to appear in the literature. Therefore, it is considered timely to integrate these writings and advance the construct into a new theoretical model. The new model reconfigures the constructs of cultural safety and cultural competence as an ethic of care informed by a postmodern perspective. Central to the new model are three interwoven, co-occurring components: an ethic of care, which unfolds within a praxiological process shaped by the context. Context is expanded through identifying the three concepts of relationality, generic competence, and collectivity, which are integral to each client-nurse encounter. The competence associated with cultural safety as an ethic of care is always in the process of development. Clients and nurses engage in a dialogue to establish the level of cultural safety achieved at given points in a care trajectory.

  16. Health care managers' views on and approaches to implementing models for improving care processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasson, Jörgen; Eriksson, Andrea; Dellve, Lotta

    2016-03-01

    To develop a deeper understanding of health-care managers' views on and approaches to the implementation of models for improving care processes. In health care, there are difficulties in implementing models for improving care processes that have been decided on by upper management. Leadership approaches to this implementation can affect the outcome. In-depth interviews with first- and second-line managers in Swedish hospitals were conducted and analysed using grounded theory. 'Coaching for participation' emerged as a central theme for managers in handling top-down initiated process development. The vertical approach in this coaching addresses how managers attempt to sustain unit integrity through adapting and translating orders from top management. The horizontal approach in the coaching refers to managers' strategies for motivating and engaging their employees in implementation work. Implementation models for improving care processes require a coaching leadership built on close manager-employee interaction, mindfulness regarding the pace of change at the unit level, managers with the competence to share responsibility with their teams and engaged employees with the competence to share responsibility for improving the care processes, and organisational structures that support process-oriented work. Implications for nursing management are the importance of giving nurse managers knowledge of change management. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Wound Care Center of Excellence: A Process for Continuous Monitoring and Improvement of Wound Care Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Raelina S; Kohan, Lauren S; Woods, Jon S; Criscitelli, Theresa; Gillette, Brian M; Donovan, Virginia; Gorenstein, Scott

    2018-05-01

    To provide information about a study using a new process for continuous monitoring to improve chronic wound care quality.This continuing education activity is intended for physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care.After completing this continuing education activity, you should be better able to:1. Recognize problems associated with chronic wound care.2. Identify methods used in this project to improve care.3. Illustrate the findings from this and similar projects and implications for providing improved wound care.Patients with chronic wounds require complex care because of comorbidities that can affect healing. Therefore, the goal of this project was to develop a system of reviewing all hospitalized patients seen by the study authors' wound care service on a weekly basis to decrease readmissions, morbidity, and mortality. Weekly multidisciplinary conferences were conducted to evaluate patient data and systematically assess for adherence to wound care protocols, as well as to create and modify patient care plans. This review of pathology and the performance of root-cause analyses often led to improved patient care.

  18. Method for modeling social care processes for national information exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Aki; Mykkänen, Juha; Laaksonen, Maarit

    2012-01-01

    Finnish social services include 21 service commissions of social welfare including Adoption counselling, Income support, Child welfare, Services for immigrants and Substance abuse care. This paper describes the method used for process modeling in the National project for IT in Social Services in Finland (Tikesos). The process modeling in the project aimed to support common national target state processes from the perspective of national electronic archive, increased interoperability between systems and electronic client documents. The process steps and other aspects of the method are presented. The method was developed, used and refined during the three years of process modeling in the national project.

  19. The role of business process reengineering in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, D

    1994-02-01

    Business process reengineering (BPR) is a management philosophy capturing attention in health care. It combines some new, old, and recycled management philosophies, and, more often than not, is yielding positive results. BPR's emphasis is on the streamlining of cross-functional processes to significantly reduce time and/or cost, increase revenue, improve quality and service, and reduce risk. Therefore, it has many applications in health care. This article provides an introduction to the concept of BPR, including the definition of BPR, its origin, its champions, and factors for its success.

  20. An Application of Business Process Management to Health Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohsen M D

    The purpose of this article is to help health care facility managers and personnel identify significant elements of their facilities to address, and steps and actions to follow, when applying business process management to them. The ABPMP (Association of Business Process Management Professionals) life-cycle model of business process management is adopted, and steps from Lean, business process reengineering, and Six Sigma, and actions from operations management are presented to implement it. Managers of health care facilities can find in business process management a more comprehensive approach to improving their facilities than Lean, Six Sigma, business process reengineering, and ad hoc approaches that does not conflict with them because many of their elements can be included under its umbrella. Furthermore, the suggested application of business process management can guide and relieve them from selecting among these approaches, as well as provide them with specific steps and actions that they can follow. This article fills a gap in the literature by presenting a much needed comprehensive application of business process management to health care facilities that has specific steps and actions for implementation.

  1. The Transformation Process in Nurses Caring for Dying Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Chi; Chen, Jih-Yuan; Chiang, Hsien-Hsien

    2016-06-01

    Despite the recent increase in attention to end-of-life hospice care, little empirical evidence regarding the process of emotional or mental transformation in caregivers is available. This study explores the transformative process that occurs in nurses because of the spiritual suffering and conflict associated with after caring for dying patients. A phenomenological approach was used to investigate eight nurses (27-40 years old) working in the hospice ward of a medical center in Taipei. Data were collected through open-ended questions using semistructured interviews and were analyzed reflectively. A three-stage transformation in the emotional processes of participants was observed. In the first stage, the participants experienced acute emotional suffering because of facing the death of their patients, potentially exacerbated by their own memories of losing family members. In the second stage, the participants adopted coping strategies to improve self-care. These strategies included attempting to soothe patients, helping patients face or deal with unfulfilled business, and participating in funeral or memorial services. In the third stage, the participants learned to provide better care through emancipatory reflection and a reassertion of responsibilities toward the self, patients, and patient families. After the third stage, the initial emotional impact morphed into a medium for self-strengthening, and participants became more adept at detecting patient needs and at providing care to complete the transformational process fully. Emotional suffering was the primary factor that induced participants to transform their personal and professional selves. Adequate emotional self-management, dialogue with other nurses, and personal reflection are crucial actions that nurses may use to cultivate personal growth, implement ethical practice, interact with other nurses, and engage in personal reflection. Strategies such as caring for patients, implementing reflective nursing

  2. Processing older persons as clients in elderly care: A study of the micro-processes of care management practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaison, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Elder care has undergone a marketization in recent years in which various models for care management have been introduced with the aim of making assessments efficient. This article investigates the effects the care management model has on resource allocation for home care when handling the requests of older persons in the needs assessment process. Sixteen tape-recorded assessment conversations with associated case-file texts were analyzed through discourse analysis. The results show that a managerialist thinking has had a partial impact on the assessment process where the documentation requirements have entailed bureaucratization in terms of the transfer that occurs from talk to text. The findings from the study nevertheless indicate that the assessment conversations have clear elements of an individual-centred perspective in which there is room for a care rational dialogue. This constitutes a welfare policy dilemma today. Providing for older people's requests should be on the basis of quality and an individual-centred perspective and care management has had a contrary effect in which focus is directed instead towards needs assessment and bureaucratic processes.

  3. The nursing process in crisis-oriented psychiatric home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, J; Dingemans, C A; Dassen, T W

    1997-08-01

    Crisis-oriented psychiatric home care is a recent development in the Dutch mental health care system. Because of the difference between psychiatric care in the home and in the hospital, an action research project was initiated. This project was directed at the nursing process and the nurses' role and skills in psychiatric home care. The main goal of the project was to describe and to standardize nursing diagnoses and interventions used in crisis-oriented and long-term psychiatric home care. The development of supporting methods of assessment and intervention were also important aspects of this project. In this article a crisis-oriented psychiatric home care programme and the first developmental research activities within this programme are described. To support the nursing process, the development of a nursing record and an assessment-format, based on Gordon's Functional Health Patterns (FHP), took place. By means of content analysis of 61 nursing records, the most frequently stated nursing diagnoses, based upon the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) taxonomy, were identified. The psychiatric diagnostic categories of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) were also collected. The most common categories found were those of mood disorders and schizophrenia or psychotic disorders. Seventy-five per cent of the nursing diagnoses showed up within four FHP: role-relationship, coping-stress tolerance, self-perception/self-concept and activity-exercise. The nursing diagnosis of 'ineffective individual coping' was stated most frequently. This is not surprising because of the similarities in the definitions of this nursing diagnosis and the concept of 'crisis' to which the psychiatric home care programme is oriented. Further research activities will be focused on standardization of nursing diagnosis and the interventions that nurses undertake in this type of care.

  4. [The process of professional qualification for the critical care nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Neuranides; Fernandes, Josicélia Dumêt

    2008-01-01

    Study of qualitative approach based on the dialectic historical materialism, that aimed at analizing the conformation of professional credentialing process of the critical care nurse of a hospital in Salvador, BA, Brazil. The subjects were 29 nurses. The analysis was based on the Analysis of Content, with the technique of Thematic Analysis, directed by the dialectic method. Three categories correlated to credentialing were generated: technological sophistication; individual and the collective organizational and as product and instrument of the work process. The results demonstrated that the institution estimulates the credentialing process; however the administrative politicies make it difficult the effectuation of the process of credentialing of the nurses.

  5. Anti-proliferative and differentiation-inducing activities of the green tea catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, H L; Ip, W K; Wong, C K; Mak, N K; Chen, Z Y; Leung, K N

    2002-12-06

    A novel approach for the treatment of leukemia is the differentiation therapy in which immature leukemia cells are induced to attain a mature phenotype when exposed to differentiation inducers, either alone or in combinations with other chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive drugs. Over the past decade, numerous studies indicated that green tea catechins (GTC) could suppress the growth and induce apoptosis on a number of human cancer cell lines. However, the differentiation-inducing activity of GTC on human tumors remains poorly understood. In the present study, the effect of the major GTC epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the proliferation and differentiation of a human eosinophilc leukemic cell line, EoL-1, was examined. Our results showed that EGCG suppressed the proliferation of the EoL-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, with an estimated IC(50) value of 31.5 microM. On the other hand, EGCG at a concentration of 40 microM could trigger the EoL-1 cells to undergo morphological differentiation into mature eosinophil-like cells. Using RT-PCR and flow cytometry, it was found that EGCG upregulated the gene and protein expression of two eosinophil-specific granule proteins, the major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), in EoL-1 cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that EGCG can exhibit anti-leukemic activity on a human eosinophilic cell line EoL-1 by suppressing the proliferation and by inducing the differentiation of the leukemia cells.

  6. Introducing an Image Processing Base Idea for Outdoor Children Caring

    OpenAIRE

    Hooman Jafarabadi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper application of artificial intelligence for baby and children caring is studied. Then a new idea for injury prevention and safety announcement is presented by using digital image processing. The paper presents the structure of the proposed system. The system determines the possibility of the dangers for children and babies in yards, gardens and swimming pools or etc. In the presented idea, multi camera System is used and receiver videos are processed to find ...

  7. A model for ageing-home-care service process improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Shu-Yan; Shie, An-Jin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an integrated model to improve service processes in ageing-home-care. According to the literature, existing service processes have potential service failures that affect service quality and efficacy. However, most previous studies have only focused on conceptual model development using New Service Development (NSD) and fail to provide a systematic model to analyse potential service failures and facilitate managers developing solutions to improve the se...

  8. Improving occupational health care for construction workers: a process evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, Julitta S.; van der Molen, Henk F.; Sluiter, Judith K.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the process of a job-specific workers' health surveillance (WHS) in improving occupational health care for construction workers. From January to July 2012 were 899 bricklayers and supervisors invited for the job-specific WHS at three locations of one occupational health service

  9. Staging Co-design Processes for Self-care Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Søsser Grith Kragh; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    field studies in people’s homes and discuss how to stage design processes with the people who are actually going to use the self-care technologies—not only end-users, but also many other actors, such as relatives, caregivers, and municipality and company staff. Specifically, we describe how challenges...

  10. Communication About Advance Directives and End-of-Life Care Options Among Internal Medicine Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ramona L.; Tindall, Kate; Xuan, Lei; Paulk, M. Elizabeth; Halm, Ethan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite increasing awareness about the importance of discussing end-of-life (EOL) care options with terminally ill patients and families, many physicians remain uncomfortable with these discussions. Objective The objective of the study was to examine perceptions of and comfort with EOL care discussions among a group of internal medicine residents and the extent to which comfort with these discussions has improved over time. Methods In 2013, internal medicine residents at a large academic medical center were asked to participate in an on-line survey that assessed their attitudes and experiences with discussing EOL care with terminally-ill patients. These results were compared to data from a similar survey residents in the same program completed in 2006. Results Eighty-three (50%) residents completed the 2013 survey. About half (52%) felt strongly that they were able to have open, honest discussions with patients and families, while 71% felt conflicted about whether CPR was in the patient’s best interest. About half (53%) felt strongly that it was okay for them to tell a patient/family member whether or not CPR was a good idea for them. Compared to 2006 respondents, the 2013 cohort felt they had more lectures about EOL communication, and had watched an attending have an EOL discussion more often. Conclusions Modest improvements were made over time in trainees’ exposure to EOL discussions; however, many residents remain uncomfortable and conflicted with having EOL care discussions with their patients. More effective training approaches in EOL communication are needed to train the next generation of internists. PMID:24418692

  11. Communication About Advance Directives and End-of-Life Care Options Among Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ramona L; Tindall, Kate; Xuan, Lei; Paulk, M Elizabeth; Halm, Ethan A

    2015-05-01

    Despite increasing awareness about the importance of discussing end-of-life (EOL) care options with terminally ill patients and families, many physicians remain uncomfortable with these discussions. The objective of the study was to examine perceptions of and comfort with EOL care discussions among a group of internal medicine residents and the extent to which comfort with these discussions has improved over time. In 2013, internal medicine residents at a large academic medical center were asked to participate in an on-line survey that assessed their attitudes and experiences with discussing EOL care with terminally-ill patients. These results were compared to data from a similar survey residents in the same program completed in 2006. Eighty-three (50%) residents completed the 2013 survey. About half (52%) felt strongly that they were able to have open, honest discussions with patients and families, while 71% felt conflicted about whether CPR was in the patient's best interest. About half (53%) felt strongly that it was okay for them to tell a patient/family member whether or not CPR was a good idea for them. Compared to 2006 respondents, the 2013 cohort felt they had more lectures about EOL communication, and had watched an attending have an EOL discussion more often. Modest improvements were made over time in trainees' exposure to EOL discussions; however, many residents remain uncomfortable and conflicted with having EOL care discussions with their patients. More effective training approaches in EOL communication are needed to train the next generation of internists. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Mapping the Asthma Care Process: Implications for Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, Alexandra Lelia; de Bruin, Marijn; Van Ganse, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Whether people with asthma gain and maintain control over their condition depends not only on the availability of effective drugs, but also on multiple patient and health care professional (HCP) behaviors. Research in asthma rarely considers how these behaviors interact with each other and drug effectiveness to determine health outcomes, which may limit real-life applicability of findings. The objective of this study was to develop a logic process model (Asthma Care Model; ACM) that explains how patient and HCP behaviors impact on the asthma care process. Within a European research project on asthma (ASTRO-LAB), we reviewed asthma care guidelines and empirical literature, and conducted qualitative interviews with patients and HCPs. Findings were discussed with the project team and respiratory care experts and integrated in a causal model. The model outlines a causal sequence of treatment events, from diagnosis and assessment to treatment prescription, drug exposure, and health outcomes. The relationships between these components are moderated by patient behaviors (medication adherence, symptom monitoring, managing triggers, and exacerbations) and HCP behaviors (medical care and self-management support). Modifiable and nonmodifiable behavioral determinants influence the behaviors of patients and HCPs. The model is dynamic as it includes feedback loops of behavioral and clinical outcomes, which influence future patient and HCP decision making. Key evidence for each relationship is summarized to derive research priorities and clinical recommendations. The ACM model is of interest to both researchers and practitioners, and intended as a first version (ACM-v1) of a common framework for generating and translating research evidence in asthma care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Exnovation of Chronic Care Management Processes by Physician Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Hector P; Henke, Rachel Mosher; Bibi, Salma; Ramsay, Patricia P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-09-01

    Policy Points The rate of adoption of chronic care management processes (CMPs) by physician organizations has been fairly slow in spite of demonstrated effectiveness of CMPs in improving outcomes of chronic care. Exnovation (ie, removal of innovations) by physician organizations largely explains the slow population-level increases in practice use of CMPs over time. Expanded health information technology functions may aid practices in retaining CMPs. Low provider reimbursement by Medicaid programs, however, may contribute to disinvestment in CMPs by physician organizations. Exnovation is the process of removal of innovations that are not effective in improving organizational performance, are too disruptive to routine operations, or do not fit well with the existing organizational strategy, incentives, structure, and/or culture. Exnovation may contribute to the low overall adoption of care management processes (CMPs) by US physician organizations over time. Three national surveys of US physician organizations, which included common questions about organizational characteristics, use of CMPs, and health information technology (HIT) capabilities for practices of all sizes, and Truven Health Insurance Coverage Estimates were integrated to assess organizational and market influences on the exnovation of CMPs in a longitudinal cohort of 1,048 physician organizations. CMPs included 5 strategies for each of 4 chronic conditions (diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure, and depression): registry use, nurse care management, patient reminders for preventive and care management services to prevent exacerbations of chronic illness, use of nonphysician clinicians to provide patient education, and quality of care feedback to physicians. Over one-third (34.1%) of physician organizations exnovated CMPs on net. Quality of care data feedback to physicians and patient reminders for recommended preventive and chronic care were discontinued by over one-third of exnovators, while nurse

  14. The Exnovation of Chronic Care Management Processes by Physician Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    HENKE, RACHEL MOSHER; BIBI, SALMA; RAMSAY, PATRICIA P.; SHORTELL, STEPHEN M.

    2016-01-01

    Policy Points The rate of adoption of chronic care management processes (CMPs) by physician organizations has been fairly slow in spite of demonstrated effectiveness of CMPs in improving outcomes of chronic care.Exnovation (ie, removal of innovations) by physician organizations largely explains the slow population‐level increases in practice use of CMPs over time.Expanded health information technology functions may aid practices in retaining CMPs. Low provider reimbursement by Medicaid programs, however, may contribute to disinvestment in CMPs by physician organizations. Context Exnovation is the process of removal of innovations that are not effective in improving organizational performance, are too disruptive to routine operations, or do not fit well with the existing organizational strategy, incentives, structure, and/or culture. Exnovation may contribute to the low overall adoption of care management processes (CMPs) by US physician organizations over time. Methods Three national surveys of US physician organizations, which included common questions about organizational characteristics, use of CMPs, and health information technology (HIT) capabilities for practices of all sizes, and Truven Health Insurance Coverage Estimates were integrated to assess organizational and market influences on the exnovation of CMPs in a longitudinal cohort of 1,048 physician organizations. CMPs included 5 strategies for each of 4 chronic conditions (diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure, and depression): registry use, nurse care management, patient reminders for preventive and care management services to prevent exacerbations of chronic illness, use of nonphysician clinicians to provide patient education, and quality of care feedback to physicians. Findings Over one‐third (34.1%) of physician organizations exnovated CMPs on net. Quality of care data feedback to physicians and patient reminders for recommended preventive and chronic care were discontinued by over one

  15. Collaboration process for integrated social and health care strategy implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, Jukka; Elfvengren, Kalle; Kaarna, Tanja; Tepponen, Merja; Tuominen, Markku

    2012-01-01

    To present a collaboration process for creating a roadmap for the implementation of a strategy for integrated health and social care. The developed collaboration process includes multiple phases and uses electronic group decision support system technology (GDSS). A case study done in the South Karelia District of Social and Health Services in Finland during 2010-2011. An expert panel of 13 participants was used in the planning process of the strategy implementation. The participants were interviewed and observed during the case study. As a practical result, a roadmap for integrated health and social care strategy implementation has been developed. The strategic roadmap includes detailed plans of several projects which are needed for successful integration strategy implementation. As an academic result, a collaboration process to create such a roadmap has been developed. The collaboration process and technology seem to suit the planning process well. The participants of the meetings were satisfied with the collaboration process and the GDSS technology. The strategic roadmap was accepted by the participants, which indicates satisfaction with the developed process.

  16. Collaboration process for integrated social and health care strategy implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Korpela

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective:  To present collaboration process for creating a roadmap for the implementation of a strategy for integrated health and social care. The developed collaboration process includes multiple phases and uses electronic group decision support system technology (GDSS.Method: A case study done in the South Karelia District of Social and Health Services in Finland during 2010 - 2011. An expert panel of 13 participants was used in the planning process of the strategy implementation. The participants were interviewed and observed during the case study.Results: As a practical result, a roadmap for integrated health and social care strategy implementation has been developed. The strategic roadmap includes detailed plans of several projects which are needed for successful integration strategy implementation. As an academic result, a collaboration process to create such a roadmap has been developed.Conclusions: The collaboration process and technology seem to suit the planning process well. The participants of the meetings were satisfied with the collaboration process and the GDSS technology. The strategic roadmap was accepted by the participants, which indicates satisfaction with the developed process.

  17. A tale of two audits: statistical process control for improving diabetes care in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hussein, Fahad Abdullah

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes constitutes a major burden of disease globally. Both primary and secondary prevention need to improve in order to face this challenge. Improving management of diabetes in primary care is therefore of fundamental importance. The objective of these series of audits was to find means of improving diabetes management in chronic disease mini-clinics in primary health care. In the process, we were able to study the effect and practical usefulness of different audit designs - those measuring clinical outcomes, process of care, or both. King Saud City Family and Community Medicine Centre, Saudi National Guard Health Affairs in Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia. Simple random samples of 30 files were selected every two weeks from a sampling frame of file numbers for all diabetes clients seen over the period. Information was transferred to a form, entered on the computer and an automated response was generated regarding the appropriateness of management, a criterion mutually agreed upon by care providers. The results were plotted on statistical process control charts, p charts, displayed for all employees. Data extraction, archiving, entry, analysis, plotting and design and preparation of p charts were managed by nursing staff specially trained for the purpose by physicians with relevant previous experience. Audit series with mixed outcome and process measures failed to detect any changes in the proportion of non-conforming cases over a period of one year. The process measures series, on the other hand, showed improvement in care corresponding to a reduction in the proportion non-conforming by 10% within a period of 3 months. Non-conformities dropped from a mean of 5.0 to 1.4 over the year (P process audits and feedbacks. Frequent process audits in the context of statistical process control should be supplemented with concurrent outcome audits, once or twice a year.

  18. Sterilization processes. Meeting the demands of today's health care technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, S

    1993-09-01

    Universal Precautions dictate sterilization for all invasive equipment that break the blood barrier; however, current methods of sterilization, such as steam and ethylene oxide gas (ETO), are not compatible with many of the delicate, heat-sensitive surgical instruments used in modern health care. In addition, traditional sterilization methods are often too time consuming for practical use in the operating room. Clearly, new sterilization processes need to be developed. In this article, the criteria modern sterilization processes must meet and how some manufacturers plan to meet this challenge are discussed. In addition, the pros and cons of using peracetic acid (the newest sterilization process currently available) are examined.

  19. All-trans-retinoic acid enhances apoptosis induction by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the eosinophilic leukemia-derived EoL-1 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Carine; Apàti, Agota; Chomienne, Christine; Papp, Béla

    2008-02-01

    Imatinib and retinoids induce apoptosis in FIP1L1/PDGFRalpha-positive EoL-1 leukemia cells. Although imatinib induces complete remission in most FIP1L1/PDGFRalpha-positive patients, response to imatinib is sometimes suboptimal. In order to enhance the potency of the molecularly targeted therapy of eosinophilic leukemia, we investigated the effect of retinoids combined with tyrosine kinase inhibitors on EoL-1 cells. We demonstrate that retinoids combined with tyrosine kinase inhibitors lead to enhanced apoptosis induction in EoL-1 cells. Our results suggest that tyrosine kinase inhibitors combined with retinoids may constitute a valuable therapeutic approach for sensitive neoplasias that may display enhanced anti-leukemic potency when compared to single drug treatments.

  20. [Improving the continuous care process in primary care during weekends and holidays: redesigning and FMEA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañada Dorado, A; Cárdenas Valladolid, J; Espejo Matorrales, F; García Ferradal, I; Sastre Páez, S; Vicente Martín, I

    2010-01-01

    To describe a project carried out in order to improve the process of Continuous Health Care (CHC) on Saturdays and bank holidays in Primary Care, area number 4, Madrid. The aim of this project was to guarantee a safe and error-free service to patients receiving home health care on weekends. The urgent need for improving CHC process was identified by the Risk Management Functional Unit (RMFU) of the area. In addition, some complaints had been received from the nurses involved in the process as well as from their patients. A SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis performed in 2009 highlighted a number of problems with the process. As a result, a project for improvement was drawn up, to be implemented in the following stages: 1. Redesigning and improving the existing process. 2. Application of failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) to the new process. 3. Follow up, managing and leading the project. 4. Nurse training. 5. Implementing the process in the whole area. 6. CHC nurse satisfaction surveys. After carrying out this project, the efficiency and level of automation improved considerably. Since implementation of the process enhancement measures, no complaints have been received from patients and surveys show that CHC nurse satisfaction has improved. By using FMEA, errors were given priority and enhancement steps were taken in order to: Inform professionals, back-up personnel and patients about the process. Improve the specialist follow-up report. Provide training in ulcer patient care. The process enhancement, and especially its automation, has resulted in a significant step forward toward achieving greater patient safety. FMEA was a useful tool, which helped in taking some important actions. Finally, CHC nurse satisfaction has clearly improved. Copyright © 2009 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Ethical implications and decision making in care education process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layse Kelle Silva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine ethical implications for nursing practice at the point of decision making by nursing professors in practice area. Methodology. A qualitative method was adopted, with use of semistructured interviews with sixteen nursing professors who delivered care at a teaching hospital in Salvador, Bahia, from May to June 2011. The methodological reference used was the discourse of the collective subject (DCS by Lefévre and Lefévre. Results. In response to DCSs, the following subjects appeared: "Ethics is fundamental and of vital importance in the decision making process," "searching for knowledge and research to identify problems and solutions, including alternatives and support for decisions," and "to act in the best way." Conclusion. Professors who provide education about patient care also delivered care. They have the responsibility to consider the ethical implications of decision making because they stimulate fundamental reflection and could positively influence future nursing professionals.

  2. The capital expenditure process for the health care supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, M M

    1993-12-01

    Competition for health care capital dollars has increased as third-party and government reimbursement decreases, patient volume decreases, and alternative services increase. Given this rationing situation, it is more important than ever that the health care supervisor carefully document and present a capital expenditure request. This request should outline skillfully the benefits and costs of undertaking a new service or replacing an old asset. A supervisor who can quantify the costs and benefits of a project and utilize one of the four common capital budgeting techniques: payback period, net present value, profitability index, or internal rate of return, will certainly be taking a step in the right direction for ensuring a serious evaluation of his or her proposal. This article attempts to explain this process using both narrative and quantitative examples.

  3. Please Ask Gently: Using Culturally Targeted Communication Strategies to Initiate End-of-Life Care Discussions With Older Chinese Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Han-Lin; Cataldo, Janine; Ho, Evelyn Y; Rehm, Roberta S

    2018-01-01

    Health-care providers (HCPs) find facilitating end-of-life (EOL) care discussions challenging, especially with patients whose ethnicities differ from their own. Currently, there is little guidance on how to initiate and facilitate such discussions with older Chinese Americans (≥55 years) and their families. To explore communication strategies for HCPs to initiate EOL care discussions with older Chinese Americans in the San Francisco Bay Area. This qualitative (focused) ethnographic study included field observations and individual semistructured interviews with 14 community-dwelling older Chinese Americans who lived independently at home, 9 adult children, and 7 HCPs. Responses were analyzed using open coding, memos, and comparison across participants. The study participants emphasized the importance of assessing readiness for early EOL care discussions. All recommended using indirect communication approaches to determine older Chinese Americans' readiness. Indirect communication can be culturally targeted and applied at both system-wide (ie, health-care system) and individual (ie, HCP) levels. To institutionalize the practice, health-care facilities should implement EOL care discussion inquiries as part of routine during check-in or intake questionnaires. In individual practice, using depersonalized communication strategies to initiate the discussion was recommended to determine older Chinese Americans' readiness. Assessing readiness should be an essential and necessary action for early EOL care discussions. Culturally targeted assessment of older Chinese Americans includes using indirect communication approaches to initiate an EOL care discussion to determine their readiness. In addition to health-care system integration, providers should implement and evaluate proposed EOL discussion initiation prompts with their older Chinese American patients.

  4. Exploring Health Care Providers' Views About Initiating End-of-Life Care Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedjat-Haiem, Frances R; Carrion, Iraida V; Gonzalez, Krystana; Ell, Kathleen; Thompson, Beti; Mishra, Shiraz I

    2017-05-01

    Numerous factors impede effective and timely end-of-life (EOL) care communication. These factors include delays in communication until patients are seriously ill and/or close to death. Gaps in patient-provider communication negatively affect advance care planning and limit referrals to palliative and hospice care. Confusion about the roles of various health care providers also limits communication, especially when providers do not coordinate care with other health care providers in various disciplines. Although providers receive education regarding EOL communication and care coordination, little is known about the roles of all health care providers, including nonphysician support staff working with physicians to discuss the possibility of dying and help patients prepare for death. This study explores the perspectives of physicians, nurses, social workers, and chaplains on engaging seriously ill patients and families in EOL care communication. Qualitative data were from 79 (medical and nonmedical) providers practicing at 2 medical centers in Central Los Angeles. Three themes that describe providers' perceptions of their roles and responsibility in talking with seriously ill patients emerged: (1) providers' roles for engaging in EOL discussions, (2) responsibility of physicians for initiating and leading discussions, and (3) need for team co-management patient care. Providers highlighted the importance of beginning discussions early by having physicians lead them, specifically due to their medical training and need to clarify medical information regarding patients' prognosis. Although physicians are a vital part of leading EOL communication, and are at the center of communication of medical information, an interdisciplinary approach that involves nurses, social workers, and chaplains could significantly improve patient care.

  5. The process of care in integrative health care settings - a qualitative study of US practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Suzanne J; Bensoussan, Alan

    2014-10-23

    There is a lack of research on the organisational operations of integrative healthcare (IHC) practices. IHC is a therapeutic strategy integrating conventional and complementary medicine in a shared context to administer individualized treatment. To better understand the process of care in IHC - the way in which patients are triaged and treatment plans are constructed, interviews were conducted with integrative health care leaders and practitioners in the US. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a pragmatic group of fourteen leaders and practitioners from nine different IHC settings. All interviews were conducted face-to-face with the exception of one phone interview. Questions focussed on understanding the "process of care" in an integrative healthcare setting. Deductive categories were formed from the aims of the study, focusing on: organisational structure, processes of care (subcategories: patient intake, treatment and charting, use of guidelines or protocols), prevalent diseases or conditions treated, and the role of research in the organisation. The similarities and differences of the ITH entities emerged from this process. On an organisational level, conventional and CM services and therapies were co-located in all nine settings. For patients, this means there is more opportunity for 'seamless care'. Shared information systems enabled easy communication using internal messaging or email systems, and shared patient intake information. But beyond this infrastructure alignment for integrative health care was less supported. There were no use of protocols or guidelines within any centre, no patient monitoring mechanism beyond that which occurred within one-on-one appointments. Joint planning for a patient treatment was typically ad hoc through informal mechanisms. Additional duties typically come at a direct financial cost to fee-for-service practitioners. In contrast, service delivery and the process of care within hospital inpatient services followed

  6. Participative Facility Planning for Obstetrical and Neonatal Care Processes: Beginning of Life Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jori Reijula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Old hospitals may promote inefficient patient care processes and safety. A new, functionally planned hospital presents a chance to create an environment that supports streamlined, patient-centered healthcare processes and adapts to users’ needs. This study depicts the phases of a facility planning project for pregnant women and newborn care processes (beginning of life process at Turku University Hospital. Materials and Methods. Project design reports and meeting documents were utilized to assess the beginning of life process as well as the work processes of the Women’s and Children’s Hospital. Results. The main elements of the facility design (FD project included rigorous preparation for the FD phase, functional planning throughout the FD process, and setting key values: (1 family-centered care, (2 Lean thinking and Lean tools as the framework for the FD process, (3 safety, and (4 cooperation. Conclusions. A well-prepared FD project with sufficient insight into functional planning, Lean thinking, and user-centricity seemed to facilitate the actual FD process. Although challenges occurred, the key values were not forgone and were successfully incorporated into the new hospital building.

  7. Improving quality in Medicaid: the use of care management processes for chronic illness and preventive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Diane R; Robinson, James C

    2006-01-01

    Care management processes (CMPs), tools to improve the efficiency and quality of primary care delivery, are particularly important for low-income patients facing substantial barriers to care. To measure the adoption of CMPs by medical groups, Independent Practice Associations, community clinics, and hospital-based clinics in California's Medicaid program and the factors associated with CMP adoption. Telephone survey of every provider organization with at least 6 primary care physicians and at least 1 Medi-Cal HMO contract, Spring 2003. One hundred twenty-three organizations participated, accounting for 64% of provider organizations serving Medicaid managed care in California. We surveyed 30 measures of CMP use for asthma and diabetes, and for child and adolescent preventive services. The mean number of CMPs used by each organization was 4.5 for asthma and 4.9 for diabetes (of a possible 8). The mean number of CMPs for preventive services was 4.0 for children and 3.5 for adolescents (of a possible 7). Organizations with more extensive involvement in Medi-Cal managed care used more CMPs for chronic illness and preventive service. Community clinics and hospital-based clinics used more CMPs for asthma and diabetes than did Independent Practice Associations (IPAs), and profitable organizations used more CMPs for child and adolescent preventive services than did entities facing severe financial constraints. The use of CMPs by Medicaid HMOs and the presence of external (financial and nonfinancial) incentives for clinical performance were strongly associated with use of care management by provider organizations. Physician and provider organizations heavily involved in California's Medicaid program are extensively engaged in preventive and chronic care management programs.

  8. Electricity production from wind energy: world situation and the French program EOLE 2005; Production d'electricite par energie eolienne: situation dans le monde et programme francais EOLE 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Electricite de France [ed.] [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    2000-06-07

    The wind electricity world market shows at present an important development stage characterized by an annual increase rate of 20% to 30%. The total installed power in the world reached the value 7,200 MW in November 1997 and, according to forecasts, it could increase fivefold up to 2005. For France's high wind potential sites, namely the DOM-TOM and in Corsica, where the electricity production is more expensive than in inland France, this energy production mode approaches the threshold of competitiveness with other production means. The program EOLE 2005 (targeting 250 to 500 MW from wind turbines to be installed in France until 2005), launched in 1996 by EDF in collaboration with ADEME, on request of public authorities, is thought to implement this demand. The sections of the report are titled as following: - An energy used by man from long time ago; - Momentous developments of the wind power technology since eighties; - From wind turbines of some hundreds kW to 3 MW, based on robust technologies and newly devised methods; - Wind energy becomes equally interesting from economic viewpoint but for which applications?; - This option presents some drawbacks; - Which is the wind potential economically acceptable if the mentioned constraints are taken into account?; - The wind generators will be installed on sea near seashores; - An outstanding change in this field in France since 1996: the programme EOLE 2005; - 35 selected projects of 125,3 MW total power; - Future. The electricity production from wind energy seems promising particularly for the countries that have not resorted to either nuclear energy or hydropower options and which possess important wind resources.

  9. Staff perceptions of end-of-life care in the acute care setting: a New Zealand perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheward, Karen; Clark, Jean; Marshall, Bridget; Allan, Simon

    2011-05-01

    Understanding current end of life (EOL) care delivery in acute care is an important prerequisite to positively influencing practice, and published New Zealand (NZ) and international data are limited. Therefore, staff perceptions of EOL care in the hospital setting were investigated via survey. This article presents key findings. A total of 610 staff members in a 194-bed regional hospital were surveyed regarding their perceptions of EOL care, which yielded a response rate of 29% with 179 surveys returned. Respondents were from medical, nursing, and allied health staff working in medical, surgical, elder health, and a regional cancer treatment service. Responses to Likert scale statements regarding the Care of the dying, Communication, Teamwork, Documentation, Attitudes to death and dying in the workplace, and Barriers to the care of patients, their whānau (a NZ Māori word that refers to extended family or family group), and families frequently contrasted with additional and explanatory comments. The thematic analysis of written text identified five themes: The reality of care, The team dynamic, The direction of care, Knowledge and education, and Environmental and organizational factors. The quality and timeliness of EOL care was significantly influenced by the elements informing the themes and the pervasive nature and importance of communication. Meeting the needs of dying patients in acute care was complex but a significant priority for staff.

  10. Hospital marketing orientation and managed care processes: are they coordinated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K R; Thompson, J M; Patel, U B

    2001-01-01

    The hospital marketing function has been widely adopted as a way to learn about markets, attract sufficient resources, develop appropriate services, and communicate the availability of such goods to those who may be able to purchase such services. The structure, tasks, and effectiveness of the marketing function have been the subject of increased inquiry by researchers and practitioners alike. A specific understanding of hospital marketing in a growing managed care environment and the relationship between marketing and managed care processes in hospitals is a growing concern. Using Kotler and Clarke's framework for assessing marketing orientation, we examined the marketing orientation of hospitals in a single state at two points in time--1993 and 1999. Study findings show that the overall marketing orientation score decreased from 1993 to 1999 for the respondent hospitals. The five elements of the Kotler and Clarke definition of marketing orientation remained relatively stable, with slightly lower scores related to customer philosophy. In addition, we evaluated the degree to which selected managed care activities are carried out as part of its marketing function. A significant (p marketing function was evident from 1993 to 1999. With increasing numbers of managed care plan enrollees, hospitals are likely focusing on organizational buyers as important customers. In order to appeal to organizational buyers, hospital executives may be focusing more on clinical quality and cost efficiency in the production of services, which will improve a hospital's position with organizational buyers.

  11. Exploring traditional end-of-life beliefs, values, expectations, and practices among Chinese women living in England: Informing culturally safe care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Mei Lan; Malcoe, Lorraine Halinka; Sixsmith, Judith; Wong, Louise Yuen Ming; Callender, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    This study explores the end-of-life (EoL) beliefs, values, practices, and expectations of a select group of harder-to-reach Chinese women living in England. A cultural safety approach was undertaken to interpret 11 in-depth, semistructured interviews. Interviews were conducted in Mandarin and Cantonese. Transcripts were translated and back-translated by two researchers. Findings were analyzed using the technical analytical principles of grounded theory. The key themes generated from our analysis include: acculturation; differential beliefs and norms in providing care: family versus health services; language and communication; Eastern versus Western spiritual practices and beliefs; and dying, death, and the hereafter. End-of-life discussions can be part of an arduous, painful, and uncomfortable process, particularly for migrants living on the margins of society in a new cultural setting. For some Chinese people living in the United Kingdom, end-of-life care requires attention to acculturation, particularly Western versus Eastern beliefs on religion, spirituality, burial practices, and provision of care, and the availability of culturally specific care, all of which encompass issues related to gender. Stories of a purposive sample of Chinese women were viewed through a cultural safety lens to gain a deeper understanding of how social and cultural norms and expectations, in addition to the pressures of acculturation, impact gendered roles and responsibilities. The analysis revealed variations between/within Eastern and Western culture that resulted in pronounced, and oftentimes gendered, differences in EoL care expectations.

  12. Assessment of children coming into care: processes, pitfalls and partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Megan F; Saunders, Alison M; New, Brendan D; Williams, Catherine L; Stachurska, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Children in out-of-home care (OOHC) present with high levels of physical, developmental and emotional and behavioural difficulties, yet often fail to receive appropriate services. This article describes a joint health and welfare service specifically developed to provide comprehensive physical, developmental and mental health assessments to a cohort of children entering long-term care in one region of Sydney, New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Paediatric, allied health, dental and psychosocial assessments were co-ordinated from a single referral from the child's welfare case manager. Follow-up appointments were held 6-12 months later to assess the outcomes of recommendations. Physical, mental health and developmental difficulties in the children are reported, the implications for service requirements are presented and process blocks described. There is a need for a specific co-ordinating service to overcome the inherent fragmentation of this group (related both to transience and change in the welfare sector, and levels of comorbidity and chronicity in health presentations). Health and Welfare services must operate together, with an awareness of the processes and resource constraints in each sector, if they are to deliver sustainable and reliable health care to this vulnerable group.

  13. A Nationwide Survey of Quality of End-of-Life Cancer Care in Designated Cancer Centers, Inpatient Palliative Care Units, and Home Hospices in Japan: The J-HOPE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    End-of-life (EOL) cancer care in general hospitals and home care has not previously been evaluated in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate EOL cancer care from the perspective of bereaved family members in nationwide designated cancer centers, inpatient palliative care units (PCUs), and home hospices in Japan. We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, self-report questionnaire survey for bereaved family members of cancer patients in March 2008 for 56 designated cancer centers and in June 2007 for 100 PCUs and 14 home hospices. Outcomes were overall care satisfaction, structure and process of care (Care Evaluation Scale), and achievement of a good death (Good Death Inventory). In designated cancer centers, PCUs, and home hospices, 2794 (response rate 59%), 5312 (response rate 69%), and 292 (response rate 67%) bereaved family members participated, respectively. Mean scores for overall care satisfaction were high for all places of death, at 4.3 ± 1.2 for designated cancer centers, 5.0 ± 1.2 for PCUs, and 5.0 ± 1.0 for home hospices. Designated cancer centers showed significantly lower ratings than PCUs and home hospices for structure and process of care and achievement of a good death (P = 0.0001 each). Home hospices were rated significantly higher than PCUs for achievement of a good death (P = 0.0001). The main findings of this study were: (1) overall, bereaved family members were satisfied with end-of-life care in all three places of death; (2) designated cancer centers were inferior to PCUs and home hospices and had more room for improvement; and 3) home hospices were rated higher than PCUs for achieving a good death, although home hospices remain uncommon in Japan. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Opening end-of-life discussions: how to introduce Voicing My CHOiCES™, an advance care planning guide for adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadeh, Sima; Pao, Maryland; Wiener, Lori

    2015-06-01

    Each year, more than 11,000 adolescents and young adults (AYAs), aged 15-34, die from cancer and other life-threatening conditions. In order to facilitate the transition from curative to end-of-life (EoL) care, it is recommended that EoL discussions be routine, begin close to the time of diagnosis, and continue throughout the illness trajectory. However, due largely to discomfort with the topic of EoL and how to approach the conversation, healthcare providers have largely avoided these discussions. We conducted a two-phase study through the National Cancer Institute with AYAs living with cancer or pediatric HIV to assess AYA interest in EoL planning and to determine in which aspects of EoL planning AYAs wanted to participate. These results provided insight regarding what EoL concepts were important to AYAs, as well as preferences in terms of content, design, format, and style. The findings from this research led to the development of an age-appropriate advance care planning guide, Voicing My CHOiCES™. Voicing My CHOiCES™: An Advanced Care Planning Guide for AYA became available in November 2012. This manuscript provides guidelines on how to introduce and utilize an advance care planning guide for AYAs and discusses potential barriers. Successful use of Voicing My CHOiCES™ will depend on the comfort and skills of the healthcare provider. The present paper is intended to introduce the guide to providers who may utilize it as a resource in their practice, including physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplains, psychiatrists, and psychologists. We suggest guidelines on how to: incorporate EoL planning into the practice setting, identify timepoints at which a patient's goals of care are discussed, and address how to empower the patient and incorporate the family in EoL planning. Recommendations for introducing Voicing My CHOiCES™ and on how to work through each section alongside the patient are provided.

  15. Evaluation of Student Care Process in Urban and Rural Health Care Centers and Health House in Tabriz Using Tracer Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Kabiri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Tracer methodology is a novel evaluation method which its purpose is to provide an accurate assessment of systems and processes for the delivery of care, treatment, and services at a health care organization. This study aimed to assess student care process in Tabriz using Tracer methodology. Material and Methods : This cross-sectional study was conducted in autumn 1391. Population study consisted of all the students who were covered by Tabriz health care center and study sample included an urban health care center, a rural health care center, a health house, and two schools in urban and rural areas which were selected by simple sampling method. Also, all the complicated and problematic processes were chosen to be assessed. Data were collected by interviewing, observing, and surveying documents and were compared with current standards. Results : The results of this study declared the percentage of points that each target group gained from tracer evaluation in student care process was 77% in health house, 90% in rural health care center and 83% in urban health care center. Findings indicated that documentation was the main weak point. Conclusion : According to the results of this study, student care process is sufficient; despite the fact that there are some deficiencies in caring process, as it may be improved through appropriate strategies. Furthermore, tracer methodology seems to be a proper method to evaluate various levels of health care system. ​

  16. [Patients' opinions and expectations about the dialysis care process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, M A; Escudero, M J; Suess, A; March, J C; Ruiz, A; Danet, A

    2011-01-01

    To determine the experiences and needs of patients on dialysis, in order to identify critical points of the care process and develop proposals for improvement. Qualitative study using semistructured interviews with 22 patients on hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, from the Andalusian Health Service. Discourse analysis, using the SERVQUAL model. Triangulation of results. The diagnostic stage is described as the hardest moment as it requires acceptance of the disease. During hemodialysis, we see both positive adaptation and the perception of a diminished quality of life. The technique of peritoneal dialysis is evaluated positively, enabling greater independence, despite requiring more responsibility for self care. The contact with patients' organizations or the provision of a counseling service are valued as an aid in the process. With respect to different dimensions of the SERVQUAL model, human treatment and professional competence are valued. The critical points are lack of coordination, malfunctioning of transportation and lack of transparency in the management of waiting lists. Shortcomings in dealing with informal caregivers and the level of knowledge of professionals from areas other than Nephrology, also appear as deficiencies. The main proposals for improving the dialysis process are: attention to psychosocial aspects, the improvement of organizational aspects such as transport, and greater attention to informal caregivers.

  17. Guideline validation in multiple trauma care through business process modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Bilir, Hüseyin; Waydhas, Christian; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2003-07-01

    Clinical guidelines can improve the quality of care in multiple trauma. In our Department of Trauma Surgery a specific guideline is available paper-based as a set of flowcharts. This format is appropriate for the use by experienced physicians but insufficient for electronic support of learning, workflow and process optimization. A formal and logically consistent version represented with a standardized meta-model is necessary for automatic processing. In our project we transferred the paper-based into an electronic format and analyzed the structure with respect to formal errors. Several errors were detected in seven error categories. The errors were corrected to reach a formally and logically consistent process model. In a second step the clinical content of the guideline was revised interactively using a process-modeling tool. Our study reveals that guideline development should be assisted by process modeling tools, which check the content in comparison to a meta-model. The meta-model itself could support the domain experts in formulating their knowledge systematically. To assure sustainability of guideline development a representation independent of specific applications or specific provider is necessary. Then, clinical guidelines could be used for eLearning, process optimization and workflow management additionally.

  18. Apoptosis- and differentiation-inducing activities of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid isomer, on human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wai-Nam; Leung, Kwok-Nam

    2014-11-01

    Conjugated linolenic acids (CLNAs) are a group of naturally occurring positional and geometrical isomers of the C18 polyunsaturated essential fatty acid, linolenic acid (LNA), with three conjugated double bonds (C18:3). Although previous research has demonstrated the growth-inhibitory effects of CLNA on a wide variety of cancer cell lines in vitro, their action mechanisms and therapeutic potential on human myeloid leukemia cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, we found that jacaric acid (8Z,10E,12Z-octadecatrienoic acid), a CLNA isomer which is present in jacaranda seed oil, inhibited the in vitro growth of human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Mechanistic studies showed that jacaric acid triggered cell cycle arrest of EoL-1 cells at the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis of the EoL-1 cells, as measured by the Cell Death Detection ELISAPLUS kit, Annexin V assay and JC-1 dye staining. Notably, the jacaric acid-treated EoL-1 cells also underwent differentiation as revealed by morphological and phenotypic analysis. Collectively, our results demonstrated the capability of jacaric acid to inhibit the growth of EoL-1 cells in vitro through triggering cell cycle arrest and by inducing apoptosis and differentiation of the leukemia cells. Therefore, jacaric acid might be developed as a potential candidate for the treatment of certain forms of myeloid leukemia with minimal toxicity and few side effects.

  19. Detained and Dying: Ethical Issues Surrounding End-of-Life Care in Prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensland, Meredith; Sanders, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Prisons are increasingly being called upon to provide end-of-life (EOL) care within the restrictive correctional environment. Several relatively recent phenomena have brought medical ethics to the forefront of prison EOL care-including aging behind bars, a paradigm shift in prison culture, the increasing rate of in-prison deaths, and the corresponding prison hospice movement. This article examines prominent ethical issues that emerge for prison personnel who are tasked with providing care to terminally ill offenders by presenting three offender composite characters that exemplify dying offenders and emergent ethical issues surrounding their care. Identification and critical analysis of these ethical issues demonstrate the need for strong commitment to ethical practice and highlights specific issues for prisons to examine in their own EOL care practice.

  20. Residential aged care residents and components of end of life care in an Australian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Laurence Jee Peng; Crawford, Gregory Brian

    2018-06-09

    With ageing of Australians, the numbers of residential aged care (RAC) residents is rising. This places a spotlight on decisions about appropriate care for this population, including hospitalisation and end-of-life (EOL) care. The aim was to study a sample of RAC residents who attended and died in hospital, to quantify measurable components of EOL care so as to describe the extent of palliative care required. A retrospective case-note review of hospital records was conducted in Adelaide, Australia. Participants were 109 RAC residents who attended from July 2013 to June 2014 and died in hospital. Measurements were advance care planning, health care input from the RAC facilities to hospital and components of EOL care. Residents with and without advanced dementia were compared. Advance care directives (ACDs) were present from 11 to 50%, and advance care plans (ACPs) at 60%. There were more ACPs, resuscitation orders (for/against) and do-not-hospitalise orders in residents with advanced dementia than those without. General practitioner (GP) and extended care paramedic (ECP) input on decisions for hospital transfer were 30% and 1 %. Mean hospital stay to death was 5.2 days. For residents admitted under non-palliative care teams, specialist palliative care (SPC) was needed for phone advice in 5%, consultation in 45%, transfer to palliative care unit in 37%, and takeover by SPC team in 19%. Mean number of documented goals-of-care discussions with family/caregiver was 1.7. In the last 3 days of life, the mean daily number of doses of EOL medications was 4.2. Continuous subcutaneous infusion was commenced in 35%. Staff in RAC need to be adequately resourced to make complex decisions about whether to transfer to hospital. RAC nurses are mainly making these decisions as GP and ECP input were suboptimal. Ways to support nurses and optimise decision-making are needed. Advance care planning can be improved, especially documentation of EOL wishes and hospitalisation orders. By

  1. Optimizing enactment of nursing roles: redesigning care processes and structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson K

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Karen Jackson,1 Deborah E White,2 Jeanne Besner,1 Jill M Norris21Health Systems and Workforce Research Unit, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 2Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaBackground: Effective and efficient use of nursing human resources is critical. The Nursing Role Effectiveness Model conceptualizes nursing practice in terms of key clinical role accountabilities and has the potential to inform redesign efforts. The aims of this study were to develop, implement, and evaluate a job redesign intended to optimize the enactment of registered nurse (RN clinical role accountabilities.Methods: A job redesign was developed and implemented in a single medical patient care unit, the redesign unit. A mixed-methods design was used to evaluate the job redesign; a second medical patient care unit served as a control unit. Data from administrative databases, observations, interviews, and demographic surveys were collected pre-redesign (November 2005 and post-redesign (October 2007.Results: Several existing unit structures and processes (eg, model of care delivery influenced RNs' ability to optimally enact their role accountabilities. Redesign efforts were hampered by contextual issues, including organizational alignment, leadership, and timing. Overall, optimized enactment of RN role accountabilities and improvements to patient outcomes did not occur, yet this was predictable, given that the redesign was not successful. Although the results were disappointing, much was learned about job redesign.Conclusion: Potential exists to improve the utilization of nursing providers by situating nurses' work in a clinical role accountability framework and attending to a clear organizational vision and well-articulated strategic plan that is championed by leaders at all levels of the organization. Health care leaders require a clear understanding of nurses' role accountabilities, support in managing change, and

  2. [End-of-Life Care in Intensive Care Units: Nursing strategies of family involvement at the end of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyrol, Katharina; Fröhlich, Martin R; Piatti, Francesca; Imhof, Lorenz

    2018-06-01

    Background: Family members of people dying in the intensive care unit (ICU) are exposed to many stress factors and they often do not experience involvement in End-of-Life (EoL) situations. For example, they criticize a low degree of participation in patients care, delayed or incomplete information and lack of privacy. Even nursing staff is facing various obstacles in EoL situations in ICUs. Aim: This study investigates strategies used by ICU nursing staff in German-speaking Switzerland to increase family members participation in situations at the end of life. Method: Data was collected by conducting 12 semi-structured interviews using an approach based on Grounded Theory. A model was developed to explain nursing strategies for family involvement in EoL situations in the ICU. Conclusions: Nurses provide personal space and tranquillity for family members and allow them to be present at any time. Against this background, they support family members and enable them to say goodbye consciously to a loved one. Subsequent work should examine the effectiveness of the strategies described, particularly in terms of stress reactions displayed by family members in the aftermath of EoL situations. In practice, family members should be provided space for privacy. The entire healthcare team is recommended to identify and pursue common values and objectives. Moreover, intradisciplinary exchange and mentoring need to be encouraged. In order to prepare future nursing staff for EoL situations in the ICU, recognizing and promoting their educational skills is mandatory.

  3. [FMEA applied to the radiotherapy patient care process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyrieux, C; Garcia, R; Pourel, N; Mège, A; Bodez, V

    2012-10-01

    Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), is a risk analysis method used at the Radiotherapy Department of Institute Sainte-Catherine as part of a strategy seeking to continuously improve the quality and security of treatments. The method comprises several steps: definition of main processes; for each of them, description for every step of prescription, treatment preparation, treatment application; identification of the possible risks, their consequences, their origins; research of existing safety elements which may avoid these risks; grading of risks to assign a criticality score resulting in a numerical organisation of the risks. Finally, the impact of proposed corrective actions was then estimated by a new grading round. For each process studied, a detailed map of the risks was obtained, facilitating the identification of priority actions to be undertaken. For example, we obtain five steps in patient treatment planning with an unacceptable level of risk, 62 a level of moderate risk and 31 an acceptable level of risk. The FMEA method, used in the industrial domain and applied here to health care, is an effective tool for the management of risks in patient care. However, the time and training requirements necessary to implement this method should not be underestimated. Copyright © 2012 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. FMEA applied to the radiotherapy patient care process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyrieux, C.; Garcia, R.; Pourel, N.; Mege, A.; Bodez, V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), is a risk analysis method used at the Radiotherapy Department of Institute Sainte-Catherine as part of a strategy seeking to continuously improve the quality and security of treatments. Patients and methods. - The method comprises several steps: definition of main processes; for each of them, description for every step of prescription, treatment preparation, treatment application; identification of the possible risks, their consequences, their origins; research of existing safety elements which may avoid these risks; grading of risks to assign a criticality score resulting in a numerical organisation of the risks. Finally, the impact of proposed corrective actions was then estimated by a new grading round. Results. - For each process studied, a detailed map of the risks was obtained, facilitating the identification of priority actions to be undertaken. For example, we obtain five steps in patient treatment planning with an unacceptable level of risk, 62 a level of moderate risk and 31 an acceptable level of risk. Conclusion. - The FMEA method, used in the industrial domain and applied here to health care, is an effective tool for the management of risks in patient care. However, the time and training requirements necessary to implement this method should not be underestimated. (authors)

  5. [Primary care nurses' difficulties in advance care planning processes: A qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero-Moya, Nani; Frías-Osuna, Antonio; Barrio-Cantalejo, Inés M; Ramos-Morcillo, Antonio Jesús

    2016-12-01

    To know the primary care nurses' difficulties to promote advance care planning process with patients in the end of life. Phenomenological qualitative methodology. Health Management Area North of Jaén. Primary care nurses. Purposive sampling. Fourteen in-depth interviews were conducted until the speeches saturation. Content analysis in four steps: transcription, coding, obtaining results and conclusions verification. Supported whit the software Nvivo 8. Triangulation of results between researchers. Professionals' difficulties: Lack of knowledge about the topic, lack of communication skills, lack of experience and presence of negative emotions. In the health institution lack of time and interference with other professionals is a barrier. Also the patient's attitude and the family are identified as an obstacle because few people speak about the end of life. Finally, our society prevents open discussion about issues related to death. Professional learning about advanced care planning, training in communication skills and emotional education are necessary. Health managers should consider the fact that early interventions for planning health decisions require training, time and continued attention. If a cultural change does not happen, an evasive way to face the end of life will persist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. How to implement process-oriented care: a case study on the implementation of process-oriented in-hospital stroke care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L.; Oostenbrugge, R.J. van; Limburg, M.; Merode, G.G. van; Groothuis, S.

    2009-01-01

    Dutch hospitals are in the midst of a transition towards process-oriented organisation to realise optimal and undisturbed care processes. Between 2004 and 2007, the University Hospital of Maastricht conducted a case study implementing process-oriented in-hospital stroke unit care. The case study

  7. Death in the Digital Age: A Systematic Review of Information and Communication Technologies in End-of-Life Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostherr, Kirsten; Killoran, Peter; Shegog, Ross; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    End-of-life (EOL) communication plays a critical role in ensuring that patients receive care concordant with their wishes and experience high quality of life. As the baby boomer population ages, scalable models of end-of-life communication will be needed to ensure that patients receive appropriate care. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) may help address the needs of this generation; however, few resources exist to guide the use of ICTs in EOL care. The primary objective was to identify the ICTs being used in EOL communication. The secondary objective was to compare the effectiveness of different ICTs in EOL communication. The study was a systematic review, following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. We systematically searched seven databases for experimental and observational studies on EOL communication between doctors and patients using ICTs, published in 1997-2013. The review identified 38 relevant articles. Eleven types of technology were identified: video, website, telephone, videoconferencing, e-mail, telemonitoring, Internet search, compact disc, fax, PalmPilot, and short message service (SMS) text messaging. ICTs were most commonly used to provide information or education, serve as decision aids, promote advance care planning (ACP), and relieve physical symptom distress. The use of ICTs in EOL care is a small but growing field of research. Additional research is needed to adapt older, analog technologies for use in the digital age. Many of the interventions discussed in this review do not take full advantage of the affordances of mobile, connected health ICTs. The growing evidence base for e-health applications in related fields should guide future interventions in EOL care.

  8. Management and Stewardship of Airborne Observational Data for the NSF/NCAR HIAPER (GV) and NSF/NCAR C-130 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) provides the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) funding for the operation, maintenance and upgrade of two research aircraft: the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Gulfstream V and the NSF/NCAR Hercules C-130. A suite of in-situ and remote sensing airborne instruments housed at the EOL Research Aviation Facility (RAF) provide a basic set of measurements that are typically deployed on most airborne field campaigns. In addition, instruments to address more specific research requirements are provided by collaborating participants from universities, industry, NASA, NOAA or other agencies. The data collected are an important legacy of these field campaigns. A comprehensive metadata database and integrated cyber-infrastructure, along with a robust data workflow that begins during the field phase and extends to long-term archival (current aircraft data holdings go back to 1967), assures that: all data and associated software are safeguarded throughout the data handling process; community standards of practice for data stewardship and software version control are followed; simple and timely community access to collected data and associated software tools are provided; and the quality of the collected data is preserved, with the ultimate goal of supporting research and the reproducibility of published results. The components of this data system to be presented include: robust, searchable web access to data holdings; reliable, redundant data storage; web-based tools and scripts for efficient creation, maintenance and update of data holdings; access to supplemental data and documentation; storage of data in standardized data formats; comprehensive metadata collection; mature version control; human-discernable storage practices; and procedures to inform users of changes. In addition, lessons learned, shortcomings, and desired upgrades

  9. Administrators' perspectives on end-of-life care for cancer patients in Japanese long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukahori, Hiroki; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Akizuki, Nobuya; Akiyama, Miki; Shirahige, Yutaka; Eguchi, Kenji

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify administrators' perspectives on availability of recommended strategies for end-of-life (EOL) care for cancer patients at long-term care (LTC) facilities in Japan. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with administrators at Japanese LTC facilities. Participants were surveyed about their facilities, reasons for hospitalization of cancer patients, and their perspectives on availability of and strategies for EOL care. The 97 responses were divided into medical facility (n = 24) and non-medical facility (n = 73) groups according to physician availability. The most frequent reasons for hospitalization were a sudden change in patient's condition (49.4%), lack of around-the-clock care (43.0%), and inability to palliate symptoms (41.0%). About 50% of administrators believed their facilities could provide EOL care if supported by palliative care experts. There was no significant difference between facility types (P = 0.635). Most administrators (81.2%) regarded unstable cancer patients as difficult to care for. However, many (68.4%) regarded opioids given orally as easy to administer, but regarded continuous subcutaneous infusion/central venous nutrition as difficult. Almost all administrators believed the most useful strategy was transferring patients to hospitals at the request of patients or family members (96.9%), followed by consultation with palliative care experts (88.5%). Although LTC facilities in Japan currently do not provide adequate EOL care for cancer patients, improvement might be possible with support by palliative care teams. Appropriate models are necessary for achieving a good death for cancer patients. Interventions based on these models are necessary for EOL care for cancer patients in LTC facilities.

  10. Overcoming barriers in care for the dying: Theoretical analysis of an innovative program model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Cara L

    2016-08-01

    This article explores barriers to end-of-life (EOL) care (including development of a death denying culture, ongoing perceptions about EOL care, poor communication, delayed access, and benefit restrictions) through the theoretical lens of symbolic interactionism (SI), and applies general systems theory (GST) to a promising practice model appropriate for addressing these barriers. The Compassionate Care program is a practice model designed to bridge gaps in care for the dying and is one example of a program offering concurrent care, a recent focus of evaluation though the Affordable Care Act. Concurrent care involves offering curative care alongside palliative or hospice care. Additionally, the program offers comprehensive case management and online resources to enrollees in a national health plan (Spettell et al., 2009).SI and GST are compatible and interrelated theories that provide a relevant picture of barriers to end-of-life care and a practice model that might evoke change among multiple levels of systems. These theories promote insight into current challenges in EOL care, as well as point to areas of needed research and interventions to address them. The article concludes with implications for policy and practice, and discusses the important role of social work in impacting change within EOL care.

  11. December 7, 2000. General framework: the European and French contexts. Results of the Eole 2005 program: the lessons; 7 decembre 2000. Cadrage general: les contextes europeens et francais. Resultats du programme Eole 2005: les enseignements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bal, J.L.; Chabot, B. [Agence de l' Environnement et de la Maitrise de l' Energie, ADEME, 75 - Paris (France); Grandidier, J.Y. [Association de l' Energie Eolienne en France, 11 - Narbonne (France); Germa, Ph. [IENA Environnement, France (France); Argenson, A.; Dugue, Ch. [Cabinet GERMA, 34 - Montpellier (France); Fassi Fihri, M.A. [Office National de l' Electricite (Morocco); Wagner, A. [Enron Wind Corp. (Germany); Krogsgaard, P. [BTM Consult ApS, Ringkbing (Denmark); Gonzalvez, C.H. [Institute for Diversification and Energy Saving (IDAE), Madrid (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    This first day of conference was organized in two parts: the first part was devoted to a presentation of the French and European contexts of the development of wind power. After a general presentation of the aims of the colloquium, a round table was organized about the European context of development of wind energy with its application to France in the framework of the new organization of the electric power industry. Testimonies about the means used by governments for the sustain of wind energy development were presented with the examples of Spain and Germany. The second part of the day was devoted to the presentation of the results of the French wind energy program 'Eole 2005' and of the lessons gained: detailed presentation of the sustain program for a minimum of 5000 MW installed power in 2010, strategic analysis of the program (projects, R and D actions, companies), the economical workability of wind power projects (tariffs, point-of-view of French and European operators), the export development prospects for the 2000-2005 era and the main international markets at the 2005-2010 vista (examples of Denmark, Portugal and Morocco). (J.S.)

  12. Decision-making process in elderly care : an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Leenke; de Jong, Dirk Johan

    2015-01-01

    Current many changes are taking place in the elderly care: care is changing from supply-oriented to demand driven, problems have to be more serious than previously to get a placement in a nursing home, furthermore the demand for heavier care will increase due to ageing. The aim of this study is to

  13. Leukotriene D4 induces chemotaxis in human eosinophilc cell line, EoL-1 cells via CysLT1 receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaki, Hideaki; Kanaizumi, Etsuko; Himi, Tetsuo

    2017-11-01

    Numerous reports have shown that cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) contribute to tissue accumulation of eosinophils in allergic airway inflammation. To date, only a few studies have reported that CysLTs promote chemotactic activity of human eosinophils in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether CysLTs promote chemotaxis in the human eosinophilic cell line, EoL-1. EoL-1 cells were induced to differentiate into mature eosinophil-like cells via incubation with butyric acid and cytokines (IL-3, IL-5 and GM-CSF). The chemotactic activity of the differentiated EoL-1 cells was assessed using the commercial cell migration assay kit. LTD 4 elicited dose-related chemotactic activity in the differntiated EoL-1 cells in the range of 1-100 nM. A typical bell-shaped dose-response curve was observed with optimal activity at 10 nM. The chemotactic activity elicited by LTD 4 (10 nM) was significantly inhibited by montelukast (control, 345 ± 19.2 × 10 3 RFU; LTD 4 10 nM alone, 511 ± 39.2 × 10 3 RFU; LTD 4 10 nM plus montelukast 100 nM, 387 ± 28.2 × 10 3 RFU). LTD 4 induces migration in eosinophilic cells via activation of CysLT1 receptor. The present in vitro model may be useful for elucidation of the mechanism underlying CysLT-induced tissue eosinophilia.

  14. Mechanism for the decrease in the FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha protein level in EoL-1 cells by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kenji; Kaneko, Motoko; Kitamura, Hajime; Takahashi, Aki; Hong, Jang Ja; Seyama, Toshio; Iida, Koji; Wada, Hiroshi; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Ohuchi, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Acetylation and deacetylation of proteins occur in cells in response to various stimuli, and are reversibly catalyzed by histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase (HDAC), respectively. EoL-1 cells have an FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene that causes transformation of eosinophilic precursor cells into leukemia cells. The HDAC inhibitors apicidin and n-butyrate suppress the proliferation of EoL-1 cells and induce differentiation into eosinophils by a decrease in the protein level of FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha without affecting the mRNA level for FIP1L1-PDGFRA. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism by which the protein level of FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha is decreased by apicidin and n-butyrate. EoL-1 cells were incubated in the presence of the HDAC inhibitors apicidin, trichostatin A or n-butyrate. The protein levels of FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha and phosphorylated eIF-2alpha were determined by Western blotting. Actinomycin D and cycloheximide were used to block RNA synthesis and protein synthesis, respectively, in the chasing experiment of the amount of FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha protein. When apicidin- and n-butyrate-treated EoL-1 cells were incubated in the presence of actinomycin D, the decrease in the protein level of FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha was significantly enhanced when compared with controls. In contrast, the protein levels were not changed by cycloheximide among these groups. Apicidin and n-butyrate induced the continuous phosphorylation of eIF-2alpha for up to 8 days. The decrease in the level of FIP1L1-PDGFRalpha protein by continuous inhibition of HDAC may be due to the decrease in the translation rate of FIP1L1-PDGFRA. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Intensive procedure preferences at the end of life (EOL) in older Latino adults with end stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Karla; Ulloa, Jesus G; Moreno, Gerardo; Echeverría, Oscar; Norris, Keith; Talamantes, Efrain

    2017-10-23

    Latinos in the U.S. are almost twice as likely to progress to End Stage Renal disease (ESRD) compared to non-Latino whites. Patients with ESRD on dialysis experience high morbidity, pre-mature mortality and receive intensive procedures at the end of life (EOL). This study explores intensive procedure preferences at the EOL in older Latino adults. Seventy-three community-dwelling Spanish- and English-Speaking Latinos over the age of 60 with and without ESRD participated in this study. Those without ESRD (n = 47) participated in one of five focus group sessions, and those with ESRD on dialysis (n = 26) participated in one-on-one semi-structured interviews. Focus group and individual participants answered questions regarding intensive procedures at the EOL. Recurring themes were identified using standard qualitative content-analysis methods. Participants also completed a brief survey that included demographics, language preference, health insurance coverage, co-morbidities, Emergency Department visits and functional limitations. The majority of participants were of Mexican origin with mean age of 70, and there were more female participants in the non-ESRD group, compared to the ESRD dialysis dependent group. The dialysis group reported a higher number of co-morbidities and functional limitations. Nearly 69% of those in the dialysis group reported one or more emergency department visits in the past year, compared to 38% in the non-ESRD group. Primary themes centered on 1) The acceptability of a "natural" versus "invasive" procedure 2) Cultural traditions and family involvement 3) Level of trust in physicians and autonomy in decision-making. Our results highlight the need for improved patient- and family-centered approaches to better understand intensive procedure preferences at the EOL in this underserved population of older adults.

  16. Inuit interpreters engaged in end-of-life care in Nunavik, Northern Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordyk, Shawn Renee; Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Brassard, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Inuit interpreters are key players in end-of-life (EOL) care for Nunavik patients and families. This emotionally intensive work requires expertise in French, English and Inuit dialects to negotiate linguistic and cultural challenges. Cultural differences among medical institutions and Inuit communities can lead to value conflicts and moral dilemmas as interpreters navigate how best to transmit messages of care at EOL. Our goal was to understand the experience of Inuit interpreters in the context of EOL care in Nunavik in order to identify training needs. In the context of a larger ethnographic project on EOL care in Nunavik, we met with 24 current and former interpreters from local health centres and Montreal tertiary care contexts. Data included informal and formal interviews focusing on linguistic resources, experiences concerning EOL care, and suggestions for the development of interpretation training. Inuit working as interpreters in Nunavik are hired to provide multiple services of which interpretation plays only a part. Many have no formal training and have few resources (e.g. visual aids, dictionaries) to draw upon during medical consultations. Given the small size of communities, many interpreters personally know their clients and often feel overwhelmed by moral dilemmas when translating EOL information for patients and families. The concept of moral distress is a helpful lens to make sense of their experience, including personal and professional repercussions. Inuit interpreters in Nunavik are working with little training yet in context with multiple linguistic and cultural challenges. Linguistic and cultural resources and focused training on moral dilemmas unique to circumpolar contexts could contribute to improved work conditions and ultimately to patient care.​​​​.

  17. What do Japanese residents learn from treating dying patients? The implications for training in end-of-life care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Arai

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How medical residents’ experiences with care for dying patients affect their emotional well-being, their learning outcomes, and the formation of their professional identities is not fully understood. We examine residents’ emotional states and learning occurring during the provision of care to dying patients and specifically discuss the impact of providing end-of-life (EOL care on professional identity formation. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 residents who had graduated in the last 3 to 5 years. Thematic theoretical analysis was applied, and key themes were developed based on Kolb’s experiential learning cycle. Results Eight key themes emerged from the analysis. The residents experienced dilemmas in confronting the reality of medical uncertainty as well as a disruption of emotional state and self-efficacy. Although the residents felt a sense of helplessness and guilt, they were able to reflect on strategies for handling medical care that focused on patients and that required a truly sincere attitude. They also contemplated the importance of palliative care and communication with patients, patients’ family members and medical staff. Building on these experiences, the residents rebuilt a sense of awareness that allowed them to directly engage with the type of medical care that they are likely to be called upon to perform in the future as the population continues to age. Conclusions This study revealed Japanese residents’ perceptions, emotions and learning processes in caring for dying patients by applying Kolb’s experiential learning theory. The findings of this study may illuminate valuable pieces of knowledge for future education in EOL care.

  18. Care Management Processes Used Less Often For Depression Than For Other Chronic Conditions In US Primary Care Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Tara F; Ramsay, Patricia P; Casalino, Lawrence P; Bao, Yuhua; Pincus, Harold A; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-03-01

    Primary care physicians play an important role in the diagnosis and management of depression. Yet little is known about their use of care management processes for depression. Using national survey data for the period 2006-13, we assessed the use of five care management processes for depression and other chronic illnesses among primary care practices in the United States. We found significantly less use for depression than for asthma, congestive heart failure, or diabetes in 2012-13. On average, practices used fewer than one care management process for depression, and this level of use has not changed since 2006-07, regardless of practice size. In contrast, use of diabetes care management processes has increased significantly among larger practices. These findings may indicate that US primary care practices are not well equipped to manage depression as a chronic illness, despite the high proportion of depression care they provide. Policies that incentivize depression care management, including additional quality metrics, should be considered. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  19. Effect of benzo[a]pyrene on the production of vascular endothelial growth factor by human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jie; Chan, Lai-Sheung; Wong, Chris Kong-Chu; Wong, Ngok-Shun; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Leung, Kok-Nam; Mak, Naiki K

    2011-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) has been shown to affect both the development and response of T and B cells in the immune system. However, the effect of BaP on other immune cells, such as eosionophils, is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of BaP on the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) using an in vitro eosinophilic EoL-1 cell and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) co-culture system. EoL-1-conditioned medium was found to promote the growth of HUVEC in a time-dependent manner. The growth stimulating activity was due to the production of VEGF by the EoL-1 cells. The production of VEGF was correlated with the enhanced expression of the phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (p-ERKs) and the upregulated expression of VEGF mRNA. Furthermore, BaP-induced expression of VEGF mRNA was reduced by the ERK inhibitor PD98059. Results from this study suggested that BaP might affect the growth of endothelial cells through the modulation of VEGF production by eosinophils.

  20. Organizational capacities for 'residential care homes for the elderly' to provide culturally appropriate end-of-life care for Chinese elders and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Sui-Ting; Fang, Christine Meng-Sang; Lou, Vivian Weiqun

    2017-01-01

    Developing culturally appropriate end-of-life care for Chinese elderly and families is not an endemic challenge for Hong Kong, but that of the Western countries with a noticeable trend of rising Chinese population. The particular development of Hong Kong healthcare system, which is currently the major provider of end-of-life care, makes Hong Kong a fruitful case for understanding the confluence of the West and the East cultures in end-of-life care practices. This study therefore aims at building our best practice to enhance the capacity of residential care homes in providing culturally appropriate end-of-life care. We conducted two phases of research, a questionnaire survey and a qualitative study, which respectively aims at (1) understanding the EoL care service demand and provision in RCHEs, including death facts and perceived barriers and challenges in providing quality end-of-life care in care homes, and (2) identifying the necessary organizational capacities for the 'relational personhood' to be sustained in the process of ageing and dying in residential care homes. Findings shed light on how to empower residential care homes with necessary environmental, structural and cultural-resource-related capacity for providing quality end-of-life care for Chinese elders and their families. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diagnosis of compliance of health care product processing in Primary Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseira, Camila Eugenia; Silva, Darlyani Mariano da; Passos, Isis Pienta Batista Dias; Orlandi, Fabiana Souza; Padoveze, Maria Clara; Figueiredo, Rosely Moralez de

    2016-11-21

    identify the compliance of health care product processing in Primary Health Care and assess possible differences in the compliance among the services characterized as Primary Health Care Service and Family Health Service. quantitative, observational, descriptive and inferential study with the application of structure, process and outcome indicators of the health care product processing at ten services in an interior city of the State of São Paulo - Brazil. for all indicators, the compliance indices were inferior to the ideal levels. No statistically significant difference was found in the indicators between the two types of services investigated. The health care product cleaning indicators obtained the lowest compliance index, while the indicator technical-operational resources for the preparation, conditioning, disinfection/sterilization, storage and distribution of health care products obtained the best index. the diagnosis of compliance of health care product processing at the services assessed indicates that the quality of the process is jeopardized, as no results close to ideal levels were obtained at any service. In addition, no statistically significant difference in these indicators was found between the two types of services studied. identificar a conformidade do processamento de produtos para saúde na Atenção Primária à Saúde e avaliar possível diferença na conformidade entre as unidades caracterizadas como Unidade Básica de Saúde e Unidade Saúde da Família. estudo quantitativo, observacional, descritivo e inferencial, com a aplicação de indicadores de estrutura, processo e resultado referentes ao processamento de produtos para a saúde em dez unidades, de um município do interior de São Paulo - Brasil. todos os indicadores obtiveram índice de conformidade inferior ao ideal. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante nos indicadores entre os dois tipos de unidades investigadas, sendo o indicador de limpeza de produtos para sa

  2. Key elements of successful care process of patients with heart symptoms in an emergency care - could an ERP system help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontio, Elina; Korvenranta, Heikki; Lundgren-Laine, Heljä; Salanterä, Sanna

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify key elements of successful care process of patients with heart symptoms from the nursing management viewpoint in an emergency care. Through these descriptions, we aimed at identifying possibilities for using enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems to support decision making in emergency care. Hospitals are increasingly moving to process-based workings and at the same time new information system in healthcare are developed and therefore it is essential to understand the strengths and weaknesses of current processes better. A qualitative descriptive design using critical incident technique was employed. Critical Incidents were collected with an open-ended questionnaire. The sample (n=50), 13 head nurses and 37 registered nurses, was purposeful selected from three acute hospitals in southern Finland. The process of patients with heart symptoms in emergency care was described. We identified three competence categories where special focus should be placed to achieve successful process of patients with heart symptoms: process-oriented competencies, personal/management competencies and logistics oriented competencies. Improvement of decision making requires that the care processes are defined and modeled. The research showed that there are several happenings in emergency care where an ERP system could help and support decision making. These happenings can be categorized in two groups: 1) administrative related happenings and 2) patient processes related happenings.

  3. Leading processes of patient care and treatment in hierarchical healthcare organizations in Sweden--process managers' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Kerstin; Sandoff, Mette

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain better understanding of the roles and functions of process managers by describing Swedish process managers' experiences of leading processes involving patient care and treatment when working in a hierarchical health-care organization. This study is based on an explorative design. The data were gathered from interviews with 12 process managers at three Swedish hospitals. These data underwent qualitative and interpretative analysis with a modified editing style. The process managers' experiences of leading processes in a hierarchical health-care organization are described under three themes: having or not having a mandate, exposure to conflict situations and leading process development. The results indicate a need for clarity regarding process manager's responsibility and work content, which need to be communicated to all managers and staff involved in the patient care and treatment process, irrespective of department. There also needs to be an emphasis on realistic expectations and orientation of the goals that are an intrinsic part of the task of being a process manager. Generalizations from the results of the qualitative interview studies are limited, but a deeper understanding of the phenomenon was reached, which, in turn, can be transferred to similar settings. This study contributes qualitative descriptions of leading care and treatment processes in a functional, hierarchical health-care organization from process managers' experiences, a subject that has not been investigated earlier.

  4. 76 FR 35221 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; NINR End-of-Life and Palliative Care Science Needs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... Request; NINR End-of-Life and Palliative Care Science Needs Assessment: Funding Source Questionnaire... Collection: Title: NINR End-of-Life and Palliative Care Science Needs Assessment: Funding Source... Collection: The NINR End-of-Life Science Palliative Care (EOL PC) Needs Assessment: Funding Source...

  5. Improving occupational health care for construction workers: a process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschman, Julitta S; van der Molen, Henk F; Sluiter, Judith K; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2013-03-11

    To evaluate the process of a job-specific workers' health surveillance (WHS) in improving occupational health care for construction workers. From January to July 2012 were 899 bricklayers and supervisors invited for the job-specific WHS at three locations of one occupational health service throughout the Netherlands. The intervention aimed at detecting signs of work-related health problems, reduced work capacity and/or reduced work functioning. Measurements were obtained using a recruitment record and questionnaires at baseline and follow-up. The process evaluation included the following: reach (attendance rate), intervention dose delivered (provision of written recommendations and follow-up appointments), intervention dose received (intention to follow-up on advice directly after WHS and remembrance of advice three months later), and fidelity (protocol adherence). The workers scored their increase in knowledge from 0-10 with regard to health status and work ability, their satisfaction with the intervention and the perceived (future) effect of such an intervention. Program implementation was defined as the mean score of reach, fidelity, and intervention dose delivered and received. Reach was 9% (77 workers participated), fidelity was 67%, the intervention dose delivered was 92 and 63%, and the intervention dose received was 68 and 49%. The total programme implementation was 58%. The increases in knowledge regarding the health status and work ability of the workers after the WHS were graded as 7.0 and 5.9, respectively. The satisfaction of the workers with the entire intervention was graded as 7.5. The perceived (future) effects on health status were graded as 6.3, and the effects on work ability were graded with a 5.2. The economic recession affected the workers as well as the occupational health service that enacted the implementation. Programme implementation was acceptable. Low reach, limited protocol adherence and modest engagement of the workers with respect

  6. Conceptualizing Surrogate Decision-Making at End of Life in the Intensive Care Unit using Cognitive Task Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne-Odom, J. Nicholas; Willis, Danny G.; Bakitas, Marie; Crandall, Beth; Grace, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Surrogate decision-makers (SDMs) face difficult decisions at end of life (EOL) for decisionally incapacitated intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Purpose Identify and describe the underlying psychological processes of surrogate decision-making for adults at EOL in the ICU. Method Qualitative case study design using a cognitive task analysis (CTA) interviewing approach. Participants were recruited from October 2012 to June 2013 from an academic tertiary medical center’s ICU located in the rural Northeastern United States. Nineteen SDMs for patients who had died in the ICU completed in-depth semi-structured CTA interviews. Discussion The conceptual framework formulated from data analysis reveals that three underlying, iterative, psychological dimensions: gist impressions, distressing emotions, and moral intuitions impact a SDM’s judgment about the acceptability of either the patient’s medical treatments or his or her condition. Conclusion The framework offers initial insights about the underlying psychological processes of surrogate decision-making and may facilitate enhanced decision support for SDMs. PMID:25982772

  7. Does case-mix based reimbursement stimulate the development of process-oriented care delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Leti; Dückers, Michel L A; Wagner, Cordula; van Merode, Godefridus G

    2010-11-01

    Reimbursement based on the total care of a patient during an acute episode of illness is believed to stimulate management and clinicians to reduce quality problems like waiting times and poor coordination of care delivery. Although many studies already show that this kind of case-mix based reimbursement leads to more efficiency, it remains unclear whether care coordination improved as well. This study aims to explore whether case-mix based reimbursement stimulates development of care coordination by the use of care programmes, and a process-oriented way of working. Data for this study were gathered during the winter of 2007/2008 in a survey involving all Dutch hospitals. Descriptive and structural equation modelling (SEM) analyses were conducted. SEM reveals that adoption of the case-mix reimbursement within hospitals' budgeting processes stimulates hospitals to establish care programmes by the use of process-oriented performance measures. However, the implementation of care programmes is not (yet) accompanied by a change in focus from function (the delivery of independent care activities) to process (the delivery of care activities as being connected to a chain of interdependent care activities). This study demonstrates that hospital management can stimulate the development of care programmes by the adoption of case-mix reimbursement within hospitals' budgeting processes. Future research is recommended to confirm this finding and to determine whether the establishment of care programmes will in time indeed lead to a more process-oriented view of professionals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The home care teaching and learning process in undergraduate health care degree courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Ana Paula; Lacerda, Maria Ribeiro; Maftum, Mariluci Alves; Bernardino, Elizabeth; Mello, Ana Lúcia Schaefer Ferreira de

    2017-07-01

    Home care, one of the services provided by the health system, requires health practitioners who are capable of understanding its specificities. This study aimed to build a substantive theory that describes experiences of home care teaching and learning during undergraduate degree courses in nursing, pharmacy, medicine, nutrition, dentistry and occupational therapy. A qualitative analysis was performed using the grounded theory approach based on the results of 63 semistructured interviews conducted with final year students, professors who taught subjects related to home care, and recent graduates working with home care, all participants in the above courses. The data was analyzed in three stages - open coding, axial coding and selective coding - resulting in the phenomenon Experiences of home care teaching and learning during the undergraduate health care degree courses. Its causes were described in the category Articulating knowledge of home care, strategies in the category Experiencing the unique nature of home care, intervening conditions in the category Understanding the multidimensional characteristics of home care, consequences in the category Changing thinking about home care training, and context in the category Understanding home care in the health system. Home care contributes towards the decentralization of hospital care.

  9. Implementation of primary health care - package or process ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After establishing the commitment of the government to comprehensive primary health care (PHC), the Department of Health and provinces are now faced with the challenge of implementation. An important response has come with the recent proposed'core package of primary health care services'.' After consultation with ...

  10. Navy Health Care Strategic Planning Process: A Draft Functional Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    are: 1. Conduct Health Care Planning 2. Manage Human Resoutrce 3. Manage Finances 4. Manag Education and Training 5. Provide Health Care Support to...and general officer medical records. This module is underdevelopment. 3. Manage Finances . This module is designed to be used by comptrollers. It assists

  11. [Analysis of the influence of the process of care in primary health care on avoidable hospitalizations for heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Saz Moreno, Vicente; Alberquilla Menéndez-Asenjo, Ángel; Camacho Hernández, Ana M; Lora Pablos, David; Enríquez de Salamanca Lorente, Rafael; Magán Tapia, Purificación

    2016-02-01

    To determine if the process of care in primary health, affects the risk of avoidable hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSH) for heart failure (HF). Case-control study analyzing the risk of hospitalization for HF. The exposure factor was the process of care for HF in primary health. Health area of the region of Madrid (n=466.901). There were included all adult patients (14 years or older) with a documented diagnosis of HF in the electronic medical record of primary health (n=3.277). The cases were patients who were hospitalized for HF while the controls did not require admission, during 2007. risk of ACSH for HF related to the process of care considered both overall and for each separate standard of appropiate care. Differences in clinical complexity of the groups were measured using the Adjusted Clinical Group (ACG) classification system. 227 cases and 3.050 controls. Clinical complexity was greater in cases. The standards of appropriate care were met to a greater degree in the control group, but none of the two groups met all the standards that would define a process of care as fully appropriate. A significantly lower risk of ACSH was seen for only two standards of appropriate care. For each additional standard of appropriate care not met, the probability of admission was significantly greater (OR: 1,33, 95% CI: 1,19-1,49). Higher quality in the process of care in primary health was associated with a lower risk of hospitalization for HF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Reducing Bottlenecks to Improve the Efficiency of the Lung Cancer Care Delivery Process: A Process Engineering Modeling Approach to Patient-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Feng; Lee, Hyo Kyung; Yu, Xinhua; Faris, Nicholas R; Rugless, Fedoria; Jiang, Shan; Li, Jingshan; Osarogiagbon, Raymond U

    2017-12-01

    The process of lung cancer care from initial lesion detection to treatment is complex, involving multiple steps, each introducing the potential for substantial delays. Identifying the steps with the greatest delays enables a focused effort to improve the timeliness of care-delivery, without sacrificing quality. We retrospectively reviewed clinical events from initial detection, through histologic diagnosis, radiologic and invasive staging, and medical clearance, to surgery for all patients who had an attempted resection of a suspected lung cancer in a community healthcare system. We used a computer process modeling approach to evaluate delays in care delivery, in order to identify potential 'bottlenecks' in waiting time, the reduction of which could produce greater care efficiency. We also conducted 'what-if' analyses to predict the relative impact of simulated changes in the care delivery process to determine the most efficient pathways to surgery. The waiting time between radiologic lesion detection and diagnostic biopsy, and the waiting time from radiologic staging to surgery were the two most critical bottlenecks impeding efficient care delivery (more than 3 times larger compared to reducing other waiting times). Additionally, instituting surgical consultation prior to cardiac consultation for medical clearance and decreasing the waiting time between CT scans and diagnostic biopsies, were potentially the most impactful measures to reduce care delays before surgery. Rigorous computer simulation modeling, using clinical data, can provide useful information to identify areas for improving the efficiency of care delivery by process engineering, for patients who receive surgery for lung cancer.

  13. Findings From a Nursing Care Audit Based on the Nursing Process: A Descriptive Study

    OpenAIRE

    Poortaghi, Sarieh; Salsali, Mahvash; Ebadi, Abbas; Rahnavard, Zahra; Maleki, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background Although using the nursing process improves nursing care quality, few studies have evaluated nursing performance in accordance with nursing process steps either nationally or internationally. Objectives This study aimed to audit nursing care based on a nursing process model. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which a nursing audit checkl...

  14. Designing quality of care--contributions from parents: Parents' experiences of care processes in paediatric care and their contribution to improvements of the care process in collaboration with healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Susanne; Gremyr, Ida; Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this article was to explore whether current quality dimensions for health care services are sufficient to capture how parents perceive and contribute to quality of health care. New quality improvement initiatives that actively involve patients must be examined with a critical view on established quality dimensions to ensure that these measures support patient involvement. This paper used a qualitative and descriptive design. This paper is based on interviews with parents participating in two experience-based co-design projects in a Swedish hospital that included qualitative content analysis of data from 12 parent interviews in paediatric care. Health care professionals often overemphasize their own significance for value creation in care processes and underappreciate parents' ability to influence and contribute to better quality. However, quality is not based solely on how professionals accomplish their task, but is co-created by health care professionals and parents. Consequently, assessment of quality outcomes also must include parents' ability and context. This paper questions current models of quality dimensions in health care, and suggests additional sub-dimensions, such as family quality and involvement quality. This paper underscores the importance of involving parents in health care improvements with health care professionals to capture as many dimensions of quality as possible. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Meaning and Practice of Palliative Care for Hospitalized Older Adults with Life Limiting Illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethel Ann Powers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To illustrate distinctions and intersections of palliative care (PC and end-of-life (EOL services through examples from case-centered data of older adults cared for during a four-year ethnographic study of an acute care hospital palliative care consultation service. Methods. Qualitative narrative and thematic analysis. Results. Description of four practice paradigms (EOL transitions, prognostic uncertainty, discharge planning, and patient/family values and preferences and identification of the underlying structure and communication patterns of PC consultation services common to them. Conclusions. Consistent with reports by other researchers, study data support the need to move beyond equating PC with hospice or EOL care and the notion that EOL is a well-demarcated period of time before death. If professional health care providers assume that PC services are limited to assisting with and helping patients and families prepare for dying, they miss opportunities to provide care considered important to older individuals confronting life-limiting illnesses.

  16. Health care clinicians' engagement in organizational redesign of care processes: The importance of work and organizational conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellve, L; Strömgren, M; Williamsson, A; Holden, R J; Eriksson, A

    2018-04-01

    The Swedish health care system is reorienting towards horizontal organization for care processes. A main challenge is to engage health care clinicians in the process. The aim of this study was to assess engagement (i.e. attitudes and beliefs, the cognitive state and clinical engagement behaviour) among health care clinicians, and to investigate how engagement was related to work resources and demands during organizational redesign. A cohort study was conducted, using a questionnaire distributed to clinicians at five hospitals working with care process improvement approaches, two of them having implemented Lean production. The results show that kinds of engagement are interlinked and contribute to clinical engagement behaviour in quality of care and patient safety. Increased work resources have importance for engagements in organizational improvements, especially in top-down implementations. An extended work engagement model during organizational improvements in health care was supported. The model contributes to knowledge about how and when clinicians are mobilized to engage in organizational changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Organizational innovation in health care - as a process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Mlakar

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Slovenia, like most countries of the modern world, spends toomuch on its public health care and supplies too little public healthcare services for the government, economists, politicians, and citizensto be happy. The many reforms of the public health care, e.g.in Slovenia, seem to be inefficient, one after the other, in solvingthis problem. Reforms have been conceived with a too poor considerationof the law of the requisite holism in decision preparation,decisions making and decision implementation. The articletackles procedure of implementation of reforms as inventions aresupposed to become innovations in the public health care organizationand management, rather than reforms’ content. Combinationof the absorption capacity, innovation promotion and diffusion issuggested for the requisite holism of implementation.

  18. What can we learn from simulation-based training to improve skills for end-of-life care? Insights from a national project in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezis, Mayer; Lahat, Yael; Frankel, Meir; Rubinov, Alan; Bohm, Davina; Cohen, Matan J; Koslowsky, Meni; Shalomson, Orit; Sprung, Charles L; Perry-Mezare, Henia; Yahalom, Rina; Ziv, Amitai

    2017-11-06

    Simulation-based training improves residents' skills for end-of-life (EOL) care. In the field, staff providers play a significant role in handling those situations and in shaping practice by role modeling. We initiated an educational intervention to train healthcare providers for improved communication skills at EOL using simulation of sensitive encounters with patients and families. Hospital physicians and nurses (n = 1324) attended simulation-based workshops (n = 100) in a national project to improve EOL care. We analyzed perceptions emerging from group discussions following simulations, from questionnaires before and after each workshop, and from video-recorded simulations using a validated coding system. We used the simulation setting as a novel tool for action research. We used a participatory inquiry paradigm, with repetitive cycles of exploring barriers and challenges with participants in an iterative pattern of observation, discussion and reflection - including a description of our own responses and evolution of thought as well as system effects. The themes transpiring included lack of training, knowledge and time, technology overuse, uncertainty in decision-making, poor skills for communication and teamwork. Specific scenarios demonstrated lack of experience at eliciting preferences for EOL care and at handling conflicts or dilemmas. Content analysis of simulations showed predominance of cognitive utterances - by an order of magnitude more prevalent than emotional expressions. Providers talked more than actors did and episodes of silence were rare. Workshop participants acknowledged needs to improve listening skills, attention to affect and teamwork. They felt that the simulation-based workshop is likely to ameliorate future handling of EOL situations. We observed unanticipated consequences from our project manifested as a field study of preparedness to EOL in nursing homes, followed by a national survey on quality of care, leading to expansion of

  19. Quality Improvement Process in a Large Intensive Care Unit: Structure and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Anita J; Guzman, Jorge A

    2016-11-01

    Quality improvement in the health care setting is a complex process, and even more so in the critical care environment. The development of intensive care unit process measures and quality improvement strategies are associated with improved outcomes, but should be individualized to each medical center as structure and culture can differ from institution to institution. The purpose of this report is to describe the structure of quality improvement processes within a large medical intensive care unit while using examples of the study institution's successes and challenges in the areas of stat antibiotic administration, reduction in blood product waste, central line-associated bloodstream infections, and medication errors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Decision Makers' Allocation of Home-Care Therapy Services: A Process Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poss, Jeff; Egan, Mary; Rappolt, Susan; Berg, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To explore decision-making processes currently used in allocating occupational and physical therapy services in home care for complex long-stay clients in Ontario. Method: An exploratory study using key-informant interviews and client vignettes was conducted with home-care decision makers (case managers and directors) from four home-care regions in Ontario. The interview data were analyzed using the framework analysis method. Results: The decision-making process for allocating therapy services has four stages: intake, assessment, referral to service provider, and reassessment. There are variations in the management processes deployed at each stage. The major variation is in the process of determining the volume of therapy services across home-care regions, primarily as a result of financial constraints affecting the home-care programme. Government funding methods and methods of information sharing also significantly affect home-care therapy allocation. Conclusion: Financial constraints in home care are the primary contextual factor affecting allocation of therapy services across home-care regions. Given the inflation of health care costs, new models of funding and service delivery need to be developed to ensure that the right person receives the right care before deteriorating and requiring more costly long-term care. PMID:24403672

  1. "Non-heart-beating," or "cardiac death," organ donation: why we should care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Mohamed Y; Verheijde, Joseph L; McGregor, Joan

    2007-09-01

    Organ donation after cessation of cardiac pump activity is referred to as non-heart-beating organ donation (NHBOD). NHBOD donors can be neurologically intact; they do not fulfill the brain death criteria prior to cessation of cardiac pump activity. For hospitals to participate in NHBOD, they must comply with a newly introduced federal requirement for ICU patients whose deaths are considered imminent after withdrawal of life support. This report describes issues related to NHBOD. A nonstructured review of selected publications and Web sites was undertaken. Scientific evidence from autoresuscitation and extracorporeal perfusion suggests that verifying cardiorespiratory arrest lasting 2-5 minutes does not uniformly comply with the dead donor rule, so that the process of organ procurement can be the irreversible event defining death in organ donors. The interest of organ procurement organizations and affiliates in maximizing recovery of transplantable organs introduces self-serving bias in gaining consent for organ donation and abandons the basic tenet of obtaining true informed consent. The impact of donor management and procurement protocols on end-of-life (EOL) care and the potential trade-off are not disclosed, raising concern about whether potential donors and their families are fully informed before consenting to donation. The use of comprehensive quality indicators for EOL care can determine the impact of NHBOD on care offered to donors and the effects on families and health care providers. Detailed evaluation of NHBOD will enable the public to make informed decisions about participating in this type of organ donation. (c) 2007 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  2. Process value of care safety: women's willingness to pay for perinatal services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anezaki, Hisataka; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the process value of care safety from the patient's view in perinatal services. Cross-sectional survey. Fifty two sites of mandated public neonatal health checkup in 6 urban cities in West Japan. Mothers who attended neonatal health checkups for their babies in 2011 (n = 1316, response rate = 27.4%). Willingness to pay (WTP) for physician-attended care compared with midwife care as the process-related value of care safety. WTP was estimated using conjoint analysis based on the participants' choice over possible alternatives that were randomly assigned from among eight scenarios considering attributes such as professional attendance, amenities, painless delivery, caesarean section rate, travel time and price. The WTP for physician-attended care over midwife care was estimated 1283 USD. Women who had experienced complications in prior deliveries had a 1.5 times larger WTP. We empirically evaluated the process value for safety practice in perinatal care that was larger than a previously reported accounting-based value. Our results indicate that measurement of process value from the patient's view is informative for the evaluation of safety care, and that it is sensitive to individual risk perception for the care process. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care.

  3. Leukotactin-1/CCL15 induces cell migration and differentiation of human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells through PKCdelta activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Sook; Kim, In Sik

    2010-06-01

    Leukotactin-1 (Lkn-1)/CCL15 is a CC chemokine that binds to the CCR1 and CCR3. Lkn-1 functions as an essential factor in the migration of monocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Although eosinophils express both receptors, the role of Lkn-1 in immature eosinophils remains to be elucidated. In this present study, we investigated the contribution of the CCR1-binding chemokines to chemotactic activity and in the differentiation in the human eosinophilic leukemia cell line EoL-1. Lkn-1 induced the stronger migration of EoL-1 cells than other CCR1-binding chemokines such as RANTES/CCL5, MIP-1alpha/CCL3 and HCC-4/CCL16. Lkn-1-induced chemotaxis was inhibited by pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G(i)/G(o) protein; U73122, an inhibitor of phospholipase C and rottlerin, an inhibitor of protein kinase C delta (PKCdelta). Lkn-1 increased PKCdelta activity, which was partially blocked by the pertussis toxin and U73122. Lkn-1 enhanced the butyric acid-induced differentiation via PKCdelta after binding to the increased CCR1 because Lkn-1 caused EoL-1 cells to change morphologically into mature eosinophil-like cells. Likewise, Lkn-1 increased the expression of both eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and the major basic protein (MBP). PKCdelta activation due to Lkn-1 is involved in migration, as well as the butyric acid-induced differentiation. This finding contributes to an understanding of CC chemokines in eosinophil biology and to the development of novel therapies for the treatment of eosinophilic disorders. This study suggests the pivotal roles of Lkn-1 in the regulation of the movement and development of eosinophils.

  4. Follow-up analysis of federal process of care data reported from three acute care hospitals in rural Appalachia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sills ES

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available E Scott Sills,1,2 Liubomir Chiriac,3 Denis Vaughan,4 Christopher A Jones,5 Shala A Salem11Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Pacific Reproductive Center, Irvine, CA, USA; 2Graduate School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, London, UK; 3Department of Mathematics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland; 5Global Health Economics Unit and Department of Surgery, Center for Clinical and Translational Science, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT, USABackground: This investigation evaluated standardized process of care data collected on selected hospitals serving a remote rural section of westernmost North Carolina.Methods: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data were analyzed retrospectively for multiple clinical parameters at Fannin Regional Hospital, Murphy Medical Center, and Union General Hospital. Data were analyzed by paired t-test for individual comparisons among the three study hospitals to compare the three facilities with each other, as well as with state and national average for each parameter.Results: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services “Hospital Compare” data from 2011 showed Fannin Regional Hospital to have significantly higher composite scores on standardized clinical process of care measures relative to the national average, compared with Murphy Medical Center (P = 0.01 and Union General Hospital (P = 0.01. This difference was noted to persist when Fannin Regional Hospital was compared with Union General Hospital using common state reference data (P = 0.02. When compared with national averages, mean process of care scores reported from Murphy Medical Center and Union General Hospital were both lower but not significantly different (−3.44 versus −6.07, respectively, P = 0.54.Conclusion: The range of process of care scores submitted by acute care

  5. A knowledge synthesis of culturally- and spiritually-sensitive end-of-life care: findings from a scoping review

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Mei Lan; Sixsmith, Judith; Sinclair, Shane; Horst, Glen

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple factors influence the end-of-life (EoL) care and experience of poor quality services by culturally- and spiritually-diverse groups. Access to EoL services e.g. health and social supports at home or in hospices is difficult for ethnic minorities compared to white European groups. A tool is required to empower patients and families to access culturally-safe care. This review was undertaken by the Canadian Virtual Hospice as a foundation for this tool. Methods To explore atti...

  6. Nursing Home Physicians' Assessments of Barriers and Strategies for End-of-Life Care in Norway and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fosse, Anette; Zuidema, Sytse; Boersma, Froukje; Malterud, Kirsti; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Ruths, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Working conditions in nursing homes (NHs) may hamper teamwork in providing quality end-of-life (EOL) care, especially the participation of NH physicians. Dutch NH physicians are specialists or trainees in elderly care medicine with NHs as the main workplace, whereas in Norway, family

  7. Organizational factors affecting the adoption of diabetes care management processes in physician organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Simon, Jodi; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Gillies, Robin R; Casalino, Lawrence; Schmittdiel, Julie; Shortell, Stephen M

    2004-10-01

    To describe the extent of adoption of diabetes care management processes in physician organizations in the U.S. and to investigate the organizational factors that affect the adoption of diabetes care management processes. Data are derived from the National Survey of Physician Organizations and the Management of Chronic Illness, conducted in 2000-2001. A total of 1,104 of the 1,590 physician organizations identified responded to the survey. The extent of adoption of four diabetes care management processes is measured by an index consisting of the organization's use of diabetic patient registries, clinical practice guidelines, case management, and physician feedback. The ordinary least-squares model is used to determine the association of organizational characteristics with the adoption of diabetes care management processes in physician organizations. A logistic regression model is used to determine the association of organizational characteristics with the adoption of individual diabetes care management processes. Of the 987 physician organizations studied that treat patients with diabetes, 48% either do not use any or use only one of the four diabetes care management processes. A total of 20% use two care management processes, and 32% use three or four processes. External incentives to improve quality, computerized clinical information systems, and ownership by hospitals or health maintenance organizations are strongly associated with the diabetes care management index and the adoption of individual diabetes care management processes. Policies to encourage external incentives to improve quality and to facilitate the adoption of computerized clinical information technology may promote greater use of diabetes care management processes. Copyright 2004 American Diabetes Association

  8. Complex pharmaceutical care intervention in pulmonary care Part B. Patient opinion and process survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuurman-Bieze, A.GG; Kokenberg, M.E.A.P.; Tobi, H; de Boer, W.O.; van Doormaal, Jasperien E.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje Theodora Wilhelmina; Tromp, Th.F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The IPMP study (Interventions on the principle of Pulmonary Medication Profiles) investigates and describes the results of complex pharmaceutical care interventions provided to selected pulmonary patients to improve their drug use. This paper describes the patients' opinions about the

  9. Quality of care in one Italian nursing home measured by ACOVE process indicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pileggi

    Full Text Available To adapt the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders Quality Indicators (ACOVE QIs for use in Italy, to assess the adherence to these indicators as reported in the medical records of residents in a nursing home (NH, to compare this adherence for general medical and geriatric conditions, and eventually, to identify the relationships between patients' characteristics and reported processes of care.Two physicians collected the data by reviewing medical records of all NH residents in the previous 5 years, for a period of one year. Patients aged <65 years were excluded. A total of 245 patients were reviewed during the study period. The ACOVE QIs set, developed for NH processes of care, was used to assess the quality of care. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify and to assess the role of patients' characteristics on quality of processes of care by several domains of care in general medical and geriatric conditions.With the exception of diabetes management, quality of processes of care for general medical conditions approached adequate adherence. Care falls substantially short of acceptable levels for geriatric conditions (pressure ulcers, falls, dementia. On the contrary, the recommended interventions for urinary incontinence were commonly performed. Adherence to indicators varied for the different domains of care and was proven worse for the screening and prevention indicators both for geriatric and general medical conditions. Statistical analysis showed disparities in provision of appropriate processes of care associated with gender, age, co-morbidities, level of function and mobility, length of stay and modality of discharge by NHs.Adherence to recommended processes of care delivered in NH is inadequate. Substantial work lies ahead for the improvement of care. Efforts should focus particularly on management of geriatric conditions and on preventive healthcare.

  10. Deployment of lean six sigma in care coordination: an improved discharge process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Susan Ellen; Hamilton, Karen Marie; Paynter, Jacquelyn

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a quality improvement project to reduce readmissions in the Medicare population related to heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. The article describes a systematic approach to the discharge process aimed at improving transitions of care from hospital to post-acute care, utilizing Lean Six Sigma methodology. Inpatient acute care hospital. A coordinated discharge process, which includes postdischarge follow-up, can reduce avoidable readmissions. Implications for The quality improvement project demonstrated the significant role case management plays in preventing costly readmissions and improving outcomes for patients through better transitions of care from the hospital to the community. By utilizing Lean Six Sigma methodology, hospitals can focus on eliminating waste in their current processes and build more sustainable improvements to deliver a safe, quality, discharge process for their patients. Case managers are leading this effort to improve care transitions and assure a smoother transition into the community postdischarge..

  11. The Wound CARE Instrument: the process for developing standards for wound management education and programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsted, Heather L; Woodbury, M Gail; Stevenson, Kimberly

    2012-06-01

    This article describes the collaborative process undertaken by the Canadian Association for Enterostomal Therapy and the Canadian Association of Wound Care in an effort to improve the quality of wound prevention and management education and programming. The end result of this process is the Wound CARE Instrument which promotes an interprofessional, collaborative appraisal process to support the development, adoption or adaption of wound management educational events and programs. © 2011 The Authors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  12. Improving Orientation Outcomes: Implementation of Phased Orientation Process in an Intermediate Special Care Nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Emily K; Shedenhelm, Heidi J; Gibbs, Ardyce L

    2015-01-01

    In response to changing needs of registered nurse orientees, the staff education committee in the Intermediate Special Care Nursery has implemented a phased orientation process. This phased process includes a mentoring experience postorientation to support a new nurse through the first year of employment. Since implementing the phased orientation process in the Intermediate Special Care Nursery, orientee satisfaction and preparation to practice have increased, and length of orientation has decreased.

  13. A Structured Transfer of Care Process Reduces Perioperative Complications in Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael; Robertson, Jamie; Merkel, Matthias; Aziz, Michael; Hutchens, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Serious complications are common during the intensive care of postoperative cardiac surgery patients. Some of these complications may be influenced by communication during the process of handover of care from the operating room to the intensive care unit (ICU) team. A structured transfer of care process may reduce the rate of communication errors and perioperative complications. We hypothesized that a collaborative, comprehensive, structured handover of care from the intraoperative team to the ICU team would reduce a specific set of postoperative complications. We tested this hypothesis by developing and introducing a comprehensive multidisciplinary transfer of care process. We measured patient outcomes before and after the intervention using a linkage between 2 care databases: an Anesthesia Information Management System and a critical care complication registry database. There were 1127 total postoperative cardiac surgery admissions during the study period, 550 before and 577 after the intervention. There was no statistical difference between overall complications before and after the intervention (P = .154). However, there was a statistically significant reduction in preventable complications after the intervention (P = .023). The main finding of this investigation is that the introduction of a collaborative, comprehensive transfer of care process from the operating room to the ICU was associated with patients suffering fewer preventable complications.

  14. Chiropractic Integrated Care Pathway for Low Back Pain in Veterans: Results of a Delphi Consensus Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisi, Anthony J; Salsbury, Stacie A; Hawk, Cheryl; Vining, Robert D; Wallace, Robert B; Branson, Richard; Long, Cynthia R; Burgo-Black, A Lucille; Goertz, Christine M

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an integrated care pathway for doctors of chiropractic, primary care providers, and mental health professionals who manage veterans with low back pain, with or without mental health comorbidity, within Department of Veterans Affairs health care facilities. The research method used was a consensus process. A multidisciplinary investigative team reviewed clinical guidelines and Veterans Affairs pain and mental health initiatives to develop seed statements and care algorithms to guide chiropractic management and collaborative care of veterans with low back pain. A 5-member advisory committee approved initial recommendations. Veterans Affairs-based panelists (n = 58) evaluated the pathway via e-mail using a modified RAND/UCLA methodology. Consensus was defined as agreement by 80% of panelists. The modified Delphi process was conducted in July to December 2016. Most (93%) seed statements achieved consensus during the first round, with all statements reaching consensus after 2 rounds. The final care pathway addressed the topics of informed consent, clinical evaluation including history and examination, screening for red flags, documentation, diagnostic imaging, patient-reported outcomes, adverse event reporting, chiropractic treatment frequency and duration standards, tailored approaches to chiropractic care in veteran populations, and clinical presentation of common mental health conditions. Care algorithms outlined chiropractic case management and interprofessional collaboration and referrals between doctors of chiropractic and primary care and mental health providers. This study offers an integrative care pathway that includes chiropractic care for veterans with low back pain. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Effective Strategies to Spread Redesigning Care Processes Among Healthcare Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; O'Connor, Patricia; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Briand, Anaïck; Biron, Alain; Baillargeon, Sophie; MacGibbon, Brenda; Ringer, Justin; Cyr, Guylaine

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how spread strategies facilitate the successful implementation of the Transforming Care at the Bedside (TCAB) program and their impact on healthcare workers and patients in a major Canadian healthcare organization. This study used a qualitative and descriptive design with focus groups and individual interviews held in May 2014. Participants included managers and healthcare providers from eight TCAB units in a university health center in Quebec, Canada. The sample was composed of 43 individuals. The data were analyzed using NVivo according to the method proposed by Miles and Huberman. The first two themes that emerged from the analysis are related to context (organizational transition requiring many changes) and spread strategies for the TCAB program (senior management support, release time and facilitation, rotation of team members, learning from previous TCAB teams, and engaging patients). The last theme that emerged from the analysis is the impact on healthcare professionals (providing front-line staff and managers with the training they need to make changes, team leadership, and increasing receptivity to hearing patients' and families' needs and requests). This study describes the perspectives of managers and team members to provide a better understanding of how spread strategies can facilitate the successful implementation of the TCAB program in a Canadian healthcare organization. Spread strategies facilitate the implementation of changes to improve the quality and safety of care provided to patients. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Exploitation of Wireless Technology in Remote Care Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämäläinen, Matti; Taparugssanagorn, Attaphongse; Iinatti, Jari; Kohno, Ryuji

    The average age of population is predicted to be raised universally but the number of nursing staff is not increasing at the same rate. This leads us to the situation where, e.g., we have too many patients for one nurse. On the other hand, sparse population in some regions, such as Northern or Eastern Finland, causes a severe problem that doctors are far away from patient. In this paper, we summarize the possibilities and applications that utilize wireless technologies in healthcare sector and which can be useful in nursing activities. The use of new innovations is one way to solve the problems that are based on the expected lack of professional staff in the future. Despite of the very natural hospital link, the developed technical solutions have applications outside hospital. Remote care of aging people and other special groups need to be done daily and almost real-time. Keeping people home instead of hospital is one way to decrease the entire care costs. In addition to the obvious human context, we derive some other applications where we can benefit wireless nursing and remote sensing techniques.

  17. Challenges in the Management and Stewardship of Airborne Observational Data at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, J.; Daniels, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) provides the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) funding for the operation, maintenance and upgrade of two research aircraft: the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Gulfstream V and the NSF/NCAR Hercules C-130. A suite of in-situ and remote sensing airborne instruments housed at the EOL Research Aviation Facility (RAF) provide a basic set of measurements that are typically deployed on most airborne field campaigns. In addition, instruments to address more specific research requirements are provided by collaborating participants from universities, industry, NASA, NOAA or other agencies (referred to as Principal Investigator, or PI, instruments). At the 2014 AGU Fall Meeting, a poster (IN13B-3639) was presented outlining the components of Airborne Data Management included field phase data collection, formats, data archival and documentation, version control, storage practices, stewardship and obsolete data formats, and public data access. This talk will cover lessons learned, challenges associated with the above components, and current developments to address these challenges, including: tracking data workflows for aircraft instrumentation to facilitate identification, and correction, of gaps in these workflows; implementation of dataset versioning guidelines; and assignment of Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to data and instrumentation to facilitate tracking data and facility use in publications.

  18. Inhibitory effect of turmeric curcuminoids on FLT3 expression and cell cycle arrest in the FLT3-overexpressing EoL-1 leukemic cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tima, Singkome; Ichikawa, Hideki; Ampasavate, Chadarat; Okonogi, Siriporn; Anuchapreeda, Songyot

    2014-04-25

    Leukemia is a hematologic malignancy with a frequent incidence and high mortality rate. Previous studies have shown that the FLT3 gene is overexpressed in leukemic blast cells, especially in acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, a commercially available curcuminoid mixture (1), pure curcumin (2), pure demethoxycurcumin (3), and pure bisdemethoxycurcumin (4) were investigated for their inhibitory effects on cell growth, FLT3 expression, and cell cycle progression in an FLT3-overexpressing EoL-1 leukemic cell line using an MTT assay, Western blotting, and flow cytometry, respectively. The mixture (1) and compounds 2-4 demonstrated cytotoxic effects with IC50 values ranging from 6.5 to 22.5 μM. A significant decrease in FLT3 protein levels was found after curcuminoid treatment with IC20 doses, especially with mixture 1 and compound 2. In addition, mixture 1 and curcumin (2) showed activity on cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and decreased the FLT3 and STAT5A protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. Compound 2 demonstrated the greatest potential for inhibiting cell growth, cell cycle progression, and FLT3 expression in EoL-1 cells. This investigation has provided new findings regarding the effect of turmeric curcuminoids on FLT3 expression in leukemic cells.

  19. Women's, midwives' and obstetricians' experiences of a structured process to document refusal of recommended maternity care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Bec; Kruske, Sue; Stapleton, Helen; Beckmann, Michael; Reynolds, Maree; Kildea, Sue

    2016-12-01

    Ethical and professional guidance for midwives and obstetricians emphasises informed consent and respect for patient autonomy; the right to refuse care is well established. However, the existing literature is largely silent on the appropriate clinical responses when pregnant women refuse recommended care, and accounts of disrespectful interactions and conflict are numerous. Policies and processes to support women and maternity care providers are rare and unstudied. To document the perspectives of women, midwives and obstetricians following the introduction of a structured process (Maternity Care Plan; MCP) to document refusal of recommended maternity care in a large tertiary maternity unit. A qualitative, interpretive study involved thematic analysis of in-depth semi-structured interviews with women (n=9), midwives (n=12) and obstetricians (n=9). Four major themes were identified including: 'Reassuring and supporting clinicians'; 'Keeping the door open'; 'Varied awareness, criteria and use of the MCP process' and 'No guarantees'. Clinicians felt protected and reassured by the structured documentation and communication process and valued keeping women engaged in hospital care. This, in turn, protected women's access to maternity care. However, the process could not guarantee favourable responses from other clinicians subsequently involved in the woman's care. Ongoing discussions of risk, perceived by women and some midwives to be pressure to consent to recommended care, were still evident. These limitations may have been attributable to the absence of agreed criteria for initiating the MCP process and fragmented care. Varying awareness and use of the process also diminished women's access to it. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Palliative Care in Critical Care Settings: A Systematic Review of Communication-Based Competencies Essential for Patient and Family Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schram, Andrew W; Hougham, Gavin W; Meltzer, David O; Ruhnke, Gregory W

    2017-11-01

    There is an emerging literature on the physician competencies most meaningful to patients and their families. However, there has been no systematic review on physician competency domains outside direct clinical care most important for patient- and family-centered outcomes in critical care settings at the end of life (EOL). Physician competencies are an essential component of palliative care (PC) provided at the EOL, but the literature on those competencies relevant for patient and family satisfaction is limited. A systematic review of this important topic can inform future research and assist in curricular development. Review of qualitative and quantitative empirical studies of the impact of physician competencies on patient- and family-reported outcomes conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines for systematic reviews. The data sources used were PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Fifteen studies (5 qualitative and 10 quantitative) meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria were identified. The competencies identified as critical for the delivery of high-quality PC in critical care settings are prognostication, conflict mediation, empathic communication, and family-centered aspects of care, the latter being the competency most frequently acknowledged in the literature identified. Prognostication, conflict mediation, empathic communication, and family-centered aspects of care are the most important identified competencies for patient- and family-centered PC in critical care settings. Incorporation of education on these competencies is likely to improve patient and family satisfaction with EOL care.

  1. Implementing Trauma-Informed Care: Recommendations on the Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane K. Yatchmenoff

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The importance of trauma-informed care (TIC is now recognized across most health and human service systems. Providers are calling for concrete examples of what TIC means in practice and how to create more trauma-informed organizations. However, much of the current understanding about implementation rests on principles and values rather than specific recommendations for action. This paper addresses this gap based on observations during the provision of technical assistance over the past decade in fields like mental health and addictions, juvenile justice, child welfare, healthcare, housing, and education. Focusing on the infrastructure for making change (the TIC workgroup, assessment and planning, and the early stages of implementation, the authors discuss barriers and challenges that are commonly encountered, strategies that have proven effective in addressing barriers, and specific action steps that can help sustain momentum for the longer term.

  2. Acute versus primary care: the health care decision making process for individuals with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decoux, Michelle

    2005-11-01

    This study's purpose was to determine factors influencing treatment choices of individuals with severe mental illness (SMI). The sample was drawn from admissions to residential crisis programs in San Francisco. Inclusion criteria were an Axis I and Axis III disorder. This qualitative study utilized grounded theory method. Interviews and field notes were coded for recurring themes. Descriptive data were also collected. Participants revealed that the most important influences on treatment decisions were immediate need for care, the belief that their subacute complaints will not be taken seriously by providers, positive reinforcement for emergency service use, and enabling factors such as insurance coverage. Other remarkable findings included: numerous reports of substance induced medical crises, lack of support from family, and unawareness of client's medical conditions in psychiatric facilities. Health care seeking behaviors are learned and learning that will promote the use of outpatient services in SMI must include positive experiences in the delivery of care in the primary care setting. Participants were knowledgeable regarding their illnesses and able to articulate symptoms of illness well. Failure to communicate symptoms appeared to reflect the participant's perception of a lack of response to their reports.

  3. How Differences Between Manager and Clinician Perceptions of Safety Culture Impact Hospital Processes of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jason; Mazurenko, Olena; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Ford, Eric W

    2017-11-04

    Evidenced-based processes of care improve patient outcomes, yet universal compliance is lacking, and perceptions of the quality of care are highly variable. The purpose of this study is to examine how differences in clinician and management perceptions on teamwork and communication relate to adherence to hospital processes of care. Hospitals submitted identifiable data for the 2012 Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Hospital Compare. The dependent variable was a composite, developed from the scores on adherence to acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia process of care measures. The primary independent variables reflected 4 safety culture domains: communication openness, feedback about errors, teamwork within units, and teamwork between units. We assigned each hospital into one of 4 groups based on agreement between managers and clinicians on each domain. Each hospital was categorized as "high" (above the median) or "low" (below) for clinicians and managers in communication and teamwork. We found a positive relationship between perceived teamwork and communication climate and processes of care measures. If managers and clinicians perceived the communication openness as high, the hospital was more likely to adhere with processes of care. Similarly, if clinicians perceived teamwork across units as high, the hospital was more likely to adhere to processes of care. Manager and staff perceptions about teamwork and communications impact adherence to processes of care. Policies should recognize the importance of perceptions of both clinicians and managers on teamwork and communication and seek to improve organizational climate and practices. Clinician perceptions of teamwork across units are more closely linked to processes of care, so managers should be cognizant and try to improve their perceptions.

  4. Pediatric advance care planning (pACP) for teens with cancer and their families: Design of a dyadic, longitudinal RCCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Katherine B; Watson, Anne E; Wang, Jichuan; Okonkwo, Obianuju C; Lyon, Maureen E

    2017-11-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of disease-related death for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) in the United States. Parents of AYAs with life-threatening illnesses have expressed the desire to talk to their children about end of life (EOL) care, yet, like caregivers of adult patients, struggle to initiate this conversation. Building Evidence for Effective Palliative/End of Life Care for Teens with Cancer is a longitudinal, randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of FAmily CEntered disease-specific advance care planning (ACP) for teens with cancer (FACE-TC). A total of 130 dyads (260 subjects) composed of AYAs 14-20years old with cancer and their family decision maker (≥18years old) will be recruited from pediatric oncology programs at Akron Children's Hospital and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Dyads will be randomized to either the FACE-TC intervention or Treatment as Usual (TAU) control. FACE-TC intervention dyads will complete three 60-minute ACP sessions held at weekly intervals. Follow-up data will be collected at 3, 6, 12, and 18months post-intervention by a blinded research assistant (RA). The effects of FACE-TC on patient-family congruence in treatment preferences, quality of life (QOL), and advance directive completion will be analyzed. FACE-TC is an evidenced-based and patient-centered intervention that considers QOL and EOL care according to the AYA's representation of illness. The family is involved in the ACP process to facilitate shared decision making, increase understanding of the AYA's preferences, and make a commitment to honor the AYA's wishes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Why wait? : Organizing integrated processes in cancer care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeftink, Anne Greetje

    2017-01-01

    The access to cancer diagnostics and cancer treatment is not the same for all types of cancer patients. Furthermore, the resources involved in these processes are costly and scarce. Long access and waiting times to diagnostics and treatment can cause increased anxiety of patients. The goal of this

  6. Survey of neonatologists' attitudes toward limiting life-sustaining treatments in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltman, D M; Du, H; Leuthner, S R

    2012-11-01

    To understand neonatologists' attitudes toward end-of-life (EOL) management in clinical scenarios, EOL ethical concepts and resource utilization. American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Perinatal section members completed an anonymous online survey. Respondents indicated preferences in limiting life-sustaining treatments in four clinical scenarios, ranked agreement with EOL-care ethics statements, indicated outside resources previously used and provided demographic information. In all, 451 surveys were analyzed. Across clinical scenarios and as general ethical concepts, withdrawal of mechanical ventilation in severely affected patients was most accepted by respondents; withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration was least accepted. One-third of neonatologists did not agree that non-initiation of treatment is ethically equivalent to withdrawal. Around 20% of neonatologists would not defer care if uncomfortable with a parent's request. Respondents' resources included ethics committees, AAP guidelines and legal counsel/courts. Challenges to providing just, unified EOL care strategies are discussed, including deferring care, limiting artificial nutrition/hydration and conditions surrounding ventilator withdrawal.

  7. Adherence to diabetes care processes at general practices in the National Capital Region-Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopa Shivashankar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the level of adherence to diabetes care processes, and associated clinic and patient factors at general practices in Delhi, India. Methods: We interviewed physicians (n = 23 and patients with diabetes (n = 406, and reviewed patient charts at general practices (government = 5; private = 18. We examined diabetes care processes, specifically measurement of weight, blood pressure (BP, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, lipids, electrocardiogram, dilated eye, and a foot examination in the last one year. We analyzed clinic and patient factors associated with a number of care processes achieved using multilevel Poisson regression model. Results: The average number of clinic visits per patient was 8.8/year (standard deviation = 5.7, and physicians had access to patient's previous records in only 19.7% of patients. Dilated eye exam, foot exam, and electrocardiogram were completed in 7.4%, 15.1%, and 29.1% of patients, respectively. An estimated 51.7%, 88.4%, and 28.1% had ≥1 measurement of HbA1c, BP, and lipids, respectively. Private clinics, physician access to patient's previous records, use of nonphysicians, patient education, and the presence of diabetes complication were positively associated with a number of care processes in the multivariable model. Conclusion: Adherence to diabetes care processes was suboptimal. Encouraging implementation of quality improvement strategies like Chronic Care Model elements at general practices may improve diabetes care.

  8. [Woman's participation in the decision process of the pregnancy and puerperal cycle: nursing care integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busanello, Josefine; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo; Kerber, Nalú Pereira da Costa; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; dos Santos, Silvana Sidnei

    2011-12-01

    This is an integrative review that aims to identify the contribution of nursing care for woman's participation in the decision process of the pregnancy and puerperal cycle, as described in Brazilian scientific publications. The scientific productions were retrieved in May, 2010, from the Virtual Library of Health (Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde) database. From the eight articles reviewed, two themes stood out: Contributions of nursing care to the woman's participation in the decision process of the pregnancy and puerperal cycle; and Limitations of nursing care to the woman's participation in the decision process of the pregnancy and puerperal cycle. The following review supports the production of knowledge in nursing, by identifying a gap in what nurses know and do about this issue, as shown by the lack of nursing researches that concern, specifically, the participation of the woman in the decision process during the pregnancy and puerperal cycle and the possible contributions of nursing care to ensure women of this right.

  9. Patient Data Synchronization Process in a Continuity of Care Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haras, Consuela; Sauquet, Dominique; Ameline, Philippe; Jaulent, Marie-Christine; Degoulet, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    In a distributed patient record environment, we analyze the processes needed to ensure exchange and access to EHR data. We propose an adapted method and the tools for data synchronization. Our study takes into account the issues of user rights management for data access and of decreasing the amount of data exchanged over the network. We describe a XML-based synchronization model that is portable and independent of specific medical data models. The implemented platform consists of several servers, of local network clients, of workstations running user’s interfaces and of data exchange and synchronization tools. PMID:16779049

  10. Effect of care management program structure on implementation: a normalization process theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Potworowski, Georges; Fitzpatrick, Laurie; Kowalk, Amy; Green, Lee A

    2016-08-15

    Care management in primary care can be effective in helping patients with chronic disease improve their health status, however, primary care practices are often challenged with implementation. Further, there are different ways to structure care management that may make implementation more or less successful. Normalization process theory (NPT) provides a means of understanding how a new complex intervention can become routine (normalized) in practice. In this study, we used NPT to understand how care management structure affected how well care management became routine in practice. Data collection involved semi-structured interviews and observations conducted at 25 practices in five physician organizations in Michigan, USA. Practices were selected to reflect variation in physician organizations, type of care management program, and degree of normalization. Data were transcribed, qualitatively coded and analyzed, initially using an editing approach and then a template approach with NPT as a guiding framework. Seventy interviews and 25 observations were completed. Two key structures for care management organization emerged: practice-based care management where the care managers were embedded in the practice as part of the practice team; and centralized care management where the care managers worked independently of the practice work flow and was located outside the practice. There were differences in normalization of care management across practices. Practice-based care management was generally better normalized as compared to centralized care management. Differences in normalization were well explained by the NPT, and in particular the collective action construct. When care managers had multiple and flexible opportunities for communication (interactional workability), had the requisite knowledge, skills, and personal characteristics (skill set workability), and the organizational support and resources (contextual integration), a trusting professional relationship

  11. A combined disease management and process modeling approach for assessing and improving care processes: a fall management case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Marjan; Westerhof, Richard; Eslami, Saied; Medlock, Stephanie; de Rooij, Sophia E; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2013-10-01

    To propose a combined disease management and process modeling approach for evaluating and improving care processes, and demonstrate its usability and usefulness in a real-world fall management case study. We identified essential disease management related concepts and mapped them into explicit questions meant to expose areas for improvement in the respective care processes. We applied the disease management oriented questions to a process model of a comprehensive real world fall prevention and treatment program covering primary and secondary care. We relied on interviews and observations to complete the process models, which were captured in UML activity diagrams. A preliminary evaluation of the usability of our approach by gauging the experience of the modeler and an external validator was conducted, and the usefulness of the method was evaluated by gathering feedback from stakeholders at an invitational conference of 75 attendees. The process model of the fall management program was organized around the clinical tasks of case finding, risk profiling, decision making, coordination and interventions. Applying the disease management questions to the process models exposed weaknesses in the process including: absence of program ownership, under-detection of falls in primary care, and lack of efficient communication among stakeholders due to missing awareness about other stakeholders' workflow. The modelers experienced the approach as usable and the attendees of the invitational conference found the analysis results to be valid. The proposed disease management view of process modeling was usable and useful for systematically identifying areas of improvement in a fall management program. Although specifically applied to fall management, we believe our case study is characteristic of various disease management settings, suggesting the wider applicability of the approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Leadership processes for re-engineering changes to the health care industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kristina L

    2004-01-01

    As health care organizations seek innovative ways to change financing and delivery mechanisms due to escalated health care costs and increased competition, drastic changes are being sought in the form of re-engineering. This study discusses the leader's role of re-engineering in health care. It specifically addresses the reasons for failures in re-engineering and argues that success depends on senior level leaders playing a critical role. Existing studies lack comprehensiveness in establishing models of re-engineering and management guidelines. This research focuses on integrating re-engineering and leadership processes in health care by creating a step-by-step model. Particularly, it illustrates the four Es: Examination, Establishment, Execution and Evaluation, as a comprehensive re-engineering process that combines managerial roles and activities to result in successfully changed and reengineered health care organizations.

  13. Development of clinical process measures for pediatric burn care: Understanding variation in practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazis, Lewis E; Sheridan, Robert L; Shapiro, Gabriel D; Lee, Austin F; Liang, Matthew H; Ryan, Colleen M; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Lydon, Martha; Soley-Bori, Marina; Sonis, Lily A; Dore, Emily C; Palmieri, Tina; Herndon, David; Meyer, Walter; Warner, Petra; Kagan, Richard; Stoddard, Frederick J; Murphy, Michael; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2018-04-01

    There has been little systematic examination of variation in pediatric burn care clinical practices and its effect on outcomes. As a first step, current clinical care processes need to be operationally defined. The highly specialized burn care units of the Shriners Hospitals for Children system present an opportunity to describe the processes of care. The aim of this study was to develop a set of process-based measures for pediatric burn care and examine adherence to them by providers in a cohort of pediatric burn patients. We conducted a systematic literature review to compile a set of process-based indicators. These measures were refined by an expert panel of burn care providers, yielding 36 process-based indicators in four clinical areas: initial evaluation and resuscitation, acute excisional surgery and critical care, psychosocial and pain control, and reconstruction and aftercare. We assessed variability in adherence to the indicators in a cohort of 1,076 children with burns at four regional pediatric burn programs in the Shriners Hospital system. The percentages of the cohort at each of the four sites were as follows: Boston, 20.8%; Cincinnati, 21.1%; Galveston, 36.0%; and Sacramento, 22.1%. The cohort included children who received care between 2006 and 2010. Adherence to the process indicators varied both across sites and by clinical area. Adherence was lowest for the clinical areas of acute excisional surgery and critical care, with a range of 35% to 48% across sites, followed by initial evaluation and resuscitation (range, 34%-60%). In contrast, the clinical areas of psychosocial and pain control and reconstruction and aftercare had relatively high adherence across sites, with ranges of 62% to 93% and 71% to 87%, respectively. Of the 36 process indicators, 89% differed significantly in adherence between clinical sites (p measures represents an important step in the assessment of clinical practice in pediatric burn care. Substantial variation was observed

  14. Interprofessional practice in primary care: development of a tailored process model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stans SEA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Steffy EA Stans, JG Anita Stevens, Anna JHM Beurskens Research Center of Autonomy and Participation for Persons with a Chronic Illness, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, The Netherlands Purpose: This study investigated the improvement of interprofessional practice in primary care by performing the first three steps of the implementation model described by Grol et al. This article describes the targets for improvement in a setting for children with complex care needs (step 1, the identification of barriers and facilitators influencing interprofessional practice (step 2, and the development of a tailored interprofessional process model (step 3. Methods: In step 2, thirteen qualitative semistructured interviews were held with several stakeholders, including parents of children, an occupational therapist, a speech and language therapist, a physical therapist, the manager of the team, two general practitioners, a psychologist, and a primary school teacher. The data were analyzed using directed content analysis and using the domains of the Chronic Care Model as a framework. In step 3, a project group was formed to develop helpful strategies, including the development of an interprofessional process through process mapping. Results: In step 2, it was found that the most important barriers to implementing interprofessional practice related to the lack of structure in the care process. A process model for interprofessional primary care was developed for the target group. Conclusion: The lack of a shared view of what is involved in the process of interprofessional practice was the most important barrier to its successful implementation. It is suggested that the tailored process developed, supported with the appropriate tools, may provide both professional staff and their clients, in this setting but also in other areas of primary care, with insight to the care process and a clear representation of "who should do what, when, and how." Keywords

  15. Developing New Mexico Health Care Policy: An application of the Vital Issues Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engi, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Icerman, L. [Icerman & Associates, Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The Vital Issues Process, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories Strategic Technologies Department, was utilized by the Health Care Task Force Advisory Group to apply structure to their policy deliberations. By convening three expert panels, an overarching goal for the New Mexico health care system, seven desired outcomes, nine policy options, and 17 action items were developed for the New Mexico health care system. Three broadly stated evaluation criteria were articulated and used to produce relative rankings of the desired outcomes and policy options for preventive care and information systems. Reports summarizing the policy deliberations were submitted for consideration by the Health Care Task Force, a Joint Interim Committee of the New Mexico Legislature, charged with facilitating the development and implementation of a comprehensive health care delivery system for New Mexico. The Task Force reported its findings and recommendations to the Second Session of the 41st New Mexico State Legislature in January 1994.

  16. Collaboration processes and perceived effectiveness of integrated care projects in primary care: a longitudinal mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn, Pim P; Ruwaard, Dirk; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; de Bont, Antoinette; Arends, Rosa Y; Bruijnzeels, Marc A

    2015-10-09

    Collaborative partnerships are considered an essential strategy for integrating local disjointed health and social services. Currently, little evidence is available on how integrated care arrangements between professionals and organisations are achieved through the evolution of collaboration processes over time. The first aim was to develop a typology of integrated care projects (ICPs) based on the final degree of integration as perceived by multiple stakeholders. The second aim was to study how types of integration differ in changes of collaboration processes over time and final perceived effectiveness. A longitudinal mixed-methods study design based on two data sources (surveys and interviews) was used to identify the perceived degree of integration and patterns in collaboration among 42 ICPs in primary care in The Netherlands. We used cluster analysis to identify distinct subgroups of ICPs based on the final perceived degree of integration from a professional, organisational and system perspective. With the use of ANOVAs, the subgroups were contrasted based on: 1) changes in collaboration processes over time (shared ambition, interests and mutual gains, relationship dynamics, organisational dynamics and process management) and 2) final perceived effectiveness (i.e. rated success) at the professional, organisational and system levels. The ICPs were classified into three subgroups with: 'United Integration Perspectives (UIP)', 'Disunited Integration Perspectives (DIP)' and 'Professional-oriented Integration Perspectives (PIP)'. ICPs within the UIP subgroup made the strongest increase in trust-based (mutual gains and relationship dynamics) as well as control-based (organisational dynamics and process management) collaboration processes and had the highest overall effectiveness rates. On the other hand, ICPs with the DIP subgroup decreased on collaboration processes and had the lowest overall effectiveness rates. ICPs within the PIP subgroup increased in control

  17. Process improvement methodologies uncover unexpected gaps in stroke care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuner, Anthony D; Schemmel, Andrew J; Pooler, B Dustin; Yu, John-Paul J

    2018-01-01

    Background The diagnosis and treatment of acute stroke requires timed and coordinated effort across multiple clinical teams. Purpose To analyze the frequency and temporal distribution of emergent stroke evaluations (ESEs) to identify potential contributory workflow factors that may delay the initiation and subsequent evaluation of emergency department stroke patients. Material and Methods A total of 719 sentinel ESEs with concurrent neuroimaging were identified over a 22-month retrospective time period. Frequency data were tabulated and odds ratios calculated. Results Of all ESEs, 5% occur between 01:00 and 07:00. ESEs were most frequent during the late morning and early afternoon hours (10:00-14:00). Unexpectedly, there was a statistically significant decline in the frequency of ESEs that occur at the 14:00 time point. Conclusion Temporal analysis of ESEs in the emergency department allowed us to identify an unexpected decrease in ESEs and through process improvement methodologies (Lean and Six Sigma) and identify potential workflow elements contributing to this observation.

  18. Impact of caregivers' unmet needs for supportive care on quality of terminal cancer care delivered and caregiver's workforce performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Min; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Samyong; Choi, Jong Soo; Lim, Ho-Yeong; Choi, Youn Seon; Hong, Young Seon; Kim, Si-Young; Heo, Dae Seog; Kang, Ki Moon; Jeong, Hyun Sik; Lee, Chang Geol; Moon, Do Ho; Choi, Jin-Young; Kong, In Sik; Yun, Young Ho

    2010-06-01

    Family caregivers play an important role in caring for cancer patients, but the impact of caregivers' unmet needs on the quality of end-of-life (EOL) care they deliver and on their workplace performance are less understood. We identified 1,662 family caregivers of cancer patients who had died at any of 17 hospitals in Korea during 2004. The caregivers answered a telephone questionnaire about needs that were not met when they delivered terminal cancer care and how those unmet their needs affected their workplace performance; they also answered the Quality Care Questionnaire-End of Life (QCQ-EOL). Compared with caregivers who did not have unmet needs, caregivers who had unmet needs for symptom management, financial support, or community support showed poorer QCQ-EOL scores (P < 0.01). Caregivers who had unmet needs for financial support (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 7.55; 95% confidential interval (CI) 3.80-15.00), psychosocial support (aOR = 6.24; 95% CI 2.95-13.05), symptom management (aOR = 3.21; 95% CI 2.26-4.54), community support (aOR = 3.82; 95% CI 2.38-6.11), or religious support (aOR = 4.55; 95% CI 1.84-11.26) were more likely to experience work limitations. Caregivers of patients receiving conventional hospital care were more likely to have unmet needs for symptom management (aOR = 1.21; 95% CI 1.00-1.47), psychosocial support (aOR = 1.99; 95% CI 1.37-2.88), and religious support (aOR = 1.73; 95% CI 1.08-2.78) than those of patients receiving palliative hospice care. Caregivers' unmet needs negatively affected both the quality of EOL care they delivered and their workplace performance. More investment in caregiver support and public policies that meet caregiver needs are needed, and hospice use should be encouraged.

  19. Parent-identified barriers to pediatric health care: a process-oriented model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobo, Elisa J; Seid, Michael; Reyes Gelhard, Leticia

    2006-02-01

    To further understand barriers to care as experienced by health care consumers, and to demonstrate the importance of conjoining qualitative and quantitative health services research. Transcripts from focus groups conducted in San Diego with English- and Spanish-speaking parents of children with special health care needs. Participants were asked about the barriers to care they had experienced or perceived, and their strategies for overcoming these barriers. Using elementary anthropological discourse analysis techniques, a process-based conceptual model of the parent experience was devised. The analysis revealed a parent-motivated model of barriers to care that enriched our understanding of quantitative findings regarding the population from which the focus group sample was drawn. Parent-identified barriers were grouped into the following six temporally and spatially sequenced categories: necessary skills and prerequisites for gaining access to the system; realizing access once it is gained; front office experiences; interactions with physicians; system arbitrariness and fragmentation; outcomes that affect future interaction with the system. Key to the successful navigation of the system was parents' functional biomedical acculturation; this construct likens the biomedical health services system to a cultural system within which all parents/patients must learn to function competently. Qualitative analysis of focus group data enabled a deeper understanding of barriers to care--one that went beyond the traditional association of marker variables with poor outcomes ("what") to reveal an understanding of the processes by which parents experience the health care system ("how,"why") and by which disparities may arise. Development of such process-oriented models furthers the provision of patient-centered care and the creation of interventions, programs, and curricula to enhance such care. Qualitative discourse analysis, for example using this project's widely applicable

  20. The transformation process for palliative care professionals: The metamorphosis, a qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota Vargas, Rafael; Mahtani-Chugani, Vinita; Solano Pallero, María; Rivero Jiménez, Borja; Cabo Domínguez, Raquel; Robles Alonso, Vicente

    2016-02-01

    Palliative care professionals are exposed daily to high levels of suffering. This makes them particularly vulnerable to suffering from stress, which can lead to burnout and/or compassion fatigue. To analyse the professional trajectory of palliative care workers over time and the factors which influence this trajectory. A qualitative study was designed based on the Grounded Theory approach, using semi-structured individual interviews. Interviews were recorded audio-visually and transcribed verbatim for subsequent analysis using the procedure described by Miles and Huberman. This process was supported using ATLAS.ti 6 software. A total of 10 palliative care professionals from Extremadura (Spain) took part in the study. The analysis revealed a common trajectory followed by participants in their working lives: pre-palliative care/honeymoon/frustration/maturation. In addition, factors which influence this trajectory were identified. Details of the self-care strategies that these professionals have developed are described. The result of this process, which we have metaphorically termed 'metamorphosis', is the formation of a professional who can work satisfactorily within a palliative care context. During their professional activity, palliative care professionals go through a series of phases, depending on the relationship between the cost of caring and the satisfaction of caring, which can influence both the care provided to patients and families and their own personal circumstances. Being aware of this risk, and implementing self-care strategies, can protect professionals and enable them to conduct their work in an optimal manner. Reflecting on the experiences of these professionals could be useful for other health professionals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Facilitating professional liaison in collaborative care for depression in UK primary care; a qualitative study utilising normalisation process theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupe, Nia; Anderson, Emma; Gask, Linda; Sykes, Paul; Richards, David A; Chew-Graham, Carolyn

    2014-05-01

    Collaborative care (CC) is an organisational framework which facilitates the delivery of a mental health intervention to patients by case managers in collaboration with more senior health professionals (supervisors and GPs), and is effective for the management of depression in primary care. However, there remains limited evidence on how to successfully implement this collaborative approach in UK primary care. This study aimed to explore to what extent CC impacts on professional working relationships, and if CC for depression could be implemented as routine in the primary care setting. This qualitative study explored perspectives of the 6 case managers (CMs), 5 supervisors (trial research team members) and 15 general practitioners (GPs) from practices participating in a randomised controlled trial of CC for depression. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and data was analysed using a two-step approach using an initial thematic analysis, and a secondary analysis using the Normalisation Process Theory concepts of coherence, cognitive participation, collective action and reflexive monitoring with respect to the implementation of CC in primary care. Supervisors and CMs demonstrated coherence in their understanding of CC, and consequently reported good levels of cognitive participation and collective action regarding delivering and supervising the intervention. GPs interviewed showed limited understanding of the CC framework, and reported limited collaboration with CMs: barriers to collaboration were identified. All participants identified the potential or experienced benefits of a collaborative approach to depression management and were able to discuss ways in which collaboration can be facilitated. Primary care professionals in this study valued the potential for collaboration, but GPs' understanding of CC and organisational barriers hindered opportunities for communication. Further work is needed to address these organisational barriers in order to facilitate

  2. End-of-life care in COPD: A survey carried out with Portuguese Pulmonologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gaspar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: End-of-life (EoL care is a major component in the management of patients with advanced COPD. Patient-physician communication is essential in this process. Aim: To evaluate the practice of Portuguese Pulmonologists in EoL communication and palliative care in COPD. Methods: An on-line survey was sent to physicians affiliated to the Portuguese Pneumology Society. Results: We obtained 136 answers from 464 eligible participants (29.3%. About half of the physicians reported that they have rarely introduced EoL discussions with their COPD patients (48.5%. Most had never/rarely suggested decision-making on the use of invasive mechanical ventilation (68.4%. Discussions were described as occurring mostly during/after a major exacerbation (53.7%. Only 37.5% of participants reported treating dyspnoea with opioids frequently/always. Only 9.6% stated that they never/rarely treated anxiety/depression. Most participants perceive the discussion of EoL issues as being difficult/very difficult (89.0%. The reasons most frequently given were feeling that patients were not prepared for this discussion (70.0%, fear of taking away a patient's hope (58.0% and lack of training (51.0%. Conclusion: Patient and medical staff EoL communication in COPD is still not good enough. Training in this area and the creation of formal protocols to initiate EoL have been identified as major factors for improvement. Resumo: Introdução: Os cuidados terminais (EoL são um componente importante do tratamento de doentes com doença pulmonar obstrutiva crónica (DPOC avançada. A comunicação entre o doente e o médico é fundamental neste processo. Objetivo: Avaliar a prática dos pneumologistas portugueses na comunicação sobre o fim de vida e os cuidados paliativos na DPOC. Métodos: Foi enviado um inquérito online para os médicos sócios da Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Resultados: Recebemos 136 respostas dos 464 participantes elegíveis (29,3%. Cerca de metade

  3. End-of-life care: Indian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Himanshu; Jagdish, Vankar; Anusha, Prabhakaran; Bharti, Sharma

    2013-01-01

    According to Hinduism, the main religion of India, the end-of-life (EOL) deals with good and bad death. The WHO definition of palliative care stresses on improving not only the quality of life of patients facing incurable diseases but also their families by providing relief from the pain and suffering that includes the psychosocial and spiritual needs as well. The Indian Society of Palliative Care has been doing a commendable work and appreciable efforts are being done by the Kerala model of delivering the EOL care. The spiritual, ethical issues and ethical challenges raised when the patients are in terminal phase are also reviewed keeping in mind the socio-cultural norms. The Indian Penal Code (IPC) has lacunae, which hamper the physicians from taking proper decision in the EOL care. Some of the sections like IPC 309 are defunct and need to be changed. The Indian Society for Critical Care Medicine has developed a position statement on the patient management of the terminally ill patient in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) which states that the society should move from the paternalistic model to the share based decision model of the West when deciding the fate of such patients. The literature review on the Indian research on palliative care shows very little emphatic results and the medical under graduates show illiteracy. To strengthen it Medical Council of India has included the palliative care in its curriculum by starting a PG course. Literature review revealed that more research from Indian perspective should be done in this area. This article studies the core issues of developing palliative care in Indian setting keeping in mind the ethical, spiritual and legal issues. PMID:23858271

  4. The work process and care production in a Brazilian indigenous health service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aridiane Alves Ribeiro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To understand the constitutive elements of the work process and care production in an Indigenous Health Support Service. Methods: Case study. Systematic observation and semi-structured interviews were conducted in January and February of 2012. The participants were 10 nursing professionals of an Indigenous Health Support Center, located in Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil. The work process was used as a conceptual and analytical category. Results: Through interpretative analysis, the data were organized into three categories. The results showed that care production was focused on procedures and guided by rigid institutional rules and bureaucracy. The prioritization of institutional rules and procedures was detrimental to the provision of person-centered care. Conclusion: The temporary employment contracts and rigid bureaucratic organization generated a tense work environment. These aspects do not maximize the efforts of the nursing staff to provide person-centered care.

  5. Nursing care of patients during the dying process: a painful professional and human function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Adiela Lopera Betancur

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This work sought to describe the care functions of nurses with patients during the dying process. Methodology. This was a qualitative study with ethnographic approach stemming from the analysis of the culture of nurses; it was conducted in the city of Medellín, Colombia. Theoretical saturation was obtained with 23 interviews. Results. Nurses feel the duty to care for patients throughout the vital cycle through functions defined as: serving, helping, accompanying, offering support, advocating, educating, and representing, which they identify as indispensable. They also perceive as their own the social responsibility for some issues related to death and due to this they get involved at the personal level, appropriate care and are affected as persons. Conclusion. Patient care during dying processes transcends the limits of the nurse' professional functions to become a human obligation.

  6. Nursing care of patients during the dying process: a painful professional and human function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopera Betancur, Martha Adiela

    2015-01-01

    This work sought to describe the care functions of nurses with patients during the dying process. This was a qualitative study with ethnographic approach stemming from the analysis of the culture of nurses; it was conducted in the city of Medellín, Colombia. Theoretical saturation was obtained with 23 interviews. Nurses feel the duty to care for patients throughout the vital cycle through functions defined as: serving, helping, accompanying, offering support, advocating, educating, and representing, which they identify as indispensable. They also perceive as their own the social responsibility for some issues related to death and due to this they get involved at the personal level, appropriate care and are affected as persons. Patient care during dying processes transcends the limits of the nurse' professional functions to become a human obligation.

  7. Well-being, the Decision making process in residential care facilities and accommodation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudstrup, Mary-Ann; Harder, Henrik

    process. 3. Alternatives to "the living environments”. In general a discussion about “the living environments” as the only and right solution for organising the residential care facilities and accommodation in Denmark is recommended. Maybe there should be a possibility given to create more private...... for assisted living residential care facilities and accommodation for senior citizens selected from different parts of Denmark. The case study will provide important knowledge on municipal activities in the area of residential care facilities, as well as discuss the different actors’ roles in the decision......-based knowledge is needed: There is a need for research-based knowledge manuals among the actors involved in the planning and project design process which describe systematically the importance of working with the different aspects on well-being in residential care facilities and accommodation in Denmark. 2. More...

  8. A team approach in palliative care: enhancing outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Susan L; Horner, Arlene; Eidsness, LuAnn; Young, Sandy; Wright, Chris; Robinson, Michael

    2002-07-01

    While most Americans envision a "good death" as one occurring quickly and painlessly at home surrounded by loved ones, many people do not die in this fashion. Palliative care focuses on holistic treatment of patients whose disease is not responsive to curative treatment, and strives to improve quality of life for patients and families at end-of-life (EOL). This hospital-based study examines the extent to which a palliative care consultant team makes a difference in EOL for patients and families. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 50 hospitalized patients referred to an interdisciplinary palliative care consulting team at a South Dakota tertiary hospital during 2001. Various palliative care interventions were introduced during the course of hospitalization, and data were collected two days later to see if quality of life had improved. Statistically significant improvements were found in pain levels, non-pain symptom management, numerous psychosocial measures of quality of life, change in code status, and perceptions of communication and treatment during hospitalization. The study demonstrates that consultations with a palliative care team are beneficial and enhance the EOL experience for patients and families.

  9. The Comfort Measures Order Set at a Tertiary Care Academic Hospital: Is There a Comparable Difference in End-of-Life Care Between Patients Dying in Acute Care When CMOS Is Utilized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Christine; Stilos, Kalli; Nowell, Allyson; Lau, Fanchea; Moore, Jennifer; Wynnychuk, Lesia

    2018-04-01

    Standardized protocols have been previously shown to be helpful in managing end-of-life (EOL) care in hospital. The comfort measures order set (CMOS), a standardized framework for assessing imminently dying patients' symptoms and needs, was implemented at a tertiary academic hospital. We assessed whether there were comparable differences in the care of a dying patient when the CMOS was utilized and when it was not. A retrospective chart review was completed on patients admitted under oncology and general internal medicine, who were referred to the inpatient palliative care team for "EOL care" between February 2015 and March 2016. Of 83 patients, 56 (67%) received intiation of the CMOS and 27 (33%) did not for EOL care. There was significant involvement of spiritual care with the CMOS (66%), as compared to the group without CMOS (19%), P care, which was significantly less than the number of symptom management adjustments per patient when CMOS was not used (3.3), P care and assessment across the organization is still required.

  10. [Modeling a clinical process for differentiated thyroid cancer health care in Hospital Base Valdivia, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Schwerter, C; Torres-Andrade, M C; Méndez, C A; Márquez-Manzano, M

    2016-01-01

    To design a clinical process model in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer in order to improve accessibility to this treatment. Based on modified Participatory Action Research, a model design process was conducted using a literature review and meetings with organisations committed to the redesigning process, and to agree an improved and feasible process. The process map was constructed by participatory action including, characterisation of the value chain, fault detection in the flow of the process, relevant documents and process for proposing modifications and approvals necessary for this purpose. Links were established between the main process and the support and strategic processes. The participatory model helped to cut the waiting times for diagnosis and treatment of this disease from 12 to 4 months. For each unit to be able to fully visualise the map of the process and understand their contribution as a set of integrated contributions and not fragmented, helps in the comprehensive management of patients and operation processes based on the hierarchical and dominant organisational model in Chilean hospitals. To analyse and remodel clinical processes by participatory action helps to limit failures in the fluidity of care of the patients, by presenting each participating unit with a general view of the process, the problems, and the possible solutions. Furthermore, this approach helps to clarify the process in order to make it more efficient, to harmonise relationships, and to improve coordination in order to optimise patient care. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Systematic review of the primary research on minority ethnic groups and end-of-life care from the United Kingdom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, N.; Meñaca, A.; Andrew, E.V.W.; Koffman, J.; Harding, R.; Higginson, I.J.; Pool, R.; Gysels, M.

    2012-01-01

    Context Patients from minority ethnic groups experience lower rates of referrals to end-of-life (EoL) care services, higher levels of dissatisfaction with services, and perceive some services as culturally inappropriate. Objectives To systematically review original studies of minority ethnic groups

  12. Systematic Review of the Primary Research on Minority Ethnic Groups and End-of-Life Care From the United Kingdom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, N.C.; Menaca, A.; Andrew, E.V.; Koffman, J.; Harding, R.; Higginson, I.J.; Pool, R.; Gysels, M.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Patients from minority ethnic groups experience lower rates of referrals to end-of-life (EoL) care services, higher levels of dissatisfaction with services, and perceive some services as culturally inappropriate. Objectives: To systematically review original studies of minority ethnic

  13. Successful long-term maintenance following Nutrition Care Process Terminology implementation across a state-wide health-care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanti, Angela; O'Sullivan, Therese A; Porter, Jane; Hogg, Marion

    2017-09-01

    Three years following a state-wide Nutrition Care Process Terminology (NCPT) implementation project, the present study aimed to (i) assess changes in NCPT knowledge and attitudes, (ii) identify implementation barriers and enablers and (iii) seek managers' opinions post-implementation. Pre-implementation and three years post-implementation, all Queensland Government hospitals state-wide were invited to repeat a validated NCPT survey. Additionally, a separate survey sought dietetic managers' opinions regarding NCPT's use and acceptance, usefulness for patient care, role in service planning and continued use. A total of 238 dietitians completed the survey in 2011 and 82 dietitians in 2014. Use of diagnostic statement in the previous six months improved (P  0.05). Key elements in sustaining NCPT implementation over three years included ongoing management support, workshops/tutorials, discussion and mentor and peer support. The most valued resources were pocket guides, ongoing workshops/tutorials and mentor support. Dietetic managers held many positive NCPT views, however, opinions differed around the usefulness of service planning, safer practice, improving patient care and facilitating communication. Some managers would not support NCPT unless it was recommended for practice. Immediate improvements following the NCPT implementation project were sustained over three years. Moving forward, a professional focus on continuing to incorporate NCPT into standard practice will provide structure for process and outcomes assessment. © 2017 State of Queensland. Nutrition and Dietetics © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  14. Computerized nursing process in the Intensive Care Unit: ergonomics and usability

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida,Sônia Regina Wagner de; Sasso,Grace Teresinha Marcon Dal; Barra,Daniela Couto Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE Analyzing the ergonomics and usability criteria of the Computerized Nursing Process based on the International Classification for Nursing Practice in the Intensive Care Unit according to International Organization for Standardization(ISO). METHOD A quantitative, quasi-experimental, before-and-after study with a sample of 16 participants performed in an Intensive Care Unit. Data collection was performed through the application of five simulated clinical cases and an evalua...

  15. Intensive care nurses' perceptions of their professional competence in the organ donor process: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Käthe; Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Eide, Hilde

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a report of a study that explored Norwegian intensive care nurses' perceptions of their professional competence to identify educational needs in the organ donor process. Intensive care professionals are requested to consider organ donation each time they care for patients with severe cerebral lesion to ensure donor organs for transplantation. The donor process challenges intensive care nurses' professional competence. Nurses' knowledge and experience may influence their professional competence in caring for organ donors and their relatives. METHODS.: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in all 28 Norwegian donor hospitals between October 2008 and January 2009. Intensive care nurses (N = 801) were invited to participate and the response rate was 71·4%. Dimensions of professional competence, learning needs and contextual and demographic variables were explored. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Few intensive care nurses had extensive experience of or competence and training in organ donation. Nurses working at university hospitals had more experience, but lesser training than nurses in local hospitals. Experience of donor acquisition had an impact on intensive care nurses' perceptions of their professional competence in the donor process. Discussions on the ward and educational input were seen as important for the further development of professional competence. Training provided by experienced colleagues and a culture that encourages discussion about aspects of the donor process can develop nurses' professional competence and communally defined professional practice. Educational input that cultivates various types of knowledge can be beneficial in organ donation. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. A process evaluation of systematic risk and needs assessment for caregivers in specialised palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kia Toft; Guldin, Mai-Britt; Nielsen, Mette Kjærgaard

    2017-01-01

    the feasibility of an intervention based on key elements of the "Bereavement support standards for specialist palliative care services" in a Danish specialised palliative home care team. We followed the UK Medical Research Council's guidelines for the process evaluation of complex interventions. The intervention...... was established according to the intervention blueprint for 62% of caregivers receiving targeted support. After managing initial challenges, palliative care staff reported that the intervention was useful and acceptable. CONCLUSION: The intervention proved feasible and useful. Still, we identified barriers...

  17. Designing a clinical audit tool to measure processes of pregnancy care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace EM

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Suzanne V Sinni1, Wendy M Cross2, Euan M Wallace1,31Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Monash University and Southern Health, Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Victoria, 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3The Ritchie Centre, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: This paper reports the development of a clinical audit tool as part of a larger project to evaluate a new maternity service, underpinned by a patient safety framework.Aim: The aim of this work is to describe the development of a clinical audit tool that measures the process of pregnancy care, and its application.Background: There are many reports about outcomes of healthcare provision, however there are limited studies examining the process of care. There is also limited evidence linking clinical audit with improvements in care delivery. Pregnancy care was chosen because there are well defined and agreed clinical standards against which to measure the delivery of pregnancy care. A clinical audit using these standards addresses both gaps in the literature.Methods: Standard methodological processes were used to develop the audit tool. Literature informed the processes. Data were collected in 2009–2010 using the tool described in the paper. Reliability testing was completed in September 2011.Results: An audit tool to measure pregnancy care was developed and applied to 354 health records to enable analysis of adherence to organizational expectations of care. Reliability testing of the tool achieved an overall kappa of 0.896.Conclusion: Developing an audit tool based on processes described in the literature is labor intensive and resource dependent, however it results in a robust, reliable, valid tool that can be used in diverse maternity services. Stakeholder participation from the outset ensures ongoing engagement for the duration of a clinically based project spanning several years

  18. Critical Care Delivery: The Importance of Process of Care and ICU Structure to Improved Outcomes: An Update From the American College of Critical Care Medicine Task Force on Models of Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weled, Barry J; Adzhigirey, Lana A; Hodgman, Tudy M; Brilli, Richard J; Spevetz, Antoinette; Kline, Andrea M; Montgomery, Vicki L; Puri, Nitin; Tisherman, Samuel A; Vespa, Paul M; Pronovost, Peter J; Rainey, Thomas G; Patterson, Andrew J; Wheeler, Derek S

    2015-07-01

    In 2001, the Society of Critical Care Medicine published practice model guidelines that focused on the delivery of critical care and the roles of different ICU team members. An exhaustive review of the additional literature published since the last guideline has demonstrated that both the structure and process of care in the ICU are important for achieving optimal patient outcomes. Since the publication of the original guideline, several authorities have recognized that improvements in the processes of care, ICU structure, and the use of quality improvement science methodologies can beneficially impact patient outcomes and reduce costs. Herein, we summarize findings of the American College of Critical Care Medicine Task Force on Models of Critical Care: 1) An intensivist-led, high-performing, multidisciplinary team dedicated to the ICU is an integral part of effective care delivery; 2) Process improvement is the backbone of achieving high-quality ICU outcomes; 3) Standardized protocols including care bundles and order sets to facilitate measurable processes and outcomes should be used and further developed in the ICU setting; and 4) Institutional support for comprehensive quality improvement programs as well as tele-ICU programs should be provided.

  19. The process of implementing a rural VA wound care program for diabetic foot ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiber, Gayle E; Raugi, Gregory J; Rowberg, Donald

    2007-10-01

    Delivering and documenting evidence-based treatment to all Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) foot ulcer patients has wide appeal. However, primary and secondary care medical centers where 52% of these patients receive care are at a disadvantage given the frequent absence of trained specialists to manage diabetic foot ulcers. A retrospective review of diabetic foot ulcer patient records and a provider survey were conducted to document the foot ulcer problem and to assess practitioner needs. Results showed of the 125 persons with foot ulcers identified through administrative data, only, 21% of diabetic foot patients were correctly coded. Chronic Care and Microsystem models were used to prepare a tailored intervention in a VA primary care medical center. The site Principal Investigators, a multidisciplinary site wound care team, and study investigators jointly implemented a diabetic foot ulcer program. Intervention components include wound care team education and training, standardized good wound care practices based on strong scientific evidence, and a wound care template embedded in the electronic medical record to facilitate data collection, clinical decision making, patient ordering, and coding. A strategy for delivering offloading pressure devices, regular case management support, and 24/7 emergency assistance also was developed. It took 9 months to implement the model. Patients were enrolled and followed for 1 year. Process and outcome evaluations are on-going.

  20. Performance of the measures of processes of care for adults and service providers in rehabilitation settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamm, Elena L; Rosenbaum, Peter; Wilkins, Seanne; Stratford, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, client-centered care has been embraced as a new philosophy of care by many organizations around the world. Clinicians and researchers have identified the need for valid and reliable outcome measures that are easy to use to evaluate success of implementation of new concepts. The current study was developed to complete adaptation and field testing of the companion patient-reported measures of processes of care for adults (MPOC-A) and the service provider self-reflection measure of processes of care for service providers working with adult clients (MPOC-SP(A)). A validation study. In-patient rehabilitation facilities. MPOC-A and measure of processes of care for service providers working with adult clients (MPOC-SP(A)). Three hundred and eighty-four health care providers, 61 patients, and 16 family members completed the questionnaires. Good to excellent internal consistency (0.71-0.88 for health care professionals, 0.82-0.90 for patients, and 0.87-0.94 for family members), as well as moderate to good correlations between domains (0.40-0.78 for health care professionals and 0.52-0.84 for clients) supported internal reliability of the tools. Exploratory factor analysis of the MPOC-SP(A) responses supported the multidimensionality of the questionnaire. MPOC-A and MPOC-SP(A) are valid and reliable tools to assess patient and service-provider accounts, respectively, of the extent to which they experience, or are able to provide, client-centered service. Research should now be undertaken to explore in more detail the relationships between client experience and provider reports of their own behavior.

  1. Implementing a Systematic Process for Consistent Nursing Care in a NICU: A Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarley, Renay Marie; Dowling, Donna A; Dolansky, Mary A; Bieda, Amy

    2018-03-01

    The global aim of this quality improvement project was to develop and implement a systematic process to assign and maintain consistent bedside nurses for infants and families. A systematic process based on a primary care nursing model was implemented to assign consistent care for a 48-bed, single-family room NICU. Four PDSA cycles were necessary to obtain agreement from the nursing staff as to the best process for assigning primary nurses. Post-intervention data revealed a 9.5 percent decrease of consistent caregivers for infants in the NICU ≤ 28 days and a 2.3 percent increase of consistent caregivers for infants in the NICU ≥ 29 days. Although these findings did not meet the goal of the specific aim, a systematic process was created to assign bedside nurses to infants. Further PDSAs will be needed to refine the process to reach the aim.

  2. Kaizen: a process improvement model for the business of health care and perioperative nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Hassan A

    2012-01-01

    Kaizen is a proven management technique that has a practical application for health care in the context of health care reform and the 2010 Institute of Medicine landmark report on the future of nursing. Compounded productivity is the unique benefit of kaizen, and its principles are change, efficiency, performance of key essential steps, and the elimination of waste through small and continuous process improvements. The kaizen model offers specific instruction for perioperative nurses to achieve process improvement in a five-step framework that includes teamwork, personal discipline, improved morale, quality circles, and suggestions for improvement. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. The process of death imminence awareness by family members of patients in adult critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumhover, Nancy C

    2015-01-01

    A focus on cost-effective quality end-of-life care remains a high priority in adult critical care given an aging population, high prevalence of death, and aggressive technologies used to extend or sustain life in this setting. A Glaserian grounded theory design was used to conduct this retrospective study to yield a substantive middle-range theory. The data source was semistructured interviews with 14 family members of decedents who died 6 to 60 months prior to the study. The purpose of this study was to generate a theory on how family members of patients in adult critical care come to realize that their loved one is dying. The Process of Death Imminence Awareness by Family Members of Patients in Adult Critical Care middle-range theory contained 6 phases: (1) patient's near-death awareness, (2) dying right in front of me, (3) turning points in the patient's condition, (4) no longer the person I once knew, (5) doing right by them, and (6) time to let go. Patient's near-death awareness preceded all other phases, if communicated by the decedent with their family. Then, family members iteratively moved through all the other key phases in the process until a time to let go became evident. This substantive middle-range theory will guide nursing education, practice, and research aimed at providing quality and cost-effective end-of-life care in adult critical care.

  4. Designing clinically valuable telehealth resources: processes to develop a community-based palliative care prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieman, Jennifer Joy; Morgan, Deidre Diane; Swetenham, Kate; To, Timothy Hong Man; Currow, David Christopher

    2014-09-04

    Changing population demography and patterns of disease are increasing demands on the health system. Telehealth is seen as providing a mechanism to support community-based care, thus reducing pressure on hospital services and supporting consumer preferences for care in the home. This study examined the processes involved in developing a prototype telehealth intervention to support palliative care patients involved with a palliative care service living in the community. The challenges and considerations in developing the palliative care telehealth prototype were reviewed against the Center for eHealth Research (CeHRes) framework, a telehealth development model. The project activities to develop the prototype were specifically mapped against the model's first four phases: multidisciplinary project management, contextual inquiry, value specification, and design. This project has been developed as part of the Telehealth in the Home: Aged and Palliative Care in South Australia initiative. Significant issues were identified and subsequently addressed during concept and prototype development. The CeHRes approach highlighted the implicit diversity in views and opinions among participants and stakeholders and enabled issues to be considered, resolved, and incorporated during design through continuous engagement. The CeHRes model provided a mechanism that facilitated "better" solutions in the development of the palliative care prototype by addressing the inherent but potentially unrecognized differences in values and beliefs of participants. This collaboration enabled greater interaction and exchange among participants resulting in a more useful and clinically valuable telehealth prototype.

  5. Warning systems in a computerized nursing process for Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Couto Carvalho Barra

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid study combining technological production and methodological research aiming to establish associations between the data and information that are part of a Computerized Nursing Process according to the ICNP® Version 1.0, indicators of patient safety and quality of care. Based on the guidelines of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the American Association of Critical Care Nurses for the expansion of warning systems, five warning systems were developed: potential for iatrogenic pneumothorax, potential for care-related infections, potential for suture dehiscence in patients after abdominal or pelvic surgery, potential for loss of vascular access, and potential for endotracheal extubation. The warning systems are a continuous computerized resource of essential situations that promote patient safety and enable the construction of a way to stimulate clinical reasoning and support clinical decision making of nurses in intensive care.

  6. Preparing a Health Care White Paper: Providing Structure to the Writing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotarius, Timothy; Rotarius, Velmarie

    2016-01-01

    Health care leaders operate in a very complex and turbulent business environment. Both government regulations and market forces are very active in the industry. Thus, health care managers have many multifaceted and, sometimes, contradictory expectations placed upon them and their organizations. To ensure professional accountability, health care executives often join professional associations and strive for licenses and certifications that are intended to place the professional above the rest. One important avenue to achieve various licensing and certification accomplishments involves writing a white paper about a specific topic of interest to the industry and organization. Presented herein are structural processes that facilitate the creation and preparation of a health care white paper. Both conceptual and empirical structures of white papers are presented, with the similarities and the differences between conceptual and empirical papers highlighted.

  7. Development of a set of process and structure indicators for palliative care: the Europall project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woitha Kathrin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background By measuring the quality of the organisation of palliative care with process and structure quality indicators (QIs, patients, caregivers and policy makers are able to monitor to what extent recommendations are met, like those of the council of the WHO on palliative care and guidelines. This will support the implementation of public programmes, and will enable comparisons between organisations or countries. Methods As no European set of indicators for the organisation of palliative care existed, such a set of QIs was developed. An update of a previous systematic review was made and extended with more databases and grey literature. In two project meetings with practitioners and experts in palliative care the development process of a QI set was finalised and the QIs were categorized in a framework, covering the recommendations of the Council of Europe. Results The searches resulted in 151 structure and process indicators, which were discussed in steering group meetings. Of those QIs, 110 were eligible for the final framework. Conclusions We developed the first set of QIs for the organisation of palliative care. This article is the first step in a multi step project to identify, validate and pilot QIs.

  8. Deployment of an in-house designed training process in a quaternary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajit; Bhatia, Saurabh; Chiang, I-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare providers, such as doctors and nurses, have been famous for high resistance to change. A careful change management plan, particularly training process, is utmost necessary. A quaternary care hospital in India changed its system, from manual to Electronic Medical Record/Health Information System (EMR/HIS). The hospital management wanted to train its 4000 diverse end-users on the EMR/HIS in two months' time. This paper describes an in-house designed training process and its deployment in the given healthcare organizational settings. We designed a training process named DRIPDA. The training process was deployed to train 4000 end-users of EMR/HIS, in the quaternary care hospital. Various factors, such as methods and tools of training, constraints of trainees, trainers, and organization were considered while deploying the training process. The effectiveness of the DRIPDA was assessed using the Kirkpatrick model. End-users received training on the new system only in 25% of estimated time and 28% of the projected expense, without having any distraction in their usual workflow, or any productivity loss. We found that the DRIPDA training process could train all employees effectively and efficiently. A decent training process can help in managing the change, thereby reduce the training time and cost.

  9. Coordinating cancer care: patient and practice management processes among surgeons who treat breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Steven J; Hawley, Sarah T; Morrow, Monica; Griggs, Jennifer J; Jagsi, Reshma; Hamilton, Ann S; Graff, John J; Friese, Christopher R; Hofer, Timothy P

    2010-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine has called for more coordinated cancer care models that correspond to initiatives led by cancer providers and professional organizations. These initiatives parallel those underway to integrate the management of patients with chronic conditions. We developed 5 breast cancer patient and practice management process measures based on the Chronic Care Model. We then performed a survey to evaluate patterns and correlates of these measures among attending surgeons of a population-based sample of patients diagnosed with breast cancer between June 2005 and February 2007 in Los Angeles and Detroit (N = 312; response rate, 75.9%). Surgeon practice specialization varied markedly with about half of the surgeons devoting 15% or less of their total practice to breast cancer, whereas 16.2% of surgeons devoted 50% or more. There was also large variation in the extent of the use of patient and practice management processes with most surgeons reporting low use. Patient and practice management process measures were positively associated with greater levels of surgeon specialization and the presence of a teaching program. Cancer program status was weakly associated with patient and practice management processes. Low uptake of patient and practice management processes among surgeons who treat breast cancer patients may indicate that surgeons are not convinced that these processes matter, or that there are logistical and cost barriers to implementation. More research is needed to understand how large variations in patient and practice management processes might affect the quality of care for patients with breast cancer.

  10. Lessons we are learning: using participatory action research to integrate palliative care, health promotion and public health through the DöBra research program in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishelman, Carol

    2018-01-01

    Public health and health promotion approaches to end-of-life (EoL) research and care are still rare in Sweden. People remain generally ill-prepared for encounters with death and unable to advocate for quality EoL care; this may be reflected in Sweden's low scores for community engagement in the 2015 Quality of Death index. We have consolidated our endeavours into a cohesive national transdisciplinary research program, DöBra (a pun meaning both 'dying well' and 'awesome' in Swedish). In DöBra, we investigate how culture, the environment and conversation can promote constructive change and support better quality of life and death among the general population, in specific subgroups and in interventions directed to staff caring for dying individuals, their friends and families. DöBra uses ideas from new public health and the Ottawa Charter as umbrella theoretical frameworks and participatory action research as an overarching methodological approach. In DöBra we aim to achieve change in communities in a broad sense. In this interactive workshop, we therefore focus on the particular challenges we encounter in conducting stringent research when trying to catalyse, rather than control, change processes. We will share our ideas, experiences, reflections, tools and approaches as well as results, related to using a variety of strategies to bring together a broad range of stakeholders to co-create experience-based evidence through innovative approaches. We begin by linking theory, research and practice through discussion of the overarching ideas and individual projects, with the second part of the session based on audience engagement with various tools used in DöBra.

  11. End-of-Life Education and Discussions With Assisted Living Certified Nursing Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohlman, Wendy L; Dassel, Kara; Supiano, Katherine P; Caserta, Michael

    2018-06-01

    In previous work, the current researchers examined attitudes and experiences of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) providing end-of-life (EOL) care in an assisted living facility (ALF). Results showed that 70% of participating CNAs felt unprepared to provide EOL care, largely due to not having received prior EOL care education within their schools or workplaces. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to implement and evaluate EOL and postmortem education to ALF CNAs. A focus group of 14 CNAs within an ALF was provided EOL education pertaining to the physiological and psychological changes observed in patients nearing EOL and postmortem care. Immediately following training, CNAs participated in a 30-minute focus group in which they discussed their experiences and educational needs regarding EOL care. Responses were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for common themes using descriptive qualitative inquiry. All participants reported that CNA programs need to place greater emphasis on teaching EOL care, and 80% desired continuing education on EOL care through their employers. There is a need for CNAs to receive EOL care education to understand the psychological and physical signs and symptoms associated with the dying process to provide best practices in postmortem care. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 44(6), 41-48.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Donabedian's structure-process-outcome quality of care model: Validation in an integrated trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lynne; Lavoie, André; Bourgeois, Gilles; Lapointe, Jean

    2015-06-01

    According to Donabedian's health care quality model, improvements in the structure of care should lead to improvements in clinical processes that should in turn improve patient outcome. This model has been widely adopted by the trauma community but has not yet been validated in a trauma system. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of an integrated trauma system in terms of structure, process, and outcome and evaluate the correlation between quality domains. Quality of care was evaluated for patients treated in a Canadian provincial trauma system (2005-2010; 57 centers, n = 63,971) using quality indicators (QIs) developed and validated previously. Structural performance was measured by transposing on-site accreditation visit reports onto an evaluation grid according to American College of Surgeons criteria. The composite process QI was calculated as the average sum of proportions of conformity to 15 process QIs derived from literature review and expert opinion. Outcome performance was measured using risk-adjusted rates of mortality, complications, and readmission as well as hospital length of stay (LOS). Correlation was assessed with Pearson's correlation coefficients. Statistically significant correlations were observed between structure and process QIs (r = 0.33), and process and outcome QIs (r = -0.33 for readmission, r = -0.27 for LOS). Significant positive correlations were also observed between outcome QIs (r = 0.37 for mortality-readmission; r = 0.39 for mortality-LOS and readmission-LOS; r = 0.45 for mortality-complications; r = 0.34 for readmission-complications; 0.63 for complications-LOS). Significant correlations between quality domains observed in this study suggest that Donabedian's structure-process-outcome model is a valid model for evaluating trauma care. Trauma centers that perform well in terms of structure also tend to perform well in terms of clinical processes, which in turn has a favorable influence on patient outcomes

  13. Associations between structural quality aspects and process quality in Dutch early childhood education and care settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, P.L.; Leseman, P.P.M.; Verhagen, J.; Mulder, H.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between structural quality and process quality in early childhood education and care (ECEC) has been addressed in several studies. However, the findings are not conclusive. The present study was conducted in the Netherlands, which has a strongly regulated mid-quality ECEC system

  14. A Habermasian Analysis of a Process of Recognition of Prior Learning for Health Care Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses a process of recognition of prior learning for accreditation of prior experiential learning to qualify for course credits used in an adult in-service education program for health care assistants at the upper-secondary level in Sweden. The data are based on interviews and observations drawn from a field study, and Habermas's…

  15. The association between residents' work-rounds styles and the process and outcome of medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, C M; Wray, N P; Friedland, J A; Zollo, A J; Scheurich, J W

    1994-04-01

    To determine whether the manner in which residents conduct work rounds is associated with the adequacy of their care processes and the outcomes of their patients. Two types of data were collected: time and motion data for residents (n = 12) during work rounds, and clinical and outcome data for the patients they cared for during the observation period (n = 211). Five residents were classified as data gatherers because they spent twice as much time gathering clinical data about their patients as they spent engaging in other activities. Three physicians blinded to the resident's identity rated the quality of the care process and assessed the frequency of undesirable events occurring during the stay and after discharge. A data-gathering style was associated with higher quality of care as judged by both process and outcomes. The data gatherers were more likely to comply with the "stability of medications before discharge" criterion (86% of the data gatherers' cases vs 73% of others', p = 0.07), and their patients were less likely to have unanticipated problems, in that fewer required calls from nurses (20% vs 37%, p work-rounds style is associated with better process and outcome. Residency programs should provide formal instruction to trainees in the conduct of work rounds.

  16. VA Health Care: Processes to Evaluate, Implement, and Monitor Organizational Structure Changes Needed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    their families , such as medallions and markers for headstones that signify veterans’ service. Page 3 GAO-16-803 VHA Organizational ... Research Oversight, and Chief Nursing Page 8 GAO-16-803 VHA Organizational Structure Officer. Also, the Chief Financial Officer and...VA HEALTH CARE Processes to Evaluate, Implement, and Monitor Organizational Structure Changes Needed Report to

  17. The Minimum Data Set Depression Quality Indicator: Does It Reflect Differences in Care Processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, S.F.; Cadogan, M.P.; Cabrera, G.R.; Al-Samarrai, N.R.; Jorge, J.S.; Levy-Storms, L.; Osterweil, D.; Schnelle, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The objective of this work was to determine if nursing homes that score differently on prevalence of depression, according to the Minimum Data Set (MDS) quality indicator, also provide different processes of care related to depression. Design and Methods. A cross-sectional study with 396 long-term residents in 14 skilled nursing…

  18. Successful aging - the nurse - aged person interaction process in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria João Soares Rodrigues de Sousa Fernandes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available With the aging population and the natural increase of nursing care within gerontology, there is increasing interest in how the nurse interacts with the aged person and utilizes their role to protect and promote successful aging behaviors. The goal lies in understanding the nurse−aged person interaction process. This is a naturalistic study of qualitative paradigm and inductive reasoning, developed in the context of primary health care. We observed the interaction process between nurse and older person in various Health Centers and Day/Socializing Centers and supplemented the information with an interview. The grounded theory analysis method of Corbin & Strauss was used, which provides the triangulation of data and uses theoretical sampling. The nurse−aged person interaction is established in a joint process of recreation of the gerontologic care predisposing, fostering and strengthening knowledge about the essence of life. The elderly person who is the object of nurse care, builds their lived experience by aiming towards integrity, establishing individual and social interaction and enhancing experiences. From this whole interaction process, a central concept emerges: clarification of the aged person’s lived experience.

  19. Findings From a Nursing Care Audit Based on the Nursing Process: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poortaghi, Sarieh; Salsali, Mahvash; Ebadi, Abbas; Rahnavard, Zahra; Maleki, Farzaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although using the nursing process improves nursing care quality, few studies have evaluated nursing performance in accordance with nursing process steps either nationally or internationally. Objectives: This study aimed to audit nursing care based on a nursing process model. Patients and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which a nursing audit checklist was designed and validated for assessing nurses’ compliance with nursing process. A total of 300 nurses from various clinical settings of Tehran university of medical sciences were selected. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequencies, Pearson correlation coefficient and independent samples t-tests. Results: The compliance rate of nursing process indicators was 79.71 ± 0.87. Mean compliance scores did not significantly differ by education level and gender. However, overall compliance scores were correlated with nurses’ age (r = 0.26, P = 0.001) and work experience (r = 0.273, P = 0.001). Conclusions: Nursing process indicators can be used to audit nursing care. Such audits can be used as quality assurance tools. PMID:26576448

  20. Findings From a Nursing Care Audit Based on the Nursing Process: A Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poortaghi, Sarieh; Salsali, Mahvash; Ebadi, Abbas; Rahnavard, Zahra; Maleki, Farzaneh

    2015-09-01

    Although using the nursing process improves nursing care quality, few studies have evaluated nursing performance in accordance with nursing process steps either nationally or internationally. This study aimed to audit nursing care based on a nursing process model. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which a nursing audit checklist was designed and validated for assessing nurses' compliance with nursing process. A total of 300 nurses from various clinical settings of Tehran university of medical sciences were selected. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics, including frequencies, Pearson correlation coefficient and independent samples t-tests. The compliance rate of nursing process indicators was 79.71 ± 0.87. Mean compliance scores did not significantly differ by education level and gender. However, overall compliance scores were correlated with nurses' age (r = 0.26, P = 0.001) and work experience (r = 0.273, P = 0.001). Nursing process indicators can be used to audit nursing care. Such audits can be used as quality assurance tools.

  1. Patient autonomy and advance care planning: a qualitative study of oncologist and palliative care physicians' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephanie B; Butow, Phyllis N; Kerridge, Ian; Tattersall, Martin H N

    2018-02-01

    Patients' are encouraged to participate in advance care planning (ACP) in order to enhance their autonomy. However, controversy exists as to what it means to be autonomous and there is limited understanding of how social and structural factors may influence cancer patients' ability to exercise their autonomy. The objective of this study is to explore oncologists' and palliative care physicians' understanding of patient autonomy, how this influences reported enactment of decision-making at the end of life (EOL), and the role of ACP in EOL care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with consultant oncologists (n = 11) and palliative medicine doctors (n = 7) working in oncology centres and palliative care units across Australia. We found that doctors generally conceptualized autonomy in terms of freedom from interference but that there was a profound disconnect between this understanding of autonomy and clinical practice in EOL decision-making. The clinicians in our study privileged care, relationships and a 'good death' above patient autonomy, and in practice were reluctant to 'abandon' their patients to total non-interference in decision-making. Patient autonomy in healthcare is bounded, as while patients were generally encouraged to express their preferences for care, medical norms about the quality and 'reasonableness' of care, the availability of services and the patients' family relationships act to enhance or limit patients' capacity to realize their preferences. While for many, this disconnect between theory and practice did not diminish the rhetorical appeal of ACP; for others, this undermined the integrity of ACP, as well as its relevance to care. For some, ACP had little to do with patient autonomy and served numerous other ethical, practical and political functions. The ethical assumptions regarding patient autonomy embedded in academic literature and policy documents relating to ACP are disconnected from the realities of clinical care

  2. Nutrition Care Process Implementation: Experiences in Various Dietetics Environments in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövestam, Elin; Boström, Anne-Marie; Orrevall, Ylva

    2017-11-01

    The Nutrition Care Process (NCP) and Nutrition Care Process Terminology (NCPT) are currently being implemented by nutrition and dietetics practitioners all over the world. Several advantages have been related to this implementation, such as consistency and clarity of dietetics-related health care records and the possibility to collect and research patient outcomes. However, little is known about dietitians' experiences of the implementation process. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore Swedish dietitians' experiences of the NCP implementation process in different dietetics environments. Thirty-seven Swedish dietitians from 13 different dietetics workplaces participated in seven focus group discussions that were audiotaped and carefully transcribed. A thematic secondary analysis was performed, after which all the discussions were re-read, following the implementation narrative from each workplace. In the analysis, The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services implementation model was used as a framework. Main categories identified in the thematic analysis were leadership and implementation strategy, the group and colleagues, the electronic health record, and evaluation. Three typical cases are described to illustrate the diversity of these aspects in dietetics settings: Case A represents a small hospital with an inclusive leadership style and discussion-friendly culture where dietitians had embraced the NCP/NCPT implementation. Case B represents a larger hospital with a more hierarchical structure where dietitians were more ambivalent toward NCP/NCPT implementation. Case C represents the only dietitian working at a small multiprofessional primary care center who received no dietetics-related support from management or colleagues. She had not started NCP/NCPT implementation. The diversity of dietetics settings and their different prerequisites should be considered in the development of NCP/NCPT implementation strategies. Tailored

  3. Geriatric Assessment-Guided Care Processes for Older Adults: A Delphi Consensus of Geriatric Oncology Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohile, Supriya Gupta; Velarde, Carla; Hurria, Arti; Magnuson, Allison; Lowenstein, Lisa; Pandya, Chintan; O'Donovan, Anita; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Dale, William

    2015-09-01

    Structured care processes that provide a framework for how oncologists can incorporate geriatric assessment (GA) into clinical practice could improve outcomes for vulnerable older adults with cancer, a growing population at high risk of toxicity from cancer treatment. We sought to obtain consensus from an expert panel on the use of GA in clinical practice and to develop algorithms of GA-guided care processes. The Delphi technique, a well-recognized structured and reiterative process to reach consensus, was used. Participants were geriatric oncology experts who attended NIH-funded U13 or Cancer and Aging Research Group conferences. Consensus was defined as an interquartile range of 2 or more units, or 66.7% or greater, selecting a utility/helpfulness rating of 7 or greater on a 10-point Likert scale. For nominal data, consensus was defined as agreement among 66.7% or more of the group. From 33 invited, 30 participants completed all 3 rounds. Most experts (75%) used GA in clinical care, and the remainder were involved in geriatric oncology research. The panel met consensus that "all patients aged 75 years or older and those who are younger with age-related health concerns" should undergo GA and that all domains (function, physical performance, comorbidity/polypharmacy, cognition, nutrition, psychological status, and social support) should be included. Consensus was met for how GA could guide nononcologic interventions and cancer treatment decisions. Algorithms for GA-guided care processes were developed. This Delphi investigation of geriatric oncology experts demonstrated that GA should be performed for older patients with cancer to guide care processes. Copyright © 2015 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  4. Process evaluation of a stepped-care program to prevent depression in primary care: patients' and practice nurses' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pols, Alide D; Schipper, Karen; Overkamp, Debbie; van Dijk, Susan E; Bosmans, Judith E; van Marwijk, Harm W J; Adriaanse, Marcel C; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-02-23

    Depression is common in patients with diabetes type 2 (DM2) and/or coronary heart disease (CHD), with high personal and societal burden and may even be preventable. Recently, a cluster randomized trial of stepped care to prevent depression among patients with DM2 and/or CHD and subthreshold depression in Dutch primary care (Step-Dep) versus usual care showed no effectiveness. This paper presents its process evaluation, exploring in-depth experiences from a patient and practice nurse perspective to further understand the results. A qualitative study was conducted. Using a purposive sampling strategy, data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 24 participants (15 patients and nine practice nurses). All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Atlas.ti 5.7.1 software was used for coding and structuring of themes. A thematic analysis of the data was performed. The process evaluation showed, even through a negative trial, that Step-Dep was perceived as valuable by both patients and practice nurses; perceived effectiveness on improving depressive symptoms varied greatly, but most felt that it had been beneficial for patients' well-being. Facilitators were: increased awareness of mental health problems in chronic disease management and improved accessibility and decreased experienced stigma of receiving mental health care. The Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9), used to determine depression severity, functioned as a useful starting point for the conversation on mental health and patients gained more insight into their mental health by regularly filling out the PHQ-9. However, patients and practice nurses did not widely support its use for monitoring depressive symptoms or making treatment decisions. Monitoring mental health was deemed important in chronically ill patients by both patients and practice nurses and was suggested to start at the time of diagnosis of a chronic disease. Appointed barriers were that patients were primarily

  5. Family-centered care in children with epilepsy: Evaluating the Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC-20).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, Kariym C; Wilk, Piotr; Ryan, Bridget L; Speechley, Kathy N

    2016-10-01

    The objective was to test whether the five-domain structure of the Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC-20) was observed in a sample of children with epilepsy and, if not, to propose adaptations to improve its utility in this population. Data came from the Health-Related Quality of Life in Children with Epilepsy Study (HERQULES)-a multicenter prospective cohort study (n = 374) following children 4-12 years of age for 2 years after diagnosis. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) tested the applicability of the five domains/factors in a sample of children with epilepsy approximately 6 months following diagnosis (n = 311). Goodness-of-fit statistics were used to examine sources of ill model fit, and modification indices guided the model modification process where there was strong theoretical rationale for changes. The five-factor model described by the originators of the MPOC-20 was found to be inadmissible in children with epilepsy, with four of the five factors demonstrating high correlations (r > 0.85). Upon merging the intercorrelated factors, a two-factor solution with a mediocre fit emerged (Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA) = 0.080, Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = 0.902, Standardized Root Mean Square Residual (SRMR) = 0.060). Modification indices identified four items as the source of poor model fit. Removing these four items and reperforming the CFA resulted in an adequate model fit and a revised 16-item MPOC (RMSEA = 0.057, CFI = 0.958, SRMR = 0.036). The two factors are "Family/Care Provider Interaction" and "Providing Information." Results suggest that the MPOC-16 better reflects family-centered care (FCC) in children with epilepsy than the original MPOC-20. The benefit of having fewer factors is that scoring is simpler and the interpretation of the results is easier. This was the first investigation of the factor structure of the MPOC-20 on a sample entirely composed of children with epilepsy. These results add to evidence that the factor structure

  6. Representation in the Care Planning Process for Nursing Home Residents With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreedy, Ellen; Loomer, Lacey; Palmer, Jennifer A; Mitchell, Susan L; Volandes, Angelo; Mor, Vincent

    2018-05-01

    Federally mandated assessments of nursing home (NH) residents drive individualized care planning. Residents with cognitive impairment may not be able to meaningfully communicate their care needs and preferences during this process-a gap that may be partially addressed by involving surrogates. We describe the prevalence of family participation in the care planning process for long-stay NH residents with varying degrees of cognitive impairment. Retrospective study using administrative data made available as part of an ongoing pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial. A total of 292 NHs from 1 large for-profit NH system. Long-stay NH residents in 2016. We identified all care planning assessments conducted in 2016 for long-stay NH residents. Cognitive functioning was defined using the Cognitive Function Scale. The Minimum Data Set was used to determine whether a resident, family member, and/or legal guardian participated in the assessment process. Certification and Survey Provider Enhance Reporting system data was used to identify facility-level correlates of family participation. Bivariate and multivariable hierarchical regression results are presented. The analytic sample included 18,552 long-stay NH residents. Family member/representative participation varied by degree of resident cognitive impairment; 8% of residents with no cognitive impairment had family or representative participation in care planning during 2016, compared with 26% of residents with severe impairment. NHs with more social workers had greater family participation in care planning. Available NH characteristics do not explain most of the variation in family participation between NHs (residual intraclass correlation = .57). Only a minority of family members and surrogates participate in NH care planning, even for residents with severe cognitive impairment. The association between social work staffing and participation suggests family involvement may be a measure of quality improvement

  7. Exploring the success of an integrated primary care partnership: a longitudinal study of collaboration processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn, Pim P; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Ruwaard, Dirk; de Bont, Antoinette; Arends, Rosa Y; Bruijnzeels, Marc A

    2015-01-22

    Forming partnerships is a prominent strategy used to promote integrated service delivery across health and social service systems. Evidence about the collaboration process upon which partnerships evolve has rarely been addressed in an integrated-care setting. This study explores the longitudinal relationship of the collaboration process and the influence on the final perceived success of a partnership in such a setting. The collaboration process through which partnerships evolve is based on a conceptual framework which identifies five themes: shared ambition, interests and mutual gains, relationship dynamics, organisational dynamics and process management. Fifty-nine out of 69 partnerships from a national programme in the Netherlands participated in this survey study. At baseline, 338 steering committee members responded, and they returned 320 questionnaires at follow-up. Multiple-regression-analyses were conducted to explore the relationship between the baseline as well as the change in the collaboration process and the final success of the partnerships. Mutual gains and process management were the most significant baseline predictors for the final success of the partnership. A positive change in the relationship dynamics had a significant effect on the final success of a partnership. Insight into the collaboration process of integrated primary care partnerships offers a potentially powerful way of predicting their success. Our findings underscore the importance of monitoring the collaboration process during the development of the partnerships in order to achieve their full collaborative advantage.

  8. Prediction of Adequate Prenatal Care Utilization Based on the Extended Parallel Process Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajian, Sepideh; Imani, Fatemeh; Riazi, Hedyeh; Salmani, Fatemeh

    2017-10-01

    Pregnancy complications are one of the major public health concerns. One of the main causes of preventable complications is the absence of or inadequate provision of prenatal care. The present study was conducted to investigate whether Extended Parallel Process Model's constructs can predict the utilization of prenatal care services. The present longitudinal prospective study was conducted on 192 pregnant women selected through the multi-stage sampling of health facilities in Qeshm, Hormozgan province, from April to June 2015. Participants were followed up from the first half of pregnancy until their childbirth to assess adequate or inadequate/non-utilization of prenatal care services. Data were collected using the structured Risk Behavior Diagnosis Scale. The analysis of the data was carried out in SPSS-22 using one-way ANOVA, linear regression and logistic regression analysis. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Totally, 178 pregnant women with a mean age of 25.31±5.42 completed the study. Perceived self-efficacy (OR=25.23; Pprenatal care. Husband's occupation in the labor market (OR=0.43; P=0.02), unwanted pregnancy (OR=0.352; Pcare for the minors or elderly at home (OR=0.35; P=0.045) were associated with lower odds of receiving prenatal care. The model showed that when perceived efficacy of the prenatal care services overcame the perceived threat, the likelihood of prenatal care usage will increase. This study identified some modifiable factors associated with prenatal care usage by women, providing key targets for appropriate clinical interventions.

  9. Assessing learning process of caring behavior among nursing students in Palembang, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Kusumawaty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Caring as the heart of nursing profession should be learned by nursing students. However, in fact, to generate caring professional nurses is not an uncomplicated issue and there are some factors that can influence its achievement. Socio-cognitive theory which emphasizes on interaction between person, behavior, and environment in learning theory was used to assess caring behavior learning process. Objective The aims of the study are to assess characteristics of nursing students, to identify students’ preferences in choosing their profession, to pinpoint students’ perception and educators’ teaching methods used in caring behavior class and to determine students understanding of caring behavior. Methods A descriptive analysis was used to analyze data obtained through surveys and brief interviews.Samples are 232 nursing students from diploma III program (89, 66 and 77 students, respectively students at semester 2, 4 and 6, 3 nurse educators and 3 stakeholders from 2 hospitals, and 1 from organizational profession. Results Majority, of the students are female and, had chosen nursing as the first priority. However, more than 50% of their choice was not based on their preferences, but influenced by family’s desire. There are more students who have less understanding about caring than those who have good understanding. Teaching strategies were varied, but mostly consist of lectures and discussions. There were complaints from stakeholders related to communication, patience, and empathy as a part of caring behavior nurses who graduated with diploma III. Conclusion Nurse educators should provide an extensive understanding of the nursing profession and motivate students from the early semester. Improved motivation is crucially important to enhance students’ caring behavior.

  10. Challenges to fair decision-making processes in the context of health care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shayo, Elizabeth H.; Norheim, Ole F.; Mboera, Leonard E. G.

    2012-01-01

    challenges to fair decision-making processes in health care services with a special focus on the potential influence of gender, wealth, ethnicity and education. We draw on the principle of fairness as outlined in the deliberative democratic theory. METHODS: The study was carried out in the Mbarali District......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Fair processes in decision making need the involvement of stakeholders who can discuss issues and reach an agreement based on reasons that are justifiable and appropriate in meeting people's needs. In Tanzania, the policy of decentralization and the health sector reform place......: The study findings indicate a substantial influence of gender, wealth, ethnicity and education on health care decision-making processes. Men, wealthy individuals, members of strong ethnic groups and highly educated individuals had greater influence. Opinions varied among the study informants as to whether...

  11. Who cares? Offering emotion work as a 'gift' in the nursing labour process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, S C

    2000-09-01

    Who cares? Offering emotion work as a 'gift' in the nursing labour process The emotional elements of the nursing labour process are being recognized increasingly. Many commentators stress that nurses' 'emotional labour' is hard and productive work and should be valued in the same way as physical or technical labour. However, the term 'emotional labour' fails to conceptualize the many occasions when nurses not only work hard on their emotions in order to present the detached face of a professional carer, but also to offer authentic caring behaviour to patients in their care. Using qualitative data collected from a group of gynaecology nurses in an English National Health Service (NHS) Trust hospital, this paper argues that nursing work is emotionally complex and may be better understood by utilizing a combination of Hochschild's concepts: emotion work as a 'gift' in addition to 'emotional labour'. The gynaecology nurses in this study describe their work as 'emotionful' and therefore it could be said that this particular group of nurses represent a distinct example. Nevertheless, though it is impossible to generalize from limited data, the research presented in this paper does highlight the emotional complexity of the nursing labour process, expands the current conceptual analysis, and offers a path for future research. The examination further emphasizes the need to understand and value the motivations behind nurses' emotion work and their wish to maintain caring as a central value in professional nursing.

  12. Audit filters for improving processes of care and clinical outcomes in trauma systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Christopher; Howes, Daniel; Pickett, William; Dagnone, Luigi

    2009-10-07

    Traumatic injuries represent a considerable public health burden with significant personal and societal costs. The care of the severely injured patient in a trauma system progresses along a continuum that includes numerous interventions being provided by a multidisciplinary group of healthcare personnel. Despite the recent emphasis on quality of care in medicine, there has been little research to direct trauma clinicians and administrators on how optimally to monitor and improve upon the quality of care delivered within a trauma system. Audit filters are one mechanism for improving quality of care and are defined as specific clinical processes or outcomes of care that, when they occur, represent unfavorable deviations from an established norm and which prompt review and feedback. Although audit filters are widely utilized for performance improvement in trauma systems they have not been subjected to systematic review of their effectiveness. To determine the effectiveness of using audit filters for improving processes of care and clinical outcomes in trauma systems. Our search strategy included an electronic search of the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane EPOC Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 4), MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and ISI Web of Science: (SCI-EXPANDED and CPCI-S). We handsearched the Journal of Trauma, Injury, Annals of Emergency Medicine, Academic Emergency Medicine, and Injury Prevention. We searched two clinical trial registries: 1) The World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and, 2) Clinical Trials.gov. We also contacted content experts for further articles. The most recent electronic search was completed in December 2008 and the handsearch was completed up to February 2009. We searched for randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-and-after studies, and interrupted time series studies that used audit filters as an

  13. A pan-European survey of research in end-of-life cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdardottir, Katrin Ruth; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg; Bausewein, Claudia; Higginson, Irene J; Harding, Richard; Rosland, Jan Henrik; Kaasa, Stein

    2012-01-01

    To date, there is no coordinated strategy for end-of-life (EOL) cancer care research in Europe. The PRISMA (Reflecting the Positive Diversities of European Priorities for Research and Measurement in End-of-life Care) project is aiming to develop a programme integrating research and measurement in EOL care. This survey aimed to map and describe present EOL cancer care research in Europe and to identify priorities and barriers. A questionnaire of 62 questions was developed and 201 researchers in 41 European countries were invited to complete it online in May 2009. An open invitation to participate was posted on the internet. Invited contacts in 36 countries sent 127 replies; eight additional responses came through websites. A total of 127 responses were eligible for analysis. Respondents were 69 male and 58 female, mean age 49 (28-74) years; 85% of the scientific team leaders were physicians. Seventy-one of 127 research groups were located in a teaching hospital or cancer centre. Forty-five percent of the groups had only one to five members and 28% six to ten members. Sixty-three of 92 groups reported specific funding for EOL care research. Seventy-five percent of the groups had published papers in journals with impact factor ≤ 5 in the last 3 years; 8% had published in journals with impact factor >10. Forty-four out of 90 groups reported at least one completed Ph.D. in the last 3 years. The most frequently reported active research areas were pain, assessment and measurement tools, and last days of life and quality of death. Very similar areas--last days of life and quality of death, pain, fatigue and cachexia, and assessment and measurement tools--were ranked as the most important research priorities. The most important research barriers were lack of funding, lack of time, and insufficient knowledge/expertise. Most research groups in EOL care are small. The few large groups (14%) had almost half of the reported publications, and more than half of the current Ph

  14. Examining the Role of Primary Care Physicians and Challenges Faced When Their Patients Transition to Home Hospice Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Ariel; Phongtankuel, Veerawat; Lampa, Katherine; Reid, M C; Eiss, Brian M; Bhatia, Sonica; Adelman, Ronald D

    2018-04-01

    The transition into home hospice care is often a critical time in a patient's medical care. Studies have shown patients and caregivers desire continuity with their physicians at the end of life (EoL). However, it is unclear what roles primary care physicians (PCPs) play and what challenges they face caring for patients transitioning into home hospice care. To understand PCPs' experiences, challenges, and preferences when their patients transition to home hospice care. Nineteen semi-structured phone interviews with PCPs were conducted. Study data were analyzed using standard qualitative methods. Participants included PCPs from 3 academic group practices in New York City. Measured: Physician recordings were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Most PCPs noted that there was a discrepancy between their actual role and ideal role when their patients transitioned to home hospice care. Primary care physicians expressed a desire to maintain continuity, provide psychosocial support, and collaborate actively with the hospice team. Better establishment of roles, more frequent communication with the hospice team, and use of technology to communicate with patients were mentioned as possible ways to help PCPs achieve their ideal role caring for their patients receiving home hospice care. Primary care physicians expressed varying degrees of involvement during a patient's transition to home hospice care, but many desired to be more involved in their patient's care. As with patients, physicians desire to maintain continuity with their patients at the EoL and solutions to improve communication between PCPs, hospice providers, and patients need to be explored.

  15. The feasibility of a train-the-trainer approach to end of life care training in care homes: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer, Andrea; Goodman, Claire; Smeeton, Nigel; Handley, Melanie; Amador, Sarah; Davies, Sue

    2016-01-22

    The ABC End of Life Education Programme trained approximately 3000 care home staff in End of Life (EoL) care. An evaluation that compared this programme with the Gold Standards Framework found that it achieved equivalent outcomes at a lower cost with higher levels of staff satisfaction. To consolidate this learning, a facilitated peer education model that used the ABC materials was piloted. The goal was to create a critical mass of trained staff, mitigate the impact of staff turnover and embed EoL care training within the organisations. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a train the trainer (TTT) model to support EoL care in care homes. A mixed method design involved 18 care homes with and without on-site nursing across the East of England. Data collection included a review of care home residents' characteristics and service use (n = 274), decedents' notes n = 150), staff interviews (n = 49), focus groups (n = 3), audio diaries (n = 28) and observations of workshops (n = 3). Seventeen care homes participated. At the end of the TTT programme 28 trainers and 114 learners (56% of the targeted number of learners) had been trained (median per home 6, range 0-13). Three care homes achieved or exceeded the set target of training 12 learners. Trainers ranged from senior care staff to support workers and administrative staff. Results showed a positive association between care home stability, in terms of leadership and staff turnover, and uptake of the programme. Care home ownership, type of care home, size of care home, previous training in EoL care and resident characteristics were not associated with programme completion. Working with facilitators was important to trainers, but insufficient to compensate for organisational turbulence. Variability of uptake was also linked to management support, programme fit with the trainers' roles and responsibilities and their opportunities to work with staff on a daily basis. When

  16. The impact of a lean rounding process in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, Atul; Goin, Kristin H; Villarreal, Monica C; Yilmaz, Tuba; Fortenberry, James D; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2012-02-01

    Poor workflow associated with physician rounding can produce inefficiencies that decrease time for essential activities, delay clinical decisions, and reduce staff and patient satisfaction. Workflow and provider resources were not optimized when a pediatric intensive care unit increased by 22,000 square feet (to 33,000) and by nine beds (to 30). Lean methods (focusing on essential processes) and scenario analysis were used to develop and implement a patient-centric standardized rounding process, which we hypothesize would lead to improved rounding efficiency, decrease required physician resources, improve satisfaction, and enhance throughput. Human factors techniques and statistical tools were used to collect and analyze observational data for 11 rounding events before and 12 rounding events after process redesign. Actions included: 1) recording rounding events, times, and patient interactions and classifying them as essential, nonessential, or nonvalue added; 2) comparing rounding duration and time per patient to determine the impact on efficiency; 3) analyzing discharge orders for timeliness; 4) conducting staff surveys to assess improvements in communication and care coordination; and 5) analyzing customer satisfaction data to evaluate impact on patient experience. Thirty-bed pediatric intensive care unit in a children's hospital with academic affiliation. Eight attending pediatric intensivists and their physician rounding teams. Eight attending physician-led teams were observed for 11 rounding events before and 12 rounding events after implementation of a standardized lean rounding process focusing on essential processes. Total rounding time decreased significantly (157 ± 35 mins before vs. 121 ± 20 mins after), through a reduction in time spent on nonessential (53 ± 30 vs. 9 ± 6 mins) activities. The previous process required three attending physicians for an average of 157 mins (7.55 attending physician man-hours), while the new process required two

  17. Implementing Dementia Care Mapping to develop person-centred care: results of a process evaluation within the Leben-QD II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quasdorf, Tina; Riesner, Christine; Dichter, Martin Nikolaus; Dortmann, Olga; Bartholomeyczik, Sabine; Halek, Margareta

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate Dementia Care Mapping implementation in nursing homes. Dementia Care Mapping, an internationally applied method for supporting and enhancing person-centred care for people with dementia, must be successfully implemented into care practice for its effective use. Various factors influence the implementation of complex interventions such as Dementia Care Mapping; few studies have examined the specific factors influencing Dementia Care Mapping implementation. A convergent parallel mixed-methods design embedded in a quasi-experimental trial was used to assess Dementia Care Mapping implementation success and influential factors. From 2011-2013, nine nursing units in nine different nursing homes implemented either Dementia Care Mapping (n = 6) or a periodic quality of life measurement using the dementia-specific instrument QUALIDEM (n = 3). Diverse data (interviews, n = 27; questionnaires, n = 112; resident records, n = 81; and process documents) were collected. Each data set was separately analysed and then merged to comprehensively portray the implementation process. Four nursing units implemented the particular intervention without deviating from the preplanned intervention. Translating Dementia Care Mapping results into practice was challenging. Necessary organisational preconditions for Dementia Care Mapping implementation included well-functioning networks, a dementia-friendly culture and flexible organisational structures. Involved individuals' positive attitudes towards Dementia Care Mapping also facilitated implementation. Precisely planning the intervention and its implementation, recruiting champions who supported Dementia Care Mapping implementation and having well-qualified, experienced project coordinators were essential to the implementation process. For successful Dementia Care Mapping implementation, it must be embedded in a systematic implementation strategy considering the specific setting. Organisational preconditions may need to

  18. Usability of computerized nursing process from the ICNP® in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Couto Carvalho Barra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the usability of Computerized Nursing Process (CNP from the ICNP® 1.0 in Intensive Care Units in accordance with the criteria established by the standards of the International Organization for Standardization and the Brazilian Association of Technical Standards of systems. METHOD This is a before-and-after semi-experimental quantitative study, with a sample of 34 participants (nurses, professors and systems programmers, carried out in three Intensive Care Units. RESULTS The evaluated criteria (use, content and interface showed that CNP has usability criteria, as it integrates a logical data structure, clinical assessment, diagnostics and nursing interventions. CONCLUSION The CNP is a source of information and knowledge that provide nurses with new ways of learning in intensive care, for it is a place that provides complete, comprehensive, and detailed content, supported by current and relevant data and scientific research information for Nursing practices.

  19. Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit: is it an adequate public health response to addressing the issue of caregiver burden in end-of-life care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison M; Eby, Jeanette A; Crooks, Valorie A; Stajduhar, Kelli; Giesbrecht, Melissa; Vuksan, Mirjana; Cohen, S Robin; Brazil, Kevin; Allan, Diane

    2011-05-18

    An increasingly significant public health issue in Canada, and elsewhere throughout the developed world, pertains to the provision of adequate palliative/end-of-life (P/EOL) care. Informal caregivers who take on the responsibility of providing P/EOL care often experience negative physical, mental, emotional, social and economic consequences. In this article, we specifically examine how Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit (CCB)--a contributory benefits social program aimed at informal P/EOL caregivers--operates as a public health response in sustaining informal caregivers providing P/EOL care, and whether or not it adequately addresses known aspects of caregiver burden that are addressed within the population health promotion (PHP) model. As part of a national evaluation of Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit, 57 telephone interviews were conducted with Canadian informal P/EOL caregivers in 5 different provinces, pertaining to the strengths and weaknesses of the CCB and the general caregiving experience. Interview data was coded with Nvivo software and emerging themes were identified by the research team, with such findings published elsewhere. The purpose of the present analysis was identified after comparing the findings to the literature specific to caregiver burden and public health, after which data was analyzed using the PHP model as a guiding framework. Informal caregivers spoke to several of the determinants of health outlined in the PHP model that are implicated in their burden experience: gender, income and social status, working conditions, health and social services, social support network, and personal health practises and coping strategies. They recognized the need for improving the CCB to better address these determinants. This study, from the perspective of family caregivers, demonstrates that the CCB is not living up to its full potential in sustaining informal P/EOL caregivers. Effort is required to transform the CCB so that it may fulfill the

  20. Implementation of the SMART MOVE intervention in primary care: a qualitative study using normalisation process theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Liam G; Glynn, Fergus; Casey, Monica; Wilkinson, Louise Gaffney; Hayes, Patrick S; Heaney, David; Murphy, Andrew W M

    2018-05-02

    Problematic translational gaps continue to exist between demonstrating the positive impact of healthcare interventions in research settings and their implementation into routine daily practice. The aim of this qualitative evaluation of the SMART MOVE trial was to conduct a theoretically informed analysis, using normalisation process theory, of the potential barriers and levers to the implementation of a mhealth intervention to promote physical activity in primary care. The study took place in the West of Ireland with recruitment in the community from the Clare Primary Care Network. SMART MOVE trial participants and the staff from four primary care centres were invited to take part and all agreed to do so. A qualitative methodology with a combination of focus groups (general practitioners, practice nurses and non-clinical staff from four separate primary care centres, n = 14) and individual semi-structured interviews (intervention and control SMART MOVE trial participants, n = 4) with purposeful sampling utilising the principles of Framework Analysis was utilised. The Normalisation Process Theory was used to develop the topic guide for the interviews and also informed the data analysis process. Four themes emerged from the analysis: personal and professional exercise strategies; roles and responsibilities to support active engagement; utilisation challenges; and evaluation, adoption and adherence. It was evident that introducing a new healthcare intervention demands a comprehensive evaluation of the intervention itself and also the environment in which it is to operate. Despite certain obstacles, the opportunity exists for the successful implementation of a novel healthcare intervention that addresses a hitherto unresolved healthcare need, provided that the intervention has strong usability attributes for both disseminators and target users and coheres strongly with the core objectives and culture of the health care environment in which it is to operate. We

  1. [Participative action research; self-care education for the mature adult, a dialogic and empowered process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Gomez, Sheila; Medina Moya, José Luis; Mendoza Pérez de Mendiguren, Beatriz; Ugarte Arena, Ana Isabel; Martínez de Albéniz Arriaran, Mercedes

    2015-11-01

    Explore and transform dialogic-reflexive learning processes oriented to self-care, capacitation, empowerment and health promotion for "mature-adult" collective. Participative action research on a qualitative and sociocritic approach. Data generation methods are SITE: Field work focuses on the development of the educational program "Care is in your hands" that takes place in two villages (Primary Care. Comarca Araba). Through a theoretical sampling involved people who are in a "mature-adult" life stage and three nurses with extensive experience in development health education programs. Participant observation where health education sessions are recorded in video and group reflection on action. To triangulate the data, have been made in-depth interviews with 4 participants. Carried out a content and discourse analysis. Participant and nurses' Previous Frameworks, and these last ones' discourses as well, reveal a current technical rationality (unidirectional, informative,.) yet in practice that perpetuates the role of passive recipient of care. Educational keys constructed from a viewpoint of Dialogic Learning emerge as elements that facilitate overcoming these previous frames limitations. Finally, Reflective Learning launched, has provided advance in professional knowledge and improve health education. Dialogical learning emerges as key to the training and empowerment, where we have seen how practical-reflexive, and not technical, rationality is meanly useful confronting ambiguous and complex situations of self-care practice and education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Process Evaluation: Standard, Effectiveness, Efficiency and Sustainability of Maternity Nursing Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laili Rahayuwati

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although globally there is a change in the trend of epidemiology from infectious diseases to chronic diseases, the prevalence and incidence of infectious diseases as well as MMR (Maternal Mortality Rate and IMR (infant mortality rate in Indonesia is still high. In year 2000, Faculty of Nursing of the Universitas Padjadjaran in collaboration with Hasan Sadikin Hospital built a model of treatment room, which was affiliated with obstetric gynecology room for improving integrated quality of health care services and education. The model built in this room aimed to : 1 Improve the quality of health care service; 2 to develop the student’s experiences with patients; 3 Provide quality nurse education to support students; 4 encourage students to improve the results of clinical prctice. The objective of process evaluation in this study was to give an insight to an appropriate model for maternity nursing service. This results showed on the one hand , there are some records not yet achieved an ideal standard , lack of effectiveness and efficiency of care delivery, namely: 1 the ratio of midwives and patients are not ideal ; 2 No one consultant obstetrician gynecologist and one doctor for every room . As well as challenges to sustainability care that meets the standards of maternity care. Conclusion: this study recommends to take a comprehensive strategic planning for improving nursing and midwifery services that involve all relevant stakeholders in the government, civil society, service delivery, education, and professional organizations.

  3. Smartphone apps and the nutrition care process: Current perspectives and future considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juliana; Gemming, Luke; Hanning, Rhona; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2018-04-01

    To provide dietitians with practical guidance on incorporating smartphone applications (apps) in the nutrition care process (NCP) to optimize patient education and counseling. The current evidence-base for mobile health (mHealth) apps was searched using PubMed and Google Scholar. Where and how apps could be implemented by dietitians across the four steps of the NCP is discussed. With functionality to automatically convert patient dietary records into nutrient components, nutrition assessment can be streamlined using nutrition apps, allowing more time for dietitians to deliver education and nutrition counseling. Dietitians could prescribe apps to provide patients with education on nutrition skills and in counseling for better adherence to behavior change. Improved patient-provider communication is also made possible through the opportunity for real-time monitoring and evaluation of patient progress via apps. A practical framework termed the 'Mobile Nutrition Care Process Grid' provides dietitians with best-practice guidance on how to use apps. Including apps into dietetic practice could enhance the efficiency and quality of nutrition care and counseling delivered by dietitians. Apps should be considered an adjunct to enable dietetic counseling and care, rather than to replace the expertise, social support and accountability provided by dietitians. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Understanding the implementation of complex interventions in health care: the normalization process model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers Anne

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Normalization Process Model is a theoretical model that assists in explaining the processes by which complex interventions become routinely embedded in health care practice. It offers a framework for process evaluation and also for comparative studies of complex interventions. It focuses on the factors that promote or inhibit the routine embedding of complex interventions in health care practice. Methods A formal theory structure is used to define the model, and its internal causal relations and mechanisms. The model is broken down to show that it is consistent and adequate in generating accurate description, systematic explanation, and the production of rational knowledge claims about the workability and integration of complex interventions. Results The model explains the normalization of complex interventions by reference to four factors demonstrated to promote or inhibit the operationalization and embedding of complex interventions (interactional workability, relational integration, skill-set workability, and contextual integration. Conclusion The model is consistent and adequate. Repeated calls for theoretically sound process evaluations in randomized controlled trials of complex interventions, and policy-makers who call for a proper understanding of implementation processes, emphasize the value of conceptual tools like the Normalization Process Model.

  5. A collaborative design method to support integrated care. An ICT development method containing continuous user validation improves the entire care process and the individual work situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandurra, Isabella; Hägglund, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Integrated care involves different professionals, belonging to different care provider organizations and requires immediate and ubiquitous access to patient-oriented information, supporting an integrated view on the care process [1]. Purpose To present a method for development of usable and work process-oriented information and communication technology (ICT) systems for integrated care. Theory and method Based on Human-computer Interaction Science and in particular Participatory Design [2], we present a new collaborative design method in the context of health information systems (HIS) development [3]. This method implies a thorough analysis of the entire interdisciplinary cooperative work and a transformation of the results into technical specifications, via user validated scenarios, prototypes and use cases, ultimately leading to the development of appropriate ICT for the variety of occurring work situations for different user groups, or professions, in integrated care. Results and conclusions Application of the method in homecare of the elderly resulted in an HIS that was well adapted to the intended user groups. Conducted in multi-disciplinary seminars, the method captured and validated user needs and system requirements for different professionals, work situations, and environments not only for current work; it also aimed to improve collaboration in future (ICT supported) work processes. A holistic view of the entire care process was obtained and supported through different views of the HIS for different user groups, resulting in improved work in the entire care process as well as for each collaborating profession [4].

  6. Translating infection control guidelines into practice: implementation process within a health care institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveis, Victoria H; Conway, Laurie J; Uchida, Mayuko; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Larson, Elaine L; Stone, Patricia W

    2014-04-01

    Health-care-associated infections (HAIs) remain a major patient safety problem even as policy and programmatic efforts designed to reduce HAIs have increased. Although information on implementing effective infection control (IC) efforts has steadily grown, knowledge gaps remain regarding the organizational elements that improve bedside practice and accommodate variations in clinical care settings. We conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews in 11 hospitals across the United States with a range of hospital personnel involved in IC (n = 116). We examined the collective nature of IC and the organizational elements that can enable disparate groups to work together to prevent HAIs. Our content analysis of participants' narratives yielded a rich description of the organizational process of implementing adherence to IC. Findings document the dynamic, fluid, interactional, and reactive nature of this process. Three themes emerged: implementing adherence efforts institution-wide, promoting an institutional culture to sustain adherence, and contending with opposition to the IC mandate.

  7. [Nurses' subjectivity production and the decision-making in the process of care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busanello, Josefine; Lunardi Filho, Wilson Danilo; Kerber, Nalú Pereira da Costa

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to understand the relationship between Nurse's production of subjectivity and the decision-making in the process of Nursing care. A qualitative design of research was conducted. The investigation was carried out with twelve nurses who work at the Associação de Caridade Santa Casa do Rio Grande, a hospital located in Rio Grande, RS, Brazil. For data collection, focus group technique was used three meetings were conducted in december 2011. The results were presented in semantic categories: Capitalist System: maintenance of employment bond; Submission System: institutionalized culture and vision of society; Nursing Hierarchical System; and Values System: feeling of guilt and lack of professional recognition. The capitalist system mediates, mainly, the behavior that prevails in the decision-making process in Nursing care.

  8. “This is Our Last Stop”: Negotiating End of Life Transitions in Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Mary M.; Kemp, Candace L.; Hollingsworth, Carole; Perkins, Molly M.

    2014-01-01

    Where people die has important implications for end-of-life (EOL) care. Assisted living (AL) increasingly is becoming a site of EOL care and a place where people die. AL residents are moving in older and sicker and with more complex care needs, yet AL remains largely a non-medical care setting that subscribes to a social rather than medical model of care. The aims of this paper are to add to the limited knowledge of how EOL is perceived, experienced, and managed in AL and to learn how individual, facility, and community factors influence these perceptions and experiences. Using qualitative methods and a grounded theory approach to study eight diverse AL settings, we present a preliminary model for how EOL care transitions are negotiated in AL that depicts the range of multilevel intersecting factors that shape EOL processes and events in AL. Facilities developed what we refer to as an EOL presence, which varied across and within settings depending on multiple influences, including, notably, the dying trajectories and care arrangements of residents at EOL, the prevalence of death and dying in a facility, and the attitudes and responses of individuals and facilities towards EOL processes and events, including how deaths were communicated and formally acknowledged and the impact of death and dying on residents and staff. Our findings indicate that in the majority of cases, EOL care must be supported by collaborative arrangements of care partners and that hospice care is a critical component. PMID:24984903

  9. Advance care planning in stroke: influence of time on engagement in the process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green T

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Theresa Green1, Shreyas Gandhi2, Tessa Kleissen1, Jessica Simon1,3, Shelley Raffin-Bouchal1, Karla Ryckborst41Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 3Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Calgary Stroke Program, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB, CanadaPurpose: Individuals who experience stroke have a higher likelihood of subsequent stroke events, making it imperative to plan for future medical care. In the event of a further serious health event, engaging in the process of advanced care planning (ACP can help family members and health care professionals (HCPs make medical decisions for individuals who have lost the capacity to do so. Few studies have explored the views and experiences of patients with stroke about discussing their wishes and preferences for future medical events, and the extent to which stroke HCPs engage in conversations around planning for such events. In this study, we sought to understand how the process of ACP unfolded between HCPs and patients post-stroke.Patients and methods: Using grounded theory (GT methodology, we engaged in direct observation of HCP and patient interactions on an acute stroke unit and two stroke rehabilitation units. Using semi-structured interviews, 14 patients and four HCPs were interviewed directly about the ACP process.Results: We found that open and continual ACP conversations were not taking place, patients experienced an apparent lack of urgency to engage in ACP, and HCPs were uncomfortable initiating ACP conversations due to the sensitive nature of the topic.Conclusion: In this study, we identified lack of engagement in ACP post-stroke, attributable to patient and HCP factors. This encourages us to look further into the process of ACP in order to develop open communication between the patient with stroke, their families, and stroke HCPs.Keywords: qualitative, engagement

  10. [The process of demedicalization of women's health care in nursing education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargens, Octávio Muniz da Costa; Progianti, Jane Márcia

    2004-03-01

    This objective of this study is to present the pedagogic strategies adopted by the Rio de Janeiro State University Nursing School (UERJ--Brazil) for the demedicalization of care in nursing education in women's health. It presents the context of teaching in this area of knowledge. It also presents, from the perspective of concepts by Pierre Bourdieu, three spheres of students' and teachers' performance in this process.

  11. Environmental Design for End-of-Life Care: An Integrative Review on Improving the Quality of Life and Managing Symptoms for Patients in Institutional Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagha Zadeh, Rana; Eshelman, Paul; Setla, Judith; Kennedy, Laura; Hon, Emily; Basara, Aleksa

    2018-03-01

    The environment in which end-of-life (EOL) care is delivered can support or detract from the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs of patients, their families, and their caretakers. This review aims to organize and analyze the existing evidence related to environmental design factors that improve the quality of life and total well-being of people involved in EOL care and to clarify directions for future research. This integrated literature review synthesized and summarized research evidence from the fields of medicine, environmental psychology, nursing, palliative care, architecture, interior design, and evidence-based design. This synthesis analyzed 225 documents, including nine systematic literature reviews, 40 integrative reviews, three randomized controlled trials, 118 empirical research studies, and 55 anecdotal evidence. Of the documents, 192 were peer-reviewed, whereas 33 were not. The key environmental factors shown to affect EOL care were those that improved 1) social interaction, 2) positive distractions, 3) privacy, 4) personalization and creation of a home-like environment, and 5) the ambient environment. Possible design interventions relating to these topics are discussed. Examples include improvement of visibility and line of sight, view of nature, hidden medical equipment, and optimization of light and temperature. Studies indicate several critical components of the physical environment that can reduce total suffering and improve quality of life for EOL patients, their families, and their caregivers. These factors should be considered when making design decisions for care facilities to improve physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs at EOL. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impacts of mobile tablet computing on provider productivity, communications, and the process of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooley, Benjamin; Walczak, Steven; Hikmet, Neset; Patel, Nitin

    2016-04-01

    Health information technology investments continue to increase while the value derived from their implementation and use is mixed. Mobile device adoption into practice is a recent trend that has increased dramatically and formal studies are needed to investigate consequent benefits and challenges. The objective of this study is to evaluate practitioner perceptions of improvements in productivity, provider-patient communications, care provision, technology usability and other outcomes following the adoption and use of a tablet computer connected to electronic health information resources. A pilot program was initiated in June 2013 to evaluate the effect of mobile tablet computers at one health provider organization in the southeast United States. Providers were asked to volunteer for the evaluation and were each given a mobile tablet computer. A total of 42 inpatient and outpatient providers were interviewed in 2015 using a survey style questionnaire that utilized yes/no, Likert-style, and open ended questions. Each had previously used an electronic health record (EHR) system a minimum of one year outside of residency, and were regular users of personal mobile devices. Each used a mobile tablet computer in the context of their practice connected to the health system EHR. The survey results indicate that more than half of providers perceive the use of the tablet device as having a positive effect on patient communications, patient education, patient's perception of the provider, time spent interacting with patients, provider productivity, process of care, satisfaction with EHR when used together with the device, and care provision. Providers also reported feeling comfortable using the device (82.9%), would recommend the device to colleagues (69.2%), did not experience increased information security and privacy concerns (95%), and noted significant reductions in EHR login times (64.1%). Less than 25% of participants reported negative impacts on any of these areas as

  13. Factors influencing implementation of a Survivorship Care Plan : A quantitative process evaluation of the ROGY Care Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, B.H.; Ezendam, N.P.M.; Nicolaije, K.A.H.; Vos, M.C.; Pijnenborg, J.M.A.; Boll, Dorry; Kruitwagen, R.F.P.M.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to investigate the factors that influence implementation of Survivorship Care Plans (SCPs) in the intervention arm of the ROGY Care trial by (1) assessing the level of SCP receipt in the ROGY Care trial and (2) identifying patient- and provider-level factors that

  14. Using Statistical Process Control to Drive Improvement in Neonatal Care: A Practical Introduction to Control Charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Munish; Kaplan, Heather C

    2017-09-01

    Quality improvement (QI) is based on measuring performance over time, and variation in data measured over time must be understood to guide change and make optimal improvements. Common cause variation is natural variation owing to factors inherent to any process; special cause variation is unnatural variation owing to external factors. Statistical process control methods, and particularly control charts, are robust tools for understanding data over time and identifying common and special cause variation. This review provides a practical introduction to the use of control charts in health care QI, with a focus on neonatology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Finding your way through EOL challenges in the ICU using Adaptive Leadership behaviours: A qualitative descriptive case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Judith A; Bailey, Donald E; Anderson, Ruth A; Thygeson, Marcus

    2013-12-01

    Using the Adaptive Leadership framework, we describe behaviours that providers used while interacting with family members facing the challenges of recognising that their loved one was dying in the ICU. In this prospective pilot case study, we selected one ICU patient with end-stage illness who lacked decision-making capacity. Participants included four family members, one nurse and two physicians. The principle investigator observed and recorded three family conferences and conducted one in-depth interview with the family. Three members of the research team independently coded the transcripts using a priori codes to describe the Adaptive Leadership behaviours that providers used to facilitate the family's adaptive work, met to compare and discuss the codes and resolved all discrepancies. We identified behaviours used by nurses and physicians that facilitated the family's ability to adapt to the impending death of a loved one. Examples of these behaviours include defining the adaptive challenges for families and foreshadowing a poor prognosis. Nurse and physician Adaptive Leadership behaviours can facilitate the transition from curative to palliative care by helping family members do the adaptive work of letting go. Further research is warranted to create knowledge for providers to help family members adapt. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The accuracy and consistency of nutrition care process terminology use in cases of refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kylie L; Palmer, Michelle A; Capra, Sandra M

    2017-11-08

    Using standardised terminology in acute care has encouraged consistency in patient care and the evaluation of outcomes. As such, the Nutrition Care Process (NCP) and Nutrition Care Process Terminology (NCPT) may assist dietitian nutritionists in the delivery of high quality nutrition care worldwide; however, limited research has been conducted examining the consistency and accuracy of its use. We aimed to examine the NCPT that dietitian nutritionists would use to formulate a diagnostic statement relating to refeeding syndrome (RFS). A multimethod action research approach was used, incorporating two projects. The first was a survey examining Australian dietitian nutritionists' (n = 195) opinions regarding NCPT use in cases of RFS. To establish if results were similar internationally, an interview was then conducted with 22 dietitian nutritionists working within 10 different countries. 'Imbalance of nutrients' was only identified as a correct code by 17% of respondents in project 1. No mention of this term was made in project 2. Also 86% of respondents incorrectly selected more than one diagnostic code. The majority of respondents (80%, n = 52/65) who incorrectly selected 'Malnutrition', without also selecting 'Imbalance of nutrients', selected 'reduce intake' as an intervention, suggesting some misunderstanding in the requirement for interrelated diagnoses, interventions and goals. Our findings demonstrate that there is limited accuracy and consistency in selecting nutritional diagnostic codes in relation to RFS. Respondents also demonstrated limited knowledge regarding appropriate application of the NCP and NCPT. Implementation practices may require further refinement, as accurate and consistent use is required to procure the benefits of standardised terminology. © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  17. Caring communities as collective learning process: findings and lessons learned from a participatory research project in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegleitner, Klaus; Schuchter, Patrick

    2018-04-01

    By now, the public health end-of-life care approach is well established and has induced diverse initiatives-subsumed under the concept of compassionate or caring communities-to engage the community in supporting vulnerable, dying people and their beloved ones. In the light of a participatory research project our paper examines the question: what are the deeper ideas behind caring communities and what constitutes a caring community? A multi-level analysis based on (I) qualitative research with focus groups and interviews with community members within the project; (II) the reflection of the role of participatory research in caring community initiatives, and (III) the meta-analysis of an international expert workshop, which allowed to discuss our experiences and insights in the light of international caring community models and expertise. Our analysis of qualities ("ingredients") of a caring community, from the perspective of community members, highlighted the importance of the co-creation of supportive care relationships in the local care web, through everyday life solidarity in the neighbourhood, appreciating and exchanging the wisdom of care, and also marked the role of professionals as enablers. Participatory research in caring community developments has the potential to engage and empower citizens, and to interlink existential care-stories with questions about the structural and political environments of appropriate end-of-life care. The caring community movement and public health end-of-life care has to maintain their critical potential against the commercialization and fragmentation of care (services), but also without "romanticizing" communities. Prospective caring community progresses need (I) an ecological health-promotion framework for action and (II) social learning processes along the existential experiences and the wisdom of community members, complementing each other. Organizing existential-political care dialogues can contribute to an ethic of caring

  18. Global quantitative indices reflecting provider process-of-care: data-base derivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, John L; Solomon, Patricia J

    2010-04-19

    Controversy has attended the relationship between risk-adjusted mortality and process-of-care. There would be advantage in the establishment, at the data-base level, of global quantitative indices subsuming the diversity of process-of-care. A retrospective, cohort study of patients identified in the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database, 1993-2003, at the level of geographic and ICU-level descriptors (n = 35), for both hospital survivors and non-survivors. Process-of-care indices were established by analysis of: (i) the smoothed time-hazard curve of individual patient discharge and determined by pharmaco-kinetic methods as area under the hazard-curve (AUC), reflecting the integrated experience of the discharge process, and time-to-peak-hazard (TMAX, in days), reflecting the time to maximum rate of hospital discharge; and (ii) individual patient ability to optimize output (as length-of-stay) for recorded data-base physiological inputs; estimated as a technical production-efficiency (TE, scaled [0,(maximum)1]), via the econometric technique of stochastic frontier analysis. For each descriptor, multivariate correlation-relationships between indices and summed mortality probability were determined. The data-set consisted of 223129 patients from 99 ICUs with mean (SD) age and APACHE III score of 59.2(18.9) years and 52.7(30.6) respectively; 41.7% were female and 45.7% were mechanically ventilated within the first 24 hours post-admission. For survivors, AUC was maximal in rural and for-profit ICUs, whereas TMAX (>or= 7.8 days) and TE (>or= 0.74) were maximal in tertiary-ICUs. For non-survivors, AUC was maximal in tertiary-ICUs, but TMAX (>or= 4.2 days) and TE (>or= 0.69) were maximal in for-profit ICUs. Across descriptors, significant differences in indices were demonstrated (analysis-of-variance, P variance, for survivors (0.89) and non-survivors (0.89), was maximized by combinations of indices demonstrating a low correlation with

  19. Global quantitative indices reflecting provider process-of-care: data-base derivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Patricia J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controversy has attended the relationship between risk-adjusted mortality and process-of-care. There would be advantage in the establishment, at the data-base level, of global quantitative indices subsuming the diversity of process-of-care. Methods A retrospective, cohort study of patients identified in the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database, 1993-2003, at the level of geographic and ICU-level descriptors (n = 35, for both hospital survivors and non-survivors. Process-of-care indices were established by analysis of: (i the smoothed time-hazard curve of individual patient discharge and determined by pharmaco-kinetic methods as area under the hazard-curve (AUC, reflecting the integrated experience of the discharge process, and time-to-peak-hazard (TMAX, in days, reflecting the time to maximum rate of hospital discharge; and (ii individual patient ability to optimize output (as length-of-stay for recorded data-base physiological inputs; estimated as a technical production-efficiency (TE, scaled [0,(maximum1], via the econometric technique of stochastic frontier analysis. For each descriptor, multivariate correlation-relationships between indices and summed mortality probability were determined. Results The data-set consisted of 223129 patients from 99 ICUs with mean (SD age and APACHE III score of 59.2(18.9 years and 52.7(30.6 respectively; 41.7% were female and 45.7% were mechanically ventilated within the first 24 hours post-admission. For survivors, AUC was maximal in rural and for-profit ICUs, whereas TMAX (≥ 7.8 days and TE (≥ 0.74 were maximal in tertiary-ICUs. For non-survivors, AUC was maximal in tertiary-ICUs, but TMAX (≥ 4.2 days and TE (≥ 0.69 were maximal in for-profit ICUs. Across descriptors, significant differences in indices were demonstrated (analysis-of-variance, P ≤ 0.0001. Total explained variance, for survivors (0.89 and non-survivors (0.89, was maximized by

  20. Review: how do hospital organizational structure and processes affect quality of care?: a critical review of research methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearld, Larry R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Fraser, Irene; Jiang, H Joanna

    2008-06-01

    Interest in organizational contributions to the delivery of care has risen significantly in recent years. A challenge facing researchers, practitioners, and policy makers is identifying ways to improve care by improving the organizations that provide this care, given the complexity of health care organizations and the role organizations play in influencing systems of care. This article reviews the literature on the relationship between the structural characteristics and organizational processes of hospitals and quality of care. The review uses Donabedian's structure-process-outcome and level of analysis frameworks to organize the literature. The results of this review indicate that a preponderance of studies are conducted at the hospital level of analysis and are predominantly focused on the organizational structure-quality outcome relationship. The article concludes with recommendations of how health services researchers can expand their research to enhance one's understanding of the relationship between organizational characteristics and quality of care.

  1. Age at introduction of ultra-processed food among preschool children attending day-care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo-Silva, Giovana; Silveira, Jonas Augusto C; Menezes, Rísia Cristina Egito de; Toloni, Maysa Helena de Aguiar

    To identify the age of introduction of ultra-processed food and its associated factors among preschool children. Cross-sectional study carried out from March to June 2014 with 359 preschool children aged 17 to 63 months attending day-care centers. Time until ultra-processed food introduction (outcome variable) was described by the Kaplan-Meier analysis, and the log-rank test was used to compare the survival functions of independent variables. Factors associated with ultra-processed food introduction were investigated using the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. The results were shown as hazard ratios with their respective 95% confidence intervals. The median time until ultra-processed food introduction was six months. Between the 3rd and 6th months, there is a significant increase in the probability of introducing ultra-processed food in the children's diet; and while the probability in the 3rd month varies from 0.15 to 0.25, at six months the variation ranges from 0.6 to 1.0. The final Cox proportional hazards model showed that unplanned pregnancy (1.32 [1.05-1.65]), absence of prenatal care (2.50 [1.02-6.16]), and income >2 minimum wages (1, 50 [1.09-2.06]) were independent risk factors for the introduction of ultra-processed food. Up to the 6th month of life, approximately 75% of preschool children had received one or more ultra-processed food in their diet. In addition, it was observed that the poorest families, as well as unfavorable prenatal factors, were associated with early introduction of ultra-processed food. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  2. Developing a Comprehensive Model of Intensive Care Unit Processes: Concept of Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romig, Mark; Tropello, Steven P; Dwyer, Cindy; Wyskiel, Rhonda M; Ravitz, Alan; Benson, John; Gropper, Michael A; Pronovost, Peter J; Sapirstein, Adam

    2015-04-23

    This study aimed to use a systems engineering approach to improve performance and stakeholder engagement in the intensive care unit to reduce several different patient harms. We developed a conceptual framework or concept of operations (ConOps) to analyze different types of harm that included 4 steps as follows: risk assessment, appropriate therapies, monitoring and feedback, as well as patient and family communications. This framework used a transdisciplinary approach to inventory the tasks and work flows required to eliminate 7 common types of harm experienced by patients in the intensive care unit. The inventory gathered both implicit and explicit information about how the system works or should work and converted the information into a detailed specification that clinicians could understand and use. Using the ConOps document, we created highly detailed work flow models to reduce harm and offer an example of its application to deep venous thrombosis. In the deep venous thrombosis model, we identified tasks that were synergistic across different types of harm. We will use a system of systems approach to integrate the variety of subsystems and coordinate processes across multiple types of harm to reduce the duplication of tasks. Through this process, we expect to improve efficiency and demonstrate synergistic interactions that ultimately can be applied across the spectrum of potential patient harms and patient locations. Engineering health care to be highly reliable will first require an understanding of the processes and work flows that comprise patient care. The ConOps strategy provided a framework for building complex systems to reduce patient harm.

  3. Effect of hospital volume on processes of breast cancer care: A National Cancer Data Base study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Tina W F; Pezzin, Liliana E; Li, Jianing; Sparapani, Rodney; Laud, Purushuttom W; Nattinger, Ann B

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine variations in delivery of several breast cancer processes of care that are correlated with lower mortality and disease recurrence, and to determine the extent to which hospital volume explains this variation. Women who were diagnosed with stage I-III unilateral breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 were identified within the National Cancer Data Base. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to determine whether hospital volume was independently associated with each of 10 individual process of care measures addressing diagnosis and treatment, and 2 composite measures assessing appropriateness of systemic treatment (chemotherapy and hormonal therapy) and locoregional treatment (margin status and radiation therapy). Among 573,571 women treated at 1755 different hospitals, 38%, 51%, and 10% were treated at high-, medium-, and low-volume hospitals, respectively. On multivariate analysis controlling for patient sociodemographic characteristics, treatment year and geographic location, hospital volume was a significant predictor for cancer diagnosis by initial biopsy (medium volume: odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.25; high volume: OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.14-1.49), negative surgical margins (medium volume: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.06-1.24; high volume: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.13-1.44), and appropriate locoregional treatment (medium volume: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.07-1.17; high volume: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.09-1.24). Diagnosis of breast cancer before initial surgery, negative surgical margins and appropriate use of radiation therapy may partially explain the volume-survival relationship. Dissemination of these processes of care to a broader group of hospitals could potentially improve the overall quality of care and outcomes of breast cancer survivors. Cancer 2017;123:957-66. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  4. Understanding and improving communication processes in an increasingly multicultural aged care workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Pam; Horner, Barbara; Fyfe, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how culture shapes relationships in aged care and the extent to which the residential aged care sector supports a cohesive multicultural workforce. An exploratory methodology utilising semi-structured questionnaires collected data from 58 participants comprising: staff who provide direct care to residents; managers; and family members from six residential care facilities in Perth, Western Australia. Communication issues emerged as an over-arching theme, and included interpersonal communication, the effect of cultural norms on communication and the impact of informal and formal workplace policies relating to spoken and written language. Sixty percent of participants from a culturally and linguistically diverse (CaLD) background had experienced negative reactions from residents with dementia, linked to visible cultural difference. They used a range of coping strategies including ignoring, resilience and avoidance in such situations. CaLD participants also reported prejudicial treatment from non-CaLD staff. The findings highlight the need for organisations to incorporate explicit processes which address the multiple layers of influence on cross cultural communication: internalised beliefs and values; moderating effects of education, experience and social circumstance; and factors external to the individuals, including workplace culture and the broader political economy, to develop a cohesive multicultural workplace. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Emergency end of life operations for CNES remote sensing satellites—Management and operational process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Régis; Alby, Fernand; Costes, Thierry; Dejoie, Joël; Delmas, Dominique-Roland; Delobette, Damien; Gibek, Isabelle; Gleyzes, Alain; Masson, Françoise; Meyer, Jean-Renaud; Moreau, Agathe; Perret, Lionel; Riclet, François; Ruiz, Hélène; Schiavon, Françoise; Spizzi, Pierre; Viallefont, Pierre; Villaret, Colette

    2012-10-01

    continue its mission using the redundancy, b/. the EOL operations must be planned within a mid-term period, or c/. the EOL operations must be implemented as soon as possible by the operational teams. The paper describes this management and operational process illustrated with study cases of failures on SPOT and PLEIADES satellites corresponding to various emergency situations.

  6. Evaluating the systematic implementation of the 'Let Me Decide' advance care planning programme in long term care through focus groups: staff perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cornally, Nicola

    2015-11-01

    The \\'Let Me Decide\\' Advance Care Planning (LMD-ACP) programme offers a structured approach to End-of-Life (EoL) care planning in long-term care for residents with and without capacity to complete an advance care directive\\/plan. The programme was implemented in three homes in the South of Ireland, with a view to improving quality of care at end of life. This paper will present an evaluation of the systematic implementation of the LMD-ACP programme in the homes.

  7. Regional process redesign of lung cancer care: a learning health system pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung-Kee-Fung, M; Maziak, D E; Pantarotto, J R; Smylie, J; Taylor, L; Timlin, T; Cacciotti, T; Villeneuve, P J; Dennie, C; Bornais, C; Madore, S; Aquino, J; Wheatley-Price, P; Ozer, R S; Stewart, D J

    2018-02-01

    The Ottawa Hospital (toh) defined delay to timely lung cancer care as a system design problem. Recognizing the patient need for an integrated journey and the need for dynamic alignment of providers, toh used a learning health system (lhs) vision to redesign regional diagnostic processes. A lhs is driven by feedback utilizing operational and clinical information to drive system optimization and innovation. An essential component of a lhs is a collaborative platform that provides connectivity across silos, organizations, and professions. To operationalize a lhs, we developed the Ottawa Health Transformation Model (ohtm) as a consensus approach that addresses process barriers, resistance to change, and conflicting priorities. A regional Community of Practice (cop) was established to engage stakeholders, and a dedicated transformation team supported process improvements and implementation. The project operationalized the lung cancer diagnostic pathway and optimized patient flow from referral to initiation of treatment. Twelve major processes in referral, review, diagnostics, assessment, triage, and consult were redesigned. The Ottawa Hospital now provides a diagnosis to 80% of referrals within the provincial target of 28 days. The median patient journey from referral to initial treatment decreased by 48% from 92 to 47 days. The initiative optimized regional integration from referral to initial treatment. Use of a lhs lens enabled the creation of a system that is standardized to best practice and open to ongoing innovation. Continued transformation initiatives across the continuum of care are needed to incorporate best practice and optimize delivery systems for regional populations.

  8. Work Process in Primary Health Care: action research with Community Health Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Luciana; Soares, Cassia Baldini

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this article was to describe and analyze the work of community health workers (CHW). The main objective of study was to analyze the development process of primary health care practices related to drug consumption. The study is based on the Marxist theoretical orientation and the action research methodology, which resulted in the performance of 15 emancipatory workshops. The category work process spawned the content analysis. It exposed the social abandonment of the environment in which the CHWs work is performed. The latter had an essential impact on the identification of the causes of drug-related problems. These findings made it possible to criticize the reiterative, stressful actions that are being undertaken there. Such an act resulted in raising of the awareness and creating the means for political action. The CHWs motivated themselves to recognize the object of the work process in primary health care, which they found to be the disease or addiction in the case of drug users. They have criticized this categorization as well as discussed the social division of work and the work itself whilst recognizing themselves as mere instruments in the work process. The latter has inspired the CHW to become subjects, or co-producers of transformations of social needs.

  9. Factors affecting long-term-care residents' decision-making processes as they formulate advance directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Heather C; McColl, Mary Ann; Gilbert, Julie; Wong, Jiahui; Murray, Gale; Shortt, Samuel E D

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe factors contributing to the decision-making processes of elderly persons as they formulate advance directives in long-term care. This study was qualitative, based on grounded theory. Recruitment was purposive and continued until saturation was reached. Nine residents of a long-term-care facility were interviewed by use of a semistructured format. Open and axial coding of interview transcripts were carried out and the factors contributing to the decision process were defined. Elders based their decisions primarily on information gathered from personal experiences with death and illness. They obtained very little information from professionals or the media. Major factors considered by elders as they weighed information included spiritual, emotional, and social considerations. The factors considered during the decision-making process were oriented more toward the individual's experiences and less on contributions from objective sources than anticipated. Decision making for advance directives is a highly personalized process. The approach of health professionals when assisting with end-of-life decision making should be planned with these contributing factors in mind, so that the services offered to the individuals in this population best meet their needs.

  10. Stable curcumin-loaded polymeric micellar formulation for enhancing cellular uptake and cytotoxicity to FLT3 overexpressing EoL-1 leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tima, Singkome; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Ampasavate, Chadarat; Berkland, Cory; Okonogi, Siriporn

    2017-05-01

    The present study aims to develop a stable polymeric micellar formulation of curcumin (CM) with improved solubility and stability, and that is suitable for clinical applications in leukemia patients. CM-loaded polymeric micelles (CM-micelles) were prepared using poloxamers. The chemical structure of the polymers influenced micellar properties. The best formulation of CM-micelles, namely CM-P407, was obtained from poloxamer 407 at drug to polymer ratio of 1:30 and rehydrated with phosphate buffer solution pH 7.4. CM-P407 exhibited the smallest size of 30.3±1.3nm and highest entrapment efficiency of 88.4±4.1%. When stored at -80°C for 60days, CM-P407 retained high protection of CM and had no significant size change. In comparison with CM solution in dimethyl sulfoxide (CM-DMSO), CM kinetic degradation in both formulations followed a pseudo-first-order reaction, but the half-life of CM in CM-P407 was approx. 200 times longer than in CM-DMSO. Regarding the activity against FLT3 overexpressing EoL-1 leukemic cells, CM-P407 showed higher cytotoxicity than CM-DMSO. Moreover, intracellular uptake to leukemic cells of CM-P407 was 2-3 times greater than that of CM-DMSO. These promising results for CM-P407 will be further investigated in rodents and in clinical studies for leukemia treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement tools and process indicators of patient safety culture in primary care. A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dianne; Wensing, Michel; Esmail, Aneez; Valderas, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: There is little guidance available to healthcare practitioners about what tools they might use to assess the patient safety culture. Objective: To identify useful tools for assessing patient safety culture in primary care organizations in Europe; to identify those aspects of performance that should be assessed when investigating the relationship between safety culture and performance in primary care. Methods: Two consensus-based studies were carried out, in which subject matter experts and primary healthcare professionals from several EU states rated (a) the applicability to their healthcare system of several existing safety culture assessment tools and (b) the appropriateness and usefulness of a range of potential indicators of a positive patient safety culture to primary care settings. The safety culture tools were field-tested in four countries to ascertain any challenges and issues arising when used in primary care. Results: The two existing tools that received the most favourable ratings were the Manchester patient safety framework (MaPsAF primary care version) and the Agency for healthcare research and quality survey (medical office version). Several potential safety culture process indicators were identified. The one that emerged as offering the best combination of appropriateness and usefulness related to the collection of data on adverse patient events. Conclusion: Two tools, one quantitative and one qualitative, were identified as applicable and useful in assessing patient safety culture in primary care settings in Europe. Safety culture indicators in primary care should focus on the processes rather than the outcomes of care. PMID:26339832

  12. The use of outcome and process indicators to incentivize integrated care for frail older people: a case study of primary care services in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Lars Anell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of reforms have been implemented in Swedish health care to support integrated care for frail older people and to reduce utilization of hospital care by this group. Outcomes and process indicators have been used in pay-for-performance (P4P schemes by both national and local governments to support developments.Objective: To analyse limitations in the use of outcome and process indicators to incentivize integrated care for elderly patients with significant health care needs in the context of primary care.Method: Data were collected from the Region Skåne county council. Eight primary care providers and associated community services were compared in a ranking exercise based on information from interviews and registered data. Registered data from 150 primary care providers were analysed in regression models.Results and conclusion: Both the ranking exercise and regression models revealed important problems related to risk-adjustment, attribution, randomness and measurement fixation when using indicators in P4P schemes and for external accountability purposes. Instead of using indicators in incentive schemes targeting individual providers, indicators may be used for diagnostic purposes and to support development of new knowledge, targeting local systems that move beyond organizational boundaries.

  13. End-of-Life Care Interventions: An Economic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, B; Krahn, M

    2014-01-01

    The annual cost of providing care for patients in their last year of life is estimated to account for approximately 9% of the Ontario health care budget. Access to integrated, comprehensive support and pain/symptom management appears to be inadequate and inequitable. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of end-of-life (EoL) care interventions included in the EoL care mega-analysis. Multiple sources were used, including systematic reviews, linked health administration databases, survey data, planning documents, expert input, and additional literature searches. We conducted a literature review of cost-effectiveness studies to inform the primary economic analysis. We conducted the primary economic analysis and budget impact analysis for an Ontario cohort of decedents and their families and included interventions pertaining to team-based models of care, patient care planning discussions, educational interventions for patients and caregivers, and supportive interventions for informal caregivers. The time horizon was the last year of life. Costs were in 2013 Canadian dollars. Effectiveness measures included days at home, percentage dying at home, and quality-adjusted life-days. We developed a Markov model; model inputs were obtained from a cohort of Ontario decedents assembled from Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences databases and published literature. In-home palliative team care was cost-effective; it increased the chance of dying at home by 10%, increased the average number of days at home (6 days) and quality-adjusted life-days (0.5 days), and it reduced costs by approximately $4,400 per patient. Expanding in-home palliative team care to those currently not receiving such services (approximately 45,000 per year, at an annual cost of $76-108 million) is likely to improve quality of life, reduce the use of acute care resources, and save $191-$385 million in health care costs. Results for the other interventions were uncertain. The cost-effectiveness analysis was

  14. [Potential of Information and Communications Technology to Improve Intersectoral Processes of Care: A Case Study of the Specialised Outpatient Palliative Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Delpho, C; Schubert, H-J

    2015-09-01

    The added value of information and communications technologies should be demonstrated precisely in such areas of care in which the importance of intersectoral and interdisciplinary cooperation is particularly high. In the context of the accompanying research of a supply concept for palliative care patients, the potential of a digital documentation process was comparatively analysed with the conventional paper-based workflow. Data were collected in the form of a multi-methodological approach and processed for the project in 3 stages: (1) Development and analysis of a palliative care process with the focus on all relevant steps of documentation. (2) Questionnaire design and the comparative mapping of specific process times. (3) Sampling, selection, and analysis of patient records and their derivable insights of process iterations. With the use of ICT, the treatment time per patient is reduced by up to 53% and achieves a reduction in costs and workload by up to 901 min. The result of an up to 213% increase in the number of patient contacts allows a higher continuity of care. Although the 16% increase in documentation loyalty improves the usability of cross-team documented information, it partially extends the workload on the level of individual actors. By using a digital health record around 31% more patients could be treated with the same staffing ratio. The multi-stage analysis of the palliative care process showed that ICT has a decisive influence on the process dimension of intersectoral cooperation. Due to favourable organisational conditions the pioneering work of palliative care also provides important guidance for a successful use of ICT technologies in the context of innovative forms of care. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Tailoring intervention procedures to routine primary health care practice; an ethnographic process evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruijnzeels Marc

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tailor-made approaches enable the uptake of interventions as they are seen as a way to overcome the incompatibility of general interventions with local knowledge about the organisation of routine medical practice and the relationship between the patients and the professionals in practice. Our case is the Quattro project which is a prevention programme for cardiovascular diseases in high-risk patients in primary health care centres in deprived neighbourhoods. This programme was implemented as a pragmatic trial and foresaw the importance of local knowledge in primary health care and internal, or locally made, guidelines. The aim of this paper is to show how this prevention programme, which could be tailored to routine care, was implemented in primary care. Methods An ethnographic design was used for this study. We observed and interviewed the researchers and the practice nurses. All the research documents, observations and transcribed interviews were analysed thematically. Results Our ethnographic process evaluation showed that the opportunity of tailoring intervention procedures to routine care in a pragmatic trial setting did not result in a well-organised and well-implemented prevention programme. In fact, the lack of standard protocols hindered the implementation of the intervention. Although it was not the purpose of this trial, a guideline was developed. Despite the fact that the developed guideline functioned as a tool, it did not result in the intervention being organised accordingly. However, the guideline did make tailoring the intervention possible. It provided the professionals with the key or the instructions needed to achieve organisational change and transform the existing interprofessional relations. Conclusion As tailor-made approaches are developed to enable the uptake of interventions in routine practice, they are facilitated by the brokering of tools such as guidelines. In our study, guidelines facilitated

  16. [Compliance with process indicators in people with type 2 diabetes and linking incentives in Primary Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual de la Pisa, Beatriz; Márquez Calzada, Cristina; Cuberos Sánchez, Carla; Cruces Jiménez, José Miguel; Fernández Gamaza, Manuel; Martínez Martínez, María Isabel

    2015-03-01

    Pay-for-performance programs to improve the quality of health care are extending gradually, particularly en Primary Health Care. Our aim was to explore the relationship between the degree of compliance with the process indicators (PrI) of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in Primary Care and linkage to incentives. Cross-sectional, descriptive, observational study. Six Primary Health Care centers in Seville Aljarafe District randomly selected and stratified by population size. From 3.647 adults included in Integrated Healthcare Process of T2DM during 2008, 366 patients were included according sample size calculation by stratified random sampling. PrI: eye and feet examination, glycated hemoglobin, lipid profile, microalbuminuria and electrocardiogram. Confounding: Age, gender, characteristics town for patients and professional variables. The mean age was 66.36 years (standard deviation [DE]: 11,56); 48.9% were women. PrI with better compliance were feet examination, glycated hemoglobin and lipid profile (59.6%, 44.3% and 44%, respectively). 2.7% of patients had simultaneous compliance of the six PrI and 11.74% of patients three PrI linkage to incentives. Statistical association was observed in the compliance of the PrI incentives linked or not (P=.001). The degree of compliance with the PrI for screening chronic complications of T2DM is mostly low but this was higher on indicators linked to incentives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of the AMMON experimental program in the EOLE facility supporting the qualification of the JHR neutron and photon tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Colombier, A.C.; Hudelot, J.P.; Leray, O.; Lemaire, M.; Di-Salvo, J.; Gruel, A.; Sireta, P.

    2013-06-01

    The first divergence of the international Jules Horowitz Material Testing Reactor under construction at CEA Cadarache is foreseen in 2016. In order to perform all the design and safety studies, a specific neutron and photon calculation tool, HORUS3D/N and P, dedicated to the JHR simulation, was developed. This development follows the V and V-UQ process; in this frame, the validation and qualification steps aim at quantifying all the biases and associated uncertainties of HORUS3D/N and P calculations. These biases originate from both the nuclear data and the calculation scheme, for calculations at step zero (JHR BOL core) or during depletion (JHR core at equilibrium). This paper focusses on the quantification of the biases due to nuclear data and the associated uncertainties. A new experimental program, named AMMON, was performed between 2010 and 2013 to provide experimental data for this quantification. A large part of the measurements has been today analyzed with the Monte Carlo TRIPOLI-4 R code and the JEFF3.1.1 and EPDL97 data libraries relative to neutron/photon transport and photon emission. The C/E results were transposed from AMMON to JHR. The synthesis of the present analysis is very satisfactory. The calculation biases remains limited. In addition, thanks to a very good control to the experimental uncertainties during measurements, it is shown that the a priori uncertainties due to nuclear data for parameters at step zero was reduced up to a factor of 2. (authors)

  18. Process improvement methods increase the efficiency, accuracy, and utility of a neurocritical care research repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Sydney; Ayres, Alison; Cortellini, Lynelle; Rosand, Jonathan; Rosenthal, Eric; Kimberly, W Taylor

    2012-08-01

    Reliable and efficient data repositories are essential for the advancement of research in Neurocritical care. Various factors, such as the large volume of patients treated within the neuro ICU, their differing length and complexity of hospital stay, and the substantial amount of desired information can complicate the process of data collection. We adapted the tools of process improvement to the data collection and database design of a research repository for a Neuroscience intensive care unit. By the Shewhart-Deming method, we implemented an iterative approach to improve the process of data collection for each element. After an initial design phase, we re-evaluated all data fields that were challenging or time-consuming to collect. We then applied root-cause analysis to optimize the accuracy and ease of collection, and to determine the most efficient manner of collecting the maximal amount of data. During a 6-month period, we iteratively analyzed the process of data collection for various data elements. For example, the pre-admission medications were found to contain numerous inaccuracies after comparison with a gold standard (sensitivity 71% and specificity 94%). Also, our first method of tracking patient admissions and discharges contained higher than expected errors (sensitivity 94% and specificity 93%). In addition to increasing accuracy, we focused on improving efficiency. Through repeated incremental improvements, we reduced the number of subject records that required daily monitoring from 40 to 6 per day, and decreased daily effort from 4.5 to 1.5 h/day. By applying process improvement methods to the design of a Neuroscience ICU data repository, we achieved a threefold improvement in efficiency and increased accuracy. Although individual barriers to data collection will vary from institution to institution, a focus on process improvement is critical to overcoming these barriers.

  19. Medication errors in residential aged care facilities: a distributed cognition analysis of the information exchange process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Amina; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna

    2013-05-01

    Medication safety is a pressing concern for residential aged care facilities (RACFs). Retrospective studies in RACF settings identify inadequate communication between RACFs, doctors, hospitals and community pharmacies as the major cause of medication errors. Existing literature offers limited insight about the gaps in the existing information exchange process that may lead to medication errors. The aim of this research was to explicate the cognitive distribution that underlies RACF medication ordering and delivery to identify gaps in medication-related information exchange which lead to medication errors in RACFs. The study was undertaken in three RACFs in Sydney, Australia. Data were generated through ethnographic field work over a period of five months (May-September 2011). Triangulated analysis of data primarily focused on examining the transformation and exchange of information between different media across the process. The findings of this study highlight the extensive scope and intense nature of information exchange in RACF medication ordering and delivery. Rather than attributing error to individual care providers, the explication of distributed cognition processes enabled the identification of gaps in three information exchange dimensions which potentially contribute to the occurrence of medication errors namely: (1) design of medication charts which complicates order processing and record keeping (2) lack of coordination mechanisms between participants which results in misalignment of local practices (3) reliance on restricted communication bandwidth channels mainly telephone and fax which complicates the information processing requirements. The study demonstrates how the identification of these gaps enhances understanding of medication errors in RACFs. Application of the theoretical lens of distributed cognition can assist in enhancing our understanding of medication errors in RACFs through identification of gaps in information exchange. Understanding

  20. Development process and initial validation of the Ethical Conflict in Nursing Questionnaire-Critical Care Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcó-Pegueroles, Anna; Lluch-Canut, Teresa; Guàrdia-Olmos, Joan

    2013-06-01

    Ethical conflicts are arising as a result of the growing complexity of clinical care, coupled with technological advances. Most studies that have developed instruments for measuring ethical conflict base their measures on the variables 'frequency' and 'degree of conflict'. In our view, however, these variables are insufficient for explaining the root of ethical conflicts. Consequently, the present study formulates a conceptual model that also includes the variable 'exposure to conflict', as well as considering six 'types of ethical conflict'. An instrument was then designed to measure the ethical conflicts experienced by nurses who work with critical care patients. The paper describes the development process and validation of this instrument, the Ethical Conflict in Nursing Questionnaire Critical Care Version (ECNQ-CCV). The sample comprised 205 nursing professionals from the critical care units of two hospitals in Barcelona (Spain). The ECNQ-CCV presents 19 nursing scenarios with the potential to produce ethical conflict in the critical care setting. Exposure to ethical conflict was assessed by means of the Index of Exposure to Ethical Conflict (IEEC), a specific index developed to provide a reference value for each respondent by combining the intensity and frequency of occurrence of each scenario featured in the ECNQ-CCV. Following content validity, construct validity was assessed by means of Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA), while Cronbach's alpha was used to evaluate the instrument's reliability. All analyses were performed using the statistical software PASW v19. Cronbach's alpha for the ECNQ-CCV as a whole was 0.882, which is higher than the values reported for certain other related instruments. The EFA suggested a unidimensional structure, with one component accounting for 33.41% of the explained variance. The ECNQ-CCV is shown to a valid and reliable instrument for use in critical care units. Its structure is such that the four variables on which our model

  1. The Process of Creating Integrated Home Care in Lithuania: from Idea to Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramunė Jurkuvienė

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The article presents an analysis of the formulation and implementation of a social innovation: integrated home care (IHC in post-soviet Lithuania. From 1998 a series of top-down orders to implement IHC were issued, however, home nursing did not start. In 2011 the Ministry of Social Security and Labour began a process to develop integrated home care using new, collaborative processes. The result was 21 pilot projects with well-conceptualized IHC services. Method: Using data from focus groups, interviews, and recorded observations, the research team systematically documented the innovation process, including themes and deviations, employing Smale’s Innovation Trinity framework to organize the larger picture. Results: In the Lithuanian post-totalitarian context, top-down communication was found to be prevalent. Not only IHC, but also openness to change and dialogue at high levels were innovations. Patient-centered practice at local levels could only occur when a new attitude of mind was reached through dialogue with officials at higher levels and between peers. Conclusions: The enactment, rather than the mask of dialogue, participatory program development were critical in the success of IHC innovation. This is difficult to achieve in the light of antiquated public bureaucracies, but in this case, the Ministry team, rather than avoiding the expectation of top-down communication, made it into an asset through promotion of collaboration.

  2. Examining the need assessment process by identifying the need profiles of elderly care recipients in the Ten-year Long-Term Care Project (TLTCP) of Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Fan; Yao, Hui-Ping

    2014-12-01

    To deal with the increasing long-term care (LTC) needs of elderly people in Taiwan, the government launched the Ten-year Long-term Care Project (TLTCP) in 2007, and through the care management system, care plans for those in need were distributed and implemented by care managers according to the single assessment process. Based on the emphasis of linking the right need assessment to the care plan, this study aimed to explore the need profiles of LTC recipients with regard to their health indicators to serve as a validity check on the identified dependency levels and care plans in the current care management system. A model based on latent class analysis (LCA) was used for dealing with the issue of health heterogeneity. LCA provides an empirical method that examines the interrelationships among health indicators and characterizes the underlying set of mutually exclusive latent classes that account for the observed indicators. The analysis included a total of 2901 elderly care recipients in the LTC dataset from a southern city, 1 of the 5 major metropolitan areas in Taiwan. The identified dependency levels of the samples and their care plans in need assessment were compared and discussed. Four need profiles were explored in the LTC dataset. Apart from the low (LD) (32.95%) and moderate dependent groups (MD) (17.48%), there were 2 groups identified among the high-dependency levels, including the severe physical and psychological dependency (SPP) (26.37%) and the comorbidities and severe dependency (CSD) groups (23.20%), which in sum were approximately identified as high dependency (HD) by care managers in the LTC dataset. In addition, the CSD group currently costs more for their care plans on average in LTC services (NT. 277,081.15, approximately 9200 USD) than the SPP group (NT. 244,084.21) and the other groups. Need assessment is a key to success in care management in LTC. The results of this study showed the importance of focusing on multifacet indicators

  3. Exploring emotions and the shared decision-making process in pediatric primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Dicé

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify conversational interaction patterns in pediatrics with a focus on the shared decision-making process and dialogue about emotions in doctor–patient relationships. We documented conversations in 163 visits by 168 children in pediatric primary care; we observed, audiorecordered, transcribed and analyzed them with specific instruments of analysis of doctor patient relationship. Our survey was conducted in four pediatric primary care practices and 15 health providers were involved. The data collection period lasted three months and was undertaken twice a week on days. We analyzed visits with Verona Coding Definitions of Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES and Observing Patient Involvement in Shared Decision Making (OPTION instruments. Frequencies of emotions’ signals (cues/concerns obtained using VR-CoDES were analyzed and compared with the OPTION ratings. We documented 318 cues/concerns for parents and 167 for children. The relationship between cues/concerns and Healthcare Providers responses was strongest in dialogues between parents and pediatricians. The conversational patterns focused on the procedures of the care, with little opportunities of dialogue about emerging emotions. We also observed limited possibilities for participant involvement, especially by children, due to several difficulties integrating dialogue about emotions and concordance processes. The conversations seemed to be characterized by rarity of shared decision making or attention to the informational value of children’s emotions. It could be useful to implement psychological interventions to achieve an enrichment of the dialogue between participants, helping them to incorporate emotions into conversations and to recognize decisional competences, necessary to concordance processes.

  4. Enhancing Care of Aged and Dying Prisoners: Is e-Learning a Feasible Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Susan J; Penrod, Janice; Myers, Valerie H; Baney, Brenda L; Strickfaden, Sophia M; Kitt-Lewis, Erin; Wion, Rachel K

    Prisons and jails are facing sharply increased demands in caring for aged and dying inmates. Our Toolkit for Enhancing End-of-life Care in Prisons effectively addressed end-of-life (EOL) care; however, geriatric content was limited, and the product was not formatted for broad dissemination. Prior research adapted best practices in EOL care and aging; but, delivery methods lacked emerging technology-focused learning and interactivity. Our purposes were to uncover current training approaches and preferences and to ascertain the technological capacity of correctional settings to deliver computer-based and other e-learning training. An environmental scan was conducted with 11 participants from U.S. prisons and jails to ensure proper fit, in terms of content and technology capacity, between an envisioned computer-based training product and correctional settings. Environmental scan findings focused on content of training, desirable qualities of training, prominence of "homegrown" products, and feasibility of commercial e-learning. This study identified qualities of training programs to adopt and pitfalls to avoid and revealed technology-related issues to be mindful of when designing computer-based training for correctional settings, and participants spontaneously expressed an interest in geriatrics and EOL training using this learning modality as long as training allowed for tailoring of materials.

  5. Software for planning processes gamma irradiation sterilization of products intended for health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Juan P; Carrillo, Miguel A; Mangussi, Josefina; Menendez, Franco

    2012-01-01

    In this work was developed an application software for PC, with a friendly interface whose main objective is to facilitate the planning processes for gamma irradiation of health care devices for a irradiation plant, decreasing costs and delays caused in the dosimetry and pretesting. Wascreated a program that predicts, previously establishing the location of a plane in the enclosure of irradiation, dose rate in [kGy/h] at certain strategic points of this plane in addition to calculating the corresponding absorbed dose [kGy] for a time defined by the user (author)

  6. Responding to demand for inpatient care in the process of health development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Asefzadeh

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available During recent decades, many changes are happening in health sector and countries are trying to respond to the increasing health demands of people. Although hospitals have important role in health delivery system of any country, numerous factors have to be taken into account before establishing a new hospital in certain area. During recent decades, in many developing countries, new hospitals are built and equipped with sophisticated plant, without any scientific investigation. This means wastage of scarce resources. This paper aims to introduce need assessment methodology to establish hospitals and discuss the criteria to be met prior to their construction in the process of health care development.

  7. Towards an organisation-wide process-oriented organisation of care: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenewegen Peter P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many hospitals have taken actions to make care delivery for specific patient groups more process-oriented, but struggle with the question how to deal with process orientation at hospital level. The aim of this study is to report and discuss the experiences of hospitals with implementing process-oriented organisation designs in order to derive lessons for future transitions and research. Methods A literature review of English language articles on organisation-wide process-oriented redesigns, published between January 1998 and May 2009, was performed. Results Of 329 abstracts identified, 10 articles were included in the study. These articles described process-oriented redesigns of five hospitals. Four hospitals tried to become process-oriented by the implementation of coordination measures, and one by organisational restructuring. The adoption of the coordination mechanism approach was particularly constrained by the functional structure of hospitals. Other factors that hampered the redesigns in general were the limited applicability of and unfamiliarity with process improvement techniques. Conclusions Due to the limitations of the evidence, it is not known which approach, implementation of coordination measures or organisational restructuring (with additional coordination measures, produces the best results in which situation. Therefore, more research is needed. For this research, the use of qualitative methods in addition to quantitative measures is recommended to contribute to a better understanding of preconditions and contingencies for an effective application of approaches to become process-oriented. Hospitals are advised to take the factors for failure described into account and to take suitable actions to counteract these obstacles on their way to become process-oriented organisations.

  8. The Impact of Faith Beliefs on Perceptions of End-of-Life Care and Decision Making among African American Church Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jerry; Hayden, Tara; True, Jennifer; Simkin, Daren; Colbert, Louis; Thompson, Beverly; Stewart, Denise; Martin, Latoya

    2016-02-01

    African Americans underuse palliative care and hospice services because of a combination of factors including faith beliefs. As the spiritual family for many African Americans, the church presents an opportunity to improve communication about palliative care and hospice and end-of-life (EOL) decision making. We conducted a focus group study to understand the cultural and spiritual perspectives that influence decisions about palliative care and hospice among African American church members who visit and support persons with life-limiting illnesses. Our specific aims were to elicit their perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes about: (1) the relation between faith beliefs and EOL care; (2) emotional and family influences on EOL decision making; (3) palliative care and hospice resources; and (4) opportunities to improve communication among lay persons and health professionals and within families. Seven focus groups using purposeful sampling. We partnered with two African American churches. Of 51 persons, 27 were deacons or deaconesses, 17 were members of health or bereavement ministries, and 7 were other members of the congregations. We found that faith beliefs of African Americans can support discussions about palliative care and hospice. Participants perceived that many of their congregants harbor beliefs, perceptions, and feelings about death and dying that were often not communicated to family members or to health providers. Among African Americans, faith beliefs, emotional issues, family dynamics, and insufficient knowledge of palliative care and hospice are intertwined and influence decision making about palliative care and hospice. Our findings confirm the influence of faith beliefs of African Americans on decisions about palliative care and hospice and demonstrate the opportunity to improve communication about palliative care and hospice and EOL through collaborations with the African American church.

  9. Multicultural long-term care nurses’ perceptions of factors influencing patient dignity at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyakoil, Vyjeyanthi S; Stevens, Marguerite; Kraemer, Helena

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this mixed-methods study was to characterize the perceptions of multicultural long-term care nurses about patient dignity at the end-of-life (EOL). The study was conducted in a large, urban, long-term care (LTC) facility. Participants were 45 long-term care nurses and 26 terminally ill nursing home residents. Nurses completed an openended interview about their perceptions of the concept of dying with dignity, and the data were analyzed using grounded theory methods. Main themes identified as promoting resident dignity at the EOL included treating them with respect, helping them prepare for the EOL, promoting shared decision-making, and providing high-quality care. The nurses’ cultural and religious backgrounds influenced their perceptions of what constitutes dignity-conserving care. Foreign-born nurses stressed the need for EOL rituals, but this was strikingly absent in the statements of U.S.-born nurses. Foreign-born Catholic nurses stated that the dying experience should not be altered using analgesics to relieve suffering or by attempts to hasten death by forgoing curative therapy or by other means. Nurses and terminally ill individuals completed the Dignity Card-sort Tool (DCT). A comparison of the DCT responses of the LTC nurses cohort with those of the terminally ill participants revealed that the nurses felt patient dignity was eroded when patient wishes were not followed and when they were treated without respect. In contrast, dying LTC residents felt that poor medical care and loss of ability to choose care options were the most important factors leading to erosion of dignity.

  10. Computerized nursing process in the Intensive Care Unit: ergonomics and usability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Regina Wagner de Almeida

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Analyzing the ergonomics and usability criteria of the Computerized Nursing Process based on the International Classification for Nursing Practice in the Intensive Care Unit according to International Organization for Standardization(ISO. METHOD A quantitative, quasi-experimental, before-and-after study with a sample of 16 participants performed in an Intensive Care Unit. Data collection was performed through the application of five simulated clinical cases and an evaluation instrument. Data analysis was performed by descriptive and inferential statistics. RESULTS The organization, content and technical criteria were considered "excellent", and the interface criteria were considered "very good", obtaining means of 4.54, 4.60, 4.64 and 4.39, respectively. The analyzed standards obtained means above 4.0, being considered "very good" by the participants. CONCLUSION The Computerized Nursing Processmet ergonomic and usability standards according to the standards set by ISO. This technology supports nurses' clinical decision-making by providing complete and up-to-date content for Nursing practice in the Intensive Care Unit.

  11. Blueprint for Implementing New Processes in Acute Care: Rescuing Adult Patients With Intraosseous Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chreiman, Kristen M; Kim, Patrick K; Garbovsky, Lyudmila A; Schweickert, William D

    2015-01-01

    The intraosseous (IO) access initiative at an urban university adult level 1 trauma center began from the need for a more expeditious vascular access route to rescue patients in extremis. The goal of this project was a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving to increase access of IO catheters to rescue patients in all care areas. The initiative became a collaborative effort between nursing, physicians, and pharmacy to embark on an acute care endeavor to standardize IO access. This is a descriptive analysis of processes to effectively develop collaborative strategies to navigate hospital systems and successfully implement multilayered initiatives. Administration should empower nurse to advance their practice to include IO for patient rescue. Intraosseous access may expedite resuscitative efforts in patients in extremis who lack venous access or where additional venous access is required for life-saving therapies. Limiting IO dwell time may facilitate timely definitive venous access. Continued education and training by offering IO skill laboratory refreshers and annual e-learning didactic is optimal for maintaining proficiency and knowledge. More research opportunities exist to determine medication safety and efficacy in adult patients in the acute care setting.

  12. Qualitative content analysis of psychologic discomfort and coping process after needlestick injuries among health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae Sim; Son, Haeng Mi; Jeong, Ihn Sook; Son, Jun Seok; Shin, Kyong-sok; Yoonchang, Sung Won; Jin, Hye Young; Han, Si Hyeon; Han, Su Ha

    2016-02-01

    This study was designed to survey psychologic discomfort and coping processes of health care workers that suffered needlestick injuries (NSIs). This qualitative analysis was performed with 15 health care workers who experienced NSIs. Data were collected using face-to-face interviews. The study subjects were asked the following: please describe the psychologic discomfort that you experienced after the NSI incidence. Data were evaluated by qualitative content analysis. Types of psychologic discomfort after NSI among health care workers included anxiety, anger, and feelings of guilt. Some personnel adopted active coping strategies, such as seeking first aid or reporting the incident to a monitoring system, whereas others used passive coping methods, such as avoidance of reporting the incident, vague expectancy to have no problems, and reliance on religious beliefs. Recommended support strategies to improve the prevention of NSIs were augmenting employee education and increasing recognition of techniques for avoiding NSIs. Medical institutions need to provide employees with repeated education so that they are familiar with guidelines for preventing NSIs and to stimulate their alertness to the risk of injuries at any time, in any place, and to anybody. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Computerized clinical decision support systems for primary preventive care: a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review of effects on process of care and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Nathan M; Sebaldt, Rolf J; Mackay, Jean A; Prorok, Jeanette C; Weise-Kelly, Lorraine; Navarro, Tamara; Wilczynski, Nancy L; Haynes, R Brian

    2011-08-03

    Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs) are claimed to improve processes and outcomes of primary preventive care (PPC), but their effects, safety, and acceptance must be confirmed. We updated our previous systematic reviews of CCDSSs and integrated a knowledge translation approach in the process. The objective was to review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of CCDSSs for PPC on process of care, patient outcomes, harms, and costs. We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid's EBM Reviews Database, Inspec, and other databases, as well as reference lists through January 2010. We contacted authors to confirm data or provide additional information. We included RCTs that assessed the effect of a CCDSS for PPC on process of care and patient outcomes compared to care provided without a CCDSS. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement) if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. We added 17 new RCTs to our 2005 review for a total of 41 studies. RCT quality improved over time. CCDSSs improved process of care in 25 of 40 (63%) RCTs. Cumulative scientifically strong evidence supports the effectiveness of CCDSSs for screening and management of dyslipidaemia in primary care. There is mixed evidence for effectiveness in screening for cancer and mental health conditions, multiple preventive care activities, vaccination, and other preventive care interventions. Fourteen (34%) trials assessed patient outcomes, and four (29%) reported improvements with the CCDSS. Most trials were not powered to evaluate patient-important outcomes. CCDSS costs and adverse events were reported in only six (15%) and two (5%) trials, respectively. Information on study duration was often missing, limiting our ability to assess sustainability of CCDSS effects. Evidence supports the effectiveness of CCDSSs for screening and

  14. Computerized clinical decision support systems for primary preventive care: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review of effects on process of care and patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilczynski Nancy L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs are claimed to improve processes and outcomes of primary preventive care (PPC, but their effects, safety, and acceptance must be confirmed. We updated our previous systematic reviews of CCDSSs and integrated a knowledge translation approach in the process. The objective was to review randomized controlled trials (RCTs assessing the effects of CCDSSs for PPC on process of care, patient outcomes, harms, and costs. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid's EBM Reviews Database, Inspec, and other databases, as well as reference lists through January 2010. We contacted authors to confirm data or provide additional information. We included RCTs that assessed the effect of a CCDSS for PPC on process of care and patient outcomes compared to care provided without a CCDSS. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Results We added 17 new RCTs to our 2005 review for a total of 41 studies. RCT quality improved over time. CCDSSs improved process of care in 25 of 40 (63% RCTs. Cumulative scientifically strong evidence supports the effectiveness of CCDSSs for screening and management of dyslipidaemia in primary care. There is mixed evidence for effectiveness in screening for cancer and mental health conditions, multiple preventive care activities, vaccination, and other preventive care interventions. Fourteen (34% trials assessed patient outcomes, and four (29% reported improvements with the CCDSS. Most trials were not powered to evaluate patient-important outcomes. CCDSS costs and adverse events were reported in only six (15% and two (5% trials, respectively. Information on study duration was often missing, limiting our ability to assess sustainability of CCDSS effects. Conclusions

  15. Advance Care Planning in Glioblastoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Fritz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite multimodal treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, glioblastoma is an incurable disease with a poor prognosis. During the disease course, glioblastoma patients may experience progressive neurological deficits, symptoms of increased intracranial pressure such as drowsiness and headache, incontinence, seizures and progressive cognitive dysfunction. These patients not only have cancer, but also a progressive brain disease. This may seriously interfere with their ability to make their own decisions regarding treatment. It is therefore warranted to involve glioblastoma patients early in the disease trajectory in treatment decision-making on their future care, including the end of life (EOL care, which can be achieved with Advance Care Planning (ACP. Although ACP, by definition, aims at timely involvement of patients and proxies in decision-making on future care, the optimal moment to initiate ACP discussions in the disease trajectory of glioblastoma patients remains controversial. Moreover, the disease-specific content of these ACP discussions needs to be established. In this article, we will first describe the history of patient participation in treatment decision-making, including the shift towards ACP. Secondly, we will describe the possible role of ACP for glioblastoma patients, with the specific aim of treatment of disease-specific symptoms such as somnolence and dysphagia, epileptic seizures, headache, and personality changes, agitation and delirium in the EOL phase, and the importance of timing of ACP discussions in this patient population.

  16. Impact of a Simulation-Based Communication Workshop on Resident Preparedness for End-of-Life Communication in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Markin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although residents frequently lead end-of-life (EOL discussions in the intensive care unit (ICU, training in EOL care during residency has been required only recently, and few educational interventions target EOL communication in the ICU. This study evaluated a simulation-based intervention designed to improve resident EOL communication skills with families in the ICU. Methods. Thirty-four second-year internal medicine residents at a large urban teaching hospital participated in small group sessions with faculty trained in the “VitalTalk” method. A Likert-type scale questionnaire measured self-assessed preparedness before, immediately following, and approximately 9 months after intervention. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon rank-sum analysis. Results. Self-assessed preparedness significantly improved for all categories surveyed (preintervention mean; postintervention mean; p value, including discussing bad news (3.3; 4.2; p<0.01, conducting a family conference (3.1; 4.1; p<0.01, discussing treatment options (3.2; 3.9; p<0.01, discussing discontinuing ICU treatments (2.9; 3.5; p<0.01, and expressing empathy (3.9; 4.5; p<0.01. Improvement persisted at follow-up for all items except “expressing empathy.” Residents rated the educational quality highly. Conclusion. This study provides evidence that brief simulation-based interventions can produce lasting improvements in residents’ confidence to discuss EOL care with family members of patients in the ICU.

  17. Paramedic knowledge, attitudes, and training in end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Susan C; Abbott, Jean; McClung, Christian D; Colwell, Chris B; Eckstein, Marc; Lowenstein, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Paramedics often are asked to care for patients at the end of life. To do this, they must communicate effectively with family and caregivers, understand their legal obligations, and know when to withhold unwanted interventions. The objectives of this study were to ascertain paramedics' attitudes toward end-of-life (EOL) situations and the frequency with which they encounter them; and to compare paramedics' preparation during training for a variety of EOL care skills. A written survey was administered to a convenience sample of paramedics in two cities: Denver, Colorado and Los Angeles, California. Questions addressed: (1) attitudes toward EOL decision-making in prehospital settings; (2) experience (number of EOL situations experienced in the past two years); (3) importance of various EOL tasks in clinical practice (pronouncing and communicating death, ending resuscitation, honoring advance directives (ADs)); and (4) self-assessed preparation for these EOL tasks. For each task, importance and preparation were measured using a four-point Likert scale. Proportions were compared using McNemar chi-square statistics to identify areas of under- or over-preparation. Two hundred thirty-six paramedics completed the survey. The mean age was 39 years (range 22-59 years), and 222 (94%) were male. Twenty percent had >20 years of experience. Almost all participants (95%; 95% CI = 91-97%) agreed that prehospital providers should honor field ADs, and more than half (59%; 95% CI = 52-65%) felt that providers should honor verbal wishes to limit resuscitation at the scene. Ninety-eight percent of the participants (95% CI = 96-100%) had questioned whether specific life support interventions were appropriate for patients who appeared to have a terminal disease. Twenty-six percent (95% CI = 20-32%) reported to have used their own judgment during the past two years to withhold or end resuscitation in a patient who appeared to have a terminal disease. Significant discrepancies between the

  18. The impact of intensivists' base specialty of training on care process and outcomes of critically ill trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Goldwasser, Eleanor R; Schaefer, Eric W; Armen, Scott B; Indeck, Matthew C

    2013-09-01

    The care of the critically ill trauma patients is provided by intensivists with various base specialties of training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of intensivists' base specialty of training on the disparity of care process and patient outcome. We performed a retrospective review of an institutional trauma registry at an academic level 1 trauma center. Two intensive care unit teams staffed by either board-certified surgery or anesthesiology intensivists were assigned to manage critically ill trauma patients. Both teams provided care, collaborating with a trauma surgeon in house. We compared patient characteristics, care processes, and outcomes between surgery and anesthesiology groups using Wilcoxon tests or chi-square tests, as appropriate. We identified a total of 620 patients. Patient baseline characteristics including age, sex, transfer status, injury type, injury severity score, and Glasgow coma scale were similar between groups. We found no significant difference in care processes and outcomes between groups. In a logistic regression model, intensivists' base specialty of training was not a significant factor for mortality (odds ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval; 0.79-2.80; P = 0.22) and major complication (odds ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.73-1.67; P = 0.63). Intensive care unit teams collaborating with trauma surgeons had minimal disparity of care processes and similar patient outcomes regardless of intensivists' base specialty of training. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [The strategy and process of out-hospital emergency care of acute cardiovascular events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gang; Wu, Li-e; Li, Qian-ying; Yang, Ye; Wang, Zi-chao; Zhang, Jing-yin; Li, Shu-jun; Yan, Xu-long; Wang, Ming; Zhang, Wen-xiang; Huang, Guan-hua

    2009-06-01

    To study the strategy and process of out-hospital emergency care of acute cardiovascular events. One hundred and eighty-three patients in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Baotou Medical College were prospectively studied. The patients were divided into two groups according to the different ways of out-hospital care, one group consisted of patients who received first-aid care after calling "120" (94 cases), another was self-aid group consisting of patients sent to hospital by relatives (89 cases). The proportion of persons with higher than high school education and better knowledge for emergency care of patients with heart disease in first-aid group was higher than self-aid group (50.0% vs. 29.2%, 83.0% vs. 60.7%, both Pemergency room, they were all treated according to our standard procedure and then registered. All patients were followed up at the end of first and third month after illness. Cardiovascular events were mainly myocardial infarction (61.7%) among 183 patients. There were statistically significant differences between two groups in self-aid response time, first disposal time and out-hospital rescuing time [(32.3+/-5.6) minutes vs. (89.6+/- 8.4) minutes, (47.3+/-7.3) minutes vs. (149.8+/-13.5) minutes, (61.7+/-8.3) minutes vs. [(149.8+/- 13.5) minutes, all P0.05]. Morbidity rate was lower in first-aid group than self-aid group in 1st and 3rd month, respectively (2.1% vs. 9.0%, 4.2% vs. 12.4%, both Pemergency system and procedure can shorten initial disposal time and out-hospital rescuing time, thus improve patients' prognosis. The education level and health knowledge of patients and their relatives directly affect their mode of arriving hospital and prognosis.

  20. Improving quality of care in substance abuse treatment using five key process improvement principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Kim A.; Green, Carla A.; Ford, James H.; Wisdom, Jennifer P.; Gustafson, David H.; McCarty, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Process and quality improvement techniques have been successfully applied in health care arenas, but efforts to institute these strategies in alcohol and drug treatment are underdeveloped. The Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) teaches participating substance abuse treatment agencies to use process improvement strategies to increase client access to, and retention in, treatment. NIATx recommends five principles to promote organizational change: 1) Understand and involve the customer; 2) Fix key problems; 3) Pick a powerful change leader; 4) Get ideas from outside the organization; and 5) Use rapid-cycle testing. Using case studies, supplemented with cross-agency analyses of interview data, this paper profiles participating NIATx treatment agencies that illustrate application of each principle. Results suggest that the most successful organizations integrate and apply most, if not all, of the five principles as they develop and test change strategies. PMID:22282129

  1. Ethnographic process evaluation in primary care: explaining the complexity of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, Arwen E; Gold, Rachel; Davis, James V; McMullen, Carmit K; Jaworski, Victoria; Mercer, MaryBeth; Nelson, Christine

    2014-12-05

    The recent growth of implementation research in care delivery systems has led to a renewed interest in methodological approaches that deliver not only intervention outcome data but also deep understanding of the complex dynamics underlying the implementation process. We suggest that an ethnographic approach to process evaluation, when informed by and integrated with quantitative data, can provide this nuanced insight into intervention outcomes. The specific methods used in such ethnographic process evaluations are rarely presented in detail; our objective is to stimulate a conversation around the successes and challenges of specific data collection methods in health care settings. We use the example of a translational clinical trial among 11 community clinics in Portland, OR that are implementing an evidence-based, health-information technology (HIT)-based intervention focused on patients with diabetes. Our ethnographic process evaluation employed weekly diaries by clinic-based study employees, observation, informal and formal interviews, document review, surveys, and group discussions to identify barriers and facilitators to implementation success, provide insight into the quantitative study outcomes, and uncover lessons potentially transferable to other implementation projects. These methods captured the depth and breadth of factors contributing to intervention uptake, while minimizing disruption to clinic work and supporting mid-stream shifts in implementation strategies. A major challenge is the amount of dedicated researcher time required. The deep understanding of the 'how' and 'why' behind intervention outcomes that can be gained through an ethnographic approach improves the credibility and transferability of study findings. We encourage others to share their own experiences with ethnography in implementation evaluation and health services research, and to consider adapting the methods and tools described here for their own research.

  2. CMS proposes prioritizing patient preferences, linking patients to follow-up care in discharge planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Hospital providers voice concerns about a proposed rule by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) that would require providers to devote more resources to discharge planning. The rule would apply to inpatients as well as emergency patients requiring comprehensive discharge plans as opposed to discharge instructions. CMS states that the rule would ensure the prioritization of patient preferences and goals in the discharge planning process, and also would prevent avoidable complications and readmissions. However, hospital and emergency medicine leaders worry that community resources are not yet in place to facilitate the links and follow-up required in the proposed rule, and that the costs associated with implementation would be prohibitive. The proposed rule would apply to acute care hospitals, EDs, long-term care facilities, inpatient rehabilitation centers, and home health agencies. Regardless of the setting, though, CMS is driving home the message that patient preferences should be given more weight during the discharge planning process. Under the rule, hospitals or EDs would need to develop a patient-centered discharge plan within 24 hours of admission or registration, and complete the plan prior to discharge or transfer to another facility. Under the rule, emergency physicians would determine which patients require a comprehensive discharge plan. Both the American Hospital Association and the American College of Emergency Physicians worry that hospitals will have to take on more staff, invest in training, and make changes to their electronic medical record systems to implement the provisions in the proposed rule.

  3. Tactical resource allocation and elective patient admission planning in care processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Peter J H; Boucherie, Richard J; Hans, Erwin W; Hurink, Johann L

    2013-06-01

    Tactical planning of resources in hospitals concerns elective patient admission planning and the intermediate term allocation of resource capacities. Its main objectives are to achieve equitable access for patients, to meet production targets/to serve the strategically agreed number of patients, and to use resources efficiently. This paper proposes a method to develop a tactical resource allocation and elective patient admission plan. These tactical plans allocate available resources to various care processes and determine the selection of patients to be served that are at a particular stage of their care process. Our method is developed in a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) framework and copes with multiple resources, multiple time periods and multiple patient groups with various uncertain treatment paths through the hospital, thereby integrating decision making for a chain of hospital resources. Computational results indicate that our method leads to a more equitable distribution of resources and provides control of patient access times, the number of patients served and the fraction of allocated resource capacity. Our approach is generic, as the base MILP and the solution approach allow for including various extensions to both the objective criteria and the constraints. Consequently, the proposed method is applicable in various settings of tactical hospital management.

  4. Will Mobile Diabetes Education Teams (MDETs in primary care improve patient care processes and health outcomes? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gucciardi Enza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence to suggest that delivery of diabetes self-management support by diabetes educators in primary care may improve patient care processes and patient clinical outcomes; however, the evaluation of such a model in primary care is nonexistent in Canada. This article describes the design for the evaluation of the implementation of Mobile Diabetes Education Teams (MDETs in primary care settings in Canada. Methods/design This study will use a non-blinded, cluster-randomized controlled trial stepped wedge design to evaluate the Mobile Diabetes Education Teams' intervention in improving patient clinical and care process outcomes. A total of 1,200 patient charts at participating primary care sites will be reviewed for data extraction. Eligible patients will be those aged ≥18, who have type 2 diabetes and a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c of ≥8%. Clusters (that is, primary care sites will be randomized to the intervention and control group using a block randomization procedure within practice size as the blocking factor. A stepped wedge design will be used to sequentially roll out the intervention so that all clusters eventually receive the intervention. The time at which each cluster begins the intervention is randomized to one of the four roll out periods (0, 6, 12, and 18 months. Clusters that are randomized into the intervention later will act as the control for those receiving the intervention earlier. The primary outcome measure will be the difference in the proportion of patients who achieve the recommended HbA1c target of ≤7% between intervention and control groups. Qualitative work (in-depth interviews with primary care physicians, MDET educators and patients; and MDET educators’ field notes and debriefing sessions will be undertaken to assess the implementation process and effectiveness of the MDET intervention. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01553266

  5. The use of data for process and quality improvement in long term care and home care: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Anne E; Bostrom, Anne-Marie; Bucknall, Tracey; Draper, Kellie; Fraser, Kimberly; Schalm, Corinne; Warren, Sharon

    2012-02-01

    Standardized resident or client assessments, including the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI), have been available in long term care and home care settings (continuing care sector) in many jurisdictions for a number of years. Although using these data can make quality improvement activities more efficient and less costly, there has not been a review of the literature reporting quality improvement interventions using standardized data. To address 2 questions: (1) How have RAI and other standardized data been used in process or quality improvement activities in the continuing care sector? and (2) Has the use of RAI and similar data resulted in improvements to resident or other outcomes? Searches using a combination of keyword and controlled vocabulary term searches were conducted in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and PsychINFO. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA, PARTICIPANTS, AND INTERVENTIONS: English language publications from database inception to October 2008 were included. Eligibility criteria included the following: (1) set in continuing care (long-term care facility or home care), (2) involved some form of intervention designed to improve quality or process of care, and (3) used standardized data in the quality or process improvement intervention. After reviewing the articles, we grouped the studies according to the type of intervention used to initiate process improvement. Four different intervention types were identified. We organized the results and discussion by these 4 intervention types. Key word searches identified 713 articles, of which we excluded 639 on abstract review because they did not meet inclusion criteria. A further 50 articles were excluded on full-text review, leaving a total of 24 articles. Of the 24 studies, 10 used a defined process improvement model, 8 used a combination of interventions (multimodal), 5 implemented new guidelines or protocols, and 1 used an education

  6. Development and evaluation of the EOL-ICDQ as a measure of experiences, attitudes and knowledge in end-of-life in patients living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thylén, Ingela; Wenemark, Marika; Fluur, Christina; Strömberg, Anna; Bolse, Kärstin; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2014-04-01

    Due to extended indications and resynchronization therapy, many implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) recipients will experience progressive co-morbid conditions and will be more likely to die of causes other than cardiac death. It is therefore important to elucidate the ICD patients' preferences when nearing end-of-life. Instead of avoiding the subject of end-of-life, a validated questionnaire may be helpful to explore patients' experiences and attitudes about end-of-life concerns and to assess knowledge of the function of the ICD in end-of-life. Validated instruments assessing patients' perspective concerning end-of-life issues are scarce. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate respondent satisfaction and measurement properties of the 'Experiences, Attitudes and Knowledge of End-of-Life Issues in Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Patients' Questionnaire' (EOL-ICDQ). The instrument was tested for validity, respondent satisfaction, and for homogeneity and stability in the Swedish language. An English version of the EOL-ICDQ was validated, but has not yet been pilot tested. The final instrument contained three domains, which were clustered into 39 items measuring: experiences (10 items), attitudes (18 items), and knowledge (11 items) of end-of-life concerns in ICD patients. In addition, the questionnaire also contained items on socio-demographic background (six items) and ICD-specific background (eight items). The validity and reliability properties were considered sufficient. The EOL-ICDQ has the potential to be used in clinical practice and future research. Further studies are needed using this instrument in an Anglo-Saxon context with a sample of English-speaking ICD recipients.

  7. Systematic review of the primary research on minority ethnic groups and end-of-life care from the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Natalie; Meñaca, Arantza; Andrew, Erin V W; Koffman, Jonathan; Harding, Richard; Higginson, Irene J; Pool, Robert; Gysels, Marjolein

    2012-02-01

    Patients from minority ethnic groups experience lower rates of referrals to end-of-life (EoL) care services, higher levels of dissatisfaction with services, and perceive some services as culturally inappropriate. To systematically review original studies of minority ethnic groups and EoL care in the U.K. and appraise their quality. Searches were carried out in 13 electronic databases, eight journals, reference lists, and the gray literature. Studies of minority ethnic groups and EoL care in the U.K. were included. Studies were graded for quality and key themes were identified. Forty-five studies met inclusion criteria. Study quality was good on average. Identified key themes included age structure; inequality by disease group; referrals; caregivers; place of care and death; awareness of services and communication; and cultural competency. Strategies described for the reduction of inequities were partial and reactive. The format of 10 studies prevented quality grading; these were, however, reviewed as they provided unique insights. Variations in terminology and sampling frames complicated comparison across studies. The results highlight the multiple and related factors that contribute to low service use and substandard quality of services experienced by minority ethnic groups, and the need for authors to clarify what they mean by "culturally competent" EoL care. The synthesis of diverse and disparate studies underpins a number of key recommendations for health care professionals and policymakers. Tackling these epidemiological, demographic, institutional, social, and cultural factors will require a systematic and organization-wide approach rather than the current piecemeal and reactive interventions. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Using data to improve medical practice by measuring processes and outcomes of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E C; Splaine, M E; Godfrey, M M; Kahn, V; Hess, A; Batalden, P; Plume, S K

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to help clinicians expand their use of data to improve medical practice performance and to do improvement research. Clinical practices can be viewed as small, complex organizations (microsystems) that produce services for specific patient populations. These services can be greatly improved by embedding measurement into the flow of daily work in the practice. WHY DO IT?: Four good reasons to build measures into daily medical practice are to (1) diagnose strengths and weaknesses in practice performance; (2) improve and innovate in providing care and services using improvement research; (3) manage patients and the practice; and (4) evaluate changes in results over time. It is helpful to have a "physiological" model of a medical practice to analyze the practice, to manage it, and to improve it. One model views clinical practices as microsystems that are designed to generate desired health outcomes for specific subsets of patients and to use resources efficiently. This article provides case study examples to show what an office-based practice might look like if it were using front-line measurement to improve care and services most of the time and to conduct clinical improvement research some of the time. WHAT ARE THE PRINCIPLES FOR USING DATA TO IMPROVE PROCESSES AND OUTCOMES OF CARE?: Principles reflected in the case study examples--such as "Keep Measurement Simple. Think Big and Start Small" and "More Data Is Not Necessarily Better Data. Seek Usefulness, Not Perfection, in Your Measures"--may help guide the development of data to study and improve practice. HOW CAN A PRACTICE START TO USE DATA TO IMPROVE CARE AND CONDUCT IMPROVEMENT RESEARCH?: Practical challenges are involved in starting to use data for enhancing care and improvement research. To increase the odds for success, it would be wise to use a change management strategy to launch the startup plan. Other recommendations include "Establish a Sense of Urgency. (Survival Is Not

  9. The importance of standardized observations to evaluate nutritional care quality in the survey process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, John F; Bertrand, Rosanna; Hurd, Donna; White, Alan; Squires, David; Feuerberg, Marvin; Hickey, Kelly; Simmons, Sandra F

    2009-10-01

    Guidelines written for government surveyors who assess nursing home (NH) compliance with federal standards contain instructions to observe the quality of mealtime assistance. However, these instructions are vague and no protocol is provided for surveyors to record observational data. This study compared government survey staff observations of mealtime assistance quality to observations by research staff using a standardized protocol that met basic standards for accurate behavioral measurement. Survey staff used either the observation instructions in the standard survey process or those written for the revised Quality Improvement Survey (QIS). Trained research staff observed mealtime care in 20 NHs in 5 states during the same time period that survey staff evaluated care in the same facilities, although it could not be determined if survey and research staff observed the same residents during the same meals. Ten NHs were evaluated by government surveyors using the QIS survey instructions and 10 NHs were evaluated by surveyors using the standard survey instructions. Research staff observations using a standardized observation protocol identified a higher proportion of residents receiving inadequate feeding assistance during meals relative to survey staff using either the standard or QIS survey instructions. For example, more than 50% of the residents who ate less than half of their meals based on research staff observation were not offered an alternative to the served meal, and the lack of alternatives, or meal substitutions, was common in all 20 NHs. In comparison, the QIS survey teams documented only 2 instances when meal substitutes were not offered in 10 NHs and the standard survey teams documented no instances in 10 NHs. Standardized mealtime observations by research staff revealed feeding assistance care quality issues in all 20 study NHs. Surveyors following the instructions in either the standard or revised QIS surveys did not detect most of these care quality

  10. Challenges in Australian policy processes for disinvestment from existing, ineffective health care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshaug, Adam G; Hiller, Janet E; Tunis, Sean R; Moss, John R

    2007-10-31

    Internationally, many health care interventions were diffused prior to the standard use of assessments of safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Disinvestment from ineffective or inappropriately applied practices is a growing priority for health care systems for reasons of improved quality of care and sustainability of resource allocation. In this paper we examine key challenges for disinvestment from these interventions and explore potential policy-related avenues to advance a disinvestment agenda. We examine five key challenges in the area of policy driven disinvestment: 1) lack of resources to support disinvestment policy mechanisms; 2) lack of reliable administrative mechanisms to identify and prioritise technologies and/or practices with uncertain clinical and cost-effectiveness; 3) political, clinical and social challenges to removing an established technology or practice; 4) lack of published studies with evidence demonstrating that existing technologies/practices provide little or no benefit (highlighting complexity of design) and; 5) inadequate resources to support a research agenda to advance disinvestment methods. Partnerships are required to involve government, professional colleges and relevant stakeholder groups to put disinvestment on the agenda. Such partnerships could foster awareness raising, collaboration and improved health outcome data generation and reporting. Dedicated funds and distinct processes could be established within the Medical Services Advisory Committee and Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee to, a) identify technologies and practices for which there is relative uncertainty that could be the basis for disinvestment analysis, and b) conduct disinvestment assessments of selected item(s) to address existing practices in an analogous manner to the current focus on new and emerging technology. Finally, dedicated funding and cross-disciplinary collaboration is necessary to build health services and policy research capacity

  11. Process and Outcome Measures among COPD Patients with a Hospitalization Cared for by an Advance Practice Provider or Primary Care Physician.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitesh Agarwal

    Full Text Available To examine the process and outcomes of care of COPD patients by Advanced Practice Providers (APPs and primary care physicians.We conducted a cross sectional retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries with COPD who had at least one hospitalization in 2010. We examined the process measures of receipt of spirometry evaluation, influenza and pneumococcal vaccine, use of COPD medications, and referral to a pulmonary specialist visit. Outcome measures were emergency department (ER visit, number of hospitalizations and 30-day readmission in 2010.A total of 7,257 Medicare beneficiaries with COPD were included. Of these, 1,999 and 5,258 received primary care from APPs and primary care physicians, respectively. Patients in the APP group were more likely to be white, younger, male, residing in non-metropolitan areas and have fewer comorbidities. In terms of process of care measures, APPs were more likely to prescribe short acting bronchodilators (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.18, 95%Confidence Interval [CI] 1.05-1.32, oxygen therapy (aOR = 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.40 and consult a pulmonary specialist (aOR = 1.39, 95% CI 1.23-1.56, but less likely to give influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations. Patients receiving care from APPs had lower rates of ER visits for COPD (aOR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.71-0.98 and had a higher follow-up rate with pulmonary specialist within 30 days of hospitalization for COPD (aOR = 1.25, 95%CI 1.07-1.48 than those cared for by physicians.Compared to patients cared for by physicians, patients cared for by APPs were more likely to receive short acting bronchodilator, oxygen therapy and been referred to pulmonologist, however they had lower rates of vaccination probably due to lower age group. Patients cared for by APPs were less like to visit an ER for COPD compared to patients care for by physicians, conversely there was no differences in hospitalization or readmission for COPD between MDs and APPs.

  12. How can health care organisations make and justify decisions about risk reduction? Lessons from a cross-industry review and a health care stakeholder consensus development process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujan, Mark A.; Habli, Ibrahim; Kelly, Tim P.; Gühnemann, Astrid; Pozzi, Simone; Johnson, Christopher W.

    2017-01-01

    Interventions to reduce risk often have an associated cost. In UK industries decisions about risk reduction are made and justified within a shared regulatory framework that requires that risk be reduced as low as reasonably practicable. In health care no such regulatory framework exists, and the practice of making decisions about risk reduction is varied and lacks transparency. Can health care organisations learn from relevant industry experiences about making and justifying risk reduction decisions? This paper presents lessons from a qualitative study undertaken with 21 participants from five industries about how such decisions are made and justified in UK industry. Recommendations were developed based on a consensus development exercise undertaken with 20 health care stakeholders. The paper argues that there is a need in health care to develop a regulatory framework and an agreed process for managing explicitly the trade-off between risk reduction and cost. The framework should include guidance about a health care specific notion of acceptable levels of risk, guidance about standardised risk reduction interventions, it should include regulatory incentives for health care organisations to reduce risk, and it should encourage the adoption of an approach for documenting explicitly an organisation's risk position. - Highlights: • Empirical description of industry perceptions on making risk reduction decisions. • Health care consensus development identified five recommendations. • Risk concept should be better integrated into safety management. • Education and awareness about risk concept are required. • Health systems need to start a dialogue about acceptable levels of risk.

  13. An educational process to strengthen primary care nursing practices in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, A M; Fracolli, L A

    2007-12-01

    To describe the experience of a registered nurse (RN) training process related to the Family Health Program (FHP) developed in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The FHP is a national, government strategy to restructure primary care services. It focuses on the family in order to understand its physical and social structure in regards to the health-illness process. In the FHP, the RN is a member of a team with the same number as medical doctors - an unprecedented situation. The FHP requires a discussion of the RNs' practice, by qualifying and empowering them with tools and knowledge. The training process was based on Freire's approach founded on critical pedagogy in order to address the fundamental problem of inequalities in health. The first phase included workshops and the second one included a course. The workshops identified the following problems related to the RN's work: lack of tools to identify the population's needs; overload of work due to the accumulation of management and assistance activities; difficulties regarding teamwork; lack of tools to evaluate the impact of nursing interventions; lack of tools to improve the participation of the community. The course was organized to tackle these problems under five thematic headings. The RN's training process allowed the group to reflect deeply on its work. This experience led to the need for the construction of tools to intervene in the reality, mainly against social exclusion, rescuing and adapting of the knowledge accumulated in the healthcare practice, identifying settings which demand institutional solutions and engaging the RN in research groups in order to develop projects according to the complexity of the primary care services. The application of the concept of equity in the health sector represented a reaction against the processes of social exclusion, starting from performance at a local level to become a reality in the accomplishments achieved by the Brazilian National Health System. This training

  14. Intermediate care: for better or worse? Process evaluation of an intermediate care model between a university hospital and a residential home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janmaat Tonnie ACM

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermediate care was developed in order to bridge acute, primary and social care, primarily for elderly persons with complex care needs. Such bridging initiatives are intended to reduce hospital stays and improve continuity of care. Although many models assume positive effects, it is often ambiguous what the benefits are and whether they can be transferred to other settings. This is due to the heterogeneity of intermediate care models and the variety of collaborating partners that set up such models. Quantitative evaluation captures only a limited series of generic structure, process and outcome parameters. More detailed information is needed to assess the dynamics of intermediate care delivery, and to find ways to improve the quality of care. Against this background, the functioning of a low intensity early discharge model of intermediate care set up in a residential home for patients released from an Amsterdam university hospital has been evaluated. The aim of this study was to produce knowledge for management to improve quality of care, and to provide more generalisable insights into the accumulated impact of such a model. Methods A process evaluation was carried out using quantitative and qualitative methods. Registration forms and patient questionnaires were used to quantify the patient population in the model. Statistical analysis encompassed T-tests and chi-squared test to assess significance. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 staff members representing all disciplines working with the model. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using both 'open' and 'framework' approaches. Results Despite high expectations, there were significant problems. A heterogeneous patient population, a relatively unqualified staff and cultural differences between both collaborating partners impeded implementation and had an impact on the functioning of the model. Conclusion We concluded that setting up a low intensity

  15. The Role of the Built Environment: How Decentralized Nurse Stations Shape Communication, Patient Care Processes, and Patient Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Kevin; Bardach, Shoshana H; Bardach, David R

    2017-12-01

    Increasingly, health communication scholars are attending to how hospital built environments shape communication, patient care processes, and patient outcomes. This multimethod study was conducted on two floors of a newly designed urban hospital. Nine focus groups interviews were conducted with 35 health care professionals from 10 provider groups. Seven of the groups were homogeneous by profession or level: nursing (three groups), nurse managers (two groups), and one group each of nurse care technicians ("techs") and physicians. Two mixed groups were comprised of staff from pharmacy, occupational therapy, patient care facilitators, physical therapy, social work, and pastoral care. Systematic qualitative analysis was conducted using a conceptual framework based on systems theory and prior health care design and communication research. Additionally, quantitative modeling was employed to assess walking distances in two different hospital designs. Results indicate nurses walked significantly more in the new hospital environment. Qualitative analysis revealed three insights developed in relationship to system structures, processes, and outcomes. First, decentralized nurse stations changed system interdependencies by reducing nurse-to-nurse interactions and teamwork while heightening nurse interdependencies and teamwork with other health care occupations. Second, many nursing-related processes remained centralized while nurse stations were decentralized, creating systems-based problems for nursing care. Third, nursing communities of practices were adversely affected by the new design. Implications of this study suggest that nurse station design shapes communication, patient care processes, and patient outcomes. Further, it is important to understand how the built environment, often treated as invisible in communication research, is crucial to understanding communication within complex health care systems.

  16. Racial variations in processes of care for patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whittle Jeff

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia (CAP have a substantial risk of death, but there is evidence that adherence to certain processes of care, including antibiotic administration within 8 hours, can decrease this risk. Although national mortality data shows blacks have a substantially increased odds of death due to pneumonia as compared to whites previous studies of short-term mortality have found decreased mortality for blacks. Therefore we examined pneumonia-related processes of care and short-term mortality in a population of patients hospitalized with CAP. Methods We reviewed the records of all identified Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for pneumonia between 10/1/1998 and 9/30/1999 at one of 101 Pennsylvania hospitals, and randomly selected 60 patients at each hospital for inclusion. We reviewed the medical records to gather process measures of quality, pneumonia severity and demographics. We used Medicare administrative data to identify 30-day mortality. Because only a small proportion of the study population was black, we included all 240 black patients and randomly selected 720 white patients matched on age and gender. We performed a resampling of the white patients 10 times. Results Males were 43% of the cohort, and the median age was 76 years. After controlling for potential confounders, blacks were less likely to receive antibiotics within 8 hours (odds ratio with 95% confidence interval 0.6, 0.4–0.97, but were as likely as whites to have blood cultures obtained prior to receiving antibiotics (0.7, 0.3–1.5, to have oxygenation assessed within 24 hours of presentation (1.6, 0.9–3.0, and to receive guideline concordant antibiotics (OR 0.9, 0.6–1.7. Black patients had a trend towards decreased 30-day mortality (0.4, 0.2 to 1.0. Conclusion Although blacks were less likely to receive optimal care, our findings are consistent with other studies that suggest better risk-adjusted survival

  17. Factors associated with student learning processes in primary health care units: a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Elisabeth; Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Saarikoski, Mikko; Kaila, Päivi

    2015-01-01

    Clinical placement plays a key role in education intended to develop nursing and caregiving skills. Studies of nursing students' clinical learning experiences show that these dimensions affect learning processes: (i) supervisory relationship, (ii) pedagogical atmosphere, (iii) management leadership style, (iv) premises of nursing care on the ward, and (v) nursing teachers' roles. Few empirical studies address the probability of an association between these dimensions and factors such as student (a) motivation, (b) satisfaction with clinical placement, and (c) experiences with professional role models. The study aimed to investigate factors associated with the five dimensions in clinical learning environments within primary health care units. The Swedish version of Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Teacher, a validated evaluation scale, was administered to 356 graduating nursing students after four or five weeks clinical placement in primary health care units. Response rate was 84%. Multivariate analysis of variance is determined if the five dimensions are associated with factors a, b, and c above. The analysis revealed a statistically significant association with the five dimensions and two factors: students' motivation and experiences with professional role models. The satisfaction factor had a statistically significant association (effect size was high) with all dimensions; this clearly indicates that students experienced satisfaction. These questionnaire results show that a good clinical learning experience constitutes a complex whole (totality) that involves several interacting factors. Supervisory relationship and pedagogical atmosphere particularly influenced students' satisfaction and motivation. These results provide valuable decision-support material for clinical education planning, implementation, and management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Cost-effectiveness of the deep vein thrombosis diagnosis process in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes Camps, Eva; Luis del Val García, José; Bellmunt Montoya, Sergi; Hmimina Hmimina, Sara; Gómez Jabalera, Efren; Muñoz Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-04-01

    To analyse the cost effectiveness of the application of diagnostic algorithms in patients with a first episode of suspected deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in Primary Care compared with systematic referral to specialised centres. Observational, cross-sectional, analytical study. Patients from hospital emergency rooms referred from Primary Care to complete clinical evaluation and diagnosis. A total of 138 patients with symptoms of a first episode of DVT were recruited; 22 were excluded (no Primary Care report, symptoms for more than 30 days, anticoagulant treatment, and previous DVT). Of the 116 patients finally included, 61% women and the mean age was 71 years. Variables from the Wells and Oudega clinical probability scales, D-dimer (portable and hospital), Doppler ultrasound, and direct costs generated by the three algorithms analysed: all patients were referred systematically, referral according to Wells and Oudega scale. DVT was confirmed in 18.9%. The two clinical probability scales showed a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 85.1 to 100) and a specificity of about 40%. With the application of the scales, one third of all referrals to hospital emergency rooms could have been avoided (P<.001). The diagnostic cost could have been reduced by € 8,620 according to Oudega and € 9,741 according to Wells, per 100 patients visited. The application of diagnostic algorithms when a DVT is suspected could lead to better diagnostic management by physicians, and a more cost effective process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Appraisal of literature reviews on end-of-life care for minority ethnic groups in the UK and a critical comparison with policy recommendations from the UK end-of-life care strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pool Robert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence of low end-of-life (EoL care service use by minority ethnic groups in the UK has given rise to a body of research and a number of reviews of the literature. This article aims to review and evaluate literature reviews on minority ethnic groups and EoL care in the UK and assess their suitability as an evidence base for policy. Methods Systematic review. Searches were carried out in thirteen electronic databases, eight journals, reference lists, and grey literature. Reviews were included if they concerned minority ethnic groups and EoL care in the UK. Reviews were graded for quality and key themes identified. Results Thirteen reviews (2001-2009 met inclusion criteria. Seven took a systematic approach, of which four scored highly for methodological quality (a mean score of six, median seven. The majority of systematic reviews were therefore of a reasonable methodological quality. Most reviews were restricted by ethnic group, aspect of EoL care, or were broader reviews which reported relevant findings. Six key themes were identified. Conclusions A number of reviews were systematic and scored highly for methodological quality. These reviews provide a good reflection of the primary evidence and could be used to inform policy. The complexity and inter-relatedness of factors leading to low service use was recognised and reflected in reviews' recommendations for service improvement. Recommendations made in the UK End-of-Life Care Strategy were limited in comparison, and the Strategy's evidence base concerning minority ethnic groups was found to be narrow. Future policy should be embedded strongly in the evidence base to reflect the current literature and minimise bias.

  20. Appraisal of literature reviews on end-of-life care for minority ethnic groups in the UK and a critical comparison with policy recommendations from the UK end-of-life care strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Natalie; Meñaca, Arantza; Andrew, Erin Vw; Koffman, Jonathan; Harding, Richard; Higginson, Irene J; Pool, Robert; Gysels, Marjolein

    2011-06-02

    Evidence of low end-of-life (EoL) care service use by minority ethnic groups in the UK has given rise to a body of research and a number of reviews of the literature. This article aims to review and evaluate literature reviews on minority ethnic groups and EoL care in the UK and assess their suitability as an evidence base for policy. Systematic review. Searches were carried out in thirteen electronic databases, eight journals, reference lists, and grey literature. Reviews were included if they concerned minority ethnic groups and EoL care in the UK. Reviews were graded for quality and key themes identified. Thirteen reviews (2001-2009) met inclusion criteria. Seven took a systematic approach, of which four scored highly for methodological quality (a mean score of six, median seven). The majority of systematic reviews were therefore of a reasonable methodological quality. Most reviews were restricted by ethnic group, aspect of EoL care, or were broader reviews which reported relevant findings. Six key themes were identified. A number of reviews were systematic and scored highly for methodological quality. These reviews provide a good reflection of the primary evidence and could be used to inform policy. The complexity and inter-relatedness of factors leading to low service use was recognised and reflected in reviews' recommendations for service improvement. Recommendations made in the UK End-of-Life Care Strategy were limited in comparison, and the Strategy's evidence base concerning minority ethnic groups was found to be narrow. Future policy should be embedded strongly in the evidence base to reflect the current literature and minimise bias.

  1. Personalized Risk Scoring for Critical Care Prognosis Using Mixtures of Gaussian Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaa, Ahmed M; Yoon, Jinsung; Hu, Scott; van der Schaar, Mihaela

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a personalized real-time risk scoring algorithm that provides timely and granular assessments for the clinical acuity of ward patients based on their (temporal) lab tests and vital signs; the proposed risk scoring system ensures timely intensive care unit admissions for clinically deteriorating patients. The risk scoring system is based on the idea of sequential hypothesis testing under an uncertain time horizon. The system learns a set of latent patient subtypes from the offline electronic health record data, and trains a mixture of Gaussian Process experts, where each expert models the physiological data streams associated with a specific patient subtype. Transfer learning techniques are used to learn the relationship between a patient's latent subtype and her static admission information (e.g., age, gender, transfer status, ICD-9 codes, etc). Experiments conducted on data from a heterogeneous cohort of 6321 patients admitted to Ronald Reagan UCLA medical center show that our score significantly outperforms the currently deployed risk scores, such as the Rothman index, MEWS, APACHE, and SOFA scores, in terms of timeliness, true positive rate, and positive predictive value. Our results reflect the importance of adopting the concepts of personalized medicine in critical care settings; significant accuracy and timeliness gains can be achieved by accounting for the patients' heterogeneity. The proposed risk scoring methodology can confer huge clinical and social benefits on a massive number of critically ill inpatients who exhibit adverse outcomes including, but not limited to, cardiac arrests, respiratory arrests, and septic shocks.

  2. Associations between the organisation of stroke services, process of care, and mortality in England: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Benjamin D; Ayis, Salma; Campbell, James; Hoffman, Alex; Roughton, Michael; Tyrrell, Pippa J; Wolfe, Charles D A; Rudd, Anthony G

    2013-05-10

    To estimate the relations between the organisation of stroke services, process measures of care quality, and 30 day mortality in patients admitted with acute ischaemic stroke. Prospective cohort study. Hospitals (n=106) admitting patients with acute stroke in England and participating in the Stroke Improvement National Audit Programme and 2010 Sentinel Stroke Audit. 36,197 adults admitted with acute ischaemic stroke to a participating hospital from 1 April 2010 to 30 November 2011. Associations between process of care (the assessments, interventions, and treatments that patients receive) and 30 day all cause mortality, adjusting for patient level characteristics. Process of care was measured using six individual measures of stroke care and summarised into an overall quality score. Of 36,197 patients admitted with acute ischaemic stroke, 25,904 (71.6%) were eligible to receive all six care processes. Patients admitted to stroke services with high organisational scores were more likely to receive most (5 or 6) of the six care processes. Three of the individual processes were associated with reduced mortality, including two care bundles: review by a stroke consultant within 24 hours of admission (adjusted odds ratio 0.86, 95%confidence interval 0.78 to 0.96), nutrition screening and formal swallow assessment within 72 hours (0.83, 0.72 to 0.96), and antiplatelet therapy and adequate fluid and nutrition for first the 72 hours (0.55, 0.49 to 0.61). Receipt of five or six care processes was associated with lower mortality compared with receipt of 0-4 in both multilevel (0.74, 0.66 to 0.83) and instrumental variable analyses (0.62, 0.46 to 0.83). Patients admitted to stroke services with higher levels of organisation are more likely to receive high quality care as measured by audited process measures of acute stroke care. Those patients receiving high quality care have a reduced risk of death in the 30 days after stroke, adjusting for patient characteristics and

  3. Targeting the worst-off for free health care: a process evaluation in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridde, Valéry; Yaogo, Maurice; Kafando, Yamba; Kadio, Kadidiatou; Ouedraogo, Moctar; Bicaba, Abel; Haddad, Slim

    2011-11-01

    Effective mechanisms to exempt the indigent from user fees at health care facilities are rare in Africa. A State-led intervention (2004-2005) and two action research projects (2007-2010) were implemented in a health district in Burkina Faso to exempt the indigent from user fees. This article presents the results of the process evaluation of these three interventions. Individual and group interviews were organized with the key stakeholders (health staff, community members) to document the strengths and weaknesses of key components of the interventions (relevance and uptake of the intervention, worst-off selection and information, financial arrangements). Data was subjected to content analysis and thematic analysis. The results show that all three intervention processes can be improved. Community-based targeting was better accepted by the stakeholders than was the State-led intervention. The strengths of the community-based approach were in clearly defining the selection criteria, informing the waiver beneficiaries, using a participative process and using endogenous funding. A weakness was that using endogenous funding led to restrictive selection by the community. The community-based approach appears to be the most effective, but it needs to be improved and retested to generate more knowledge before scaling up. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Setting priorities in health care organizations: criteria, processes, and parameters of success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Douglas K

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitals and regional health authorities must set priorities in the face of resource constraints. Decision-makers seek practical ways to set priorities fairly in strategic planning, but find limited guidance from the literature. Very little has been reported from the perspective of Board members and senior managers about what criteria, processes and parameters of success they would use to set priorities fairly. Discussion We facilitated workshops for board members and senior leadership at three health care organizations to assist them in developing a strategy for fair priority setting. Workshop participants identified 8 priority setting criteria, 10 key priority setting process elements, and 6 parameters of success that they would use to set priorities in their organizations. Decision-makers in other organizations can draw lessons from these findings to enhance the fairness of their priority setting decision-making. Summary Lessons learned in three workshops fill an important gap in the literature about what criteria, processes, and parameters of success Board members and senior managers would use to set priorities fairly.

  5. Setting priorities in health care organizations: criteria, processes, and parameters of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jennifer L; Martin, Douglas K; Singer, Peter A

    2004-09-08

    Hospitals and regional health authorities must set priorities in the face of resource constraints. Decision-makers seek practical ways to set priorities fairly in strategic planning, but find limited guidance from the literature. Very little has been reported from the perspective of Board members and senior managers about what criteria, processes and parameters of success they would use to set priorities fairly. We facilitated workshops for board members and senior leadership at three health care organizations to assist them in developing a strategy for fair priority setting. Workshop participants identified 8 priority setting criteria, 10 key priority setting process elements, and 6 parameters of success that they would use to set priorities in their organizations. Decision-makers in other organizations can draw lessons from these findings to enhance the fairness of their priority setting decision-making. Lessons learned in three workshops fill an important gap in the literature about what criteria, processes, and parameters of success Board members and senior managers would use to set priorities fairly.

  6. Enhancing the informed consent process for critical care research: strategies from a thromboprophylaxis trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Orla M; McDonald, Ellen; Zytaruk, Nicole; Foster, Denise; Matte, Andrea; Clarke, France; Fleury, Suzie; Krause, Katie; McArdle, Tracey; Skrobik, Yoanna; Cook, Deborah J

    2013-12-01

    Critically ill patients lack capacity for decisions about research participation. Consent to enrol these patients in studies is typically obtained from substitute decision-makers. To present strategies that may optimise the process of obtaining informed consent from substitute decision-makers for participation of critically ill patients in trials. We use examples from a randomised trial of heparin thromboprophylaxis in the intensive care unit (PROTECT, clinicaltrials.gov NCT00182143). 3764 patients were randomised, with an informed consent rate of 82%; 90% of consents were obtained from substitute decision-makers. North American PROTECT research coordinators attended three meetings to discuss enrolment: (1) Trial start-up (January 2006); (2) Near trial closure (January 2010); and (3) Post-publication (April 2011). Data were derived from slide presentations, field notes from break-out groups and plenary discussions, then analysed inductively. We derived three phases for the informed consent process: (1) Preparation for the Consent Encounter; (2) The Consent Encounter; and (3) Follow-up to the Consent Encounter. Specific strategies emerged for each phase: Phase 1 (four strategies); Phase 2 (six strategies); and Phase 3 (three strategies). We identified 13 strategies that may improve the process of obtaining informed consent from substitute decision-makers and be generalisable to other settings and studies. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Organizational culture and the implementation of person centered care: results from a change process in Swedish hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Tariq Saleem J; Ekman, Inger; Olsson, Lars-Eric; Dudas, Kerstin; Carlström, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Sweden has one of the oldest, most coherent and stable healthcare systems in the world. The culture has been described as conservative, mechanistic and increasingly standardized. In order to provide a care adjusted to the patient, person centered care (PCC) has been developed and implemented into some parts of the health care industry. The model has proven to decrease patient uncertainty. However, the impact of PCC has been limited in some clinics and hospital wards. An assumption is that organizational culture has an impact on desired outcomes of PCC, such as patient uncertainty. Therefore, in this study we identify the impact of organizational culture on patient uncertainty in five hospital wards during the implementation of PCC. Data from 220 hospitalized patients who completed the uncertainty cardiovascular population scale (UCPS) and 117 nurses who completed the organizational values questionnaire (OVQ) were investigated with regression analysis. The results seemed to indicate that in hospitals where the culture promotes stability, control and goal setting, patient uncertainty is reduced. In contrast to previous studies suggesting that a culture of flexibility, cohesion and trust is positive, a culture of stability can better sustain a desired outcome of reform or implementation of new care models such as person centered care. It is essential for health managers to be aware of what characterizes their organizational culture before attempting to implement any sort of new healthcare model. The organizational values questionnaire has the potential to be used as a tool to aid health managers in reaching that understanding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The clinical surveillance process as carried out by expert nurses in a critical care context: A theoretical explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhomme, Daniel; Gagnon, Johanne; Lechasseur, Kathleen

    2018-02-01

    Nursing Science presents surveillance as an indispensable component of patient safety. Although the literature defines surveillance fully, its implementation is not well understood. This research aims to formulate a theoretical explanation of the surveillance process that expert nurses employ in critical care. To develop the theoretical explanation for the surveillance process of critical care nurses, Strauss and Corbin's (1998) grounded theory approach and Think Aloud Method (Fonteyn et al., 1993) were used with fifteen expert critical care nurses (n=15). Surveillance in critical care is a continual process of collaborative vigilance that starts with the thought process and behaviour related to data collection, analysis and interpretation. The surveillance process comprises five key elements: 1) Managing the risk of complications; 2) Collecting data; 3) Detecting a problem; 4) Making a decision and 5) Working in synergy. In developing a theoretical explanation, this research leads to an understanding of the surveillance process performed by expert nurses in a critical care context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Choice Processes and Satisfaction with Care According to Parents of Children and Young Adults with Intellectual Disability in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieboer, Anna P.; Cramm, Jane M.; van der Meij, Birgitha; Huijsman, Robbert

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the expressed desire for access to information on care providers and increased availability of this information, the use of available information falls short of expectations. We lack research on the decision-making processes and on how these processes are influenced. A study that employs "real-life" decisions is…

  10. A Conceptual Model for Assessing Quality of Care for Patients Boarding in the Emergency Department: Structure-Process-Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan W.; Singer, Sara J.; Sun, Benjamin C.; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Many believe that the “boarding” of emergency department (ED) patients awaiting inpatient beds compromises quality of care. To better study the quality of care of boarded patients, one should identify and understand the mechanisms accounting for any potential differences in care. This paper present a conceptual boarding “structure-process-outcome” model to help assess quality of care provided to boarded patients, and to aid in recognizing potential solutions to improve that quality, if it is deficient. The goal of the conceptual model is to create a practical framework on which a research and policy agenda can be based to measure and improve quality of care for boarded patients. PMID:21496148

  11. Accelerating Best Care in Pennsylvania: adapting a large academic system's quality improvement process to rural community hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydar, Ziad; Gunderson, Julie; Ballard, David J; Skoufalos, Alexis; Berman, Bettina; Nash, David B

    2008-01-01

    Industrial quality improvement (QI) methods such as continuous quality improvement (CQI) may help bridge the gap between evidence-based "best care" and the quality of care provided. In 2006, Baylor Health Care System collaborated with Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University to conduct a QI demonstration project in select Pennsylvania hospitals using CQI techniques developed by Baylor. The training was provided over a 6-month period and focused on methods for rapid-cycle improvement; data system design; data management; tools to improve patient outcomes, processes of care, and cost-effectiveness; use of clinical guidelines and protocols; leadership skills; and customer service skills. Participants successfully implemented a variety of QI projects. QI education programs developed and pioneered within large health care systems can be adapted and applied successfully to other settings, providing needed tools to smaller rural and community hospitals that lack the necessary resources to establish such programs independently.

  12. [AT THE CROSSROADS: THE ROLE OF LABORATORY MEDICINE IN THE PATIENT CARE PROCESS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffen, Yuval; Zaidise, Itzhak

    2017-06-01

    In recent decades, the laboratory medicine profession has undergone significant changes due to both technological developments and economic constraints. Technological innovations support automation, provide faster and more accurate equipment, and allow increased efficiency through the use of commercial test kits. These changes, combined with budgetary constraints, have led to mergers and centralization of medical laboratories to optimize work and cut costs. While this centralization may be a business necessity, it leads to a disconnection between the laboratory and the clinical context. In addition, laboratory tests are treated as a commodity, which places emphasis on price only, rather than quality. In this article, we review the developments and changes that medical laboratories and the laboratory medicine profession have undergone in recent decades. We focus on technological and structural challenges affecting the functioning of medical laboratories and the relations between laboratory workers and medical teams. We then introduce vocational education changes required for the laboratory medicine profession. We propose defining the role of medical laboratory directors in terms of their basic training as medical doctors or doctors of science. We suggest that laboratory employees should become a reliable source of information regarding selection of appropriate test methods, processing data and presenting the results to the medical staff. Laboratory workers must deepen their clinical knowledge and become an integral part of the patient care process, along with medical and nursing staff. Special training programs for medical laboratory workers and directors must be developed in order to match the complex activities currently being conducted in laboratories.

  13. Guiding the Process of Culturally Competent Care With Hispanic Patients: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Linda L; Metzler Sawin, Erika

    2016-05-01

    To explore nursing care actions that lead to culturally competent care for Hispanic patients. Nurses report apprehension when delivering nursing care because of language barriers and a lack of Hispanic cultural understanding. Research is needed to inform culturally aware nursing practice actions for Hispanic patients. The study used a qualitative, grounded theory design to address the questions: (a) What cultural knowledge should nurses have when caring for Hispanic patients and families and (b) What nursing actions should nurses take to provide culturally competent care? Hispanic lay health promoters and Hispanic community members were interviewed to make recommendations for care. A model was identified that informs culturally competent nursing care. "Connectedness," the central phenomenon, describes nursing actions and contains subthemes explaining influences on nursing care. "Up to You" and "At the Mercy of the System" are descriptive themes influencing connectedness. Connectedness is central to culturally well-informed nurse-patient interactions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. How high-performance work systems drive health care value: an examination of leading process improvement strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Julie; Garman, Andrew N; Song, Paula H; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-01-01

    As hospitals focus on increasing health care value, process improvement strategies have proliferated, seemingly faster than the evidence base supporting them. Yet, most process improvement strategies are associated with work practices for which solid evidence does exist. Evaluating improvement strategies in the context of evidence-based work practices can provide guidance about which strategies would work best for a given health care organization. We combined a literature review with analysis of key informant interview data collected from 5 case studies of high-performance work practices (HPWPs) in health care organizations. We explored the link between an evidence-based framework for HPWP use and 3 process improvement strategies: Hardwiring Excellence, Lean/Six Sigma, and Baldrige. We found that each of these process improvement strategies has not only strengths but also important gaps with respect to incorporating HPWPs involving engaging staff, aligning leaders, acquiring and developing talent, and empowering the front line. Given differences among these strategies, our analyses suggest that some may work better than others for individual health care organizations, depending on the organizations' current management systems. In practice, most organizations implementing improvement strategies would benefit from including evidence-based HPWPs to maximize the potential for process improvement strategies to increase value in health care.

  15. Interface flow process audit: using the patient's career as a tracer of quality of care and of system organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Unger

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This case study aims to demonstrate the method's feasibility and capacity to improve quality of care. Several drawbacks attached to tracer condition and selected procedure audits oblige clinicians to rely on external evaluators. Interface flow process audit is an alternative method, which also favours integration of health care across institutions divide. Methods: An action research study was carried out to test the feasibility of interface flow process audit and its impact on quality improvement. An anonymous questionnaire was carried out to assess the participants' perception of the process. Results: In this study, interface flow process audit brought together general practitioners and hospital doctors to analyse the co-ordination of their activities across the primary-secondary interface. Human factors and organisational characteristics had a clear influence on implementation of the solutions. In general, the participants confirmed that the interface flow process audit helped them to analyse the quality of case management both at primary and secondary care level. Conclusions: The interface flow process audit appears a useful method for regular in-service self-evaluation. Its practice enabled to address a wide scope of clinical, managerial and economical problems. Bridging the primary-secondary care gap, interface flow process audit's focus on the patient's career combined with the broad scope of problems that can be analysed are particularly powerful features. The methodology would benefit from an evaluation of its practice on larger scale.

  16. Midwives' perceptions of organisational structures and processes influencing their ability to provide caseload care to socially disadvantaged and vulnerable women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Jane; Fenwick, Jennifer; Gamble, Jenny; Brittain, Hazel; Creedy, Debra K

    2014-10-01

    This study examined midwives' perceptions of organisational structures and processes of care when working in a caseload model (Midwifery Group Practice MGP) for socially disadvantaged and vulnerable childbearing women. This study used Donabedian's theoretical framework for evaluating the quality of health care provision. Of the 17 eligible midwives, 15 participated in focus group discussions and two others provided written comments. Thematic analysis was guided by three headings; clinical outcomes, processes of care and organisational structure. Midwives believed they provided an excellent service to socially disadvantaged and vulnerable childbearing women. Midwives gained satisfaction from working in partnership with women, working across their full scope of practice, and making a difference to the women. However the midwives perceived the MGP was situated within an organisation that was hostile to the caseload model of care. Midwives felt frustrated and distressed by a lack of organisational support for the model and a culture of blame dominated by medicine. A lack of material resources and no identified office space created feelings akin to 'homelessness'. Together these challenges threatened the cohesiveness of the MGP and undermined midwives' ability to advocate for women and keep birth normal. If access to caseload midwifery care for women with diverse backgrounds and circumstances is to be enhanced, then mechanisms need to be implemented to ensure organisational structures and processes are developed to sustain midwives in the provision of 'best practice' maternity care. Women accessing midwifery caseload care have excellent maternal and newborn outcomes. However there remains limited understanding of the impact of organisational structures and processes of care on clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Parental perceptions of forgoing artificial nutrition and hydration during end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Adam; Shaheed, Jenny; Newman, Christine; Rugg, Maria; Steele, Rose

    2013-05-01

    Forgoing artificial nutrition and hydration (FANH) in children at the end of life (EOL) is a medically, legally, and ethically acceptable practice under specific circumstances. However, most of the evidence on FANH involves dying adults. There is a paucity of pediatric evidence to guide health care providers' and parents' decision-making around this practice. Objectives were (1) to explore the experiences of bereaved parents when a decision had been made to FANH during EOL care for their child and (2) to describe the perceived quality of death in these children, as reported by their parents. This was a qualitative study using in-depth interviews with parents whose children died after a decision to FANH. Parental perceptions about the experience and their child's quality of death were explored. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed, then data were analyzed by using interpretive description methodology. All parents were satisfied with their decision to FANH and believed that their child's death was generally peaceful and comfortable. The child's perceived poor quality of life was central to the decision to FANH, with feeding intolerance often contributing to this perception. Despite overall satisfaction, all parents had doubts and questions about the decision and benefited from ongoing assurances from the clinical team. FANH in children at the EOL is an acceptable form of palliation for some parents and may contribute to a death that is perceived to be peaceful and comfortable. In situations in which FANH may be a reasonable possibility, physicians should be prepared to introduce the option.

  18. Communicating With Dying Patients and Their Families: Multimedia Training in End-of-Life Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Phylliss M; Healy, Jennifer; Lee, Shuko; Medellin, Glen; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra

    2017-08-01

    The need for end-of-life (EOL), high-impact education initiatives to prepare medical students to communicate with dying patients and their families and to cope with issues of death and dying, is well recognized. Third-year medical students (n = 224), during their ambulatory rotation, completed a multimedia EOL curriculum, which included pre-/posttests, an online case-based module, didactic presentation, and a tablet computer application designed to demonstrate the signs and symptoms seen in the last hours of life for families of dying patients. Pre- and posttests were compared using Pearson χ 2 or Fisher exact test, and improvement was measured by weighted κ coefficient. On preintervention surveys, the majority of students demonstrated positive attitudes toward the care of dying patients and their families. Despite this high pretest positive attitude, there was a statistically significant overall positive attitude change after the intervention. The lowest pretest positive attitudes and lowest posttest positive attitude shifts, although all statistically improved, involved addressing the thoughts and feelings of dying patients and in coping with their own emotional response. Medical students exposure to this multimedia EOL curriculum increases positive attitudes in caring for dying patients and their families.

  19. The consequences of task delegation for the process of care: Female patients seem to benefit more

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van

    2016-01-01

    The shift of tasks from primary care physicians to practice nurses and the continuing incease in the numbers of women involved in medical care may have consequences for the provision of health care and communication. The aim of the present study was to examine potential differences in female

  20. Active Involvement of Students in the Learning Process of the American Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Sylvie

    1997-01-01

    Over 200 pharmacy students in a University of Georgia class on the American health care system engaged in debates on health care issues, discussed newspaper articles, conducted client home visits, analyzed county health statistics, and completed exercises on pharmacists' compensation and health care planning. Most participating students responded…

  1. Cultural competence in end-of-life care: terms, definitions, and conceptual models from the British literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Natalie; Meñaca, Arantza; Koffman, Jonathan; Harding, Richard; Higginson, Irene J; Pool, Robert; Gysels, Marjolein

    2012-07-01

    Cultural competency is increasingly recommended in policy and practice to improve end-of-life (EoL) care for minority ethnic groups in multicultural societies. It is imperative to critically analyze this approach to understand its underlying concepts. Our aim was to appraise cultural competency approaches described in the British literature on EoL care and minority ethnic groups. This is a critical review. Articles on cultural competency were identified from a systematic review of the literature on minority ethnic groups and EoL care in the United Kingdom. Terms, definitions, and conceptual models of cultural competency approaches were identified and situated according to purpose, components, and origin. Content analysis of definitions and models was carried out to identify key components. One-hundred thirteen articles on minority ethnic groups and EoL care in the United Kingdom were identified. Over half (n=60) contained a term, definition, or model for cultural competency. In all, 17 terms, 17 definitions, and 8 models were identified. The most frequently used term was "culturally sensitive," though "cultural competence" was defined more often. Definitions contained one or more of the components: "cognitive," "implementation," or "outcome." Models were categorized for teaching or use in patient assessment. Approaches were predominantly of American origin. The variety of terms, definitions, and models underpinning cultural competency approaches demonstrates a lack of conceptual clarity, and potentially complicates implementation. Further research is needed to compare the use of cultural competency approaches in diverse cultures and settings, and to assess the impact of such approaches on patient outcomes.

  2. [Acute complicated and uncomplicated pyelonephritis in the emergency department: process-of-care indicators and outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Vicente, Miriam; Lecaroz Agara, Mª Concepción; Barrios Andrés, José Luis; Canut Blasco, Andrés

    2017-02-01

    To assess process-of-care indicators and outcomes in acute pyelonephritis (APN) in a general hospital emergency department, and compare them between uncomplicaed and complicated APN. Retrospective study of consecutive patients discharged with a diagnosis of APN. We studied health processof- care indicators (percentage admitted, avoidable hospitalization, appropriate initial antibiotic therapy, urine and blood cultures) and outcomes (hospital length of stay [LOS], discharge from the emergency department, revisits, mortality, yields of microbiological tests ordered). A total of 529 cases (59% of them complicated) were included. Patients with uncomplicated APN were significantly younger on average (mean, 39 years) than patients with complicated APN (56 years). Escherichia coli was the most common pathogen identified, although the percentage of E coli infection was lower in patients with complicated APN (78%) than in patients with uncomplicated APN (95%). The rates of admission and orders for urine and blood cultures were significantly higher and hospital LOS was longer in the group with complicated APN. Moreover, these patients had even longer stays if the initial antibiotic therapy was inappropriate. Significantly more patients with uncomplicated APN were discharged from the emergency department. Sixty-one percent of patients with uncomplicated APN were admitted; 9% of these cases were considered avoidable hospitalizations. Complicated APN is diagnosed more often in older patients, and E coli infection causes a smaller proportion of these cases. Hospital LOS is longer in complicated APN and more urine and blood cultures are ordered. Patients with uncomplicated APN are more often discharged from the emergency department, although the number of avoidable hospitalizations seems high based on the rate found in this study.

  3. Computerized nursing process in the Intensive Care Unit: ergonomics and usability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Sônia Regina Wagner de; Sasso, Grace Teresinha Marcon Dal; Barra, Daniela Couto Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the ergonomics and usability criteria of the Computerized Nursing Process based on the International Classification for Nursing Practice in the Intensive Care Unit according to International Organization for Standardization(ISO). A quantitative, quasi-experimental, before-and-after study with a sample of 16 participants performed in an Intensive Care Unit. Data collection was performed through the application of five simulated clinical cases and an evaluation instrument. Data analysis was performed by descriptive and inferential statistics. The organization, content and technical criteria were considered "excellent", and the interface criteria were considered "very good", obtaining means of 4.54, 4.60, 4.64 and 4.39, respectively. The analyzed standards obtained means above 4.0, being considered "very good" by the participants. The Computerized Nursing Processmet ergonomic and usability standards according to the standards set by ISO. This technology supports nurses' clinical decision-making by providing complete and up-to-date content for Nursing practice in the Intensive Care Unit. Analisar os critérios de ergonomia e usabilidade do Processo de Enfermagem Informatizado a partir da Classificação Internacional para as Práticas de Enfermagem, em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, de acordo com os padrões da InternationalOrganization for Standardization (ISO). Pesquisa quantitativa, quase-experimental do tipo antes e depois, com uma amostra de 16 participantes, realizada em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva. Coleta de dados realizada por meio da aplicação de cinco casos clínicos simulados e instrumento de avaliação. A análise dos dados foi realizada pela estatística descritiva e inferencial. Os critérios organização, conteúdo e técnico foram considerados "excelentes", e o critério interface "muito bom", obtendo médias 4,54, 4,60, 4,64 e 4,39, respectivamente. Os padrões analisados obtiveram médias acima de 4,0, sendo considerados "muito bons

  4. Development of the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) for migrants to Western societies: an international Delphi consensus process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Through the World Health Assembly Resolution, ‘Health of Migrants’, the international community has identified migrant health as a priority. Recommendations for general hospital care for international migrants in receiving-countries have been put forward by the Migrant Friendly Hospital Initiative; adaptations of these recommendations specific to maternity care have yet to be elucidated and validated. We aimed to develop a questionnaire measuring migrant-friendly maternity care (MFMC) which could be used in a range of maternity care settings and countries. Methods This study was conducted in four stages. First, questions related to migrant friendly maternity care were identified from existing questionnaires including the Migrant Friendliness Quality Questionnaire, developed in Europe to capture recommended general hospital care for migrants, and the Mothers In a New Country (MINC) Questionnaire, developed in Australia and revised for use in Canada to capture the maternity care experiences of migrant women, and combined to create an initial MFMC questionnaire. Second, a Delphi consensus process in three rounds with a panel of 89 experts in perinatal health and migration from 17 countries was undertaken to identify priority themes and questions as well as to clarify wording and format. Third, the draft questionnaire was translated from English to French and Spanish and back-translated and subsequently culturally validated (assessed for cultural appropriateness) by migrant women. Fourth, the questionnaire was piloted with migrant women who had recently given birth in Montreal, Canada. Results A 112-item questionnaire on maternity care from pregnancy, through labour and birth, to postpartum care, and including items on maternal socio-demographic, migration and obstetrical characteristics, and perceptions of care, has been created - the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) – in three languages (English, French and Spanish). It is

  5. Development of the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) for migrants to Western societies: an international Delphi consensus process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Anita J; DeBruyn, Rebecca; Essén, Birgitta; Gissler, Mika; Heaman, Maureen; Jeambey, Zeinab; Korfker, Dineke; McCourt, Christine; Roth, Carolyn; Zeitlin, Jennifer; Small, Rhonda

    2014-06-10

    Through the World Health Assembly Resolution, 'Health of Migrants', the international community has identified migrant health as a priority. Recommendations for general hospital care for international migrants in receiving-countries have been put forward by the Migrant Friendly Hospital Initiative; adaptations of these recommendations specific to maternity care have yet to be elucidated and validated. We aimed to develop a questionnaire measuring migrant-friendly maternity care (MFMC) which could be used in a range of maternity care settings and countries. This study was conducted in four stages. First, questions related to migrant friendly maternity care were identified from existing questionnaires including the Migrant Friendliness Quality Questionnaire, developed in Europe to capture recommended general hospital care for migrants, and the Mothers In a New Country (MINC) Questionnaire, developed in Australia and revised for use in Canada to capture the maternity care experiences of migrant women, and combined to create an initial MFMC questionnaire. Second, a Delphi consensus process in three rounds with a panel of 89 experts in perinatal health and migration from 17 countries was undertaken to identify priority themes and questions as well as to clarify wording and format. Third, the draft questionnaire was translated from English to French and Spanish and back-translated and subsequently culturally validated (assessed for cultural appropriateness) by migrant women. Fourth, the questionnaire was piloted with migrant women who had recently given birth in Montreal, Canada. A 112-item questionnaire on maternity care from pregnancy, through labour and birth, to postpartum care, and including items on maternal socio-demographic, migration and obstetrical characteristics, and perceptions of care, has been created--the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ)--in three languages (English, French and Spanish). It is completed in 45 minutes via interview

  6. Death is not always a failure: outcomes from implementing an online virtual patient clinical case in palliative care for family medicine clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amy; Ross, Shelley Paige; Duerksen, Kimberley

    2013-11-22

    The dying patient is a reality of medicine. Medical students, however, feel unprepared to effectively manage the complex end-of-life (EOL) management issues of the dying patient and want increased experiential learning in Palliative Care. To address the need for more formal curriculum in EOL care, we developed and implemented an online virtual patient (VP) clinical case in Palliative Care into the 2010-2011 Year Three Family Medicine Clerkship rotation curriculum. A mixed-method design was used to measure the change in knowledge and perceived preparedness level in EOL care before and after completing the online VP case. A survey collected qualitative descriptions of the students' educational experience of using this case. Ninety five percent (130/137) of the students voluntarily consented to have their results analyzed. The group knowledge score (n=127) increased significantly from a pre-course average of 7.69/16±2.27, to a post-course average of 10.02/16±2.39 (p<0.001). The students' self-assessed comfort level increased significantly with all aspects of EOL management from pre-course to post-course (p<0.001). Nearly, 91.1% of the students rated the VP realism as 'Good to Excellent', 86% rated the case as educationally beneficial. Nearly 59.3% of students felt emotionally engaged with the VP. Qualitative feedback found that the case content was very useful and realistic, but that the interface was sometimes awkward to navigate. The online VP case in Palliative Care is a useful teaching tool that may help to address the need for increased formal Palliative Care experience in medical school training programs.

  7. Death is not always a failure: outcomes from implementing an online virtual patient clinical case in palliative care for family medicine clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Tan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dying patient is a reality of medicine. Medical students, however, feel unprepared to effectively manage the complex end-of-life (EOL management issues of the dying patient and want increased experiential learning in Palliative Care. Aims: To address the need for more formal curriculum in EOL care, we developed and implemented an online virtual patient (VP clinical case in Palliative Care into the 2010–2011 Year Three Family Medicine Clerkship rotation curriculum. Methods: A mixed-method design was used to measure the change in knowledge and perceived preparedness level in EOL care before and after completing the online VP case. A survey collected qualitative descriptions of the students’ educational experience of using this case. Results: Ninety five percent (130/137 of the students voluntarily consented to have their results analyzed. The group knowledge score (n=127 increased significantly from a pre-course average of 7.69/16±2.27, to a post-course average of 10.02/16±2.39 (p<0.001. The students’ self-assessed comfort level increased significantly with all aspects of EOL management from pre-course to post-course (p<0.001. Nearly, 91.1% of the students rated the VP realism as ‘Good to Excellent’, 86% rated the case as educationally beneficial. Nearly 59.3% of students felt emotionally engaged with the VP. Qualitative feedback found that the case content was very useful and realistic, but that the interface was sometimes awkward to navigate. Conclusions: The online VP case in Palliative Care is a useful teaching tool that may help to address the need for increased formal Palliative Care experience in medical school training programs.

  8. Outpatient rehabilitation care process factors and clinical outcomes among patients discharged home following unilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Gerard P; Fritz, Julie M; Houck, L T C Kevin M; Hunter, Stephen J

    2015-05-01

    Research examining care process variables and their relationship to clinical outcomes after total knee arthroplasty has focused primarily on inpatient variables. Care process factors related to outpatient rehabilitation have not been adequately examined. We conducted a retrospective review of 321 patients evaluating outpatient care process variables including use of continuous passive motion, home health physical therapy, number of days from inpatient discharge to beginning outpatient physical therapy, and aspects of outpatient physical therapy (number of visits, length of stay) as possible predictors of pain and disability outcomes of outpatient physical therapy. Only the number of days between inpatient discharge and outpatient physical therapy predicted better outcomes, suggesting that this may be a target for improving outcomes after total knee arthroplasty for patients discharged directly home. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Performing well in financial management and quality of care: evidence from hospital process measures for treatment of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Gang Nathan

    2015-02-01

    Fiscal constraints faced by U.S. hospitals as a result of the recent economic downturn are leading to business practices that reduce costs and improve financial and operational efficiency in hospitals. There naturally arises the question of how this finance-driven management culture could affect the quality of care. This paper attempts to determine whether the process measures of treatment quality are correlated with hospital financial performance. Panel study of hospital care quality and financial condition between 2005 and 2010 for cardiovascular disease treatment at acute care hospitals in the United States. Process measures for condition-specific treatment of heart attack and heart failure and hospital-level financial condition ratios were collected from the CMS databases of Hospital Compare and Cost Reports. There is a statistically significant relationship between hospital financial performance and quality of care. Hospital profitability, financial leverage, asset liquidity, operating efficiency, and costs appear to be important factors of health care quality. In general, public hospitals provide lower quality care than their nonprofit counterparts, and urban hospitals report better quality score than those located in rural areas. Specifically, the first-difference regression results indicate that the quality of treatment for cardiovascular patients rises in the year following an increase in hospital profitability, financial leverage, and labor costs. The results suggest that, when a hospital made more profit, had the capacity to finance investment using debt, paid higher wages presumably to attract more skilled nurses, its quality of care would generally improve. While the pursuit of profit induces hospitals to enhance both quantity and quality of services they offer, the lack of financial strength may result in a lower standard of health care services, implying the importance of monitoring the quality of care among those hospitals with poor financial health.

  10. Ward nurses' experiences of the discharge process between intensive care unit and general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Wivica; Proos, Matilda; Olausson, Sepideh

    2018-05-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) discharges are challenging practices that carry risks for patients. Despite the existing body of knowledge, there are still difficulties in clinical practice concerning unplanned ICU discharges, specifically where there is no step-down unit. The aim of this study was to explore general ward nurses' experiences of caring for patients being discharged from an ICU. Data were collected from focus groups and in-depth interviews with a total of 16 nurses from three different hospitals in Sweden. An inductive qualitative design was chosen. The analysis revealed three themes that reflect the challenges in nursing former ICU patients: a vulnerable patient, nurses' powerlessness and organizational structure. The nurses described the challenge of nursing a fragile patient based on several aspects. They expressed feeling unrealistic demands when caring for a fragile former ICU patient. The demands were related to their own profession and knowledge regarding how to care for this group of patients. The organizational structure had an impact on how the nurses' caring practice could be realized. This evoked ethical concerns that the nurses had to cope with as the organization's care guidelines did not always favour the patients. The structure of the organization and its leadership appear to have a significant impact on the nurses' ability to offer patients the care they need. This study sheds light on the need for extended outreach services and intermediate care in order to meet the needs of patients after the intensive care period. © 2018 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  11. Process and Outcomes of Patient-Centered Medical Care With Alaska Native People at Southcentral Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, David L.; Hiratsuka, Vanessa; Johnston, Janet M.; Norman, Sara; Reilly, Katie M.; Shaw, Jennifer; Smith, Julia; Szafran, Quenna N.; Dillard, Denise

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study describes key elements of the transition to a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model at Southcentral Foundation (SCF), a tribally owned and managed primary care system, and evaluates changes in emergency care use for any reason, for asthma, and for unintentional injuries, during and after the transition. METHODS We conducted a time series analyses of emergency care use from medical record data. We also conducted 45 individual, in-depth interviews with PCMH patients (customer-owners), primary care clinicians, health system employees, and tribal leaders. RESULTS Emergency care use for all causes was increasing before the PCMH implementation, dropped during and immediately after the implementation, and subsequently leveled off. Emergency care use for adult asthma dropped before, during, and immediately after implementation, subsequently leveling off approximately 5 years after implementation. Emergency care use for unintentional injuries, a comparison variable, showed an increasing trend before and during implementation and decreasing trends after implementation. Interview participants observed improved access to primary care services after the transition to the PCMH tempered by increased staff fatigue. Additional themes of PCMH transformation included the building of relationships for coordinated, team-based care, and the important role of leadership in PCMH implementation. CONCLUSIONS All reported measures of emergency care use show a decreasing trend after the PCMH implementation. Before the implementation, overall use and use for unintentional injuries had been increasing. The combined quantitative and qualitative results are consistent with decreased emergency care use resulting from a decreased need for emergency care services due to increased availability of primary care services and same-day appointments. PMID:23690385

  12. [Miscommunication as a risk focus in patient safety : Work process analysis in prehospital emergency care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, S; Siegl, L; Siegl, K; Hohenstein, C

    2018-04-01

    In an analysis of a critical incident reporting system (CIRS) in out-of-hospital emergency medicine, it was demonstrated that in 30% of cases deficient communication led to a threat to patients; however, the analysis did not show what exactly the most dangerous work processes are. Current research shows the impact of poor communication on patient safety. An out-of-hospital workflow analysis collects data about key work processes and risk areas. The analysis points out confounding factors for a sufficient communication. Almost 70% of critical incidents are based on h