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Sample records for enzyme substrate interactions

  1. Development of the Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Linenberger, Kimberly J.

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme function is central to student understanding of multiple topics within the biochemistry curriculum. In particular, students must understand how enzymes and substrates interact with one another. This manuscript describes the development of a 15-item Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory (ESICI) that measures student understanding…

  2. Cell In Situ Zymography: Imaging Enzyme-Substrate Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Aastha; Rani, Vibha

    2017-01-01

    Zymography has long been used for the detection of substrate-specific enzyme activity. In situ zymography (ISZ), an adaptation from the conventional substrate zymography, is a widely employed technique useful for the detection, localization, and estimation of enzyme-substrate interactions in tissues. Here, we describe a protocol to detect 'in position' matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in cells utilizing H9c2 cardiomyoblasts as a model. This technique is primarily adopted from the method used for histological sections and is termed as 'Cell in situ Zymography'. It is a simple, sensitive, and quantifiable methodology to assess the functional activity of an enzyme 'on site/in position' in cell culture.

  3. Biochemistry Students' Ideas about How an Enzyme Interacts with a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-substrate interactions are a fundamental concept of biochemistry that is built upon throughout multiple biochemistry courses. Central to understanding enzyme-substrate interactions is specific knowledge of exactly how an enzyme and substrate interact. Within this narrower topic, students must understand the various binding sites on an…

  4. Biochemistry students' ideas about how an enzyme interacts with a substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-substrate interactions are a fundamental concept of biochemistry that is built upon throughout multiple biochemistry courses. Central to understanding enzyme-substrate interactions is specific knowledge of exactly how an enzyme and substrate interact. Within this narrower topic, students must understand the various binding sites on an enzyme and be able to reason from simplistic lock and key or induced fit models to the more complex energetics model of transition state theory. Learning to understand these many facets of enzyme-substrate interactions and reasoning from multiple models present challenges where students incorrectly make connections between concepts or make no connection at all. This study investigated biochemistry students' understanding of enzyme-substrate interactions through the use of clinical interviews and a national administration (N = 707) of the Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory. Findings include misconceptions regarding the nature of enzyme-substrate interactions, naïve ideas about the active site, a lack of energetically driven interactions, and an incomplete understanding of the specificity pocket. © 2015 by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  5. Biochemistry students' ideas about shape and charge in enzyme-substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2014-01-01

    Biochemistry is a visual discipline that requires students to develop an understanding of numerous representations. However, there is very little known about what students actually understand about the representations that are used to communicate ideas in biochemistry. This study investigated biochemistry students' understanding of multiple representations of enzyme-substrate interactions through both student interviews (N = 25) and responses by a national sample (N = 707) to the Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory. This manuscript reports the findings regarding one category of misconceptions measured by the concept inventory, namely, students' understandings of shape and charge in the context of enzyme-substrate interactions. Students interpret molecular representations depicting such interactions by determining the complementarity between enzyme and substrate by focusing upon charge and hydrogen bonding, but with a disregard for stereochemistry. Copyright © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. Deconstructing the DGAT1 enzyme: membrane interactions at substrate binding sites.

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    Jose L S Lopes

    Full Text Available Diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1 is a key enzyme in the triacylglyceride synthesis pathway. Bovine DGAT1 is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane-bound protein associated with the regulation of fat content in milk and meat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction of DGAT1 peptides corresponding to putative substrate binding sites with different types of model membranes. Whilst these peptides are predicted to be located in an extramembranous loop of the membrane-bound protein, their hydrophobic substrates are membrane-bound molecules. In this study, peptides corresponding to the binding sites of the two substrates involved in the reaction were examined in the presence of model membranes in order to probe potential interactions between them that might influence the subsequent binding of the substrates. Whilst the conformation of one of the peptides changed upon binding several types of micelles regardless of their surface charge, suggesting binding to hydrophobic domains, the other peptide bound strongly to negatively-charged model membranes. This binding was accompanied by a change in conformation, and produced leakage of the liposome-entrapped dye calcein. The different hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions observed suggest the peptides may be involved in the interactions of the enzyme with membrane surfaces, facilitating access of the catalytic histidine to the triacylglycerol substrates.

  7. Understanding the Specificity and Random Collision of Enzyme-Substrate Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kin, Ng Hong; Ling, Tan Aik

    2016-01-01

    The concept of specificity of enzyme action can potentially be abstract for some students as they fail to appreciate how the three-dimensional configuration of enzymes and the active sites confer perfect fit for specific substrates. In science text books, the specificity of enzyme-substrate binding is typically likened to the action of a lock and…

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B: II. Substrate-enzyme interactions and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.j.; Frimurer, T. M.; Andersen, J. N.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) complexed with the phosphorylated peptide substrate DADEpYL and the free substrate have been conducted to investigate 1) the physical forces involved in substrate-protein interactions, 2) the importance of enzyme...... to substrate binding. Based on essential dynamics analysis of the PTP1B/DADEpYL trajectory, it is shown that internal motions in the binding pocket occur in a subspace of only a few degrees of freedom. in particular, relatively large flexibilities are observed along several eigenvectors in the segments: Arg(24...... for catalysis. Analysis of the individual enzyme-substrate interaction energies revealed that mainly electrostatic forces contribute to binding. Indeed, calculation of the electrostatic field of the enzyme reveals that only the field surrounding the binding pocket is positive, while the remaining protein...

  9. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Xylella fastidiosa DsbA Family Members: New insightsinto the Enzyme-Substrate Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, F.; Meza, A; Gulmarges, B

    2009-01-01

    Disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA catalyzes disulfide bond formation in proteins secreted to the periplasm and has been related to the folding process of virulence factors in many organisms. It is among the most oxidizing of the thioredoxin-like proteins, and DsbA redox power is understood in terms of the electrostatic interactions involving the active site motif CPHC. The plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa has two chromosomal genes encoding two oxidoreductases belonging to the DsbA family, and in one of them, the canonical motif CPHC is replaced by CPAC. Biochemical assays showed that both X. fastidiosa homologues have similar redox properties and the determination of the crystal structure of XfDsbA revealed substitutions in the active site of X. fastidiosa enzymes, which are proposed to compensate for the lack of the conserved histidine in XfDsbA2. In addition, electron density maps showed a ligand bound to the XfDsbA active site, allowing the characterization of the enzyme interaction with an 8-mer peptide. Finally, surface analysis of XfDsbA and XfDsbA2 suggests that X. fastidiosa enzymes may have different substrate specificities.

  10. MOLECULAR MODELLING OF HUMAN ALDEHYDE OXIDASE AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE KEY INTERACTIONS IN THE ENZYME-SUBSTRATE COMPLEX

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    Siavoush Dastmalchi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde oxidase (EC 1.2.3.1, a cytosolic enzyme containing FAD, molybdenum and iron-sulphur cluster, is a member of non-cytochrome P-450 enzymes called molybdenum hydroxylases which is involved in the metabolism of a wide range of endogenous compounds and many drug substances. Drug metabolism is one of the important characteristics which influences many aspects of a therapeutic agent such as routes of administration, drug interaction and toxicity and therefore, characterisation of the key interactions between enzymes and substrates is very important from drug development point of view. The aim of this study was to generate a three-dimensional model of human aldehyde oxidase (AO in order to assist us to identify the mode of interaction between enzyme and a set of phethalazine/quinazoline derivatives. Both sequence-based (BLAST and inverse protein fold recognition methods (THREADER were used to identify the crystal structure of bovine xanthine dehydrogenase (pdb code of 1FO4 as the suitable template for comparative modelling of human AO. Model structure was generated by aligning and then threading the sequence of human AO onto the template structure, incorporating the associated cofactors, and molecular dynamics simulations and energy minimization using GROMACS program. Different criteria which were measured by the PROCHECK, QPACK, VERIFY-3D were indicative of a proper fold for the predicted structural model of human AO. For example, 97.9 percentages of phi and psi angles were in the favoured and most favoured regions in the ramachandran plot, and all residues in the model are assigned environmentally positive compatibility scores. Further evaluation on the model quality was performed by investigation of AO-mediated oxidation of a set of phthalazine/quinazoline derivatives to develop QSAR model capable of describing the extent of the oxidation. Substrates were aligned by docking onto the active site of the enzyme using GOLD technology and then

  11. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejerskov, Betina; Jarlstad Olesen, Morten T; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2017-01-01

    Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug administra......Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug...

  12. Moving college students to a better understanding of substrate specificity of enzymes through utilizing multimedia pre-training and an interactive enzyme model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mounir R.

    Scientists' progress in understanding enzyme specificity uncovered a complex natural phenomenon. However, not all of the currently available biology textbooks seem to be up to date on this progress. Students' understanding of how enzymes work is a core requirement in biochemistry and biology tertiary education. Nevertheless, current pre-college science education does not provide students with enough biochemical background to enable them to understand complex material such as this. To bridge this gap, a multimedia pre-training presentation was prepared to fuel the learner's prior knowledge with discrete facts necessary to understand the presented concept. This treatment is also known to manage intrinsic cognitive load during the learning process. An interactive instructional enzyme model was also built to motivate students to learn about substrate specificity of enzymes. Upon testing the effect of this combined treatment on 111 college students, desirable learning outcomes were found in terms of cognitive load, motivation, and achievement. The multimedia pre-training group reported significantly less intrinsic cognitive load, higher motivation, and demonstrated higher transfer performance than the control and post-training groups. In this study, a statistical mediation model is also proposed to explain how cognitive load and motivation work in concert to foster learning from multimedia pre-training. This type of research goes beyond simple forms of "what works" to a deeper understanding of "how it works", thus enabling informed decisions for multimedia instructional design. Multimedia learning plays multiple roles in science education. Therefore, science learners would be some of the first to benefit from improving multimedia instructional design. Accordingly, complex scientific phenomena can be introduced to college students in a motivating, informative, and cognitively efficient learning environment.

  13. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Fejerskov

    Full Text Available In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol, β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose - dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  14. Substrates and method for determining enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.E.; Bissell, E.R.

    1981-10-13

    A method is disclosed for determining the presence of an enzyme in a biological fluid, which includes the steps of contacting the fluid with a synthetic chromogenic substrate, which is an amino acid derivative of 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin; incubating the substrate-containing fluid to effect enzymatic hydrolysis; and fluorometrically determining the presence of the free 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin chromophore in the hydrolyzate. No Drawings

  15. Enzyme structure and interaction with inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    This article reviews some of the results of studies on the 13 C-labeled enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are used in combination with isotopic labeling to learn about the structure and dynamics of this enzyme. 13 C-labeling is used for the purpose of studying enzyme/substrate and enzyme/inhibitor interactions. A second set of studies with DHFR was designed to investigate the basis for the high affinity between the inhibitor methotrexate and DHFR. The label was placed on the inhibitor, rather than the enzyme

  16. PREFACE: Cell-substrate interactions Cell-substrate interactions

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    Gardel, Margaret; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    One of the most striking achievements of evolution is the ability to build cellular systems that are both robust and dynamic. Taken by themselves, both properties are obvious requirements: robustness reflects the fact that cells are there to survive, and dynamics is required to adapt to changing environments. However, it is by no means trivial to understand how these two requirements can be implemented simultaneously in a physical system. The long and difficult quest to build adaptive materials is testimony to the inherent difficulty of this goal. Here materials science can learn a lot from nature, because cellular systems show that robustness and dynamics can be achieved in a synergetic fashion. For example, the capabilities of tissues to repair and regenerate are still unsurpassed in the world of synthetic materials. One of the most important aspects of the way biological cells adapt to their environment is their adhesive interaction with the substrate. Numerous aspects of the physiology of metazoan cells, including survival, proliferation, differentiation and migration, require the formation of adhesions to the cell substrate, typically an extracellular matrix protein. Adhesions guide these diverse processes both by mediating force transmission from the cell to the substrate and by controlling biochemical signaling pathways. While the study of cell-substrate adhesions is a mature field in cell biology, a quantitative biophysical understanding of how the interactions of the individual molecular components give rise to the rich dynamics and mechanical behaviors observed for cell-substrate adhesions has started to emerge only over the last decade or so. The recent growth of research activities on cell-substrate interactions was strongly driven by the introduction of new physical techniques for surface engineering into traditional cell biological work with cell culture. For example, microcontact printing of adhesive patterns was used to show that cell fate depends

  17. Enzyme activity and kinetics in substrate-amended river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duddridge, J E; Wainwright, M

    1982-01-01

    In determining the effects of heavy metals in microbial activity and litter degradation in river sediments, one approach is to determine the effects of these pollutants on sediment enzyme activity and synthesis. Methods to assay amylase, cellulase and urease activity in diverse river sediments are reported. Enzyme activity was low in non-amended sediments, but increased markedly when the appropriate substrate was added, paralleling both athropogenic and natural amendment. Linear relationships between enzyme activity, length of incubation, sample size and substrate concentration were established. Sediment enzyme activity generally obeyed Michaelis-Menton kinetics, but of the three enzymes, urease gave least significant correlation coefficients when the data for substrate concentration versus activity was applied to the Eadie-Hofstee transformation of the Michaelis-Menten equation. K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ for amylase, cellulase and urease in sediments are reported. (JMT)

  18. Substrate-driven chemotactic assembly in an enzyme cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xi; Palacci, Henri; Yadav, Vinita; Spiering, Michelle M.; Gilson, Michael K.; Butler, Peter J.; Hess, Henry; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Sen, Ayusman

    2018-03-01

    Enzymatic catalysis is essential to cell survival. In many instances, enzymes that participate in reaction cascades have been shown to assemble into metabolons in response to the presence of the substrate for the first enzyme. However, what triggers metabolon formation has remained an open question. Through a combination of theory and experiments, we show that enzymes in a cascade can assemble via chemotaxis. We apply microfluidic and fluorescent spectroscopy techniques to study the coordinated movement of the first four enzymes of the glycolysis cascade: hexokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, phosphofructokinase and aldolase. We show that each enzyme independently follows its own specific substrate gradient, which in turn is produced by the preceding enzymatic reaction. Furthermore, we find that the chemotactic assembly of enzymes occurs even under cytosolic crowding conditions.

  19. Evolutionarily conserved substrate substructures for automated annotation of enzyme superfamilies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranyee A Chiang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of enzymes affects how well a species can adapt to new environmental conditions. During enzyme evolution, certain aspects of molecular function are conserved while other aspects can vary. Aspects of function that are more difficult to change or that need to be reused in multiple contexts are often conserved, while those that vary may indicate functions that are more easily changed or that are no longer required. In analogy to the study of conservation patterns in enzyme sequences and structures, we have examined the patterns of conservation and variation in enzyme function by analyzing graph isomorphisms among enzyme substrates of a large number of enzyme superfamilies. This systematic analysis of substrate substructures establishes the conservation patterns that typify individual superfamilies. Specifically, we determined the chemical substructures that are conserved among all known substrates of a superfamily and the substructures that are reacting in these substrates and then examined the relationship between the two. Across the 42 superfamilies that were analyzed, substantial variation was found in how much of the conserved substructure is reacting, suggesting that superfamilies may not be easily grouped into discrete and separable categories. Instead, our results suggest that many superfamilies may need to be treated individually for analyses of evolution, function prediction, and guiding enzyme engineering strategies. Annotating superfamilies with these conserved and reacting substructure patterns provides information that is orthogonal to information provided by studies of conservation in superfamily sequences and structures, thereby improving the precision with which we can predict the functions of enzymes of unknown function and direct studies in enzyme engineering. Because the method is automated, it is suitable for large-scale characterization and comparison of fundamental functional capabilities of both characterized

  20. Evolutionarily conserved substrate substructures for automated annotation of enzyme superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ranyee A; Sali, Andrej; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2008-08-01

    The evolution of enzymes affects how well a species can adapt to new environmental conditions. During enzyme evolution, certain aspects of molecular function are conserved while other aspects can vary. Aspects of function that are more difficult to change or that need to be reused in multiple contexts are often conserved, while those that vary may indicate functions that are more easily changed or that are no longer required. In analogy to the study of conservation patterns in enzyme sequences and structures, we have examined the patterns of conservation and variation in enzyme function by analyzing graph isomorphisms among enzyme substrates of a large number of enzyme superfamilies. This systematic analysis of substrate substructures establishes the conservation patterns that typify individual superfamilies. Specifically, we determined the chemical substructures that are conserved among all known substrates of a superfamily and the substructures that are reacting in these substrates and then examined the relationship between the two. Across the 42 superfamilies that were analyzed, substantial variation was found in how much of the conserved substructure is reacting, suggesting that superfamilies may not be easily grouped into discrete and separable categories. Instead, our results suggest that many superfamilies may need to be treated individually for analyses of evolution, function prediction, and guiding enzyme engineering strategies. Annotating superfamilies with these conserved and reacting substructure patterns provides information that is orthogonal to information provided by studies of conservation in superfamily sequences and structures, thereby improving the precision with which we can predict the functions of enzymes of unknown function and direct studies in enzyme engineering. Because the method is automated, it is suitable for large-scale characterization and comparison of fundamental functional capabilities of both characterized and uncharacterized

  1. 4-Demethylwyosine Synthase from Pyrococcus abyssi Is a Radical-S-adenosyl-l-methionine Enzyme with an Additional [4Fe-4S]+2 Cluster That Interacts with the Pyruvate Co-substrate*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perche-Letuvée, Phanélie; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Berggren, Gustav; Clemancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Maurel, Vincent; Douki, Thierry; Armengaud, Jean; Mulliez, Etienne; Fontecave, Marc; Garcia-Serres, Ricardo; Gambarelli, Serge; Atta, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Wybutosine and its derivatives are found in position 37 of tRNA encoding Phe in eukaryotes and archaea. They are believed to play a key role in the decoding function of the ribosome. The second step in the biosynthesis of wybutosine is catalyzed by TYW1 protein, which is a member of the well established class of metalloenzymes called “Radical-SAM.” These enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster, chelated by three cysteines in a CX3CX2C motif, and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to generate a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical that initiates various chemically challenging reactions. Sequence analysis of TYW1 proteins revealed, in the N-terminal half of the enzyme beside the Radical-SAM cysteine triad, an additional highly conserved cysteine motif. In this study we show by combining analytical and spectroscopic methods including UV-visible absorption, Mössbauer, EPR, and HYSCORE spectroscopies that these additional cysteines are involved in the coordination of a second [4Fe-4S] cluster displaying a free coordination site that interacts with pyruvate, the second substrate of the reaction. The presence of two distinct iron-sulfur clusters on TYW1 is reminiscent of MiaB, another tRNA-modifying metalloenzyme whose active form was shown to bind two iron-sulfur clusters. A possible role for the second [4Fe-4S] cluster in the enzyme activity is discussed. PMID:23043105

  2. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities.

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    Fiona Karen Harlan

    Full Text Available Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson's Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research

  3. Thermodynamic activity-based intrinsic enzyme kinetic sheds light on enzyme-solvent interactions.

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    Grosch, Jan-Hendrik; Wagner, David; Nistelkas, Vasilios; Spieß, Antje C

    2017-01-01

    The reaction medium has major impact on biocatalytic reaction systems and on their economic significance. To allow for tailored medium engineering, thermodynamic phenomena, intrinsic enzyme kinetics, and enzyme-solvent interactions have to be discriminated. To this end, enzyme reaction kinetic modeling was coupled with thermodynamic calculations based on investigations of the alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis (LbADH) in monophasic water/methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) mixtures as a model solvent. Substrate concentrations and substrate thermodynamic activities were varied separately to identify the individual thermodynamic and kinetic effects on the enzyme activity. Microkinetic parameters based on concentration and thermodynamic activity were derived to successfully identify a positive effect of MTBE on the availability of the substrate to the enzyme, but a negative effect on the enzyme performance. In conclusion, thermodynamic activity-based kinetic modeling might be a suitable tool to initially curtail the type of enzyme-solvent interactions and thus, a powerful first step to potentially understand the phenomena that occur in nonconventional media in more detail. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:96-103, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  4. Enzyme functional evolution through improved catalysis of ancestrally nonpreferred substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruiqi; Hippauf, Frank; Rohrbeck, Diana; Haustein, Maria; Wenke, Katrin; Feike, Janie; Sorrelle, Noah; Piechulla, Birgit; Barkman, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role for ancestral functional variation that may be selected upon to generate protein functional shifts using ancestral protein resurrection, statistical tests for positive selection, forward and reverse evolutionary genetics, and enzyme functional assays. Data are presented for three instances of protein functional change in the salicylic acid/benzoic acid/theobromine (SABATH) lineage of plant secondary metabolite-producing enzymes. In each case, we demonstrate that ancestral nonpreferred activities were improved upon in a daughter enzyme after gene duplication, and that these functional shifts were likely coincident with positive selection. Both forward and reverse mutagenesis studies validate the impact of one or a few sites toward increasing activity with ancestrally nonpreferred substrates. In one case, we document the occurrence of an evolutionary reversal of an active site residue that reversed enzyme properties. Furthermore, these studies show that functionally important amino acid replacements result in substrate discrimination as reflected in evolutionary changes in the specificity constant (kcat/KM) for competing substrates, even though adaptive substitutions may affect KM and kcat separately. In total, these results indicate that nonpreferred, or even latent, ancestral protein activities may be coopted at later times to become the primary or preferred protein activities. PMID:22315396

  5. Immobilized enzymes: understanding enzyme - surface interactions at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoarau, Marie; Badieyan, Somayesadat; Marsh, E Neil G

    2017-11-22

    Enzymes immobilized on solid supports have important and industrial and medical applications. However, their uses are limited by the significant reductions in activity and stability that often accompany the immobilization process. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular level interactions between proteins and supporting surfaces that contribute to changes in stability and activity. This understanding has been facilitated by the application of various surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques that allow the structure and orientation of enzymes at the solid/liquid interface to be probed, often with monolayer sensitivity. An appreciation of the molecular interactions between enzyme and surface support has allowed the surface chemistry and method of enzyme attachement to be fine-tuned such that activity and stability can be greatly enhanced. These advances suggest that a much wider variety of enzymes may eventually be amenable to immobilization as green catalysts.

  6. Probe substrate and enzyme source-dependent inhibition of UDP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) inhibition based drug-drug interaction and herb-drug interaction severely challenge the R&D process of drugs or herbal ingredients. Objective: To evaluate the inhibition potential of wogonin (an important flavonoid isolated from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis) towards ...

  7. Oligosaccharide and Substrate Binding in the Starch Debranching Enzyme Barley Limit Dextrinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Sofie; Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Sim, Lyann

    2015-01-01

    Complete hydrolytic degradation of starch requires hydrolysis of both the α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in amylopectin. Limit dextrinase (LD) is the only endogenous barley enzyme capable of hydrolyzing the α-1,6-glucosidic bond during seed germination, and impaired LD activity inevitably...... reduces the maltose and glucose yields from starch degradation. Crystal structures of barley LD and active-site mutants with natural substrates, products and substrate analogues were sought to better understand the facets of LD-substrate interactions that αconfine high activity of LD to branched...... starch synthesis....

  8. Printing of polymer microcapsules for enzyme immobilization on paper substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savolainen, Anne; Zhang, Yufen; Rochefort, Dominic; Holopainen, Ulla; Erho, Tomi; Virtanen, Jouko; Smolander, Maria

    2011-06-13

    Poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) microcapsules containing laccase from Trametes hirsuta (ThL) and Trametes versicolor (TvL) were printed onto paper substrate by three different methods: screen printing, rod coating, and flexo printing. Microcapsules were fabricated via interfacial polycondensation of PEI with the cross-linker sebacoyl chloride, incorporated into an ink, and printed or coated on the paper substrate. The same ink components were used for three printing methods, and it was found that laccase microcapsules were compatible with the ink. Enzymatic activity of microencapsulated TvL was maintained constant in polymer-based ink for at least eight weeks. Thick layers with high enzymatic activity were obtained when laccase-containing microcapsules were screen printed on paper substrate. Flexo printed bioactive paper showed very low activity, since by using this printing method the paper surface was not fully covered by enzyme microcapsules. Finally, screen printing provided a bioactive paper with high water-resistance and the highest enzyme lifetime.

  9. Substrate Specificity and Enzyme Recycling Using Chitosan Immobilized Laccase

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    Everton Skoronski

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The immobilization of laccase (Aspergillus sp. on chitosan by cross-linking and its application in bioconversion of phenolic compounds in batch reactors were studied. Investigation was performed using laccase immobilized via chemical cross-linking due to the higher enzymatic operational stability of this method as compared to immobilization via physical adsorption. To assess the influence of different substrate functional groups on the enzyme’s catalytic efficiency, substrate specificity was investigated using chitosan-immobilized laccase and eighteen different phenol derivatives. It was observed that 4-nitrophenol was not oxidized, while 2,5-xylenol, 2,6-xylenol, 2,3,5-trimethylphenol, syringaldazine, 2,6-dimetoxyphenol and ethylphenol showed reaction yields up 90% at 40 °C. The kinetic of process, enzyme recyclability and operational stability were studied. In batch reactors, it was not possible to reuse the enzyme when it was applied to syringaldazne bioconversion. However, when the enzyme was applied to bioconversion of 2,6-DMP, the activity was stable for eight reaction batches.

  10. Enzyme replacement and substrate reduction therapy for Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Elad; Deroma, Laura; Bembi, Bruno; Deegan, Patrick; Hollak, Carla; Weinreb, Neal J; Cox, Timothy M

    2015-03-27

    Gaucher disease, a rare disorder, is caused by inherited deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. It is unique among the ultra-orphan disorders in that four treatments are currently approved by various regulatory authorities for use in routine clinical practice. Hitherto, because of the relatively few people affected worldwide, many of whom started therapy during a prolonged period when there were essentially no alternatives to imiglucerase, these treatments have not been systematically evaluated in studies such as randomized controlled trials now considered necessary to generate the highest level of clinical evidence. To summarize all available randomized controlled study data on the efficacy and safety of enzyme replacement therapies and substrate reduction therapy for treating Gaucher disease. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register. Additional searches were conducted on ClinicalTrials.gov for any ongoing studies with potential interim results, and through PubMed. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 07 August 2014. All randomized and quasi-randomized controlled studies (including open-label studies and cross-over studies) assessing enzyme replacement therapy or substrate reduction therapy, or both, in all types of Gaucher disease were included. Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias in the included studies, and extracted relevant data. Of the 488 studies retrieved by the electronic searches, eight met the inclusion criteria and were analysed (300 participants). Response parameters were restricted to haemoglobin concentration, platelet count, spleen and liver volume and serum biomarkers (chitotriosidase and CCL18). Only one publication reported a 'low risk of bias' score in all parameters assessed, and all studies included were randomized.Four studies reported the responses to enzyme replacement therapy of previously

  11. Substrate-Competitive Activity-Based Profiling of Ester Prodrug Activating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Davda, Dahvid; Ghanakota, Phani; Kim, Ki H; Carlson, Heather A; Showalter, Hollis D; Martin, Brent R; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-09-08

    Understanding the mechanistic basis of prodrug delivery and activation is critical for establishing species-specific prodrug sensitivities necessary for evaluating preclinical animal models and potential drug-drug interactions. Despite significant adoption of prodrug methodologies for enhanced pharmacokinetics, functional annotation of prodrug activating enzymes is laborious and often unaddressed. Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) describes an emerging chemoproteomic approach to assay active site occupancy within a mechanistically similar enzyme class in native proteomes. The serine hydrolase enzyme family is broadly reactive with reporter-linked fluorophosphonates, which have shown to provide a mechanism-based covalent labeling strategy to assay the activation state and active site occupancy of cellular serine amidases, esterases, and thioesterases. Here we describe a modified ABPP approach using direct substrate competition to identify activating enzymes for an ethyl ester prodrug, the influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir. Substrate-competitive ABPP analysis identified carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) as an oseltamivir-activating enzyme in intestinal cell homogenates. Saturating concentrations of oseltamivir lead to a four-fold reduction in the observed rate constant for CES1 inactivation by fluorophosphonates. WWL50, a reported carbamate inhibitor of mouse CES1, blocked oseltamivir hydrolysis activity in human cell homogenates, confirming CES1 is the primary prodrug activating enzyme for oseltamivir in human liver and intestinal cell lines. The related carbamate inhibitor WWL79 inhibited mouse but not human CES1, providing a series of probes for analyzing prodrug activation mechanisms in different preclinical models. Overall, we present a substrate-competitive activity-based profiling approach for broadly surveying candidate prodrug hydrolyzing enzymes and outline the kinetic parameters for activating enzyme discovery, ester prodrug design, and

  12. Unmasking tandem site interaction in human acetylcholinesterase. Substrate activation with a cationic acetanilide substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph L; Cusack, Bernadette; Davies, Matthew P; Fauq, Abdul; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2003-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) contains a narrow and deep active site gorge with two sites of ligand binding, an acylation site (or A-site) at the base of the gorge, and a peripheral site (or P-site) near the gorge entrance. The P-site contributes to catalytic efficiency by transiently binding substrates on their way to the acylation site, where a short-lived acyl enzyme intermediate is produced. A conformational interaction between the A- and P-sites has recently been found to modulate ligand affinities. We now demonstrate that this interaction is of functional importance by showing that the acetylation rate constant of a substrate bound to the A-site is increased by a factor a when a second molecule of substrate binds to the P-site. This demonstration became feasible through the introduction of a new acetanilide substrate analogue of acetylcholine, 3-(acetamido)-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (ATMA), for which a = 4. This substrate has a low acetylation rate constant and equilibrates with the catalytic site, allowing a tractable algebraic solution to the rate equation for substrate hydrolysis. ATMA affinities for the A- and P-sites deduced from the kinetic analysis were confirmed by fluorescence titration with thioflavin T as a reporter ligand. Values of a >1 give rise to a hydrolysis profile called substrate activation, and the AChE site-specific mutant W86F, and to a lesser extent wild-type human AChE itself, showed substrate activation with acetylthiocholine as the substrate. Substrate activation was incorporated into a previous catalytic scheme for AChE in which a bound P-site ligand can also block product dissociation from the A-site, and two additional features of the AChE catalytic pathway were revealed. First, the ability of a bound P-site ligand to increase the substrate acetylation rate constant varied with the structure of the ligand: thioflavin T accelerated ATMA acetylation by a factor a(2) of 1.3, while propidium failed to accelerate. Second, catalytic rate

  13. [Interaction between CYP450 enzymes and metabolism of traditional Chinese medicine as well as enzyme activity assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tu-lin; Su, Lian-lin; Ji, De; Gu, Wei; Mao, Chun-qin

    2015-09-01

    Drugs are exogenous compounds for human bodies, and will be metabolized by many enzymes after administration. CYP450 enzyme, as a major metabolic enzyme, is an important phase I drug metabolizing enzyme. In human bodies, about 75% of drug metabolism is conducted by CYP450 enzymes, and CYP450 enzymes is the key factor for drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine( TCM) -TCM, TCM-medicine and other drug combination. In order to make clear the interaction between metabolic enzymes and TCM metabolism, we generally chose the enzymatic activity as an evaluation index. That is to say, the enhancement or reduction of CYP450 enzyme activity was used to infer the inducing or inhibitory effect of active ingredients and extracts of traditional Chinese medicine on enzymes. At present, the common method for measuring metabolic enzyme activity is Cocktail probe drugs, and it is the key to select the suitable probe substrates. This is of great significance for study drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) process in organisms. The study focuses on the interaction between TCMs, active ingredients, herbal extracts, cocktail probe substrates as well as CYP450 enzymes, in order to guide future studies.

  14. Decoding P4-ATPase substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Bartholomew P; Graham, Todd R

    Cellular membranes display a diversity of functions that are conferred by the unique composition and organization of their proteins and lipids. One important aspect of lipid organization is the asymmetric distribution of phospholipids (PLs) across the plasma membrane. The unequal distribution of key PLs between the cytofacial and exofacial leaflets of the bilayer creates physical surface tension that can be used to bend the membrane; and like Ca 2+ , a chemical gradient that can be used to transduce biochemical signals. PL flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase (P4-ATPase) family are the principle transporters used to set and repair this PL gradient and the asymmetric organization of these membranes are encoded by the substrate specificity of these enzymes. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of P4-ATPase substrate specificity will help reveal their role in membrane organization and cell biology. Further, decoding the structural determinants of substrate specificity provides investigators the opportunity to mutationally tune this specificity to explore the role of particular PL substrates in P4-ATPase cellular functions. This work reviews the role of P4-ATPases in membrane biology, presents our current understanding of P4-ATPase substrate specificity, and discusses how these fundamental aspects of P4-ATPase enzymology may be used to enhance our knowledge of cellular membrane biology.

  15. Enzyme-substrate binding landscapes in the process of nitrile biodegradation mediated by nitrile hydratase and amidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zeng, Zhuotong; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Xuanming; Chen, Ming; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Zhifeng; Xie, Gengxin

    2013-08-01

    The continuing discharge of nitriles in various industrial processes has caused serious environmental consequences of nitrile pollution. Microorganisms possess several nitrile-degrading pathways by direct interactions of nitriles with nitrile-degrading enzymes. However, these interactions are largely unknown and difficult to experimentally determine but important for interpretation of nitrile metabolisms and design of nitrile-degrading enzymes with better nitrile-converting activity. Here, we undertook a molecular modeling study of enzyme-substrate binding modes in the bi-enzyme pathway for degradation of nitrile to acid. Docking results showed that the top substrates having favorable interactions with nitrile hydratase from Rhodococcus erythropolis AJ270 (ReNHase), nitrile hydratase from Pseudonocardia thermophila JCM 3095 (PtNHase), and amidase from Rhodococcus sp. N-771 (RhAmidase) were benzonitrile, 3-cyanopyridine, and L-methioninamide, respectively. We further analyzed the interactional profiles of these top poses with corresponding enzymes, showing that specific residues within the enzyme's binding pockets formed diverse contacts with substrates. This information on binding landscapes and interactional profiles is of great importance for the design of nitrile-degrading enzyme mutants with better oxidation activity toward nitriles or amides in the process of pollutant treatments.

  16. Interaction between chitosan and its related enzymes: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinya, Shoko; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2017-11-01

    Chitosan-related enzymes including chitosanases, exo-β-glucosaminidases, and enzymes having chitosan-binding modules recognize ligands through electrostatic interactions between the acidic amino acids in proteins and amino groups of chitosan polysaccharides. However, in GH8 chitosanases, several aromatic residues are also involved in substrate recognition through stacking interactions, and these enzymes consequently hydrolyze β-1,4-glucan as well as chitosan. The binding grooves of these chitosanases are extended and opened at both ends of the grooves, so that the enzymes can clamp a long chitosan polysaccharide. The association/dissociation of positively charged glucosamine residues to/from the binding pocket of a GH2 exo-β-glucosaminidase controls the p K a of the catalytic acid, thereby maintaining the high catalytic potency of the enzyme. In contrast to chitosanases, chitosan-binding modules only accommodate a couple of glucosamine residues, predominantly recognizing the non-reducing end glucosamine residue of chitosan by electrostatic interactions and a hydrogen-bonding network. These structural findings on chitosan-related enzymes may contribute to future applications for the efficient conversion of the chitin/chitosan biomass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamic Modelling Reveals 'Hotspots' on the Pathway to Enzyme-Substrate Complex Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane E Gordon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS catalyzes the first committed step in the diaminopimelate pathway of bacteria, yielding amino acids required for cell wall and protein biosyntheses. The essentiality of the enzyme to bacteria, coupled with its absence in humans, validates DHDPS as an antibacterial drug target. Conventional drug design efforts have thus far been unsuccessful in identifying potent DHDPS inhibitors. Here, we make use of contemporary molecular dynamics simulation and Markov state models to explore the interactions between DHDPS from the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and its cognate substrate, pyruvate. Our simulations recover the crystallographic DHDPS-pyruvate complex without a priori knowledge of the final bound structure. The highly conserved residue Arg140 was found to have a pivotal role in coordinating the entry of pyruvate into the active site from bulk solvent, consistent with previous kinetic reports, indicating an indirect role for the residue in DHDPS catalysis. A metastable binding intermediate characterized by multiple points of intermolecular interaction between pyruvate and key DHDPS residue Arg140 was found to be a highly conserved feature of the binding trajectory when comparing alternative binding pathways. By means of umbrella sampling we show that these binding intermediates are thermodynamically metastable, consistent with both the available experimental data and the substrate binding model presented in this study. Our results provide insight into an important enzyme-substrate interaction in atomistic detail that offers the potential to be exploited for the discovery of more effective DHDPS inhibitors and, in a broader sense, dynamic protein-drug interactions.

  18. Optimization of the enzyme system for hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulose substrates; Optimering av enzymsystemet foer hydrolys av foerbehandlade lignocellulosa substrat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjerneld, Folke [Lund univ., (Sweden). Dept. of Biochemistry

    2000-06-01

    This project aims to clarify the reasons for the slow and incomplete enzymatic hydrolysis of certain lignocellulose substrates, particularly softwood e.g. spruce. Based on this knowledge we will optimize the enzyme system so that the yield of fermentable sugars is increased as well as the rate of hydrolysis. We will also study methods for recycling of the enzymes in the process by adsorption on fresh substrate. Progress in these areas will lead to improved process economy in an ethanol process. We collaborate with Chemical Engineering on hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulose substrates and with Analytical Chemistry and Applied Microbiology on analysis of potential inhibitors. Within this main research direction the work at Biochemistry during this project period (since 970701) has been focused on the following areas: (1) Studies of the role of substrate properties in the enzymatic hydrolysis to clarify the reasons for the decrease in the rate of hydrolysis; (2) enzyme adsorption on lignin; (3) studies of recently identified low molecular weight endo glucanases which may be used for more effective penetration of small pores in pretreated substrates (this part is financed by the Nordic Energy Research Program). Central results during the period: In order to study the role of substrate properties for hydrolysis we have initiated investigations on steam pretreated substrates with several techniques. Measurements of pore sizes have been done with probe molecules of known molecular weights. Results show that probe molecules with diameters larger than 50 Aangstroem can more easily penetrate pretreated willow compared with spruce, which can be a part of the explanation for the better hydrolysability of hardwood substrates compared with softwood. We have started studies with electron microscopy of pretreated substrates at different degrees of enzymatic hydrolysis. With scanning electron microscopy (SEM) we can see significant differences in substrate structure in

  19. Redox-dependent substrate-cofactor interactions in the Michaelis-complex of a flavin-dependent oxidoreductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Tobias; Wahlefeld, Stefan; Salewski, Johannes; Kuhlmann, Uwe; Zebger, Ingo; Hildebrandt, Peter; Dobbek, Holger

    2017-07-01

    How an enzyme activates its substrate for turnover is fundamental for catalysis but incompletely understood on a structural level. With redox enzymes one typically analyses structures of enzyme-substrate complexes in the unreactive oxidation state of the cofactor, assuming that the interaction between enzyme and substrate is independent of the cofactors oxidation state. Here, we investigate the Michaelis complex of the flavoenzyme xenobiotic reductase A with the reactive reduced cofactor bound to its substrates by X-ray crystallography and resonance Raman spectroscopy and compare it to the non-reactive oxidized Michaelis complex mimics. We find that substrates bind in different orientations to the oxidized and reduced flavin, in both cases flattening its structure. But only authentic Michaelis complexes display an unexpected rich vibrational band pattern uncovering a strong donor-acceptor complex between reduced flavin and substrate. This interaction likely activates the catalytic ground state of the reduced flavin, accelerating the reaction within a compressed cofactor-substrate complex.

  20. Change in enzyme production by gradually drying culture substrate during solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kazunari; Gomi, Katsuya; Kariyama, Masahiro; Miyake, Tsuyoshi

    2015-06-01

    The influence of drying the culture substrate during solid-state fermentation on enzyme production was investigated using a non-airflow box. The drying caused a significant increase in enzyme production, while the mycelium content decreased slightly. This suggests that changes in the water content in the substrate during culture affect enzyme production in fungi. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Sensitive and Robust Enzyme Kinetic Experiment Using Microplates and Fluorogenic Ester Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Jeremy; Hoops, Geoffrey C.; Savas, Christopher J.; Kartje, Zachary; Lavis, Luke D.

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics measurements are a standard component of undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. The combination of serine hydrolases and fluorogenic enzyme substrates provides a rapid, sensitive, and general method for measuring enzyme kinetics in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. In this method, the kinetic activity of multiple protein…

  2. Effects of multiple enzyme–substrate interactions in basic units of cellular signal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaton, D D; Krishnan, J

    2012-01-01

    Covalent modification cycles are a ubiquitous feature of cellular signalling networks. In these systems, the interaction of an active enzyme with the unmodified form of its substrate is essential for signalling to occur. However, this interaction is not necessarily the only enzyme–substrate interaction possible. In this paper, we analyse the behaviour of a basic model of signalling in which additional, non-essential enzyme–substrate interactions are possible. These interactions include those between the inactive form of an enzyme and its substrate, and between the active form of an enzyme and its product. We find that these additional interactions can result in increased sensitivity and biphasic responses, respectively. The dynamics of the responses are also significantly altered by the presence of additional interactions. Finally, we evaluate the consequences of these interactions in two variations of our basic model, involving double modification of substrate and scaffold-mediated signalling, respectively. We conclude that the molecular details of protein–protein interactions are important in determining the signalling properties of enzymatic signalling pathways. (paper)

  3. MEROPS: the database of proteolytic enzymes, their substrates and inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Neil D; Waller, Matthew; Barrett, Alan J; Bateman, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Peptidases, their substrates and inhibitors are of great relevance to biology, medicine and biotechnology. The MEROPS database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk) aims to fulfill the need for an integrated source of information about these. The database has hierarchical classifications in which homologous sets of peptidases and protein inhibitors are grouped into protein species, which are grouped into families, which are in turn grouped into clans. Recent developments include the following. A community annotation project has been instigated in which acknowledged experts are invited to contribute summaries for peptidases. Software has been written to provide an Internet-based data entry form. Contributors are acknowledged on the relevant web page. A new display showing the intron/exon structures of eukaryote peptidase genes and the phasing of the junctions has been implemented. It is now possible to filter the list of peptidases from a completely sequenced bacterial genome for a particular strain of the organism. The MEROPS filing pipeline has been altered to circumvent the restrictions imposed on non-interactive blastp searches, and a HMMER search using specially generated alignments to maximize the distribution of organisms returned in the search results has been added.

  4. Mycelial growth interactions and mannan-degrading enzyme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... enzymes (Frost and Moss, 1987). However, microbial enzymes are more in use due to cheaper substrates and ease of process modification. In microbial enzyme and biomass production, defined mixed culture method in which more than one organism grows simultaneously can result in increased biomass ...

  5. Crius: A Novel Fragment-Based Algorithm of De Novo Substrate Prediction for Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuiqin; Zhang, Lujia; Gao, Bei; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H; Wei, Dongzhi

    2018-05-03

    The study of enzyme substrate specificity is vital for developing potential applications of enzymes. However, the routine experimental procedures require lot of resources in the discovery of novel substrates. This article reports an in silico structure-based algorithm called Crius, which predicts substrates for enzyme. The results of this fragment-based algorithm show good agreements between the simulated and experimental substrate specificities, using a lipase from Candida antarctica (CALB), a nitrilase from Cyanobacterium syechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Nit6803), and an aldo-keto reductase from Gluconobacter oxydans (Gox0644). This opens new prospects of developing computer algorithms that can effectively predict substrates for an enzyme. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 The Protein Society.

  6. Histone acetyltransferases : challenges in targeting bi-substrate enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wapenaar, Hannah; Dekker, Frank J

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are epigenetic enzymes that install acetyl groups onto lysine residues of cellular proteins such as histones, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, and enzymes. HATs have been shown to play a role in diseases ranging from cancer and inflammatory diseases to

  7. Purification of SUMO conjugating enzymes and kinetic analysis of substrate conjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Ali A.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMO conjugation to protein substrates requires the concerted action of a dedicated E2 ubiquitin conjugation enzyme (Ubc9) and associated E3 ligases. Although Ubc9 can directly recognize and modify substrate lysine residues that occur within a consensus site for SUMO modification, E3 ligases can redirect specificity and enhance conjugation rates during SUMO conjugation in vitro and in vivo. In this chapter, we will describe methods utilized to purify SUMO conjugating enzymes and model substrates which can be used for analysis of SUMO conjugation in vitro. We will also describe methods to extract kinetic parameters during E3-dependent or E3-independent substrate conjugation. PMID:19107417

  8. [Enzyme kinetic glucose determination by the glucose dehydrogenase method. Enzyme kinetic substrate determination using competitive inhibitors, II (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Matthesius, R

    1975-05-01

    The sensitivity of enzyme kinetic substrate determinations can be improved with the aid of competitive inhibitors. As an example, the determination of glucose dehydrogenase in the presence of potassium thiocyanate is described. The method has the advantage of rapid operation with satisfactory precision.

  9. Interactions of Cannabinoids With Biochemical Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian F Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent decades have seen much progress in the identification and characterization of cannabinoid receptors and the elucidation of the mechanisms by which derivatives of the Cannabis sativa plant bind to receptors and produce their physiological and psychological effects. The information generated in this process has enabled better understanding of the fundamental physiological and psychological processes controlled by the central and peripheral nervous systems and has fostered the development of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. A negative aspect of this decades-long effort is the proliferation of clandestinely synthesized analogs as recreational street drugs with dangerous effects. Currently, the interactions of cannabinoids with their biochemical substrates are extensively but inadequately understood, and the clinical application of derived and synthetic receptor ligands remains quite limited. The wide anatomical distribution and functional complexity of the cannabinoid system continue to indicate potential for both therapeutic and side effects, which offers challenges and opportunities for medicinal chemists involved in drug discovery and development.

  10. Recycle of enzymes and substrate following enzymatic hydrolysis of steam-pretreated aspenwood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mes-Hartree, M.; Hogan, C.M.; Saddler, J.N.

    1987-09-01

    The commercial production of chemicals and fuels from lignocellulosic residues by enzymatic means still requires considerable research on both the technical and economic aspects. Two technical problems that have been identified as requiring further research are the recycle of the enzymes used in hydrolysis and the reuse of the recalcitrant cellulose remaining after incomplete hydrolysis. Enzyme recycle is required to lower the cost of the enzymes, while the reuse of the spent cellulose will lower the feedstock cost. The conversion process studied was a combined enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation (CHF) procedure that utilized the cellulolytic enzymes derived from the fungus Trichoderma harzianum E58 and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The rate and extent of hydrolysis and ethanol production was monitored as was the activity and hydrolytic potential of the enzymes remaining in the filtrate after the hydrolysis period. When a commercial cellulose was used as the substrate for a routine 2-day CHF process, 60% of the original filter paper activity could be recovered. When steam-treated, water-extracted aspenwood was used as the substrate, only 13% of the original filter paper activity was detected after a similar procedure. The combination of 60% spent enzymes with 40% fresh enzymes resulted in the production of 30% less reducing sugars than the original enzyme mixture. Since 100% hydrolysis of the cellulose portion is seldom accomplished in an enzymatic hydrolysis process, the residual cellulose was used as a substrate for the growth of T. harzianum E58 and production of cellulolytic enzymes. The residue remaining after the CHF process was used as a substrate for the production of the cellulolytic enzymes. The production of enzymes from the residue of the Solka Floc hydrolysis was greater than the production of enzymes from the original Solka Floc. (Refs. 14).

  11. Cytochrome P450 enzyme mediated herbal drug interactions (Part 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanwimolruk, Sompon; Phopin, Kamonrat; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    To date, a number of significant herbal drug interactions have their origins in the alteration of cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity by various phytochemicals. Among the most noteworthy are those involving St. John's wort and drugs metabolized by human CYP3A4 enzyme. This review article is the continued work from our previous article (Part 1) published in this journal (Wanwimolruk and Prachayasittikul, 2014[ref:133]). This article extends the scope of the review to six more herbs and updates information on herbal drug interactions. These include black cohosh, ginseng, grape seed extract, green tea, kava, saw palmetto and some important Chinese medicines are also presented. Even though there have been many studies to determine the effects of herbs and herbal medicines on the activity of CYP, most of them were in vitro and in animal studies. Therefore, the studies are limited in predicting the clinical relevance of herbal drug interactions. It appeared that the majority of the herbal medicines have no clear effects on most of the CYPs examined. For example, the existing clinical trial data imply that black cohosh, ginseng and saw palmetto are unlikely to affect the pharmacokinetics of conventional drugs metabolized by human CYPs. For grape seed extract and green tea, adverse herbal drug interactions are unlikely when they are concomitantly taken with prescription drugs that are CYP substrates. Although there were few clinical studies on potential CYP-mediated interactions produced by kava, present data suggest that kava supplements have the ability to inhibit CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 significantly. Therefore, caution should be taken when patients take kava with CYP1A2 or CYP2E1 substrate drugs as it may enhance their therapeutic and adverse effects. Despite the long use of traditional Chinese herbal medicines, little is known about the potential drug interactions with these herbs. Many popularly used Chinese medicines have been shown in vitro to significantly change the

  12. Substrate interactions and promiscuity in a viral DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aathavan, K; Politzer, Adam T; Kaplan, Ariel; Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Chemla, Yann R; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Anderson, Dwight L; Bustamante, Carlos

    2009-10-01

    The ASCE (additional strand, conserved E) superfamily of proteins consists of structurally similar ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities involving metabolism and transport of proteins and nucleic acids in all forms of life. A subset of these enzymes consists of multimeric ringed pumps responsible for DNA transport in processes including genome packaging in adenoviruses, herpesviruses, poxviruses and tailed bacteriophages. Although their mechanism of mechanochemical conversion is beginning to be understood, little is known about how these motors engage their nucleic acid substrates. Questions remain as to whether the motors contact a single DNA element, such as a phosphate or a base, or whether contacts are distributed over several parts of the DNA. Furthermore, the role of these contacts in the mechanochemical cycle is unknown. Here we use the genome packaging motor of the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage varphi29 (ref. 4) to address these questions. The full mechanochemical cycle of the motor, in which the ATPase is a pentameric-ring of gene product 16 (gp16), involves two phases-an ATP-loading dwell followed by a translocation burst of four 2.5-base-pair (bp) steps triggered by hydrolysis product release. By challenging the motor with a variety of modified DNA substrates, we show that during the dwell phase important contacts are made with adjacent phosphates every 10-bp on the 5'-3' strand in the direction of packaging. As well as providing stable, long-lived contacts, these phosphate interactions also regulate the chemical cycle. In contrast, during the burst phase, we find that DNA translocation is driven against large forces by extensive contacts, some of which are not specific to the chemical moieties of DNA. Such promiscuous, nonspecific contacts may reflect common translocase-substrate interactions for both the nucleic acid and protein translocases of the ASCE superfamily.

  13. High-throughput screening of carbohydrate-degrading enzymes using novel insoluble chromogenic substrate assay kits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schückel, Julia; Kracun, Stjepan Kresimir; Willats, William George Tycho

    2016-01-01

    for this is that advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing, together with associated bioinformatics tools allow for rapid identification of candidate CAZymes, but technology for determining an enzyme's biochemical characteristics has advanced more slowly. To address this technology gap, a novel high-throughput assay...... CPH and ICB substrates are provided in a 96-well high-throughput assay system. The CPH substrates can be made in four different colors, enabling them to be mixed together and thus increasing assay throughput. The protocol describes a 96-well plate assay and illustrates how this assay can be used...... for screening the activities of enzymes, enzyme cocktails, and broths....

  14. Adsorption of monocomponent enzymes in enzyme mixture analyzed quantitatively during hydrolysis of lignocellulose substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Várnai, Anikó; Viikari, Liisa; Marjamaa, Kaisa; Siika-aho, Matti

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of purified Trichoderma reesei cellulases (TrCel7A, TrCel6A and TrCel5A) and xylanase TrXyn11 and Aspergillus niger β-glucosidase AnCel3A was studied in enzyme mixture during hydrolysis of two pretreated lignocellulosic materials, steam pretreated and catalytically delignified spruce, along with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). The enzyme mixture was compiled to resemble the composition of commercial cellulase preparations. The hydrolysis was carried out at 35 °C to mimic the temperature of the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Enzyme adsorption was followed by analyzing the activity and the protein amount of the individual free enzymes in the hydrolysis supernatant. Most enzymes adsorbed quickly at early stages of the hydrolysis and remained bound throughout the hydrolysis, although the conversion reached was fairly high. Only with the catalytically oxidized spruce samples, the bound enzymes started to be released as the hydrolysis degree reached 80%. The results based on enzyme activities and protein assay were in good accordance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enzyme architecture: deconstruction of the enzyme-activating phosphodianion interactions of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Lawrence M; Amyes, Tina L; Goryanova, Bogdana; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P

    2014-07-16

    The mechanism for activation of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) by interactions of side chains from Gln215 and Try217 at a gripper loop and R235, adjacent to this loop, with the phosphodianion of OMP was probed by determining the kinetic parameters k(cat) and K(m) for all combinations of single, double, and triple Q215A, Y217F, and R235A mutations. The 12 kcal/mol intrinsic binding energy of the phosphodianion is shown to be equal to the sum of the binding energies of the side chains of R235 (6 kcal/mol), Q215 (2 kcal/mol), Y217 (2 kcal/mol), and hydrogen bonds to the G234 and R235 backbone amides (2 kcal/mol). Analysis of a triple mutant cube shows small (ca. 1 kcal/mol) interactions between phosphodianion gripper side chains, which are consistent with steric crowding of the side chains around the phosphodianion at wild-type OMPDC. These mutations result in the same change in the activation barrier to the OMPDC-catalyzed reactions of the whole substrate OMP and the substrate pieces (1-β-D-erythrofuranosyl)orotic acid (EO) and phosphite dianion. This shows that the transition states for these reactions are stabilized by similar interactions with the protein catalyst. The 12 kcal/mol intrinsic phosphodianion binding energy of OMP is divided between the 8 kcal/mol of binding energy, which is utilized to drive a thermodynamically unfavorable conformational change of the free enzyme, resulting in an increase in (k(cat))(obs) for OMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP, and the 4 kcal/mol of binding energy, which is utilized to stabilize the Michaelis complex, resulting in a decrease in (K(m))(obs).

  16. Empirical evaluation of inhibitory product, substrate, and enzyme effects during the enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin T; Knutsen, Jeffrey S; Davis, Robert H

    2010-05-01

    The cellulose hydrolysis kinetics during batch enzymatic saccharification are typified by a rapid initial rate that subsequently decays, resulting in incomplete conversion. Previous studies suggest that changes associated with the solution, substrate, or enzymes may be responsible. In this work, kinetic experiments were conducted to determine the relative magnitude of these effects. Pretreated corn stover (PCS) was used as a lignocellulosic substrate likely to be found in a commercial saccharification process, while Avicel and Kraft lignin were used to create model substrates. Glucose inhibition was observed by spiking the reaction slurry with glucose during initial-rate experiments. Increasing the glucose concentration from 7 to 48 g/L reduced the cellulose conversion rate by 94%. When product sugars were removed using ultrafiltration with a 10 kDa membrane, the glucose-based conversion increased by 9.5%. Reductions in substrate reactivity with conversion were compared directly by saccharifying PCS and Avicel substrates that had been pre-reacted to different conversions. Reaction of substrate with a pre-conversion of 40% resulted in about 40% reduction in the initial rate of saccharification, relative to fresh substrate with identical cellulose concentration. Overall, glucose inhibition and reduced substrate reactivity appear to be dominant factors, whereas minimal reductions of enzyme activity were observed.

  17. miCLIP-MaPseq, a Substrate Identification Approach for Radical SAM RNA Methylating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojković, Vanja; Chu, Tongyue; Therizols, Gabriel; Weinberg, David E; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2018-06-13

    Although present across bacteria, the large family of radical SAM RNA methylating enzymes is largely uncharacterized. Escherichia coli RlmN, the founding member of the family, methylates an adenosine in 23S rRNA and several tRNAs to yield 2-methyladenosine (m 2 A). However, varied RNA substrate specificity among RlmN enzymes, combined with the ability of certain family members to generate 8-methyladenosine (m 8 A), makes functional predictions across this family challenging. Here, we present a method for unbiased substrate identification that exploits highly efficient, mechanism-based cross-linking between the enzyme and its RNA substrates. Additionally, by determining that the thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase introduces mismatches at the site of the cross-link, we have identified the precise positions of RNA modification using mismatch profiling. These results illustrate the capability of our method to define enzyme-substrate pairs and determine modification sites of the largely uncharacterized radical SAM RNA methylating enzyme family.

  18. Accessory enzymes influence cellulase hydrolysis of the model substrate and the realistic lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fubao Fuebiol; Hong, Jiapeng; Hu, Jinguang; Saddler, Jack N; Fang, Xu; Zhang, Zhenyu; Shen, Song

    2015-11-01

    The potential of cellulase enzymes in the developing and ongoing "biorefinery" industry has provided a great motivation to develop an efficient cellulase mixture. Recent work has shown how important the role that the so-called accessory enzymes can play in an effective enzymatic hydrolysis. In this study, three newest Novozymes Cellic CTec cellulase preparations (CTec 1/2/3) were compared to hydrolyze steam pretreated lignocellulosic substrates and model substances at an identical FPA loading. These cellulase preparations were found to display significantly different hydrolytic performances irrelevant with the FPA. And this difference was even observed on the filter paper itself when the FPA based assay was revisited. The analysis of specific enzyme activity in cellulase preparations demonstrated that different accessory enzymes were mainly responsible for the discrepancy of enzymatic hydrolysis between diversified substrates and various cellulases. Such the active role of accessory enzymes present in cellulase preparations was finally verified by supplementation with β-glucosidase, xylanase and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases AA9. This paper provides new insights into the role of accessory enzymes, which can further provide a useful reference for the rational customization of cellulase cocktails in order to realize an efficient conversion of natural lignocellulosic substrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Multifunctionality is affected by interactions between green roof plant species, substrate depth, and substrate type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusza, Yann; Barot, Sébastien; Kraepiel, Yvan; Lata, Jean-Christophe; Abbadie, Luc; Raynaud, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services through evapotranspiration and nutrient cycling that depend, among others, on plant species, substrate type, and substrate depth. However, no study has assessed thoroughly how interactions between these factors alter ecosystem functions and multifunctionality of green roofs. We simulated some green roof conditions in a pot experiment. We planted 20 plant species from 10 genera and five families (Asteraceae, Caryophyllaceae, Crassulaceae, Fabaceae, and Poaceae) on two substrate types (natural vs. artificial) and two substrate depths (10 cm vs. 30 cm). As indicators of major ecosystem functions, we measured aboveground and belowground biomasses, foliar nitrogen and carbon content, foliar transpiration, substrate water retention, and dissolved organic carbon and nitrates in leachates. Interactions between substrate type and depth strongly affected ecosystem functions. Biomass production was increased in the artificial substrate and deeper substrates, as was water retention in most cases. In contrast, dissolved organic carbon leaching was higher in the artificial substrates. Except for the Fabaceae species, nitrate leaching was reduced in deep, natural soils. The highest transpiration rates were associated with natural soils. All functions were modulated by plant families or species. Plant effects differed according to the observed function and the type and depth of the substrate. Fabaceae species grown on natural soils had the most noticeable patterns, allowing high biomass production and high water retention but also high nitrate leaching from deep pots. No single combination of factors enhanced simultaneously all studied ecosystem functions, highlighting that soil-plant interactions induce trade-offs between ecosystem functions. Substrate type and depth interactions are major drivers for green roof multifunctionality.

  20. An in vitro assay to study the recruitment and substrate specificity of chromatin modifying enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Michiel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications of core histones play an important role in regulating fundamental biological processes such as DNA repair, transcription and replication. In this paper, we describe a novel assay that allows sequential targeting of distinct histone modifying enzymes to immobilized nucleosomal templates using recombinant chimeric targeting molecules. The assay can be used to study the histone substrate specificity of chromatin modifying enzymes as well as whether and how certain enzymes affect each other's histone modifying activities. As such the assay can help to understand how a certain histone code is established and interpreted.

  1. Stoichiometry and Substrate Affinity of the Mannitol Transporter, EnzymeIImtl, from Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Gertjan; Broos, Jaap; Poolman, Bert; Scheek, Ruud M.

    2005-01-01

    Uptake and consecutive phosphorylation of mannitol in Escherichia coli is catalyzed by the mannitol permease EnzymeIImtl. The substrate is bound at an extracellular-oriented binding site, translocated to an inward-facing site, from where it is phosphorylated, and subsequently released into the cell.

  2. A fluorescence assay for elucidating the substrate specificities of deubiquitinating enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Si-Tao; Huang, Hao; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Zhou, Zi-Ren; Song, Ai-Xin; Hong, Fa-Shui; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► A deubiquitinating enzyme has its unique substrate specificity for deubiquitination. ► We have established an activity assay for ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases. ► This assay can be applicable to other deubiquitinating enzymes. -- Abstract: Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs) are a representative family of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which specifically cleave ubiquitin (Ub) chains or extensions. Here we present a convenient method for characterizing the substrate specificities of various UCHs by fluorescently mutated Ub-fusion proteins (Ub F45W -Xaa) and di-ubiquitin chains (Ub F45W -diUb). After removal of the intact substrate by Ni 2+ -NTA affinity, the enzymatic activities of UCHs were quantitatively determined by recording fluorescence of the Ub F45W product. The results show that three UCHs, i.e. UCH-L1, UCH-L3 and UCH37/UCH-L5, are distinct in their substrate specificities for the Ub-fusions and diUb chains. This assay method may also be applied to study the enzymatic activities and substrate specificities of other DUBs.

  3. Lack of interaction between the peptidomimetic substrates captopril and cephradine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, David R; Yee, Shiyin; Bleske, Barry E; Carver, Peggy L; Shea, Michael J; Menon, Sujatha S; Ramachandran, Chandrasekharan; Welage, Lynda S; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-03-01

    Intestinal peptide transporters, including hPEPT1, facilitate the absorption of cephalosporins and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and have been investigated as a means to improve oral drug absorption. Renal peptide transporters including hPEPT2, may also facilitate renal reabsorption of such compounds. In vitro and animal studies suggest that co-administration of peptidomimetic compounds may alter oral pharmacokinetics, although this has not been well studied in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine whether co-administration of the hPEPT substrates captopril and cephradine alters the oral pharmacokinetics of either agent. Nine healthy male volunteers received a single oral 25-mg dose of captopril, a single oral 500-mg dose of cephradine, or concurrent ingestion of captopril and cephradine in a cross-over manner. Venous blood samples were taken and captopril and cephradine pharmacokinetics were determined using noncompartmental analyses. No significant differences were observed in captopril or cephradine pharmacokinetics when administered together as compared to each agent alone (a marginal decrease in C(max) was observed for both captopril and cephradine during co-administration [5-15%]; however, differences were not statistically significant). The results of our study suggest that hPEPT1 and hPEPT2 are unlikely to contribute to clinically important drug interactions in humans.

  4. Alternate substrates and isotope effects as a probe of the malic enzyme reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavva, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    Dissociation constants for alternative dinucleotide substrates and competitive inhibitors suggest that the dinucleotide binding site of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme is hydrophobic in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Changes in the divalent metal ion activator from Mg 2+ to Mn 2+ or Cd 2+ results in a decrease in the dinucleotide affinity and an increase in the affinity for malate. Primary deuterium and 13 C isotope effects obtained with the different metal ions suggest either a change in the transition state structure for the hydride transfer or decarboxylation steps or both. Deuterium isotope effects are finite whether reactants are maintained at saturating or limiting concentrations with all the metal ions and dinucleotide substrates used. For the native enzyme, primary deuterium isotope effects increase with a concomitant decrease in the 13 C effects when NAD is replaced by an alternate dinucleotide substrate different in redox potential

  5. Conserved regions of ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP are involved in interactions with its substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2013-08-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a ubiquitous and essential site-specific eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein with a large catalytic RNA moiety that is closely related to the RNA component of RNase P, and multiple proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. Here, we report the results of an ultraviolet-cross-linking analysis of interactions between a photoreactive RNase MRP substrate and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP holoenzyme. The results show that the substrate interacts with phylogenetically conserved RNA elements universally found in all enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family, as well as with a phylogenetically conserved RNA region that is unique to RNase MRP, and demonstrate that four RNase MRP protein components, all shared with RNase P, interact with the substrate. Implications for the structural organization of RNase MRP and the roles of its components are discussed.

  6. Brownian dynamic study of an enzyme metabolon in the TCA cycle: Substrate kinetics and channeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ming M; Huber, Gary A; Wang, Nuo; Minteer, Shelley D; McCammon, J Andrew

    2018-02-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and citrate synthase (CS) are two pacemaking enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Oxaloacetate (OAA) molecules are the intermediate substrates that are transferred from the MDH to CS to carry out sequential catalysis. It is known that, to achieve a high flux of intermediate transport and reduce the probability of substrate leaking, a MDH-CS metabolon forms to enhance the OAA substrate channeling. In this study, we aim to understand the OAA channeling within possible MDH-CS metabolons that have different structural orientations in their complexes. Three MDH-CS metabolons from native bovine, wild-type porcine, and recombinant sources, published in recent work, were selected to calculate OAA transfer efficiency by Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations and to study, through electrostatic potential calculations, a possible role of charges that drive the substrate channeling. Our results show that an electrostatic channel is formed in the metabolons of native bovine and recombinant porcine enzymes, which guides the oppositely charged OAA molecules passing through the channel and enhances the transfer efficiency. However, the channeling probability in a suggested wild-type porcine metabolon conformation is reduced due to an extended diffusion length between the MDH and CS active sites, implying that the corresponding arrangements of MDH and CS result in the decrease of electrostatic steering between substrates and protein surface and then reduce the substrate transfer efficiency from one active site to another. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  7. Predicting novel substrates for enzymes with minimal experimental effort with active learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertusi, Dante A; Moura, Matthew E; Jeffryes, James G; Prabhu, Siddhant; Walters Biggs, Bradley; Tyo, Keith E J

    2017-11-01

    Enzymatic substrate promiscuity is more ubiquitous than previously thought, with significant consequences for understanding metabolism and its application to biocatalysis. This realization has given rise to the need for efficient characterization of enzyme promiscuity. Enzyme promiscuity is currently characterized with a limited number of human-selected compounds that may not be representative of the enzyme's versatility. While testing large numbers of compounds may be impractical, computational approaches can exploit existing data to determine the most informative substrates to test next, thereby more thoroughly exploring an enzyme's versatility. To demonstrate this, we used existing studies and tested compounds for four different enzymes, developed support vector machine (SVM) models using these datasets, and selected additional compounds for experiments using an active learning approach. SVMs trained on a chemically diverse set of compounds were discovered to achieve maximum accuracies of ~80% using ~33% fewer compounds than datasets based on all compounds tested in existing studies. Active learning-selected compounds for testing resolved apparent conflicts in the existing training data, while adding diversity to the dataset. The application of these algorithms to wide arrays of metabolic enzymes would result in a library of SVMs that can predict high-probability promiscuous enzymatic reactions and could prove a valuable resource for the design of novel metabolic pathways. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Biosensors based on enzyme field-effect transistors for determination of some substrates and inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyadevych, Sergei V; Soldatkin, Alexey P; Korpan, Yaroslav I; Arkhypova, Valentyna N; El'skaya, Anna V; Chovelon, Jean-Marc; Martelet, Claude; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2003-10-01

    This paper is a review of the authors' publications concerning the development of biosensors based on enzyme field-effect transistors (ENFETs) for direct substrates or inhibitors analysis. Such biosensors were designed by using immobilised enzymes and ion-selective field-effect transistors (ISFETs). Highly specific, sensitive, simple, fast and cheap determination of different substances renders them as promising tools in medicine, biotechnology, environmental control, agriculture and the food industry. The biosensors based on ENFETs and direct enzyme analysis for determination of concentrations of different substrates (glucose, urea, penicillin, formaldehyde, creatinine, etc.) have been developed and their laboratory prototypes were fabricated. Improvement of the analytical characteristics of such biosensors may be achieved by using a differential mode of measurement, working solutions with different buffer concentrations and specific agents, negatively or positively charged additional membranes, or genetically modified enzymes. These approaches allow one to decrease the effect of the buffer capacity influence on the sensor response in an aim to increase the sensitivity of the biosensors and to extend their dynamic ranges. Biosensors for the determination of concentrations of different toxic substances (organophosphorous pesticides, heavy metal ions, hypochlorite, glycoalkaloids, etc.) were designed on the basis of reversible and/or irreversible enzyme inhibition effect(s). The conception of an enzymatic multibiosensor for the determination of different toxic substances based on the enzyme inhibition effect is also described. We will discuss the respective advantages and disadvantages of biosensors based on the ENFETs developed and also demonstrate their practical application.

  9. Predicting novel substrates for enzymes with minimal experimental effort with active learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pertusi, Dante A.; Moura, Matthew E.; Jeffryes, James G.; Prabhu, Siddhant; Walters Biggs, Bradley; Tyo, Keith E. J.

    2017-11-01

    Enzymatic substrate promiscuity is more ubiquitous than previously thought, with significant consequences for understanding metabolism and its application to biocatalysis. This realization has given rise to the need for efficient characterization of enzyme promiscuity. Enzyme promiscuity is currently characterized with a limited number of human-selected compounds that may not be representative of the enzyme's versatility. While testing large numbers of compounds may be impractical, computational approaches can exploit existing data to determine the most informative substrates to test next, thereby more thoroughly exploring an enzyme's versatility. To demonstrate this, we used existing studies and tested compounds for four different enzymes, developed support vector machine (SVM) models using these datasets, and selected additional compounds for experiments using an active learning approach. SVMs trained on a chemically diverse set of compounds were discovered to achieve maximum accuracies of similar to 80% using similar to 33% fewer compounds than datasets based on all compounds tested in existing studies. Active learning-selected compounds for testing resolved apparent conflicts in the existing training data, while adding diversity to the dataset. The application of these algorithms to wide arrays of metabolic enzymes would result in a library of SVMs that can predict high-probability promiscuous enzymatic reactions and could prove a valuable resource for the design of novel metabolic pathways.

  10. Substrate-Wrapped, Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Probes for Hydrolytic Enzyme Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallmyer, Nathaniel E; Musielewicz, Joseph; Sutter, Joel; Reuel, Nigel F

    2018-04-17

    Hydrolytic enzymes are a topic of continual study and improvement due to their industrial impact and biological implications; however, the ability to measure the activity of these enzymes, especially in high-throughput assays, is limited to an established, few enzymes and often involves the measurement of secondary byproducts or the design of a complex degradation probe. Herein, a versatile single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based biosensor that is straightforward to produce and measure is described. The hydrolytic enzyme substrate is rendered as an amphiphilic polymer, which is then used to solubilize the hydrophobic nanotubes. When the target enzyme degrades the wrapping, the SWNT fluorescent signal is quenched due to increased solvent accessibility and aggregation, allowing quantitative measurement of hydrolytic enzyme activity. Using (6,5) chiral SWNT suspended with polypeptides and polysaccharides, turnover frequencies are estimated for cellulase, pectinase, and bacterial protease. Responses are recorded for concentrations as low as 5 fM using a well-characterized protease, Proteinase K. An established trypsin-based plate reader assay is used to compare this nanotube probe assay with standard techniques. Furthermore, the effect of freeze-thaw cycles and elevated temperature on enzyme activity is measured, suggesting freezing to have minimal impact even after 10 cycles and heating to be detrimental above 60 °C. Finally, rapid optimization of enzyme operating conditions is demonstrated by generating a response surface of cellulase activity with respect to temperature and pH to determine optimal conditions within 2 h of serial scans.

  11. Identification of Enzyme Genes Using Chemical Structure Alignments of Substrate-Product Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Yuki; Yamada, Takuji; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakagawa, Zenichi; Kotera, Masaaki; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2016-03-28

    Although there are several databases that contain data on many metabolites and reactions in biochemical pathways, there is still a big gap in the numbers between experimentally identified enzymes and metabolites. It is supposed that many catalytic enzyme genes are still unknown. Although there are previous studies that estimate the number of candidate enzyme genes, these studies required some additional information aside from the structures of metabolites such as gene expression and order in the genome. In this study, we developed a novel method to identify a candidate enzyme gene of a reaction using the chemical structures of the substrate-product pair (reactant pair). The proposed method is based on a search for similar reactant pairs in a reference database and offers ortholog groups that possibly mediate the given reaction. We applied the proposed method to two experimentally validated reactions. As a result, we confirmed that the histidine transaminase was correctly identified. Although our method could not directly identify the asparagine oxo-acid transaminase, we successfully found the paralog gene most similar to the correct enzyme gene. We also applied our method to infer candidate enzyme genes in the mesaconate pathway. The advantage of our method lies in the prediction of possible genes for orphan enzyme reactions where any associated gene sequences are not determined yet. We believe that this approach will facilitate experimental identification of genes for orphan enzymes.

  12. Kinetics of Single-Enzyme Reactions on Vesicles: Role of Substrate Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2015-03-01

    Enzymatic reactions occurring in vivo on lipid membranes can be influenced by various factors including macromolecular crowding in general and substrate aggregation in particular. In academic studies, the role of these factors can experimentally be clarified by tracking single-enzyme kinetics occurring on individual lipid vesicles. To extend the conceptual basis for such experiments, we analyze herein the corresponding kinetics mathematically with emphasis on the role of substrate aggregation. In general, the aggregation may occur on different length scales. Small aggregates may e.g. contain a few proteins or peptides while large aggregates may be mesoscopic as in the case of lipid domains which can be formed in the membranes composed of different lipids. We present a kinetic model describing comprehensively the effect of aggregation of the former type on the dependence of the reaction rate on substrate membrane concentration. The results obtained with physically reasonable parameters indicate that the aggregation-related deviations from the conventional Michaelis-Menten kinetics may be appreciable. Special Issue Comments: This theoretical article is focused on single-enzyme reactions occurring in parallel with substrate aggregation on individual vesicles. This subject is related to a few Special Issue articles concerning enzyme dynamics6,7 and function8 and mathematical aspects of stochastic kinetics.9

  13. Agricultural waste from the tequila industry as substrate for the production of commercially important enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huitron, C; Perez, R; Sanchez, A E; Lappe, P; Rocha Zavaleta, L

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 1 million tons of Agave tequilana plants are processed annually by the Mexican Tequila industry generating vast amounts of agricultural waste. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of Agave tequilana waste as substrate for the production of commercially important enzymes. Two strains of Aspergillus niger (CH-A-2010 and CH-A-2016), isolated from agave fields, were found to grow and propagate in submerged cultures using Agave tequilana waste as substrate. Isolates showed simultaneous extracellular inulinase, xylanase, pectinase, and cellulase activities. Aspergillus CH-A-2010 showed the highest production of inulinase activity (1.48 U/ml), whereas Aspergillus niger CH-A-2016 produced the highest xylanase (1.52 U/ml) and endo-pectinase (2.7U/ml) activities. In both cases production of enzyme activities was significantly higher on Agave tequilana waste than that observed on lemon peel and specific polymeric carbohydrates. Enzymatic hydrolysis of raw A. tequilana stems and leaves, by enzymes secreted by the isolates yielded maximum concentrations of reducing sugars of 28.2 g/l, and 9.9 g/l respectively. In conclusion, Agave tequilana waste can be utilized as substrate for the production of important biotechnological enzymes.

  14. High-Throughput Functional Screening of Steroid Substrates with Wild-Type and Chimeric P450 Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Urban

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The promiscuity of a collection of enzymes consisting of 31 wild-type and synthetic variants of CYP1A enzymes was evaluated using a series of 14 steroids and 2 steroid-like chemicals, namely, nootkatone, a terpenoid, and mifepristone, a drug. For each enzyme-substrate couple, the initial steady-state velocity of metabolite formation was determined at a substrate saturating concentration. For that, a high-throughput approach was designed involving automatized incubations in 96-well microplate with sixteen 6-point kinetics per microplate and data acquisition using LC/MS system accepting 96-well microplate for injections. The resulting dataset was used for multivariate statistics aimed at sorting out the correlations existing between tested enzyme variants and ability to metabolize steroid substrates. Functional classifications of both CYP1A enzyme variants and steroid substrate structures were obtained allowing the delineation of global structural features for both substrate recognition and regioselectivity of oxidation.

  15. High-throughput functional screening of steroid substrates with wild-type and chimeric P450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Philippe; Truan, Gilles; Pompon, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The promiscuity of a collection of enzymes consisting of 31 wild-type and synthetic variants of CYP1A enzymes was evaluated using a series of 14 steroids and 2 steroid-like chemicals, namely, nootkatone, a terpenoid, and mifepristone, a drug. For each enzyme-substrate couple, the initial steady-state velocity of metabolite formation was determined at a substrate saturating concentration. For that, a high-throughput approach was designed involving automatized incubations in 96-well microplate with sixteen 6-point kinetics per microplate and data acquisition using LC/MS system accepting 96-well microplate for injections. The resulting dataset was used for multivariate statistics aimed at sorting out the correlations existing between tested enzyme variants and ability to metabolize steroid substrates. Functional classifications of both CYP1A enzyme variants and steroid substrate structures were obtained allowing the delineation of global structural features for both substrate recognition and regioselectivity of oxidation.

  16. Effects of heavy metals on enzyme synthesis in substrate-amended river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wainwright, M; Duddridge, J E

    1982-01-01

    The effects of heavy metals in diverse substrate-amended river sediments were studied. Cd/sup 2 +/, Pb/sup 2 +/ and Zn/sup 2 +/ generally had a marked inhibitory effect on the synthesis of amylase, cellulase and urease, on numbers of substrate-hydrolysing bacteria, in all sediments studied. Inhibition increased with increasing metal concentration, and amylase was particularly sensitive. Pb/sup 2 +/ generally had the least effect. We conclude that enzyme synthesis measurements are useful in determining the effects of heavy metals on the degradation of organic pollutants in river sediments.

  17. Interfacial interactions between calcined hydroxyapatite nanocrystals and substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masahiro; Furukawa, Keiko; Serizawa, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Tomoji; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2009-06-02

    Interfacial interactions between calcined hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals and surface-modified substrates were investigated by measuring adsorption behavior and adhesion strength with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and a contact-mode atomic force microscope (AFM), respectively. The goal was to develop better control of HAp-nanocrystal coatings on biomedical materials. HAp nanocrystals with rodlike or spherical morphology were prepared by a wet chemical process followed by calcination at 800 degrees C with an antisintering agent to prevent the formation of sintered polycrystals. The substrate surface was modified by chemical reaction with a low-molecular-weight compound, or graft polymerization with a functional monomer. QCM measurement showed that the rodlike HAp nanocrystals adsorbed preferentially onto anionic COOH-modified substrates compared to cationic NH2- or hydrophobic CH3-modified substrates. On the other hand, the spherical nanocrystals adsorbed onto NH2- and COOH-modified substrates, which indicates that the surface properties of the HAp nanocrystals determined their adsorption behavior. The adhesion strength, which was estimated from the force required to move the nanocrystal in contact-mode AFM, on a COOH-grafted substrate prepared by graft polymerization was almost 9 times larger than that on a COOH-modified substrate prepared by chemical reaction with a low-molecular-weight compound, indicating that the long-chain polymer grafted on the substrate mitigated the surface roughness mismatch between the nanocrystal and the substrate. The adhesion strength of the nanocrystal bonded covalently by the coupling reaction to a Si(OCH3)-grafted substrate prepared by graft polymerization was approximately 1.5 times larger than that when adsorbed on the COOH-grafted substrate.

  18. Effect of enzyme/substrate ratio on the antioxidant properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antioxidant properties of African yam bean hydrolysates (AYH) produced at different enzyme to substrate (E/S) ratios of 1: 100 and 3: 100 (W/V) using pepsin (pH 2.0, 37°C) were studied. 2, 2-Diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity of the hydrolysates was significantly influenced by the E\\S ratio as ...

  19. Substrate strain induced interaction of adatoms on W (110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, W.

    1980-09-01

    The interaction of adatoms due to elastic strains created in an elastically isotropic substrate is investigated. For cases where the adatoms occupy sites with low symmetry, an angular dependent interaction results which falls off as s-3 at large distances. An exact expression is given for the long range interaction in terms of an anisotropy parameter of the force dipole tensor. The short range interaction is calculated by introducing a smooth cutoff. Interactions of adatoms on near neighbour sites on W (110) are given.

  20. Determination of enzyme-substrate dissociation rates by dynamic isotope exchange enhancement experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.C.; Raushel, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    A new method for the determination of dissociation rates of enzyme-substrate complexes has been developed. The rate of exchange of a labeled product back into the substrate is measured during catalysis of the forward reaction when the forward reaction is kept far from equilibrium by the enzymatic removal of the nonexchanging product. The ratio of the exchange rate and the net rate for product formation is then determined at various concentrations of the exchanging product. A plot of this ratio is a diagnostic indication of the kinetic mechanism and the relative rates of product dissociation from the binary and ternary enzyme complexes. This technique has been applied to the reaction catalyzed by bovine liver argininosuccinate lyase. The ratio for the rate of exchange of fumarate into argininosuccinate and the net rate for product formation was found to increase with the concentration of fumarate but to reach a limit of 3.3. The ratio of rates was half-maximal at 36 mM fumarate. The data have been interpreted to indicate the argininosuccinate lyase has a random kinetic mechanism. The calculated lower limit for the rate of release of arginine from the enzyme-fumarate-arginine complex is 0.35 times as fast as the Vmax in the reverse direction. The rate of release of arginine from the enzyme-arginine binary complex is 210 times faster than Vmax in the reverse direction

  1. Diel changes in stream periphyton extracellular enzyme activity throughout community development on inert and organic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rier, S. T.; Francoeur, S. N.; Kuehn, K. A.

    2005-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that algal photosynthesis in stream periphyton communities would influence the activities of extracellular enzymes produced by associated heterotrophic bacteria and fungi to acquire organic compounds and inorganic nutrients. We approached this question by looking for diurnal variation in activities of four extracellular enzymes in periphyton communities that were grown on either inert (glass fiber filters) or organic (leaves) substrata that there were incubated in stream-side channels that were either open to full sun or shaded. Substrata were subsampled for β-glucosidase, alkaline phosphotase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phenol oxidase activities at 3-5 hr. intervals over two consecutive diurnal cycles that were repeated at an early and later stage of periphyton community development. Activities of all enzymes displayed diurnal periodicity but the strength of the diurnal effects depended largely on the substrate type and stage of community development. The most consistent diurnal change was observed with phenol oxidase activity with significantly greater (p<0.05) activities being observed in during the day for both stages of community development and for both substrate types. It is likely that oxygen produced by algal photosynthesis is driving the activity of this oxidative enzyme and that algae might indirectly influence the decomposition of phenolic compounds.

  2. Structural differences of matrix metalloproteinases. Homology modeling and energy minimization of enzyme-substrate complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terp, G E; Christensen, I T; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2000-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are extracellular enzymes taking part in the remodeling of extracellular matrix. The structures of the catalytic domain of MMP1, MMP3, MMP7 and MMP8 are known, but structures of enzymes belonging to this family still remain to be determined. A general approach...... to the homology modeling of matrix metalloproteinases, exemplified by the modeling of MMP2, MMP9, MMP12 and MMP14 is described. The models were refined using an energy minimization procedure developed for matrix metalloproteinases. This procedure includes incorporation of parameters for zinc and calcium ions...... in the AMBER 4.1 force field, applying a non-bonded approach and a full ion charge representation. Energy minimization of the apoenzymes yielded structures with distorted active sites, while reliable three-dimensional structures of the enzymes containing a substrate in active site were obtained. The structural...

  3. Regulatory site of inorganic pyrophosphatase. Interaction with substrate analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikov, A.A.; Pavlov, A.R.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of four PP 1 analogs with the structure PXP (X = N, C), phosphate, and the complex Cr(H 2 O) 4 PP 1 on the activity of inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast was studied over a wide range of substrate (Mg-PP 1 ) concentrations (lower limit 0.5 μM). The enzyme activity decreased in the presence of imidodiphosphate, hydroxymethane diphosphonate [PC(OH)P], and P 1 , and a double reciprocal plot of the rate of hydrolysis of Mg-PP 1 versus its concentration became linear. Small amounts of methane diphosphonate (PCP), ethane-1-hydroxy-1,1-diphosphonate (0.1-1μM), and Cr(H 2 O) 4 PP 1 (10 μM) activated the enzyme almost 2-fold by a competitive mechanism. The activation was due to an increase in the affinity of the protein for the activating Mg 2+ ion. Ultrafiltration showed that the pyrophosphatase molecule has 2.1 and 3.1 binding sites for PCP and PC(OHP)P, respectively. These results confirm the hypothesis that the enzyme contains a regulatory site whose occupation by PP 1 , P 1 , and substrate analogs increases the affinity of the protein for the activating metal

  4. On the substrate specificity of the rice strigolactone biosynthesis enzyme DWARF27

    KAUST Repository

    Bruno, Mark

    2016-03-05

    Main conclusion: The β-carotene isomerase OsDWARF27 is stereo- and double bond-specific. It converts bicyclic carotenoids with at least one unsubstituted β-ionone ring. OsDWARF27 may contribute to the formation of α-carotene-based strigolactone-like compounds.Strigolactones (SLs) are synthesized from all-trans-β-carotene via a pathway involving the β-carotene isomerase DWARF27, the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 7 and 8 (CCD7, CCD8), and cytochrome P450 enzymes from the 711 clade (MAX1 in Arabidopsis). The rice enzyme DWARF27 was shown to catalyze the reversible isomerization of all-trans- into 9-cis-β-carotene in vitro. β-carotene occurs in different cis-isomeric forms, and plants accumulate other carotenoids, which may be substrates of DWARF27. Here, we investigated the stereo and substrate specificity of the rice enzyme DWARF27 in carotenoid-accumulating E. coli strains and in in vitro assays performed with heterologously expressed and purified enzyme. Our results suggest that OsDWARF27 is strictly double bond-specific, solely targeting the C9–C10 double bond. OsDWARF27 did not introduce a 9-cis-double bond in 13-cis- or 15-cis-β-carotene. Substrates isomerized by OsDWARF27 are bicyclic carotenoids, including β-, α-carotene and β,β-cryptoxanthin, that contain at least one unsubstituted β-ionone ring. Accordingly, OsDWARF27 did not produce the abscisic acid precursors 9-cis-violaxanthin or -neoxanthin from the corresponding all-trans-isomers, excluding a direct role in the formation of this carotenoid derived hormone. The conversion of all-trans-α-carotene yielded two different isomers, including 9′-cis-α-carotene that might be the precursor of strigolactones with an ε-ionone ring, such as the recently identified heliolactone. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  5. Enzyme catalysis: a new definition accounting for noncovalent substrate- and product-like states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purich, D L

    2001-07-01

    Biological catalysis frequently causes changes in noncovalent bonding. By building on Pauling's assertion that any long-lived, chemically distinct interaction is a chemical bond, this article redefines enzyme catalysis as the facilitated making and/or breaking of chemical bonds, not just of covalent bonds. It is also argued that nearly every ATPase or GTPase is misnamed as a hydrolase and actually belongs to a distinct class of enzymes, termed here 'energases'. By transducing covalent bond energy into mechanical work, energases mediate such fundamental processes as protein folding, self-assembly, G-protein interactions, DNA replication, chromatin remodeling and even active transport.

  6. The enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic substrates by the addition of accessory enzymes such as xylanase: is it an additive or synergistic effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddler Jack N

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We and other workers have shown that accessory enzymes, such as β-glucosidase, xylanase, and cellulase cofactors, such as GH61, can considerably enhance the hydrolysis effectiveness of cellulase cocktails when added to pretreated lignocellulosic substrates. It is generally acknowledged that, among the several factors that hamper our current ability to attain efficient lignocellulosic biomass conversion yields at low enzyme loadings, a major problem lies in our incomplete understanding of the cooperative action of the different enzymes acting on pretreated lignocellulosic substrates. Results The reported work assessed the interaction between cellulase and xylanase enzymes and their potential to improve the hydrolysis efficiency of various pretreated lignocellulosic substrates when added at low protein loadings. When xylanases were added to the minimum amount of cellulase enzymes required to achieve 70% cellulose hydrolysis of steam pretreated corn stover (SPCS, or used to partially replace the equivalent cellulase dose, both approaches resulted in enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis. However, the xylanase supplementation approach increased the total protein loading required to achieve significant improvements in hydrolysis (an additive effect, whereas the partial replacement of cellulases with xylanase resulted in similar improvements in hydrolysis without increasing enzyme loading (a synergistic effect. The enhancement resulting from xylanase-aided synergism was higher when enzymes were added simultaneously at the beginning of hydrolysis. This co-hydrolysis of the xylan also influenced the gross fiber characteristics (for example, fiber swelling resulting in increased accessibility of the cellulose to the cellulase enzymes. These apparent increases in accessibility enhanced the steam pretreated corn stover digestibility, resulting in three times faster cellulose and xylan hydrolysis, a seven-fold decrease in cellulase loading and

  7. Plant cell-wall hydrolyzing enzymes from indigenously isolated fungi grown on conventional and novel natural substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, D.; Sohail, M.; Jahangeer, S.; Abideen, Z.; Khan, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Fungi elaborate a variety of plant-hydrolyzing enzymes including cellulases, xylanases, pectinases and amylases. Although these enzymes have potential biotechnological applications, their production at industrial level is limited because of higher costs of the purified substrates. Hence, the present study was aimed to explore the novel, natural and cheaper substrates for enzyme production. Indigenously isolated fungal strains of Aspergillus sp. were grown on banana-peels, grapefruit-peels, pomegranate-peels, sugarcane bagasse, Eucalyptus camaldulensis-leaves and shoots of two halophytic plants including Halopyrum mucronatum and Desmostachya bipinnata under solid-state fermentation (SSF) and submerged fermentation (Smf) conditions. The crude enzyme preparation was screened for cellulase (endoglucanase, beta-glucosidase and filter-paperase), hemicellulase (xylanase), pectinase and amylase production. The results revealed that among all investigated enzymes, the xylanase titers were highest using D. bipinnata- shoots and H. mucronatum- shoots as substrates under solid state fermentation conditions, suggesting their exploitation at commercial scale. (author)

  8. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  9. Phosphorylated alpha(1 leads to 4) glucans as substrate for potato starch-branching enzyme I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikso-Nielsen, A.; Blennow, A.; Nielsen, T.H.; Moller, B.L.

    1998-01-01

    The possible involvement of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) starch-branching enzyme I (PSBE-I) in the in vivo synthesis of phosphorylated amylopectin was investigated in in vitro experiments with isolated PSBE-I using 33P-labeled phosphorylated and 3H end-labeled nonphosphorylated alpha(1 leads to 4) glucans as the substrates. From these radiolabeled substrates PSBE-I was shown to catalyze the formation of dual-labeled (3H/33P) phosphorylated branched polysaccharides with an average degree of polymerization of 80 to 85. The relatively high molecular mass indicated that the product was the result of multiple chain-transfer reactions. The presence of alpha(1 leads to 6) branch points was documented by isoamylase treatment and anion-exchange chromatography. Although the initial steps of the in vivo mechanism responsible for phosphorylation of potato starch remains elusive, the present study demonstrates that the enzyme machinery available in potato has the ability to incorporate phosphorylated alpha(1 leads to 4) glucans into neutral polysaccharides in an interchain catalytic reaction. Potato mini tubers synthesized phosphorylated starch from exogenously supplied 33PO4(3-) and [U-14C]Glc at rates 4 times higher than those previously obtained using tubers from fully grown potato plants. This system was more reproducible compared with soil-grown tubers and was therefore used for preparation of 33P-labeled phosphorylated alpha(1 leads to 4) glucan chains

  10. Roles of multiple surface sites, long substrate binding clefts, and carbohydrate binding modules in the action of amylolytic enzymes on polysaccharide substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Munch; Seo, E.S.; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2008-01-01

    Germinating barley seeds contain multiple forms of alpha-amylase, which are subject to both differential gene expression and differential degradation as part of the repertoire of starch-degrading enzymes. The alpha-amylases are endo-acting and possess a long substrate binding cleft with a charact......Germinating barley seeds contain multiple forms of alpha-amylase, which are subject to both differential gene expression and differential degradation as part of the repertoire of starch-degrading enzymes. The alpha-amylases are endo-acting and possess a long substrate binding cleft...... will address surface sites in both barley alpha-amylase 1 and in the related isozyme 2....

  11. A homogeneous assay principle for universal substrate quantification via hydrogen peroxide producing enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zscharnack, Kristin; Kreisig, Thomas; Prasse, Agneta A.; Zuchner, Thole

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Application of the TRF-based PATb system for universal oxidase substrate detection. • H 2 O 2 generated by choline or glucose oxidase quenches the TRF signal of PATb. • The assay time is only limited by the oxidase catalysis rate. • Glucose is precisely detected in human serum consistent to a commercial assay. • A reliable quantification of choline in infant formula is shown. - Abstract: H 2 O 2 is a widely occurring molecule which is also a byproduct of a number of enzymatic reactions. It can therefore be used to quantify the corresponding enzymatic substrates. In this study, the time-resolved fluorescence emission of a previously described complex consisting of phthalic acid and terbium (III) ions (PATb) is used for H 2 O 2 detection. In detail, glucose oxidase and choline oxidase convert glucose and choline, respectively, to generate H 2 O 2 which acts as a quencher for the PATb complex. The response time of the PATb complex toward H 2 O 2 is immediate and the assay time only depends on the conversion rate of the enzymes involved. The PATb assay quantifies glucose in a linear range of 0.02–10 mmol L −1 , and choline from 1.56 to 100 μmol L −1 with a detection limit of 20 μmol L −1 for glucose and 1.56 μmol L −1 for choline. Both biomolecules glucose and choline could be detected without pretreatment with good precision and reproducibility in human serum samples and infant formula, respectively. Furthermore, it is shown that the detected glucose concentrations by the PATb system agree with the results of a commercially available assay. In principle, the PATb system is a universal and versatile tool for the quantification of any substrate and enzyme reaction where H 2 O 2 is involved

  12. Pyrimidine nucleoside analogues, potential chemotherapeutic agents, and substrates/inhibitors in various enzyme systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikowski, T.; Bretner, M.; Felczak, K.; Drabikowska, A.; Shugar, D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text. Pyrimidine nucleoside analogues are an important class of compounds with antimetabolic (antitumor, antiparasitic and antiviral) properties. The synthesis of thiated nucleoside and nucleotide analogues, determination of structures, conformation and dissociation constans, their potential chemotherapeutic activities, and their substrate/inhibitor properties in various enzyme systems, with emphasis on enzymes related to chemotherapeutic activities, were investigated. In the series of thionated inhibitors of thymidylate synthase (TS), potential antitumor agents, regioselective syntheses were elaborated for 2- and 4-thio, and 2,4-dithio derivatives of 2'-deoxyuridine (dUrd), 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FdUrd), and several other 5-fluoro-, 5-bromo- and 5-trifluoromethyl congeners, and the 2-thio derivatives of FdUrd and its α-anomer, which proved to be selective agents with high cytotoxicities correlated with the inhibitory activities vs TS of their corresponding 5'-monophosphates. Regioslective syntheses were also elaborated for 2'-deoxycytidin e and 5-fluoro-2'-deoxycitidine derivatives. Solution conformation of these nucleosides were deduced from high-resolution (500 MHz) 1 H NMR spectra. Substrate/inhibitor properties of 2-thio-2'-deoxycitidine (S 2 dCyd) and 5-fluoro-2-thio-2'-deoxycitidine ( S 2 FdCyd) with respect to human leukemic spleen deoxycytidine kinase have been examined. Both are substrates, and also good inhibitors, of phosphorylation of 2'-deoxycitidine and 2'-deoxyadenosine. Particular attention was directed to the specificity of t he NTP phosphate donor for several nucleoside kinases, and procedures have been developed for distinguishing between ATP and other NTP donors, a problem of importance in chemotherapy with nucleoside analogues. Biological properties of the newly synthetize d thiated pyrimidine 2',3'-dideoxy-3'-fluoronucleosides, S 2 ,3'-FddUrd and S 2 ,3'-FddThd, were also investigated. Thiated 3'-fluoronucleosides were moderate

  13. The fungal cultivar of leaf-cutter ants produces specific enzymes in response to different plant substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khadempour, Lily [Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA; Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA; Department of Energy Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Baker, Erin S. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Nicora, Carrie D. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; White, Richard A. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Monroe, Matthew E. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Huang, Eric L. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Smith, Richard D. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Currie, Cameron R. [Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA; Department of Energy Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA

    2016-10-26

    Herbivores use symbiotic microbes to help gain access to energy and nutrients from plant material. Leaf-cutter ants are a paradigmatic example, having tremendous impact on their ecosystems as dominant generalist herbivores through cultivation of a fungus, Leucoagaricus gongylophorous. Here we examine how this mutualism could facilitate the flexible substrate incorporation of the ants by providing leaf-cutter ant subcolonies four substrate types: leaves, flowers, oats, and a mixture of all three. Through metaproteomic analysis of the fungus gardens, we were able to identify and quantify 1766 different fungal proteins, including 161 biomass-degrading enzymes. This analysis revealed that fungal protein profiles were significantly different between subcolonies fed different substrates with the highest abundance of cellulolytic enzymes observed in the leaf and flower treatments. When the fungus garden is provided with leaves and flowers, which contain the majority of their energy in recalcitrant material, it increases its production of proteins that break down cellulose: endoglucanases, exoglucanase and β-glucosidase. Further, the complete metaproteomes for the leaves and flowers treatments were very similar, the mixed treatment closely resembled the treatment with oats alone. This suggests that when provided a mixture of substrates, the fungus garden preferentially produces enzymes necessary for breakdown of simpler, more digestible substrates. This flexible, substrate-specific response of the fungal cultivar allows the leaf-cutter ants to derive energy from a wide range of substrates, which may contribute to their ability to be dominant generalist herbivores.

  14. A homogeneous assay principle for universal substrate quantification via hydrogen peroxide producing enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zscharnack, Kristin; Kreisig, Thomas; Prasse, Agneta A. [Institute of Bioanalytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry and Mineralogy, Universität Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Zuchner, Thole, E-mail: Thole.Zuechner@octapharma.com [Institute of Bioanalytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry and Mineralogy, Universität Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Center for Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Universität Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-01-07

    Highlights: • Application of the TRF-based PATb system for universal oxidase substrate detection. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by choline or glucose oxidase quenches the TRF signal of PATb. • The assay time is only limited by the oxidase catalysis rate. • Glucose is precisely detected in human serum consistent to a commercial assay. • A reliable quantification of choline in infant formula is shown. - Abstract: H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is a widely occurring molecule which is also a byproduct of a number of enzymatic reactions. It can therefore be used to quantify the corresponding enzymatic substrates. In this study, the time-resolved fluorescence emission of a previously described complex consisting of phthalic acid and terbium (III) ions (PATb) is used for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} detection. In detail, glucose oxidase and choline oxidase convert glucose and choline, respectively, to generate H{sub 2}O{sub 2} which acts as a quencher for the PATb complex. The response time of the PATb complex toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is immediate and the assay time only depends on the conversion rate of the enzymes involved. The PATb assay quantifies glucose in a linear range of 0.02–10 mmol L{sup −1}, and choline from 1.56 to 100 μmol L{sup −1} with a detection limit of 20 μmol L{sup −1} for glucose and 1.56 μmol L{sup −1} for choline. Both biomolecules glucose and choline could be detected without pretreatment with good precision and reproducibility in human serum samples and infant formula, respectively. Furthermore, it is shown that the detected glucose concentrations by the PATb system agree with the results of a commercially available assay. In principle, the PATb system is a universal and versatile tool for the quantification of any substrate and enzyme reaction where H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is involved.

  15. Molecular dynamics investigations of regioselectivity of anionic/aromatic substrates by a family of enzymes: a case study of diclofenac binding in CYP2C isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying-Lu; Xu, Fang; Wu, Rongling

    2016-06-29

    The CYP2C subfamily is of particular importance in the metabolism of drugs, food toxins, and procarcinogens. Like other P450 subfamilies, 2C enzymes share a high sequence identity, but significantly contribute in different ways to hepatic capacity to metabolize drugs. They often metabolize the same substrate to more than one product with different catalytic sites. Because it is challenging to characterize experimentally, much still remains unknown about the reason for why the substrate regioselectivity of these closely related subfamily members is different. Here, we have investigated the structural features of CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 bound with their shared substrate diclofenac to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism for the substrate regioselectivity of CYP2C subfamily enzymes. The obtained results demonstrate how a sequence divergence for the active site residues causes heterogeneous variations in the secondary structures and in major tunnel selections, and further affects the shape and chemical properties of the substrate-binding site. Structural analysis and free energy calculations showed that the most important determinants of regioselectivity among the CYP2C isoforms are the geometrical features of the active sites, as well as the hydrogen bonds and the hydrophobic interactions, mainly presenting as the various locations of Arg108 and substitutions of Phe205 for Ile205 in CYP2C8. The MM-GB/SA calculations combined with PMF results accord well with the experimental KM values, bridging the gap between the theory and the experimentally observed results of binding affinity differences. The present study provides important insights into the structure-function relationships of CYP2C subfamily enzymes, the knowledge of ligand binding characteristics and key residue contributions could guide future experimental and computational work on the synthesis of drugs with better pharmacokinetic properties so that CYP interactions could be avoided.

  16. Rapid shifts in Atta cephalotes fungus-garden enzyme activity after a change in fungal substrate (Attini, Formicidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooij, P W; Schiøtt, M; Boomsma, J J

    2011-01-01

    Fungus gardens of the basidiomycete Leucocoprinus gongylophorus sustain large colonies of leaf-cutting ants by degrading the plant material collected by the ants. Recent studies have shown that enzyme activity in these gardens is primarily targeted toward starch, proteins and the pectin matrix......, we measured the changes in enzyme activity after a controlled shift in fungal substrate offered to six laboratory colonies of Atta cephalotes. An ant diet consisting exclusively of grains of parboiled rice rapidly increased the activity of endo-proteinases and some of the pectinases attacking...... from the rice diet, relative to the leaf diet controls. Enzyme activity in the older, bottom sections of fungus gardens decreased, indicating a faster processing of the rice substrate compared to the leaf diet. These results suggest that leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens can rapidly adjust enzyme...

  17. Combining Solvent Isotope Effects with Substrate Isotope Effects in Mechanistic Studies of Alcohol and Amine Oxidation by Enzymes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin-and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. PMID:25448013

  18. Purifying capability, enzyme activity, and nitrification potentials in December in integrated vertical flow constructed wetland with earthworms and different substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Defu; Gu, Jiaru; Li, Yingxue; Zhang, Yu; Howard, Alan; Guan, Yidong; Li, Jiuhai; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The response of purifying capability, enzyme activity, nitrification potentials, and total number of bacteria in the rhizosphere in December to wetland plants, substrates, and earthworms was investigated in integrated vertical flow constructed wetlands (IVFCW). The removal efficiency of total nitrogen (TN), NH4-N, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total phosphorus (TP) was increased when earthworms were added into IVFCW. A significantly average removal efficiency of N in IVFCW that employed river sand as substrate and in IVFCW that employed a mixture of river sand and Qing sand as substrate was not found. However, the average removal efficiency of P was higher in IVFCW with a mixture of river sand and Qing sand as substrate than in IVFCW with river sand as substrate. Invertase activity in December was higher in IVFCW that used a mixture of river sand and Qing sand as substrate than in IVFCW which used only river sand as substrate. However, urease activity, nitrification potential, and total number of bacteria in December was higher in IVFCW that employed river sand as substrate than in IVFCW with a mixture of river sand and Qing sand as substrate. The addition of earthworms into the integrated vertical flow constructed wetland increased the above-ground biomass, enzyme activity (catalase, urease, and invertase), nitrification potentials, and total number of bacteria in December. The above-ground biomass of wetland plants was significantly positively correlated with urease and nitrification potentials (p earthworms into IVFCW increased enzyme activity and nitrification potentials in December, which resulted in improving purifying capability.

  19. Solution of non-steady-state substrate concentration in the action of biosensor response at mixed enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthamarai, R.; Jana Ranjani, R.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model of an amperometric biosensor at mixed enzyme kinetics and diffusion limitation in the case of substrate inhibition has been developed. The model is based on time dependent reaction diffusion equation containing a non -linear term related to non -Michaelis - Menten kinetics of the enzymatic reaction. Solution for the concentration of the substrate has been derived for all values of parameters using the homotopy perturbation method. All the approximate analytic expressions of substrate concentration are compared with simulation results using Scilab/Matlab program. Finally, we have given a satisfactory agreement between them.

  20. Reconstructed ancestral enzymes reveal that negative selection drove the evolution of substrate specificity in ADP-dependent kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Fernandez, Víctor; Herrera-Morande, Alejandra; Zamora, Ricardo; Merino, Felipe; Gonzalez-Ordenes, Felipe; Padilla-Salinas, Felipe; Pereira, Humberto M; Brandão-Neto, Jose; Garratt, Richard C; Guixe, Victoria

    2017-09-22

    One central goal in molecular evolution is to pinpoint the mechanisms and evolutionary forces that cause an enzyme to change its substrate specificity; however, these processes remain largely unexplored. Using the glycolytic ADP-dependent kinases of archaea, including the orders Thermococcales , Methanosarcinales , and Methanococcales , as a model and employing an approach involving paleoenzymology, evolutionary statistics, and protein structural analysis, we could track changes in substrate specificity during ADP-dependent kinase evolution along with the structural determinants of these changes. To do so, we studied five key resurrected ancestral enzymes as well as their extant counterparts. We found that a major shift in function from a bifunctional ancestor that could phosphorylate either glucose or fructose 6-phosphate (fructose-6-P) as a substrate to a fructose 6-P-specific enzyme was started by a single amino acid substitution resulting in negative selection with a ground-state mode against glucose and a subsequent 1,600-fold change in specificity of the ancestral protein. This change rendered the residual phosphorylation of glucose a promiscuous and physiologically irrelevant activity, highlighting how promiscuity may be an evolutionary vestige of ancestral enzyme activities, which have been eliminated over time. We also could reconstruct the evolutionary history of substrate utilization by using an evolutionary model of discrete binary characters, indicating that substrate uses can be discretely lost or acquired during enzyme evolution. These findings exemplify how negative selection and subtle enzyme changes can lead to major evolutionary shifts in function, which can subsequently generate important adaptive advantages, for example, in improving glycolytic efficiency in Thermococcales . © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Substrate reduction augments the efficacy of enzyme therapy in a mouse model of Fabry disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Marshall

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked glycosphingolipid storage disorder caused by a deficiency in the activity of the lysosomal hydrolase α-galactosidase A (α-gal. This deficiency results in accumulation of the glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (GL-3 in lysosomes. Endothelial cell storage of GL-3 frequently leads to kidney dysfunction, cardiac and cerebrovascular disease. The current treatment for Fabry disease is through infusions of recombinant α-gal (enzyme-replacement therapy; ERT. Although ERT can markedly reduce the lysosomal burden of GL-3 in endothelial cells, variability is seen in the clearance from several other cell types. This suggests that alternative and adjuvant therapies may be desirable. Use of glucosylceramide synthase inhibitors to abate the biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids (substrate reduction therapy, SRT has been shown to be effective at reducing substrate levels in the related glycosphingolipidosis, Gaucher disease. Here, we show that such an inhibitor (eliglustat tartrate, Genz-112638 was effective at lowering GL-3 accumulation in a mouse model of Fabry disease. Relative efficacy of SRT and ERT at reducing GL-3 levels in Fabry mouse tissues differed with SRT being more effective in the kidney, and ERT more efficacious in the heart and liver. Combination therapy with ERT and SRT provided the most complete clearance of GL-3 from all the tissues. Furthermore, treatment normalized urine volume and uromodulin levels and significantly delayed the loss of a nociceptive response. The differential efficacies of SRT and ERT in the different tissues indicate that the combination approach is both additive and complementary suggesting the possibility of an improved therapeutic paradigm in the management of Fabry disease.

  2. An enzyme-assisted electrochemiluminescent biosensor developed on order mesoporous carbons substrate for ultrasensitive glyphosate sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qingrong; Xu, Guifang; Gong, Lingshan; Dai, Hong; Zhang, Shupei; Li, Yilin; Lin, Yanyu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a strategy of developing a late-model and sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for glyphosate detection based on enzyme-assisted in situ generation of ZnS quantum dots (QDs) on ordered mesoporous carbons (OMC) substrate was proposed. OMC, as a typically ordered mesoporous carbon material, not only provides a protective microenvironment for enzyme to retain its structure and activity but also has a synergistic effect with chitosan for the absorption of Zn 2+ ions by virtue of its high surface area and high pore volume and thus employed as the matrix of proposed biosensor. Then horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was introduced to expedite the generation of ZnS QDs via accelerating the reduction of Na 2 S 2 O 3 with H 2 O 2 to yield H 2 S that reacted with Zn 2+ ions. Glyphosate, as a kind of organic pesticide with amine, carboxyl and phosphonate group which would coordinate strongly to metal ions, possessed the potential to inhibited the activity of HRP, because HRP contain iron (III) protoporphyrin IX (ferriprotoporphyrin IX) as the prosthetic group which would react with the amine, carboxyl and phosphonate group of glyphosate. Accordingly, the proposed ECL QDs biosensor was employed to determine the Gly and shown a wide linear range from 0.1 nM to 10 mM with excellent sensitivity, reproducibility and selectivity. Further, the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) and the Michaelis–Menten constant were studied, and all the results indicated that the proposed strategy is practicable and provide a new opportunity to develop novel ECL sensing platforms in various applications.

  3. Manipulating molecule-substrate exchange interactions via graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandary, Sumanta; Eriksson, Olle; Sanyal, Biplab

    2013-03-01

    Organometallic molecules with a 3d metal center carrying a spin offers many interesting properties, e.g., existence of multiple spin states. A recent interest has been in understanding the magnetic exchange interaction between these organometallic molecules and magnetic substrates both from experiments and theory. In this work, we will show by calculations based on density functional theory how the exchange interaction is mediated via graphene in a geometry containing iron porphyrin(FeP)/graphene/Ni(111). The exchange interaction varies from a ferromagnetic to an antiferromagnetic one depending on the lattice site and type of defect in the graphene lattice along with the switching of spin state of Fe in FeP between S=1 and S=2, which should be detectable by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments. This scenario of complex magnetic couplings with large magnetic moments may offer a unique spintronic logic device. We acknowledge financial support from the Swedish Research Council, KAW foundation and the ERC(project 247062 - ASD).

  4. Determination of the Influence of Substrate Concentration on Enzyme Selectivity Using Whey Protein Isolate and Bacillus licheniformis Protease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butré, C.I.; Sforza, S.; Gruppen, H.; Wierenga, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing substrate concentration during enzymatic protein hydrolysis results in a decrease in hydrolysis rate. To test if changes in the mechanism of hydrolysis also occur, the enzyme selectivity was determined. The selectivity is defined quantitatively as the relative rate of hydrolysis of each

  5. Nitrilase enzymes and their role in plant–microbe interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, Andrew J. M.; Preston, Gail M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Nitrilase enzymes (nitrilases) catalyse the hydrolysis of nitrile compounds to the corresponding carboxylic acid and ammonia, and have a wide range of industrial and biotechnological applications, including the synthesis of industrially important carboxylic acids and bioremediation of cyanide and toxic nitriles. Nitrilases are produced by a wide range of organisms, including plants, bacteria and fungi, but despite their biotechnological importance, the role of these enzymes in living organisms is relatively underexplored. Current research suggests that nitrilases play important roles in a range of biological processes. In the context of plant–microbe interactions they may have roles in hormone synthesis, nutrient assimilation and detoxification of exogenous and endogenous nitriles. Nitrilases are produced by both plant pathogenic and plant growth‐promoting microorganisms, and their activities may have a significant impact on the outcome of plant–microbe interactions. In this paper we review current knowledge of the role of nitriles and nitrilases in plants and plant‐associated microorganisms, and discuss how greater understanding of the natural functions of nitrilases could be applied to benefit both industry and agriculture. PMID:21255276

  6. Nitrilase enzymes and their role in plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, Andrew J M; Preston, Gail M

    2009-07-01

    Nitrilase enzymes (nitrilases) catalyse the hydrolysis of nitrile compounds to the corresponding carboxylic acid and ammonia, and have a wide range of industrial and biotechnological applications, including the synthesis of industrially important carboxylic acids and bioremediation of cyanide and toxic nitriles. Nitrilases are produced by a wide range of organisms, including plants, bacteria and fungi, but despite their biotechnological importance, the role of these enzymes in living organisms is relatively underexplored. Current research suggests that nitrilases play important roles in a range of biological processes. In the context of plant-microbe interactions they may have roles in hormone synthesis, nutrient assimilation and detoxification of exogenous and endogenous nitriles. Nitrilases are produced by both plant pathogenic and plant growth-promoting microorganisms, and their activities may have a significant impact on the outcome of plant-microbe interactions. In this paper we review current knowledge of the role of nitriles and nitrilases in plants and plant-associated microorganisms, and discuss how greater understanding of the natural functions of nitrilases could be applied to benefit both industry and agriculture. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Bacillus subtilis BY-kinase PtkA controls enzyme activity and localization of its protein substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jers, Carsten; Pedersen, Malene Mejer; Paspaliari, Dafni Katerina

    2010-01-01

    -phosphorylated proteins in B. subtilis. We found that the majority of these proteins could be phosphorylated by PtkA in vitro. Among these new substrates, single-stranded DNA exonuclease YorK, and aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase Asd were activated by PtkA-dependent phosphorylation. Because enzyme activity......A was dramatically altered in Delta ptkA background. Our results confirm that PtkA can control enzyme activity of its substrates in some cases, but also reveal a new mode of action for PtkA, namely ensuring correct cellular localization of its targets.......P>Bacillus subtilis BY-kinase PtkA was previously shown to phosphorylate, and thereby regulate the activity of two classes of protein substrates: UDP-glucose dehydrogenases and single-stranded DNA-binding proteins. Our recent phosphoproteome study identified nine new tyrosine...

  8. Improving simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation of pretreated wheat straw using both enzyme and substrate feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmqvist Benny

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF has been recognized as a feasible option for ethanol production from xylose-rich lignocellulosic materials. To reach high ethanol concentration in the broth, a high content of water-insoluble solids (WIS is needed, which creates mixing problems and, furthermore, may decrease xylose uptake. Feeding of substrate has already been proven to give a higher xylose conversion than a batch SSCF. In the current work, enzyme feeding, in addition to substrate feeding, was investigated as a means of enabling a higher WIS content with a high xylose conversion in SSCF of a xylose-rich material. A recombinant xylose-fermenting strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (TMB3400 was used for this purpose in fed-batch SSCF experiments of steam-pretreated wheat straw. Results By using both enzyme and substrate feeding, the xylose conversion in SSCF could be increased from 40% to 50% in comparison to substrate feeding only. In addition, by this design of the feeding strategy, it was possible to process a WIS content corresponding to 11% in SSCF and obtain an ethanol yield on fermentable sugars of 0.35 g g-1. Conclusion A combination of enzyme and substrate feeding was shown to enhance xylose uptake by yeast and increase overall ethanol yield in SSCF. This is conceptually important for the design of novel SSCF processes aiming at high-ethanol titers. Substrate feeding prevents viscosity from becoming too high and thereby allows a higher total amount of WIS to be added in the process. The enzyme feeding, furthermore, enables keeping the glucose concentration low, which kinetically favors xylose uptake and results in a higher xylose conversion.

  9. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  10. Cellulolytic Enzymes Production via Solid-State Fermentation: Effect of Pretreatment Methods on Physicochemical Characteristics of Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushal Brijwani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of pretreatment on the physicochemical characteristics—crystallinity, bed porosity, and volumetric specific surface of soybean hulls and production of cellulolytic enzymes in solid-state fermentation of Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus oryzae cultures. Mild acid and alkali and steam pretreatments significantly increased crystallinity and bed porosity without significant change inholocellulosic composition of substrate. Crystalline and porous steam-pretreated soybean hulls inoculated with T. reesei culture had 4 filter paper units (FPU/g-ds, 0.6 IU/g-ds β-glucosidase, and 45 IU/g-ds endocellulase, whereas untreated hulls had 0.75 FPU/g-ds, 0.06 IU/g-ds β-glucosidase, and 7.29 IU/g-ds endocellulase enzyme activities. In A. oryzae steam-pretreated soybean hulls had 47.10 IU/g-ds endocellulase compared to 30.82 IU/g-ds in untreated soybean hulls. Generalized linear statistical model fitted to enzyme activity data showed that effects of physicochemical characteristics on enzymes production were both culture and enzyme specific. The paper shows a correlation between substrate physicochemical properties and enzyme production.

  11. Cellulolytic Enzymes Production via Solid-State Fermentation: Effect of Pretreatment Methods on Physicochemical Characteristics of Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brijwani, Khushal; Vadlani, Praveen V

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effect of pretreatment on the physicochemical characteristics-crystallinity, bed porosity, and volumetric specific surface of soybean hulls and production of cellulolytic enzymes in solid-state fermentation of Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus oryzae cultures. Mild acid and alkali and steam pretreatments significantly increased crystallinity and bed porosity without significant change inholocellulosic composition of substrate. Crystalline and porous steam-pretreated soybean hulls inoculated with T. reesei culture had 4 filter paper units (FPU)/g-ds, 0.6 IU/g-ds β-glucosidase, and 45 IU/g-ds endocellulase, whereas untreated hulls had 0.75 FPU/g-ds, 0.06 IU/g-ds β-glucosidase, and 7.29 IU/g-ds endocellulase enzyme activities. In A. oryzae steam-pretreated soybean hulls had 47.10 IU/g-ds endocellulase compared to 30.82 IU/g-ds in untreated soybean hulls. Generalized linear statistical model fitted to enzyme activity data showed that effects of physicochemical characteristics on enzymes production were both culture and enzyme specific. The paper shows a correlation between substrate physicochemical properties and enzyme production.

  12. Insights into the Mechanism of Deubiquitination by JAMM Deubiquitinases from Cocrystal Structures of the Enzyme with the Substrate and Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    AMSH, a conserved zinc metallo deubiquitinase, controls downregulation and degradation of cell-surface receptors mediated by the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. It displays high specificity toward the Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chain, which is used as a signal for ESCRT-mediated endosomal–lysosomal sorting of receptors. Herein, we report the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of AMSH orthologue Sst2 from fission yeast, its ubiquitin (product)-bound form, and its Lys63-linked diubiquitin (substrate)-bound form at 1.45, 1.7, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The structures reveal that the P-side product fragment maintains nearly all the contacts with the enzyme as seen with the P portion (distal ubiquitin) of the Lys63-linked diubiquitin substrate, with additional coordination of the Gly76 carboxylate group of the product with the active-site Zn2+. One of the product-bound structures described herein is the result of an attempt to cocrystallize the diubiquitin substrate bound to an active site mutant presumed to render the enzyme inactive, instead yielding a cocrystal structure of the enzyme bound to the P-side ubiquitin fragment of the substrate (distal ubiquitin). This fragment was generated in situ from the residual activity of the mutant enzyme. In this structure, the catalytic water is seen placed between the active-site Zn2+ and the carboxylate group of Gly76 of ubiquitin, providing what appears to be a snapshot of the active site when the product is about to depart. Comparison of this structure with that of the substrate-bound form suggests the importance of dynamics of a flexible flap near the active site in catalysis. The crystal structure of the Thr319Ile mutant of the catalytic domain of Sst2 provides insight into structural basis of microcephaly capillary malformation syndrome. Isothermal titration calorimetry yields a dissociation constant (KD) of 10.2 ± 0.6 μM for the binding of ubiquitin to the enzyme, a value

  13. Real-time sensing of epithelial cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions by impedance spectroscopy on porous substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, D.; RoyChaudhuri, C., E-mail: chirosreepram@yahoo.com [Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Pal, D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)

    2015-07-28

    Oxidized porous silicon (PS) is a common topographical biocompatible substrate that potentially provides a distinct in vitro environment for better understanding of in vivo behavior. But in the reported studies on oxidized PS, cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions have been detected only by fluorescent labeling. This paper is the first attempt to investigate real-time sensing of these interactions on HaCaT cells by label-free impedance spectroscopy on oxidized PS of two pore diameters (50 and 500 nm). One of the major requirements for successful impedance spectroscopy measurement is to restrict the channeling of electric field lines through the pores. To satisfy this criterion, we have designed the pore depths after analyzing the penetration of the medium by using computational fluid dynamics simulation. A distributed electrical model was also developed for estimating the various cellular attributes by considering a pseudorandom distribution of pores. It is observed from the impedance measurements and from the model that the proliferation rate increases for 50 nm pores but decreases for 500 nm pores compared to that for planar substrates. The rate of decrease in cell substrate separation (h) in the initial stage is more than the rate of increase in cell-cell junction resistance (R{sub b}) corresponding to the initial adhesion phase of cells. It is observed that R{sub b} and h are higher for 50 nm pores than those for planar substrates, corresponding to the fact that substrates more conducive toward cell adhesion encourage cell-cell interactions than direct cell-substrate interactions. Thus, the impedance spectroscopy coupled with the proposed theoretical framework for PS substrates can sense and quantify the cellular interactions.

  14. Real-time sensing of epithelial cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions by impedance spectroscopy on porous substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, D.; RoyChaudhuri, C.; Pal, D.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized porous silicon (PS) is a common topographical biocompatible substrate that potentially provides a distinct in vitro environment for better understanding of in vivo behavior. But in the reported studies on oxidized PS, cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions have been detected only by fluorescent labeling. This paper is the first attempt to investigate real-time sensing of these interactions on HaCaT cells by label-free impedance spectroscopy on oxidized PS of two pore diameters (50 and 500 nm). One of the major requirements for successful impedance spectroscopy measurement is to restrict the channeling of electric field lines through the pores. To satisfy this criterion, we have designed the pore depths after analyzing the penetration of the medium by using computational fluid dynamics simulation. A distributed electrical model was also developed for estimating the various cellular attributes by considering a pseudorandom distribution of pores. It is observed from the impedance measurements and from the model that the proliferation rate increases for 50 nm pores but decreases for 500 nm pores compared to that for planar substrates. The rate of decrease in cell substrate separation (h) in the initial stage is more than the rate of increase in cell-cell junction resistance (R b ) corresponding to the initial adhesion phase of cells. It is observed that R b and h are higher for 50 nm pores than those for planar substrates, corresponding to the fact that substrates more conducive toward cell adhesion encourage cell-cell interactions than direct cell-substrate interactions. Thus, the impedance spectroscopy coupled with the proposed theoretical framework for PS substrates can sense and quantify the cellular interactions

  15. Interactions between Casein kinase Iepsilon (CKIepsilon and two substrates from disparate signaling pathways reveal mechanisms for substrate-kinase specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Lund Dahlberg

    Full Text Available Members of the Casein Kinase I (CKI family of serine/threonine kinases regulate diverse biological pathways. The seven mammalian CKI isoforms contain a highly conserved kinase domain and divergent amino- and carboxy-termini. Although they share a preferred target recognition sequence and have overlapping expression patterns, individual isoforms often have specific substrates. In an effort to determine how substrates recognize differences between CKI isoforms, we have examined the interaction between CKIepsilon and two substrates from different signaling pathways.CKIepsilon, but not CKIalpha, binds to and phosphorylates two proteins: Period, a transcriptional regulator of the circadian rhythms pathway, and Disheveled, an activator of the planar cell polarity pathway. We use GST-pull-down assays data to show that two key residues in CKIalpha's kinase domain prevent Disheveled and Period from binding. We also show that the unique C-terminus of CKIepsilon does not determine Dishevelled's and Period's preference for CKIepsilon nor is it essential for binding, but instead plays an auxillary role in stabilizing the interactions of CKIepsilon with its substrates. We demonstrate that autophosphorylation of CKIepsilon's C-terminal tail prevents substrate binding, and use mass spectrometry and chemical crosslinking to reveal how a phosphorylation-dependent interaction between the C-terminal tail and the kinase domain prevents substrate phosphorylation and binding.The biochemical interactions between CKIepsilon and Disheveled, Period, and its own C-terminus lead to models that explain CKIepsilon's specificity and regulation.

  16. The Post-polyketide Synthase Steps in iso-Migrastatin Biosynthesis Featuring Tailoring Enzymes with Broad Substrate Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; Kwong, Thomas; Lim, Si-Kyu; Ju, Jianhua; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Shen, Ben

    2013-01-01

    The iso-migrastatin (iso-MGS) biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces platensis NRRL 18993 consists of 11 genes, featuring an acyltransferase (AT)-less type I polyketide synthase (PKS) and three tailoring enzymes MgsIJK. Systematic inactivation of mgsIJK in S. platensis enabled us to (i) identify two nascent products (10 and 13) of the iso-MGS AT-less type I PKS, establishing an unprecedented novel feature for AT-less type I PKSs, and (ii) account for the formation of all known post-PKS biosynthetic intermediates (10-17) generated by the three tailoring enzymes MgsIJK, which possessed significant substrate promiscuities. PMID:23394593

  17. Molecular and structural insight into lysine selection on substrate and ubiquitin lysine 48 by the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suryadinata, Randy; Holien, Jessica K; Yang, George

    2013-01-01

    , the mechanisms of lysine selection are not clearly understood. The positioning of lysine(s) toward the E2/E3 active site and residues proximal to lysines are critical in their selection. We investigated determinants of lysine specificity of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, toward substrate and Ub lysines....... Evaluation of the relative importance of different residues positioned -2, -1, +1 and +2 toward ubiquitination of its substrate, Sic1, on lysine 50 showed that charged residues in the -1 and -2 positions negatively impact on ubiquitination. Modeling suggests that charged residues at these positions alter...... the native salt-bridge interactions in Ub and Cdc34, resulting in misplacement of Sic1 lysine 50 in the Cdc34 catalytic cleft. During polyubiquitination, Cdc34 showed a strong preference for Ub lysine 48 (K48), with lower activity towards lysine 11 (K11) and lysine 63 (K63). Mutating the -2, -1, +1 and +2...

  18. Enzyme Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  19. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 2: drugs interacting with enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 19 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease modifying drugs meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. This review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  20. Bioethanol in Biofuels Checked by an Amperometric Organic Phase Enzyme Electrode (OPEE Working in “Substrate Antagonism” Format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Tomassetti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The bioethanol content of two samples of biofuels was determined directly, after simple dilution in decane, by means of an amperometric catalase enzyme biosensor working in the organic phase, based on substrate antagonisms format. The results were good from the point of view of accuracy, and satisfactory for what concerns the recovery test by the standard addition method. Limit of detection (LOD was on the order of 2.5 × 10−5 M.

  1. Design of a single-step immunoassay principle based on the combination of an enzyme-labeled antibody release coating and a hydrogel copolymerized with a fluorescent enzyme substrate in a microfluidic capillary device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, Hideki; Henares, Terence G; Jigawa, Kaede; Funano, Shun-ichi; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Endo, Tatsuro; Hisamoto, Hideaki

    2013-11-21

    A combination of an enzyme-labeled antibody release coating and a novel fluorescent enzyme substrate-copolymerized hydrogel in a microchannel for a single-step, no-wash microfluidic immunoassay is demonstrated. This hydrogel discriminates the free enzyme-conjugated antibody from an antigen-enzyme-conjugated antibody immunocomplex based on the difference in molecular size. A selective and sensitive immunoassay, with 10-1000 ng mL(-1) linear range, is reported.

  2. Adhesive interactions of geckos with wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Dryden, Daniel M; Olderman, Jeffrey; Peterson, Kelly A; Niewiarowski, Peter H; French, Roger H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-07-06

    Fluorinated substrates like Teflon® (poly(tetrafluoroethylene); PTFE) are well known for their role in creating non-stick surfaces. We showed previously that even geckos, which can stick to most surfaces under a wide variety of conditions, slip on PTFE. Surprisingly, however, geckos can stick reasonably well to PTFE if it is wet. In an effort to explain this effect, we have turned our attention to the role of substrate surface energy and roughness when shear adhesion occurs in media other than air. In this study, we removed the roughness component inherent to commercially available PTFE and tested geckos on relatively smooth wet and dry fluoropolymer substrates. We found that roughness had very little effect on shear adhesion in air or in water and that the level of fluorination was most important for shear adhesion, particularly in air. Surface energy calculations of the two fluorinated substrates and one control substrate using the Tabor-Winterton approximation and the Young-Dupré equation were used to determine the interfacial energy of the substrates. Using these interfacial energies we estimated the ratio of wet and dry normal adhesion for geckos clinging to the three substrates. Consistent with the results for rough PTFE, our predictions show a qualitative trend in shear adhesion based on fluorination, and the quantitative experimental differences highlight the unusually low shear adhesion of geckos on dry smooth fluorinated substrates, which is not captured by surface energy calculations. Our work has implications for bioinspired design of synthetics that can preferentially stick in water but not in air.

  3. New reactions and products resulting from alternative interactions between the P450 enzyme and redox partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yi; Yan, Jinyong; Cao, Shaona; Bai, Fali; Yang, Ying; Huang, Shaohua; Yao, Lishan; Anzai, Yojiro; Kato, Fumio; Podust, Larissa M; Sherman, David H; Li, Shengying

    2014-03-05

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are capable of catalyzing a great variety of synthetically useful reactions such as selective C-H functionalization. Surrogate redox partners are widely used for reconstitution of P450 activity based on the assumption that the choice of these auxiliary proteins or their mode of action does not affect the type and selectivity of reactions catalyzed by P450s. Herein, we present an exceptional example to challenge this postulate. MycG, a multifunctional biosynthetic P450 monooxygenase responsible for hydroxylation and epoxidation of 16-membered ring macrolide mycinamicins, is shown to catalyze the unnatural N-demethylation(s) of a range of mycinamicin substrates when partnered with the free Rhodococcus reductase domain RhFRED or the engineered Rhodococcus-spinach hybrid reductase RhFRED-Fdx. By contrast, MycG fused with the RhFRED or RhFRED-Fdx reductase domain mediates only physiological oxidations. This finding highlights the larger potential role of variant redox partner protein-protein interactions in modulating the catalytic activity of P450 enzymes.

  4. Titanium diboride coatings and their interaction with the substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierson, H.O.; Randich, E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of titanium diboride (TiB 2 ) on metallic substrates, using the hydrogen reduction of TiCl 4 and BCl 3 at 1 atmosphere and at temperatures between 850 0 C and 1050 0 C is described. To be coated, the substrate had to meet the following requirements: (1) ability to withstand the deposition temperature without detrimental transformation, (2) chemical inertness to the by-products of the reaction (mostly HCl), (3) reasonable matching of its thermal expansion with that of TiB 2 . The latter requirement may be partially circumvented by using a ductile intermediate coating such as Cu or Ni. Substrates meeting these requirements were W, Ta, Ni, WC, TiC, Kovar and some high chrome steels. Coatings on these substrates were examined by metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe. The structures and the degree of interdiffusion were determined. In most cases, intermediate borides of the type M 3 B and M 2 B were formed. The hardness of the coatings was 3330 +- 310 kg/mm 2 (VHN 50 ). Coatings of TiB 2 have already been used successfully on letdown valves in a bench scale coal liquefaction reactor at Sandia Laboratories

  5. Enzyme-ligand interactions that drive active site rearrangements in the Helicobacter pylori 5´-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronning, Donald R; Iacopelli, Natalie M; Mishra, Vidhi [Toledo

    2012-03-15

    The bacterial enzyme 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) plays a central role in three essential metabolic pathways in bacteria: methionine salvage, purine salvage, and polyamine biosynthesis. Recently, its role in the pathway that leads to the production of autoinducer II, an important component in quorum-sensing, has garnered much interest. Because of this variety of roles, MTAN is an attractive target for developing new classes of inhibitors that influence bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. To gain insight toward the development of new classes of MTAN inhibitors, the interactions between the Helicobacter pylori-encoded MTAN and its substrates and substrate analogs were probed using X-ray crystallography. The structures of MTAN, an MTAN-Formycin A complex, and an adenine bound form were solved by molecular replacement and refined to 1.7, 1.8, and 1.6 Å, respectively. The ribose-binding site in the MTAN and MTAN-adenine cocrystal structures contain a tris[hydroxymethyl]aminomethane molecule that stabilizes the closed form of the enzyme and displaces a nucleophilic water molecule necessary for catalysis. This research gives insight to the interactions between MTAN and bound ligands that promote closing of the enzyme active site and highlights the potential for designing new classes of MTAN inhibitors using a link/grow or ligand assembly development strategy based on the described H. pylori MTAN crystal structures.

  6. Nitrilase enzymes and their role in plant–microbe interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Howden, Andrew J. M.; Preston, Gail M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Nitrilase enzymes (nitrilases) catalyse the hydrolysis of nitrile compounds to the corresponding carboxylic acid and ammonia, and have a wide range of industrial and biotechnological applications, including the synthesis of industrially important carboxylic acids and bioremediation of cyanide and toxic nitriles. Nitrilases are produced by a wide range of organisms, including plants, bacteria and fungi, but despite their biotechnological importance, the role of these enzymes in living ...

  7. Mixed-substrate (glycerol tributyrate and fibrin) zymography for simultaneous detection of lipolytic and proteolytic enzymes on a single gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nack-Shick; Choi, Jong Hyun; Kim, Bo-Hye; Han, Yun-Jon; Kim, Joong Su; Lee, Seung-Goo; Song, Jae Jun

    2009-06-01

    A new zymography method for simultaneous detection of two different enzymatic activities (lipolytic and proteolytic) using a single SDS-containing or native-conformation gel and a mixed-substrate (glycerol tributyrate and fibrin) (MS)(1) gel was developed. After routine electrophoresis, SDS in the gel was removed by treatment with Triton X-100. Gel proteins were electrotransferred to the MS gel. To visualize lipolytic activity, the MS gel was incubated at 37 degrees C (for 6 or 24 h) until clear bands against an opaque background were observed. To detect proteolytic activity, the same MS gel was stained with Coomassie brilliant blue. Using this method, we show that six lipolytic enzymes from Staphylococcus pasteuri NJ-1 and four proteolytic enzymes from two Bacillus strains, B. licheniformis DJ-2 and B. licheniformis NJ-5, isolated from soil, can be simultaneously detected.

  8. Structure formation in bis(terpyridine) derivative adlayers: molecule-substrate versus molecule-molecule interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoster, Harry E; Roos, Matthias; Breitruck, Achim; Meier, Christoph; Tonigold, Katrin; Waldmann, Thomas; Ziener, Ulrich; Landfester, Katharina; Behm, R Jürgen

    2007-11-06

    The influence of the substrate and the deposition conditions-vapor deposition versus deposition from solution-on the structures formed upon self-assembly of deposited bis(terpyridine) derivative (2,4'-BTP) monolayers on different hexagonal substrates, including highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), Au(111), and (111)-oriented Ag thin films, was investigated by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and by model calculations of the intermolecular energies and the lateral corrugation of the substrate-adsorbate interaction. Similar quasi-quadratic network structures with almost the same lattice constants obtained on all substrates are essentially identical to the optimum configuration expected from an optimization of the adlayer structure with C-H...N-type bridging bonds as a structure-determining factor, which underlines a key role of the intermolecular interactions in adlayer order. Slight distortions from the optimum values to form commensurate adlayer structures on the metal substrates and the preferential orientation of the adlayer with respect to the substrate are attributed to the substrate-adsorbate interactions, specifically, the lateral corrugation in the substrate-adsorbate interaction upon lateral displacement and rotation of the adsorbed BTP molecules. The fact that similar adlayer structures are obtained on HOPG under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (solid|gas interface) and on HOPG in trichlorobenzene (solid|liquid interface) indicates that the intermolecular interactions are not severely affected by the solvent.

  9. Interactions between Cellulolytic Enzymes with Native, Autohydrolysis, and Technical Lignins and the Effect of a Polysorbate Amphiphile in Reducing Nonproductive Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Consuelo; Ferrer, Ana; Salas, Carlos; Jameel, Hasan; Rojas, Orlando J

    2015-12-14

    Understanding enzyme-substrate interactions is critical in designing strategies for bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study we monitored molecular events, in situ and in real time, including the adsorption and desorption of cellulolytic enzymes on lignins and cellulose, by using quartz crystal microgravimetry and surface plasmon resonance. The effect of a nonionic surface active molecule was also elucidated. Three lignin substrates relevant to the sugar platform in biorefinery efforts were considered, namely, hardwood autohydrolysis cellulolytic (HWAH), hardwood native cellulolytic (MPCEL), and nonwood native cellulolytic (WSCEL) lignin. In addition, Kraft lignins derived from softwoods (SWK) and hardwoods (HWK) were used as references. The results indicated a high affinity between the lignins with both, monocomponent and multicomponent enzymes. More importantly, the addition of nonionic surfactants at concentrations above their critical micelle concentration reduced remarkably (by over 90%) the nonproductive interactions between the cellulolytic enzymes and the lignins. This effect was hypothesized to be a consequence of the balance of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions. Moreover, the reduction of surface roughness and increased wettability of lignin surfaces upon surfactant treatment contributed to a lower affinity with the enzymes. Conformational changes of cellulases were observed upon their adsorption on lignin carrying preadsorbed surfactant. Weak electrostatic interactions were determined in aqueous media at pH between 4.8 and 5.5 for the native cellulolytic lignins (MPCEL and WSCEL), whereby a ∼20% reduction in the enzyme affinity was observed. This was mainly explained by electrostatic interactions (osmotic pressure effects) between charged lignins and cellulases. Noteworthy, adsorption of nonionic surfactants onto cellulose, in the form cellulose nanofibrils, did not affect its hydrolytic conversion. Overall, our results

  10. The substrate oxidation mechanism of pyranose 2-oxidase and other related enzymes in the glucose-methanol-choline superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2013-07-01

    Enzymes in the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase superfamily catalyze the oxidation of an alcohol moiety to the corresponding aldehyde. In this review, the current understanding of the sugar oxidation mechanism in the reaction of pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O) is highlighted and compared with that of other enzymes in the GMC family for which structural and mechanistic information is available, including glucose oxidase, choline oxidase, cholesterol oxidase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, aryl-alcohol oxidase, and pyridoxine 4-oxidase. Other enzymes in the family that have been newly discovered or for which less information is available are also discussed. A large primary kinetic isotope effect was observed for the flavin reduction when 2-d-D-glucose was used as a substrate, but no solvent kinetic isotope effect was detected for the flavin reduction step. The reaction of P2O is consistent with a hydride transfer mechanism in which there is stepwise formation of d-glucose alkoxide prior to the hydride transfer. Site-directed mutagenesis of P2O and pH-dependence studies indicated that His548 is a catalytic base that facilitates the deprotonation of C2-OH in D-glucose. This finding agrees with the current mechanistic model for aryl-alcohol oxidase, glucose oxidase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, methanol oxidase, and pyridoxine 4-oxidase, but is different from that of cholesterol oxidase and choline oxidase. Although all of the GMC enzymes share similar structural folding and use the hydride transfer mechanism for flavin reduction, they appear to have subtle differences in the fine-tuned details of how they catalyze substrate oxidation. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  11. Substrate-HTcS thin film interaction studies by (S)TEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaekers, P.P.J.; Klepper, D.; Kitazawa, K.; Ishiguro, T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper concerns with compatibility aspects beween HTcS thin film either their substrates. The influence of substrate-thin film interaction and thin film microstructure on the superconducting properties is discussed. In this respect, data based on (S)TEM observations are presented. It is

  12. The mechanism distinguishability problem in biochemical kinetics: the single-enzyme, single-substrate reaction as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Santiago; Chappell, Michael J; Evans, Neil D; Roussel, Marc R

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the distinguishability problem of two rival models of the single enzyme-single substrate reaction, the Michaelis-Menten and Henri mechanisms, is presented. We also outline a general approach for analysing the structural indistinguishability between two mechanisms. The approach involves constructing, if possible, a smooth mapping between the two candidate models. Evans et al. [N.D. Evans, M.J. Chappell, M.J. Chapman, K.R. Godfrey, Structural indistinguishability between uncontrolled (autonomous) nonlinear analytic systems, Automatica 40 (2004) 1947-1953] have shown that if, in addition, either of the mechanisms satisfies a particular criterion then such a transformation always exists when the models are indistinguishable from their experimentally observable outputs. The approach is applied to the single enzyme-single substrate reaction mechanism. In principle, mechanisms can be distinguished using this analysis, but we show that our ability to distinguish mechanistic models depends both on the precise measurements made, and on our knowledge of the system prior to performing the kinetics experiments.

  13. Production of crude enzyme from Aspergillus nidulans AKB-25 using black gram residue as the substrate and its industrial applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The production of crop residues in India is estimated to be about 500–550 million tons annually. It is estimated that about 93 million tons of crop residues is burnt annually which is not only wastage of valuable biomass resources but pollution of the environment with the production of green house gases also. Among different low cost crop residues, black gram residue as the substrate produced maximal endoglucanase, FPase, and β-glucosidase activities from Aspergillus nidulans AKB-25 under solid-state fermentation. During optimisation of cultural parameters A. nidulans AKB-25 produced maximal endoglucanase (152.14 IU/gds, FPase (3.42 FPU/gds and xylanase (2441.03 IU/gds activities. The crude enzyme was found effective for the saccharification of pearl millet stover and bio-deinking of mixed office waste paper. The crude enzyme from A. nidulans AKB-25 produced maximum fermentable sugars of 546.91 mg/g from alkali-pretreated pearl millet stover by saccharification process at a dose of 15 FPU/g of substrate. Pulp brightness and deinking efficiency of mixed office waste paper improved by 4.6% and 25.01% respectively and mitigated dirt counts by 74.70% after bio-deinking. Physical strength properties like burst index, tensile index and double fold number were also improved during bio-deinking of mixed office waste paper.

  14. Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase enzyme assay using a BODIPY-labeled substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Li Zaiguo; Bittman, Robert; Saba, Julie D.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase (SPL) is responsible for the irreversible catabolism of sphingosine 1-phosphate, which signals through five membrane receptors to mediate cell stress responses, angiogenesis, and lymphocyte trafficking. The standard assay for SPL activity utilizes a radioactive dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate substrate and is expensive and cumbersome. In this study, we describe an SPL assay that employs an ω-labeled BODIPY-sphingosine 1-phosphate substrate, allowing fluorescent product detection by HPLC and incorporating advantages of the BODIPY fluorophore. The major aldehyde product is confirmed by reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. The SPL-catalyzed reaction is linear over a 30 min time period and yields a K m of 35 μM for BODIPY-sphingosine 1-phosphate.

  15. Structure of active IspH enzyme from escherichia coli provides mechanistic insights into substrate reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Gräwert, Tobias

    2009-07-20

    The terminal step of the non-mevalonate pathway of terpene biosynthesis is catalyzed by IspH (see scheme). In the crystal structure of IspH from E. coli, a bound inorganic diphosphate ligand occupies the position of the diphosphate residue of the substrate. Together with mutation studies and theoretical calculations, these data support a mechanism which is analogous to the Birch reduction of allylic alcohols. © 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  16. Novel substrate specificity of glutathione synthesis enzymes from Streptococcus agalactiae and Clostridium acetobutylicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kino, Kuniki; Kuratsu, Shoko; Noguchi, Atsushi; Kokubo, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Yuji; Arai, Toshinobu; Yagasaki, Makoto; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2007-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is synthesized by γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) and glutathione synthetase (GS) in living organisms. Recently, bifunctional fusion protein, termed γ-GCS-GS catalyzing both γ-GCS and GS reactions from gram-positive firmicutes Streptococcus agalactiae, has been reported. We revealed that in the γ-GCS activity, S. agalactiae γ-GCS-GS had different substrate specificities from those of Escherichia coli γ-GCS. Furthermore, S. agalactiae γ-GCS-GS synthesized several kinds of γ-glutamyltripeptide, γ-Glu-X aa -Gly, from free three amino acids. In Clostridium acetobutylicum, the genes encoding γ-GCS and putative GS were found to be immediately adjacent by BLAST search, and had amino acid sequence homology with S. agalactiae γ-GCS-GS, respectively. We confirmed that the proteins expressed from each gene showed γ-GCS and GS activity, respectively. C. acetobutylicum GS had broad substrate specificities and synthesized several kinds of γ-glutamyltripeptide, γ-Glu-Cys-X aa . Whereas the substrate specificities of γ-GCS domain protein and GS domain protein of S. agalactiae γ-GCS-GS were the same as those of S. agalactiae γ-GCS-GS

  17. Tracking dynamics of plant biomass composting by changes in substrate structure, microbial community, and enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hui

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the dynamics of the microbial communities that, along with their secreted enzymes, are involved in the natural process of biomass composting may hold the key to breaking the major bottleneck in biomass-to-biofuels conversion technology, which is the still-costly deconstruction of polymeric biomass carbohydrates to fermentable sugars. However, the complexity of both the structure of plant biomass and its counterpart microbial degradation communities makes it difficult to investigate the composting process. Results In this study, a composter was set up with a mix of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera wood-chips and mown lawn grass clippings (85:15 in dry-weight and used as a model system. The microbial rDNA abundance data obtained from analyzing weekly-withdrawn composted samples suggested population-shifts from bacteria-dominated to fungus-dominated communities. Further analyses by an array of optical microscopic, transcriptional and enzyme-activity techniques yielded correlated results, suggesting that such population shifts occurred along with early removal of hemicellulose followed by attack on the consequently uncovered cellulose as the composting progressed. Conclusion The observed shifts in dominance by representative microbial groups, along with the observed different patterns in the gene expression and enzymatic activities between cellulases, hemicellulases, and ligninases during the composting process, provide new perspectives for biomass-derived biotechnology such as consolidated bioprocessing (CBP and solid-state fermentation for the production of cellulolytic enzymes and biofuels.

  18. Tracking dynamics of plant biomass composting by changes in substrate structure, microbial community, and enzyme activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the dynamics of the microbial communities that, along with their secreted enzymes, are involved in the natural process of biomass composting may hold the key to breaking the major bottleneck in biomass-to-biofuels conversion technology, which is the still-costly deconstruction of polymeric biomass carbohydrates to fermentable sugars. However, the complexity of both the structure of plant biomass and its counterpart microbial degradation communities makes it difficult to investigate the composting process. Results In this study, a composter was set up with a mix of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) wood-chips and mown lawn grass clippings (85:15 in dry-weight) and used as a model system. The microbial rDNA abundance data obtained from analyzing weekly-withdrawn composted samples suggested population-shifts from bacteria-dominated to fungus-dominated communities. Further analyses by an array of optical microscopic, transcriptional and enzyme-activity techniques yielded correlated results, suggesting that such population shifts occurred along with early removal of hemicellulose followed by attack on the consequently uncovered cellulose as the composting progressed. Conclusion The observed shifts in dominance by representative microbial groups, along with the observed different patterns in the gene expression and enzymatic activities between cellulases, hemicellulases, and ligninases during the composting process, provide new perspectives for biomass-derived biotechnology such as consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) and solid-state fermentation for the production of cellulolytic enzymes and biofuels. PMID:22490508

  19. Kinetic analysis of enzyme systems with suicide substrate in the presence of a reversible competitive inhibitor, tested by simulated progress curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moruno-Dávila, M A; Garrido-del Solo, C; García-Moreno, M; Havsteen, B H; Garcia-Sevilla, F; Garcia-Cánovas, F; Varón, R

    2001-02-01

    The use of suicide substrates remains a very important and useful method in enzymology for studying enzyme mechanisms and designing potential drugs. Suicide substrates act as modified substrates for the target enzymes and bind to the active site. Therefore the presence of a competitive reversible inhibitor decreases the rate of substrate-induced inactivation and protects the enzyme from this inactivation. This lowering on the inactivation rate has evident physiological advantages, since it allows the easy acquisition of experimental data and facilitates kinetic data analysis by providing another variable (inhibitor concentration). However despite the importance of the simultaneous action of a suicide substrate and a competitive reversible inhibition, to date no corresponding kinetic analysis has been carried out. Therefore we present a general kinetic analysis of a Michaelis-Menten reaction mechanism with double inhibition caused by both, a suicide substrate and a competitive reversible inhibitor. We assume rapid equilibrium of the reversible reaction steps involved, while the time course equations for the reaction product have been derived with the assumption of a limiting enzyme. The goodness of the analytical solutions has been tested by comparison with the simulated curves obtained by numerical integration. A kinetic data analysis to determine the corresponding kinetic parameters from the time progress curve of the product is suggested. In conclusion, we present a complete kinetic analysis of an enzyme reaction mechanism as described above in an attempt to fill a gap in the theoretical treatment of this type of system.

  20. Drug metabolism by cytochrome p450 enzymes: what distinguishes the pathways leading to substrate hydroxylation over desaturation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Li; Faponle, Abayomi S; Quesne, Matthew G; Sainna, Mala A; Zhang, Jing; Franke, Alicja; Kumar, Devesh; van Eldik, Rudi; Liu, Weiping; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-06-15

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are highly versatile biological catalysts in our body that react with a broad range of substrates. Key functions in the liver include the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics. One particular metabolic pathway that is poorly understood relates to the P450 activation of aliphatic groups leading to either hydroxylation or desaturation pathways. A DFT and QM/MM study has been carried out on the factors that determine the regioselectivity of aliphatic hydroxylation over desaturation of compounds by P450 isozymes. The calculations establish multistate reactivity patterns, whereby the product distributions differ on each of the spin-state surfaces; hence spin-selective product formation was found. The electronic and thermochemical factors that determine the bifurcation pathways were analysed and a model that predicts the regioselectivity of aliphatic hydroxylation over desaturation pathways was established from valence bond and molecular orbital theories. Thus, the difference in energy of the OH versus the OC bond formed and the π-conjugation energy determines the degree of desaturation products. In addition, environmental effects of the substrate binding pocket that affect the regioselectivities were identified. These studies imply that bioengineering P450 isozymes for desaturation reactions will have to include modifications in the substrate binding pocket to restrict the hydroxylation rebound reaction. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Osteoblast interaction with DLC-coated Si substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Feng; Mathis, Nicolas; Blanchemain, Nicolas; Meunier, Cathy; Hildebrand, Hartmut F

    2008-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating is a convenient means of modifying material surfaces that are sensitive to wear, such as titanium and silica substrates. This work aims to evaluate the osteoblast-like cells' response to DLC-coated Si (Si-DLC), which was treated under different conditions. DLC and deuterated DLC films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to obtain a 200-nm-thick layer on all the samples. Three types of precursor gas were applied for deposition: pure methane (CH(4)), pure deuterated methane (CD(4)) and their half/half mixture. All surface treatments were performed under two different self-bias voltages (V(sb)): -400 and -600V. The modified surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, X-ray reflectometry and the sessile-drop method. MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured on the Si-DLC wafers for 3 and 6 days. Biological tests to measure cell proliferation, cell vitality, cell morphology and cell adhesion were performed. All DLC coatings produced a slightly more hydrophobic state than non-treated Si. Certain types of amorphous DLC coating, such as the surface treated under the V(sb) of -600V in pure methane (600CH(4)) or in pure deuterated methane (600CD(4)), offered a significantly higher cell proliferation rate to Si substrate. Scanning electron microscopy observations confirmed that the optimal cell adhesion behavior, among all the treated surfaces, occurred on the surface of the 600CH(4) and 600CD(4) groups, which showed increased amounts of filopodia and microvilli to enhance cell-environment exchange. In conclusion, DLC coating on Si could produce better surface stability and improved cellular responses.

  2. Enzymes coimmobilized with microorganisms for the microbial conversion of nonmetabolizable substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haegerdal, B

    1980-01-01

    EtOH is produced from cellobiose and from lactose by bakers' yeast coimmobilized on Ca alginate with Beta-glucosidase and lactase respectively. The maximum EtOH yield was 2.2%, or 80% of theoretical, when a 5% cellobiose solution was passed through a column containing 2-mm diameter beads with the immobilized enzyme and yeast cells. The EtOH yield was 66% of theoretical when acid whey permeate, containing 4.5% lactose, was passed over the column containing immobilized yeast cells and lactase.

  3. The orbital ground state of the azide-substrate complex of human heme oxygenase is an indicator of distal H-bonding: Implications for the enzyme mechanism‡

    OpenAIRE

    Ogura, Hiroshi; Evans, John P.; Peng, Dungeng; Satterlee, James D.; de Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz; Mar, Gerd N. La

    2009-01-01

    The active site electronic structure of the azide complex of substrate-bound human heme oxygenase-1, (hHO) has been investigated by 1H NMR spectroscopy to shed light on the orbital/spin ground state as an indicator of the unique distal pocket environment of the enzyme. 2D 1H NMR assignments of the substrate and substrate-contact residue signals reveal a pattern of substrate methyl contact shifts, that places the lone iron π-spin in the dxz orbital, rather than the dyz orbital found in the cya...

  4. ER-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B interacts with Src at the plasma membrane/substrate interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa C Monteleone

    Full Text Available PTP1B is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER anchored enzyme whose access to substrates is partly dependent on the ER distribution and dynamics. One of these substrates, the protein tyrosine kinase Src, has been found in the cytosol, endosomes, and plasma membrane. Here we analyzed where PTP1B and Src physically interact in intact cells, by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC in combination with temporal and high resolution microscopy. We also determined the structural basis of this interaction. We found that BiFC signal is displayed as puncta scattered throughout the ER network, a feature that was enhanced when the substrate trapping mutant PTP1B-D181A was used. Time-lapse and co-localization analyses revealed that BiFC puncta did not correspond to vesicular carriers; instead they localized at the tip of dynamic ER tubules. BiFC puncta were retained in ventral membrane preparations after cell unroofing and were also detected within the evanescent field of total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRFM associated to the ventral membranes of whole cells. Furthermore, BiFC puncta often colocalized with dark spots seen by surface reflection interference contrast (SRIC. Removal of Src myristoylation and polybasic motifs abolished BiFC. In addition, PTP1B active site and negative regulatory tyrosine 529 on Src were primary determinants of BiFC occurrence, although the SH3 binding motif on PTP1B also played a role. Our results suggest that ER-bound PTP1B dynamically interacts with the negative regulatory site at the C-terminus of Src at random puncta in the plasma membrane/substrate interface, likely leading to Src activation and recruitment to adhesion complexes. We postulate that this functional ER/plasma membrane crosstalk could apply to a wide array of protein partners, opening an exciting field of research.

  5. The role of enzyme and substrate concentration in the evaluation of serum angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition by enalaprilat in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisser, K; Schloos, J

    1991-10-09

    The relationship between serum angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity and concentration of the ACE inhibitor enalaprilat was determined in vitro in the presence of different concentrations (S = 4-200 mM) of the substrate Hip-Gly-Gly. From Henderson plots, a competitive tight-binding relationship between enalaprilat and serum ACE was found yielding a value of approximately 5 nM for serum ACE concentration (Et) and an inhibition constant (Ki) for enalaprilat of approximately 0.1 nM. A plot of reaction velocity (Vi) versus total inhibitor concentration (It) exhibited a non-parallel shift of the inhibition curve to the right with increasing S. This was reflected by apparent Hill coefficients greater than 1 when the commonly used inhibitory sigmoid concentration-effect model (Emax model) was applied to the data. Slopes greater than 1 were obviously due to discrepancies between the free inhibitor concentration (If) present in the assay and It plotted on the abscissa and could, therefore, be indicators of tight-binding conditions. Thus, the sigmoid Emax model leads to an overestimation of Ki. Therefore, a modification of the inhibitory sigmoid Emax model (called "Emax tight model") was applied, which accounts for the depletion of If by binding, refers to It and allows estimation of the parameters Et and IC50f (free concentration of inhibitor when 50% inhibition occurs) using non-linear regression analysis. This model could describe the non-symmetrical shape of the inhibition curves and the results for Ki and Et correlated very well with those derived from the Henderson plots. The latter findings confirm that the degree of ACE inhibition measured in vitro is, in fact, dependent on the concentration of substrate and enzyme present in the assay. This is of importance not only for the correct evaluation of Ki but also for the interpretation of the time course of serum ACE inhibition measured ex vivo. The non-linear model has some advantages over the linear Henderson

  6. Integration of statistical modeling and high-content microscopy to systematically investigate cell-substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen Li Kelly; Likhitpanichkul, Morakot; Ho, Anthony; Simmons, Craig A

    2010-03-01

    Cell-substrate interactions are multifaceted, involving the integration of various physical and biochemical signals. The interactions among these microenvironmental factors cannot be facilely elucidated and quantified by conventional experimentation, and necessitate multifactorial strategies. Here we describe an approach that integrates statistical design and analysis of experiments with automated microscopy to systematically investigate the combinatorial effects of substrate-derived stimuli (substrate stiffness and matrix protein concentration) on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) spreading, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. C3H10T1/2 cells were grown on type I collagen- or fibronectin-coated polyacrylamide hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties. Experimental conditions, which were defined according to central composite design, consisted of specific permutations of substrate stiffness (3-144 kPa) and adhesion protein concentration (7-520 microg/mL). Spreading area, BrdU incorporation and Runx2 nuclear translocation were quantified using high-content microscopy and modeled as mathematical functions of substrate stiffness and protein concentration. The resulting response surfaces revealed distinct patterns of protein-specific, substrate stiffness-dependent modulation of MSC proliferation and differentiation, demonstrating the advantage of statistical modeling in the detection and description of higher-order cellular responses. In a broader context, this approach can be adapted to study other types of cell-material interactions and can facilitate the efficient screening and optimization of substrate properties for applications involving cell-material interfaces. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Visualising substrate-fingermark interactions: Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of amino acid reagent development on cellulose substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Xanthe; Shimmon, Ronald; Roux, Claude; Lennard, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Most spectroscopic studies of the reaction products formed by ninhydrin, 1,2-indanedione-zinc (Ind-Zn) and 1,8-diazafluoren-9-one (DFO) when reacted with amino acids or latent fingermarks on paper substrates are focused on visible absorption or luminescence spectroscopy. In addition, structural elucidation studies are typically limited to solution-based mass spectrometry or liquid nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which does not provide an accurate representation of the fingermark development process on common paper substrates. The research presented in this article demonstrates that solid-state carbon-13 magic angle spinning NMR ((13)C-MAS-NMR) is a technique that can not only be utilised for structural studies of fingermark enhancement reagents, but is a promising technique for characterising the effect of paper chemistry on fingermark deposition and enhancement. The latter opens up a research area that has been under-explored to date but has the potential to improve our understanding of how fingermark secretions and enhancement reagents interact with paper substrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural and Kinetic Properties of the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase NahF, a Broad Substrate Specificity Enzyme for Aldehyde Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coitinho, Juliana B; Pereira, Mozart S; Costa, Débora M A; Guimarães, Samuel L; Araújo, Simara S; Hengge, Alvan C; Brandão, Tiago A S; Nagem, Ronaldo A P

    2016-09-27

    The salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase (NahF) catalyzes the oxidation of salicylaldehyde to salicylate using NAD(+) as a cofactor, the last reaction of the upper degradation pathway of naphthalene in Pseudomonas putida G7. The naphthalene is an abundant and toxic compound in oil and has been used as a model for bioremediation studies. The steady-state kinetic parameters for oxidation of aliphatic or aromatic aldehydes catalyzed by 6xHis-NahF are presented. The 6xHis-NahF catalyzes the oxidation of aromatic aldehydes with large kcat/Km values close to 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The active site of NahF is highly hydrophobic, and the enzyme shows higher specificity for less polar substrates than for polar substrates, e.g., acetaldehyde. The enzyme shows α/β folding with three well-defined domains: the oligomerization domain, which is responsible for the interlacement between the two monomers; the Rossmann-like fold domain, essential for nucleotide binding; and the catalytic domain. A salicylaldehyde molecule was observed in a deep pocket in the crystal structure of NahF where the catalytic C284 and E250 are present. Moreover, the residues G150, R157, W96, F99, F274, F279, and Y446 were thought to be important for catalysis and specificity for aromatic aldehydes. Understanding the molecular features responsible for NahF activity allows for comparisons with other aldehyde dehydrogenases and, together with structural information, provides the information needed for future mutational studies aimed to enhance its stability and specificity and further its use in biotechnological processes.

  9. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 2: drugs interacting with enzymes. Update 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Scientists working in the field of Alzheimer's disease and, in particular, cognitive enhancers are very productive. The review on Drugs interacting with Enzymes was accepted in August 2012. However, this field is very dynamic. New potential targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease were identified. This update describes drugs interacting with 60 enzymes versus 43 enzymes in the first paper. Some compounds progressed in their development, while many others were discontinued. The present review covers the evolution of research in this field through April 2014.

  10. Resveratrol serves as a protein-substrate interaction stabilizer in human SIRT1 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xuben; Rooklin, David; Fang, Hao; Zhang, Yingkai

    2016-11-01

    Resveratrol is a natural compound found in red wine that has been suggested to exert its potential health benefit through the activation of SIRT1, a crucial member of the mammalian NAD+-dependent deacetylases. SIRT1 has emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for many aging related diseases, however, how its activity can only be activated toward some specific substrates by resveratrol has been poorly understood. Herein, by employing extensive molecular dynamics simulations as well as fragment-centric topographical mapping of binding interfaces, we have clarified current controversies in the literature and elucidated that resveratrol plays an important activation role by stabilizing SIRT1/peptide interactions in a substrate-specific manner. This new mechanism highlights the importance of the N-terminal domain in substrate recognition, explains the activity restoration role of resveratrol toward some “loose-binding” substrates of SIRT1, and has significant implications for the rational design of new substrate-specific SIRT1 modulators.

  11. Implementation of anion-receptor macrocycles in supramolecular tandem assays for enzymes involving nucleotides as substrates, products, and cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Mara; Nau, Werner M

    2010-03-07

    A supramolecular tandem assay for direct continuous monitoring of nucleotide triphosphate-dependent enzymes such as potato apyrase is described. The underlying principle of the assay relies on the use of anion-receptor macrocycles in combination with fluorescent dyes as reporter pairs. A combinatorial approach was used to identify two complementary reporter pairs, i.e. an amino-gamma-cyclodextrin with 2-anilinonaphtalene-6-sulfonate (ANS) as dye (fluorescence enhancement factor of 17 upon complexation) and a polycationic cyclophane with 8-hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrene trisulfonate (HPTS) as dye (fluorescence decrease by a factor of more than 2000), which allow the kinetic monitoring of potato apyrase activity at different ATP concentration ranges (microM and mM) with different types of photophysical responses (switch-ON and switch-OFF). Competitive fluorescence titrations revealed a differential binding of ATP (strongest competitor) versus ADP and AMP, which constitutes the prerequisite for monitoring enzymatic conversions (dephosphorylation or phosphorylation) involving nucleotides. The assay was tested for different enzyme and substrate concentrations and exploited for the screening of activating additives, namely divalent transition metal ions (Ni(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), and Ca(2+)). The transferability of the assay could be demonstrated by monitoring the dephosphorylation of other nucleotide triphosphates (GTP, TTP, and CTP).

  12. PRODUCTION AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROWTH CONDITIONS FOR INVERTASE ENZYME BY ASPERGILLUS SP., IN SOLID STATE FERMENTATION (SSF USING PAPAYA PEEL AS SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brindha Chelliappan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Invertase enzymes are produced mainly by plants, some filamentous fungi, yeast and many other microorganisms which finds applications in food industries, confectionaries, pharmaceuticals, etc., The present work deals with the production of Invertase by Aspergillus sp., isolated from various soil samples in solid state fermentation using papaya peel waste as substrate. Enzyme activity was checked using Fehling’s reagent and assay was carried out by DNSA method. The results of optimized conditions showed that the invertase activity was high in the SSF using papaya peel as substrate, incubated for 6 days at temperature of 35°C, pH 7, with 2.25gms/100ml of Ammonium nitrate as nitrogen source and 10gms/100ml of sucrose as carbon source. Hence the agro wastes from industries can be recycled by using it as substrate in SSF for high invertase enzyme production which finds applications in many fields.

  13. Expression of fungal cutinase and swollenin in tobacco chloroplasts reveals novel enzyme functions and/or substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dheeraj Verma

    Full Text Available In order to produce low-cost biomass hydrolyzing enzymes, transplastomic lines were generated that expressed cutinase or swollenin within chloroplasts. While swollenin expressing plants were homoplasmic, cutinase transplastomic lines remained heteroplasmic. Both transplastomic lines showed interesting modifications in their phenotype, chloroplast structure, and functions. Ultrastructural analysis of chloroplasts from cutinase- and swollenin-expressing plants did not show typical lens shape and granal stacks. But, their thylakoid membranes showed unique scroll like structures and chloroplast envelope displayed protrusions, stretching into the cytoplasm. Unusual honeycomb structures typically observed in etioplasts were observed in mature chloroplasts expressing swollenin. Treatment of cotton fiber with chloroplast-derived swollenin showed enlarged segments and the intertwined inner fibers were irreversibly unwound and fully opened up due to expansin activity of swollenin, causing disruption of hydrogen bonds in cellulose fibers. Cutinase transplastomic plants showed esterase and lipase activity, while swollenin transplastomic lines lacked such enzyme activities. Higher plants contain two major galactolipids, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG, in their chloroplast thylakoid membranes that play distinct roles in their structural organization. Surprisingly, purified cutinase effectively hydrolyzed DGDG to MGDG, showing alpha galactosidase activity. Such hydrolysis resulted in unstacking of granal thylakoids in chloroplasts and other structural changes. These results demonstrate DGDG as novel substrate and function for cutinase. Both MGDG and DGDG were reduced up to 47.7% and 39.7% in cutinase and 68.5% and 67.5% in swollenin expressing plants. Novel properties and functions of both enzymes reported here for the first time should lead to better understanding and enhanced biomass hydrolysis.

  14. Molecular Determinants for Substrate Interactions with the Glycine Transporter GlyT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carland, Jane E; Thomas, Michael; Mostyn, Shannon N; Subramanian, Nandhitha; O'Mara, Megan L; Ryan, Renae M; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2018-03-21

    Transporters in the SLC6 family play key roles in regulating neurotransmission and are the targets for a wide range of therapeutics. Important insights into the transport mechanisms and the specificity of drug interactions of SLC6 transporters have been obtained from the crystal structures of a bacterial homologue of the family, LeuT Aa , and more recently the Drosophila dopamine transporter and the human serotonin transporter. However, there is disputed evidence that the bacterial leucine transporter, LeuT Aa , contains two substrate binding sites that work cooperatively in the mechanism of transport, with the binding of a second substrate being required for the release of the substrate from the primary site. An alternate proposal is that there may be low affinity binding sites that serve to direct the flow of substrates to the primary site. We have used a combination of molecular dynamics simulations of substrate interactions with a homology model of GlyT2, together with radiolabeled amino acid uptake assays and electrophysiological analysis of wild-type and mutant transporters, to provide evidence that substrate selectivity of GlyT2 is determined entirely by the primary substrate binding site and, furthermore, if a secondary site exists then it is a low affinity nonselective amino acid binding site.

  15. Cell-substrate interaction with cell-membrane-stress dependent adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H; Yang, B

    2012-01-10

    Cell-substrate interaction is examined in a two-dimensional mechanics model. The cell and substrate are treated as a shell and an elastic solid, respectively. Their interaction through adhesion is treated using nonlinear springs. Compared to previous cell mechanics models, the present model introduces a cohesive force law that is dependent not only on cell-substrate distance but also on internal cell-membrane stress. It is postulated that a living cell would establish focal adhesion sites with density dependent on the cell-membrane stress. The formulated mechanics problem is numerically solved using coupled finite elements and boundary elements for the cell and the substrate, respectively. The nodes in the adhesion zone from either side are linked by the cohesive springs. The specific cases of a cell adhering to a homogeneous substrate and a heterogeneous bimaterial substrate are examined. The analyses show that the substrate stiffness affects the adhesion behavior significantly and regulates the direction of cell adhesion, in good agreement with the experimental results in the literature. By introducing a reactive parameter (i.e., cell-membrane stress) linking biological responses of a living cell to a mechanical environment, the present model offers a unified mechanistic vehicle for characterization and prediction of living cell responses to various kinds of mechanical stimuli including local extracellular matrix and neighboring cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interactions between Melanin Enzymes and Their Atypical Recruitment to the Secretory Pathway by Palmitoylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srijana Upadhyay

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Melanins are biopolymers that confer coloration and protection to the host organism against biotic or abiotic insults. The level of protection offered by melanin depends on its biosynthesis and its subcellular localization. Previously, we discovered that Aspergillus fumigatus compartmentalizes melanization in endosomes by recruiting all melanin enzymes to the secretory pathway. Surprisingly, although two laccases involved in the late steps of melanization are conventional secretory proteins, the four enzymes involved in the early steps of melanization lack a signal peptide or a transmembrane domain and are thus considered “atypical” secretory proteins. In this work, we found interactions among melanin enzymes and all melanin enzymes formed protein complexes. Surprisingly, the formation of protein complexes by melanin enzymes was not critical for their trafficking to the endosomal system. By palmitoylation profiling and biochemical analyses, we discovered that all four early melanin enzymes were strongly palmitoylated during conidiation. However, only the polyketide synthase (PKS Alb1 was strongly palmitoylated during both vegetative hyphal growth and conidiation when constitutively expressed alone. This posttranslational lipid modification correlates the endosomal localization of all early melanin enzymes. Intriguingly, bioinformatic analyses predict that palmitoylation is a common mechanism for potential membrane association of polyketide synthases (PKSs and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs in A. fumigatus. Our findings indicate that protein-protein interactions facilitate melanization by metabolic channeling, while posttranslational lipid modifications help recruit the atypical enzymes to the secretory pathway, which is critical for compartmentalization of secondary metabolism.

  17. Identification of a Substrate-binding Site in a Peroxisomal β-Oxidation Enzyme by Photoaffinity Labeling with a Novel Palmitoyl Derivative*

    OpenAIRE

    Kashiwayama, Yoshinori; Tomohiro, Takenori; Narita, Kotomi; Suzumura, Miyuki; Glumoff, Tuomo; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Hatanaka, Yasumaru; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisomes play an essential role in a number of important metabolic pathways including β-oxidation of fatty acids and their derivatives. Therefore, peroxisomes possess various β-oxidation enzymes and specialized fatty acid transport systems. However, the molecular mechanisms of these proteins, especially in terms of substrate binding, are still unknown. In this study, to identify the substrate-binding sites of these proteins, we synthesized a photoreactive palmitic acid analogue bearing a d...

  18. Pan-pathway based interaction profiling of FDA-approved nucleoside and nucleobase analogs with enzymes of the human nucleotide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeblad, Louise; Welin, Martin; Flodin, Susanne; Gräslund, Susanne; Wang, Liya; Balzarini, Jan; Eriksson, Staffan; Nordlund, Pär

    2012-01-01

    To identify interactions a nucleoside analog library (NAL) consisting of 45 FDA-approved nucleoside analogs was screened against 23 enzymes of the human nucleotide metabolism using a thermal shift assay. The method was validated with deoxycytidine kinase; eight interactions known from the literature were detected and five additional interactions were revealed after the addition of ATP, the second substrate. The NAL screening gave relatively few significant hits, supporting a low rate of "off target effects." However, unexpected ligands were identified for two catabolic enzymes guanine deaminase (GDA) and uridine phosphorylase 1 (UPP1). An acyclic guanosine prodrug analog, valaciclovir, was shown to stabilize GDA to the same degree as the natural substrate, guanine, with a ΔT(agg) around 7°C. Aciclovir, penciclovir, ganciclovir, thioguanine and mercaptopurine were also identified as ligands for GDA. The crystal structure of GDA with valaciclovir bound in the active site was determined, revealing the binding of the long unbranched chain of valaciclovir in the active site of the enzyme. Several ligands were identified for UPP1: vidarabine, an antiviral nucleoside analog, as well as trifluridine, idoxuridine, floxuridine, zidovudine, telbivudine, fluorouracil and thioguanine caused concentration-dependent stabilization of UPP1. A kinetic study of UPP1 with vidarabine revealed that vidarabine was a mixed-type competitive inhibitor with the natural substrate uridine. The unexpected ligands identified for UPP1 and GDA imply further metabolic consequences for these nucleoside analogs, which could also serve as a starting point for future drug design.

  19. Molecular dynamics investigation of nanoscale substrate topography and its interaction with liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro Rodrigues, Jhonatam

    Nanotechnology has been presenting successful applications in several areas. However, experimentation with nanoscale materials is costly and limited in analysis capability. This research investigates the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to model and study nanomaterials and manufacturing processes. MD simulations are employed to reduce cost, optimize design, increase productivity and allow for the investigation of material interactions not yet observable through experimentation. This work investigates the interaction of water with substrates at the nanoscale. The effect of temperature, droplet impingement velocities and size, as well as substrate material, are investigated at the nanoscale. Several substrate topography designs were modeled to reveal their influence on the wettability of the substrate. Nanoscale gold and silicon substrates are more hydrophilic at higher temperatures than at room temperature. The reduction in droplet diameter increases its wettability. High impingement velocity of droplets does not influence final wettability of substrates but induces higher diffusion rates of droplets in a heated environment. Droplets deposited over a gradient of surface exposure presents spontaneous movement. The Leidenfrost effect was investigated at the nanoscale. Droplets of 4 and 10nm in diameter presented behaviors pertinent to the Leidenfrost effect at 373K, significantly lower than at micro scale and of potential impact to the field. Topographical features were manipulated using superhydrophobic coating resulting in micro whiskers. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) was used to manufacture substrate topographies at the nanoscale. Water droplets were deposited on the substrates and their wettability was measured using droplet contact angles. Lower surface area exposure resulted in higher contact angles. The experimental relationships between surface topography and substrate wettability were used to validate the insights gained from MD simulations for

  20. DNA Damage: Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Study on the Oxygen Binding and Substrate Hydroxylation Step in AlkB Repair Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesne, Matthew G; Latifi, Reza; Gonzalez-Ovalle, Luis E; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P

    2014-01-01

    AlkB repair enzymes are important nonheme iron enzymes that catalyse the demethylation of alkylated DNA bases in humans, which is a vital reaction in the body that heals externally damaged DNA bases. Its mechanism is currently controversial and in order to resolve the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes, a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study was performed on the demethylation of the N1-methyladenine fragment by AlkB repair enzymes. Firstly, the initial modelling identified the oxygen binding site of the enzyme. Secondly, the oxygen activation mechanism was investigated and a novel pathway was found, whereby the catalytically active iron(IV)–oxo intermediate in the catalytic cycle undergoes an initial isomerisation assisted by an Arg residue in the substrate binding pocket, which then brings the oxo group in close contact with the methyl group of the alkylated DNA base. This enables a subsequent rate-determining hydrogen-atom abstraction on competitive σ-and π-pathways on a quintet spin-state surface. These findings give evidence of different locations of the oxygen and substrate binding channels in the enzyme and the origin of the separation of the oxygen-bound intermediates in the catalytic cycle from substrate. Our studies are compared with small model complexes and the effect of protein and environment on the kinetics and mechanism is explained. PMID:24339041

  1. RanBP3 influences interactions between CRM1 and its nuclear protein export substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Englmeier, Ludwig; Fornerod, Maarten; Bischoff, F. Ralf; Petosa, Carlo; Mattaj, Iain W.; Kutay, Ulrike

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the role of RanBP3, a nuclear member of the Ran-binding protein 1 family, in CRM1-mediated protein export in higher eukaryotes. RanBP3 interacts directly with CRM1 and also forms a trimeric complex with CRM1 and RanGTP. However, RanBP3 does not bind to CRM1 like an export substrate. Instead, it can stabilize CRM1–export substrate interaction. Nuclear RanBP3 stimulates CRM1-dependent protein export in permeabilized cells. These data indicate that RanBP3 functions by a novel mec...

  2. Germacrene A Synthase in Yarrow (Achillea millefolium Is an Enzyme with Mixed Substrate Specificity: Gene Cloning, Functional Characterization and Expression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila ePazouki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Terpenoid synthases constitute a highly diverse gene family producing a wide range of cyclic and acyclic molecules consisting of isoprene (C5 residues. Often a single terpene synthase produces a spectrum of molecules of given chain length, but some terpene synthases can use multiple substrates, producing products of different chain length. Only a few such enzymes has been characterized, but the capacity for multiple-substrate use can be more widespread than previously thought. Here we focused on germacrene A synthase (GAS that is a key cytosolic enzyme in the sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis pathway in the important medicinal plant Achillea millefolium (AmGAS. The full length encoding gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3, functionally characterized, and its in vivo expression was analyzed. The recombinant protein catalyzed formation of germacrene A with the C15 substrate farnesyl diphosphate (FDP, while acyclic monoterpenes were formed with the C10 substrate geranyl diphosphate (GDP and cyclic monoterpenes with the C10 substrate neryl diphosphate (NDP. Although monoterpene synthesis has been assumed to be confined exclusively to plastids, AmGAS can potentially synthesize monoterpenes in cytosol when GDP or NDP become available. AmGAS enzyme had high homology with GAS sequences from other Asteraceae species, suggesting that multi-substrate use can be more widespread among germacrene A synthases than previously thought. Expression studies indicated that AmGAS was expressed in both autotrophic and heterotrophic plant compartments with the highest expression levels in leaves and flowers. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the cloning and characterization of germacrene A synthase coding gene in A. millefolium, and multi-substrate use of GAS enzymes.

  3. Structural insights into conserved L-arabinose metabolic enzymes reveal the substrate binding site of a thermophilic L-arabinose isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Sang-Jae; Kim, Seong-Bo; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Sung Haeng; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2014-03-18

    Structural genomics demonstrates that despite low levels of structural similarity of proteins comprising a metabolic pathway, their substrate binding regions are likely to be conserved. Herein based on the 3D-structures of the α/β-fold proteins involved in the ara operon, we attempted to predict the substrate binding residues of thermophilic Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-arabinose isomerase (GSAI) with no 3D-structure available. Comparison of the structures of L-arabinose catabolic enzymes revealed a conserved feature to form the substrate-binding modules, which can be extended to predict the substrate binding site of GSAI (i.e., D195, E261 and E333). Moreover, these data implicated that proteins in the l-arabinose metabolic pathway might retain their substrate binding niches as the modular structure through conserved molecular evolution even with totally different structural scaffolds. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nodule-Enriched GRETCHEN HAGEN 3 Enzymes Have Distinct Substrate Specificities and Are Important for Proper Soybean Nodule Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Damodaran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Legume root nodules develop as a result of a symbiotic relationship between the plant and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia bacteria in soil. Auxin activity is detected in different cell types at different stages of nodule development; as well as an enhanced sensitivity to auxin inhibits, which could affect nodule development. While some transport and signaling mechanisms that achieve precise spatiotemporal auxin output are known, the role of auxin metabolism during nodule development is unclear. Using a soybean root lateral organ transcriptome data set, we identified distinct nodule enrichment of three genes encoding auxin-deactivating GRETCHEN HAGEN 3 (GH3 indole-3-acetic acid (IAA amido transferase enzymes: GmGH3-11/12, GmGH3-14 and GmGH3-15. In vitro enzymatic assays showed that each of these GH3 proteins preferred IAA and aspartate as acyl and amino acid substrates, respectively. GmGH3-15 showed a broad substrate preference, especially with different forms of auxin. Promoter:GUS expression analysis indicated that GmGH3-14 acts primarily in the root epidermis and the nodule primordium where as GmGH3-15 might act in the vasculature. Silencing the expression of these GH3 genes in soybean composite plants led to altered nodule numbers, maturity, and size. Our results indicate that these GH3s are needed for proper nodule maturation in soybean, but the precise mechanism by which they regulate nodule development remains to be explained.

  5. The mechanisms of substrates interaction with the active site of Mycobacterium tuberculosis tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykuliak V. V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the mechanisms of substrates interaction with the active site of Mycobacterium tuberculosis tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (MtTyrRS. Methods. Complexes of MtTyrRS with tyrosine, ATP and tyrosyl adenylate were constructed by superposition of the MtTyrRS structure and crystallographic structures of bacterial TyrRS. All complexes of MtTyrRS with substrates were investigated by molecular dynamics (MD simulations in solution. Results. It was shown the formation of network of hydrogen bonds between substrates and the MtTyrRS active center, which were stable in the course of MD simulations. ATP binds in the active site both by hydrogen bonds and via electrostatic interactions with Lys231 and Lys234 of catalytic KFGKS motif. Conclusions. The L-tyrosine binding site in the enzyme active site is negatively charged, whereas the ATP binding site contains positive Lys231 and Lys234 residues of catalytic KFGKS motif. The occupancy of H-bonds between substrates and the enzyme evidences a significant conformational mobility of the active site.

  6. Effect of low severity dilute-acid pretreatment of barley straw and decreased enzyme loading hydrolysis on the production of fermentable substrates and the release of inhibitory compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panagiotopoulos, I.A.; Lignos, G.D.; Bakker, R.R.C.; Koukios, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility of combining low severity dilute-acid pretreatment of barley straw and decreased enzyme loading hydrolysis for the high production of fermentable substrates and the low release of inhibitory compounds. For most of the pretreatments at 160

  7. Insights into the evolution of enzyme substrate promiscuity after the discovery of (βα)₈ isomerase evolutionary intermediates from a diverse metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda-García, Lianet; Juárez-Vázquez, Ana L; Ávila-Arcos, María C; Verduzco-Castro, Ernesto A; Montero-Morán, Gabriela; Gaytán, Paul; Carrillo-Tripp, Mauricio; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2015-06-10

    Current sequence-based approaches to identify enzyme functional shifts, such as enzyme promiscuity, have proven to be highly dependent on a priori functional knowledge, hampering our ability to reconstruct evolutionary history behind these mechanisms. Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profiles, broadly used to classify enzyme families, can be useful to distinguish between closely related enzyme families with different specificities. The (βα)8-isomerase HisA/PriA enzyme family, involved in L-histidine (HisA, mono-substrate) biosynthesis in most bacteria and plants, but also in L-tryptophan (HisA/TrpF or PriA, dual-substrate) biosynthesis in most Actinobacteria, has been used as model system to explore evolutionary hypotheses and therefore has a considerable amount of evolutionary, functional and structural knowledge available. We searched for functional evolutionary intermediates between the HisA and PriA enzyme families in order to understand the functional divergence between these families. We constructed a HMM profile that correctly classifies sequences of unknown function into the HisA and PriA enzyme sub-families. Using this HMM profile, we mined a large metagenome to identify plausible evolutionary intermediate sequences between HisA and PriA. These sequences were used to perform phylogenetic reconstructions and to identify functionally conserved amino acids. Biochemical characterization of one selected enzyme (CAM1) with a mutation within the functionally essential N-terminus phosphate-binding site, namely, an alanine instead of a glycine in HisA or a serine in PriA, showed that this evolutionary intermediate has dual-substrate specificity. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis of this alanine residue, either backwards into a glycine or forward into a serine, revealed the robustness of this enzyme. None of these mutations, presumably upon functionally essential amino acids, significantly abolished its enzyme activities. A truncated version of this enzyme (CAM2

  8. Enhanced printability of thermoplastic polyurethane substrates by silica particles surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, S., E-mail: s.cruz@dep.uminho.pt [IPC/I3N – Institute of Polymers and Composites/Inst. of Nanostructures, Nanomodelling and Nanofabrication, Department Polymer Engineering, University of Minho, 4804-533 Guimarães (Portugal); Rocha, L.A. [CMEMS, University of Minho, 4804-533 Guimarães (Portugal); Viana, J.C. [IPC/I3N – Institute of Polymers and Composites/Inst. of Nanostructures, Nanomodelling and Nanofabrication, Department Polymer Engineering, University of Minho, 4804-533 Guimarães (Portugal)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A new method development for surface treatment of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) substrates. • The proposed method increases TPU surface energy (by 45%) and consequently the TPU wettability. • Great increase of the TPU surface roughness (by 621%). • Inkjet printed conductive ink was applied to the surface treated TPU substrate and significant improvements on the printability were obtained. - Abstract: A new method developed for the surface treatment of thermoplastic polymer substrates that increases their surface energies is introduced in this paper. The method is environmental friendly and low cost. In the proposed surface treatment method, nanoparticles are spread over the thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) flexible substrate surface and then thermally fixed. This latter step allows the nanoparticles sinking-in on the polymer surface, resulting in a higher polymer–particle interaction at their interfacial region. The addition of nanoparticles onto the polymer surface increases surface roughness. The extent of the nanoparticles dispersion and sink-in in the substrate was evaluated through microscopy analysis (SEM). The roughness of the surface treated polymeric substrate was evaluated by AFM analysis. Substrate critical surface tension (ST) was measured by contact angle. In general, a homogeneous roughness form is achieved to a certain level. Great increase of the TPU surface roughness (by 621%) was induced by the propose method. The proposed surface treatment method increased significantly the substrate ST (by 45%) and consequently the TPU wettability. This novel surface treatment of thermoplastic polymers was applied to the inkjet printing of TPU substrates with conductive inks, and significant improvements on the printability were obtained.

  9. Simulation of the fluid structure interaction for an aerostatic bearing and a flexible substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olieslagers, R.; Wild, M. de; Melick, S. van; Knaapen, R.

    2014-01-01

    The fluid structure interaction for an aerostatic bearing and a substrate is solved numerically by a semi-analytical model, programmed in the software package MATLAB. This semi-analytical model uses a fluidic network of resistances and capacities to solve the pressure field in the bearing channel.

  10. Mapping the Complex Morphology of Cell Interactions with Nanowire Substrates Using FIB-SEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Købler, Carsten; Jensen, Mikkel Ravn Boye

    2013-01-01

    Using high resolution focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) we study the details of cell-nanostructure interactions using serial block face imaging. 3T3 Fibroblast cellular monolayers are cultured on flat glass as a control surface and on two types of nanostructured scaffold...... substrates made from silicon black (Nanograss) with low- and high nanowire density. After culturing for 72 hours the cells were fixed, heavy metal stained, embedded in resin, and processed with FIB-SEM block face imaging without removing the substrate. The sample preparation procedure, image acquisition...

  11. Thermal interaction between WC-Co coating and steel substrate in process of HVOF spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilemany, J.M.; Sobolev, V.V.; Nutting, J.; Dong, Z.; Calero, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    The WC-Co powders can be used to produce good adhesive and wear resistant HVOF thermal spray coatings on steel and light alloys substrates. In order to understand the properties of this kind of coating, the phases which are present in the coatings and structure changes during post heat treatments have been investigated. Although the coating properties depend very much on the structure developed in the substrate-coating interfacial region it has not been yet investigated in detail. The present study is devoted to the experimental and theoretical analysis of this interfacial region. The structure characterization has been performed mainly through the use of transmission electron microscopy. To provide a theoretical investigation a realistic prediction model of the process has been developed and on its base the mathematical simulation of the substrate-coating thermal interaction has been undertaken

  12. Thermodynamic Activity-Based Progress Curve Analysis in Enzyme Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiss, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    Macrokinetic Michaelis-Menten models based on thermodynamic activity provide insights into enzyme kinetics because they separate substrate-enzyme from substrate-solvent interactions. Kinetic parameters are estimated from experimental progress curves of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Three pitfalls are discussed: deviations between thermodynamic and concentration-based models, product effects on the substrate activity coefficient, and product inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In vivo continuous and simultaneous monitoring of brain energy substrates with a multiplex amperometric enzyme-based biosensor device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, C A; de Vries, M G; Ngabi, W; Oomen, P E; Cremers, T I F H; Westerink, B H C

    2015-05-15

    Enzyme-based amperometric biosensors are widely used for monitoring key biomarkers. In experimental neuroscience there is a growing interest in in vivo continuous and simultaneous monitoring of metabolism-related biomarkers, like glucose, lactate and pyruvate. The use of multiplex biosensors will provide better understanding of brain energy metabolism and its role in neuropathologies such as diabetes, ischemia, and epilepsy. We have developed and characterized an implantable multiplex microbiosensor device (MBD) for simultaneous and continuous in vivo monitoring of glucose, lactate, and pyruvate. First, we developed and characterized amperometric microbiosensors for monitoring lactate and pyruvate. In vitro evaluation allowed us to choose the most suitable biosensors for incorporation into the MBD, along with glucose and background biosensors. Fully assembled MBDs were characterized in vitro. The calculated performance parameters (LOD, LR, LRS, IMAX and appKM) showed that the multiplex MBD was highly selective and sensitive (LRS≥100 nA/mM) for each analyte and within an adequate range for in vivo application. Finally, MBDs were implanted in the mPFC of anesthetized adult male Wistar rats for in vivo evaluation. Following an equilibration period, baseline brain levels of glucose (1.3±0.2 mM), lactate (1.5±0.4 mM) and pyruvate (0.3±0.1 mM) were established. Subsequently, the MBDs recorded the responses of the animals when submitted to hyperglycemic (40% glucose i.v.) and hypoglycemic (5 U/kg insulin i.v.) challenges. Afterwards, MBDs were recalibrated to convert electrochemical readings into accurate substrate concentrations and to assess biofouling. The presented MBD can monitor simultaneously multiple biomarkers in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Substrate sequence selectivity of APOBEC3A implicates intra-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvas, Tania V; Hou, Shurong; Myint, Wazo; Nalivaika, Ellen; Somasundaran, Mohan; Kelch, Brian A; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2018-05-14

    The APOBEC3 (A3) family of human cytidine deaminases is renowned for providing a first line of defense against many exogenous and endogenous retroviruses. However, the ability of these proteins to deaminate deoxycytidines in ssDNA makes A3s a double-edged sword. When overexpressed, A3s can mutate endogenous genomic DNA resulting in a variety of cancers. Although the sequence context for mutating DNA varies among A3s, the mechanism for substrate sequence specificity is not well understood. To characterize substrate specificity of A3A, a systematic approach was used to quantify the affinity for substrate as a function of sequence context, length, secondary structure, and solution pH. We identified the A3A ssDNA binding motif as (T/C)TC(A/G), which correlated with enzymatic activity. We also validated that A3A binds RNA in a sequence specific manner. A3A bound tighter to substrate binding motif within a hairpin loop compared to linear oligonucleotide, suggesting A3A affinity is modulated by substrate structure. Based on these findings and previously published A3A-ssDNA co-crystal structures, we propose a new model with intra-DNA interactions for the molecular mechanism underlying A3A sequence preference. Overall, the sequence and structural preferences identified for A3A leads to a new paradigm for identifying A3A's involvement in mutation of endogenous or exogenous DNA.

  15. A new generation of versatile chromogenic substrates for high-throughput analysis of biomass-degrading enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kracun, Stjepan Kresimir; Schückel, Julia; Westereng, Bjørge

    2015-01-01

    of carbohydrate-acting enzymes to be putatively identified. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the biochemical activities of these enzymes, and this is a serious bottleneck in the development of enzyme-reliant bio-refining processes. Results: We have developed a new generation of multi...

  16. Alkylation of amide linkages and cleavage of the C chain in the enzyme-activated-substrate inhibition of alpha-chymotrypsin with N-nitrosamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donadio, S.; Perks, H.M.; Tsuchiya, K.; White, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Active-site-directed N-nitrosamides inhibit alpha-chymotrypsin through an enzyme-activated-substrate mechanism. In this work, the activation results in the release--in the active site--of benzyl carbonium ions, which alkylate and inhibit the enzyme. The final ratio of benzyl groups to enzyme molecules is 1.0, but the alkyl groups are scattered over a number of sites. Reduction and alkylation of the inhibited enzyme generate peptides insoluble in most media. Guanidine hydrochloride at 6 M proved a good solvent, and its use as an eluant on G-75 Sephadex permitted separation of the peptides. In the case of 14 C-labeled enzyme, such an approach has shown that all of the alkylation occurs on the C chain of the enzyme, the chain of which the active site is constructed. Chemical modification of the peptides with ethylenediamine and N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-N'-ethylcarbodiimide rendered them soluble in dilute acid, permitting high-performance liquid chromatographic separation. Model studies have shown that the benzyl carbonium ions are highly reactive, alkylating amide linkages at both oxygen and nitrogen. Chromatography of this mixture and also 13 C NMR spectroscopy of the intact inhibited enzyme have shown that three major N-alkylations have occurred. Tryptic digestion of the C chain of chymotrypsin, which contains all of the alkylation sites, provides evidence that the stable N sites are principally located between residue 216 and residue 230

  17. Synchrotron radiation in the Far-Infrared: Adsorbate-substrate vibrations and resonant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, F.M.; Williams, G.P.; Hirschmugl, C.J.; Chabal, Y.J.

    1991-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation in the Far Infrared offers the potential for a broadband source of high brightness and intensity. Recent development of a Far-Infrared Beamline at the NSLS in Brookhaven provides an unique high intensity source in the FIR spectral range (800-10 cm -1 ). This talk reviews its application to surface vibrational spectroscopy of low frequency adsorbate-substrate vibrations and resonant interactions on metal surfaces

  18. Simultaneously and separately immobilizing incompatible dual-enzymes on polymer substrate via visible light induced graft polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xing; He, Bin; Zhao, Changwen; Ma, Yuhong; Yang, Wantai

    2018-04-01

    Developing facile and mild strategy to construct multi-enzymes immobilization system has attracted considerable attentions in recent years. Here a simple immobilization strategy called visible light induced graft polymerization that can simultaneously and separately encapsulate two kinds of enzymes on one polymer film was proposed. Two incompatible enzymes, trypsin and transglutaminase (TGase) were selected as model dual-enzymes system and simultaneously immobilized on two sides of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film. After immobilization, it was found that more than 90% of the enzymes can be embedded into dual-enzymes loaded film without leakage. And the activities of both separately immobilized enzymes were higher than the activities of mixed co-immobilized enzymes or the sequential immobilized ones. This dual-enzymes loaded film (DEL film) showed excellent recyclability and can retain >87% activities of both enzymes after 4 cycles of utilization. As an example, this DEL film was used to conjugate a prodrug of cytarabine with a target peptide. The successful preparation of expected product demonstrated that the separately immobilized two enzymes can worked well together to catalyze a two-step reaction.

  19. Biochemistry Students' Ideas about Shape and Charge in Enzyme-Substrate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2014-01-01

    Biochemistry is a visual discipline that requires students to develop an understanding of numerous representations. However, there is very little known about what students actually understand about the representations that are used to communicate ideas in biochemistry. This study investigated biochemistry students' understanding of multiple…

  20. Cellulosic ethanol: interactions between cultivar and enzyme loading in wheat straw processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felby Claus

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in sugar yield due to genotypic qualities of feedstock are largely undescribed for pilot-scale ethanol processing. Our objectives were to compare glucose and xylose yield (conversion and total sugar yield from straw of five winter wheat cultivars at three enzyme loadings (2.5, 5 and 10 FPU g-1 dm pretreated straw and to compare particle size distribution of cultivars after pilot-scale hydrothermal pretreatment. Results Significant interactions between enzyme loading and cultivars show that breeding for cultivars with high sugar yields under modest enzyme loading could be warranted. At an enzyme loading of 5 FPU g-1 dm pretreated straw, a significant difference in sugar yields of 17% was found between the highest and lowest yielding cultivars. Sugar yield from separately hydrolyzed particle-size fractions of each cultivar showed that finer particles had 11% to 21% higher yields than coarse particles. The amount of coarse particles from the cultivar with lowest sugar yield was negatively correlated with sugar conversion. Conclusions We conclude that genetic differences in sugar yield and response to enzyme loading exist for wheat straw at pilot scale, depending on differences in removal of hemicellulose, accumulation of ash and particle-size distribution introduced by the pretreatment.

  1. Application of solid waste from anaerobic digestion of poultry litter in Agrocybe aegerita cultivation: mushroom production, lignocellulolytic enzymes activity and substrate utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikhuemhen, Omoanghe S; Mikiashvili, Nona A; Kelkar, Vinaya

    2009-06-01

    The degradation and utilization of solid waste (SW) from anaerobic digestion of poultry litter by Agrocybe aegerita was evaluated through mushroom production, loss of organic matter (LOM), lignocellulolytic enzymes activity, lignocellulose degradation and mushroom nutrients content. Among the substrate combinations (SCs) tested, substrates composed of 10-20% SW, 70-80% wheat straw and 10% millet was found to produce the highest mushroom yield (770.5 and 642.9 g per 1.5 kg of substrate). LOM in all SCs tested varied between 8.8 and 48.2%. A. aegerita appears to degrade macromolecule components (0.6-21.8% lignin, 33.1-55.2% cellulose and 14-53.9% hemicellulose) during cultivation on the different SCs. Among the seven extracellular enzymes monitored, laccase, peroxidase and CMCase activities were higher before fruiting; while xylanase showed higher activities after fruiting. A source of carbohydrates (e.g., millet) in the substrate is needed in order to obtain yield and biological efficiency comparable to other commercially cultivated exotic mushrooms.

  2. Insulin receptor substrate-3, interacting with Bcl-3, enhances p50 NF-{kappa}B activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabuta, Tomohiro [Departments of Animal Sciences and Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Department of Degenerative Neurological Diseases, National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8502 (Japan); Hakuno, Fumihiko; Cho, Yoshitake; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Chida, Kazuhiro [Departments of Animal Sciences and Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Asano, Tomoichiro [Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Wada, Keiji [Department of Degenerative Neurological Diseases, National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8502 (Japan); Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro, E-mail: atkshin@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Departments of Animal Sciences and Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2010-04-09

    The insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins are major substrates of both insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I receptor tyrosine kinases. Previously, we reported that IRS-3 is localized to both cytosol and nucleus, and possesses transcriptional activity. In the present study, we identified Bcl-3 as a novel binding protein to IRS-3. Bcl-3 is a nuclear protein, which forms a complex with the homodimer of p50 NF-{kappa}B, leading to enhancement of transcription through p50 NF-{kappa}B. We found that Bcl-3 interacts with the pleckstrin homology domain and the phosphotyrosine binding domain of IRS-3, and that IRS-3 interacts with the ankyrin repeat domain of Bcl-3. In addition, IRS-3 augmented the binding activity of p50 to the NF-{kappa}B DNA binding site, as well as the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-induced transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B. Lastly, IRS-3 enhanced NF-{kappa}B-dependent anti-apoptotic gene induction and consequently inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced cell death. This series of results proposes a novel function for IRS-3 as a transcriptional regulator in TNF-{alpha} signaling, distinct from its function as a substrate of insulin/IGF receptor kinases.

  3. Essential multimeric enzymes in kinetoplastid parasites: A host of potentially druggable protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsmuth, Leah M; Johnson, Meredith G; Gavenonis, Jason

    2017-06-01

    Parasitic diseases caused by kinetoplastid parasites of the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania are an urgent public health crisis in the developing world. These closely related species possess a number of multimeric enzymes in highly conserved pathways involved in vital functions, such as redox homeostasis and nucleotide synthesis. Computational alanine scanning of these protein-protein interfaces has revealed a host of potentially ligandable sites on several established and emerging anti-parasitic drug targets. Analysis of interfaces with multiple clustered hotspots has suggested several potentially inhibitable protein-protein interactions that may have been overlooked by previous large-scale analyses focusing solely on secondary structure. These protein-protein interactions provide a promising lead for the development of new peptide and macrocycle inhibitors of these enzymes.

  4. Profiling of Substrates for Zinc‐dependent Lysine Deacylase Enzymes: HDAC3 Exhibits Decrotonylase Activity In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Olsen, Christian Adam

    2012-01-01

    Ein systematisches Screening der Aktivitäten der elf humanen zinkabhängigen Lysin-Deacylasen gegen eine Reihe fluorogener Substrate (siehe Schema) ergab wiederum geeignete Substrate für Screenings der Histon-Deacetylasen HDAC10 und HDAC11. Darüber hinaus wurde gefunden, dass HDAC3 im Komplex mit...

  5. Study on the interaction of chemopreventive compounds and food born carcinogens with cytochrome P450 enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Brabencová, Eliška

    2013-01-01

    The use of food supplements containing natural chemopreventive compounds increased in recent years. Some of the most popular chemopreventive compounds are flavonoids. Due to their natural origin, flavonoids are generally accepted as safe compounds. They exert antioxidant, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. However, flavonoids should be considered as foreign compounds (xenobiotics). Flavonoids interact with many enzymes, among the most important belong cytochromes P450 (CYPs), key e...

  6. A multi-substrate approach for functional metagenomics-based screening for (hemi)cellulases in two wheat straw-degrading microbial consortia unveils novel thermoalkaliphilic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthamuthu, Mukil; Jiménez, Diego Javier; Stevens, Patricia; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-01-28

    Functional metagenomics is a promising strategy for the exploration of the biocatalytic potential of microbiomes in order to uncover novel enzymes for industrial processes (e.g. biorefining or bleaching pulp). Most current methodologies used to screen for enzymes involved in plant biomass degradation are based on the use of single substrates. Moreover, highly diverse environments are used as metagenomic sources. However, such methods suffer from low hit rates of positive clones and hence the discovery of novel enzymatic activities from metagenomes has been hampered. Here, we constructed fosmid libraries from two wheat straw-degrading microbial consortia, denoted RWS (bred on untreated wheat straw) and TWS (bred on heat-treated wheat straw). Approximately 22,000 clones from each library were screened for (hemi)cellulose-degrading enzymes using a multi-chromogenic substrate approach. The screens yielded 71 positive clones for both libraries, giving hit rates of 1:440 and 1:1,047 for RWS and TWS, respectively. Seven clones (NT2-2, T5-5, NT18-17, T4-1, 10BT, NT18-21 and T17-2) were selected for sequence analyses. Their inserts revealed the presence of 18 genes encoding enzymes belonging to twelve different glycosyl hydrolase families (GH2, GH3, GH13, GH17, GH20, GH27, GH32, GH39, GH53, GH58, GH65 and GH109). These encompassed several carbohydrate-active gene clusters traceable mainly to Klebsiella related species. Detailed functional analyses showed that clone NT2-2 (containing a beta-galactosidase of ~116 kDa) had highest enzymatic activity at 55 °C and pH 9.0. Additionally, clone T5-5 (containing a beta-xylosidase of ~86 kDa) showed > 90% of enzymatic activity at 55 °C and pH 10.0. This study employed a high-throughput method for rapid screening of fosmid metagenomic libraries for (hemi)cellulose-degrading enzymes. The approach, consisting of screens on multi-substrates coupled to further analyses, revealed high hit rates, as compared with recent other studies. Two

  7. Root development during soil genesis: effects of root-root interactions, mycorrhizae, and substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, A.; Zaharescu, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    A major driver of soil formation is the colonization and transformation of rock by plants and associated microbiota. In turn, substrate chemical composition can also influence the capacity for plant colonization and development. In order to better define these relationships, a mesocosm study was set up to analyze the effect mycorrhizal fungi, plant density and rock have on root development, and to determine the effect of root morphology on weathering and soil formation. We hypothesized that plant-plant and plant-fungi interactions have a stronger influence on root architecture and rock weathering than the substrate composition alone. Buffalo grass (Bouteloua dactyloides) was grown in a controlled environment in columns filled with either granular granite, schist, rhyolite or basalt. Each substrate was given two different treatments, including grass-microbes and grass-microbes-mycorrhizae and incubated for 120, 240, and 480 days. Columns were then extracted and analyzed for root morphology, fine fraction, and pore water major element content. Preliminary results showed that plants produced more biomass in rhyolite, followed by schist, basalt, and granite, indicating that substrate composition is an important driver of root development. In support of our hypothesis, mycorrhizae was a strong driver of root development by stimulating length growth, biomass production, and branching. However, average root length and branching also appeared to decrease in response to high plant density, though this trend was only present among roots with mycorrhizal fungi. Interestingly, fine fraction production was negatively correlated with average root thickness and volume. There is also slight evidence indicating that fine fraction production is more related to substrate composition than root morphology, though this data needs to be further analyzed. Our hope is that the results of this study can one day be applied to agricultural research in order to promote the production of crops

  8. The selective interaction between silica nanoparticles and enzymes from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotian Sun

    Full Text Available Nanoscale particles have become promising materials in many fields, such as cancer therapeutics, diagnosis, imaging, drug delivery, catalysis, as well as biosensors. In order to stimulate and facilitate these applications, there is an urgent need for the understanding of the interaction mode between the nano-particles and proteins. In this study, we investigate the orientation and adsorption between several enzymes (cytochrome c, RNase A, lysozyme and 4 nm/11 nm silica nanoparticles (SNPs by using molecular dynamics (MD simulation. Our results show that three enzymes are adsorbed onto the surfaces of both 4 nm and 11 nm SNPs during our MD simulations and the small SNPs induce greater structural stabilization. The active site of cytochrome c is far away from the surface of 4 nm SNPs, while it is adsorbed onto the surface of 11 nm SNPs. We also explore the influences of different groups (-OH, -COOH, -NH2 and CH3 coated onto silica nanoparticles, which show significantly different impacts. Our molecular dynamics results indicate the selective interaction between silicon nanoparticles and enzymes, which is consistent with experimental results. Our study provides useful guides for designing/modifying nanomaterials to interact with proteins for their bio-applications.

  9. Binding of Substrates to the Central Pore of the Vps4 ATPase Is Autoinhibited by the Microtubule Interacting and Trafficking (MIT) Domain and Activated by MIT Interacting Motifs (MIMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Monroe, Nicole; Votteler, Jörg; Shakya, Binita; Sundquist, Wesley I; Hill, Christopher P

    2015-05-22

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) pathway drives reverse topology membrane fission events within multiple cellular pathways, including cytokinesis, multivesicular body biogenesis, repair of the plasma membrane, nuclear membrane vesicle formation, and HIV budding. The AAA ATPase Vps4 is recruited to membrane necks shortly before fission, where it catalyzes disassembly of the ESCRT-III lattice. The N-terminal Vps4 microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains initially bind the C-terminal MIT-interacting motifs (MIMs) of ESCRT-III subunits, but it is unclear how the enzyme then remodels these substrates in response to ATP hydrolysis. Here, we report quantitative binding studies that demonstrate that residues from helix 5 of the Vps2p subunit of ESCRT-III bind to the central pore of an asymmetric Vps4p hexamer in a manner that is dependent upon the presence of flexible nucleotide analogs that can mimic multiple states in the ATP hydrolysis cycle. We also find that substrate engagement is autoinhibited by the Vps4p MIT domain and that this inhibition is relieved by binding of either Type 1 or Type 2 MIM elements, which bind the Vps4p MIT domain through different interfaces. These observations support the model that Vps4 substrates are initially recruited by an MIM-MIT interaction that activates the Vps4 central pore to engage substrates and generate force, thereby triggering ESCRT-III disassembly. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Binding of Substrates to the Central Pore of the Vps4 ATPase Is Autoinhibited by the Microtubule Interacting and Trafficking (MIT) Domain and Activated by MIT Interacting Motifs (MIMs)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Monroe, Nicole; Votteler, Jörg; Shakya, Binita; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) pathway drives reverse topology membrane fission events within multiple cellular pathways, including cytokinesis, multivesicular body biogenesis, repair of the plasma membrane, nuclear membrane vesicle formation, and HIV budding. The AAA ATPase Vps4 is recruited to membrane necks shortly before fission, where it catalyzes disassembly of the ESCRT-III lattice. The N-terminal Vps4 microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains initially bind the C-terminal MIT-interacting motifs (MIMs) of ESCRT-III subunits, but it is unclear how the enzyme then remodels these substrates in response to ATP hydrolysis. Here, we report quantitative binding studies that demonstrate that residues from helix 5 of the Vps2p subunit of ESCRT-III bind to the central pore of an asymmetric Vps4p hexamer in a manner that is dependent upon the presence of flexible nucleotide analogs that can mimic multiple states in the ATP hydrolysis cycle. We also find that substrate engagement is autoinhibited by the Vps4p MIT domain and that this inhibition is relieved by binding of either Type 1 or Type 2 MIM elements, which bind the Vps4p MIT domain through different interfaces. These observations support the model that Vps4 substrates are initially recruited by an MIM-MIT interaction that activates the Vps4 central pore to engage substrates and generate force, thereby triggering ESCRT-III disassembly. PMID:25833946

  11. Sudden cardiac death: the pro-arrhythmic interaction of an acute loading with an underlying substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, George R

    2017-10-21

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a complex phenomenon, occurring either in apparently normal individuals or in those where there is a recognized underlying cardiac abnormality. In both groups, the lethal arrhythmia has frequently been related to the physiologic trigger of either exercise or stress. Prior research into SCD has focused mainly on a combination of identifying either vulnerable myocardial substrates; pharmacological approaches to altering electrical activation/repolarisation in substrates; or the suppression of induced lethal arrhythmias with implantable defibrillators. However, it has been suggested that in a significant number of cases, the interaction of a transient induced trigger with a pre-existing electrical or mechanical substrate is the basis for the induction of the sustained lethal arrhythmia. In this manuscript we will discuss the precise mechanisms whereby one of such potential physiologic trigger: an acute change in systolic blood pressure, can induce a sequence of alterations in global and local cardiac mechanics which in turn result in regional left ventricular post-systolic deformation which, mediated (through stretch-induced changes in local mechano-electrical coupling) provokes local electrical after-depolarisations which can spill over into complex runs of premature ventricular beats. These local acute pressure/stretch induced runs of ventricular ectopy originate in either basal or apical normal myocardium and, in combination with a co-existing distal pro-arrhymic substrate, can interact to induce a lethal arrhythmia. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Theoretical study of the interparticle interaction of nanoparticles randomly dispersed on a substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikoshi, S.; Kato, T.

    2015-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles exhibit the phenomenon of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) due to the collective oscillation of their conduction electrons, which is induced by external electromagnetic radiation. The finite-differential time-domain (FDTD) method is widely used as an electromagnetic field analysis tool for nanoparticles. Although the influence of interparticle interactions is taken into consideration in the FDTD calculation for the plural particles configuration, the FDTD calculation of a random configuration is very difficult, particularly in the case of non-spherical particles. In this study, a theoretical calculation method incorporating interparticle interactions on a substrate with various particle shapes and sizes on a subwavelength scale is developed. The interparticle interaction is incorporated following FDTD calculation with an isolated single particle. This is explained systematically using a signal flow graph. Moreover, the mirror image effect of the substrate and the retardation effect are also taken into account in this method. The validity of this method is verified by calculations for simple arrangements of nanoparticles. In addition, it is confirmed that the method can improve the accuracy of predicted experimental results for Au nanoparticles prepared by the sputtering method, in terms of the plasmon peak wavelength. This method may enable the design of LSPR devices by controlling nanoparticle characteristics, such as the size, shape, and distribution density

  13. Ultrafast dynamics of ligand and substrate interaction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase under Soret excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chih-Chang; Yabushita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Chen, Pei-Feng; Liang, Keng S

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of endothelial NOS oxygenase domain (eNOS-oxy) was performed to study dynamics of ligand or substrate interaction under Soret band excitation. Photo-excitation dissociates imidazole ligand in 4ps. The eNOS-oxy without additive is partially bound with water molecule, thus its photoexcited dynamics also shows ligand dissociation in <800fs. Then it followed by vibrational cooling coupled with charge transfer in 4.8ps, and recombination of ligand to distal side of heme in 12ps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. High-level accumulation of oleyl oleate in plant seed oil by abundant supply of oleic acid substrates to efficient wax ester synthesis enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan; Hornung, Ellen; Iven, Tim; Feussner, Ivo

    2018-01-01

    Biotechnology enables the production of high-valued industrial feedstocks from plant seed oil. The plant-derived wax esters with long-chain monounsaturated acyl moieties, like oleyl oleate, have favorite properties for lubrication. For biosynthesis of wax esters using acyl-CoA substrates, expressions of a fatty acyl reductase (FAR) and a wax synthase (WS) in seeds are sufficient. For optimization of the enzymatic activity and subcellular localization of wax ester synthesis enzymes, two fusion proteins were created, which showed wax ester-forming activities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae . To promote the formation of oleyl oleate in seed oil, WSs from Acinetobactor baylyi ( Ab WSD1) and Marinobacter aquaeolei ( Ma WS2), as well as the two created fusion proteins were tested in Arabidopsis to evaluate their abilities and substrate preference for wax ester production. The tested seven enzyme combinations resulted in different yields and compositions of wax esters. Expression of a FAR of Marinobacter aquaeolei ( Ma FAR) with Ab WSD1 or Ma WS2 led to a high incorporation of C 18 substrates in wax esters. The Ma FAR/TM Mm AWAT2- Ab WSD1 combination resulted in the incorporation of more C 18:1 alcohol and C 18:0 acyl moieties into wax esters compared with Ma FAR/ Ab WSD1. The fusion protein of a WS from Simmondsia chinensis ( Sc WS) with MaFAR exhibited higher specificity toward C 20:1 substrates in preference to C 18:1 substrates. Expression of Ma FAR/ Ab WSD1 in the Arabidopsis fad2 fae1 double mutant resulted in the accumulation of oleyl oleate (18:1/18:1) in up to 62 mol% of total wax esters in seed oil, which was much higher than the 15 mol% reached by Ma FAR/ Ab WSD1 in Arabidopsis Col-0 background. In order to increase the level of oleyl oleate in seed oil of Camelina , lines expressing Ma FAR/ Sc WS were crossed with a transgenic high oleate line. The resulting plants accumulated up to >40 mg g seed -1 of wax esters, containing 27-34 mol% oleyl oleate. The

  15. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based method for measuring galactosyltransferase activity using a synthetic glycopolymer acceptor substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oubihi, M; Kitajima, K; Kobayashi, K; Adachi, T; Aoki, N; Matsuda, T

    1998-03-15

    A lectin-assisted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based method using a synthetic glycopolymer as an acceptor substrate was developed for measuring beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalT) activity. A polyacrylamide derivative having a beta-linked N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc beta) moiety on each monomeric unit was synthesized chemically and immobilized on a polystyrene microtiter plate as an acceptor substrate for GalT. After the plate was incubated with bovine GalT, the enzyme reaction product, beta-linked Gal residue on the polyacrylamide-bound GlcNAc residue, was detected by using Ricinus communis agglutinin 1 (RCA1), rabbit anti-RCA1 antibody, and a peroxidase-labeled anti-rabbit IgG. The lowest GalT concentration detectable by this method was about 0.5 mU/ml, which is comparable to those by the previously reported ELISA-based assays. The unique property of the glycopolymer, PAP(GlcNAc beta), of binding noncovalently but tightly to the polystyrene microtiter plate allowed the use of this acceptor substrate for the GalT activity measurement even in the presence of 1% Triton CF-54 and X-100. Our system was successfully applied to assess GalT activity in milk of various mammals.

  16. Electrophoretic analysis of proteinases in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels containing copolymerized radiolabeled protein substrates: Application to proenkephalin processing enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irvine, J.W.; Roberts, S.F.; Lindberg, I. (Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans (USA))

    1990-10-01

    A novel method is described for the zymographic analysis of proteinases in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels containing copolymerized radiolabeled protein substrates such as ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled proenkephalin or {sup 125}I-labeled proinsulin. After electrophoresis the enzyme is reactivated and cleaves the radiolabeled in situ substrate into smaller peptides. These small peptides are able to diffuse out of the gel, leaving clear areas against a dark background when visualized by autoradiography. The technique can be used to detect as little as 200 fg of trypsin using only 50 ng (1.25 microCi) of ({sup 35}S)proenkephalin. Soluble- and membrane-bound adrenal trypsin-like enzyme were isolated from bovine adrenal chromaffin granules. Both proteinases cleaved ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled proenkephalin but not {sup 125}I-labeled proinsulin. Moreover, both had a Mr of approximately 30,000. The potential of this technique for general use is discussed. An additional method using the synthetic fluorogenic substrate t-butoxycarbonyl Glu-Lys-Lys aminomethylcoumarin is also described.

  17. Interaction and modulation of two antagonistic cell wall enzymes of mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik C Hett

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell growth and division require coordinated cell wall hydrolysis and synthesis, allowing for the removal and expansion of cell wall material. Without proper coordination, unchecked hydrolysis can result in cell lysis. How these opposing activities are simultaneously regulated is poorly understood. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the resuscitation-promoting factor B (RpfB, a lytic transglycosylase, interacts and synergizes with Rpf-interacting protein A (RipA, an endopeptidase, to hydrolyze peptidoglycan. However, it remains unclear what governs this synergy and how it is coordinated with cell wall synthesis. Here we identify the bifunctional peptidoglycan-synthesizing enzyme, penicillin binding protein 1 (PBP1, as a RipA-interacting protein. PBP1, like RipA, localizes both at the poles and septa of dividing cells. Depletion of the ponA1 gene, encoding PBP1 in M. smegmatis, results in a severe growth defect and abnormally shaped cells, indicating that PBP1 is necessary for viability and cell wall stability. Finally, PBP1 inhibits the synergistic hydrolysis of peptidoglycan by the RipA-RpfB complex in vitro. These data reveal a post-translational mechanism for regulating cell wall hydrolysis and synthesis through protein-protein interactions between enzymes with antagonistic functions.

  18. Improved management of lysosomal glucosylceramide levels in a mouse model of type 1 Gaucher disease using enzyme and substrate reduction therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John; McEachern, Kerry Anne; Chuang, Wei-Lien; Hutto, Elizabeth; Siegel, Craig S; Shayman, James A; Grabowski, Greg A; Scheule, Ronald K; Copeland, Diane P; Cheng, Seng H

    2010-06-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (acid beta-glucosidase), with consequent cellular accumulation of glucosylceramide (GL-1). The disease is managed by intravenous administrations of recombinant glucocerebrosidase (imiglucerase), although symptomatic patients with mild to moderate type 1 Gaucher disease for whom enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is not an option may also be treated by substrate reduction therapy (SRT) with miglustat. To determine whether the sequential use of both ERT and SRT may provide additional benefits, we compared the relative pharmacodynamic efficacies of separate and sequential therapies in a murine model of Gaucher disease (D409V/null). As expected, ERT with recombinant glucocerebrosidase was effective in reducing the burden of GL-1 storage in the liver, spleen, and lung of 3-month-old Gaucher mice. SRT using a novel inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthase (Genz-112638) was also effective, albeit to a lesser degree than ERT. Animals administered recombinant glucocerebrosidase and then Genz-112638 showed the lowest levels of GL-1 in all the visceral organs and a reduced number of Gaucher cells in the liver. This was likely because the additional deployment of SRT following enzyme therapy slowed the rate of reaccumulation of GL-1 in the affected organs. Hence, in patients whose disease has been stabilized by intravenously administered recombinant glucocerebrosidase, orally administered SRT with Genz-112638 could potentially be used as a convenient maintenance therapy. In patients naïve to treatment, ERT followed by SRT could potentially accelerate clearance of the offending substrate.

  19. Cost-effective production of cellulose hydrolysing enzymes from Trichoderma sp. RCK65 under SSF and its evaluation in saccharification of cellulosic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subhojit; Gupta, Rishi; Jain, Kavish Kumar; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2016-11-01

    Trichoderma sp. is a potential cellulase producing mesophilic fungi which grow under mild acidic condition. In this study, growth and nutritional conditions were manipulated for the maximum and cost-effective production of cellulase using lab strain Trichoderma sp. RCK65 and checked for its efficiency in hydrolysis of Prosopis juliflora (a woody substrate). Preliminary studies suggested that when 48 h old secondary fungal culture (20 % v/w) was inoculated in wheat bran moistened with mineral salt solution (pH 4.5 and 1:3 solid to moisture ratio), incubated at 30 °C and after 72 h, it produced maximum cellulase (CMCase 145 U/gds, FPase 38 U/gds and β-glucosidase 105 U/gds). However, using statistical approach a S:L ratio (1:1) was surprisingly found to be optimum that improved cellulase that is CMCase activity by 6.21 %, FPase activity by 23.68 % and β-glucosidase activity by 37.28 %. The estimated cost of crude enzyme (Rs. 5.311/1000 FPase units) seems to be economically feasible which may be due to high enzyme titre, less cultivation time and low media cost. Moreover, when the crude enzyme was used to saccharify pretreated Prosopis juliflora (a woody substrate), it resulted up to 83 % (w/w) saccharification.

  20. Water-mediated interactions enable smooth substrate transport in a bacterial efflux pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargiu, Attilio Vittorio; Ramaswamy, Venkata Krishnan; Malvacio, Ivana; Malloci, Giuliano; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Ruggerone, Paolo

    2018-04-01

    Efflux pumps of the Resistance-Nodulation-cell Division superfamily confer multi-drug resistance to Gram-negative bacteria. The most-studied polyspecific transporter belonging to this class is the inner-membrane trimeric antiporter AcrB of Escherichia coli. In previous studies, a functional rotation mechanism was proposed for its functioning, according to which the three monomers undergo concerted conformational changes facilitating the extrusion of substrates. However, the molecular determinants and the energetics of this mechanism still remain unknown, so its feasibility must be proven mechanistically. A computational protocol able to mimic the functional rotation mechanism in AcrB was developed. By using multi-bias molecular dynamics simulations we characterized the translocation of the substrate doxorubicin driven by conformational changes of the protein. In addition, we estimated for the first time the free energy profile associated to this process. We provided a molecular view of the process in agreement with experimental data. Moreover, we showed that the conformational changes occurring in AcrB enable the formation of a layer of structured waters on the internal surface of the transport channel. This water layer, in turn, allows for a fairly constant hydration of the substrate, facilitating its diffusion over a smooth free energy profile. Our findings reveal a new molecular mechanism of polyspecific transport whereby water contributes by screening potentially strong substrate-protein interactions. We provided a mechanistic understanding of a fundamental process related to multi-drug transport. Our results can help rationalizing the behavior of other polyspecific transporters and designing compounds avoiding extrusion or inhibitors of efflux pumps. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Kinase Substrate Sensor (KISS), a mammalian in situ protein interaction sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Sam; Gerlo, Sarah; Lemmens, Irma; De Clercq, Dries J H; Risseeuw, Martijn D P; Vanderroost, Nele; De Smet, Anne-Sophie; Ruyssinck, Elien; Chevet, Eric; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Tavernier, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Probably every cellular process is governed by protein-protein interaction (PPIs), which are often highly dynamic in nature being modulated by in- or external stimuli. Here we present KISS, for KInase Substrate Sensor, a mammalian two-hybrid approach designed to map intracellular PPIs and some of the dynamic features they exhibit. Benchmarking experiments indicate that in terms of sensitivity and specificity KISS is on par with other binary protein interaction technologies while being complementary with regard to the subset of PPIs it is able to detect. We used KISS to evaluate interactions between different types of proteins, including transmembrane proteins, expressed at their native subcellular location. In situ analysis of endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced clustering of the endoplasmic reticulum stress sensor ERN1 and ligand-dependent β-arrestin recruitment to GPCRs illustrated the method's potential to study functional PPI modulation in complex cellular processes. Exploring its use as a tool for in cell evaluation of pharmacological interference with PPIs, we showed that reported effects of known GPCR antagonists and PPI inhibitors are properly recapitulated. In a three-hybrid setup, KISS was able to map interactions between small molecules and proteins. Taken together, we established KISS as a sensitive approach for in situ analysis of protein interactions and their modulation in a changing cellular context or in response to pharmacological challenges. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Theory of substrate, Zeeman, and electron-phonon interaction effects on the quantum capacitance in graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.; Sabeeh, K.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Shaukat, A.

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of graphene, a lot of interest has been attracted by the zeroth Landau level, which has no analog in the conventional two dimensional electron gas. Recently, lifting of the spin and valley degeneracies has been confirmed experimentally by capacitance measurements, while in transport experiments, this is difficult due to the scattering in the device. In this context, we model interaction effects on the quantum capacitance of graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, finding good agreement with experiments. We demonstrate that the valley degeneracy is lifted by the substrate and by Kekule distortion, whereas the spin degeneracy is lifted by Zeeman interaction. The two cases can be distinguished by capacitance measurements.

  3. Theory of substrate, Zeeman, and electron-phonon interaction effects on the quantum capacitance in graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2013-12-10

    Since the discovery of graphene, a lot of interest has been attracted by the zeroth Landau level, which has no analog in the conventional two dimensional electron gas. Recently, lifting of the spin and valley degeneracies has been confirmed experimentally by capacitance measurements, while in transport experiments, this is difficult due to the scattering in the device. In this context, we model interaction effects on the quantum capacitance of graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, finding good agreement with experiments. We demonstrate that the valley degeneracy is lifted by the substrate and by Kekule distortion, whereas the spin degeneracy is lifted by Zeeman interaction. The two cases can be distinguished by capacitance measurements.

  4. Theory of substrate, Zeeman, and electron-phonon interaction effects on the quantum capacitance in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, M.; Sabeeh, K.; Shaukat, A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of graphene, a lot of interest has been attracted by the zeroth Landau level, which has no analog in the conventional two dimensional electron gas. Recently, lifting of the spin and valley degeneracies has been confirmed experimentally by capacitance measurements, while in transport experiments, this is difficult due to the scattering in the device. In this context, we model interaction effects on the quantum capacitance of graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, finding good agreement with experiments. We demonstrate that the valley degeneracy is lifted by the substrate and by Kekule distortion, whereas the spin degeneracy is lifted by Zeeman interaction. The two cases can be distinguished by capacitance measurements

  5. Molecular interaction of the first 3 enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirawake, Hiroko; Liao, Chien-Wei; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Morales, Jorge; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Fan, Chia-Kwung; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Inoue, Masayuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An Escherichia coli strain co-expressing CPSII, ATC, and DHO of Trypanosoma cruzi was constructed. ► Molecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of T. cruzi were demonstrated. ► CPSII bound with both ATC and DHO. ► ATC bound with both CPSII and DHO. ► A functional tri-enzyme complex might precede the establishment of the fused enzyme. -- Abstract: The first 3 reaction steps of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway are catalyzed by carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII), aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC), and dihydroorotase (DHO), respectively. In eukaryotes, these enzymes are structurally classified into 2 types: (1) a CPSII-DHO-ATC fusion enzyme (CAD) found in animals, fungi, and amoebozoa, and (2) stand-alone enzymes found in plants and the protist groups. In the present study, we demonstrate direct intermolecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The 3 enzymes were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their interactions were examined. Immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for each enzyme coupled with Western blotting-based detection using antibodies for the counterpart enzymes showed co-precipitation of all 3 enzymes. From an evolutionary viewpoint, the formation of a functional tri-enzyme complex may have preceded—and led to—gene fusion to produce the CAD protein. This is the first report to demonstrate the structural basis of these 3 enzymes as a model of CAD. Moreover, in conjunction with the essentiality of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the parasite, our findings provide a rationale for new strategies for developing drugs for Chagas disease, which target the intermolecular interactions of these 3 enzymes.

  6. Enzyme-semiconductor interactions: Routes from fundamental aspects to photoactive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewerenz, H.J. [Division of Solar Energy, Hahn-Meitner-Institut GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) experiments at protein-semiconductor systems are analyzed using concepts from applied semiconductor physics such as Fermi level pinning and MIS (metal-insulator-semiconductor) junction electronics. Routes for immobilization of enzymes (proteins) on nanostructured surfaces of MoTe{sub 2} and Si are outlined using so-called DLVO and non-DLVO interaction forces. An overview of the catalytic activity of the imaged enzymes, reverse transcriptases of the retroviruses HIV 1 and AMV (avian myeloblastosis virus), is given including their tertiary structural properties which is revealed also in the STM and tapping mode AFM images. For the interpretation of STM images, a resonant charge transfer mechanism is invoked, based on the potential dependence of the image contrast and the energy band structure of MoTe{sub 2} near the valence band maximum. First analyses of the charge transport from the semiconductor to the STM tip at negative bias of MoTe{sub 2} suggest that the observed uninhibited conductivity in the constant current experiments results from solvation-assisted release of electrons from traps that exist along the polypeptide chains and that charge transport occurs at the circumference of the enzymes where biological water is present. Therefore, charge injection into catalytically active enzymes such as hydrogenase or water oxidase of photosystem I and II with subsequent charge transport to the active sites appears difficult to realize. Possibilities of radiation-less long-distance energy transfer based on the Foerster mechanism, its multichromic extension and on Dexter exciton hopping are considered for catalytically active hybrid inorganic/organic absorber-enzyme structures. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. 2,3-Dihydro-2,5-dihydroxy-4H-benzopyran-4-one: a nonphysiological substrate for fungal melanin biosynthetic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J E; Basarab, G S; Pierce, J; Hodge, C N; Jordan, D B

    1998-02-01

    We have synthesized an alternate substrate for trihydroxynaphthalene reductase (3HNR) and scytalone dehydratase (SD), two enzymes in the fungal melanin biosynthetic pathway. The oxidation of 2,3-dihydro-2,5-dihydroxy-4H-benzopyran-4-one (DDBO) to 4,5-dihydroxy-2H-benzopyran-2-one (DBO) with concomitant reduction of NADP+ is catalyzed by 3HNR. DDBO is dehydrated by SD to 5-hydroxy-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (HBO). These reactions can be monitored using continuous spectrophotometric assays. DDBO race-mizes rapidly, so chiral synthesis to mimic the natural substrate is not required. DDBO, DBO, and HBO are stable in aerated aqueous solution, in contrast to the rapidly autooxidizing trihydroxynaphthalene, a physiological substrate for 3HNR and product of SD. Unlike the natural substrates, DDBO, DBO, and HBO do not change protonation state between pH's 4 and 9. Oxidation of DDBO is effectively irreversible at pH 7, as DBO deprotonates with a pKa of 2.5. At pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C, the kcat for 3HNR catalyzed DDBO oxidation is 14 s-1 and the K(m) is 5 microM; the kcat for SD catalyzed DDBO dehydration is 400 s-1 and the K(m) is 15 microM. Based on these kinetic constants, DDBO is a better substrate than the natural substrate scytalone for both 3HNR and SD at neutral pH. An explanation for the preference of DDBO over scytalone in the oxidation and dehydration reactions is offered.

  8. Functional mapping of protein-protein interactions in an enzyme complex by directed evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Roderer

    Full Text Available The shikimate pathway enzyme chorismate mutase converts chorismate into prephenate, a precursor of Tyr and Phe. The intracellular chorismate mutase (MtCM of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is poorly active on its own, but becomes >100-fold more efficient upon formation of a complex with the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase (MtDS. The crystal structure of the enzyme complex revealed involvement of C-terminal MtCM residues with the MtDS interface. Here we employed evolutionary strategies to probe the tolerance to substitution of the C-terminal MtCM residues from positions 84-90. Variants with randomized positions were subjected to stringent selection in vivo requiring productive interactions with MtDS for survival. Sequence patterns identified in active library members coincide with residue conservation in natural chorismate mutases of the AroQδ subclass to which MtCM belongs. An Arg-Gly dyad at positions 85 and 86, invariant in AroQδ sequences, was intolerant to mutation, whereas Leu88 and Gly89 exhibited a preference for small and hydrophobic residues in functional MtCM-MtDS complexes. In the absence of MtDS, selection under relaxed conditions identifies positions 84-86 as MtCM integrity determinants, suggesting that the more C-terminal residues function in the activation by MtDS. Several MtCM variants, purified using a novel plasmid-based T7 RNA polymerase gene expression system, showed that a diminished ability to physically interact with MtDS correlates with reduced activatability and feedback regulatory control by Tyr and Phe. Mapping critical protein-protein interaction sites by evolutionary strategies may pinpoint promising targets for drugs that interfere with the activity of protein complexes.

  9. Functional mapping of protein-protein interactions in an enzyme complex by directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderer, Kathrin; Neuenschwander, Martin; Codoni, Giosiana; Sasso, Severin; Gamper, Marianne; Kast, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The shikimate pathway enzyme chorismate mutase converts chorismate into prephenate, a precursor of Tyr and Phe. The intracellular chorismate mutase (MtCM) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is poorly active on its own, but becomes >100-fold more efficient upon formation of a complex with the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase (MtDS). The crystal structure of the enzyme complex revealed involvement of C-terminal MtCM residues with the MtDS interface. Here we employed evolutionary strategies to probe the tolerance to substitution of the C-terminal MtCM residues from positions 84-90. Variants with randomized positions were subjected to stringent selection in vivo requiring productive interactions with MtDS for survival. Sequence patterns identified in active library members coincide with residue conservation in natural chorismate mutases of the AroQδ subclass to which MtCM belongs. An Arg-Gly dyad at positions 85 and 86, invariant in AroQδ sequences, was intolerant to mutation, whereas Leu88 and Gly89 exhibited a preference for small and hydrophobic residues in functional MtCM-MtDS complexes. In the absence of MtDS, selection under relaxed conditions identifies positions 84-86 as MtCM integrity determinants, suggesting that the more C-terminal residues function in the activation by MtDS. Several MtCM variants, purified using a novel plasmid-based T7 RNA polymerase gene expression system, showed that a diminished ability to physically interact with MtDS correlates with reduced activatability and feedback regulatory control by Tyr and Phe. Mapping critical protein-protein interaction sites by evolutionary strategies may pinpoint promising targets for drugs that interfere with the activity of protein complexes.

  10. Structural Basis for Specificity of Propeptide-Enzyme Interaction in Barley C1A Cysteine Peptidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Inés; Hernández, David; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    C1A cysteine peptidases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes. Activation takes place by proteolysis cleaving off the inhibitory propeptide. The inhibitory capacity of propeptides from barley cathepsin L and B-like peptidases towards commercial and barley cathepsins has been characterized. Differences in selectivity have been found for propeptides from L-cathepsins against their cognate and non cognate enzymes. Besides, the propeptide from barley cathepsin B was not able to inhibit bovine cathepsin B. Modelling of their three-dimensional structures suggests that most propeptide inhibitory properties can be explained from the interaction between the propeptide and the mature cathepsin structures. Their potential use as biotechnological tools is discussed. PMID:22615948

  11. The role of glycosylation and domain interactions in the thermal stability of human angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Hester G; Redelinghuys, Pierre; Schwager, Sylva L U; Sturrock, Edward D

    2008-09-01

    The N and C domains of somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme (sACE) differ in terms of their substrate specificity, inhibitor profiling, chloride dependency and thermal stability. The C domain is thermally less stable than sACE or the N domain. Since both domains are heavily glycosylated, the effect of glycosylation on their thermal stability was investigated by assessing their catalytic and physicochemical properties. Testis ACE (tACE) expressed in mammalian cells, mammalian cells in the presence of a glucosidase inhibitor and insect cells yielded proteins with altered catalytic and physicochemical properties, indicating that the more complex glycans confer greater thermal stabilization. Furthermore, a decrease in tACE and N-domain N-glycans using site-directed mutagenesis decreased their thermal stability, suggesting that certain N-glycans have an important effect on the protein's thermodynamic properties. Evaluation of the thermal stability of sACE domain swopover and domain duplication mutants, together with sACE expressed in insect cells, showed that the C domain contained in sACE is less dependent on glycosylation for thermal stabilization than a single C domain, indicating that stabilizing interactions between the two domains contribute to the thermal stability of sACE and are decreased in a C-domain-duplicating mutant.

  12. Structure of branching enzyme- and amylomaltase modified starch produced from well-defined amylose to amylopectin substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorndecha, Waraporn; Sagnelli, Domenico; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    by the molar mass rather that the branching density of the glucan per se . Our data demonstrate that a higher amylose content in the substrate starch efficiently produces α-1,6 glucosidic linkages and that the present of amylose generates a higher Μw and more resistant product than amylopectin. The combination...

  13. Introducing enzyme selectivity as a quantitative parameter to describe the effects of substrate concentration on protein hydrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butré, C.I.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the differences in peptide composition that result from variations in the conditions of enzymatic hydrolysis of proteins (e.g. substrate concentration) the mechanism of hydrolysis needs to be understood in detail. Therefore, methods and tools were developed to characterize and

  14. Diverse effects of arsenic on selected enzyme activities in soil-plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubun, Yelena V; Pleshakova, Ekaterina V; Mkandawire, Martin; Turkovskaya, Olga V

    2013-11-15

    Under the influence of pollutants, enzyme activities in plant-microbe-soil systems undergo changes of great importance in predicting soil-plant-microbe interactions, regulation of metal and nutrient uptake, and, ultimately, improvement of soil health and fertility. We evaluated the influence of As on soil enzyme activities and the effectiveness of five field crops for As phytoextraction. The initial As concentration in soil was 50mg As kg(-1) soil; planted clean soil, unplanted polluted soil, and unplanted clean soil served as controls. After 10 weeks, the growth of the plants elevated soil dehydrogenase activity relative to polluted but unplanted control soils by 2.4- and 2.5-fold for sorghum and sunflower (respectively), by 3-fold for ryegrass and sudangrass, and by 5.2-fold for spring rape. Soil peroxidase activity increased by 33% with ryegrass and rape, while soil phosphatase activity was directly correlated with residual As (correlation coefficient R(2)=0.7045). We conclude that soil enzyme activities should be taken into account when selecting plants for phytoremediation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential efficacy of enzyme replacement and substrate reduction therapy in three siblings with Gaucher disease type III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox-Brinkman, J.; van Breemen, M. J.; van Maldegem, B. T.; Bour, L.; Donker, W. E.; Hollak, C. E. M.; Wijburg, F. A.; Aerts, J. M. F. G.

    2008-01-01

    We report three siblings with Gaucher disease type III, born between 1992 and 2004. During this period, new developments resulted in different potential therapies, changing clinical practice. The two eldest siblings received enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) from the age of 24 and 5 months

  16. Scaling Down the Analysis of Environmental Processes: Monitoring Enzyme Activity in Natural Substrates on a Millimeter Resolution Scale

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baldrian, Petr; Větrovský, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 78, č. 9 (2012), s. 3473-3475 ISSN 0099-2240 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LA10001; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10152 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : enzyme activity * fungal colonies * soil Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.678, year: 2012

  17. In vivo continuous and simultaneous monitoring of brain energy substrates with a multiplex amperometric enzyme-based biosensor device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lima Braga Lopes Cordeiro, Carlos; de Vries, M.G.; Ngabi, W; Oomen, P.E.; Cremers, T.I.F.H.; Westerink, B.H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-based amperometric biosensors are widely used for monitoring key biomarkers. In experimental neuroscience there is a growing interest in in vivo continuous and simultaneous monitoring of metabolism-related biomarkers, like glucose, lactate and pyruvate. The use of multiplex biosensors will

  18. Enzyme Kinetics Experiment with the Multienzyme Complex Viscozyme L and Two Substrates for the Accurate Determination of Michaelian Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Nelson Pérez

    2017-01-01

    A laboratory experiment in which students study the kinetics of the Viscozyme-L-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose and starch comparatively was designed for an upper-division biochemistry laboratory. The main objective of this experiment was to provide an opportunity to perform enhanced enzyme kinetics data analysis using appropriate informatics…

  19. Van der Waals interactions between planar substrate and tubular lipid membranes undergoing pearling instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valchev, G. S.; Djondjorov, P. A.; Vassilev, V. M.; Dantchev, D. M.

    2017-10-01

    In the current article we study the behavior of the van der Waals force between a planar substrate and an axisymmetric bilayer lipid membrane undergoing pearling instability, caused by uniform hydrostatic pressure difference. To do so, the recently suggested "surface integration approach" is used, which can be considered a generalization of the well known and widely used Derjaguin approximation. The static equilibrium shape after the occurrence of the instability is described in the framework of Helfrich's spontaneous curvature model. Some specific classes of exact analytical solutions to the corresponding shape equation are considered, and the components of the respective position vectors given in terms of elliptic integrals and Jacobi elliptic functions. The mutual orientation between the interacting objects is chosen such that the axis of revolution of the distorted cylinder be parallel to the plane bounding the substrate. Based on the discussed models and approaches we made some estimations for the studied force in real experimentally realizable systems, thus showing the possibility of pearling as an useful technique for reduction of the adhesion in variety of industrial processes using lipid membranes as carriers.

  20. Sensing small neurotransmitter-enzyme interaction with nanoporous gated ion-sensitive field effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Alexandre; Stockmann, Regina; Jansen, Michael; Yegin, Ugur; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo; Mourzina, Yulia

    2012-01-15

    Ion-sensitive field effect transistors with gates having a high density of nanopores were fabricated and employed to sense the neurotransmitter dopamine with high selectivity and detectability at micromolar range. The nanoporous structure of the gates was produced by applying a relatively simple anodizing process, which yielded a porous alumina layer with pores exhibiting a mean diameter ranging from 20 to 35 nm. Gate-source voltages of the transistors demonstrated a pH-dependence that was linear over a wide range and could be understood as changes in surface charges during protonation and deprotonation. The large surface area provided by the pores allowed the physical immobilization of tyrosinase, which is an enzyme that oxidizes dopamine, on the gates of the transistors, and thus, changes the acid-base behavior on their surfaces. Concentration-dependent dopamine interacting with immobilized tyrosinase showed a linear dependence into a physiological range of interest for dopamine concentration in the changes of gate-source voltages. In comparison with previous approaches, a response time relatively fast for detecting dopamine was obtained. Additionally, selectivity assays for other neurotransmitters that are abundantly found in the brain were examined. These results demonstrate that the nanoporous structure of ion-sensitive field effect transistors can easily be used to immobilize specific enzyme that can readily and selectively detect small neurotransmitter molecule based on its acid-base interaction with the receptor. Therefore, it could serve as a technology platform for molecular studies of neurotransmitter-enzyme binding and drugs screening. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sulfate-activating enzymes of Penicillium chrysogenum. The ATP sulfurylase.adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate complex does not serve as a substrate for adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renosto, F.; Martin, R.L.; Segel, I.H.

    1989-01-01

    At a noninhibitory steady state concentration of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS), increasing the concentration of Penicillium chrysogenum ATP sulfurylase drives the rate of the APS kinase-catalyzed reaction toward zero. The result indicates that the ATP sulfurylase.APS complex does not serve as a substrate for APS kinase, i.e. there is no ''substrate channeling'' of APS between the two sulfate-activating enzymes. APS kinase had no effect on the [S]0.5 values, nH values, or maximum isotope trapping in the single turnover of ATP sulfurylase-bound [ 35 S]APS. Equimolar APS kinase (+/- MgATP or APS) also had no effect on the rate constants for the inactivation of ATP sulfurylase by phenylglyoxal, diethylpyrocarbonate, or N-ethylmaleimide. Similarly, ATP sulfurylase (+/- ligands) had no effect on the inactivation of equimolar APS kinase by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, diethylpyrocarbonate, or heat. (The last promotes the dissociation of dimeric APS kinase to inactive monomers.) ATP sulfurylase also had no effect on the reassociation of APS kinase subunits at low temperature. The cumulative results suggest that the two sulfate activating enzymes do not associate to form a ''3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate synthetase'' complex

  2. Interaction between focal adhesion kinase and Crk-associated tyrosine kinase substrate p130Cas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polte, T R; Hanks, S K

    1995-11-07

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) has been implicated in integrin-mediated signaling events and in the mechanism of cell transformation by the v-Src and v-Crk oncoproteins. To gain further insight into FAK signaling pathways, we used a two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that interact with mouse FAK. The screen identified two proteins that interact with FAK via their Src homology 3 (SH3) domains: a v-Crk-associated tyrosine kinase substrate (Cas), p130Cas, and a still uncharacterized protein, FIPSH3-2, which contains an SH3 domain closely related to that of p130Cas. These SH3 domains bind to the same proline-rich region of FAK (APPKPSR) encompassing residues 711-717. The mouse p130Cas amino acid sequence was deduced from cDNA clones, revealing an overall high degree of similarity to the recently reported rat sequence. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that p130Cas and FAK are associated in mouse fibroblasts. The stable interaction between p130Cas and FAK emerges as a likely key element in integrin-mediated signal transduction and further represents a direct molecular link between the v-Src and v-Crk oncoproteins. The Src family kinase Fyn, whose Src homology 2 (SH2) domain binds to the major FAK autophosphorylation site (tyrosine 397), was also identified in the two-hybrid screen.

  3. Leucoagaricus gongylophorus uses leaf-cutting ants to vector proteolytic enzymes towards new plant substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooij, Pepijn Wilhelmus; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Hoffmann, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    fluid at pH values of 5–7, but the aspartic proteases were inactive across a pH range of 3–10. Protease activity disappeared when the ants were kept on a sugar water diet without fungus. Relative to normal mycelium, both metalloendoproteases, both serine proteases and one aspartic protease were...... fungi, consistent with previous indications of convergent evolution of decomposition enzymes in attine ant fungal symbionts and phytopathogenic fungi....

  4. Roles of the C-terminal domains of human dihydrodiol dehydrogenase isoforms in the binding of substrates and modulators: probing with chimaeric enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, K; Hara, A; Deyashiki, Y; Iwasa, H; Kume, T; Ishikura, S; Shiraishi, H; Katagiri, Y

    1998-01-01

    Human liver dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (DD; EC 1.3.1.20) exists in isoforms (DD1, DD2 and DD4) composed of 323 amino acids. DD1 and DD2 share 98% amino acid sequence identity, but show lower identities (approx. 83%) with DD4, in which a marked difference is seen in the C-terminal ten amino acids. DD4 exhibits unique catalytic properties, such as the ability to oxidize both (R)- and (S)-alicyclic alcohols equally, high dehydrogenase activity for bile acids, potent inhibition by steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and activation by sulphobromophthalein and clofibric acid derivatives. In this study, we have prepared chimaeric enzymes, in which we exchanged the C-terminal 39 residues between the two enzymes. Compared with DD1, CDD1-4 (DD1 with the C-terminal sequence of DD4) had increased kcat/Km values for 3alpha-hydroxy-5beta-androstanes and bile acids of 3-9-fold and decreased values for the other substrates by 5-100-fold. It also became highly sensitive to DD4 inhibitors such as phenolphthalein and hexoestrol. Another chimaeric enzyme, CDD4-1 (DD4 with the C-terminal sequence of DD1), showed the same (S)-stereospecificity for the alicyclic alcohols as DD1, had decreased kcat/Km values for bile acids with 7beta- or 12alpha-hydroxy groups by more than 120-fold and was resistant to inhibition by betamethasone. In addition, the activation effects of sulphobromophthalein and bezafibrate decreased or disappeared for CDD4-1. The recombinant DD4 with the His314-->Pro (the corresponding residue of DD1) mutation showed intermediate changes in the properties between those of wild-type DD4 and CDD4-1. The results indicate that the binding of substrates, inhibitors and activators to the enzymes is controlled by residues in their C-terminal domains; multiple residues co-ordinately act as determinants for substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity. PMID:9820821

  5. Investigating the Impact of Asp181 Point Mutations on Interactions between PTP1B and Phosphotyrosine Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyuan; Wang, Lushan; Sun, Xun; Zhao, Xian

    2014-05-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of insulin and leptin signaling, which suggests that it is an attractive therapeutic target in type II diabetes and obesity. The aim of this research is to explore residues which interact with phosphotyrosine substrate can be affected by D181 point mutations and lead to increased substrate binding. To achieve this goal, molecular dynamics simulations were performed on wild type (WT) and two mutated PTP1B/substrate complexes. The cross-correlation and principal component analyses show that point mutations can affect the motions of some residues in the active site of PTP1B. Moreover, the hydrogen bond and energy decomposition analyses indicate that apart from residue 181, point mutations have influence on the interactions of substrate with several residues in the active site of PTP1B.

  6. VTVH-MCD and DFT studies of thiolate bonding to [FeNO]7/[FeO2]8 complexes of isopenicillin N synthase: substrate determination of oxidase versus oxygenase activity in nonheme Fe enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christina D; Neidig, Michael L; Neibergall, Matthew B; Lipscomb, John D; Solomon, Edward I

    2007-06-13

    Isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS) is a unique mononuclear nonheme Fe enzyme that catalyzes the four-electron oxidative double ring closure of its substrate ACV. A combination of spectroscopic techniques including EPR, absorbance, circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD, and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH-MCD) were used to evaluate the geometric and electronic structure of the [FeNO]7 complex of IPNS coordinated with the ACV thiolate ligand. Density Function Theory (DFT) calculations correlated to the spectroscopic data were used to generate an experimentally calibrated bonding description of the Fe-IPNS-ACV-NO complex. New spectroscopic features introduced by the binding of the ACV thiolate at 13 100 and 19 800 cm-1 are assigned as the NO pi*(ip) --> Fe dx2-y2 and S pi--> Fe dx2-y2 charge transfer (CT) transitions, respectively. Configuration interaction mixes S CT character into the NO pi*(ip) --> Fe dx2-y2 CT transition, which is observed experimentally from the VTVH-MCD data from this transition. Calculations on the hypothetical {FeO2}8 complex of Fe-IPNS-ACV reveal that the configuration interaction present in the [FeNO]7 complex results in an unoccupied frontier molecular orbital (FMO) with correct orientation and distal O character for H-atom abstraction from the ACV substrate. The energetics of NO/O2 binding to Fe-IPNS-ACV were evaluated and demonstrate that charge donation from the ACV thiolate ligand renders the formation of the FeIII-superoxide complex energetically favorable, driving the reaction at the Fe center. This single center reaction allows IPNS to avoid the O2 bridged binding generally invoked in other nonheme Fe enzymes that leads to oxygen insertion (i.e., oxygenase function) and determines the oxidase activity of IPNS.

  7. Structure of a bacterial glycoside hydrolase family 63 enzyme in complex with its glycosynthase product, and insights into the substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takatsugu; Ichikawa, Megumi; Yokoi, Gaku; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Mori, Haruhide; Kitano, Yoshikazu; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Tonozuka, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    Proteins belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 63 (GH63) are found in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Although the eukaryotic GH63 proteins have been identified as processing α-glucosidase I, the substrate specificities of the bacterial and archaeal GH63 proteins are not clear. Here, we converted a bacterial GH63 enzyme, Escherichia coli YgjK, to a glycosynthase to probe its substrate specificity. Two mutants of YgjK (E727A and D324N) were constructed, and both mutants showed glycosynthase activity. The reactions of E727A with β-D-glucosyl fluoride and monosaccharides showed that the largest amount of glycosynthase product accumulated when galactose was employed as an acceptor molecule. The crystal structure of E727A complexed with the reaction product indicated that the disaccharide bound at the active site was 2-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-α-D-galactopyranose (Glc12Gal). A comparison of the structures of E727A-Glc12Gal and D324N-melibiose showed that there were two main types of conformation: the open and closed forms. The structure of YgjK adopted the closed form when subsite -1 was occupied by glucose. These results suggest that sugars containing the Glc12Gal structure are the most likely candidates for natural substrates of YgjK. © 2013 FEBS.

  8. NMR-based Structural Analysis of Threonylcarbamoyl-AMP Synthase and Its Substrate Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kimberly A; Bobay, Benjamin G; Sarachan, Kathryn L; Sims, Alexis F; Bilbille, Yann; Deutsch, Christopher; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; Agris, Paul F

    2015-08-14

    The hypermodified nucleoside N(6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t(6)A37) is present in many distinct tRNA species and has been found in organisms in all domains of life. This post-transcriptional modification enhances translation fidelity by stabilizing the anticodon/codon interaction in the ribosomal decoding site. The biosynthetic pathway of t(6)A37 is complex and not well understood. In bacteria, the following four proteins have been discovered to be both required and sufficient for t(6)A37 modification: TsaC, TsaD, TsaB, and TsaE. Of these, TsaC and TsaD are members of universally conserved protein families. Although TsaC has been shown to catalyze the formation of L-threonylcarbamoyl-AMP, a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of t(6)A37, the details of the enzymatic mechanism remain unsolved. Therefore, the solution structure of Escherichia coli TsaC was characterized by NMR to further study the interactions with ATP and L-threonine, both substrates of TsaC in the biosynthesis of L-threonylcarbamoyl-AMP. Several conserved amino acids were identified that create a hydrophobic binding pocket for the adenine of ATP. Additionally, two residues were found to interact with L-threonine. Both binding sites are located in a deep cavity at the center of the protein. Models derived from the NMR data and molecular modeling reveal several sites with considerable conformational flexibility in TsaC that may be important for L-threonine recognition, ATP activation, and/or protein/protein interactions. These observations further the understanding of the enzymatic reaction catalyzed by TsaC, a threonylcarbamoyl-AMP synthase, and provide structure-based insight into the mechanism of t(6)A37 biosynthesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Neuron-astrocyte interaction enhance GABAergic synaptic transmission in a manner dependent on key metabolic enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław eKaczor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain and mechanisms of GABAergic inhibition have been intensely investigated in the past decades. Recent studies provided evidence for an important role of astrocytes in shaping GABAergic currents. One of the most obvious, but yet poorly understood, mechanisms of the cross-talk between GABAergic currents and astrocytes is metabolism including neurotransmitter homeostasis. In particular, how modulation of GABAergic currents by astrocytes depends on key enzymes involved in cellular metabolism remains largely unknown. To address this issue, we have considered two simple models of neuronal cultures: nominally astrocyte-free neuronal culture (NC and neuronal-astrocytic co-cultures (ANCC and miniature Inhibitory Postsynaptic Currents (mIPSCs were recorded in control conditions and in the presence of respective enzyme blockers. We report that enrichment of neuronal culture with astrocytes results in a marked increase in mIPSC frequency. This enhancement of GABAergic activity was accompanied by increased number of GAD65 and vGAT puncta, indicating that at least a part of the frequency enhancement was due to increased number of synaptic contacts. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (with MSO strongly reduced mIPSC frequency in ANCC but had no effect in NC. Moreover, treatment of ANCC with inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase (BAYU6751 or with selective inhibitor of astrocytic Krebs cycle,fluoroacetate, resulted in a marked reduction of mIPSC frequency in ANCC having no effect in NC. We conclude that GABAergic synaptic transmission strongly depends on neuron-astrocyte interaction in a manner dependent on key metabolic enzymes as well as on the Krebs cycle.

  10. Effects of manufactured nano-copper on copper uptake, bioaccumulation and enzyme activities in cowpea grown on soil substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunkunle, Clement O; Jimoh, Mahboob A; Asogwa, Nnaemeka T; Viswanathan, K; Vishwakarma, Vinita; Fatoba, Paul O

    2018-07-15

    Increased use of nanoparticles-based products in agriculture portends important implications for agriculture. Therefore, the impact of nano-copper particles (nano-Cu for 65 days. Results indicated significant (Pnano-Cu levels compared to control, and bioaccumulation increased in seeds by at least 250%. Response of antioxidant enzymes to both nano-Cu types was concentration-dependent. Activity of APX and GR was enhanced in leaves and roots in response to both nano-Cu treatments in similar patterns compared to control. Both nano-Cu increased CAT activity in roots while SOD activity reduced in both leaves and roots. This shows that response of antioxidant enzymes to nano-Cu toxicity was organ-specific in cowpea. Malondialdehyde, a measure of lipid peroxidation, increased at 500 -1000 mg/kg of 25 nm nano-Cu in leaves by average of 8.4%, and 60-80 nm nano-Cu in root by 52.8%, showing particle-size and organ-dependent toxicity of nano-Cu. In conclusion, exposure of cowpea to nano-Cu treatments increased both the uptake and bioaccumulation of Cu, and also promoted the activity of APX and GR in root and leaf tissues of cowpea. Therefore, APX- and GR-activity level could be a useful predictive biomarker of nano-Cu toxicity in cowpea. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The orbital ground state of the azide-substrate complex of human heme oxygenase is an indicator of distal H-bonding: Implications for the enzyme mechanism‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Hiroshi; Evans, John P.; Peng, Dungeng; Satterlee, James D.; de Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz; Mar, Gerd N. La

    2009-01-01

    The active site electronic structure of the azide complex of substrate-bound human heme oxygenase-1, (hHO) has been investigated by 1H NMR spectroscopy to shed light on the orbital/spin ground state as an indicator of the unique distal pocket environment of the enzyme. 2D 1H NMR assignments of the substrate and substrate-contact residue signals reveal a pattern of substrate methyl contact shifts, that places the lone iron π-spin in the dxz orbital, rather than the dyz orbital found in the cyanide complex. Comparison of iron spin relaxivity, magnetic anisotropy and magnetic susceptibilities argues for a low-spin, (dxy)2(dyz,dxz)3, ground state in both azide and cyanide complexes. The switch from singly-occupied dyz for the cyanide to dxz for the azide complex of hHO is shown to be consistent with the orbital hole determined by the azide π-plane in the latter complex, which is ∼90° in-plane rotated from that of the imidazole π-plane. The induction of the altered orbital ground state in the azide relative to the cyanide hHO complex, as well as the mean low-field bias of methyl hyperfine shifts and their paramagnetic relaxivity relative to those in globins, indicate that azide exerts a stronger ligand field in hHO than in the globins, or that the distal H-bonding to azide is weaker in hHO than in globins. The Asp140 → Ala hHO mutant that abolishes activity retains the unusual WT azide complex spin/orbital ground state. The relevance of our findings for other HO complexes and the HO mechanism is discussed. PMID:19243105

  12. The orbital ground state of the azide-substrate complex of human heme oxygenase is an indicator of distal H-bonding: implications for the enzyme mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Hiroshi; Evans, John P; Peng, Dungeng; Satterlee, James D; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R; La Mar, Gerd N

    2009-04-14

    The active site electronic structure of the azide complex of substrate-bound human heme oxygenase 1 (hHO) has been investigated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy to shed light on the orbital/spin ground state as an indicator of the unique distal pocket environment of the enzyme. Two-dimensional (1)H NMR assignments of the substrate and substrate-contact residue signals reveal a pattern of substrate methyl contact shifts that places the lone iron pi-spin in the d(xz) orbital, rather than the d(yz) orbital found in the cyanide complex. Comparison of iron spin relaxivity, magnetic anisotropy, and magnetic susceptibilities argues for a low-spin, (d(xy))(2)(d(yz),d(xz))(3), ground state in both azide and cyanide complexes. The switch from singly occupied d(yz) for the cyanide to d(xz) for the azide complex of hHO is shown to be consistent with the orbital hole determined by the azide pi-plane in the latter complex, which is approximately 90 degrees in-plane rotated from that of the imidazole pi-plane. The induction of the altered orbital ground state in the azide relative to the cyanide hHO complex, as well as the mean low-field bias of methyl hyperfine shifts and their paramagnetic relaxivity relative to those in globins, indicates that azide exerts a stronger ligand field in hHO than in the globins, or that the distal H-bonding to azide is weaker in hHO than in globins. The Asp140 --> Ala hHO mutant that abolishes activity retains the unusual WT azide complex spin/orbital ground state. The relevance of our findings for other HO complexes and the HO mechanism is discussed.

  13. Enzymatic synthesis of RNAs capped with nucleotide analogues reveals the molecular basis for substrate selectivity of RNA capping enzyme: impacts on RNA metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moheshwarnath Issur

    Full Text Available RNA cap binding proteins have evolved to specifically bind to the N7-methyl guanosine cap structure found at the 5' ends of eukaryotic mRNAs. The specificity of RNA capping enzymes towards GTP for the synthesis of this structure is therefore crucial for mRNA metabolism. The fact that ribavirin triphosphate was described as a substrate of a viral RNA capping enzyme, raised the possibility that RNAs capped with nucleotide analogues could be generated in cellulo. Owing to the fact that this prospect potentially has wide pharmacological implications, we decided to investigate whether the active site of the model Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus-1 RNA capping enzyme was flexible enough to accommodate various purine analogues. Using this approach, we identified several key structural determinants at each step of the RNA capping reaction and generated RNAs harboring various different cap analogues. Moreover, we monitored the binding affinity of these novel capped RNAs to the eIF4E protein and evaluated their translational properties in cellulo. Overall, this study establishes a molecular rationale for the specific selection of GTP over other NTPs by RNA capping enzyme It also demonstrates that RNAs can be enzymatically capped with certain purine nucleotide analogs, and it also describes the impacts of modified RNA caps on specific steps involved in mRNA metabolism. For instance, our results indicate that the N7-methyl group of the classical N7-methyl guanosine cap is not always indispensable for binding to eIF4E and subsequently for translation when compensatory modifications are present on the capped residue. Overall, these findings have important implications for our understanding of the molecular determinants involved in both RNA capping and RNA metabolism.

  14. Neural substrates underlying the tendency to accept anger-infused ultimatum offers during dynamic social interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilam, Gadi; Lin, Tamar; Raz, Gal; Azrielant, Shir; Fruchter, Eyal; Ariely, Dan; Hendler, Talma

    2015-10-15

    In managing our way through interpersonal conflict, anger might be crucial in determining whether the dispute escalates to aggressive behaviors or resolves cooperatively. The Ultimatum Game (UG) is a social decision-making paradigm that provides a framework for studying interpersonal conflict over division of monetary resources. Unfair monetary UG-offers elicit anger and while accepting them engages regulatory processes, rejecting them is regarded as an aggressive retribution. Ventro-medial prefrontal-cortex (vmPFC) activity has been shown to relate to idiosyncratic tendencies in accepting unfair offers possibly through its role in emotion regulation. Nevertheless, standard UG paradigms lack fundamental aspects of real-life social interactions in which one reacts to other people in a response contingent fashion. To uncover the neural substrates underlying the tendency to accept anger-infused ultimatum offers during dynamic social interactions, we incorporated on-line verbal negotiations with an obnoxious partner in a repeated-UG during fMRI scanning. We hypothesized that vmPFC activity will differentiate between individuals with high or low monetary gains accumulated throughout the game and reflect a divergence in the associated emotional experience. We found that as individuals gained more money, they reported less anger but also more positive feelings and had slower sympathetic response. In addition, high-gain individuals had increased vmPFC activity, but also decreased brainstem activity, which possibly reflected the locus coeruleus. During the more angering unfair offers, these individuals had increased dorsal-posterior Insula (dpI) activity which functionally coupled to the medial-thalamus (mT). Finally, both vmPFC activity and dpI-mT connectivity contributed to increased gain, possibly by modulating the ongoing subjective emotional experience. These ecologically valid findings point towards a neural mechanism that might nurture pro-social interactions by

  15. Practical steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are key components of most biological processes. Characterization of enzymes is therefore frequently required during the study of biological systems. Steady-state kinetics provides a simple and rapid means of assessing the substrate specificity of an enzyme. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis (see Site-Directed Mutagenesis), it can be used to probe the roles of particular amino acids in the enzyme in substrate recognition and catalysis. Effects of interaction partners and posttranslational modifications can also be assessed using steady-state kinetics. This overview explains the general principles of steady-state enzyme kinetics experiments in a practical, rather than theoretical, way. Any biochemistry textbook will have a section on the theory of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, including derivations of the relevant equations. No specific enzymatic assay is described here, although a method for monitoring product formation or substrate consumption over time (an assay) is required to perform the experiments described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of trace of nitrogen on the helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet interacting with a dielectric substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Wenjun; Dai, Dong; Zhang, Yuhui; Han, Yongxia; Li, Licheng

    2018-03-01

    Experimental observations and simulation results regarding a pure He atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) and He  +  N2 APPJs interacting with a downstream dielectric substrate are presented in this paper. Experiments utilizing spatial-temporal imaging show that, in the case of the pure He APPJ, an annular plasma-substrate interaction pattern is formed. With the introduction of N2, the plasma is more uniformly distributed on the substrate surface, appearing a solid interaction pattern. The experimental measurements indicate 0.5% N2 mixture is the optimal condition to achieve the most intense discharge, while the plasma-substrate contact area is slightly reduced by 6.1% in comparison to that of the pure He APPJ. A 2D self-consistent fluid model is constructed to provide insights into the role of the addition of trace of N2 on the discharge dynamics. The discharge morphologies predicated by the model is in principle consistent with the experimental observations. The simulation reveals that the conversion from the annular plasma-substrate interaction pattern to the solid one is attributed to the synthetic effect of the addition of N2 and the presentence of the substrate acting as the cathode to enhance the local electric field. In the solid interaction pattern, the Penning ionization makes a significant contribution to the surface discharge, especially in the afterglow region. The dominant positive ions (N2+ and N4+ ) and the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species including O and N gain remarkable increment in the flux intensity to the central surface, which merits great application potential.

  17. Sodium nitroprusside may modulate Escherichia coli antioxidant enzyme expression by interacting with the ferric uptake regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, R; Danielson, D; Gong, V; Olynik, B; Eze, M O

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to explore possible relationships between nitric oxide (NO) and antioxidant enzymes in an Escherichia coli model have uncovered a possible interaction between sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a potent, NO-donating drug, and the ferric uptake regulator (Fur), an iron(II)--dependent regulator of antioxidant and iron acquisition proteins present in Gram-negative bacteria. The enzymatic profiles of superoxide dismutase and hydroperoxidase during logarithmic phase of growth were studied via non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and activity staining specific to each enzyme. Though NO is known to induce transcription of the manganese-bearing isozyme of SOD (MnSOD), treatment with SNP paradoxically suppressed MnSOD expression and greatly enhanced the activity of the iron-containing equivalent (FeSOD). Fur, one of six global regulators of MnSOD transcription, is uniquely capable of suppressing MnSOD while enhancing FeSOD expression through distinct mechanisms. We thus hypothesize that Fur is complacent in causing this behaviour and that the iron(II) component of SNP is activating Fur. E. coli was also treated with the SNP structural analogues, potassium ferricyanide (PFi) and potassium ferrocyanide (PFo). Remarkably, the ferrous PFo was capable of mimicking the SNP-related pattern, whereas the ferric PFi was not. As Fur depends upon ferrous iron for activation, we submit this observation of redox-specificity as preliminary supporting evidence for the hypothesized Fur-SNP interaction. Iron is an essential metal that the human innate immune system sequesters to prevent its use by invading pathogens. As NO is known to inhibit iron-bound Fur, and as activated Fur regulates iron uptake through feedback inhibition, we speculate that the administration of this drug may disrupt this strategic management of iron in favour of residing Gram-negative species by providing a source of iron in an otherwise iron-scarce environment capable of encouraging its own uptake

  18. Interaction of silicene with β-Si3N4(0001)/Si(111) substrate; energetics and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippone, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The free-standing, quasi-2D layer of Si is known as silicene, in analogy with graphene. Much effort is devoted in the study of silicene, since, similarly to graphene, it shows a very high electron mobility. The interaction of silicene with a hybrid substrate, β-Si 3 N 4 (0001)/Si(111), exposing the β-Si 3 N 4 (0001) surface, has been studied by means of Density Functional calculations, with van der Waals interactions included. Once deepened the most important structural and electronic features of the hybrid substrate, we demonstrated that an electron transfer occurs from the substrate to the silicene layer. In turn, such an electron transfer can be modulated by the doping of the substrate. The β-Si 3 N 4 /silicene interaction appears to be strong enough to ensure adequate adsorption stability. It is also shown that electronic states of substrate and adsorbate still remain decoupled, paving the way for the exploitation of the peculiar electron mobility properties of the silicene layer. A detailed analysis in both direct and reciprocal space is reported. (paper)

  19. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...... by that enzyme...

  20. Ag films deposited on Si and Ti: How the film-substrate interaction influences the nanoscale film morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffino, F.; Torrisi, V.

    2017-11-01

    Submicron-thick Ag films were sputter deposited, at room temperature, on Si, covered by the native SiO2 layer, and on Ti, covered by the native TiO2 layer, under normal and oblique deposition angle. The aim of this work was to study the morphological differences in the grown Ag films on the two substrates when fixed all the other deposition parameters. In fact, the surface diffusivity of the Ag adatoms is different on the two substrates (higher on the SiO2 surface) due to the different Ag-SiO2 and Ag-TiO2 atomic interactions. So, the effect of the adatoms surface diffusivity, as determined by the adatoms-substrate interaction, on the final film morphology was analyzed. To this end, microscopic analyses were used to study the morphology of the grown Ag films. Even if the homologous temperature prescribes that the Ag film grows on both substrates in the zone I described by the structure zone model some significant differences are observed on the basis of the supporting substrate. In the normal incidence condition, on the SiO2/Si surface a dense close-packed Ag film exhibiting a smooth surface is obtained, while on the TiO2/Ti surface a more columnar film morphology is formed. In the oblique incidence condition the columnar morphology for the Ag film occurs both on SiO2/Si and TiO2/Ti but a higher porous columnar film is obtained on TiO2/Ti due to the lower Ag diffusivity. These results indicate that the adatoms diffusivity on the substrate as determined by the adatom-surface interaction (in addition to the substrate temperature) strongly determines the final film nanostructure.

  1. Interactions of Cu-substrates with titanium-alloyed Sn-Zn solders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares D.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of copper substrate with titanium-alloyed Sn-Zn eutectic solders have been studied. Two series of experiments have been performed. The first one consisted in differential thermal analyses of Sn-Zn nearly eutectic alloys containing from 1.3 to 2.2 wt. % Ti. Diffusion couples consisted of Cu-wires and Sn-Zn-Ti liquid solders, produced at 250 and 275 OC have been prepared in the second series,. The contact times were up to 3600 s. The contact zones have been characterized by optical and scanning electron microscope. Two layers have been found along the interfaces solid/liquid. The first and the second layers are identical, respectively, with γ and ε phases of the Cu-Zn system. No changes of the chemical compositions were detected for the tested temperatures and reaction times. Continuous parabolic growth of the total diffusion zone thickness with the time of diffusion is observed. The growth is due mainly to one the formed layers (γ while the thickness of the ε-phase layer, stays almost constant for all tested diffusion times and temperatures.

  2. Non-invasive imaging of tumors by monitoring autotaxin activity using an enzyme-activated near-infrared fluorogenic substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Madan

    Full Text Available Autotaxin (ATX, an autocrine motility factor that is highly upregulated in metastatic cancer, is a lysophospholipase D enzyme that produces the lipid second messenger lysophosphatidic acid (LPA from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC. Dysregulation of the lysolipid signaling pathway is central to the pathophysiology of numerous cancers, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases. Consequently, the ATX/LPA pathway has emerged as an important source of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Herein we describe development and validation of a fluorogenic analog of LPC (AR-2 that enables visualization of ATX activity in vivo. AR-2 exhibits minimal fluorescence until it is activated by ATX, which substantially increases fluorescence in the near-infrared (NIR region, the optimal spectral window for in vivo imaging. In mice with orthotopic ATX-expressing breast cancer tumors, ATX activated AR-2 fluorescence. Administration of AR-2 to tumor-bearing mice showed high fluorescence in the tumor and low fluorescence in most healthy tissues with tumor fluorescence correlated with ATX levels. Pretreatment of mice with an ATX inhibitor selectively decreased fluorescence in the tumor. Together these data suggest that fluorescence directly correlates with ATX activity and its tissue expression. The data show that AR-2 is a non-invasive and selective tool that enables visualization and quantitation of ATX-expressing tumors and monitoring ATX activity in vivo.

  3. Active Site Dynamics in Substrate Hydrolysis Catalyzed by DapE Enzyme and Its Mutants from Hybrid QM/MM-Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Debodyuti; Mishra, Sabyashachi

    2017-07-27

    The mechanism of the catalytic hydrolysis of N-succinyl diaminopimelic acid (SDAP) by the microbial enzyme DapE in its wild-type (wt) form as well as three of its mutants (E134D, H67A, and H349A) is investigated employing a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, wherein the time evolution of the atoms of the QM and MM regions are obtained from the forces acting on the individual atoms. The free-energy profiles along the reaction coordinates of this multistep hydrolysis reaction process are explored using a combination of equilibrium and nonequilibrium (umbrella sampling) QM/MM-MD simulation techniques. In the enzyme-substrate complexes of wt-DapE and the E134D mutant, nucleophilic attack is found to be the rate-determining step involving a barrier of 15.3 and 21.5 kcal/mol, respectively, which satisfactorily explains the free energy of activation obtained from kinetic experiments in wt-DapE-SDAP (15.2 kcal/mol) and the 3 orders of magnitude decrease in the catalytic activity due to E134D mutation. The catalysis is found to be quenched in the H67A and H349A mutants of DapE due to conformational rearrangement in the active site induced by the absence of the active site His residues that prohibits activation of the catalytic water molecule.

  4. The Enzyme Activity and Substrate Specificity of Two Major Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenases in Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), SbCAD2 and SbCAD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Se-Young; Walker, Alexander M; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; Vermerris, Wilfred; Sattler, Scott E; Kang, ChulHee

    2017-08-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyzes the final step in monolignol biosynthesis, reducing sinapaldehyde, coniferaldehyde, and p -coumaraldehyde to their corresponding alcohols in an NADPH-dependent manner. Because of its terminal location in monolignol biosynthesis, the variation in substrate specificity and activity of CAD can result in significant changes in overall composition and amount of lignin. Our in-depth characterization of two major CAD isoforms, SbCAD2 (Brown midrib 6 [bmr6]) and SbCAD4, in lignifying tissues of sorghum ( Sorghum bicolor ), a strategic plant for generating renewable chemicals and fuels, indicates their similarity in both structure and activity to Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) CAD5 and Populus tremuloides sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively. This first crystal structure of a monocot CAD combined with enzyme kinetic data and a catalytic model supported by site-directed mutagenesis allows full comparison with dicot CADs and elucidates the potential signature sequence for their substrate specificity and activity. The L119W/G301F-SbCAD4 double mutant displayed its substrate preference in the order coniferaldehyde > p -coumaraldehyde > sinapaldehyde, with higher catalytic efficiency than that of both wild-type SbCAD4 and SbCAD2. As SbCAD4 is the only major CAD isoform in bmr6 mutants, replacing SbCAD4 with L119W/G301F-SbCAD4 in bmr6 plants could produce a phenotype that is more amenable to biomass processing. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Quantitative framework for ordered degradation of APC/C substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dan; Girard, Juliet R; Li, Weihan; Mizrak, Arda; Morgan, David O

    2015-11-16

    During cell-cycle progression, substrates of a single master regulatory enzyme can be modified in a specific order. Here, we used experimental and computational approaches to dissect the quantitative mechanisms underlying the ordered degradation of the substrates of the ubiquitin ligase APC/C(Cdc20), a key regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis. We show experimentally that the rate of catalysis varies with different substrates of APC/C(Cdc20). Using a computational model based on multi-step ubiquitination, we then show how changes in the interaction between a single substrate and APC/C(Cdc20) can alter the timing of degradation onset relative to APC/C(Cdc20) activation, while ensuring a fast degradation rate. Degradation timing and dynamics depend on substrate affinity for the enzyme as well as the catalytic rate at which the substrate is modified. When two substrates share the same pool of APC/C(Cdc20), their relative enzyme affinities and rates of catalysis influence the partitioning of APC/C(Cdc20) among substrates, resulting in substrate competition. Depending on how APC/C(Cdc20) is partitioned among its substrates, competition can have minor or major effects on the degradation of certain substrates. We show experimentally that increased expression of the early APC/C(Cdc20) substrate Clb5 does not delay the degradation of the later substrate securin, arguing against a role for competition with Clb5 in establishing securin degradation timing. The degradation timing of APC/C(Cdc20) substrates depends on the multi-step nature of ubiquitination, differences in substrate-APC/C(Cdc20) interactions, and competition among substrates. Our studies provide a conceptual framework for understanding how ordered modification can be established among substrates of the same regulatory enzyme, and facilitate our understanding of how precise temporal control is achieved by a small number of master regulators to ensure a successful cell division cycle.

  6. Influence and interaction of iron and cadmium on photosynthesis and antioxidative enzymes in two rice cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Houjun; Zhang, Chengxin; Wang, Junmei; Zhou, Chongjun; Feng, Huan; Mahajan, Manoj D; Han, Xiaori

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a soil pot experiment was conducted to investigate the changes in photosynthesis and antioxidative enzymes in two rice varieties (Shendao 6 and Shennong 265) supplied with iron (Fe), cadmium (Cd), and Fe and Cd together. The concentrations of Fe and Cd in the soil were 0, 1.0 g Fe·kg -1 and 0, 2.0 mg Cd·kg -1 , respectively. Photosynthetic indices and antioxidative enzyme activities were recorded at different rice growth stages. At the early stage, Cd showed a transient stimulatory effect on the photosynthetic rate of Shennong 265. For Shendao 6, however, Cd showed a transient stimulatory effect on photosynthetic rate, intercellular CO 2 concentration, stomatal conductance and transpiration efficiency. In addition, the results show that Cd can also enhance the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities, but reduce the malondialdehyde (MDA) and soluble protein contents in the two rice cultivars. Subsequently, Cd starts to inhibit photosynthesis and SOD activity until the ripening stage, causing the lowest photosynthetic rate and SOD activity at this stage. In contrast, Fe alleviates the Cd-induced changes at earlier or later growth stage. Notably at the later growth stage, the results show that the interaction between Fe and Cd increases the SOD and catalase (CAT) activities, while decreasing the lipid peroxidation and promoting photosynthesis. As a result, it ultimately increases the biomass. The results from this study suggest that Fe (as Fe fertilizer) is a promising alternative for agricultural use to enhance the plant development and, simultaneously, to reduce Cd toxicity in extensively polluted soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Unravelling the Interactions between Hydrolytic and Oxidative Enzymes in Degradation of Lignocellulosic Biomass by Sporothrix carnis under Various Fermentation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusola A. Ogunyewo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying the action of lignocellulolytic enzymes in biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass remains unclear; hence, it is crucial to investigate enzymatic interactions involved in the process. In this study, degradation of corn cob by Sporothrix carnis and involvement of lignocellulolytic enzymes in biodegradation were investigated over 240 h cultivation period. About 60% degradation of corn cob was achieved by S. carnis at the end of fermentation. The yields of hydrolytic enzymes, cellulase and xylanase, were higher than oxidative enzymes, laccase and peroxidase, over 144 h fermentation period. Maximum yields of cellulase (854.4 U/mg and xylanase (789.6 U/mg were at 96 and 144 h, respectively. Laccase and peroxidase were produced cooperatively with maximum yields of 489.06 U/mg and 585.39 U/mg at 144 h. Drastic decline in production of cellulase at 144 h (242.01 U/mg and xylanase at 192 h (192.2 U/mg indicates that they play initial roles in biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass while laccase and peroxidase play later roles. Optimal degradation of corn cob (76.6% and production of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes were achieved with 2.5% inoculum at pH 6.0. Results suggest synergy in interactions between the hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes which can be optimized for improved biodegradation.

  8. Pharmacokinetic Effects of Isavuconazole Coadministration With the Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Substrates Bupropion, Repaglinide, Caffeine, Dextromethorphan, and Methadone in Healthy Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Takao; Desai, Amit; Goldwater, Ronald; Han, David; Howieson, Corrie; Akhtar, Shahzad; Kowalski, Donna; Lademacher, Christopher; Pearlman, Helene; Rammelsberg, Diane; Townsend, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This report describes phase 1 clinical trials performed to assess interactions of oral isavuconazole at the clinically targeted dose (200 mg, administered as isavuconazonium sulfate 372 mg, 3 times a day for 2 days; 200 mg once daily [QD] thereafter) with single oral doses of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) substrates: bupropion hydrochloride (CYP2B6; 100?mg; n = 24), repaglinide (CYP2C8/CYP3A4; 0.5 mg; n = 24), caffeine (CYP1A2; 200 mg; n = 24), dextromethorphan hydrobromide (CYP2D6/CYP3A...

  9. Catalyst–substrate interaction and growth delay in vapor–liquid–solid nanowire growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolíbal, Miroslav; Pejchal, Tomáš; Musálek, Tomáš; Šikola, Tomáš

    2018-05-01

    Understanding of the initial stage of nanowire growth on a bulk substrate is crucial for the rational design of nanowire building blocks in future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we provide in situ scanning electron microscopy and Auger microscopy analysis of the initial stage of Au-catalyzed Ge nanowire growth on different substrates. Real-time microscopy imaging and elementally resolved spectroscopy clearly show that the catalyst dissolves the underlying substrate if held above a certain temperature. If the substrate dissolution is blocked (or in the case of heteroepitaxy) the catalyst needs to be filled with nanowire material from the external supply, which significantly increases the initial growth delay. The experiments presented here reveal the important role of the substrate in metal-catalyzed nanowire growth and pave the way for different growth delay mitigation strategies.

  10. The Effect of EDTA and Citric acid on Soil Enzymes Activity, Substrate Induced Respiration and Pb Availability in a Contaminated Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyed sajjad hosseini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Application of EDTA may increase the heavy metal availability and phytoextraction efficiency in contaminated soils. In spite of that, it might also have some adverse effects on soil biological properties. Metals as freeions are considered to be severely toxic, whereas the complexed form of these metalswith organic compounds or Fe/Mn oxides may be less available to soil microbes. However, apart from this fact, some of these compounds like EDTA and EDTA-metal complexes have low bio- chemo- and photo-degradablity and high solubility in their own characteristics andable to cause toxicity in soil environment. So more attentions have been paid to use of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs such as Citric acid because of having less unfavorable effects to the environment. Citric acid increases heavy metals solubility in soils and it also improves soil microbial activity indirectly. Soil enzymes activity is a good indicator of soil quality, and it is more suitable for monitoring the soil quality compared to physical or chemical indicators. The aims of this research were to evaluate the changes of dehydrogenase, urease and alkaline phosphomonoesterase activities, substrate-induced respiration (SIR and Pb availability after EDTA and citric acid addition into a contaminated soil with PbCl2. Materials and Methods: An experiment was conducted in a completely randomized design with factorial arrangement and three replications in greenhouse condition. The soil samples collected from surface horizon (0-20 cm of the Typic haplocalsids, located in Mashhad, Iran. Soil samples were artificially contaminated with PbCl2 (500 mg Pb per kg of soil and incubated for one months in 70 % of water holding capacity at room temperature. The experimental treatments included control, 3 and 5 mmol EDTA (EDTA3 and EDTA5 and Citric acid (CA3 and CA5 per kg of soil. Soil enzymes activity, substrate-induced respiration and Pb availability of soil samples were

  11. Physical adsorption at the nanoscale: Towards controllable scaling of the substrate-adsorbate van der Waals interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti, Alberto; Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2017-06-01

    The Lifshitz-Zaremba-Kohn (LZK) theory is commonly considered as the correct large-distance limit for the van der Waals (vdW) interaction of adsorbates (atoms, molecules, or nanoparticles) with solid substrates. In the standard approximate form, implicitly based on local dielectric functions, the LZK approach predicts universal power laws for vdW interactions depending only on the dimensionality of the interacting objects. However, recent experimental findings are challenging the universality of this theoretical approach at finite distances of relevance for nanoscale assembly. Here, we present a combined analytical and numerical many-body study demonstrating that physical adsorption can be significantly enhanced at the nanoscale. Regardless of the band gap or the nature of the adsorbate specie, we find deviations from conventional LZK power laws that extend to separation distances of up to 10-20 nm. Comparison with recent experimental observations of ultra-long-ranged vdW interactions in the delamination of graphene from a silicon substrate reveals qualitative agreement with the present theory. The sensitivity of vdW interactions to the substrate response and to the adsorbate characteristic excitation frequency also suggests that adsorption strength can be effectively tuned in experiments, paving the way to an improved control of physical adsorption at the nanoscale.

  12. Residue Phe112 of the Human-Type Corrinoid Adenosyltransferase (PduO) Enzyme of Lactobacillus reuteri Is Critical to the Formation of the Four-Coordinate Co(II) Corrinoid Substrate and to the Activity of the Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mera, Paola E.; St. Maurice, Martin; Rayment, Ivan; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.; UW

    2009-06-08

    ATP:Corrinoid adenosyltransferases (ACAs) catalyze the transfer of the adenosyl moiety from ATP to cob(I)alamin via a four-coordinate cob(II)alamin intermediate. At present, it is unknown how ACAs promote the formation of the four-coordinate corrinoid species needed for activity. The published high-resolution crystal structure of the ACA from Lactobacillus reuteri (LrPduO) in complex with ATP and cob(II)alamin shows that the environment around the alpha face of the corrin ring consists of bulky hydrophobic residues. To understand how these residues promote the generation of the four-coordinate cob(II)alamin, variants of the human-type ACA enzyme from L. reuteri (LrPduO) were kinetically and structurally characterized. These studies revealed that residue Phe112 is critical in the displacement of 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) from its coordination bond with the Co ion of the ring, resulting in the formation of the four-coordinate species. An F112A substitution resulted in a 80% drop in the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. The explanation for this loss of activity was obtained from the crystal structure of the mutant protein, which showed cob(II)alamin bound in the active site with DMB coordinated to the cobalt ion. The crystal structure of an LrPduO(F112H) variant showed a DMB-off/His-on interaction between the corrinoid and the enzyme, whose catalytic efficiency was 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of the wild-type protein. The analysis of the kinetic parameters of LrPduO(F112H) suggests that the F112H substitution negatively impacts product release. Substitutions of other hydrophobic residues in the Cbl binding pocket did not result in significant defects in catalytic efficiency in vitro; however, none of the variant enzymes analyzed in this work supported AdoCbl biosynthesis in vivo.

  13. Evolution of Substrate Specificity within a Diverse Family of [beta/alpha]-Barrel-fold Basic Amino Acid Decarboxylases X-ray Structure Determination of Enzymes with Specificity for L-Arginine and Carboxynorspermidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Lee, Jeongmi; Michael, Anthony J.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A. (Sungkyunkwan); (UTSMC)

    2010-08-26

    Pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate (PLP)-dependent basic amino acid decarboxylases from the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel-fold class (group IV) exist in most organisms and catalyze the decarboxylation of diverse substrates, essential for polyamine and lysine biosynthesis. Herein we describe the first x-ray structure determination of bacterial biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase (CANSDC) to 2.3- and 2.0-{angstrom} resolution, solved as product complexes with agmatine and norspermidine. Despite low overall sequence identity, the monomeric and dimeric structures are similar to other enzymes in the family, with the active sites formed between the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel domain of one subunit and the {beta}-barrel of the other. ADC contains both a unique interdomain insertion (4-helical bundle) and a C-terminal extension (3-helical bundle) and it packs as a tetramer in the asymmetric unit with the insertions forming part of the dimer and tetramer interfaces. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed that the ADC solution structure is a tetramer. Specificity for different basic amino acids appears to arise primarily from changes in the position of, and amino acid replacements in, a helix in the {beta}-barrel domain we refer to as the 'specificity helix.' Additionally, in CANSDC a key acidic residue that interacts with the distal amino group of other substrates is replaced by Leu{sup 314}, which interacts with the aliphatic portion of norspermidine. Neither product, agmatine in ADC nor norspermidine in CANSDC, form a Schiff base to pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate, suggesting that the product complexes may promote product release by slowing the back reaction. These studies provide insight into the structural basis for the evolution of novel function within a common structural-fold.

  14. Interaction of Carthamus tinctorius lignan arctigenin with the binding site of tryptophan-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temml, Veronika; Kuehnl, Susanne; Schuster, Daniela; Schwaiger, Stefan; Stuppner, Hermann; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    Mediterranean Carthamus tinctorius (Safflower) is used for treatment of inflammatory conditions and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recently C. tinctorius lignans arctigenin and trachelogenin but not matairesinol were described to interfere with the activity of tryptophan-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. We examined a potential direct influence of compounds on IDO enzyme activity applying computational calculations based on 3D geometry of the compounds. The interaction pattern analysis and force field-based minimization was performed within LigandScout 3.03, the docking simulation with MOE 2011.10 using the X-ray crystal structure of IDO. Results confirm the possibility of an intense interaction of arctigenin and trachelogenin with the binding site of the enzyme, while matairesinol had no such effect. PMID:24251110

  15. Interaction of metallic nanoparticles with dielectric substrates: effect of optical constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutter, Tanya; Elliott, Stephen R; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the local-field enhancement in a system of a metallic nanoparticle placed very near to a dielectric substrate. In such systems, intense electric fields are localized in the gap between the particle and the substrate, creating a ‘hot-spot’ under appropriate excitation conditions. We use finite-element numerical simulations in order to study the field enhancement in this dielectric–metal system. More specifically, we show how the optical properties of the dielectric substrate (n and k) affect the plasmonic field enhancement in the nano-gap. We also analyze the degree of field confinement in the gap and discuss it in the context of utilization for surface-enhanced Raman scattering. We finally show the fields generated by real substrates and compare them to metallic ones. (paper)

  16. Structural Evidence of a Major Conformational Change Triggered by Substrate Binding in DapE Enzymes: Impact on the Catalytic Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocek, Boguslaw; Reidl, Cory; Starus, Anna; Heath, Tahirah; Bienvenue, David; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Becker, Daniel P; Holz, Richard C

    2018-02-06

    The X-ray crystal structure of the dapE-encoded N-succinyl-l,l-diaminopimelic acid desuccinylase from Haemophilus influenzae (HiDapE) bound by the products of hydrolysis, succinic acid and l,l-DAP, was determined at 1.95 Å. Surprisingly, the structure bound to the products revealed that HiDapE undergoes a significant conformational change in which the catalytic domain rotates ∼50° and shifts ∼10.1 Å (as measured at the position of the Zn atoms) relative to the dimerization domain. This heretofore unobserved closed conformation revealed significant movements within the catalytic domain compared to that of wild-type HiDapE, which results in effectively closing off access to the dinuclear Zn(II) active site with the succinate carboxylate moiety bridging the dinculear Zn(II) cluster in a μ-1,3 fashion forming a bis(μ-carboxylato)dizinc(II) core with a Zn-Zn distance of 3.8 Å. Surprisingly, His194.B, which is located on the dimerization domain of the opposing chain ∼10.1 Å from the dinuclear Zn(II) active site, forms a hydrogen bond (2.9 Å) with the oxygen atom of succinic acid bound to Zn2, forming an oxyanion hole. As the closed structure forms upon substrate binding, the movement of His194.B by more than ∼10 Å is critical, based on site-directed mutagenesis data, for activation of the scissile carbonyl carbon of the substrate for nucleophilic attack by a hydroxide nucleophile. Employing the HiDapE product-bound structure as the starting point, a reverse engineering approach called product-based transition-state modeling provided structural models for each major catalytic step. These data provide insight into the catalytic reaction mechanism and also the future design of new, potent inhibitors of DapE enzymes.

  17. Moiré superlattice-level stick-slip instability originated from geometrically corrugated graphene on a strongly interacting substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ruoyu; Gao, Lei; Lu, Hongliang; Li, Qunyang; Ma, Tian-Bao; Guo, Hui; Du, Shixuan; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Yanmin; Cheng, Peng; Hu, Yuan-Zhong; Gao, Hong-Jun; Luo, Jianbin

    2017-06-01

    Two dimensional (2D) materials often exhibit novel properties due to various coupling effects with their supporting substrates. Here, using friction force microscopy (FFM), we report an unusual moiré superlattice-level stick-slip instability on monolayer graphene epitaxially grown on Ru(0 0 0 1) substrate. Instead of smooth friction modulation, a significant long-range stick-slip sawtooth modulation emerges with a period coinciding with the moiré superlattice structure, which is robust against high external loads and leads to an additional channel of energy dissipation. In contrast, the long-range stick-slip instability reduces to smooth friction modulation on graphene/Ir(1 1 1) substrate. The moiré superlattice-level slip instability could be attributed to the large sliding energy barrier, which arises from the morphological corrugation of graphene on Ru(0 0 0 1) surface as indicated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The locally steep humps acting as obstacles opposing the tip sliding, originates from the strong interfacial electronic interaction between graphene and Ru(0 0 0 1). This study opens an avenue for modulating friction by tuning the interfacial atomic interaction between 2D materials and their substrates.

  18. The role of a second-shell residue in modifying substrate and inhibitor interactions in the SHV beta-lactamase: a study of ambler position Asn276.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawz, Sarah M; Bethel, Christopher R; Hujer, Kristine M; Hurless, Kelly N; Distler, Anne M; Caselli, Emilia; Prati, Fabio; Bonomo, Robert A

    2009-06-02

    Inhibitor-resistant class A beta-lactamases of the TEM and SHV families that arise by single amino acid substitutions are a significant threat to the efficacy of beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations. To better understand the basis of the inhibitor-resistant phenotype in SHV, we performed mutagenesis to examine the role of a second-shell residue, Asn276. Of the 19 variants expressed in Escherichia coli, only the Asn276Asp enzyme demonstrated reduced susceptibility to ampicillin/clavulanate (MIC increased from 50/2 --> 50/8 microg/mL) while maintaining high-level resistance to ampicillin (MIC = 8192 microg/mL). Steady-state kinetic analyses of Asn276Asp revealed slightly diminished k(cat)/K(m) for all substrates tested. In contrast, we observed a 5-fold increase in K(i) for clavulanate (7.4 +/- 0.9 microM for Asn276Asp vs 1.4 +/- 0.2 microM for SHV-1) and a 40% reduction in k(inact)/K(I) (0.013 +/- 0.002 microM(-1 )s(-1) for Asn276Asp vs 0.021 +/- 0.004 microM(-1) s(-1) for SHV-1). Timed electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of clavulanate-inhibited SHV-1 and SHV Asn276Asp showed nearly identical mass adducts, arguing for a similar pathway of inactivation. Molecular modeling shows that novel electrostatic interactions are formed between Arg244Neta2 and both 276AspOdelta1 and Odelta2; these new forces restrict the spatial position of Arg244, a residue important in the recognition of the C(3)/C(4) carboxylate of beta-lactam substrates and inhibitors. Testing the functional consequences of this interaction, we noted considerable free energy costs (+DeltaDeltaG) for substrates and inhibitors. A rigid carbapenem (meropenem) was most affected by the Asn276Asp substitution (46-fold increase in K(i) vs SHV-1). We conclude that residue 276 is an important second-shell residue in class A beta-lactamase-mediated resistance to substrates and inhibitors, and only Asn is able to precisely modulate the conformational flexibility of Arg244 required for successful

  19. Production of enzymes by a newly isolated Bacillus sp. TMF-1 in solid state fermentation on agricultural by-products: The evaluation of substrate pretreatment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Abdalla Ali; Grbavčić, Sanja; Šekuljica, Nataša; Stefanović, Andrea; Jakovetić Tanasković, Sonja; Luković, Nevena; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica

    2017-03-01

    Study on potential of different agro-industrial waste residues for supporting the growth of newly isolated Bacillus sp. TMF-1 strain under solid-state fermentation (SSF) was conducted aiming to produce several industrially valuable enzymes. Since the feasibility of the initial study was confirmed, further objectives included evaluation of several pretreatments of the studied agricultural by-products (soybean meal, sunflower meal, maize bran, maize pericarp, olive oil cake and wheat bran) on the microbial productivity as means of enhancing the yields of produced proteases, α-amylases, cellulases and pectinases. Among acid/alkaline treatment, ultrasound and microwave assisted methods, chemical treatments superiorly affected most of the studied substrates. Highest yields of produced proteases (50.5IUg -1 ) and α-amylases (50.75IUg -1 ) were achieved on alkaline treated corn pericarp. Alkaline treatment also promoted the secretion of cellulases on maize bran (1.19IUg -1 ). Highest yield of pectinases was obtained on untreated soybean meal (64.90IUg -1 ). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Substrate interactions of benzene, toluene, and para-xylene during microbial degradation by pure cultures and mixed culture aquifer slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, P.J.J.; Vogel, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    Release of petroleum hydrocarbons in the environment is a widespread occurrence. One particular concern is the contamination of drinking water sources by the toxic, water-soluble, and mobile petroleum components benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX). Benzene, toluene, and p-xylene (BTX) were degraded by indigenous mixed cultures in sandy aquifer material and by two pure cultures isolated from the same site. Although BTX compounds have a similar chemical structure, the fate of individual BTX compounds differed when the compounds were fed to each pure culture and mixed culture aquifer slurries. The identification of substrate interactions aided the understanding of this behavior. Beneficial substrate interactions included enhanced degradation of benzene-dependent degradation of toluene and p-xylene by Arthrobacter sp. strain HCB. Detrimental substrate interactions included retardation in benzene and toluene degradation by the presence of p-xylene in both aquifer slurries and Pseudomonas incubations. The catabolic diversity of microbes in the environment precludes generalizations about the capacity of individual BTX compounds to enhance or inhibit the degradation of other BTX compounds

  1. Magnus-induced ratchet effects for skyrmions interacting with asymmetric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, C.; Ray, D.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.

    2015-07-01

    We show using numerical simulations that pronounced ratchet effects can occur for ac driven skyrmions moving over asymmetric quasi-one-dimensional substrates. We find a new type of ratchet effect called a Magnus-induced transverse ratchet that arises when the ac driving force is applied perpendicular rather than parallel to the asymmetry direction of the substrate. This transverse ratchet effect only occurs when the Magnus term is finite, and the threshold ac amplitude needed to induce it decreases as the Magnus term becomes more prominent. Ratcheting skyrmions follow ordered orbits in which the net displacement parallel to the substrate asymmetry direction is quantized. Skyrmion ratchets represent a new ac current-based method for controlling skyrmion positions and motion for spintronic applications.

  2. Explaining an Unusually Fast Parasitic Enzyme: Folate Tail-Binding Residues Dictate Substrate Positioning and Catalysis in Cryptosporidium hominis Thymidylate Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martucci,W.; Vargo, M.; Anderson, K.

    2008-01-01

    The essential enzyme TS-DHFR from Cryptosporidium hominis undergoes an unusually rapid rate of catalysis at the conserved TS domain, facilitated by two nonconserved residues, Ala287 and Ser290, in the folate tail-binding region. Mutation of these two residues to their conserved counterparts drastically affects multiple steps of the TS catalytic cycle. We have determined the crystal structures of all three mutants (A287F, S290G, and A287F/S290G) in complex with active site ligands dUMP and CB3717. The structural data show two effects of the mutations: an increased distance between the ligands in the active site and increased flexibility of the folate ligand in the partially open enzyme state that precedes conformational change to the active catalytic state. The latter effect is able to be rescued by the mutants containing the A287F mutation. In addition, the conserved water network of TS is altered in each of the mutants. The structural results point to a role of the folate tail-binding residues in closely positioning ChTS ligands and restricting ligand flexibility in the partially open state to allow for a rapid transition to the active closed state and enhanced rate of catalysis. These results provide an explanation on how folate tail-binding residues at one end of the active site affect long-range interactions throughout the TS active site and validate these residues as targets for species-specific drug design.

  3. The Effect of Substrate-Bulk Interaction on Hydrolysis Modeling in Anaerobic Digestion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Panico

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In an Anaerobic Digestion (AD process treating particulate substrates, the size of solids is expected to negatively affect the rate of hydrolysis step and consequently influence the performance of the whole process. To avoid any disadvantage due to size of solids, expensive pre-treatments aimed at disintegrating and solubilizing substrates are commonly conducted prior to AD. This practice is doubtlessly successful, but not always necessary, since some organic substrates, although particulate, once immersed in water, tend to solubilize immediately. This aspect, if properly considered, could result in saving money and time in the AD process, as well as refining the development and calibration of AD mathematical models. The present study is actually aimed at demonstrating, through experiments and mathematical simulations, different results deriving from the AD process performed, under the same operating conditions, on two different substrates, i.e. homemade pasta and carrot batons, having the same particle size, but different chemical composition and texture. Experimental outcomes highlighted the effect of particles size on bio-methane production only from the bio-methanation potential tests (BMP conducted on carrot batons. Similar results were obtained by mathematical model calibration, i.e., different kinetic constants for differently-sized carrot batons and same kinetic constant for differently-sized homemade pasta solids.

  4. Interactions of barley alpha-amylase isozymes with Ca2+, substrates and proteinaceous inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abou Hachem, Maher; Bozonnet, Sophie; Willemoes, Martin

    2006-01-01

    discovered 'sugar tongs' site in domain C of AMY1 is thus critical for binding to starch granules. Furthermore, mutations of binding sites mostly reduced the degree of multiple attack in amylose hydrolysis. AMY1 has higher substrate affinity than AMY2, but isozyme chimeras with AMY2 domain C and other...

  5. Interactions between nitrate and chloride in nutrient solutions for substrate grown tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, W.; Sonneveld, C.

    2004-01-01

    In two successive experiments tomato was grown at different Cl and NO3 concentrations in the root environment with rockwool as a sub-strate. The EC value in the nutrient solution was fairly constant, varying between 3.5 and 4.0 dS m-1 in all treatments. The NO3 concentrations in the treatments

  6. Interfacial Interaction of Oxidatively Cured Hydrogen Silsesquioxane Spin-On-Glass Enamel with Stainless Steel Substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampert, Felix; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Jensen, Annemette H.

    2017-01-01

    interfacial duplex-oxide with an outer zone composed of Fe2O3 in a SiO2-x matrix and an inner zone composed of complex (Cr3+,Fe2+,Mn2+)-oxides. Moreover, a Cr depletion of the substrate in the immediate vicinity of the surface was observed. It was concluded that the interfacial formation is controlled...

  7. Interactions between Barley a-Amylases, Substrates, Inhibitors and Regulatory Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachem, Maher Abou; Bozonnet, Sophie; Willemoës, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Barley a-amylase binds sugars at two sites on the enzyme surface in addition to the active site. Crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis highlight the importance of aromatic residues at these surface sites as demonstrated by Kd values determined for ß-cyclodextrin by surface plasmon resonan...

  8. Modelling substrate specificity and enantioselectivity for lipases and esterases by substrate-imprinted docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Sadhna

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, ways to adapt docking programs that were developed for modelling inhibitor-receptor interaction have been explored. Two main issues were discussed. First, when trying to model catalysis a reaction intermediate of the substrate is expected to provide more valid information than the ground state of the substrate. Second, the incorporation of protein flexibility is essential for reliable predictions. Results Here we present a predictive and robust method to model substrate specificity and enantioselectivity of lipases and esterases that uses reaction intermediates and incorporates protein flexibility. Substrate-imprinted docking starts with covalent docking of reaction intermediates, followed by geometry optimisation of the resulting enzyme-substrate complex. After a second round of docking the same substrate into the geometry-optimised structures, productive poses are identified by geometric filter criteria and ranked by their docking scores. Substrate-imprinted docking was applied in order to model (i enantioselectivity of Candida antarctica lipase B and a W104A mutant, (ii enantioselectivity and substrate specificity of Candida rugosa lipase and Burkholderia cepacia lipase, and (iii substrate specificity of an acetyl- and a butyrylcholine esterase toward the substrates acetyl- and butyrylcholine. Conclusion The experimentally observed differences in selectivity and specificity of the enzymes were reproduced with an accuracy of 81%. The method was robust toward small differences in initial structures (different crystallisation conditions or a co-crystallised ligand, although large displacements of catalytic residues often resulted in substrate poses that did not pass the geometric filter criteria.

  9. Cognitive enhancers (Nootropics). Part 3: drugs interacting with targets other than receptors or enzymes. Disease-modifying drugs. Update 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Scientists working in the field of Alzheimer's disease and, in particular, cognitive enhancers, are very productive. The review "Drugs interacting with Targets other than Receptors or Enzymes. Disease-modifying Drugs" was accepted in October 2012. In the last 20 months, new targets for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease were identified. Enormous progress was realized in the pharmacological characterization of natural products with cognitive enhancing properties. This review covers the evolution of research in this field through May 2014.

  10. Radiation inactivation of multimeric enzymes: application to subunit interactions of adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkman, A.S.; Skorecki, K.L.; Ausiello, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation inactivation has been applied extensively to determine the molecular weight of soluble enzyme and receptor systems from the slope of a linear ln (activity) vs. dose curve. Complex nonlinear inactivation curves are predicted for multimeric enzyme systems, composed of distinct subunits in equilibrium with multimeric complexes. For the system A1 + A2----A1A2, with an active A1A2 complex (associative model), the ln (activity) vs. dose curve is linear for high dissociation constant, K. If a monomer, A1, has all the enzyme activity (dissociative model), the ln (activity) vs. dose curve has an activation hump at low radiation dose if the inactive subunit, A2, has a higher molecular weight than A1 and has upward concavity when A2 is smaller than A1. In general, a radiation inactivation model for a multistep mechanism for enzyme activation fulfills the characteristics of an associative or dissociative model if the reaction step forming active enzyme is an associative or dissociative reaction. Target theory gives the molecular weight of the active enzyme subunit or complex from the limiting slope of the ln (activity) vs. dose curve at high radiation dose. If energy transfer occurs among subunits in the multimer, the ln (activity) vs. dose curve is linear for a single active component and is concave upward for two or more active components. The use of radiation inactivation as a method to determine enzyme size and multimeric subunit assembly is discussed with specific application to the hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase system. It is shown that the complex inactivation curves presented in the accompanying paper can be used select the best mechanism out of a series of seven proposed mechanisms for the activation of adenylate cyclase by hormone

  11. Substantial improvements of long-term stability in encapsulation-free WS2 using highly interacting graphene substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Yang; Kwak, Jinsung; Kim, Jung Hwa; Lee, Jae-Ung; Jo, Yongsu; Youb Kim, Sung; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Lee, Zonghoon; Kwon, Soon-Yong

    2017-03-01

    We report the novel role of graphene substrates in obstructing the aging propagation in both the basal planes and edges of two-dimensitional sheets of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Even after 300 d in ambient air conditions, the epitaxially grown WS2/graphene samples have a clean, uniform surface without any encapsulation. We show that high crystallinity is an effective factor that determines the excellent air stability of WS2/graphene, and we present impressive experimental evidence of the relation between defects and the aging phenomena. Moreover, we reveal the strong interlayer charge interaction as an additional factor for the enhanced air stability as a result of charge transfer-induced doping. This work not only proposes a simple method to create highly stable TMDs by the selection of a suitable substrate but also paves the way for the realization of practical TMDs-based applications.

  12. High-throughput evaluation of interactions between biomaterials, proteins and cells using patterned superhydrophobic substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, Ana I.; Custódio, Catarina A.; Wenlong Song; Mano, J. F.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new low cost platform for high-throughput analysis that permits screening the biological performance of independent combinations of biomaterials, cells and culture media. Patterned superhydrophobic flat substrates with controlled wettable spots are used to produce microarray chips for accelerated multiplexing evaluation. This work was partially supported by Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia (FCT) under project PTDC/FIS/68517/2006.

  13. Novel IgG-Degrading Enzymes of the IgdE Protease Family Link Substrate Specificity to Host Tropism of Streptococcus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerry, Christian; Hessle, Pontus; Lewis, Melanie J; Paton, Lois; Woof, Jenny M; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Recently we have discovered an IgG degrading enzyme of the endemic pig pathogen S. suis designated IgdE that is highly specific for porcine IgG. This protease is the founding member of a novel cysteine protease family assigned C113 in the MEROPS peptidase database. Bioinformatical analyses revealed putative members of the IgdE protease family in eight other Streptococcus species. The genes of the putative IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. porcinus, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus were cloned for production of recombinant protein into expression vectors. Recombinant proteins of all four IgdE family proteases were proteolytically active against IgG of the respective Streptococcus species hosts, but not against IgG from other tested species or other classes of immunoglobulins, thereby linking the substrate specificity to the known host tropism. The novel IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi showed IgG subtype specificity, i.e. IgdE from S. agalactiae and S. pseudoporcinus cleaved human IgG1, while IgdE from S. equi was subtype specific for equine IgG7. Porcine IgG subtype specificities of the IgdE family proteases of S. porcinus and S. pseudoporcinus remain to be determined. Cleavage of porcine IgG by IgdE of S. pseudoporcinus is suggested to be an evolutionary remaining activity reflecting ancestry of the human pathogen to the porcine pathogen S. porcinus. The IgG subtype specificity of bacterial proteases indicates the special importance of these IgG subtypes in counteracting infection or colonization and opportunistic streptococci neutralize such antibodies through expression of IgdE family proteases as putative immune evasion factors. We suggest that IgdE family proteases might be valid vaccine targets against streptococci of both human and veterinary medical concerns and could also be of therapeutic as well as biotechnological use.

  14. Molecular view of the interaction between iota-carrageenan and a phospholipid film and its role in enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Thatyane M; de Sousa e Silva, Heurison; Furriel, Rosa P M; Leone, Francisco A; Miranda, Paulo B; Zaniquelli, Maria Elisabete D

    2009-05-28

    Proteins incorporated into phospholipid Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films are a good model system for biomembranes and enzyme immobilization studies. The specific fluidity of biomembranes, an important requisite for enzymatic activity, is naturally controlled by varying phospholipid compositions. In a model system, instead, LB film fluidity may be varied by covering the top layer with different substances able to interact simultaneously with the phospholipid and the protein to be immobilized. In this study, we immobilized a carbohydrate rich Neurospora crassa alkaline phosphatase (NCAP) in monolayers of the sodium salt of dihexadecylphosphoric acid (DHP), a synthetic phospholipid that provides very condensed Langmuir films. The binding of NCAP to DHP Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films was mediated by the anionic polysaccharide iota-carrageenan (iota-car). Combining results from surface isotherms and the quartz crystal microbalance technique, we concluded that the polysaccharide was essential to promote the interaction between DHP and NCAP and also to increase the fluidity of the film. An estimate of DHP:iota-car ratio within the film also revealed that the polysaccharide binds to DHP LB film in an extended conformation. Furthermore, the investigation of the polysaccharide conformation at molecular level, using sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), indicated a preferential conformation of the carrageenan molecules with the sulfate groups oriented toward the phospholipid monolayer, and both the hydroxyl and ether groups interacting preferentially with the protein. These results demonstrate how interfacial electric fields can reorient and induce conformational changes in macromolecules, which may significantly affect intermolecular interactions at interfaces. This detailed knowledge of the interaction mechanism between the enzyme and the LB film is relevant to design strategies for enzyme immobilization when orientation and fluidity properties of the film provided by the

  15. Structural basis of the interaction of MbtH-like proteins, putative regulators of nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis, with adenylating enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Dominik A; Boll, Björn; Zocher, Georg; Stehle, Thilo; Heide, Lutz

    2013-01-18

    The biosynthesis of nonribosomally formed peptides (NRPs), which include important antibiotics such as vancomycin, requires the activation of amino acids through adenylate formation. The biosynthetic gene clusters of NRPs frequently contain genes for small, so-called MbtH-like proteins. Recently, it was discovered that these MbtH-like proteins are required for some of the adenylation reactions in NRP biosynthesis, but the mechanism of their interaction with the adenylating enzymes has remained unknown. In this study, we determined the structure of SlgN1, a 3-methylaspartate-adenylating enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the hybrid polyketide/NRP antibiotic streptolydigin. SlgN1 contains an MbtH-like domain at its N terminus, and our analysis defines the parameters required for an interaction between MbtH-like domains and an adenylating enzyme. Highly conserved tryptophan residues of the MbtH-like domain critically contribute to this interaction. Trp-25 and Trp-35 form a cleft on the surface of the MbtH-like domain, which accommodates the alanine side chain of Ala-433 of the adenylating domain. Mutation of Ala-433 to glutamate abolished the activity of SlgN1. Mutation of Ser-23 of the MbtH-like domain to tyrosine resulted in strongly reduced activity. However, the activity of this S23Y mutant could be completely restored by addition of the intact MbtH-like protein CloY from another organism. This suggests that the interface found in the structure of SlgN1 is the genuine interface between MbtH-like proteins and adenylating enzymes.

  16. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...

  17. Role of Proteolytic Enzymes in the Interaction of Phytopathogenic Microorganisms with Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valueva, T A; Zaichik, B Ts; Kudryavtseva, N N

    2016-12-01

    Various forms of participation of proteolytic enzymes in pathogenesis and defense in plants are reviewed. Along with extracellular proteinases, phytopathogenic microorganisms produce specific effectors having proteolytic activity and capable of acting on proteins inside plant cells. In turn, for defense against pathogens, plants use both extracellular and intracellular proteinases.

  18. Interactive roles of Ras, insulin receptor substrate-1, and proteins with Src homology-2 domains in insulin signaling in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, L M; Hausdorff, S F; Myers, M G; White, M F; Birnbaum, M J; Kahn, C R

    1994-11-04

    Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) serves as the major immediate substrate of insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptors and following tyrosine phosphorylation binds to specific Src homology-2 (SH2) domain-containing proteins including the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and GRB2, a molecule believed to link IRS-1 to the Ras pathway. To investigate how these SH2-containing signaling molecules interact to regulate insulin/IGF-1 action, IRS-1, glutathione S-transferase (GST)-SH2 domain fusion proteins and Ras proteins were microinjected into Xenopus oocytes. We found that pleiotropic insulin actions are mediated by IRS-1 through two independent, but convergent, pathways involving PI 3-kinase and GRB2. Thus, microinjection of GST-fusion proteins of either p85 or GRB2 inhibited IRS-1-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) and S6 kinases and oocyte maturation, although only the GST-SH2 of p85 reduced insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase activation. Co-injection of a dominant negative Ras (S17N) with IRS-1 inhibited insulin-stimulated MAP and S6 kinase activation. Micro-injection of activated [Arg12,Thr59]Ras increased basal MAP and S6 kinase activities and sensitized the oocytes to insulin-stimulated maturation without altering insulin-stimulated PI 3-kinase. The Ras-enhanced oocyte maturation response, but not the elevated basal level of MAP and S6 kinase, was partially blocked by the SH2-p85, but not SH2-GRB2. These data strongly suggest that IRS-1 can mediate many of insulin's actions on cellular enzyme activation and cell cycle progression requires binding and activation of multiple different SH2-domain proteins.

  19. A meta-selective C-H borylation directed by a secondary interaction between ligand and substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuninobu, Yoichiro; Ida, Haruka; Nishi, Mitsumi; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-09-01

    Regioselective C-H bond transformations are potentially the most efficient method for the synthesis of organic molecules. However, the presence of many C-H bonds in organic molecules and the high activation barrier for these reactions make these transformations difficult. Directing groups in the reaction substrate are often used to control regioselectivity, which has been especially successful for the ortho-selective functionalization of aromatic substrates. Here, we describe an iridium-catalysed meta-selective C-H borylation of aromatic compounds using a newly designed catalytic system. The bipyridine-derived ligand that binds iridium contains a pendant urea moiety. A secondary interaction between this urea and a hydrogen-bond acceptor in the substrate places the iridium in close proximity to the meta-C-H bond and thus controls the regioselectivity. 1H NMR studies and control experiments support the participation of hydrogen bonds in inducing regioselectivity. Reversible direction of the catalyst through hydrogen bonds is a versatile concept for regioselective C-H transformations.

  20. Insights into enzyme-substrate interaction and characterization of catalytic al intermediates of a Xylella Fastidiosa antioxidant protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Marcos Antonio de; Cussiol, Jose Renato Rosa; Soares Netto, Luis Eduardo; Guimaraes, Beatriz Gomes; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar

    2005-01-01

    Plants and animals have developed various strategies to defend themselves from pathogens. One of them is the generation of oxidants such as organic Hydroperoxides (OHP). OHP can be generated through free radicals as well as enzymatic oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. To counteract this oxidative stress, bacteria have evolved several antioxidant mechanisms. Organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (Ohr) was initially identified as a factor involved in the resistance of bacteria, most of them pathogenic, to OHP, but not H 2 O 2 . We have cloned Ohr gene from Xylella fastidiosa and expressed in in Escherichia coli. The biochemical role of Ohr remained unknown for a long time until this work and the work of Nikolov's group (Cornell University, New York) independently showed that these proteins are thiol dependent peroxidases, whose activity is generated by a reactive cysteine. (author)

  1. Insights into enzyme-substrate interaction and characterization of catalytic al intermediates of a Xylella Fastidiosa antioxidant protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Marcos Antonio de; Cussiol, Jose Renato Rosa; Soares Netto, Luis Eduardo [Sao Paulo Univ. (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias. Dept. de Genetica e Biologia Evolutiva; Guimaraes, Beatriz Gomes; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biologia Molecular Estrutural

    2005-07-01

    Plants and animals have developed various strategies to defend themselves from pathogens. One of them is the generation of oxidants such as organic Hydroperoxides (OHP). OHP can be generated through free radicals as well as enzymatic oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. To counteract this oxidative stress, bacteria have evolved several antioxidant mechanisms. Organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (Ohr) was initially identified as a factor involved in the resistance of bacteria, most of them pathogenic, to OHP, but not H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. We have cloned Ohr gene from Xylella fastidiosa and expressed in in Escherichia coli. The biochemical role of Ohr remained unknown for a long time until this work and the work of Nikolov's group (Cornell University, New York) independently showed that these proteins are thiol dependent peroxidases, whose activity is generated by a reactive cysteine. (author)

  2. Albumin stimulates the activity of the human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases 1A7, 1A8, 1A10, 2A1 and 2B15, but the effects are enzyme and substrate dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manevski, Nenad; Troberg, Johanna; Svaluto-Moreolo, Paolo; Dziedzic, Klaudyna; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Finel, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are important enzymes in metabolic elimination of endo- and xenobiotics. It was recently shown that addition of fatty acid free bovine serum albumin (BSA) significantly enhances in vitro activities of UGTs, a limiting factor in in vitro-in vivo extrapolation. Nevertheless, since only few human UGT enzymes were tested for this phenomenon, we have now performed detailed enzyme kinetic analysis on the BSA effects in six previously untested UGTs, using 2-4 suitable substrates for each enzyme. We also examined some of the previously tested UGTs, but using additional substrates and a lower BSA concentration, only 0.1%. The latter concentration allows the use of important but more lipophilic substrates, such as estradiol and 17-epiestradiol. In five newly tested UGTs, 1A7, 1A8, 1A10, 2A1, and 2B15, the addition of BSA enhanced, to a different degree, the in vitro activity by either decreasing reaction's K(m), increasing its V(max), or both. In contrast, the activities of UGT2B17, another previously untested enzyme, were almost unaffected. The results of the assays with the previously tested UGTs, 1A1, 1A6, 2B4, and 2B7, were similar to the published BSA only as far as the BSA effects on the reactions' K(m) are concerned. In the cases of V(max) values, however, our results differ significantly from the previously published ones, at least with some of the substrates. Hence, the magnitude of the BSA effects appears to be substrate dependent, especially with respect to V(max) increases. Additionally, the BSA effects may be UGT subfamily dependent since K(m) decreases were observed in members of subfamilies 1A, 2A and 2B, whereas large V(max) increases were only found in several UGT1A members. The results shed new light on the complexity of the BSA effects on the activity and enzyme kinetics of the human UGTs.

  3. Albumin stimulates the activity of the human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases 1A7, 1A8, 1A10, 2A1 and 2B15, but the effects are enzyme and substrate dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Manevski

    Full Text Available Human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs are important enzymes in metabolic elimination of endo- and xenobiotics. It was recently shown that addition of fatty acid free bovine serum albumin (BSA significantly enhances in vitro activities of UGTs, a limiting factor in in vitro-in vivo extrapolation. Nevertheless, since only few human UGT enzymes were tested for this phenomenon, we have now performed detailed enzyme kinetic analysis on the BSA effects in six previously untested UGTs, using 2-4 suitable substrates for each enzyme. We also examined some of the previously tested UGTs, but using additional substrates and a lower BSA concentration, only 0.1%. The latter concentration allows the use of important but more lipophilic substrates, such as estradiol and 17-epiestradiol. In five newly tested UGTs, 1A7, 1A8, 1A10, 2A1, and 2B15, the addition of BSA enhanced, to a different degree, the in vitro activity by either decreasing reaction's K(m, increasing its V(max, or both. In contrast, the activities of UGT2B17, another previously untested enzyme, were almost unaffected. The results of the assays with the previously tested UGTs, 1A1, 1A6, 2B4, and 2B7, were similar to the published BSA only as far as the BSA effects on the reactions' K(m are concerned. In the cases of V(max values, however, our results differ significantly from the previously published ones, at least with some of the substrates. Hence, the magnitude of the BSA effects appears to be substrate dependent, especially with respect to V(max increases. Additionally, the BSA effects may be UGT subfamily dependent since K(m decreases were observed in members of subfamilies 1A, 2A and 2B, whereas large V(max increases were only found in several UGT1A members. The results shed new light on the complexity of the BSA effects on the activity and enzyme kinetics of the human UGTs.

  4. Auger electron spectroscopy study on interaction between aluminum thin layers and uranium substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wei; Liu Kezhao; Yang Jiangrong; Xiao Hong; Jiang Chunli; Lu Lei

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum thin layers on uranium were prepared by sputter deposition at room temperature in ultra high vacuum analysis chamber. Interaction between U and Al, and growth mode were investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). It is shown that Al thin film growth follows the volmer-weber (VW) mode. At room temperature, Al and U interact with each other, resulting in interdiffusion action and formation of U-Al alloys at U/Al interface. Annealing promotes interaction and interdiffusion between U and Al, and UAl x maybe formed at interface. (authors)

  5. The interactive effects of mercury and selenium on metabolic profiles, gene expression and antioxidant enzymes in halophyte Suaeda salsa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Lai, Yongkai; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yiyan; Zou, Ning

    2016-04-01

    Suaeda salsa is the pioneer halophyte in the Yellow River Delta and was consumed as a popular vegetable. Mercury has become a highly risky contaminant in the sediment of intertidal zones of the Yellow River Delta. In this work, we investigated the interactive effects of mercury and selenium in S. salsa on the basis of metabolic profiling, antioxidant enzyme activities and gene expression quantification. Our results showed that mercury exposure (20 μg L(-1)) inhibited plant growth of S. salsa and induced significant metabolic responses and altered expression levels of INPS, CMO, and MDH in S. salsa samples, together with the increased activities of antioxidant enzymes including SOD and POD. Overall, these results indicated osmotic and oxidative stresses, disturbed protein degradation and energy metabolism change in S. salsa after mercury exposures. Additionally, the addition of selenium could induce both antagonistic and synergistic effects including alleviating protein degradation and aggravating osmotic stress caused by mercury. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Increased interaction with insulin receptor substrate 1, a novel abnormality in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caruso, Michael; Ma, Danjun; Msallaty, Zaher

    2014-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) is a key mediator of insulin signal transduction. Perturbations involving IRS1 complexes may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Surprisingly little is known about the proteins that interact with IRS1 in humans under health...... in obesity and T2D in humans, provides new insights into the molecular mechanism of insulin resistance and identifies new targets for T2D drug development....... and disease conditions. We used a proteomic approach to assess IRS1 interaction partners in skeletal muscle from lean healthy control subjects (LCs), obese insulin-resistant nondiabetic control subjects (OCs), and participants with T2D before and after insulin infusion. We identified 113 novel endogenous IRS1...

  7. Dynamics of Preferential Substrate Recognition in HIV-1 Protease: Redefining the Substrate Envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özen, Ayşegül; Haliloğlu, Türkan; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) permits viral maturation by processing the Gag and Gag-Pro-Pol polyproteins. Though HIV-1 PR inhibitors (PIs) are used in combination antiviral therapy, the emergence of drug resistance has limited their efficacy. The rapid evolution of HIV-1 necessitates the consideration of drug resistance in novel drug-design strategies. Drug-resistant HIV-1 PR variants, while no longer efficiently inhibited, continue to efficiently hydrolyze the natural viral substrates. Though highly diverse in sequence, the HIV-1 PR substrates bind in a conserved three-dimensional shape we defined as the “substrate envelope”. We previously showed that resistance mutations arise where PIs protrude beyond the substrate envelope, as these regions are crucial for drug binding but not for substrate recognition. Here, we extend this model by considering the role of protein dynamics in the interaction of HIV-1 PR with its substrates. Seven molecular dynamics simulations of PR-substrate complexes were performed to estimate the conformational flexibility of substrates in their complexes. Interdependency of the substrate-protease interactions may compensate for the variations in cleavage-site sequences, and explain how a diverse set of sequences can be recognized as substrates by the same enzyme. This diversity may be essential for regulating sequential processing of substrates. We also define a dynamic substrate envelope as a more accurate representation of PR-substrate interactions. This dynamic substrate envelope, described by a probability distribution function, is a powerful tool for drug design efforts targeting ensembles of resistant HIV-1 PR variants with the aim of developing drugs that are less susceptible to resistance. PMID:21762811

  8. Effects of varying oxygen partial pressure on molten silicon-ceramic substrate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownby, D. P.; Barsoum, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    The silicon sessile drop contact angle was measured on hot pressed silicon nitride, silicon nitride coated on hot pressed silicon nitride, silicon carbon coated on graphite, and on Sialon to determine the degree to which silicon wets these substances. The post-sessile drop experiment samples were sectioned and photomicrographs were taken of the silicon-substrate interface to observe the degree of surface dissolution and degradation. Of these materials, silicon did not form a true sessile drop on the SiC on graphite due to infiltration of the silicon through the SiC coating, nor on the Sialon due to the formation of a more-or-less rigid coating on the liquid silicon. The most wetting was obtained on the coated Si3N4 with a value of 42 deg. The oxygen concentrations in a silicon ribbon furnace and in a sessile drop furnace were measured using the protable thoria-yttria solid solution electrolyte oxygen sensor. Oxygen partial pressures of 10 to the minus 7 power atm and 10 to the minus 8 power atm were obtained at the two facilities. These measurements are believed to represent nonequilibrium conditions.

  9. Oncogenic activation of v-kit involves deletion of a putative tyrosine-substrate interaction site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, R; Munemitsu, S; Ullrich, A

    1995-01-19

    The transforming gene of the Hardy-Zuckerman-4 strain of feline sarcoma virus, v-kit, arose by transduction of the cellular c-kit gene, which encodes the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) p145c-kit. To gain insight into the molecular basis of the v-kit transforming potential, we characterized the feline c-kit by cDNA cloning. Comparison of the feline v-kit and c-kit sequences revealed, in addition to deletions of the extracellular and transmembrane domains, three additional mutations in the v-kit oncogene product: deletion of tyrosine-569 and valine-570, the exchange of aspartate at position 761 to glycine, and replacement of the C-terminal 50 amino acids by five unrelated residues. Examinations of individual v-kit mutations in the context of chimeric receptors yielded inhibitory effects for some mutants on both autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation functions. In contrast, deletion of tyrosine-569 and valine-570 significantly enhanced transforming and mitogenic activities of p145c-kit, while the other mutations had no significant effects. Conservation in subclass III RTKs and the identification of the corresponding residue in beta PDGF-R, Y579, as a binding site for src family tyrosine kinases suggests an important role for Y568 in kit signal regulation and the definition of its oncogenic potential. Repositioning of Y571 by an inframe two codon deletion may be the crucial alteration resulting in enhancement of v-kit oncogenic activity.

  10. Neutron Reflectometry and QCM-D Study of the Interaction of Cellulase Enzymes with Films of Amorphous Cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbert, Candice E.; Ankner, John Francis; Kent, Michael S.; Jaclyn, Murton K.; Browning, Jim; Cheng, Gang; Liu, Zelin; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Supratim, Datta; Michael, Jablin; Bulent, Akgun; Alan, Esker; Simmons, Blake

    2011-01-01

    Improving the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is one of the key technological hurdles to reduce the cost of producing ethanol and other transportation fuels from lignocellulosic material. A better understanding of how soluble enzymes interact with insoluble cellulose will aid in the design of more efficient enzyme systems. We report a study involving neutron reflectometry (NR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) of the interaction of a commercial fungal enzyme extract (T. viride), two purified endoglucanses from thermophilic bacteria (Cel9A from A. acidocaldarius and Cel5A from T. maritima), and a mesophilic fungal endoglucanase (Cel45A from H. insolens) with amorphous cellulose films. The use of amorphous cellulose is motivated by the promise of ionic liquid pretreatment as a second generation technology that disrupts the native crystalline structure of cellulose. NR reveals the profile of water through the film at nm resolution, while QCM-D provides changes in mass and film stiffness. At 20 C and 0.3 mg/ml, the T. viride cocktail rapidly digested the entire film, beginning from the surface followed by activity throughout the bulk of the film. For similar conditions, Cel9A and Cel5A were active for only a short period of time and only at the surface of the film, with Cel9A releasing 40 from the ∼ 700 film and Cel5A resulting in only a slight roughening/swelling effect at the surface. Subsequent elevation of the temperature to the Topt in each case resulted in a very limited increase in activity, corresponding to the loss of an additional 60 from the film for Cel9A and 20 from the film for Cel5A, and very weak penetration into and digestion within the bulk of the film, before the activity again ceased. The results for Cel9A and Cel5A contrast sharply with results for Cel45A where very rapid and extensive penetration and digestion within the bulk of the film was observed at 20 C. We speculate that the large differences are due

  11. Interactions of nitrite with catalase: Enzyme activity and reaction kinetics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2017-06-01

    Catalase, a heme enzyme, which catalyzes decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, is one of the main enzymes of the antioxidant defense system of the cell. Nitrite, used as a food preservative has long been regarded as a harmful compound due to its ability to form carcinogenic nitrosamines. Recently, much evidence has been presented that nitrite plays a protective role as a nitric oxide donor under hypoxic conditions. In this work the effect of nitrite on the catalytic reactions of catalase was studied. Catalase was inhibited by nitrite, and this process was pH-dependent. IC 50 values varied from about 1μM at pH5.0 to about 150μM of nitrite at pH7.4. The presence of chloride significantly enhanced nitrite-induced catalase inhibition, in agreement with earlier observations. The kinetics of the reactions of nitrite with ferric catalase, its redox intermediate, Compound I, and catalase inactive form, Compound II, was also studied. Possible mechanisms of nitrite-induced catalase inhibition are analyzed and the biological consequences of the reactions of catalase with nitrite are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neural substrates of interactive musical improvisation: an FMRI study of 'trading fours' in jazz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel F Donnay

    Full Text Available Interactive generative musical performance provides a suitable model for communication because, like natural linguistic discourse, it involves an exchange of ideas that is unpredictable, collaborative, and emergent. Here we show that interactive improvisation between two musicians is characterized by activation of perisylvian language areas linked to processing of syntactic elements in music, including inferior frontal gyrus and posterior superior temporal gyrus, and deactivation of angular gyrus and supramarginal gyrus, brain structures directly implicated in semantic processing of language. These findings support the hypothesis that musical discourse engages language areas of the brain specialized for processing of syntax but in a manner that is not contingent upon semantic processing. Therefore, we argue that neural regions for syntactic processing are not domain-specific for language but instead may be domain-general for communication.

  13. Neural substrates of interactive musical improvisation: an FMRI study of 'trading fours' in jazz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnay, Gabriel F; Rankin, Summer K; Lopez-Gonzalez, Monica; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Limb, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    Interactive generative musical performance provides a suitable model for communication because, like natural linguistic discourse, it involves an exchange of ideas that is unpredictable, collaborative, and emergent. Here we show that interactive improvisation between two musicians is characterized by activation of perisylvian language areas linked to processing of syntactic elements in music, including inferior frontal gyrus and posterior superior temporal gyrus, and deactivation of angular gyrus and supramarginal gyrus, brain structures directly implicated in semantic processing of language. These findings support the hypothesis that musical discourse engages language areas of the brain specialized for processing of syntax but in a manner that is not contingent upon semantic processing. Therefore, we argue that neural regions for syntactic processing are not domain-specific for language but instead may be domain-general for communication.

  14. Interaction of cw CO2 laser radiation with plasma near-metallic substrate surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Astapchik, S. A.; Zabelin, Alexandre M.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Golubev, V. S.; Grezev, A. N.; Filatov, Igor V.; Chubrik, N. I.; Shimanovich, V. D.

    2000-07-01

    Optical and spectroscopic methods were used in studying near-surface plasma that is formed under the effect CW CO2 laser of (2- 5)x106W/cm2 power density upon stainless steel in He and Ar shielding gases. The variation of plume spatial structure with time has been studied, the outflow of gas-vapor jets from the interaction area has been characterized. The spectra of plasma plume pulsations have been obtained for the frequency range Δf = 0-1 MHz. The temperature and electron concentration of plasma plume have been found under radiation effect upon the target of stainless steel. Consideration has been given to the most probable mechanisms of CW laser radiation-metal non-stationary interaction.

  15. Structural Basis for Substrate Recognition by the Ankyrin Repeat Domain of Human DHHC17 Palmitoyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verardi, Raffaello; Kim, Jin-Sik; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Banerjee, Anirban

    2017-09-01

    DHHC enzymes catalyze palmitoylation, a major post-translational modification that regulates a number of key cellular processes. There are up to 24 DHHCs in mammals and hundreds of substrate proteins that get palmitoylated. However, how DHHC enzymes engage with their substrates is still poorly understood. There is currently no structural information about the interaction between any DHHC enzyme and protein substrates. In this study we have investigated the structural and thermodynamic bases of interaction between the ankyrin repeat domain of human DHHC17 (ANK17) and Snap25b. We solved a high-resolution crystal structure of the complex between ANK17 and a peptide fragment of Snap25b. Through structure-guided mutagenesis, we discovered key residues in DHHC17 that are critically important for interaction with Snap25b. We further extended our finding by showing that the same residues are also crucial for the interaction of DHHC17 with Huntingtin, one of its most physiologically relevant substrates.

  16. The van der Waals interaction of microparticles with a substrate characterized by a nonlocal response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorofeyev, Illarion

    2007-01-01

    The van der Waals energy of the system constituted by a microparticle and a solid surface characterized by a nonlocal response is calculated taking into account an influence of another microparticle. A saturation of the dispersion interaction at short distances from the surface both for the spectral density of energy and for the total energy is shown. The known McLachlan expression for the pair and triple energies in the case of local media directly follows from the obtained general expression

  17. Pharmacokinetic Effects of Isavuconazole Coadministration With the Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Substrates Bupropion, Repaglinide, Caffeine, Dextromethorphan, and Methadone in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Takao; Desai, Amit; Goldwater, Ronald; Han, David; Howieson, Corrie; Akhtar, Shahzad; Kowalski, Donna; Lademacher, Christopher; Pearlman, Helene; Rammelsberg, Diane; Townsend, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This report describes phase 1 clinical trials performed to assess interactions of oral isavuconazole at the clinically targeted dose (200 mg, administered as isavuconazonium sulfate 372 mg, 3 times a day for 2 days; 200 mg once daily [QD] thereafter) with single oral doses of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) substrates: bupropion hydrochloride (CYP2B6; 100 mg; n = 24), repaglinide (CYP2C8/CYP3A4; 0.5 mg; n = 24), caffeine (CYP1A2; 200 mg; n = 24), dextromethorphan hydrobromide (CYP2D6/CYP3A4; 30 mg; n = 24), and methadone (CYP2B6/CYP2C19/CYP3A4; 10 mg; n = 23). Compared with each drug alone, coadministration with isavuconazole changed the area under the concentration-time curves (AUC ∞ ) and maximum concentrations (C max ) as follows: bupropion, AUC ∞ reduced 42%, C max reduced 31%; repaglinide, AUC ∞ reduced 8%, C max reduced 14%; caffeine, AUC ∞ increased 4%, C max reduced 1%; dextromethorphan, AUC ∞ increased 18%, C max increased 17%; R-methadone, AUC ∞ reduced 10%, C max increased 3%; S-methadone, AUC ∞ reduced 35%, C max increased 1%. In all studies, there were no deaths, 1 serious adverse event (dextromethorphan study; perioral numbness, numbness of right arm and leg), and adverse events leading to study discontinuation were rare. Thus, isavuconazole is a mild inducer of CYP2B6 but does not appear to affect CYP1A2-, CYP2C8-, or CYP2D6-mediated metabolism. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  18. Interaction of IBA and NAA with enzymes in root induction of Crocus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-01-11

    Jan 11, 2010 ... Key words: Crocus sativus L., saffron, root formation, IBA, NAA. .... square coefficient. ... Interaction of medium and hormone and its effect on mean number of root per ... It is apparent in Table2 that the fluctuations in protein.

  19. Interaction of sigma 70 with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase core enzyme studied by surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, A L; Hughes, A D; Tufail, U; Baumann, C G; Scott, D J; Hoggett, J G

    2000-09-22

    The interaction between the core form of bacterial RNA polymerases and sigma factors is essential for specific promoter recognition, and for coordinating the expression of different sets of genes in response to varying cellular needs. The interaction between Escherichia coli core RNA polymerase and sigma 70 has been investigated by surface plasmon resonance. The His-tagged form of sigma 70 factor was immobilised on a Ni2+-NTA chip for monitoring its interaction with core polymerase. The binding constant for the interaction was found to be 1.9x10(-7) M, and the dissociation rate constant for release of sigma from core, in the absence of DNA or transcription, was 4x10(-3) s(-1), corresponding to a half-life of about 200 s.

  20. Case-only study of interactions between metabolic enzymes and smoking in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Chunhong; Jin, Mingjuan; Chen, Kun; Zhang, Yongjing; Zhang, Shuangshuang; Liu, Bing

    2007-01-01

    Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions involved in the metabolism of carcinogens may increase the risk of cancer. Our objective was to measure the interactions between common polymorphisms of P450 (CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2E1), GSTM1 and T1, SULT1A1 and cigarette smoking in colorectal cancer (CRC). A case-only design was conducted in a Chinese population including 207 patients with sporadic CRC. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed adjusting for age, gender, alcohol consumption, and cigarette smoking. The interaction odds ratio (COR) for the gene-gene interaction between CYP1B1 1294G and SULT1A1 638A allele was 2.68 (95% CI: 1.16–6.26). The results of the gene-environment analyses revealed that an interaction existed between cigarette smoking and the CYP1B1 1294G allele for CRC (COR = 2.62, 95%CI: 1.01–6.72), the COR for the interaction of CYP1B1 1294G and smoking history > 35 pack-years was 3.47 (95%CI: 1.12–10.80). No other significant gene-gene and gene-environment interactions were observed. Our results showed that the interaction between polymorphisms in CYP1B1 1294G and SULT1A1*2 may play a significant role on CRC in the Chinese population. Also, it is suggested that the association between cigarette smoking and CRC could be differentiated by the CYP1B1 1294G allele

  1. RNA substrate length as an indicator of exosome interactions in vivo [version 2; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Delan-Forino

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The exosome complex plays key roles in RNA processing and degradation in Eukaryotes and Archaea. Outstanding structural studies identified multiple pathways for RNA substrates into the exosome in vitro, but identifying the pathway followed by individual RNA species in vivo remains challenging. Methods: We attempted to address this question using RNase protection. In vivo RNA-protein crosslinking (CRAC was applied to the exosome component Rrp44/Dis3, which has both endonuclease and exonuclease activity. During CRAC, the exosome was purified under native conditions and subjected to RNase digestion, prior to protein denaturation and cDNA cloning. The resulting high-throughput sequence reads were stratified by length of the cDNA sequence. This should reflect RNA fragment lengths, and therefore the RNA region that was protected by exosome binding. We anticipated major read lengths of ~30nt and ~10nt, reflecting the “central channel” and “direct access” routes to the Rrp44 exonuclease active site observed in vitro. Results: Unexpectedly, no clear peak was observed at 30nt, whereas a broad peak was seen around 20nt. The expected ~10nt peak was seen, and showed strong elevation in strains lacking exonuclease activity. Unexpectedly, this peak was suppressed by point mutations in the Rrp44 endonuclease active site. This indicates that the short fragments are degraded by the exonuclease activity of Rrp44, but also suggests that at least some may be generated by endonuclease activity. Conclusions: The absence of 30nt protected fragments may reflect obligatory binding of cofactors at the entrance to the exosome central channel in vivo. The presence of ~20nt fragments apparently indicates an access route not yet reported from in vitro studies. Confident mapping of 10nt reads is challenging, but they are clearly derived from a subset of exosome targets. In particular, pre-rRNA species, which are major exosome targets, are strongly

  2. Substrate analog interaction with MCR-1 offers insight into the rising threat of the plasmid-mediated transferable colistin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Pengcheng; Song, Guangji; Shi, Mengyang; Zhou, Yafei; Liu, Yang; Lei, Jun; Chen, Peng; Yin, Lei

    2018-02-01

    Colistin is considered a last-resort antibiotic against most gram-negative bacteria. Recent discoveries of a plasmid-mediated, transferable mobilized colistin-resistance gene ( mcr-1) on all continents have heralded the imminent emergence of pan-drug-resistant superbacteria. The inner-membrane protein MCR-1 can catalyze the transfer of phosphoethanolamine (PEA) to lipid A, resulting in colistin resistance. However, little is known about the mechanism, and few drugs exist to address this issue. We present crystal structures revealing the MCR-1 catalytic domain (cMCR-1) as a monozinc metalloprotein with ethanolamine (ETA) and d-glucose, respectively, thus highlighting 2 possible substrate-binding pockets in the MCR-1-catalyzed PEA transfer reaction. Mutation of the residues involved in ETA and d-glucose binding impairs colistin resistance in recombinant Escherichia coli containing full-length MCR-1. Partial analogs of the substrate are used for cocrystallization with cMCR-1, providing valuable information about the family of PEA transferases. One of the analogs, ETA, causes clear inhibition of polymyxin B resistance, highlighting its potential for drug development. These data demonstrate the crucial role of the PEA- and lipid A-binding pockets and provide novel insights into the structure-based mechanisms, important drug-target hot spots, and a drug template for further drug development to combat the urgent, rising threat of MCR-1-mediated antibiotic resistance.-Wei, P., Song, G., Shi, M., Zhou, Y., Liu, Y., Lei, J., Chen, P., Yin, L. Substrate analog interaction with MCR-1 offers insight into the rising threat of the plasmid-mediated transferable colistin resistance.

  3. Direct interaction of beta-amyloid with Na,K-ATPase as a putative regulator of the enzyme function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu.; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Anashkina, Anastasia A.; Adzhubei, Alexei A.; Burnysheva, Ksenia M.; Lakunina, Valentina A.; Kamanina, Yulia V.; Dergousova, Elena A.; Lopina, Olga D.; Ogunshola, Omolara O.; Bogdanova, Anna Yu.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2016-06-01

    By maintaining the Na+ and K+ transmembrane gradient mammalian Na,K-ATPase acts as a key regulator of neuronal electrotonic properties. Na,K-ATPase has an important role in synaptic transmission and memory formation. Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) at the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease is accompanied by reduction of Na,K-ATPase functional activity. The molecular mechanism behind this phenomenon is not known. Here we show that the monomeric Aβ(1-42) forms a tight (Kd of 3 μM), enthalpy-driven equimolar complex with α1β1 Na,K-ATPase. The complex formation results in dose-dependent inhibition of the enzyme hydrolytic activity. The binding site of Aβ(1-42) is localized in the “gap” between the alpha- and beta-subunits of Na,K-ATPase, disrupting the enzyme functionality by preventing the subunits from shifting towards each other. Interaction of Na,K-ATPase with exogenous Aβ(1-42) leads to a pronounced decrease of the enzyme transport and hydrolytic activity and Src-kinase activation in neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y. This interaction allows regulation of Na,K-ATPase activity by short-term increase of the Aβ(1-42) level. However prolonged increase of Aβ(1-42) level under pathological conditions could lead to chronical inhibition of Na,K-ATPase and disruption of neuronal function. Taken together, our data suggest the role of beta-amyloid as a novel physiological regulator of Na,K-ATPase.

  4. Interactions between urinary 4-tert-octylphenol levels and metabolism enzyme gene variants on idiopathic male infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Qin

    Full Text Available Octylphenol (OP and Trichlorophenol (TCP act as endocrine disruptors and have effects on male reproductive function. We studied the interactions between 4-tert-Octylphenol (4-t-OP, 4-n- Octylphenol (4-n-OP, 2,3,4-Trichlorophenol (2,3,4-TCP, 2,4,5-Trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP urinary exposure levels and polymorphisms in selected xenobiotic metabolism enzyme genes among 589 idiopathic male infertile patients and 396 controls in a Han-Chinese population. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS was used to measure alkylphenols and chlorophenols in urine. Polymorphisms were genotyped using the SNPstream platform and the Taqman method. Among four phenols that were detected, we found that only exposure to 4-t-OP increased the risk of male infertility (P(trend = 1.70×10(-7. The strongest interaction was between 4-t-OP and rs4918758 in CYP2C9 (P(inter = 6.05×10(-7. It presented a significant monotonic increase in risk estimates for male infertility with increasing 4-t-OP exposure levels among men with TC/CC genotype (low level compared with non-exposed, odds ratio (OR = 2.26, 95% confidence intervals (CI = 1.06, 4.83; high level compared with non-exposed, OR = 9.22, 95% CI = 2.78, 30.59, but no associations observed among men with TT genotype. We also found interactions between 4-t-OP and rs4986894 in CYP2C19, and between rs1048943 in CYP1A1, on male infertile risk (P(inter = 8.09×10(-7, P(inter = 3.73×10(-4, respectively.We observed notable interactions between 4-t-OP exposure and metabolism enzyme gene polymorphisms on idiopathic infertility in Han-Chinese men.

  5. Toward a Molecular Understanding of the Interaction of Dual Specificity Phosphatases with Substrates: Insights from Structure-Based Modeling and High Throughput Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Bakan, Ahmet; Lazo, John S; Wipf, Peter; Brummond, Kay M; Bahar, Ivet

    2008-01-01

    Dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs) are important, but poorly understood, cell signaling enzymes that remove phosphate groups from tyrosine and serine/threonine residues on their substrate. Deregulation of DSPs has been implicated in cancer, obesity, diabetes, inflammation, and Alzheimer’s disease. Due to their biological and biomedical significance, DSPs have increasingly become the subject of drug discovery high-throughput screening (HTS) and focused compound library development efforts. P...

  6. Label-Free Proteomic Identification of Endogenous, Insulin-Stimulated Interaction Partners of Insulin Receptor Substrate-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geetha, Thangiah; Langlais, Paul; Luo, Moulun; Mapes, Rebekka; Lefort, Natalie; Chen, Shu-Chuan; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Yi, Zhengping

    2011-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to most cellular processes. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based proteomics combined with co-immunoprecipitation (CO-IP) has emerged as a powerful approach for studying protein complexes. However, a majority of systematic proteomics studies on protein-protein interactions involve the use of protein overexpression and/or epitope-tagged bait proteins, which might affect binding stoichiometry and lead to higher false positives. Here, we report an application of a straightforward, label-free CO-IP-MS/MS method, without the use of protein overexpression or protein tags, to the investigation of changes in the abundance of endogenous proteins associated with a bait protein, which is in this case insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), under basal and insulin stimulated conditions. IRS-1 plays a central role in the insulin signaling cascade. Defects in the protein-protein interactions involving IRS-1 may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses identified eleven novel endogenous insulin-stimulated IRS-1 interaction partners in L6 myotubes reproducibly, including proteins play an important role in protein dephosphorylation [protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A, (PPP1R12A)], muscle contraction and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and protein folding, as well as protein synthesis. This novel application of label-free CO-IP-MS/MS quantification to assess endogenous interaction partners of a specific protein will prove useful for understanding how various cell stimuli regulate insulin signal transduction.

  7. Precise Placement of Metallic Nanowires on a Substrate by Localized Electric Fields and Inter-Nanowire Electrostatic Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Hyeok Choi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Placing nanowires at the predetermined locations on a substrate represents one of the significant hurdles to be tackled for realization of heterogeneous nanowire systems. Here, we demonstrate spatially-controlled assembly of a single nanowire at the photolithographically recessed region at the electrode gap with high integration yield (~90%. Two popular routes, such as protruding electrode tips and recessed wells, for spatially-controlled nanowire alignment, are compared to investigate long-range dielectrophoretic nanowire attraction and short-range nanowire-nanowire electrostatic interaction for determining the final alignment of attracted nanowires. Furthermore, the post-assembly process has been developed and tested to make a robust electrical contact to the assembled nanowires, which removes any misaligned ones and connects the nanowires to the underlying electrodes of circuit.

  8. Interplay of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions in self-assembled molecular surface nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnadt, Joachim; Xu, Wei; Vang, Ronnie Thorbjørn

    2010-01-01

    a large tolerance to monatomic surface steps on the Ag(110) surface. The observed behaviour is explained in terms of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding and a strong surface-mediated directionality, assisted by a sufficient degree of molecular backbone flexibility. In contrast, the same kind of step......-edge crossing is not observed when the molecules are adsorbed on the isotropic Ag(111) or more reactive Cu(110) surfaces. On Ag(111), similar 1-D assemblies are formed to those on Ag(110), but they are oriented along the step edges. On Cu(110), the carboxylic groups of NDCA are deprotonated and form covalent...... bonds to the surface, a situation which is also achieved on Ag(110) by annealing to 200 degrees C. These results show that the formation of particular self-assembled molecular nanostructures depends significantly on a subtle balance between the adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions...

  9. TRITON: graphic software for rational engineering of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damboský, J; Prokop, M; Koca, J

    2001-01-01

    Engineering of the catalytic properties of enzymes requires knowledge about amino acid residues interacting with the transition state of the substrate. TRITON is a graphic software package for modelling enzymatic reactions for the analysis of essential interactions between the enzyme and its substrate and for in silico construction of protein mutants. The reactions are modelled using semi-empirical quantum-mechanic methods and the protein mutants are constructed by homology modelling. The users are guided through the calculation and data analysis by wizards.

  10. The relevance of chemical interactions with CYP17 enzyme activity: Assessment using a novel in vitro assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, Maarke J.E.; Piersma, Aldert H.; Berg, Martin van den; Duursen, Majorie B.M. van

    2013-01-01

    The steroidogenic cytochrome P450 17 (CYP17) enzyme produces dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), which is the most abundant circulating endogenous sex steroid precursor. DHEA plays a key role in e.g. sexual functioning and development. To date, no rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available. In this study, a novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. Effects of twenty-eight suggested endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) on CYP17 activity were compared with effects in the US EPA validated H295R (human adrenocorticocarcinoma cell line) steroidogenesis assay. In the PACM assay DHEA production was higher compared with the H295R assay (4.4 versus 2.2 nmol/h/mg protein). To determine the additional value of a CYP17 assay, all compounds were also tested for interaction with CYP19 (aromatase) using human placental microsomes (HPMs) and H295R cells. 62.5% of the compounds showed enzyme inhibition in at least one of the microsomal assays. Only the cAMP inducer forskolin induced CYP17 activity, while CYP19 was induced by four test compounds in the H295R assay. These effects remained unnoticed in the PACM and HPM assays. Diethylstilbestrol and tetrabromobisphenol A inhibited CYP17 but not CYP19 activity, indicating different mechanisms for the inhibition of these enzymes. From our results it becomes apparent that CYP17 can be a target for EDCs and that this interaction differs from interactions with CYP19. Our data strongly suggest that research attention should focus on validating a specific assay for CYP17 activity, such as the PACM assay, that can be included in the EDC screening battery. - Highlights: ► DHEA, produced by CYP17, plays a key role in sexual functioning and development. ► No rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available yet. ► A novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. ► Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) targeting CYP17 interact differently with CYP19. ► A

  11. The relevance of chemical interactions with CYP17 enzyme activity: Assessment using a novel in vitro assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofs, Maarke J.E., E-mail: m.j.e.roelofs@uu.nl [Endocrine Toxicology Research Group, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Center for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H. [Endocrine Toxicology Research Group, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Center for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Berg, Martin van den; Duursen, Majorie B.M. van [Endocrine Toxicology Research Group, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-05-01

    The steroidogenic cytochrome P450 17 (CYP17) enzyme produces dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), which is the most abundant circulating endogenous sex steroid precursor. DHEA plays a key role in e.g. sexual functioning and development. To date, no rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available. In this study, a novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. Effects of twenty-eight suggested endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) on CYP17 activity were compared with effects in the US EPA validated H295R (human adrenocorticocarcinoma cell line) steroidogenesis assay. In the PACM assay DHEA production was higher compared with the H295R assay (4.4 versus 2.2 nmol/h/mg protein). To determine the additional value of a CYP17 assay, all compounds were also tested for interaction with CYP19 (aromatase) using human placental microsomes (HPMs) and H295R cells. 62.5% of the compounds showed enzyme inhibition in at least one of the microsomal assays. Only the cAMP inducer forskolin induced CYP17 activity, while CYP19 was induced by four test compounds in the H295R assay. These effects remained unnoticed in the PACM and HPM assays. Diethylstilbestrol and tetrabromobisphenol A inhibited CYP17 but not CYP19 activity, indicating different mechanisms for the inhibition of these enzymes. From our results it becomes apparent that CYP17 can be a target for EDCs and that this interaction differs from interactions with CYP19. Our data strongly suggest that research attention should focus on validating a specific assay for CYP17 activity, such as the PACM assay, that can be included in the EDC screening battery. - Highlights: ► DHEA, produced by CYP17, plays a key role in sexual functioning and development. ► No rapid screening assay for effects on CYP17 is available yet. ► A novel assay using porcine adrenal cortex microsomes (PACMs) was described. ► Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) targeting CYP17 interact differently with CYP19. ► A

  12. Interaction of 3D dewetting nanodroplets on homogeneous and chemically heterogeneous substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asgari, M; Moosavi, A

    2014-01-01

    Long-time interaction of dewetting nanodroplets is investigated using a long-wave approximation method. Although three-dimensional (3D) droplets evolution dynamics exhibits qualitative behavior analogous to two-dimensional (2D) dynamics, there is an extensive quantitative difference between them. 3D dynamics is substantially faster than 2D dynamics. This can be related to the larger curvature and, as a consequence, the larger Laplace pressure difference between the droplets in 3D systems. The influence of various chemical heterogeneities on the behavior of droplets has also been studied. In the case of gradient surfaces, it is shown how the gradient direction could change the dynamics. For a chemical step located between the droplets, the dynamics is enhanced or weakened depending on the initial configuration of the system. (paper)

  13. Investigation of high temperature reactions on solid substrates with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry: interaction of palladium with selenium on heated graphite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majidi, V.; Robertson, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Selenium and palladium interactions on heated pyrolytically coated graphite substrates were investigated using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The studies were performed using selenium alone, palladium alone, and a combination of selenium and palladium deposited on the graphite substrates. The results indicate that palladium instantaneously stabilizes selenium at ambient temperatures and prevents the diffusion of selenium into the graphite. As the substrate is heated, temperature dependent diffusion of all analytes into the graphite is observed. Furthermore, it appears that the stabilization of selenium is due to the formation of a stoichiometric compound with palladium and oxygen. This compound decomposes at a temperature between 1070 and 1770 K. (author)

  14. Investigation of high temperature reactions on solid substrates with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry: interaction of palladium with selenium on heated graphite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidi, V.; Robertson, J.D. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    Selenium and palladium interactions on heated pyrolytically coated graphite substrates were investigated using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The studies were performed using selenium alone, palladium alone, and a combination of selenium and palladium deposited on the graphite substrates. The results indicate that palladium instantaneously stabilizes selenium at ambient temperatures and prevents the diffusion of selenium into the graphite. As the substrate is heated, temperature dependent diffusion of all analytes into the graphite is observed. Furthermore, it appears that the stabilization of selenium is due to the formation of a stoichiometric compound with palladium and oxygen. This compound decomposes at a temperature between 1070 and 1770 K. (author).

  15. Involvement of the lysophosphatidic acid-generating enzyme autotaxin in lymphocyte-endothelial cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasaki, Tae; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Okudaira, Shinichi; Hirosawa, Michi; Umemoto, Eiji; Otani, Kazuhiro; Jin, Soojung; Bai, Zhongbin; Hayasaka, Haruko; Fukui, Yoshinori; Aozasa, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Naoya; Tsuruo, Takashi; Ozono, Keiichi; Aoki, Junken; Miyasaka, Masayuki

    2008-11-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted protein with lysophospholipase D activity that generates lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) from lysophosphatidylcholine. Here we report that functional ATX is selectively expressed in high endothelial venules (HEVs) of both lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. ATX expression was developmentally regulated and coincided with lymphocyte recruitment to the lymph nodes. In adults, ATX expression was independent of HEV-expressed chemokines such as CCL21 and CXCL13, innate immunity signals including those via TLR4 or MyD88, and of the extent of lymphocyte trafficking across the HEVs. ATX expression was induced in venules at sites of chronic inflammation. Receptors for the ATX enzyme product LPA were constitutively expressed in HEV endothelial cells (ECs). In vitro, LPA induced strong morphological changes in HEV ECs. Forced ATX expression caused cultured ECs to respond to lysophosphatidylcholine, up-regulating lymphocyte binding to the ECs in a LPA receptor-dependent manner under both static and flow conditions. Although in vivo depletion of circulating ATX did not affect lymphocyte trafficking into the lymph nodes, we surmise, based on the above data, that ATX expressed by HEVs acts on HEVs in situ to facilitate lymphocyte binding to ECs and that ATX in the general circulation does not play a major role in this process. Tissue-specific inactivation of ATX will verify this hypothesis in future studies of its mechanism of action.

  16. Live Cell Discovery of Microbial Vitamin Transport and Enzyme-Cofactor Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Lindsey N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Landorf, Elizabeth V.; Konopka, Allan; Collart, Frank; Lipton, Mary S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2016-02-02

    The rapid completion of microbial genomes is inducing a conundrum in functional gene discovery. Novel methods are critically needed to shorten the gap between characterizing a microbial genome and experimentally validating bioinformatically-predicted functions. Of particular importance are transport mechanisms, used to shuttle nutrients and metabolites across cell mem-branes, such as B vitamins, which are indispensable to metabolic reactions crucial to the survival of diverse microbes ranging from members of environmental microbial communities to human pathogens. Methods to accurately assign function and specificity for a wide range of experimentally unidentified and/or predicted membrane-embedded transport proteins, and characterization of intra-cellular enzyme-cofactor/nutrient associations are needed to enable a significantly improved understanding of microbial biochemis-try and physiology, how microbes associate with others, and how they sense and respond to environmental perturbations. Chemical probes derived from B vitamins B1, B2, and B7 have allowed us to experimentally address the aforementioned needs by identifying B vitamin transporters and intracellular protein-cofactor associations through live cell labeling of the filamentous anoxygenic pho-toheterotroph, Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl, known for both B vitamin biosynthesis and environmental salvage. Our probes provide a unique opportunity to directly link cellular activity and protein function back to ecosystem and/or host dynamics by iden-tifying B vitamin transport and disposition mechanisms required for survival.

  17. Probing Enzyme-Surface Interactions via Protein Engineering and Single-Molecule Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The overall objective of this research was to exploit protein engineering and fluorescence single-molecule methods to...enhance our understanding of the interaction of proteins and surfaces. Given this objective, the specific aims of this research were to: 1) exploit the...incorporation of unnatural amino acids in proteins to introduce single-molecule probes (i.e., fluorophores for fluorescence resonance energy transfer

  18. Compost mixture influence of interactive physical parameters on microbial kinetics and substrate fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajer, Ardavan; Tremier, Anne; Barrington, Suzelle; Teglia, Cecile

    2010-01-01

    Composting is a feasible biological treatment for the recycling of wastewater sludge as a soil amendment. The process can be optimized by selecting an initial compost recipe with physical properties that enhance microbial activity. The present study measured the microbial O(2) uptake rate (OUR) in 16 sludge and wood residue mixtures to estimate the kinetics parameters of maximum growth rate mu(m) and rate of organic matter hydrolysis K(h), as well as the initial biodegradable organic matter fractions present. The starting mixtures consisted of a wide range of moisture content (MC), waste to bulking agent (BA) ratio (W/BA ratio) and BA particle size, which were placed in a laboratory respirometry apparatus to measure their OUR over 4 weeks. A microbial model based on the activated sludge process was used to calculate the kinetic parameters and was found to adequately reproduced OUR curves over time, except for the lag phase and peak OUR, which was not represented and generally over-estimated, respectively. The maximum growth rate mu(m), was found to have a quadratic relationship with MC and a negative association with BA particle size. As a result, increasing MC up to 50% and using a smaller BA particle size of 8-12 mm was seen to maximize mu(m). The rate of hydrolysis K(h) was found to have a linear association with both MC and BA particle size. The model also estimated the initial readily biodegradable organic matter fraction, MB(0), and the slower biodegradable matter requiring hydrolysis, MH(0). The sum of MB(0) and MH(0) was associated with MC, W/BA ratio and the interaction between these two parameters, suggesting that O(2) availability was a key factor in determining the value of these two fractions. The study reinforced the idea that optimization of the physical characteristics of a compost mixture requires a holistic approach. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular self assembly and chiral recognition of copper octacyanophthalocyanine on Au(111): Interplay of intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sk, Rejaul; Dhara, Barun; Miller, Joel; Deshpande, Aparna

    Submolecular resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) of copper octacyanophthalocyanine, CuPc(CN)8, at 77 K demonstrates that these achiral molecules form a two dimensional (2D) tetramer-based self-assembly upon evaporation onto an atomically flat Au(111) substrate. They assemble in two different structurally chiral configurations upon adsorption on Au(111). Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS),acquired at 77 K, unveils the HOMO and LUMO energy levels of this self-assembly. Voltage dependent STM images show that each molecule in both the structurally chiral configurations individually becomes chiral by breaking the mirror symmetry due to the enhanced intermolecular dipolar coupling interaction at the LUMO energy while the individual molecules remain achiral at the HOMO energy and within the HOMO-LUMO gap. At the LUMO energy, the handedness of the each chiral molecule is decided by the direction of the dipolar coupling interaction in the tetramer unit cell. This preference for LUMO energy indicates that this chirality is purely electronic in nature and it manifests on top of the organizational chirality that is present in the self-assembly independent of the orbital energy. Supported by IISER Pune and DAE-BRNS, India (Project No. 2011/20/37C/17/BRNS).

  20. Discovery and characterization of surface binding sites in polysaccharide converting enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper

    Enzymes that act on various polysaccharides are widespread in any domain of life and they play a role in degradation, modification, and synthesis of carbohydrates. These carbohydrate active enzymes interact with their substrate (the polysaccharide) at the active site and often at so called subsites...

  1. Regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes in infectious and inflammatory disease: implications for biologics-small molecule drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Pankajini; Taneja, Guncha; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Ghose, Romi

    2017-06-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) are primarily down-regulated during infectious and inflammatory diseases, leading to disruption in the metabolism of small molecule drugs (smds), which are increasingly being prescribed therapeutically in combination with biologics for a number of chronic diseases. The biologics may exert pro- or anti-inflammatory effect, which may in turn affect the expression/activity of DMEs. Thus, patients with infectious/inflammatory diseases undergoing biologic/smd treatment can have complex changes in DMEs due to combined effects of the disease and treatment. Areas covered: We will discuss clinical biologics-SMD interaction and regulation of DMEs during infection and inflammatory diseases. Mechanistic studies will be discussed and consequences on biologic-small molecule combination therapy on disease outcome due to changes in drug metabolism will be highlighted. Expert opinion: The involvement of immunomodulatory mediators in biologic-SMDs is well known. Regulatory guidelines recommend appropriate in vitro or in vivo assessments for possible interactions. The role of cytokines in biologic-SMDs has been documented. However, the mechanisms of drug-drug interactions is much more complex, and is probably multi-factorial. Studies aimed at understanding the mechanism by which biologics effect the DMEs during inflammation/infection are clinically important.

  2. Interaction of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) with membrane-bound carboxypeptidase M (CPM) - a new function of ACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoou; Wiesner, Burkhard; Lorenz, Dorothea; Papsdorf, Gisela; Pankow, Kristin; Wang, Po; Dietrich, Nils; Siems, Wolf-Eberhard; Maul, Björn

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) demonstrates, besides its typical dipeptidyl-carboxypeptidase activity, several unusual functions. Here, we demonstrate with molecular, biochemical, and cellular techniques that the somatic wild-type murine ACE (mACE), stably transfected in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) or Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells, interacts with endogenous membranal co-localized carboxypeptidase M (CPM). CPM belongs to the group of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins. Here we report that ACE, completely independent of its known dipeptidase activities, has GPI-targeted properties. Our results indicate that the spatial proximity between mACE and the endogenous CPM enables an ACE-evoked release of CPM. These results are discussed with respect to the recently proposed GPI-ase activity and function of sperm-bound ACE.

  3. Kinetics of enzyme action: essential principles for drug hunters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stein, Ross L

    2011-01-01

    ... field. Beginning with the most basic principles pertaining to simple, one-substrate enzyme reactions and their inhibitors, and progressing to a thorough treatment of two-substrate enzymes, Kinetics of Enzyme Action...

  4. Evaluation of Selected CYP51A1 Polymorphisms in View of Interactions with Substrate and Redox Partner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeja Režen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is essential for development, growth, and maintenance of organisms. Mutations in cholesterol biosynthetic genes are embryonic lethal and few polymorphisms have been so far associated with pathologies in humans. Previous analyses show that lanosterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51A1 from the late part of cholesterol biosynthesis has only a few missense mutations with low minor allele frequencies and low association with pathologies in humans. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of amino acid changes in the natural missense mutations of the hCYP51A1 protein. We searched SNP databases for existing polymorphisms of CYP51A1 and evaluated their effect on protein function. We found rare variants causing detrimental missense mutations of CYP51A1. Some missense variants were also associated with a phenotype in humans. Two missense variants have been prepared for testing enzymatic activity in vitro but failed to produce a P450 spectrum. We performed molecular modeling of three selected missense variants to evaluate the effect of the amino acid substitution on potential interaction with its substrate and the obligatory redox partner POR. We show that two of the variants, R277L and especially D152G, have possibly lower binding potential toward obligatory redox partner POR. D152G and R431H have also potentially lower affinity toward the substrate lanosterol. We evaluated the potential effect of damaging variants also using data from other in vitro CYP51A1 mutants. In conclusion, we propose to include damaging CYP51A1 variants into personalized diagnostics to improve genetic counseling for certain rare disease phenotypes.

  5. Similar substrate specificity of cynomolgus monkey cytochrome P450 2C19 to reported human P450 2C counterpart enzymes by evaluation of 89 drug clearances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Shinya; Murayama, Norie; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Shimizu, Makiko; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Iwano, Shunsuke; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are used widely in preclinical studies as non-human primate species. The amino acid sequence of cynomolgus monkey cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) 2C19 is reportedly highly correlated to that of human CYP2C19 (92%) and CYP2C9 (93%). In the present study, 89 commercially available compounds were screened to find potential substrates for cynomolgus monkey CYP2C19. Of 89 drugs, 34 were metabolically depleted by cynomolgus monkey CYP2C19 with relatively high rates. Among them, 30 compounds have been reported as substrates or inhibitors of, either or both, human CYP2C19 and CYP2C9. Several compounds, including loratadine, showed high selectivity to cynomolgus monkey CYP2C19, and all of these have been reported as human CYP2C19 and/or CYP2C9 substrates. In addition, cynomolgus monkey CYP2C19 formed the same loratadine metabolite as human CYP2C19, descarboethoxyloratadine. These results suggest that cynomolgus monkey CYP2C19 is generally similar to human CYP2C19 and CYP2C9 in its substrate recognition functionality. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Study of the interaction of enzyme Heparanase 1 (HPSE1) active with deoxyribonucleic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cid, Gisele da Silva

    2016-01-01

    The human heparanase 1 (HPSE 1) is a protein with multiple functions and has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in the context of antitumor therapy. This fact is due to its clinical relevance in the tumor development and progression, as determined by their enzymatic ability to degrade heparan sulfate (HS), the main constituent of the extracellular matrix, providing a tumor microenvironment to tumor dissemination. In addition, this protein plays a significant role in the increase of tumor cells migration ionizing radiation dose delivery in radiotherapy from the increase in the expression levels of HPSE1. In order to evaluate in more detail the functions of active HPSE1, it has been proposed to characterize the interaction of human heparanase protein 1 with deoxyribonucleic acids. Our results are original and point to a new function of HPSE1 of the endonuclease type. (author)

  7. Characterizations of substrate and enzyme specificity of glucoamylase assays of mucosal starch digestion with determinations of group and single biopsy reference values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbohydrate digesting enzyme activities are measured in duodenal biopsies to detect deficiencies of lactase and sucrase activities, however glucoamylase (GA) assays for starch digestion are not included. Because food starch represents half of energy intake in the human diet, assays for starch diges...

  8. Optimizing electrode-attached redox-peptide systems for kinetic characterization of protease action on immobilized substrates. Observation of dissimilar behavior of trypsin and thrombin enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne, Agnès; Chovin, Arnaud; Demaille, Christophe

    2012-06-12

    In this work, we experimentally address the issue of optimizing gold electrode attached ferrocene (Fc)-peptide systems for kinetic measurements of protease action. Considering human α-thrombin and bovine trypsin as proteases of interest, we show that the recurring problem of incomplete cleavage of the peptide layer by these enzymes can be solved by using ultraflat template-stripped gold, instead of polished polycrystalline gold, as the Fc-peptide bearing electrode material. We describe how these fragile surfaces can be mounted in a rotating disk configuration so that enzyme mass transfer no longer limits the overall measured cleavage kinetics. Finally, we demonstrate that, once the system has been optimized, in situ real-time cyclic voltammetry monitoring of the protease action can yield high-quality kinetic data, showing no sign of interfering effects. The cleavage progress curves then closely match the Langmuirian variation expected for a kinetically controlled surface process. Global fit of the progress curves yield accurate values of the peptide cleavage rate for both trypsin and thrombin. It is shown that, whereas trypsin action on the surface-attached peptide closely follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, thrombin displays a specific and unexpected behavior characterized by a nearly enzyme-concentration-independent cleavage rate in the subnanomolar enzyme concentration range. The reason for this behavior has still to be clarified, but its occurrence may limit the sensitivity of thrombin sensors based on Fc-peptide layers.

  9. In vitro interactions of malachite green and leucomalachite green with hepatic drug-metabolizing enzyme systems in the rainbow trout (Onchorhyncus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbia, Carlo; Girolami, Flavia; Carletti, Monica; Gasco, Laura; Zoccarato, Ivo; Giuliano Albo, Alessandra

    2017-10-05

    Malachite green (MG) has been widely used in aquaculture to treat a number of microbial and parasitic diseases. It is currently banned in the EU because of the high cytotoxicity and carcinogenic activity, which is also shared by leucomalachite green (LMG), a reduced MG metabolite that can persist in fish tissues for months. There is scant information about the ability of either compound to interact with drug metabolizing enzymes in fish. Therefore we evaluated the in vitro effects of MG and LMG (25, 50 and 100μM) on some DMEs and glutathione (GSH) content in rainbow trout liver subfractions. LMG did not affect any of the examined parameters. In contrast, MG proved to deplete GSH and to depress to a various extent the activities of NAD(P)H cytochrome c reductase, 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase, 1-naphthol uridindiphosphoglucuronyl-transferase and maximally those of 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) accepting 1-chloro2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate. The inhibition mechanisms of EROD and GST were investigated by means of non-linear Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Lineweaver-Burk plots using 0.175-8μM MG. The calculated IC 50 for EROD was 7.1μM, and the inhibition appeared to be competitive (K i 2.78±0.24μM). In the case of GST, the calculated IC 50 was 0.53μM. The inhibition was best described as competitive toward GSH (Ki 0.39±0.02μM) and of mixed-type toward CDNB (Ki 0.64±0.06μM). Our findings indicate that, contrary to LMG, MG behaves as a relatively strong inhibitor of certain liver DMEs and can reversibly bind GSH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction of sigma factor sigmaN with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase core enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D J; Ferguson, A L; Gallegos, M T; Pitt, M; Buck, M; Hoggett, J G

    2000-12-01

    The equilibrium binding and kinetics of assembly of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) sigma(N)-holoenzyme has been investigated using biosynthetically labelled 7-azatryptophyl- (7AW)sigma(N). The spectroscopic properties of such 7AW proteins allows their absorbance and fluorescence to be monitored selectively, even in the presence of high concentrations of other tryptophan-containing proteins. The 7AWsigma(N) retained its biological activity in stimulating transcription from sigma(N)-specific promoters, and in in vitro gel electrophoresis assays of binding to core RNAP from Escherichia coli. Furthermore, five Trp-->Ala single mutants of sigma(N) were shown to support growth under conditions of nitrogen limitation, and showed comparable efficiency in activating the sigma(N)-dependent nifH promoter in vivo, indicating that none of the tryptophan residues were essential for activity. The equilibrium binding of 7AWsigma(N) to core RNAP was examined by analytical ultracentrifugation. In sedimentation equilibrium experiments, absorbance data at 315 nm (which reports selectively on the distribution of free and bound 7AWsigma(N)) established that a 1:1 complex was formed, with a dissociation constant lower than 2 microM. The kinetics of the interaction between 7AWsigma(N) and core RNAP was investigated using stopped-flow spectrofluorimetry. A biphasic decrease in fluorescence intensity was observed when samples were excited at 280 nm, whereas only the slower of the two phases was observed at 315 nm. The kinetic data were analysed in terms of a mechanism in which a fast bimolecular association of sigma(N) with core RNAP is followed by a relatively slow isomerization step. The consequences of these findings on the competition between sigma(N) and the major sigma factor, sigma(70), in Escherichia coli are discussed.

  11. Interrogating the activities of conformational deformed enzyme by single-molecule fluorescence-magnetic tweezers microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; He, Yufan; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the impact of fluctuating enzyme conformation on enzymatic activity is critical in understanding the structure–function relationship and enzymatic reaction dynamics. Different from studying enzyme conformations under a denaturing condition, it is highly informative to manipulate the conformation of an enzyme under an enzymatic reaction condition while monitoring the real-time enzymatic activity changes simultaneously. By perturbing conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules using our home-developed single-molecule total internal reflection magnetic tweezers, we successfully manipulated the enzymatic conformation and probed the enzymatic activity changes of HRP in a catalyzed H2O2–amplex red reaction. We also observed a significant tolerance of the enzyme activity to the enzyme conformational perturbation. Our results provide a further understanding of the relation between enzyme behavior and enzymatic conformational fluctuation, enzyme–substrate interactions, enzyme–substrate active complex formation, and protein folding–binding interactions. PMID:26512103

  12. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 3: drugs interacting with targets other than receptors or enzymes. disease-modifying drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 19 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease modifying drugs, meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs, whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. The review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  13. Benazepril, an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor: drug interaction with salbutamol and bronchial response to histamine in normal subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, K. G.; Brunel, P.; Nell, G.; Quinn, G.; Kaik, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    Aims To investigate the effect of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, benazepril, on pulmonary function. Methods We investigated the influence of benazepril, on lung function and the interaction with inhaled salbutamol (0.1 to 6.6 mg) and histamine (0.03 to 30.69 g l−1 ) in normal subjects. Benazepril 20 mg, salbutamol 8 mg, propranolol 160 mg, and placebo were given orally once daily over 10 days. Results On day 8, there was no difference in the area under the salbutamol dose-response curves between benazepril, placebo and oral salbutamol (P >0.05), propranolol shifted the curves to the right (Pbenazepril 1.04 (0.99–1.08), salbutamol 1.19 (1.13–1.25), propranolol 0.57 (0.50–0.65). Conclusions Benazepril had no influence on baseline lung function, caused no interaction with inhaled salbutamol and the bronchial response to histamine was similar to placebo. However, our findings in normal subjects cannot be extrapolated automatically to asthmatics. PMID:9431834

  14. Interaction and Cooperative Nucleation of InAsSbP Quantum Dots and Pits on InAs(100 Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambaryan Karen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An example of InAsSbP quaternary quantum dots (QDs, pits and dots–pits cooperative structures’ growth on InAs(100 substrates by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE is reported. The interaction and surface morphology of the dots–pits combinations are investigated by the high-resolution scanning electron microscope. Bimodal growth mechanism for the both QDs and pits nucleation is observed. Cooperative structures consist of the QDs banded by pits, as well as the “large” pits banded by the quantum wires are detected. The composition of the islands and the pits edges is found to be quaternary, enriched by antimony and phosphorus, respectively. This repartition is caused by dissociation of the wetting layer, followed by migration (surface diffusion of the Sb and P atoms in opposite directions. The “small” QDs average density ranges from 0.8 to 2 × 109 cm−2, with heights and widths dimensions from 2 to 20 nm and 5 to 45 nm, respectively. The average density of the “small” pits is equal to (6–10 × 109 cm−2 with dimensions of 5–40 nm in width and depth. Lifshits–Slezov-like distribution for the amount and surface density of both “small” QDs and pits versus their average diameter is experimentally detected. A displacement of the absorption edge toward the long wavelength region and enlargement toward the short wavelength region is detected by the Fourier transform infrared spectrometry.

  15. Insights into the substrate specificity of plant peptide deformylase, an essential enzyme with potential for the development of novel biotechnology applications in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirk, Lynnette M A; Schmidt, Jack J; Cai, Yiying; Barnes, Jonathan C; Hanger, Katherine M; Nayak, Nihar R; Williams, Mark A; Grossman, Robert B; Houtz, Robert L; Rodgers, David W

    2008-08-01

    The crystal structure of AtPDF1B [Arabidopsis thaliana PDF (peptide deformylase) 1B; EC 3.5.1.88], a plant specific deformylase, has been determined at a resolution of 2.4 A (1 A=0.1 nm). The overall fold of AtPDF1B is similar to other peptide deformylases that have been reported. Evidence from the crystal structure and gel filtration chromatography indicates that AtPDF1B exists as a symmetric dimer. PDF1B is essential in plants and has a preferred substrate specificity towards the PS II (photosystem II) D1 polypeptide. Comparative analysis of AtPDF1B, AtPDF1A, and the type 1B deformylase from Escherichia coli, identifies a number of differences in substrate binding subsites that might account for variations in sequence preference. A model of the N-terminal five amino acids from the D1 polypeptide bound in the active site of AtPDF1B suggests an influence of Tyr(178) as a structural determinant for polypeptide substrate specificity through hydrogen bonding with Thr(2) in the D1 sequence. Kinetic analyses using a polypeptide mimic of the D1 N-terminus was performed on AtPDF1B mutated at Tyr(178) to alanine, phenylalanine or arginine (equivalent residue in AtPDF1A). The results suggest that, whereas Tyr(178) can influence catalytic activity, other residues contribute to the overall preference for the D1 polypeptide.

  16. The existence of an insulin-stimulated glucose and non-essential but not essential amino acid substrate interaction in diabetic pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, S.J.; Meulen, van der J.; Wijdenes, J.W.; Corbijn, H.; Dekker, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The generation of energy from glucose is impaired in diabetes and can be compensated by other substrates like fatty acids (Randle cycle). Little information is available on amino acids (AA) as alternative energy-source in diabetes. To study the interaction between insulin-stimulated

  17. Electronic structure of CoPc adsorbed on Ag(100): Evidence for molecule-substrate interaction mediated by Co 3d orbitals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Salomon, E.; Amsalem, P.; Marom, N.; Vondráček, Martin; Kronik, L.; Koch, N.; Angot, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 7 (2013), "075407-1"-"075407-9" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG12003 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : cobalt-phthalocyanine * molecule-substrate interaction * photoemission spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.664, year: 2013

  18. Biomimetic and enzyme-responsive dynamic hydrogels for studying cell-matrix interactions in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hung-Yi; Korc, Murray; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2018-04-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) governs all aspects of cancer progression and in vitro 3D cell culture platforms are increasingly developed to emulate the interactions between components of the stromal tissues and cancer cells. However, conventional cell culture platforms are inadequate in recapitulating the TME, which has complex compositions and dynamically changing matrix mechanics. In this study, we developed a dynamic gelatin-hyaluronic acid hybrid hydrogel system through integrating modular thiol-norbornene photopolymerization and enzyme-triggered on-demand matrix stiffening. In particular, gelatin was dually modified with norbornene and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid to render this bioactive protein photo-crosslinkable (through thiol-norbornene gelation) and responsive to tyrosinase-triggered on-demand stiffening (through HPA dimerization). In addition to the modified gelatin that provides basic cell adhesive motifs and protease cleavable sequences, hyaluronic acid (HA), an essential tumor matrix, was modularly and covalently incorporated into the cell-laden gel network. We systematically characterized macromer modification, gel crosslinking, as well as enzyme-triggered stiffening and degradation. We also evaluated the influence of matrix composition and dynamic stiffening on pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell fate in 3D. We found that either HA-containing matrix or a dynamically stiffened microenvironment inhibited PDAC cell growth. Interestingly, these two factors synergistically induced cell phenotypic changes that resembled cell migration and/or invasion in 3D. Additional mRNA expression array analyses revealed changes unique to the presence of HA, to a stiffened microenvironment, or to the combination of both. Finally, we presented immunostaining and mRNA expression data to demonstrate that these irregular PDAC cell phenotypes were a result of matrix-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  19. Communication: Surface-to-bulk diffusion of isolated versus interacting C atoms in Ni(111) and Cu(111) substrates: A first principle investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpale, Abhilash; Panesi, Marco; Chew, Huck Beng, E-mail: hbchew@illinois.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-02-14

    Using first principle calculations, we study the surface-to-bulk diffusion of C atoms in Ni(111) and Cu(111) substrates, and compare the barrier energies associated with the diffusion of an isolated C atom versus multiple interacting C atoms. We find that the preferential Ni-C bonding over C–C bonding induces a repulsive interaction between C atoms located at diagonal octahedral voids in Ni substrates. This C–C interaction accelerates C atom diffusion in Ni with a reduced barrier energy of ∼1 eV, compared to ∼1.4-1.6 eV for the diffusion of isolated C atoms. The diffusion barrier energy of isolated C atoms in Cu is lower than in Ni. However, bulk diffusion of interacting C atoms in Cu is not possible due to the preferential C–C bonding over C–Cu bonding, which results in C–C dimer pair formation near the surface. The dramatically different C–C interaction effects within the different substrates explain the contrasting growth mechanisms of graphene on Ni(111) and Cu(111) during chemical vapor deposition.

  20. Communication: Surface-to-bulk diffusion of isolated versus interacting C atoms in Ni(111) and Cu(111) substrates: A first principle investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpale, Abhilash; Panesi, Marco; Chew, Huck Beng

    2015-02-14

    Using first principle calculations, we study the surface-to-bulk diffusion of C atoms in Ni(111) and Cu(111) substrates, and compare the barrier energies associated with the diffusion of an isolated C atom versus multiple interacting C atoms. We find that the preferential Ni-C bonding over C-C bonding induces a repulsive interaction between C atoms located at diagonal octahedral voids in Ni substrates. This C-C interaction accelerates C atom diffusion in Ni with a reduced barrier energy of ∼1 eV, compared to ∼1.4-1.6 eV for the diffusion of isolated C atoms. The diffusion barrier energy of isolated C atoms in Cu is lower than in Ni. However, bulk diffusion of interacting C atoms in Cu is not possible due to the preferential C-C bonding over C-Cu bonding, which results in C-C dimer pair formation near the surface. The dramatically different C-C interaction effects within the different substrates explain the contrasting growth mechanisms of graphene on Ni(111) and Cu(111) during chemical vapor deposition.

  1. Kinetics of reactions of the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase with specific substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adediran, S A; Kumar, Ish; Nagarajan, Rajesh; Sauvage, Eric; Pratt, R F

    2011-01-25

    The Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase catalyzes the hydrolysis and aminolysis of a number of small peptides and depsipeptides. Details of its substrate specificity and the nature of its in vivo substrate are not, however, well understood. This paper describes the interactions of the R39 enzyme with two peptidoglycan-mimetic substrates 3-(D-cysteinyl)propanoyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine and 3-(D-cysteinyl)propanoyl-D-alanyl-D-thiolactate. A detailed study of the reactions of the former substrate, catalyzed by the enzyme, showed DD-carboxypeptidase, DD-transpeptidase, and DD-endopeptidase activities. These results confirm the specificity of the enzyme for a free D-amino acid at the N-terminus of good substrates and indicated a preference for extended D-amino acid leaving groups. The latter was supported by determination of the structural specificity of amine nucleophiles for the acyl-enzyme generated by reaction of the enzyme with the thiolactate substrate. It was concluded that a specific substrate for this enzyme, and possibly the in vivo substrate, may consist of a partly cross-linked peptidoglycan polymer where a free side chain N-terminal un-cross-linked amino acid serves as the specific acyl group in an endopeptidase reaction. The enzyme is most likely a DD-endopeptidase in vivo. pH-rate profiles for reactions of the enzyme with peptides, the thiolactate named above, and β-lactams indicated the presence of complex proton dissociation pathways with sticky substrates and/or protons. The local structure of the active site may differ significantly for reactions of peptides and β-lactams. Solvent kinetic deuterium isotope effects indicate the presence of classical general acid/base catalysis in both acylation and deacylation; there is no evidence of the low fractionation factor active site hydrogen found previously in class A and C β-lactamases.

  2. Interacting signal pathways control defense gene expression in Arabidopsis in response to cell wall-degrading enzymes from Erwinia carotovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman-Setterblad, C; Vidal, S; Palva, E T

    2000-04-01

    We have characterized the role of salicylic acid (SA)-independent defense signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana in response to the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora. Use of pathway-specific target genes as well as signal mutants allowed us to elucidate the role and interactions of ethylene, jasmonic acid (JA), and SA signal pathways in this response. Gene expression studies suggest a central role for both ethylene and JA pathways in the regulation of defense gene expression triggered by the pathogen or by plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (CF) secreted by the pathogen. Our results suggest that ethylene and JA act in concert in this regulation. In addition, CF triggers another, strictly JA-mediated response inhibited by ethylene and SA. SA does not appear to have a major role in activating defense gene expression in response to CF. However, SA may have a dual role in controlling CF-induced gene expression, by enhancing the expression of genes synergistically induced by ethylene and JA and repressing genes induced by JA alone.

  3. Evaluation of herb-drug interaction of a polyherbal Ayurvedic formulation through high throughput cytochrome P450 enzyme inhibition assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Subrata; Kanjilal, Satyajyoti; Awasthi, Anshumali; Chaudhary, Anika; Banerjee, Dipankar; Bhatt, B N; Narwaria, Avinash; Singh, Rahul; Dutta, Kakoli; Jaggi, Manu; Singh, Anu T; Sharma, Neena; Katiyar, Chandra Kant

    2017-02-02

    Arishtas are Ayurvedic formulation made with decoction of herbs. Arjunarishta formulation is being used in Ayurveda for cardio-protective activity. Ashwagandharishta formulation possesses antioxidant, anti-atherosclerotic and anti-stress properties. Ridayarishta, a novel empirical formulation was prepared using combination of selected ingredients from these two formulations to support healthy heart functions and to reduce stress. Aim of the Study was to investigate herb-drug interaction (HDI) of Ridayarishta formulation through human hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme inhibition assay. Ridayarishta formulation was phyto-chemically standardized against arjunolic acid, arjunetin, berberine, piperine, resveratrol and withaferin-A using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) analysis. The formulation was standardized with respect to ethanol by gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. HDI was evaluated with Ridayarishta formulation and amlodipine besilate, atenolol, atorvastatin, metformin, glipizide glimepiride cocktail using high throughput CYP450 enzyme inhibition assay; against CYP1A2, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4 isozymes. Contents of arjunolic acid, arjunetin, berberine, piperine, resveratrol and withaferin-A in Ridayarishta formulation were found to be 1.76±0.12, 1.51±0.09, 1.85±0.05, 3.2±0.12, 1.21±0.08, and 2.16±0.09ppm, respectively. Quantity of ethanol in Ridayarishta was found to be 7.95±0.023% (V/V). Ridayarishta showed significantly higher (Pdrugs showed significantly (P<0.001and P<0.01) less or negligible HDI. Ridayarishta formulation alone and cocktail with amlodipine besilate, atenolol, atorvastatin, metformin, glipizide, glimepiride had negligible or insignificant effect on CYP450 inhibition. It may be concluded that consumption of Ridayarishta along with selective cardio protective, antihypertensive and anti-diabetic conventional medicine is safe with negligible or without any significant CYP450 (CYP1A2, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A4) inhibition mediated

  4. Effect of dispersion on surface interactions of cobalt(II) octaethylporphyrin monolayer on Au(111) and HOPG(0001) substrates: a comparative first principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilukuri, Bhaskar; Mazur, Ursula; Hipps, K W

    2014-07-21

    A density functional theory study of a cobalt(II) octaethylporphyrin (CoOEP) monolayer on Au(111) and HOPG(0001) surfaces was performed under periodic boundary conditions. Calculations with and without dispersion corrections are performed and the effect of van der Waals forces on the interface properties is analyzed. Calculations have determined that the CoOEP molecule tends to bind at the 3-fold and the 6-fold center sites on Au(111) and HOPG(0001), respectively. Geometric optimizations at the center binding sites have indicated that the porphyrin molecules (in the monolayer) lie flat on both substrates. Calculations also reveal that the CoOEP monolayer binds slightly more strongly to Au(111) than to HOPG(0001). Charge density difference plots disclose that charge is redistributed mostly around the porphyrin plane and the first layer of the substrates. Dispersion interactions cause a larger substrate to molecule charge pushback on Au(111) than on HOPG. CoOEP adsorption tends to lower the work functions of either substrate, qualitatively agreeing with the experimental photoelectron spectroscopic data. Comparison of the density of states (DOS) of the isolated CoOEP molecule with that on gold and HOPG substrates showed significant band shifts around the Fermi energy due to intermolecular orbital hybridization. Simulated STM images were plotted with the Tersoff-Hamann approach using the local density of states, which also agree with the experimental results. This study elucidates the role of dispersion for better describing porphyrin-substrate interactions. A DFT based overview of geometric, adsorption and electronic properties of a porphyrin monolayer on conductive surfaces is presented.

  5. Analysis of DNA binding by human factor xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) provides insight into its interactions with nucleotide excision repair substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugitani, Norie; Voehler, Markus W; Roh, Michelle S; Topolska-Woś, Agnieszka M; Chazin, Walter J

    2017-10-13

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A (XPA) is an essential scaffolding protein in the multiprotein nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. The interaction of XPA with DNA is a core function of this protein; a number of mutations in the DNA-binding domain (DBD) are associated with XP disease. Although structures of the central globular domain of human XPA and data on binding of DNA substrates have been reported, the structural basis for XPA's DNA-binding activity remains unknown. X-ray crystal structures of the central globular domain of yeast XPA (Rad14) with lesion-containing DNA duplexes have provided valuable insights, but the DNA substrates used for this study do not correspond to the substrates of XPA as it functions within the NER machinery. To better understand the DNA-binding activity of human XPA in NER, we used NMR to investigate the interaction of its DBD with a range of DNA substrates. We found that XPA binds different single-stranded/double-stranded junction DNA substrates with a common surface. Comparisons of our NMR-based mapping of binding residues with the previously reported Rad14-DNA crystal structures revealed similarities and differences in substrate binding between XPA and Rad14. This includes direct evidence for DNA contacts to the residues extending C-terminally from the globular core, which are lacking in the Rad14 construct. Moreover, mutation of the XPA residue corresponding to Phe-262 in Rad14, previously reported as being critical for DNA binding, had only a moderate effect on the DNA-binding activity of XPA. The DNA-binding properties of several disease-associated mutations in the DBD were investigated. These results suggest that for XPA mutants exhibiting altered DNA-binding properties, a correlation exists between the extent of reduction in DNA-binding affinity and the severity of symptoms in XP patients. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Interactive Effectiveness of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin Receptor Blockers or Their Combination on Survival of Hemodialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Ryo; Akizawa, Tadao; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Onishi, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2018-01-01

    Background Does the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers individually or as a combination confer a survival benefit in hemodialysis patients? The answer to this question is yet unclear. Methods We performed a case-cohort study using data from the Mineral and Bone Disorder Outcomes Study for Japanese CKD stage 5D patients (MBD-5D), a 3-year multicenter prospective case-cohort study, including 8,229 hemodialysis patients registered from 86 facilities in Japan. All patients had secondary hyperparathyroidism, a condition defined as a parathyroid hormone level ≥180 pg/mL and/or receiving vitamin D receptor activators. We compared all-cause mortality rates between those receiving ACEI, ARB, and their combination and non-users with interaction testing. We used marginal structural Poisson regression (causal model) to estimate the causal effect and interaction adjusted for possible time-dependent confounding. Cardiovascular mortality was also evaluated. Results Among 3,762 randomly sampled subcohort patients, those taking ACEI, ARB, and their combination at baseline accounted for 4.0, 31.6, and 3.8%, respectively. Over 3 years, 1,226 all-cause and 462 cardiovascular deaths occurred. Compared to non-users, ARB-alone users had a lower all-cause mortality rate (adjusted incident rate ratio [aIRR] 0.62, 95% CI 0.50–0.76), whereas ACEI-alone users showed a statistically similar rate (aIRR 1.01, 95% CI 0.57–1.77). On the contrary, combination users had a greater mortality rate (aIRR 2.56, 95% CI 1.22–5.37), showing significant interaction (p = 0.03). Analysis for cardiovascular mortality showed similar results. Conclusion Among hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism, unlike ACEI use, ARB use was associated with greater survival than non-use. Conversely, combination use was associated with greater mortality. Controlled trials are warranted to verify the causality factors of these associations. PMID:29161689

  7. Dissection of structural and functional requirements that underlie the interaction of ERdj3 protein with substrates in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Joel H; Lizák, Beata; Feige, Matthias J; Hendershot, Linda M

    2014-10-03

    ERdj3, a mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Hsp40/DnaJ family member, binds unfolded proteins, transfers them to BiP, and concomitantly stimulates BiP ATPase activity. However, the requirements for ERdj3 binding to and release from substrates in cells are not well understood. We found that ERdj3 homodimers that cannot stimulate the ATPase activity of BiP (QPD mutants) bound to unfolded ER proteins under steady state conditions in much greater amounts than wild-type ERdj3. This was due to reduced release from these substrates as opposed to enhanced binding, although in both cases dimerization was strictly required for substrate binding. Conversely, heterodimers consisting of one wild-type and one mutant ERdj3 subunit bound substrates at levels comparable with wild-type ERdj3 homodimers, demonstrating that release requires only one protomer to be functional in stimulating BiP ATPase activity. Co-expressing wild-type ERdj3 and a QPD mutant, which each exclusively formed homodimers, revealed that the release rate of wild-type ERdj3 varied according to the relative half-lives of substrates, suggesting that ERdj3 release is an important step in degradation of unfolded client proteins in the ER. Furthermore, pulse-chase experiments revealed that the binding of QPD mutant homodimers remained constant as opposed to increasing, suggesting that ERdj3 does not normally undergo reiterative binding cycles with substrates. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. A critical review on the interaction of substrate nutrient balance and microbial community structure and function in anaerobic co-digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rong; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Pu; Khan, Aman; Xiong, Jian; Tian, Fake; Li, Xiangkai

    2018-01-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion generally results in a higher yield of biogas than mono-digestion, hence co-digestion has become a topic of general interest in recent studies of anaerobic digestion. Compared with mono-digestion, co-digestion utilizes multiple substrates. The balance of substrate nutrient in co-digestion comprises better adjustments of C/N ratio, pH, moisture, trace elements, and dilution of toxic substances. All of these changes could result in positive shifts in microbial community structure and function in the digestion processes and consequent augmentation of biogas production. Nevertheless, there have been few reviews on the interaction of nutrient and microbial community in co-digestions. The objective of this review is to investigate recent achievements and perspectives on the interaction of substrate nutrient balance and microbial community structure and function. This may provide valuable information on the optimization of combinations of substrates and prediction of bioreactor performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Novel Mechanism for Chemical Sensing Based on Solvent-Fluorophore-Substrate Interaction: Highly Selective Alcohol and Water Sensor with Large Fluorescence Signal Contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyeongwoon; Yang, Da Seul; Jung, Jaehun; Seo, Deokwon; Kwon, Min Sang; Kim, Jinsang

    2016-10-06

    Differentiation of solvents having similar physicochemical properties, such as ethanol and methanol, is an important issue of interest. However, without performing chemical analyses, discrimination between methanol and ethanol is highly challenging due to their similarity in chemical structure as well as properties. Here, we present a novel type of alcohol and water sensor based on the subtle differences in interaction among solvent analytes, fluorescent organic molecules, and a mesoporous silica gel substrate. A gradual change in the chemical structure of the fluorescent diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) derivatives alters their interaction with the substrate and solvent analyte, which creates a distinct intermolecular aggregation of the DPP derivatives on the silica gel substrate depending on the solvent environment and produces a change in the fluorescence color and intensity as a sensory signal. The devised sensor device, which is fabricated with simple drop-casting of the DPP derivative solutions onto a silica gel substrate, exhibited a completely reversible fluorescence signal change with large fluorescence signal contrast, which allows selective solvent detection by simple optical observation with the naked eye under UV light. Superior selectivity of the alcohol and water sensor system, which can clearly distinguish among ethanol, methanol, ethylene glycol, and water, is demonstrated.

  10. Interplay of drug metabolizing enzymes with cellular transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmdorfer, Michaela; Maier-Salamon, Alexandra; Riha, Juliane; Brenner, Stefan; Höferl, Martina; Jäger, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Many endogenous and xenobiotic substances and their metabolites are substrates for drug metabolizing enzymes and cellular transporters. These proteins may not only contribute to bioavailability of molecules but also to uptake into organs and, consequently, to overall elimination. The coordinated action of uptake transporters, metabolizing enzymes, and efflux pumps, therefore, is a precondition for detoxification and elimination of drugs. As the understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to predict alterations in drug disposal, adverse drug reactions and, finally, drug-drug interactions, this review illustrates the interplay between selected uptake/efflux transporters and phase I/II metabolizing enzymes.

  11. Substrate-induced stable enzyme-inhibitor complex formation allows tight binding of novel 2-aminopyrimidin-4(3H)-ones to drug-resistant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuele, Alberta; Facchini, Marcella; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Artico, Marino; Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Esté, José A; Maga, Giovanni

    2008-09-01

    We recently reported the synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel series of 5-alkyl-2-(N,N-disubstituted)amino-6-(2,6-difluorophenylalkyl)-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-4(3H)-ones (F(2)-N,N-DABOs). These compounds are highly active against both wild-type HIV-1 and the K103N, Y181C, and Y188L mutant strains. Herein we present novel 6-(2-chloro-6-fluorophenylalkyl)-N,N-DABO (2-Cl-6-F-N,N-DABO) derivatives and investigate the molecular basis for their high-affinity binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Our results show that the new compounds display higher association rates than the difluoro derivatives toward wild-type HIV-1 RT or drug-resistant RT mutant forms. We also show that they preferentially associate to either the free enzyme or the enzyme-nucleic acid binary complex, and that this binding is stabilized upon formation of the ternary complex between HIV-1 RT and both the nucleic acid and nucleotide substrates. Interestingly, one compound showed dissociation rates from the ternary complex with RT mutants K103N and Y181I 10-20-fold slower than from the corresponding complex with wild-type RT.

  12. Ferrochelatase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: substrate specificity and role of sulfhydryl and arginyl residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dailey, H.A.; Fleming, J.E.; Harbin, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Purified ferrochelatase from the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides was examined to determine the roles of cationic and sulfhydryl residues in substrate binding. Reaction of the enzyme sulfhydryl residues with N-ethylmaleimide or monobromobimane resulted in a rapid loss of enzyme activity. Ferrous iron, but not porphyrin substrate, had a protective effect against inactivation by these two reagents. Quantitation with 3 H-labeled N-ethylmaleimide revealed that inactivation required one to two sulfhydryl groups to be modified. Modification of arginyl residues with either 2,3-butanedione or camphorquinone 10-sulfonate resulted in a loss of ferrochelatase activity. A kinetic analysis of the modified enzyme showed that the K/sub m/ for ferrous iron was not altered but that the K/sub m/ for the prophyrin substrate was increased. These data suggested that arginyl residues may be involved in porphyrin binding, possibly via charge pair interactions between the arginyl residue and the anionic porphyrin propionate side chain. Modification of lysyl residues had no effect on enzyme activity. The authors also examined the ability of bacterial ferrochelatase to use various 2,4-disubstituted porphyrins as substrates. The authors found that 2,4-bis-acetal- and 2,4-disulfonate deuteroporphyrins were effective substrates for the purified bacterial enzyme and that N-methylprotoporphyrin was an effective inhibitor of the enzyme. Data for the ferrochelatase of R. sphaeroides are compared with previously published data for the eucaryotic enzyme

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Complex Drug-Drug Interactions Between Repaglinide and Cyclosporin A/Gemfibrozil Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models With In Vitro Transporter/Enzyme Inhibition Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Jin; Toshimoto, Kota; Yao, Yoshiaki; Yoshikado, Takashi; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2017-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of transporter- and enzyme-mediated complex drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is challenging. Repaglinide (RPG) is transported into the liver by OATP1B1 and then is metabolized by CYP2C8 and CYP3A4. The purpose of this study was to describe the complex DDIs of RPG quantitatively based on unified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models using in vitro K i values for OATP1B1, CYP3A4, and CYP2C8. Cyclosporin A (CsA) or gemfibrozil (GEM) increased the blood concentrations of RPG. The time profiles of RPG and the inhibitors were analyzed by PBPK models, considering the inhibition of OATP1B1 and CYP3A4 by CsA or OATP1B1 inhibition by GEM and its glucuronide and the mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2C8 by GEM glucuronide. RPG-CsA interaction was closely predicted using a reported in vitro K i,OATP1B1 value in the presence of CsA preincubation. RPG-GEM interaction was underestimated compared with observed data, but the simulation was improved with the increase of f m,CYP2C8 . These results based on in vitro K i values for transport and metabolism suggest the possibility of a bottom-up approach with in vitro inhibition data for the prediction of complex DDIs using unified PBPK models and in vitro f m value of a substrate for multiple enzymes should be considered carefully for the prediction. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Plant performance on Mediterranean green roofs: interaction of species-specific hydraulic strategies and substrate water relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Fabio; Trifilò, Patrizia; Lo Gullo, Maria A; Andri, Sergio; Savi, Tadeja; Nardini, Andrea

    2015-01-20

    Recent studies have highlighted the ecological, economic and social benefits assured by green roof technology to urban areas. However, green roofs are very hostile environments for plant growth because of shallow substrate depths, high temperatures and irradiance and wind exposure. This study provides experimental evidence for the importance of accurate selection of plant species and substrates for implementing green roofs in hot and arid regions, like the Mediterranean area. Experiments were performed on two shrub species (Arbutus unedo L. and Salvia officinalis L.) grown in green roof experimental modules with two substrates slightly differing in their water retention properties, as derived from moisture release curves. Physiological measurements were performed on both well-watered and drought-stressed plants. Gas exchange, leaf and xylem water potential and also plant hydraulic conductance were measured at different time intervals following the last irrigation. The substrate type significantly affected water status. Arbutus unedo and S. officinalis showed different hydraulic responses to drought stress, with the former species being substantially isohydric and the latter one anisohydric. Both A. unedo and S. officinalis were found to be suitable species for green roofs in the Mediterranean area. However, our data suggest that appropriate choice of substrate is key to the success of green roof installations in arid environments, especially if anisohydric species are employed. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  15. Atrial overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 improves the canine rapid atrial pacing-induced structural and electrical remodeling. Fan, ACE2 improves atrial substrate remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jinqi; Zou, Lili; Cui, Kun; Woo, Kamsang; Du, Huaan; Chen, Shaojie; Ling, Zhiyu; Zhang, Quanjun; Zhang, Bo; Lan, Xianbin; Su, Li; Zrenner, Bernhard; Yin, Yuehui

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether atrial overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) by homogeneous transmural atrial gene transfer can reverse atrial remodeling and its mechanisms in a canine atrial-pacing model. Twenty-eight mongrel dogs were randomly divided into four groups: Sham-operated, AF-control, gene therapy with adenovirus-enhanced green fluorescent protein (Ad-EGFP) and gene therapy with Ad-ACE2 (Ad-ACE2) (n = 7 per subgroup). AF was induced in all dogs except the Sham-operated group by rapid atrial pacing at 450 beats/min for 2 weeks. Ad-EGFP and Ad-ACE2 group then received epicardial gene painting. Three weeks after gene transfer, all animals except the Sham group underwent rapid atrial pacing for another 3 weeks and then invasive electrophysiological, histological and molecular studies. The Ad-ACE2 group showed an increased ACE2 and Angiotensin-(1-7) expression, and decreased Angiotensin II expression in comparison with Ad-EGFP and AF-control group. ACE2 overexpression attenuated rapid atrial pacing-induced increase in activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) levels, and decrease in MAPK phosphatase 1(MKP-1) level, resulting in attenuation of atrial fibrosis collagen protein markers and transforming growth factor-β1. Additionally, ACE2 overexpression also modulated the tachypacing-induced up-regulation of connexin 40, down-regulation of connexin 43 and Kv4.2, and significantly decreased the inducibility and duration of AF. ACE2 overexpression could shift the renin-angiotensin system balance towards the protective axis, attenuate cardiac fibrosis remodeling associated with up-regulation of MKP-1 and reduction of MAPKs activities, modulate tachypacing-induced ion channels and connexin remodeling, and subsequently reduce the inducibility and duration of AF.

  16. Crystal Structures of the Helicobacter pylori MTAN Enzyme Reveal Specific Interactions between S-Adenosylhomocysteine and the 5'-Alkylthio Binding Subsite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Vidhi [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Ronning, Donald R. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)

    2012-11-13

    The bacterial 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) enzyme is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-ribosidic bond of at least four different adenosine-based metabolites: S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), 5'-deoxyadenosine (5'-DOA), and 6-amino-6-deoxyfutalosine. These activities place the enzyme at the hub of seven fundamental bacterial metabolic pathways: S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) utilization, polyamine biosynthesis, the purine salvage pathway, the methionine salvage pathway, the SAM radical pathways, autoinducer-2 biosynthesis, and menaquinone biosynthesis. The last pathway makes MTAN essential for Helicobacter pylori viability. Although structures of various bacterial and plant MTANs have been described, the interactions between the homocysteine moiety of SAH and the 5'-alkylthiol binding site of MTAN have never been resolved. We have determined crystal structures of an inactive mutant form of H. pylori MTAN bound to MTA and SAH to 1.63 and 1.20 Å, respectively. The active form of MTAN was also crystallized in the presence of SAH, allowing the determination of the structure of a ternary enzyme–product complex resolved at 1.50 Å. These structures identify interactions between the homocysteine moiety and the 5'-alkylthiol binding site of the enzyme. This information can be leveraged for the development of species-specific MTAN inhibitors that prevent the growth of H. pylori.

  17. Interaction of Thermus thermophilus ArsC enzyme and gold nanoparticles naked-eye assays speciation between As(III) and As(V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Politi, Jane; De Stefano, Luca; Spadavecchia, Jolanda; Casale, Sandra; Fiorentino, Gabriella; Antonucci, Immacolata

    2015-01-01

    The thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB27 encodes chromosomal arsenate reductase (TtArsC), the enzyme responsible for resistance to the harmful effects of arsenic. We report on adsorption of TtArsC onto gold nanoparticles for naked-eye monitoring of biomolecular interaction between the enzyme and arsenic species. Synthesis of hybrid biological–metallic nanoparticles has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible (UV–vis), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and phase modulated infrared reflection absorption (PM-IRRAS) spectroscopies. Molecular interactions have been monitored by UV–vis and Fourier transform-surface plasmon resonance (FT-SPR). Due to the nanoparticles’ aggregation on exposure to metal salts, pentavalent and trivalent arsenic solutions can be clearly distinguished by naked-eye assay, even at 85 μM concentration. Moreover, the assay shows partial selectivity against other heavy metals. (paper)

  18. Mesoscopic dynamics of diffusion-influenced enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-01-28

    A particle-based mesoscopic model for enzyme kinetics is constructed and used to investigate the influence of diffusion on the reactive dynamics. Enzymes and enzyme-substrate complexes are modeled as finite-size soft spherical particles, while substrate, product, and solvent molecules are point particles. The system is evolved using a hybrid molecular dynamics-multiparticle collision dynamics scheme. Both the nonreactive and reactive dynamics are constructed to satisfy mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws, and reversible reaction steps satisfy detailed balance. Hydrodynamic interactions among the enzymes and complexes are automatically accounted for in the dynamics. Diffusion manifests itself in various ways, notably in power-law behavior in the evolution of the species concentrations. In accord with earlier investigations, regimes where the product production rate exhibits either monotonic or nonmonotonic behavior as a function of time are found. In addition, the species concentrations display both t(-1/2) and t(-3/2) power-law behavior, depending on the dynamical regime under investigation. For high enzyme volume fractions, cooperative effects influence the enzyme kinetics. The time dependent rate coefficient determined from the mass action rate law is computed and shown to depend on the enzyme concentration. Lifetime distributions of substrate molecules newly released in complex dissociation events are determined and shown to have either a power-law form for rebinding to the same enzyme from which they were released or an exponential form for rebinding to different enzymes. The model can be used and extended to explore a variety of issues related concentration effects and diffusion on enzyme kinetics.

  19. Mesoscopic dynamics of diffusion-influenced enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    A particle-based mesoscopic model for enzyme kinetics is constructed and used to investigate the influence of diffusion on the reactive dynamics. Enzymes and enzyme-substrate complexes are modeled as finite-size soft spherical particles, while substrate, product, and solvent molecules are point particles. The system is evolved using a hybrid molecular dynamics-multiparticle collision dynamics scheme. Both the nonreactive and reactive dynamics are constructed to satisfy mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws, and reversible reaction steps satisfy detailed balance. Hydrodynamic interactions among the enzymes and complexes are automatically accounted for in the dynamics. Diffusion manifests itself in various ways, notably in power-law behavior in the evolution of the species concentrations. In accord with earlier investigations, regimes where the product production rate exhibits either monotonic or nonmonotonic behavior as a function of time are found. In addition, the species concentrations display both t^{-1/2} and t^{-3/2} power-law behavior, depending on the dynamical regime under investigation. For high enzyme volume fractions, cooperative effects influence the enzyme kinetics. The time dependent rate coefficient determined from the mass action rate law is computed and shown to depend on the enzyme concentration. Lifetime distributions of substrate molecules newly released in complex dissociation events are determined and shown to have either a power-law form for rebinding to the same enzyme from which they were released or an exponential form for rebinding to different enzymes. The model can be used and extended to explore a variety of issues related concentration effects and diffusion on enzyme kinetics.

  20. Aspects of electron-phonon interactions with strong forward scattering in FeSe Thin Films on SrTiO3 substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Nakatsukasa, K.; Rademaker, L.; Berlijn, T.; Johnston, S.

    2016-05-01

    Mono- and multilayer FeSe thin films grown on SrTiO3 and BiTiO3 substrates exhibit a greatly enhanced superconductivity over that found in bulk FeSe. A number of proposals have been advanced for the mechanism of this enhancement. One possibility is the introduction of a cross-interface electron-phonon (e-ph) interaction between the FeSe electrons and oxygen phonons in the substrates that is peaked in the forward scattering (small {q}) direction due to the two-dimensional nature of the interface system. Motivated by this, we explore the consequences of such an interaction on the superconducting state and electronic structure of a two-dimensional system using Migdal-Eliashberg (ME) theory. This interaction produces not only deviations from the expectations of conventional phonon-mediated pairing but also replica structures in the spectral function and density of states, as probed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy, and quasiparticle interference imaging. We also discuss the applicability of ME theory for a situation where the e-ph interaction is peaked at small momentum transfer and in the FeSe/STO system.

  1. Estrogen response of MCF-7 cells grown on diverse substrates and in suspension culture: promotion of morphological heterogeneity, modulation of progestin receptor induction; cell-substrate interactions on collagen gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourreau-Schneider, N; Berthois, Y; Mittre, H; Charpin, C; Jacquemier, J; Martin, P M

    1984-12-01

    In this study we observed the incidence of hormone sensitivity in the response of MCF-7 cells to estrogen stimulation when the cells were cultured in different contact environments (hydrophilic plastic, bovine corneal extracellular matrix, type I collagen and in suspension culture). The major purpose was to describe the influence of cell to cell and cell to substrate contacts on the morphological response to estrogen treatment. However, other parameters including growth and induction of progestin receptor were also explored, keeping in mind that the MCF-7 cell line, although representative of normal mammary epithelium in that it contains a similar hormone receptivity, was selected in vitro from a metastatic population in a pleural effusion. Although substrate conditions did not modify growth enhancement by estrogens, progestin receptor levels were significantly higher in three-dimensional spheroid cultures in which cell to cell contacts were optimal due to elimination of basal contact. A careful morphological survey of large surfaces lead to an objective opinion of the overall effect of the hormone treatment on the non-cloned cell line in which a marked heterogeneity in the response of individual cells was observed. In terms of morphofunctional differentiation, the edification of acini with dense microvillus coating was best in suspension culture. When sections were made perpendicular to the plane of cultures on collagen gel rafts two other phenomena were noted: decrease in intercellular junctions, resulting in reduced cell to cell cohesion, and accumulation biodegradation products in the collagen lattice. This suggested a hormone-mediated interaction between the metastatic cells and the fibrillar substrate, collagen I, one of the major constituents of tissue stroma. This estrogen response might be related to the metastatic phenotype and must be distinct from their hormone sensitivity in terms of growth and differentiation since hormone receptivity is generally

  2. Monolayer Boron Nitride Substrate Interactions with Graphene Under In-Plane and Perpendicular Strains: A First-Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Somayeh

    2018-04-01

    Effects of strain on the electronic and optical properties of graphene on monolayer boron nitride (BN) substrate are investigated using first-principle calculations based on density functional theory. Strain-free graphene/BN has a small band gap of 97 meV at the K point. The magnitude of band gap increases with in-plane biaxial strain while it decreases with the perpendicular uniaxial strain. The ɛ2 (ω ) spectrum of graphene/BN bilayer for parallel polarization shows red and blue shifts by applying the in-plane tensile and compressive strains, respectively. Also the positions of peaks in the ɛ2 (ω ) spectrum are not significantly changed under perpendicular strain. The calculated results indicate that graphene on the BN substrate has great potential in microelectronic and optoelectronic applications.

  3. Maternal use of drug substrates of placental transporters and the effect of transporter-mediated drug interactions on the risk of congenital anomalies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizati N A Daud

    Full Text Available A number of transporter proteins are expressed in the placenta, and they facilitate the placental transfer of drugs. The inhibition of P-glycoprotein (P-gp was previously found to be associated with an increase in the risk of congenital anomalies caused by drug substrates of this transporter. We now explore the role of other placental transporter proteins.A population-based case-referent study was performed using cases with congenital anomalies (N = 5,131 from EUROCAT Northern Netherlands, a registry of congenital anomalies. The referent population (N = 31,055 was selected from the pregnancy IADB.nl, a pharmacy prescription database.Ten placental transporters known to have comparable expression levels in the placenta to that of P-gp, were selected in this study. In total, 147 drugs were identified to be substrates, inhibitors or inducers, of these transporters. Fifty-eight of these drugs were used by at least one mother in our cases or referent population, and 28 were used in both. The highest user rate was observed for the substrates of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1, mainly folic acid (6% of cases, 8% of referents, and breast cancer resistance protein, mainly nitrofurantoin (2.3% of cases, 2.9% of referents. In contrast to P-gp, drug interactions involving substrates of these transporters did not have a significant effect on the risk of congenital anomalies.Some of the drugs which are substrates or inhibitors of placental transporters were commonly used during pregnancy. No significant effect of transporter inhibition was found on fetal drug exposure, possibly due to a limited number of exposures.

  4. In vitro studies of interaction of rickettsia and macrophages: effect of ultraviolet light on Coxiella burnetti inactivation and macrophage enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J.S.; Kishimoto, R.A.; Canonico, P.G.

    1980-03-01

    The inactivation of Coxiella burnetii in suspension or in cultures of guinea pig peritoneal macrophages by ultraviolet (uv) light was studied. The effect of uv treatment on the activity of macrophage organelle marker enzymes and their subsequent equilibration in linear sucrose gradients was also determined. It was shown that uv treatment for 15 s at a distance of 10 cm inactivated C. burnetti, either in suspension or within guinea pig peritoneal macrophages. Similar uv treatment had little effect on the activity or equilibration of macrophage organelle marker enzymes in linear sucrose gradients.

  5. In vitro studies of interaction of rickettsia and macrophages: effect of ultraviolet light on Coxiella burnetti inactivation and macrophage enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.S.; Kishimoto, R.A.; Canonico, P.G.

    1980-01-01

    The inactivation of Coxiella burnetii in suspension or in cultures of guinea pig peritoneal macrophages by ultraviolet (uv) light was studied. The effect of uv treatment on the activity of macrophage organelle marker enzymes and their subsequent equilibration in linear sucrose gradients was also determined. It was shown that uv treatment for 15 s at a distance of 10 cm inactivated C. burnetti, either in suspension or within guinea pig peritoneal macrophages. Similar uv treatment had little effect on the activity or equilibration of macrophage organelle marker enzymes in linear sucrose gradients

  6. Hfq stimulates the activity of the CCA-adding enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betat Heike

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial Sm-like protein Hfq is known as an important regulator involved in many reactions of RNA metabolism. A prominent function of Hfq is the stimulation of RNA polyadenylation catalyzed by E. coli poly(A polymerase I (PAP. As a member of the nucleotidyltransferase superfamily, this enzyme shares a high sequence similarity with an other representative of this family, the tRNA nucleotidyltransferase that synthesizes the 3'-terminal sequence C-C-A to all tRNAs (CCA-adding enzyme. Therefore, it was assumed that Hfq might not only influence the poly(A polymerase in its specific activity, but also other, similar enzymes like the CCA-adding enzyme. Results Based on the close evolutionary relation of these two nucleotidyltransferases, it was tested whether Hfq is a specific modulator acting exclusively on PAP or whether it also influences the activity of the CCA-adding enzyme. The obtained data indicate that the reaction catalyzed by this enzyme is substantially accelerated in the presence of Hfq. Furthermore, Hfq binds specifically to tRNA transcripts, which seems to be the prerequisite for the observed effect on CCA-addition. Conclusion The increase of the CCA-addition in the presence of Hfq suggests that this protein acts as a stimulating factor not only for PAP, but also for the CCA-adding enzyme. In both cases, Hfq interacts with RNA substrates, while a direct binding to the corresponding enzymes was not demonstrated up to now (although experimental data indicate a possible interaction of PAP and Hfq. So far, the basic principle of these stimulatory effects is not clear yet. In case of the CCA-adding enzyme, however, the presented data indicate that the complex between Hfq and tRNA substrate might enhance the product release from the enzyme.

  7. Structural and Affinity Determinants in the Interaction between Alcohol Acyltransferase from F. x ananassa and Several Alcohol Substrates: A Computational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Navarro-Retamal

    Full Text Available Aroma and flavor are important factors of fruit quality and consumer preference. The specific pattern of aroma is generated during ripening by the accumulation of volatiles compounds, which are mainly esters. Alcohol acyltransferase (AAT (EC 2.3.1.84 catalyzes the esterification reaction of aliphatic and aromatic alcohols and acyl-CoA into esters in fruits and flowers. In Fragaria x ananassa, there are different volatiles compounds that are obtained from different alcohol precursors, where octanol and hexanol are the most abundant during fruit ripening. At present, there is not structural evidence about the mechanism used by the AAT to synthesize esters. Experimental data attribute the kinetic role of this enzyme to 2 amino acidic residues in a highly conserved motif (HXXXD that is located in the middle of the protein. With the aim to understand the molecular and energetic aspects of volatiles compound production from F. x ananassa, we first studied the binding modes of a series of alcohols, and also different acyl-CoA substrates, in a molecular model of alcohol acyltransferase from Fragaria x ananassa (SAAT using molecular docking. Afterwards, the dynamical behavior of both substrates, docked within the SAAT binding site, was studied using routine molecular dynamics (MD simulations. In addition, in order to correlate the experimental and theoretical data obtained in our laboratories, binding free energy calculations were performed; which previous results suggested that octanol, followed by hexanol, presented the best affinity for SAAT. Finally, and concerning the SAAT molecular reaction mechanism, it is suggested from molecular dynamics simulations that the reaction mechanism may proceed through the formation of a ternary complex, in where the Histidine residue at the HXXXD motif deprotonates the alcohol substrates. Then, a nucleophilic attack occurs from alcohol charged oxygen atom to the carbon atom at carbonyl group of the acyl CoA. This

  8. Biochemical characterization of thermostable cellulase enzyme from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... tested for their ability to produce cellulase complex enzyme by growing on a defined substrates as well ... In the current industrial processes, cellulolytic enzymes ... energy sources such as glucose, ethanol, hydrogen and.

  9. Combining crystallographic information and an aspherical-atom data bank in the evaluation of the electrostatic interaction energy in an enzyme–substrate complex: influenza neuraminidase inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominiak, Paulina M., E-mail: pdomin@chem.uw.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Volkov, Anatoliy; Dominiak, Adam P. [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Jarzembska, Katarzyna N. [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Coppens, Philip, E-mail: pdomin@chem.uw.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States)

    2009-05-01

    The electrostatic component of the enzyme/inhibitor interaction of a wide range influenza neuraminidases and inhibitors has been analyzed using transferable aspherical-atom densities from a recently compiled databank. Results are subdivided into the contributions of individual active-site residues and different functional groups of the inhibitors, and the effect of the Arg292→Lys mutation is considered. Although electrostatic interactions contribute only a part of the interaction energies between macromolecules, unlike dispersion forces they are highly directional and therefore dominate the nature of molecular packing in crystals and in biological complexes and contribute significantly to differences in inhibition strength among related enzyme inhibitors. In the reported study, a wide range of complexes of influenza neuraminidases with inhibitor molecules (sialic acid derivatives and others) have been analyzed using charge densities from a transferable aspherical-atom data bank. The strongest interactions of the residues are with the acidic group at the C2 position of the inhibitor (∼−300 kJ mol{sup −1} for —COO{sup −} in non-aromatic inhibitors, ∼−120–210 kJ mol{sup −1} for —COO{sup −} in aromatic inhibitors and ∼−450 kJ mol{sup −1} for —PO{sub 3}{sup 2−}) and with the amino and guanidine groups at C4 (∼−250 kJ mol{sup −1}). Other groups contribute less than ∼100 kJ mol{sup −1}. Residues Glu119, Asp151, Glu227, Glu276 and Arg371 show the largest variation in electrostatic energies of interaction with different groups of inhibitors, which points to their important role in the inhibitor recognition. The Arg292→Lys mutation reduces the electrostatic interactions of the enzyme with the acidic group at C2 for all inhibitors that have been studied (SIA, DAN, 4AM, ZMR, G20, G28, G39 and BCZ), but enhances the interactions with the glycerol group at C6 for inhibitors that contain it. This is in agreement with the lower level

  10. Angiotensin converting enzyme insertion/deletion genotype, exercise and physical decline: evidence of a gene-environment interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kritchevsky, S.B.; Nicklas, B.J.; Visser, M.; Simonsick, E.M.; Newman, A.B.; Harris, T.B.; Lange, E.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Goodpaster, B.H.; Satterfield, S.; Colbert, L.; Rubin, S; Pahor, M.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Physical performance in response to exercise appears to be influenced by the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) insertion (I)/deletion (D) genotype in young adults, but whether this relationship could help explain variation in older individuals' response to exercise has not been well

  11. Drug-gene interaction between the insertion/deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and antihypertensive therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelleman, Hedi; Klungel, Olaf H; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hofman, Albert; de Boer, Anthonius; Stricker, Bruno H Ch

    BACKGROUND: Despite the availability of a variety of effective drugs, inadequate control of blood pressure is common. There are some indications that the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene modifies the response to antihypertensive drugs, but the results have been inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: To

  12. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  13. Enzyme specific activity in functionalized nanoporous supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Chenghong; Soares, Thereza A; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu Jun; Ackerman, Eric J

    2008-01-01

    Here we reveal that enzyme specific activity can be increased substantially by changing the protein loading density (P LD ) in functionalized nanoporous supports so that the enzyme immobilization efficiency (I e , defined as the ratio of the specific activity of the immobilized enzyme to the specific activity of the free enzyme in solution) can be much higher than 100%. A net negatively charged glucose oxidase (GOX) and a net positively charged organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) were entrapped spontaneously in NH 2 - and HOOC-functionalized mesoporous silica (300 A, FMS) respectively. The specific activity of GOX entrapped in FMS increased with decreasing P LD . With decreasing P LD , I e of GOX in FMS increased from 150%. Unlike GOX, OPH in HOOC-FMS showed increased specific activity with increasing P LD . With increasing P LD , the corresponding I e of OPH in FMS increased from 100% to>200%. A protein structure-based analysis of the protein surface charges directing the electrostatic interaction-based orientation of the protein molecules in FMS demonstrates that substrate access to GOX molecules in FMS is limited at high P LD , consequently lowering the GOX specific activity. In contrast, substrate access to OPH molecules in FMS remains open at high P LD and may promote a more favorable confinement environment that enhances the OPH activity

  14. Computer-assisted enzyme immunoassays and simplified immunofluorescence assays: applications for the diagnostic laboratory and the veterinarian's office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, R H; Downing, D R; Lynch, T J

    1982-11-15

    A computer-assisted enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system, based on kinetics of the reaction between substrate and enzyme molecules, was developed for testing large numbers of sera in laboratory applications. Systematic and random errors associated with conventional ELISA technique were identified leading to results formulated on a statistically validated, objective, and standardized basis. In a parallel development, an inexpensive system for field and veterinary office applications contained many of the qualities of the computer-assisted ELISA. This system uses a fluorogenic indicator (rather than the enzyme-substrate interaction) in a rapid test (15 to 20 minutes' duration) which promises broad application in serodiagnosis.

  15. Identification of PNG kinase substrates uncovers interactions with the translational repressor TRAL in the oocyte-to-embryo transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Masatoshi; Lourido, Sebastian; Petrova, Boryana; Lou, Hua Jane; Von Stetina, Jessica R; Kashevsky, Helena; Turk, Benjamin E; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2018-02-26

    The Drosophila Pan Gu (PNG) kinase complex regulates hundreds of maternal mRNAs that become translationally repressed or activated as the oocyte transitions to an embryo. In a previous paper (Hara et al., 2017), we demonstrated PNG activity is under tight developmental control and restricted to this transition. Here, examination of PNG specificity showed it to be a Thr-kinase yet lacking a clear phosphorylation site consensus sequence. An unbiased biochemical screen for PNG substrates identified the conserved translational repressor Trailer Hitch (TRAL). Phosphomimetic mutation of the PNG phospho-sites in TRAL reduced its ability to inhibit translation in vitro. In vivo, mutation of tral dominantly suppressed png mutants and restored Cyclin B protein levels. The repressor Pumilio (PUM) has the same relationship with PNG, and we also show that PUM is a PNG substrate. Furthermore, PNG can phosphorylate BICC and ME31B, repressors that bind TRAL in cytoplasmic RNPs. Therefore, PNG likely promotes translation at the oocyte-to-embryo transition by phosphorylating and inactivating translational repressors. © 2018, Hara et al.

  16. Inherent dynamics within the Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic fever virus protease are localized to the same region as substrate interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Capodagli, Glenn; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Holliday, Michael; Isern, Nancy G.; Zhang, Fengli; Pegan, Scott D.

    2015-05-01

    Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is one of several lethal viruses that encodes for a viral ovarian tumor domain (vOTU), which serves to cleave and remove multiple proteins involved in cellular signaling such as ubiquitin (Ub) and interferon stimulated gene produce 15 (ISG15). Such manipulation of the host cell machinery serves to downregulate the host response and, therefore, complete characterization of these proteases is important. While several structures of the CCHFV vOTU protease have been solved, both free and bound to Ub and ISG15, few structural differences have been found and little insight has been gained as to the dynamic plasticity of this protease. Therefore, we have used NMR relaxation experiments to probe the dynamics of CCHV vOTU, both alone and in complex with Ub, thereby discovering a highly dynamic protease that exhibits conformational exchange within the same regions found to engage its Ub substrate. These experiments reveal a structural plasticity around the N-terminal regions of CCHV vOTU, which are unique to vOTUs, and provide a rationale for engaging multiple substrates with the same binding site.

  17. Electrostatic interaction between an enzyme and electrodes in the electric double layer examined in a view of direct electron transfer-type bioelectrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Yu; Kitazumi, Yuki; Tsujimura, Seiya; Shirai, Osamu; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kano, Kenji

    2015-01-15

    Effects of the electrode poential on the activity of an adsorbed enzyme has been examined by using copper efflux oxidase (CueO) as a model enzyme and by monitoring direct electron transfer (DET)-type bioelectrocatalysis of oxygen reduction. CueO adsorbed on bare Au electrodes at around the point of zero charge (E(pzc)) shows the highest DET activity, and the activity decreases as the adsorption potential (E(ad); at which the enzyme adsorbs) is far from E(pzc). We propose a model to explain the phenomena in which the electrostatic interaction between the enzyme and electrodes in the electric double layer affects the orientation and the stability of the adsorbed enzyme. The self-assembled monolayer of butanethiol on Au electrodes decreases the electric field in the outside of the inner Helmholtz plane and drastically diminishes the E(ad) dependence of the DET activity of CueO. When CueO is adsorbed on bare Au electrodes under open circuit potential and then is held at hold potentials (E(ho)) more positive than E(pzc), the DET activity of the CueO rapidly decreases with the hold time. The strong electric field with positive surface charge density on the metallic electrode (σ(M)) leads to fatal denaturation of the adsorbed CueO. Such denaturation effect is not so serious at E(ho)

  18. Role of hydrogen peroxide and antioxidant enzymes in the interaction between a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen, Leptosphaeria maculans, and oilseed rape

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindřichová, Barbora; Fodor, J.; Šindelářová, Milada; Burketová, Lenka; Valentová, O.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 2 (2011), s. 149-156 ISSN 0098-8472 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/08/1581; GA MŠk MEB040923 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : hydrogen peroxide * antioxidant enzymes * hemibiotrophic pathogen Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection Impact factor: 2.985, year: 2011

  19. Review of the biochemical basis of enzyme immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingler, W.

    1982-01-01

    The ever increasing number of radioimmunological determination poses problems allied with the handling of radioactive substances. In recent years various non-radioactive methods have been developed, among which the enzyme immunoassay is already in routine use. Homogeneous and heterogeneous enzyme immunoassays are described. Criteria for enzymes, substrates and enzyme-substrate reactions are listed. (orig.) [de

  20. Seeing & Feeling How Enzymes Work Using Tangible Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kwok-chi

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a tangible model used to help students tackle some misconceptions about enzyme actions, particularly the induced-fit model, enzyme-substrate complementarity, and enzyme inhibition. The model can simulate how substrates induce a change in the shape of the active site and the role of attraction force during enzyme-substrate…

  1. Two-way pharmacokinetic interaction studies between saxagliptin and cytochrome P450 substrates or inhibitors: simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, and ketoconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chirag G Patel, Li Li, Suzette Girgis, David M Kornhauser, Ernest U Frevert, David W BoultonBristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USABackground: Many medicines, including several cholesterol-lowering agents (eg, lovastatin, simvastatin, antihypertensives (eg, diltiazem, nifedipine, verapamil, and antifungals (eg, ketoconazole are metabolized by and/or inhibit the cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4 metabolic pathway. These types of medicines are commonly coprescribed to treat comorbidities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and the potential for drug-drug interactions of these medicines with new medicines for T2DM must be carefully evaluated.Objective: To investigate the effects of CYP3A4 substrates or inhibitors, simvastatin (substrate, diltiazem (moderate inhibitor, and ketoconazole (strong inhibitor on the pharmacokinetics and safety of saxagliptin, a CYP3A4/5 substrate; and the effects of saxagliptin on these agents in three separate studies.Methods: Healthy subjects were administered saxagliptin 10 mg or 100 mg. Simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, and ketoconazole doses of 40 mg once daily, 360 mg once daily, and 200 mg twice daily, respectively, were used to determine two-way pharmacokinetic interactions.Results: Coadministration of simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, or ketoconazole increased mean area under the concentration-time curve values (AUC of saxagliptin by 12%, 109%, and 145%, respectively, versus saxagliptin alone. Mean exposure (AUC of the CYP3A4-generated active metabolite of saxagliptin, 5-hydroxy saxagliptin, decreased with coadministration of simvastatin, diltiazem, and ketoconazole by 2%, 34%, and 88%, respectively. All adverse events were considered mild or moderate in all three studies; there were no serious adverse events or deaths.Conclusion: Saxagliptin, when coadministered with simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, or ketoconazole, was safe and generally well tolerated in healthy subjects. Clinically

  2. The surface science of enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2002-01-01

    One of the largest challenges to science in the coming years is to find the relation between enzyme structure and function. Can we predict which reactions an enzyme catalyzes from knowledge of its structure-or from its amino acid sequence? Can we use that knowledge to modify enzyme function......? To solve these problems we must understand in some detail how enzymes interact with reactants from its surroundings. These interactions take place at the surface of the enzyme and the question of enzyme function can be viewed as the surface science of enzymes. In this article we discuss how to describe...... catalysis by enzymes, and in particular the analogies between enzyme catalyzed reactions and surface catalyzed reactions. We do this by discussing two concrete examples of reactions catalyzed both in nature (by enzymes) and in industrial reactors (by inorganic materials), and show that although analogies...

  3. TERRA mimicking ssRNAs prevail over the DNA substrate for telomerase in vitro due to interactions with the alternative binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhibek, Dulat; Skvortsov, Dmitry; Andreeva, Anna; Zatsepin, Timofei; Arutyunyan, Alexandr; Zvereva, Maria; Dontsova, Olga

    2016-06-01

    Telomerase is a key component of the telomere length maintenance system in the majority of eukaryotes. Telomerase displays maximal activity in stem and cancer cells with high proliferative potential. In humans, telomerase activity is regulated by various mechanisms, including the interaction with telomere ssDNA overhangs that contain a repetitive G-rich sequence, and with noncoding RNA, Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), that contains the same sequence. So these nucleic acids can compete for telomerase RNA templates in the cell. In this study, we have investigated the ability of different model substrates mimicking telomere DNA overhangs and TERRA RNA to compete for telomerase in vitro through a previously developed telomerase inhibitor assay. We have shown in this study that RNA oligonucleotides are better competitors for telomerase that DNA ones as RNA also use an alternative binding site on telomerase, and the presence of 2'-OH groups is significant in these interactions. In contrast to DNA, the possibility of forming intramolecular G-quadruplex structures has a minor effect for RNA binding to telomerase. Taking together our data, we propose that TERRA RNA binds better to telomerase compared with its native substrate - the 3'-end of telomere DNA overhang. As a result, some specific factor may exist that participates in switching telomerase from TERRA to the 3'-end of DNA for telomere elongation at the distinct period of a cell cycle in vivo. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Substrate interactions in dehalogenation of 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, and 1,1,2-trichloroethane mixtures by Dehalogenimonas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillehay, Jacob L; Bowman, Kimberly S; Yan, Jun; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2014-04-01

    When chlorinated alkanes are present as soil or groundwater pollutants, they often occur in mixtures. This study evaluated substrate interactions during the anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated alkanes by the type strains of two Dehalogenimonas species, D. lykanthroporepellens and D. alkenigignens. Four contaminant mixtures comprised of combinations of the chlorinated solvents 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-DCP), and 1,1,2-trichloroethane (1,1,2-TCA) were assessed for each species. Chlorinated solvent depletion and daughter product formation determined as a function of time following inoculation into anaerobic media revealed preferential dechlorination of 1,1,2-TCA over both 1,2-DCA and 1,2-DCP for both species. 1,2-DCA in particular was not dechlorinated until 1,1,2-TCA reached low concentrations. In contrast, both species concurrently dechlorinated 1,2-DCA and 1,2-DCP over a comparably large concentration range. This is the first report of substrate interactions during chlorinated alkane dehalogenation by pure cultures, and the results provide insights into the chlorinated alkane transformation processes that may be expected for contaminant mixtures in environments where Dehalogenimonas spp. are present.

  5. STAY-GREEN and Chlorophyll Catabolic Enzymes Interact at Light-Harvesting Complex II for Chlorophyll Detoxification during Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Schelbert, Silvia; Park, So-Yon; Han, Su-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Doo; Andrès, Céline Besagni; Kessler, Felix; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2012-01-01

    During leaf senescence, plants degrade chlorophyll to colorless linear tetrapyrroles that are stored in the vacuole of senescing cells. The early steps of chlorophyll breakdown occur in plastids. To date, five chlorophyll catabolic enzymes (CCEs), NONYELLOW COLORING1 (NYC1), NYC1-LIKE, pheophytinase, pheophorbide a oxygenase (PAO), and red chlorophyll catabolite reductase, have been identified; these enzymes catalyze the stepwise degradation of chlorophyll to a fluorescent intermediate, pFCC, which is then exported from the plastid. In addition, STAY-GREEN (SGR), Mendel’s green cotyledon gene encoding a chloroplast protein, is required for the initiation of chlorophyll breakdown in plastids. Senescence-induced SGR binds to light-harvesting complex II (LHCII), but its exact role remains elusive. Here, we show that all five CCEs also specifically interact with LHCII. In addition, SGR and CCEs interact directly or indirectly with each other at LHCII, and SGR is essential for recruiting CCEs in senescing chloroplasts. PAO, which had been attributed to the inner envelope, is found to localize in the thylakoid membrane. These data indicate a predominant role for the SGR-CCE-LHCII protein interaction in the breakdown of LHCII-located chlorophyll, likely to allow metabolic channeling of phototoxic chlorophyll breakdown intermediates upstream of nontoxic pFCC. PMID:22366162

  6. Response to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition is selectively blunted by high sodium in angiotensin-converting enzyme DD genotype: evidence for gene-environment interaction in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lely, A Titia; Heerspink, Hiddo J Lambers; Zuurman, Mike; Visser, Folkert W; Kocks, Menno J A; Boomsma, Frans; Navis, Gerjan

    2010-12-01

    Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade is a cornerstone in cardiovascular protection. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-DD genotype has been associated with resistance to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEi), but data are conflicting. As sodium intake modifies the effect of ACEi as well as the genotype-phenotype relationship, we hypothesize gene-environment interaction between sodium-status, the response to ACEi, and ACE genotype. Thirty-five male volunteers (26 ± 9 years; II n = 6, ID n = 18, DD n = 11) were studied during placebo and ACEi (double blind, enalapril 20 mg/day) on low [7 days 50 mmol Na/day (low salt)] and high [7 days 200 mmol Na/day (high salt)] sodium, with a washout of 6 weeks in-between. After each period mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured before and during graded infusion of angiotensin II (Ang II). During high salt, ACEi reduced MAP in II and ID, but not in DD [II: 88 (78-94) versus 76 (72-88); ID: 87 (84-91) versus 83 (79-87); both P DD: 86 (82-96) versus 88 (80-90); ns, P DD: 84 (80-91) versus 81 (75-85); all P DD, with an 18% rise in MAP during the highest dose versus 22 and 31% in ID and II (P DD genotype during high salt, accompanied by blunted sensitivity to Ang II. Low salt corrects both abnormalities. Further analysis of this gene-environment interaction in patients may contribute to strategies for improvement of individual treatment efficacy.

  7. Progressive and Regressive Developmental Changes in Neural Substrates for Face Processing: Testing Specific Predictions of the Interactive Specialization Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jane E.; Gathers, Ann D.; Bhatt, Ramesh S.

    2011-01-01

    Face processing undergoes a fairly protracted developmental time course but the neural underpinnings are not well understood. Prior fMRI studies have only examined progressive changes (i.e. increases in specialization in certain regions with age), which would be predicted by both the Interactive Specialization (IS) and maturational theories of…

  8. Interaction between Red Yeast Rice and CYP450 Enzymes/P-Glycoprotein and Its Implication for the Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Lovastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hao Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Red yeast rice (RYR can reduce cholesterol through its active component, lovastatin. This study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of lovastatin in RYR products and potential RYR-drug interactions. Extracts of three registered RYR products (LipoCol Forte, Cholestin, and Xuezhikang were more effective than pure lovastatin in inhibiting the activities of cytochrome P450 enzymes and P-glycoprotein. Among CYP450 enzymes, RYR showed the highest inhibition on CYP1A2 and CYP2C19, with comparable inhibitory potencies to the corresponding typical inhibitors. In healthy volunteers taking the RYR product LipoCol Forte, the pharmacokinetic properties of lovastatin and lovastatin acid were linear in the dose range of 1 to 4 capsules taken as a single dose and no significant accumulation was observed after multiple dosing. Concomitant use of one LipoCol Forte capsule with nifedipine did not change the pharmacokinetics of nifedipine. Yet, concomitant use of gemfibrozil with LipoCol Forte resulted in a significant increase in the plasma concentration of lovastatin acid. These findings suggest that the use of RYR products may not have effects on the pharmacokinetics of concomitant comedications despite their effects to inhibit the activities of CYP450 enzymes and P-gp, whereas gemfibrozil affects the pharmacokinetics of lovastatin acid when used concomitantly with RYR products.

  9. Changes in oxidative enzyme activity during interspecific mycelial interactions involving the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hiscox, J.; Baldrian, Petr; Rogers, H. J.; Boddy, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 6 (2010), s. 562-571 ISSN 1087-1845 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Interactions * Basidiomycetes * Trametes Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.333, year: 2010

  10. Neural Substrates of Interactive Musical Improvisation: An fMRI Study of ‘Trading Fours’ in Jazz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnay, Gabriel F.; Rankin, Summer K.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Monica; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Limb, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Interactive generative musical performance provides a suitable model for communication because, like natural linguistic discourse, it involves an exchange of ideas that is unpredictable, collaborative, and emergent. Here we show that interactive improvisation between two musicians is characterized by activation of perisylvian language areas linked to processing of syntactic elements in music, including inferior frontal gyrus and posterior superior temporal gyrus, and deactivation of angular gyrus and supramarginal gyrus, brain structures directly implicated in semantic processing of language. These findings support the hypothesis that musical discourse engages language areas of the brain specialized for processing of syntax but in a manner that is not contingent upon semantic processing. Therefore, we argue that neural regions for syntactic processing are not domain-specific for language but instead may be domain-general for communication. PMID:24586366

  11. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Indicators for suicide substrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jatinder

    The usual trend is to apply QSSA to a system with high substrate concentration. But, QSSA, i.e., steadiness in intermediate concentration, may even be achieved at high and even comparable enzyme-substrate ratio. Whether a system will attain a steady state depends not only on the high substrate concentration, but also on ...

  12. Salinity and Salicylic Acid Interactions in Affecting Nitrogen Assimilation, Enzyme Activity, Ions Content and Translocation Rate of Maize Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodary, S.E.A.; Moussa, H.R.

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out to establish the relationship between nitrogen metabolism, enzyme activity, ions concentration as well as the translocation rate (TR) of carbohydrates and salicylic acid (SA) in salt-stressed maize (Zea mays L). Salicylic acid plus salinity treatment highly significantly increased: nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), protein content, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) and nitrate reductase (NR) and inhibited nucleases (DNase and RNase) activities compared with Na CI-treated plants. In addition, the ionic levels of potassium (K), phosphorus (P), nitrate (NO 3 ) and the translocation rate of the labelled photo assimilates have also been stimulated while sodium (Na) ions content was decreased. It is concluded that, salinazid maize plants might show an enhancement in their growth pattern upon salicylic acid application

  13. Interactive Effect of Salicylic Acid on Some Physiological Features and Antioxidant Enzymes Activity in Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawa Z. E. Jaafar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of foliar salicylic acid (SA applications (10−3 and 10−5 M on activities of nitrate reductase, guaiacol peroxidase (POD, superoxide dismutases (SOD, catalase (CAT and proline enzymes and physiological parameters was evaluated in two ginger varieties (Halia Bentong and Halia Bara under greenhouse conditions. In both varieties, tested treatments generally enhanced photosynthetic rate and total dry weight. Photosynthetic rate increases were generally accompanied by increased or unchanged stomatal conductance levels, although intercellular CO2 concentrations of treated plants were typically lower than in controls. Lower SA concentrations were generally more effective in enhancing photosynthetic rate and plant growth. Exogenous application of SA increased antioxidant enzyme activities and proline content; the greatest responses were obtained in plants sprayed with 10–5 M SA, with significant increases observed in CAT (20.1%, POD (45.2%, SOD (44.1% and proline (43.1% activities. Increased CAT activity in leaves is naturally expected to increase photosynthetic efficiency and thus net photosynthesis by maintaining a constant CO2 supply. Our results support the idea that low SA concentrations (10–5 M may induce nitrite reductase synthesis by mobilizing intracellular NO3− and can provide protection to nitrite reductase degradation in vivo in the absence of NO3–. Observed positive correlations among proline, SOD, CAT and POD activities in the studied varieties suggest that increased SOD activity was accompanied by increases in CAT and POD activities because of the high demands of H2O2 quenching.

  14. Solution characterization of the extracellular region of CD147 and its interaction with its enzyme ligand cyclophilin-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, Jennifer; Redzic, Jasmina S.; Porter, Christopher; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Bukrinsky, Michael; Labeikovsky, Wladimir; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Zhang, Fengli; Isern, Nancy G.; Degregori, James; Hodges, Robert; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2009-08-21

    The CD147 receptor plays an integral role in numerous diseases by stimulating the expression of several protein families and serving as the receptor for extracellular cyclophilins, however, neither CD147 nor its interactions with its cyclophilin ligands have been well characterized in solution. CD147 is a unique protein in that it can function both at the cell membrane and after being released from cells where it continues to retain activity. Thus, the CD147 receptor functions through at least two mechanisms that include both cyclophilin-independent and cyclophilin-dependent modes of action. In regard to CD147 cyclophilin-independent activity, CD147 homophilic interactions are thought to underlie its activity. In regard to CD147 cyclophilin-dependent activity, cyclophilin/CD147 interactions may represent a novel means of signaling since cyclophilins are also peptidyl-prolyl isomerases.

  15. Harpin Hpa1 Interacts with Aquaporin PIP1;4 to Promote the Substrate Transport and Photosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Wang, Hao; Gago, Jorge; Cui, Haiying; Qian, Zhengjiang; Kodama, Naomi; Ji, Hongtao; Tian, Shan; Shen, Dan; Chen, Yanjuan; Sun, Fengli; Xia, Zhonglan; Ye, Qing; Sun, Wei; Flexas, Jaume; Dong, Hansong

    2015-11-26

    Harpin proteins produced by plant-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria are the venerable player in regulating bacterial virulence and inducing plant growth and defenses. A major gap in these effects is plant sensing linked to cellular responses, and plant sensor for harpin Hpa1 from rice bacterial blight pathogen points to plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP). Here we show that Arabidopsis AtPIP1;4 is a plasma membrane sensor of Hpa1 and plays a dual role in plasma membrane permeability of CO2 and H2O. In particular, AtPIP1;4 mediates CO2 transport with a substantial contribute to photosynthesis and further increases this function upon interacting with Hpa1 at the plasma membrane. As a result, leaf photosynthesis rates are increased and the plant growth is enhanced in contrast to the normal process without Hpa1-AtPIP1;4 interaction. Our findings demonstrate the first case that plant sensing of a bacterial harpin protein is connected with photosynthetic physiology to regulate plant growth.

  16. Detection of microwave radiation of cytochrome CYP102 A1 solution during the enzyme reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.D. Ivanov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microwave radiation at 3.4–4.2 GHz frequency of the cytochrome P450 CYP102 A1 (BM3 solution was registered during the lauric acid hydroxylation reaction. The microwave radiation generation was shown to occur following the addition of electron donor NADPH to a system containing an enzyme and a substrate. The radiation occurs for the enzyme solutions with enzyme concentrations of 10−8 and 10−9 М. The microwave radiation effect elicited by the aqueous enzyme solution was observed for the first time. The results obtained can be used to elaborate a new approach to enzyme systems research, including studying of the mechanism of interaction of a functioning enzyme system with microenvironment.

  17. Substrate binding and catalytic mechanism in phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus. a molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Graça Thrige, D; Buur, J R; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    1997-01-01

    cereus including a docked substrate molecule was subjected to a stepwise molecular mechanics energy minimization. Second, the location of the nucleophilic water molecule in the active site of the fully relaxed enzyme-substrate complex was determined by evaluation of nonbonded interaction energies between...... water molecule was verified during a 100 ps molecular dynamics simulation. During the simulation the substrate undergoes a conformational change, but retains its localization in the active site. The contacts between the enzyme, the substrate, and the nucleophilic water molecule display some fluctuations...... the strong electrostatic interactions in the active site realistically during energy minimization, delocalization of the charges from the three zinc ions was considered. Therefore, quantum mechanics calculations on the zinc ions and the zinc-coordinating residues were carried out prior to the molecular...

  18. The existence of an insulin-stimulated glucose and non-essential but not essential amino acid substrate interaction in diabetic pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wijdenes Jan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The generation of energy from glucose is impaired in diabetes and can be compensated by other substrates like fatty acids (Randle cycle. Little information is available on amino acids (AA as alternative energy-source in diabetes. To study the interaction between insulin-stimulated glucose and AA utilization in normal and diabetic subjects, intraportal hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic euaminoacidaemic clamp studies were performed in normal (n = 8 and streptozotocin (120 mg/kg induced diabetic (n = 7 pigs of ~40-45 kg. Results Diabetic vs normal pigs showed basal hyperglycaemia (19.0 ± 2.0 vs 4.7 ± 0.1 mmol/L, P P P P P P P . Essential AA clearance was largely unchanged (72.9 ± 8.5 vs 63.3 ± 8.5 mL/kg· min, however clearances of threonine (P P Conclusions The ratio of insulin-stimulated glucose versus AA clearance was decreased 5.4-fold in diabetic pigs, which was caused by a 3.6-fold decrease in glucose clearance and a 2.0-fold increase in non-essential AA clearance. In parallel with the Randle concept (glucose - fatty acid cycle, the present data suggest the existence of a glucose and non-essential AA substrate interaction in diabetic pigs whereby reduced insulin-stimulated glucose clearance seems to be partly compensated by an increase in non-essential AA clearance whereas essential AA are preferentially spared from an increase in clearance.

  19. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  20. Characterization of papillomavirus E1 helicase mutants defective for interaction with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradet-Turcotte, Amelie; Brault, Karine; Titolo, Steve; Howley, Peter M.; Archambault, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    The E1 helicase from BPV and HPV16 interacts with Ubc9 to facilitate viral genome replication. We report that HPV11 E1 also interacts with Ubc9 in vitro and in the yeast two-hybrid system. Residues in E1 involved in oligomerization (353-435) were sufficient for binding to Ubc9 in vitro, but the origin-binding and ATPase domains were additionally required in yeast. Nuclear accumulation of BPV E1 was shown previously to depend on its interaction with Ubc9 and sumoylation on lysine 514. In contrast, HPV11 and HPV16 E1 mutants defective for Ubc9 binding remained nuclear even when the SUMO pathway was inhibited. Furthermore, we found that K514 in BPV E1 and the analogous K559 in HPV11 E1 are not essential for nuclear accumulation of E1. These results suggest that the interaction of E1 with Ubc9 is not essential for its nuclear accumulation but, rather, depends on its oligomerization and binding to DNA and ATP.

  1. Interactive plant functional group and water table effects on decomposition and extracellular enzyme activity in Sphagnum peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalena M. Wiedermann; Evan S. Kane; Lynette R. Potvin; Erik A. Lilleskov

    2017-01-01

    Peatland decomposition may be altered by hydrology and plant functional groups (PFGs), but exactly how the latter influences decomposition is unclear, as are potential interactions of these factors.We used a factorial mesocosm experiment with intact 1 m3 peat monoliths to explore how PFGs (sedges vs Ericaceae) and water table level individually...

  2. Thermally-driven hydrogen interaction with single-layer graphene on SiO2/Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feijo, Tais Orestes; Rolim, Guilherme Koszeniewski; Radtke, Claudio; Soares, Gabriel Vieira

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Graphene is a monolayer of carbon with sp 2 hybridization and hexagonal structure. Since all its area is exposed to the atmosphere, it is important to understand how graphene interacts with elements present in the atmosphere, such as hydrogen, oxygen and water, to control the processes of manufacturing [1]. In addition, some studies show that graphene can allow storage of hydrogen for use in fuel cells, which would contribute to the use of clean energies. This study aims to understand the thermally-driven hydrogen interaction with graphene samples. We used samples of graphene deposited on SiO 2 (285 nm) films on Si and then annealed in controlled atmosphere of deuterium (D 2 , natural abundance of 0.15%) at temperatures between 200 and 1000°C. We also investigated hydrogen desorption from graphene using samples previously treated in deuterium at 600°C and afterwards annealed in nitrogen atmosphere between 200 and 1000°C. After annealings, Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) was employed to quantify deuterium, where we observed a large increase in deuterium incorporation above 400°C, with an constant D incorporation until 1000°C. We also observed that the desorption of deuterium from graphene only occurred above 800°C, although D desorption from silicon oxide samples takes place already at 600°C. Raman spectroscopy analysis was performed after each thermal treatment. Results show that defects in the graphene structure increases for higher treatment temperatures in incorporation and in desorption steps. Characterization using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) will also be presented. [1] A. C. Ferrari, et al., Nanoscale 7 (2015). (author)

  3. A Correlation between the Activity of Candida antarctica Lipase B and Differences in Binding Free Energies of Organic Solvent and Substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banik, Sindrila Dutta; Nordblad, Mathias; Woodley, John

    2016-01-01

    in an inhibitory effect which is also confirmed by the binding free energies for the solvent and substrate molecules estimated from the simulations. Consequently, the catalytic activity of CALB decreases in polar solvents. This effect is significant, and CALB is over 10 orders of magnitude more active in nonpolar...... of the enzyme may be ascribed to binding of solvent molecules to the enzyme active site region and the solvation energy of substrate molecules in the different solvents. Polar solvent molecules interact strongly with CALB and compete with the substrate to bind to the active site region, resulting...

  4. Matrix Metalloproteinase Enzyme Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases play an important role in many biological processes such as embriogenesis, tissue remodeling, wound healing, and angiogenesis, and in some pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, arthritis and cancer. Currently, 24 genes have been identified in humans that encode different groups of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes. This review discuss the members of the matrix metalloproteinase family and their substrate specificity, structure, function and the regulation of their enzyme activity by tissue inhibitors. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 209-220

  5. Measuring the Enzyme Activity of Arabidopsis Deubiquitylating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowska, Kamila; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Isono, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitylating enzymes, or DUBs, are important regulators of ubiquitin homeostasis and substrate stability, though the molecular mechanisms of most of the DUBs in plants are not yet understood. As different ubiquitin chain types are implicated in different biological pathways, it is important to analyze the enzyme characteristic for studying a DUB. Quantitative analysis of DUB activity is also important to determine enzyme kinetics and the influence of DUB binding proteins on the enzyme activity. Here, we show methods to analyze DUB activity using immunodetection, Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining, and fluorescence measurement that can be useful for understanding the basic characteristic of DUBs.

  6. Inducers of resistance and silicon on the activity of defense enzymes in the soybean-Phakopsora pachyrhizi interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Antunes da Cruz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effect of jasmonic acid (JA, Acibenzolar-S-Methyl (ASM and calcium silicate (a source of soluble silicon, Si, on the potentiation of soybean resistance to Asian soybean rust (ASR. The ASR severity was significantly reduced on plants sprayed with ASM or supplied with Si in comparison to plants sprayed with JA or deionized water. For chitinases (CHI, significant differences in activity between non-inoculated and inoculated plants sprayed with deionized water or with ASM occurred at 72 hours after inoculation (hai, at 24 and 72 hai when sprayed with JA and at 141 hai when supplied with Si. For β-1,3-glucanases (GLU, significant differences in activity between non-inoculated and inoculated plants sprayed with deionized water occurred at 24, 48 and 141 hai, but not until 72 for plants sprayed with ASM. For phenylalanine ammonia-lyases (PAL, significant differences in activity between non-inoculated and inoculated plants occurred only for plants sprayed with ASM at 72 and 141 hai. In conclusion, the ASR symptoms can be mild on plants sprayed with ASM or supplied with Si and that this amelioration likely involved the defense enzymes.

  7. Database of ligand-induced domain movements in enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayward Steven

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conformational change induced by the binding of a substrate or coenzyme is a poorly understood stage in the process of enzyme catalysed reactions. For enzymes that exhibit a domain movement, the conformational change can be clearly characterized and therefore the opportunity exists to gain an understanding of the mechanisms involved. The development of the non-redundant database of protein domain movements contains examples of ligand-induced domain movements in enzymes, but this valuable data has remained unexploited. Description The domain movements in the non-redundant database of protein domain movements are those found by applying the DynDom program to pairs of crystallographic structures contained in Protein Data Bank files. For each pair of structures cross-checking ligands in their Protein Data Bank files with the KEGG-LIGAND database and using methods that search for ligands that contact the enzyme in one conformation but not the other, the non-redundant database of protein domain movements was refined down to a set of 203 enzymes where a domain movement is apparently triggered by the binding of a functional ligand. For these cases, ligand binding information, including hydrogen bonds and salt-bridges between the ligand and specific residues on the enzyme is presented in the context of dynamical information such as the regions that form the dynamic domains, the hinge bending residues, and the hinge axes. Conclusion The presentation at a single website of data on interactions between a ligand and specific residues on the enzyme alongside data on the movement that these interactions induce, should lead to new insights into the mechanisms of these enzymes in particular, and help in trying to understand the general process of ligand-induced domain closure in enzymes. The website can be found at: http://www.cmp.uea.ac.uk/dyndom/enzymeList.do

  8. Substrate specificity determinants of class III nucleotidyl cyclases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharambe, Nikhil G; Barathy, Deivanayaga V; Syed, Wajeed; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Colaςo, Melwin; Misquith, Sandra; Suguna, Kaza

    2016-10-01

    The two second messengers in signalling, cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, are produced by adenylyl and guanylyl cyclases respectively. Recognition and discrimination of the substrates ATP and GTP by the nucleotidyl cyclases are vital in these reactions. Various apo-, substrate- or inhibitor-bound forms of adenylyl cyclase (AC) structures from transmembrane and soluble ACs have revealed the catalytic mechanism of ATP cyclization reaction. Previously reported structures of guanylyl cyclases represent ligand-free forms and inactive open states of the enzymes and thus do not provide information regarding the exact mode of substrate binding. The structures we present here of the cyclase homology domain of a class III AC from Mycobacterium avium (Ma1120) and its mutant in complex with ATP and GTP in the presence of calcium ion, provide the structural basis for substrate selection by the nucleotidyl cyclases at the atomic level. Precise nature of the enzyme-substrate interactions, novel modes of substrate binding and the ability of the binding pocket to accommodate diverse conformations of the substrates have been revealed by the present crystallographic analysis. This is the first report to provide structures of both the nucleotide substrates bound to a nucleotidyl cyclase. Coordinates and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank with accession numbers: 5D15 (Ma1120 CHD +ATP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0E (Ma1120 CHD +GTP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0H (Ma1120 CHD (KDA→EGY)+ATP.Ca 2+ ), 5D0G (Ma1120 CHD (KDA→EGY)+GTP.Ca 2+ ). Adenylyl cyclase (EC number: 4.6.1.1). © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. Dynamics of bleomycin interaction with a strongly bound hairpin DNA substrate, and implications for cleavage of the bound DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Trevor C; Nanjunda, Rupesh; Tang, Chenhong; Liu, Yang; Segerman, Zachary J; Zaleski, Paul A; Wilson, W David; Hecht, Sidney M

    2012-10-31

    Recent studies involving DNAs bound strongly by bleomycins have documented that such DNAs are degraded by the antitumor antibiotic with characteristics different from those observed when studying the cleavage of randomly chosen DNAs in the presence of excess Fe·BLM. In the present study, surface plasmon resonance has been used to characterize the dynamics of BLM B(2) binding to a strongly bound hairpin DNA, to define the effects of Fe(3+), salt, and temperature on BLM-DNA interaction. One strong primary DNA binding site, and at least one much weaker site, were documented. In contrast, more than one strong cleavage site was found, an observation also made for two other hairpin DNAs. Evidence is presented for BLM equilibration between the stronger and weaker binding sites in a way that renders BLM unavailable to other, less strongly bound DNAs. Thus, enhanced binding to a given site does not necessarily result in increased DNA degradation at that site; i.e., for strongly bound DNAs, the facility of DNA cleavage must involve other parameters in addition to the intrinsic rate of C-4' H atom abstraction from DNA sugars.

  10. Manipulation and Investigation of Uniformly-Spaced Nanowire Array on a Substrate via Dielectrophoresis and Electrostatic Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Hyeok Choi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Directed-assembly of nanowires on the dielectrics-covered parallel electrode structure is capable of producing uniformly-spaced nanowire array at the electrode gap due to dielectrophoretic nanowire attraction and electrostatic nanowire repulsion. Beyond uniformly-spaced nanowire array formation, the control of spacing in the array is beneficial in that it should be the experimental basis of the precise positioning of functional nanowires on a circuit. Here, we investigate the material parameters and bias conditions to modulate the nanowire spacing in the ordered array, where the nanowire array formation is readily attained due to the electrostatic nanowire interaction. A theoretical model for the force calculation and the simulation of the induced charge in the assembled nanowire verifies that the longer nanowires on thicker dielectric layer tend to be assembled with a larger pitch due to the stronger nanowire-nanowire electrostatic repulsion, which is consistent with the experimental results. It was claimed that the stronger dielectrophoretic force is likely to attract more nanowires that are suspended in solution at the electrode gap, causing them to be less-spaced. Thus, we propose a generic mechanism, competition of dielectrophoretic and electrostatic force, to determine the nanowire pitch in an ordered array. Furthermore, this spacing-controlled nanowire array offers a way to fabricate the high-density nanodevice array without nanowire registration.

  11. Crystallographic structure and substrate-binding interactions of the molybdate-binding protein of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Andrea; Santacruz-Pérez, Carolina; Moutran, Alexandre; Ferreira, Luís Carlos Souza; Neshich, Goran; Gonçalves Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro

    2008-02-01

    In Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac or X. citri), the modA gene codes for a periplasmic protein (ModA) that is capable of binding molybdate and tungstate as part of the ABC-type transporter required for the uptake of micronutrients. In this study, we report the crystallographic structure of the Xac ModA protein with bound molybdate. The Xac ModA structure is similar to orthologs with known three-dimensional structures and consists of two nearly symmetrical domains separated by a hinge region where the oxyanion-binding site lies. Phylogenetic analysis of different ModA orthologs based on sequence alignments revealed three groups of molybdate-binding proteins: bacterial phytopathogens, enterobacteria and soil bacteria. Even though the ModA orthologs are segregated into different groups, the ligand-binding hydrogen bonds are mostly conserved, except for Archaeglobus fulgidus ModA. A detailed discussion of hydrophobic interactions in the active site is presented and two new residues, Ala38 and Ser151, are shown to be part of the ligand-binding pocket.

  12. Purification and characterization of extracellular amylolytic enzyme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, the amylase enzyme producing potential of four different Aspergillus species was analyzed. The extracted amylase enzyme was purified by diethyl amino ethyl (DEAE) cellulose and Sephadex G-50 column chromatography and the enzyme activity was measured by using synthetic substrate starch.

  13. Seasonal variation in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity in temperate forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, Edward R.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2012-03-01

    Increasing soil temperature has the potential to alter the activity of the extracellular enzymes that mobilize nitrogen (N) from soil organic matter (SOM) and ultimately the availability of N for primary production. Proteolytic enzymes depolymerize N from proteinaceous components of SOM into amino acids, and their activity is a principal driver of the within-system cycle of soil N. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the soils of temperate forest tree species differ in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity over the growing season and the role of substrate limitation in regulating temperature sensitivity. Across species and sampling dates, proteolytic enzyme activity had relatively low sensitivity to temperature with a mean activation energy (Ea) of 33.5 kJ mol-1. Ea declined in white ash, American beech, and eastern hemlock soils across the growing season as soils warmed. By contrast, Eain sugar maple soil increased across the growing season. We used these data to develop a species-specific empirical model of proteolytic enzyme activity for the 2009 calendar year and studied the interactive effects of soil temperature (ambient or +5°C) and substrate limitation (ambient or elevated protein) on enzyme activity. Declines in substrate limitation had a larger single-factor effect on proteolytic enzyme activity than temperature, particularly in the spring. There was, however, a large synergistic effect of increasing temperature and substrate supply on proteolytic enzyme activity. Our results suggest limited increases in N availability with climate warming unless there is a parallel increase in the availability of protein substrates.

  14. Selectivity of substrate binding and ionization of 2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine-5-carboxylic acid oxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luanloet, Thikumporn; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2015-08-01

    2-Methyl-3-hydroxypyridine-5-carboxylic acid (MHPC) oxygenase (EC 1.14.12.4) from Pseudomonas sp. MA-1 is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes a hydroxylation and aromatic ring cleavage reaction. The functional roles of two residues, Tyr223 and Tyr82, located ~ 5 Å away from MHPC, were characterized using site-directed mutagenesis, along with ligand binding, product analysis and transient kinetic experiments. Mutation of Tyr223 resulted in enzyme variants that were impaired in their hydroxylation activity and had Kd values for substrate binding 5-10-fold greater than the wild-type enzyme. Because this residue is adjacent to the water molecule that is located next to the 3-hydroxy group of MHPC, the results indicate that the interaction between Tyr223, H2 O and the 3-hydroxyl group of MHPC are important for substrate binding and hydroxylation. By contrast, the Kd for substrate binding of Tyr82His and Tyr82Phe variants were similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. However, only ~ 40-50% of the substrate was hydroxylated in the reactions of both variants, whereas most of the substrate was hydroxylated in the wild-type enzyme reaction. In free solution, MHPC or 5-hydroxynicotinic acid exists in a mixture of monoanionic and tripolar ionic forms, whereas only the tripolar ionic form binds to the wild-type enzyme. The binding of tripolar ionic MHPC would allow efficient hydroxylation through an electrophilic aromatic substitution mechanism. For the Tyr82His and Tyr82Phe variants, both forms of substrates can bind to the enzymes, indicating that the mutation at Tyr82 abolished the selectivity of the enzyme towards the tripolar ionic form. Transient kinetic studies indicated that the hydroxylation rate constants of both Tyr82 variants are approximately two- to 2.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. Altogether, our findings suggest that Tyr82 is important for the binding selectivity of MHPC oxygenase towards the tripolar ionic species, whereas the

  15. Real-Time Label-Free Direct Electronic Monitoring of Topoisomerase Enzyme Binding Kinetics on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaro, Laura; Tesauro, Cinzia; Kurkina, Tetiana; Fiorani, Paola; Yu, Hak Ki; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Kern, Klaus; Desideri, Alessandro; Balasubramanian, Kannan

    2015-11-24

    Monolayer graphene field-effect sensors operating in liquid have been widely deployed for detecting a range of analyte species often under equilibrium conditions. Here we report on the real-time detection of the binding kinetics of the essential human enzyme, topoisomerase I interacting with substrate molecules (DNA probes) that are immobilized electrochemically on to monolayer graphene strips. By monitoring the field-effect characteristics of the graphene biosensor in real-time during the enzyme-substrate interactions, we are able to decipher the surface binding constant for the cleavage reaction step of topoisomerase I activity in a label-free manner. Moreover, an appropriate design of the capture probes allows us to distinctly follow the cleavage step of topoisomerase I functioning in real-time down to picomolar concentrations. The presented results are promising for future rapid screening of drugs that are being evaluated for regulating enzyme activity.

  16. Phonon linewidth due to electron-phonon interactions with strong forward scattering in FeSe thin films on oxide substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rademaker, Louk [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Dagotto, Elbio R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johnston, Steven [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-08-18

    Here, the discovery of an enhanced superconducting transition temperature Tc in monolayers of FeSe grown on several oxide substrates has opened a new route to high-Tc superconductivity through interface engineering. One proposal for the origin of the observed enhancement is an electronphonon (e-ph) interaction across the interface that peaked at small momentum transfers. In this paper, we examine the implications of such a coupling on the phononic properties of the system. We show that a strong forward scattering leads to a sizable broadening of phonon lineshape, which may result in charge instabilities at long-wavelengths. However, we further find that the inclusion of Coulombic screening significantly reduces the phonon broadening. Our results show that one might not expect anomalously broad phonon linewidths in the FeSe interface systems, despite the fact that the e-ph interaction has a strong peak in the forward scattering (small \\bfq ) direction.

  17. 2D or not 2D? The impact of nanoscale roughness and substrate interactions on the tribological properties of graphene and MoS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elinski, Meagan B; Liu, Zhuotong; Spear, Jessica C; Batteas, James D

    2017-01-01

    The use of 2D nanomaterials for controlling friction and wear at interfaces has received increased attention over the past few years due to their unique structural, thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. These materials proffer potential critical solutions to challenges in boundary lubrication across numerous platforms ranging from engines, to biomedical implants and micro- and nano-scaled machines that will play a major role in the Internet of Things. There has been significant work on a range of 2D nanomaterials, such as graphene and molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ). From these studies, their frictional properties have been shown to be highly dependent on numerous factors, such as substrate structure, strain, and competing chemical interactions between the interfaces in sliding contact. Moreover, when considering real contacts in machined interfaces, these surfaces are often composed of nanoscaled asperities, whose intermittent contact dominates the tribochemical processes that result in wear. In this review we aim to capture recent work on the tribological properties of graphene and MoS 2 and to discuss the impacts of surface roughness (from the atomic scale to the nanoscale) and chemical interactions at interfaces on their frictional properties, and their use in designing advanced boundary lubrication schemes. (topical review)

  18. 2D or not 2D? The impact of nanoscale roughness and substrate interactions on the tribological properties of graphene and MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elinski, Meagan B.; Liu, Zhuotong; Spear, Jessica C.; Batteas, James D.

    2017-03-01

    The use of 2D nanomaterials for controlling friction and wear at interfaces has received increased attention over the past few years due to their unique structural, thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. These materials proffer potential critical solutions to challenges in boundary lubrication across numerous platforms ranging from engines, to biomedical implants and micro- and nano-scaled machines that will play a major role in the Internet of Things. There has been significant work on a range of 2D nanomaterials, such as graphene and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2). From these studies, their frictional properties have been shown to be highly dependent on numerous factors, such as substrate structure, strain, and competing chemical interactions between the interfaces in sliding contact. Moreover, when considering real contacts in machined interfaces, these surfaces are often composed of nanoscaled asperities, whose intermittent contact dominates the tribochemical processes that result in wear. In this review we aim to capture recent work on the tribological properties of graphene and MoS2 and to discuss the impacts of surface roughness (from the atomic scale to the nanoscale) and chemical interactions at interfaces on their frictional properties, and their use in designing advanced boundary lubrication schemes.

  19. Molecular Modeling of Peroxidase and Polyphenol Oxidase: Substrate Specificity and Active Site Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalida Shank

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases (POD and polyphenol oxidase (PPO are enzymes that are well known to be involved in the enzymatic browning reaction of fruits and vegetables with different catalytic mechanisms. Both enzymes have some common substrates, but each also has its specific substrates. In our computational study, the amino acid sequence of grape peroxidase (ABX was used for the construction of models employing homology modeling method based on the X-ray structure of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase from pea (PDB ID:1APX, whereas the model of grape polyphenol oxidase was obtained directly from the available X-ray structure (PDB ID:2P3X. Molecular docking of common substrates of these two enzymes was subsequently studied. It was found that epicatechin and catechin exhibited high affinity with both enzymes, even though POD and PPO have different binding pockets regarding the size and the key amino acids involved in binding. Predicted binding modes of substrates with both enzymes were also compared. The calculated docking interaction energy of trihydroxybenzoic acid related compounds shows high affinity, suggesting specificity and potential use as common inhibitor to grape ascorbate peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase.

  20. Bacillus subtilis RapA phosphatase domain interaction with its substrate, phosphorylated Spo0F, and its inhibitor, the PhrA peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Alejandra R; Core, Leighton J; Jiang, Min; Morelli, Michela; Chiang, Christina H; Szurmant, Hendrik; Perego, Marta

    2012-03-01

    Rap proteins in Bacillus subtilis regulate the phosphorylation level or the DNA-binding activity of response regulators such as Spo0F, involved in sporulation initiation, or ComA, regulating competence development. Rap proteins can be inhibited by specific peptides generated by the export-import processing pathway of the Phr proteins. Rap proteins have a modular organization comprising an amino-terminal alpha-helical domain connected to a domain formed by six tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR). In this study, the molecular basis for the specificity of the RapA phosphatase for its substrate, phosphorylated Spo0F (Spo0F∼P), and its inhibitor pentapeptide, PhrA, was analyzed in part by generating chimeric proteins with RapC, which targets the DNA-binding domain of ComA, rather than Spo0F∼P, and is inhibited by the PhrC pentapeptide. In vivo analysis of sporulation efficiency or competence-induced gene expression, as well as in vitro biochemical assays, allowed the identification of the amino-terminal 60 amino acids as sufficient to determine Rap specificity for its substrate and the central TPR3 to TPR5 (TPR3-5) repeats as providing binding specificity toward the Phr peptide inhibitor. The results allowed the prediction and testing of key residues in RapA that are essential for PhrA binding and specificity, thus demonstrating how the widespread structural fold of the TPR is highly versatile, using a common interaction mechanism for a variety of functions in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms.

  1. A multi-substrate approach for functional metagenomics-based screening for (hemi)cellulases in two wheat straw-degrading microbial consortia unveils novel thermoalkaliphilic enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maruthamuthu, Mukil; Jiménez Avella, Diego; Stevens, Patricia; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Functional metagenomics is a promising strategy for the exploration of the biocatalytic potential of microbiomes in order to uncover novel enzymes for industrial processes (e.g. biorefining or bleaching pulp). Most current methodologies used to screen for enzymes involved in plant

  2. Offshore Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This shapefile displays the distribution of substrate types from Pt. Arena to Pt. Sal in central/northern California. Originally this data consisted of seven paper...

  3. Structure/functional aspects of the human riboflavin transporter-3 (SLC52A3): role of the predicted glycosylation and substrate-interacting sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Veedamali S; Sabui, Subrata; Teafatiller, Trevor; Bohl, Jennifer A; Said, Hamid M

    2017-08-01

    The human riboflavin (RF) transporter-3 (hRFVT-3; product of the SLC52A3 gene) plays an essential role in the intestinal RF absorption process and is expressed exclusively at the apical membrane domain of polarized enterocytes. Previous studies have characterized different physiological/biological aspects of this transporter, but nothing is known about the glycosylation status of the hRFVT-3 protein and role of this modification in its physiology/biology. Additionally, little is known about the residues in the hRFVT-3 protein that interact with the ligand, RF. We addressed these issues using appropriate biochemical/molecular approaches, a protein-docking model, and established intestinal/renal epithelial cells. Our results showed that the hRFVT-3 protein is glycosylated and that glycosylation is important for its function. Mutating the predicted N -glycosylation sites at Asn 94 and Asn 168 led to a significant decrease in RF uptake; it also led to a marked intracellular (in the endoplasmic reticulum, ER) retention of the mutated proteins as shown by live-cell confocal imaging studies. The protein-docking model used in this study has identified a number of putative substrate-interacting sites: Ser 16 , Ile 20 , Trp 24 , Phe 142 , Thr 314 , and Asn 315 Mutating these potential interacting sites was indeed found to lead to a significant inhibition in RF uptake and to intracellular (ER) retention of the mutated proteins (except for the Phe 142 mutant). These results demonstrate that the hRFVT-3 protein is glycosylated and this glycosylation is important for its function and cell surface expression. This study also identified a number of residues in the hRFVT-3 polypeptide that are important for its function/cell surface expression.

  4. Interaction of on-site and near real time measured turbidity and enzyme activity in stream water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Philipp; Farnleitner, Andreas H.; Zessner, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    influence of turbidity on rapid GLUC measurements of stream water. During event run off conditions with high sediment load, accuracy of the GLUC determination was assayed. Various on-site set ups were tested to ascertain the use of sample prefiltration. We would like acknowledge financial support from the Austrian Science Funds (FWF) as part of the Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems (DK-plus W1219-N22). References: Cabral, J. P. S. 2010. "Water Microbiology. Bacterial Pathogens and Water." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 7 (10): 3657-3703. Biswal , N. , S. Gupta, N. Ghosh, and A. Pradhan 2003. "Recovery of turbidity free fluorescence from measured fluorescence: An experimental approach. Optics Express 11, (24): 3320. Molina-Munoz, M., J. M. Poyatos, R. Vilchez, E. Hontoria, B. Rodelas, and J. Gonzalez-Lopez. 2007. "Effect of the Concentration of Suspended Solids on the Enzymatic Activities and Biodiversity of a Submerged Membrane Bioreactor for Aerobic Treatment of Domestic Wastewater." Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 73 (6): 1441-1451. Tryland, I., and L. Fiksdal. 1998. "Enzyme Characteristics of β-d-Galactosidase-and β-d-Glucuronidase-Positive Bacteria and Their Interference in Rapid Methods for Detection of Waterborne Coliforms andEscherichia Coli." Applied and Environmental Microbiology 64 (3): 1018-1023.

  5. Phonon scattering in graphene over substrate steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevincli, Haldun; Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the effect on phonon transport of substrate-induced bends in graphene. We consider bending induced by an abrupt kink in the substrate, and provide results for different step-heights and substrate interaction strengths. We find that individual substrate steps reduce thermal conductance...

  6. Enzyme Molecules in Solitary Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela B. Liebherr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  7. The effect of polylysine on casein-kinase-2 activity is influenced by both the structure of the protein/peptide substrates and the subunit composition of the enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meggio, F; Boldyreff, B; Marin, O

    1992-01-01

    , moreover, is variably accounted for by changes in Vmax and/or Km, depending on the structure of the peptide substrate. Maximum stimulation with all protein/peptide substrates tested requires the presence of the beta subunit, since the recombinant alpha subunit is much less responsive than CK2 holoenzyme......The mechanism by which polybasic peptides stimulate the activity of casein kinase 2 (CK2) has been studied by comparing the effect of polylysine on the phosphorylation of a variety of protein and peptide substrates by the native CK2 holoenzyme and by its recombinant catalytic alpha subunit, either...

  8. Zymography methods for visualizing hydrolytic enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Vandooren, Jennifer; Geurts, Nathalie; Martens, Erik; Van den Steen, Philippe E.; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2013-01-01

    Zymography is a technique for studying hydrolytic enzymes on the basis of substrate degradation. It is a powerful., but often misinterpreted, tool. yielding information on potential. hydrolytic activities, enzyme forms and the locations of active enzymes. In this Review, zymography techniques are compared in terms of advantages, limitations and interpretations. With in gel zymography, enzyme forms are visualized according to their molecular weights. Proteolytic activities are localized in tis...

  9. Combining affinity proteomics and network context to identify new phosphatase substrates and adapters in growth pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eSacco

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation homoeostasis is tightly controlled and pathological conditions are caused by subtle alterations of the cell phosphorylation profile. Altered levels of kinase activities have already been associated to specific diseases. Less is known about the impact of phosphatases, the enzymes that down-regulate phosphorylation by removing the phosphate groups. This is partly due to our poor understanding of the phosphatase-substrate network. Much of phosphatase substrate specificity is not based on intrinsic enzyme specificity with the catalytic pocket recognizing the sequence/structure context of the phosphorylated residue. In addition many phosphatase catalytic subunits do not form a stable complex with their substrates. This makes the inference and validation of phosphatase substrates a non-trivial task. Here, we present a novel approach that builds on the observation that much of phosphatase substrate selection is based on the network of physical interactions linking the phosphatase to the substrate. We first used affinity proteomics coupled to quantitative mass spectrometry to saturate the interactome of eight phosphatases whose down regulations was shown to affect the activation of the RAS-PI#K pathway. By integrating information from functional siRNA with protein interaction information, we develop a strategy that aims at inferring phosphatase physiological substrates. Graph analysis is used to identify protein scaffolds that may link the catalytic subunits to their substrates. By this approach we rediscover several previously described phosphatase substrate interactions and characterize two new protein scaffolds that promote the dephosphorylation of PTPN11 and ERK by DUSP18 and DUSP26 respectively.

  10. Interaction of the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp2 and the e3 ligase Rsp5 is required for transporter/receptor sorting in the multivesicular body pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy H Y Lam

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitination is essential for many events linked to intracellular protein trafficking. We sought to elucidate the possible involvement of the S. cerevisiae deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp2 in transporter and receptor trafficking after we (this study and others established that affinity purified Ubp2 interacts stably with the E3 ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 and the (ubiquitin associated UBA domain containing protein Rup1. UBP2 interacts genetically with RSP5, while Rup1 facilitates the tethering of Ubp2 to Rsp5 via a PPPSY motif. Using the uracil permease Fur4 as a model reporter system, we establish a role for Ubp2 in membrane protein turnover. Similar to hypomorphic rsp5 alleles, cells deleted for UBP2 exhibited a temporal stabilization of Fur4 at the plasma membrane, indicative of perturbed protein trafficking. This defect was ubiquitin dependent, as a Fur4 N-terminal ubiquitin fusion construct bypassed the block and restored sorting in the mutant. Moreover, the defect was absent in conditions where recycling was absent, implicating Ubp2 in sorting at the multivesicular body. Taken together, our data suggest a previously overlooked role for Ubp2 as a positive regulator of Rsp5-mediated membrane protein trafficking subsequent to endocytosis.

  11. Insight into the binding interactions of CYP450 aromatase inhibitors with their target enzyme: a combined molecular docking and molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Roberta; Massaccesi, Luca

    2012-03-01

    CYP450 aromatase catalyzes the terminal and rate-determining step in estrogen synthesis, the aromatization of androgens, and its inhibition is an efficient approach to treating estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Insight into the molecular basis of the interaction at the catalytic site between CYP450 aromatase inhibitors and the enzyme itself is required in order to design new and more active compounds. Hence, a combined molecular docking-molecular dynamics study was carried out to obtain the structure of the lowest energy association complexes of aromatase with some third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs) and with other novel synthesized letrozole-derived compounds which showed high in vitro activity. The results obtained clearly demonstrate the role of the pharmacophore groups present in the azaheterocyclic inhibitors (NSAIs)-namely the triazolic ring and highly functionalized aromatic moieties carrying H-bond donor or acceptor groups. In particular, it was pointed out that all of them can contribute to inhibition activity by interacting with residues of the catalytic cleft, but the amino acids involved are different for each compound, even if they belong to the same class. Furthermore, the azaheterocyclic group strongly coordinates with the Fe(II) of heme cysteinate in the most active NSAI complexes, while it prefers to adopt another orientation in less active ones.

  12. Numerical study of melted particles crush metallic substrates and the interaction between particles and a plasma beam in the thermal projection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriba, Ilhem; Djebaili, A.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma spray processes have been widely used to produce high performance coatings of a wide range of materials (metallic, non-metallic, and ceramics), offering protection from, e.g. wear, extreme temperature, chemical attack and environmental corrosion. To obtain good quality coatings, spray parameters must be carefully selected. Due to the large variety in process parameters, it is difficult to optimize the process for each specific coating and substrate combinations. Furthermore modelling the spray process allows a better understanding of the process sequences during thermal spraying. The simulation of coating formation to estimate the process parameters is an important tool to develop new coating structures with defined properties. In this work, the process of plasma sprayed coating has been analyzed by numerical simulation. Commercial code is used to predict the plasma jet characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and coating formation. Using this model we can obtain coating microstructure and characteristics which form a foundation for further improvement of an advanced ceramic coating build up model

  13. Continuous enzyme reactions with immobilized enzyme tubes prepared by radiation cast-polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru; Kaetsu, Isao

    1986-01-01

    Immobilized glucose oxidase tubes were prepared by radiation cast-polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and tetraethyleneglycol diacrylate monomer at low temperatures. The immobilized enzyme tubes which were spirally set in a water bath were used as reactor, in which the enzyme activity varied with tube size and flow rate of the substrate. The conversion yield of the substrate in continuous enzyme reaction was about 80%. (author)

  14. Caractéristiques des substrats et interactions dans les filières de co-digestion : cas particulier des co-substrats d’origine agro-industrielle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIRAULT, Romain

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pour assurer l’équilibre économique des unités de méthanisation, l’ajout de co-substrats est en général nécessaire. Pour les choisir, deux questions se posent aux porteurs de projets : quelles sont les caractéristiques des co-substrats disponibles et quel est l’impact des mélanges sur le fonctionnement du digesteur. Le présent article se propose de répondre à ces questions sur la base des résultats du projet Biodecol2.

  15. Surface Chemistry of Enzymes for Detection and Decontamination of Organophosphorus Compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leblanc, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ...), organophosphorus acid hydrolase (OPH), and covalent bonding of the enzyme onto the substrate. Results are encouraging and the studied enzymes form stable monolayers at the interface and can be transferred on to the solid substrate...

  16. ALDH16A1 is a novel non-catalytic enzyme that may be involved in the etiology of gout via protein-protein interactions with HPRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliou, Vasilis; Sandoval, Monica; Backos, Donald S; Jackson, Brian C; Chen, Ying; Reigan, Philip; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Johnson, Richard J; Koppaka, Vindhya; Thompson, David C

    2013-02-25

    Gout, a common form of inflammatory arthritis, is strongly associated with elevated uric acid concentrations in the blood (hyperuricemia). A recent study in Icelanders identified a rare missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ALDH16A1 gene, ALDH16A1*2, to be associated with gout and serum uric acid levels. ALDH16A1 is a novel and rather unique member of the ALDH superfamily in relation to its gene and protein structures. ALDH16 genes are present in fish, amphibians, protista, bacteria but absent from archaea, fungi and plants. In most mammalian species, two ALDH16A1 spliced variants (ALDH16A1, long form and ALDH16A1_v2, short form) have been identified and both are expressed in HepG-2, HK-2 and HK-293 human cell lines. The ALDH16 proteins contain two ALDH domains (as opposed to one in the other members of the superfamily), four transmembrane and one coiled-coil domains. The active site of ALDH16 proteins from bacterial, frog and lower animals contain the catalytically important cysteine residue (Cys-302); this residue is absent from the mammalian and fish orthologs. Molecular modeling predicts that both the short and long forms of human ALDH16A1 protein would lack catalytic activity but may interact with the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT1) protein, a key enzyme involved in uric acid metabolism and gout. Interestingly, such protein-protein interactions with HPRT1 are predicted to be impaired for the long or short forms of ALDH16A1*2. These results lead to the intriguing possibility that association between ALDH16A1 and HPRT1 may be required for optimal HPRT activity with disruption of this interaction possibly contributing to the hyperuricemia seen in ALDH16A1*2 carriers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacterial protease uses distinct thermodynamic signatures for substrate recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Ohara-Nemoto, Yuko; Cornaciu, Irina; Fedosyuk, Sofiya; Hoffmann, Guillaume; Round, Adam; Márquez, José A; Nemoto, Takayuki K; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2017-06-06

    Porphyromonas gingivalis and Porphyromonas endodontalis are important bacteria related to periodontitis, the most common chronic inflammatory disease in humans worldwide. Its comorbidity with systemic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, oral cancers and cardiovascular diseases, continues to generate considerable interest. Surprisingly, these two microorganisms do not ferment carbohydrates; rather they use proteinaceous substrates as carbon and energy sources. However, the underlying biochemical mechanisms of their energy metabolism remain unknown. Here, we show that dipeptidyl peptidase 11 (DPP11), a central metabolic enzyme in these bacteria, undergoes a conformational change upon peptide binding to distinguish substrates from end products. It binds substrates through an entropy-driven process and end products in an enthalpy-driven fashion. We show that increase in protein conformational entropy is the main-driving force for substrate binding via the unfolding of specific regions of the enzyme ("entropy reservoirs"). The relationship between our structural and thermodynamics data yields a distinct model for protein-protein interactions where protein conformational entropy modulates the binding free-energy. Further, our findings provide a framework for the structure-based design of specific DPP11 inhibitors.

  18. Zymography methods for visualizing hydrolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandooren, Jennifer; Geurts, Nathalie; Martens, Erik; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2013-03-01

    Zymography is a technique for studying hydrolytic enzymes on the basis of substrate degradation. It is a powerful, but often misinterpreted, tool yielding information on potential hydrolytic activities, enzyme forms and the locations of active enzymes. In this Review, zymography techniques are compared in terms of advantages, limitations and interpretations. With in gel zymography, enzyme forms are visualized according to their molecular weights. Proteolytic activities are localized in tissue sections with in situ zymography. In vivo zymography can pinpoint proteolytic activity to sites in an intact organism. Future development of novel substrate probes and improvement in detection and imaging methods will increase the applicability of zymography for (reverse) degradomics studies.

  19. Potent Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Protease: Design and Synthesis of Macrocyclic Substrate-Based [beta]-Strand Mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudreau, Nathalie; Brochu, Christian; Cameron, Dale R.; Duceppe, Jean-Simon; Faucher, Anne-Marie; Ferland, Jean-Marie; Grand-Maître, Chantal; Poirier, Martin; Simoneau, Bruno; Tsantrizos, Youla S. (Boehringer)

    2008-06-30

    The virally encoded NS3 protease is essential to the life cycle of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), an important human pathogen causing chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis of the liver, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The design and synthesis of 15-membered ring {beta}-strand mimics which are capable of inhibiting the interactions between the HCV NS3 protease enzyme and its polyprotein substrate will be described. The binding interactions between a macrocyclic ligand and the enzyme were explored by NMR and molecular dynamics, and a model of the ligand/enzyme complex was developed.

  20. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of Drosophila 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine Decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q.; Ding, H; Robinson, H; Christensen, B; Li, J

    2010-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase (DDC), also known as aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of a number of aromatic L-amino acids. Physiologically, DDC is responsible for the production of dopamine and serotonin through the decarboxylation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively. In insects, both dopamine and serotonin serve as classical neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, or neurohormones, and dopamine is also involved in insect cuticle formation, eggshell hardening, and immune responses. In this study, we expressed a typical DDC enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster, critically analyzed its substrate specificity and biochemical properties, determined its crystal structure at 1.75 Angstrom resolution, and evaluated the roles residues T82 and H192 play in substrate binding and enzyme catalysis through site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme. Our results establish that this DDC functions exclusively on the production of dopamine and serotonin, with no activity to tyrosine or tryptophan and catalyzes the formation of serotonin more efficiently than dopamine. The crystal structure of Drosophila DDC and the site-directed mutagenesis study of the enzyme demonstrate that T82 is involved in substrate binding and that H192 is used not only for substrate interaction, but for cofactor binding of drDDC as well. Through comparative analysis, the results also provide insight into the structure-function relationship of other insect DDC-like proteins.

  1. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of Drosophila 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Han

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase (DDC, also known as aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of a number of aromatic L-amino acids. Physiologically, DDC is responsible for the production of dopamine and serotonin through the decarboxylation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively. In insects, both dopamine and serotonin serve as classical neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, or neurohormones, and dopamine is also involved in insect cuticle formation, eggshell hardening, and immune responses.In this study, we expressed a typical DDC enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster, critically analyzed its substrate specificity and biochemical properties, determined its crystal structure at 1.75 Angstrom resolution, and evaluated the roles residues T82 and H192 play in substrate binding and enzyme catalysis through site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme. Our results establish that this DDC functions exclusively on the production of dopamine and serotonin, with no activity to tyrosine or tryptophan and catalyzes the formation of serotonin more efficiently than dopamine.The crystal structure of Drosophila DDC and the site-directed mutagenesis study of the enzyme demonstrate that T82 is involved in substrate binding and that H192 is used not only for substrate interaction, but for cofactor binding of drDDC as well. Through comparative analysis, the results also provide insight into the structure-function relationship of other insect DDC-like proteins.

  2. Anti-melanization mechanism of the white spot syndrome viral protein, WSSV453, via interaction with shrimp proPO-activating enzyme, PmproPPAE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutthangkul, Jantiwan; Amparyup, Piti; Eum, Jai-Hoon; Strand, Michael R; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2017-04-01

    Inhibition of the host melanization reaction, activated by the prophenoloxidase activating (proPO) system, is one of the crucial evasion strategies of pathogens. Recently, the shrimp pathogen, white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), was found to inhibit melanization in the shrimp Penaeus monodon. The viral protein WSSV453 was previously shown to interact with PO-activating enzyme 2 (PmPPAE2) and reported to be involved in suppressing the shrimp melanization response after WSSV infection. Here, we characterized how WSSV453 inhibits melanization. WSSV453 is a non-structural viral protein, which was first detected in shrimp haemocytes at 6 hours post-infection (hpi) by WSSV and in shrimp plasma at 24 hpi. We produced recombinant proteins for three components of the P. monodon proPO system: PmproPPAE2, PmproPO1 and PmproPO2. Functional assays showed that active PmPPAE2 processed PmproPO1 and 2 to produce functional PO. Incubation of WSSV453 with PmproPPAE2 dose-dependently reduced PmPPAE2 activity toward PmPO1 or PmPO2. In contrast, WSSV453 had no effect on activated PmPPAE2. The addition of active PmPPAE2 to WSSV-infected shrimp plasma at day 2 post-infection also rescued PO activity. Taken together, these results indicate that the anti-melanization activity of WSSV is due to WSSV453, which interacts with PmproPPAE2 and interferes with its activation to active PmPPAE2.

  3. Analyzing the Interaction of Andrographolide and Neoandrographolide, Diterpenoid Compounds From Andrographis Paniculata (Burm.F Nees, to Cyclooxygenase-2 Enzyme by Docking Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutti Levita

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase (COX, an enzyme involved in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, exists in two isoforms, which are COX-1 and COX-2. Despite the similarities of COX-1 and COX-2, the two isoforms show subtle differences in amino acid composition at the active sites. Since COX-1 has isoleucine, a bulkier amino acid at position 523 than COX-2’s valine, it allows COX-2 to have a larger space in its active site. Andrographolide reduces COX-2 expression induced by PAF and fMLP in HL60/neutrophils. Neoandrographolide inhibits COX-2 expression at the translational level. The purpose of this study is to examine the binding modes of andrographolide and neoandrographolide against COX-1 and COX-2 in terms of hydrogen bonds and docking energy, to understand their antiinflammatory property. The docking study indicates that both andrographolide and neoandrographolide are able to be located in the COX-2’s binding pocket but not in the COX-1’s. It confirms that COX-1’s binding pocket is smaller than COX-2’s. Based on this study, both andrographolide and neoandrographolide show selective inhibitory property to COX-2. Their selectivity are due to their specific interaction with Arg 513 in the binding pocket of COX-2, which is also shown by SC-558, a COX-2 selective inhibitor.

  4. Characterization of the interdependency between residues that bind the substrate in a β-glycosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Tomassi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The manner by which effects of simultaneous mutations combine to change enzymatic activity is not easily predictable because these effects are not always additive in a linear manner. Hence, the characterization of the effects of simultaneous mutations of amino acid residues that bind the substrate can make a significant contribution to the understanding of the substrate specificity of enzymes. In the β-glycosidase from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sfβgly, both residues Q39 and E451 interact with the substrate and this is essential for defining substrate specificity. Double mutants of Sfβgly (A451E39, S451E39 and S451N39 were prepared by site-directed mutagenesis, expressed in bacteria and purified using affinity chromatography. These enzymes were characterized using p-nitrophenyl β-galactoside and p-nitrophenyl β-fucoside as substrates. The k cat/Km ratio for single and double mutants of Sfβgly containing site-directed mutations at positions Q39 and E451 was used to demonstrate that the effect on the free energy of ES‡ (enzyme-transition state complex of the double mutations (∆∆G‡xy is not the sum of the effects resulting from the single mutations (∆∆G‡x and ∆∆G‡y. This difference in ∆∆G‡ indicates that the effects of the single mutations partially overlap. Hence, this common effect counts only once in ∆∆G‡xy. Crystallographic data on β-glycosidases reveal the presence of a bidentate hydrogen bond involving residues Q39 and E451 and the same hydroxyl group of the substrate. Therefore, both thermodynamic and crystallographic data suggest that residues Q39 and E451 exert a mutual influence on their respective interactions with the substrate.

  5. Characterization of the interdependency between residues that bind the substrate in a beta-glycosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassi, M H; Rozenfeld, J H K; Gonçalves, L M; Marana, S R

    2010-01-01

    The manner by which effects of simultaneous mutations combine to change enzymatic activity is not easily predictable because these effects are not always additive in a linear manner. Hence, the characterization of the effects of simultaneous mutations of amino acid residues that bind the substrate can make a significant contribution to the understanding of the substrate specificity of enzymes. In the beta-glycosidase from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sfbetagly), both residues Q39 and E451 interact with the substrate and this is essential for defining substrate specificity. Double mutants of Sfbetagly (A451E39, S451E39 and S451N39) were prepared by site-directed mutagenesis, expressed in bacteria and purified using affinity chromatography. These enzymes were characterized using p-nitrophenyl beta-galactoside and p-nitrophenyl beta-fucoside as substrates. The k cat/Km ratio for single and double mutants of Sfbetagly containing site-directed mutations at positions Q39 and E451 was used to demonstrate that the effect on the free energy of ESdouble dagger (enzyme-transition state complex) of the double mutations (Gdouble daggerxy) is not the sum of the effects resulting from the single mutations (Gdouble daggerx and Gdouble daggery). This difference in Gdouble dagger indicates that the effects of the single mutations partially overlap. Hence, this common effect counts only once in Gdouble daggerxy. Crystallographic data on beta-glycosidases reveal the presence of a bidentate hydrogen bond involving residues Q39 and E451 and the same hydroxyl group of the substrate. Therefore, both thermodynamic and crystallographic data suggest that residues Q39 and E451 exert a mutual influence on their respective interactions with the substrate.

  6. A Chimeric LysK-Lysostaphin Fusion Enzyme Lysing Staphylococcus aureus Cells: a Study of Both Kinetics of Inactivation and Specifics of Interaction with Anionic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, Lyubov Y; Donovan, David M; Ishnazarova, Nadiya T; Foster-Frey, Juli A; Becker, Stephen C; Pugachev, Vladimir G; Balabushevich, Nadezda G; Dmitrieva, Natalia F; Klyachko, Natalia L

    2016-10-01

    A staphylolytic fusion protein (chimeric enzyme K-L) was created, harboring three unique lytic activities composed of the LysK CHAP endopeptidase, and amidase domains, and the lysostaphin glycyl-glycine endopeptidase domain. To assess the potential of possible therapeutic applications, the kinetic behavior of chimeric enzyme K-L was investigated. As a protein antimicrobial, with potential antigenic properties, the biophysical effect of including chimeric enzyme K-L in anionic polymer matrices that might help reduce the immunogenicity of the enzyme was tested. Chimeric enzyme K-L reveals a high lytic activity under the following optimal ( opt ) conditions: pH opt 6.0-10.0, t opt 20-30 °C, NaCl opt 400-800 mM. At the working temperature of 37 °C, chimeric enzyme K-L is inactivated by a monomolecular mechanism and possesses a high half-inactivation time of 12.7 ± 3.0 h. At storage temperatures of 22 and 4 °C, a complex mechanism (combination of monomolecular and bimolecular mechanisms) is involved in the chimeric enzyme K-L inactivation. The optimal storage conditions under which the enzyme retains 100 % activity after 140 days of incubation (4 °C, the enzyme concentration of 0.8 mg/mL, pH 6.0 or 7.5) were established. Chimeric enzyme K-L is included in complexes with block-copolymers of poly-L-glutamic acid and polyethylene glycol, while the enzyme activity and stability are retained, thus suggesting methods to improve the application of this fusion as an effective antimicrobial agent.

  7. Stochastic simulation of enzyme-catalyzed reactions with disparate timescales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Debashis; Paul, Mark R; Baumann, William T; Cao, Yang; Tyson, John J

    2008-10-01

    Many physiological characteristics of living cells are regulated by protein interaction networks. Because the total numbers of these protein species can be small, molecular noise can have significant effects on the dynamical properties of a regulatory network. Computing these stochastic effects is made difficult by the large timescale separations typical of protein interactions (e.g., complex formation may occur in fractions of a second, whereas catalytic conversions may take minutes). Exact stochastic simulation may be very inefficient under these circumstances, and methods for speeding up the simulation without sacrificing accuracy have been widely studied. We show that the "total quasi-steady-state approximation" for enzyme-catalyzed reactions provides a useful framework for efficient and accurate stochastic simulations. The method is applied to three examples: a simple enzyme-catalyzed reaction where enzyme and substrate have comparable abundances, a Goldbeter-Koshland switch, where a kinase and phosphatase regulate the phosphorylation state of a common substrate, and coupled Goldbeter-Koshland switches that exhibit bistability. Simulations based on the total quasi-steady-state approximation accurately capture the steady-state probability distributions of all components of these reaction networks. In many respects, the approximation also faithfully reproduces time-dependent aspects of the fluctuations. The method is accurate even under conditions of poor timescale separation.

  8. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Defining the Interactions of Cellobiohydrolase with Substrate through Structure Function Studies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-409

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.

    2013-07-01

    NREL researchers will use their expertise and skilled resources in numerical computational modeling to generate structure-function relationships for improved cellulase variant enzymes to support the development of cellulases with improved performance in biomass conversion.

  10. Subcellular localization of pituitary enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    A cytochemical procedure is reported for identifying subcellular sites of enzymes hydrolyzing beta-naphthylamine substrates, and to study the sites of reaction product localization in cells of various tissues. Investigations using the substrate Leu 4-methoxy-8-naphthylamine, a capture with hexonium pararosaniline, and the final chelation of osmium have identified the hydrolyzing enzyme of rat liver cells; this enzyme localized on cell membranes with intense deposition in the areas of the parcanaliculi. The study of cells in the anterior pituitary of the rat showed the deposition of reaction product on cell membrane; and on the membranes of secretion granules contained within the cell. The deposition of reaction product on the cell membrane however showed no increase or decrease with changes in the physiological state of the gland and release of secretion granules from specific cells.

  11. Electrochemical Nanoparticle-Enzyme Sensors for Screening Bacterial Contamination in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juhong; Jiang, Ziwen; Ackerman, Jonathan D.; Yazdani, Mahdieh; Hou, Singyuk

    2015-01-01

    Traditional plating and culturing methods used to quantify bacteria commonly require hours to days from sampling to results. We present here a simple, sensitive and rapid electrochemical method for bacteria detection in drinking water based on gold nanoparticle-enzyme complexes. The gold nanoparticles were functionalized with positively charged quaternary amine headgroups that could bind to enzymes through electrostatic interactions, resulting in inhibition of enzymatic activity. In the presence of bacteria, the nanoparticles released from the enzymes and preferentially bound to the bacteria, resulting in an increase in enzyme activity, releasing a redox-active phenol from the substrate. We employed this strategy for the electrochemical sensing of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, resulting in a rapid detection (<1h) with high sensitivity (102 CFU·mL−1). PMID:26042607

  12. Unique features of the structure and interactions of mycobacterial uracil-DNA glycosylase: structure of a complex of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme in comparison with those from other sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Prem Singh; Talawar, Ramappa K; Krishna, P D V; Varshney, Umesh; Vijayan, M

    2008-05-01

    Uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG), a repair enzyme involved in the excision of uracil from DNA, from mycobacteria differs from UNGs from other sources, particularly in the sequence in the catalytically important loops. The structure of the enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtUng) in complex with a proteinaceous inhibitor (Ugi) has been determined by X-ray analysis of a crystal containing seven crystallographically independent copies of the complex. This structure provides the first geometric characterization of a mycobacterial UNG. A comparison of the structure with those of other UNG proteins of known structure shows that a central core region of the molecule is relatively invariant in structure and sequence, while the N- and C-terminal tails exhibit high variability. The tails are probably important in folding and stability. The mycobacterial enzyme exhibits differences in UNG-Ugi interactions compared with those involving UNG from other sources. The MtUng-DNA complex modelled on the basis of the known structure of the complex involving the human enzyme indicates a domain closure in the enzyme when binding to DNA. The binding involves a larger burial of surface area than is observed in binding by human UNG. The DNA-binding site of MtUng is characterized by the presence of a higher proportion of arginyl residues than is found in the binding site of any other UNG of known structure. In addition to the electrostatic effects produced by the arginyl residues, the hydrogen bonds in which they are involved compensate for the loss of some interactions arising from changes in amino-acid residues, particularly in the catalytic loops. The results arising from the present investigation represent unique features of the structure and interaction of mycobacterial Ungs.

  13. Wetting on structured substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, S; Popescu, M N; Rauscher, M

    2005-01-01

    Chemically patterned surfaces are of significant interest in the context of microfluidic applications, and miniaturization of such devices aims at generating structures on the nano-scale. Whereas on the micron scale purely macroscopic descriptions of liquid flow are valid, on the nanometre scale long-ranged inter-molecular interactions, thermal fluctuations such as capillary waves, and finally the molecular structure of the liquid become important. We discuss the most important conceptual differences between flow on chemically patterned substrates on the micron scale and on the nanometre scale, and formulate four design issues for nanofluidics related to channel width, channel separation, and channel bending radius. As a specific example of nano-scale transport we present a microscopic model for the dynamics of spreading of monolayers on homogeneous substrates. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of this model on a homogeneous substrate reveal a complex spatio-temporal structure of the extracted monolayer, which includes the emergence of interfaces and of scaling properties of density profiles. These features are discussed and rationalized within the corresponding continuum limit derived from the microscopic dynamics. The corresponding spreading behaviour on a patterned substrate is briefly addressed

  14. Interaction of RBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x (R = Y or Nd) coatings with alumina and zirconia substrates. [YBaCuO; NdBaCuO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, C; Parent, L; Champagne, B; Dallaire, S [National Research Council of Canada, Industrial Materials Research Inst., Boucherville, PQ (Canada)

    1989-12-10

    As-deposited YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} coatings by plasma spraying are not superconducting because of their inadequate crystalline structure and low oxygen content. A post-deposition heat treatment in oxygen is required to restore the appropriate superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} structure. During heat treatment, deterimental reactions between coatings and substrates may occur and lead to the degradation or destruction of the coating superconducting properties. In the present paper, interactions of RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (R = Y, Nd) coatings with alumina and zirconia substrates are examined. The modifications of the coating electrical properties and microstructure are studied using X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and resistivity measurements. Coating degradation is shown to occur by diffusion of the barium atoms out of the coating leading to the formation of Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5} and CuO in yttrium-based coatings, and to the formation of nonstoichiometric Nd{sub 1+y}Ba{sub 2-y}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and CuO in neodymium-based coatings. The coating degradation is more important on alumina substrates that on zirconia substrates for both yttrium- and neodymium-based coatings. (orig.).

  15. Internal Diffusion-Controlled Enzyme Reaction: The Acetylcholinesterase Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyun; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sangyoub

    2012-02-14

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme with a very high turnover rate; it quenches the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, at the synapse. We have investigated the kinetics of the enzyme reaction by calculating the diffusion rate of the substrate molecule along an active site channel inside the enzyme from atomic-level molecular dynamics simulations. In contrast to the previous works, we have found that the internal substrate diffusion is the determinant of the acetylcholinesterase kinetics in the low substrate concentration limit. Our estimate of the overall bimolecular reaction rate constant for the enzyme is in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the present calculation provides a reasonable explanation for the effects of the ionic strength of solution and the mutation of surface residues of the enzyme. The study suggests that internal diffusion of the substrate could be a key factor in understanding the kinetics of enzymes of similar characteristics.

  16. Rethinking fundamentals of enzyme action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrop, D B

    1999-01-01

    Despite certain limitations, investigators continue to gainfully employ concepts rooted in steady-state kinetics in efforts to draw mechanistically relevant inferences about enzyme catalysis. By reconsidering steady-state enzyme kinetic behavior, this review develops ideas that allow one to arrive at the following new definitions: (a) V/K, the ratio of the maximal initial velocity divided by the Michaelis-Menten constant, is the apparent rate constant for the capture of substrate into enzyme complexes that are destined to yield product(s) at some later point in time; (b) the maximal velocity V is the apparent rate constant for the release of substrate from captured complexes in the form of free product(s); and (c) the Michaelis-Menten constant K is the ratio of the apparent rate constants for release and capture. The physiologic significance of V/K is also explored to illuminate aspects of antibiotic resistance, the concept of "perfection" in enzyme catalysis, and catalytic proficiency. The conceptual basis of congruent thermodynamic cycles is also considered in an attempt to achieve an unambiguous way for comparing an enzyme-catalyzed reaction with its uncatalyzed reference reaction. Such efforts promise a deeper understanding of the origins of catalytic power, as it relates to stabilization of the reactant ground state, stabilization of the transition state, and reciprocal stabilizations of ground and transition states.

  17. Fungal enzymes in the attine ant symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Schiøtt, Morten; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    the more basal attine genera use substrates such as flowers, plant debris, small twigs, insect feces and insect carcasses. This diverse array of fungal substrates across the attine lineage implies that the symbiotic fungus needs different enzymes to break down the plant material that the ants provide...... or different efficiencies of enzyme function. Fungal enzymes that degrade plant cell walls may have functionally co-evolved with the ants in this scenario. We explore this hypothesis with direct measurements of enzyme activity in fungus gardens in 12 species across 8 genera spanning the entire phylogeny...... and diversity of life-styles within the attine clade. We find significant differences in enzyme activity between different genera and life-styles of the ants. How these findings relate to attine ant coevolution and crop optimization are discussed....

  18. Auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 Enhances Its Substrate Ubiquitin Ligase Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaweera, Ruchira S.; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-01-01

    The RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2 is the master regulator of the tumor suppressor p53. It targets p53 for proteasomal degradation, restraining the potent activity of p53 and enabling cell survival and proliferation. Like most E3 ligases, Mdm2 can also ubiquitinate itself. How Mdm2 auto-ubiquitination may influence its substrate ubiquitin ligase activity is undefined. Here we show that auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 is an activating event. Mdm2 that has been conjugated to polyubiquitin chains, but not to single ubiquitins, exhibits substantially enhanced activity to polyubiquitinate p53. Mechanistically, auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 facilitates the recruitment of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. This occurs through noncovalent interactions between the ubiquitin chains on Mdm2 and the ubiquitin binding domain on E2s. Mutations that diminish the noncovalent interactions render auto-ubiquitination unable to stimulate Mdm2 substrate E3 activity. These results suggest a model in which polyubiquitin chains on an E3 increase the local concentration of E2 enzymes and permit the processivity of substrate ubiquitination. They also support the notion that autocatalysis may be a prevalent mode for turning on the activity of latent enzymes. PMID:23671280

  19. Solid substrate fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tengerdy, R P

    1985-04-01

    Solid Substrate Fermentation (SSF) describes the microbiological tranformation of biological materials in their natural state, in contrast with liquid or submerged fermentations which are carried out in dilute solutions or slurries. The most important industrial microorganisms used in SSF are filamentous fungi and the critical factors in their growth are the control of the moisture level and the temperature. Traditionally, most SSFs are conducted in shallow trays (so that heat build up is avoided) and stacked in a moist chamber, however, the modern SSF should be able to mix large amounts of substrate for a uniform fermentation, maximum automization scale-up of the process, continuous operation and fermentation control and a promising new design is the Helical screw fermenter. At the present time SSF is used in the production of foods (e.g. mushrooms and oriental foods) in municipal, agricultural and industrial solid waste disposal and in the production of enzymes and speciality chemicals but it does not seem likely that it will replace prevalent liquid fermentation technologies. 29 references.

  20. Interaction of plasma-sprayed YBa/sub y/Cu/sub 3/0/sub x/ coatings with alumina substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, C; Parent, L; Dallaire, S; Champagne, B

    1989-01-01

    Superconducting YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub x/ coatings can be obtained by plasma spraying. Since the as-sprayed coatings do not have an appropriate crystalline structure and are not superconducting, a thermal treatment must be done for crystallizing them in the appropriate YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub x/ phase. During heat treatment, reactions between the substrate and coating occur and in some cases, may prevent superconducting properties to be obtained. In the present study, YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O sub/x/ coatings have been deposited on alumina substrates by plasma spraying and heat treated under flowing oxygen at 950/sup 0/C for different periods of time. The modification in coating microstructure has been investigated after different heat treatments. A degradation mechanism of superconducting coatings is proposed. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Bioethanol from lignocellulose - pretreatment, enzyme immobilization and hydrolysis kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsai, Chien Tai

    , the cost of enzyme is still the bottle neck, re-using the enzyme is apossible way to reduce the input of enzyme in the process. In the point view of engineering, the prediction of enzymatic hydrolysis kinetics under different substrate loading, enzyme combination is usful for process design. Therefore...... lignocellulose is the required high cellulase enzyme dosages that increase the processing costs. One method to decrease the enzyme dosage is to re-use BG, which hydrolyze the soluble substrate cellobiose. Based on the hypothesis that immobilized BG can be re-used, how many times the enzyme could be recycled...... liquid and pretreatment time can be reduced, the influence of substrate concentration, pretreatment time and temperature were investigated and optimized. Pretreatment of barley straw by [EMIM]Ac, correlative models were constructed using 3 different pretreatment parameters (temperature, time...

  2. Significant inhibitory impact of dibenzyl trisulfide and extracts of Petiveria alliacea on the activities of major drug-metabolizing enzymes in vitro: An assessment of the potential for medicinal plant-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J; Picking, D; Lamm, A; McKenzie, J; Hartley, S; Watson, C; Williams, L; Lowe, H; Delgoda, R

    2016-06-01

    Dibenzyl trisulfide (DTS) is the major active ingredient expressed in Petiveria alliacea L., a shrub widely used for a range of conditions, such as, arthritis, asthma and cancer. Given its use alone and concomitantly with prescription medicines, we undertook to investigate its impact on the activities of important drug metabolizing enzymes, the cytochromes P450 (CYP), a key family of enzymes involved in many adverse drug reactions. DTS and seven standardized extracts from the plant were assessed for their impact on the activities of CYPs 1A2, 2C19, 2C9, 2D6 and 3A4 on a fluorometric assay. DTS revealed significant impact against the activities of CYPs 1A2, 2C19 and 3A4 with IC50 values of 1.9, 4.0 and 3.2μM, respectively, which are equivalent to known standard inhibitors of these enzymes (furafylline, and tranylcypromine), and the most potent interaction with CYP1A2 displayed irreversible enzyme kinetics. The root extract, drawn with 96% ethanol (containing 2.4% DTS), displayed IC50 values of 5.6, 3.9 and 4.2μg/mL respectively, against the same isoforms, CYPs 1A2, 2C19 and 3A4. These investigations identify DTS as a valuable CYP inhibitor and P. alliacea as a candidate plant worthy of clinical trials to confirm the conclusions that extracts yielding high DTS may lead to clinically relevant drug interactions, whilst extracts yielding low levels of DTS, such as aqueous extracts, are unlikely to cause adverse herb-drug interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Substrate-Trapped Interactors of PHD3 and FIH Cluster in Distinct Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Rodriguez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid hydroxylation is a post-translational modification that regulates intra- and inter-molecular protein-protein interactions. The modifications are regulated by a family of 2-oxoglutarate- (2OG dependent enzymes and, although the biochemistry is well understood, until now only a few substrates have been described for these enzymes. Using quantitative interaction proteomics, we screened for substrates of the proline hydroxylase PHD3 and the asparagine hydroxylase FIH, which regulate the HIF-mediated hypoxic response. We were able to identify hundreds of potential substrates. Enrichment analysis revealed that the potential substrates of both hydroxylases cluster in the same pathways but frequently modify different nodes of signaling networks. We confirm that two proteins identified in our screen, MAPK6 (Erk3 and RIPK4, are indeed hydroxylated in a FIH- or PHD3-dependent mechanism. We further determined that FIH-dependent hydroxylation regulates RIPK4-dependent Wnt signaling, and that PHD3-dependent hydroxylation of MAPK6 protects the protein from proteasomal degradation.

  4. Concentration profiles near an activated enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soohyung; Agmon, Noam

    2008-09-25

    When a resting enzyme is activated, substrate concentration profile evolves in its vicinity, ultimately tending to steady state. We use modern theories for many-body effects on diffusion-influenced reactions to derive approximate analytical expressions for the steady-state profile and the Laplace transform of the transient concentration profiles. These show excellent agreement with accurate many-particle Brownian-dynamics simulations for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The steady-state profile has a hyperbolic dependence on the distance of the substrate from the enzyme, albeit with a prefactor containing the complexity of the many-body effects. These are most conspicuous for the substrate concentration at the surface of the enzyme. It shows an interesting transition as a function of the enzyme turnover rate. When it is high, the contact concentration decays monotonically to steady state. However, for slow turnover it is nonmonotonic, showing a minimum due to reversible substrate binding, then a maximum due to diffusion of new substrate toward the enzyme, and finally decay to steady state. Under certain conditions one can obtain a good estimate for the critical value of the turnover rate constant at the transition.

  5. Perspectives on electrostatics and conformational motions in enzyme catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanoian, Philip; Liu, C Tony; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Benkovic, Stephen

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Enzymes are essential for all living organisms, and their effectiveness as chemical catalysts has driven more than a half century of research seeking to understand the enormous rate enhancements they provide. Nevertheless, a complete understanding of the factors that govern the rate enhancements and selectivities of enzymes remains elusive, due to the extraordinary complexity and cooperativity that are the hallmarks of these biomolecules. We have used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, pre-steady-state kinetics, X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), vibrational and fluorescence spectroscopies, resonance energy transfer, and computer simulations to study the implications of conformational motions and electrostatic interactions on enzyme catalysis in the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). We have demonstrated that modest equilibrium conformational changes are functionally related to the hydride transfer reaction. Results obtained for mutant DHFRs illustrated that reductions in hydride transfer rates are correlated with altered conformational motions, and analysis of the evolutionary history of DHFR indicated that mutations appear to have occurred to preserve both the hydride transfer rate and the associated conformational changes. More recent results suggested that differences in local electrostatic environments contribute to finely tuning the substrate pKa in the initial protonation step. Using a combination of primary and solvent kinetic isotope effects, we demonstrated that the reaction mechanism is consistent across a broad pH range, and computer simulations suggested that deprotonation of the active site Tyr100 may play a crucial role in substrate protonation at high pH. Site-specific incorporation of vibrational thiocyanate probes into the ecDHFR active site provided an experimental tool for interrogating these microenvironments and for investigating changes in electrostatics along the DHFR catalytic cycle

  6. Specificity and versatility of substrate binding sites in four catalytic domains of human N-terminal acetyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Grauffel

    Full Text Available Nt-acetylation is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes. Although thought for a long time to protect proteins from degradation, the role of Nt-acetylation is still debated. It is catalyzed by enzymes called N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs. In eukaryotes, several NATs, composed of at least one catalytic domain, target different substrates based on their N-terminal sequences. In order to better understand the substrate specificity of human NATs, we investigated in silico the enzyme-substrate interactions in four catalytic subunits of human NATs (Naa10p, Naa20p, Naa30p and Naa50p. To date hNaa50p is the only human subunit for which X-ray structures are available. We used the structure of the ternary hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex and a structural model of hNaa10p as a starting point for multiple molecular dynamics simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE, MKG, hNaa10p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE. Nine alanine point-mutants of the hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex were also simulated. Homology models of hNaa20p and hNaa30p were built and compared to hNaa50p and hNaa10p. The simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG reproduce the interactions revealed by the X-ray data. We observed strong hydrogen bonds between MLG and tyrosines 31, 138 and 139. Yet the tyrosines interacting with the substrate's backbone suggest that their role in specificity is limited. This is confirmed by the simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/EEE and hNaa10p/AcCoA/MLG, where these hydrogen bonds are still observed. Moreover these tyrosines are all conserved in hNaa20p and hNaa30p. Other amino acids tune the specificity of the S1' sites that is different for hNaa10p (acidic, hNaa20p (hydrophobic/basic, hNaa30p (basic and hNaa50p (hydrophobic. We also observe dynamic correlation between the ligand binding site and helix [Formula: see text] that tightens under substrate binding. Finally, by comparing the four structures we propose maps of the peptide-enzyme

  7. Structural Basis of Substrate Recognition in Thiopurine S-Methyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Yi; Feng, Qiping; Wilk, Dennis; Adjei, Araba A.; Salavaggione, Oreste E.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Yee, Vivien C. (Case Western); (MCCM)

    2008-09-23

    Thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) modulates the cytotoxic effects of thiopurine prodrugs such as 6-mercaptopurine by methylating them in a reaction using S-adenosyl-l-methionine as the donor. Patients with TPMT variant allozymes exhibit diminished levels of protein and/or enzyme activity and are at risk for thiopurine drug-induced toxicity. We have determined two crystal structures of murine TPMT, as a binary complex with the product S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and as a ternary complex with S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and the substrate 6-mercaptopurine, to 1.8 and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Comparison of the structures reveals that an active site loop becomes ordered upon 6-mercaptopurine binding. The positions of the two ligands are consistent with the expected S{sub N}2 reaction mechanism. Arg147 and Arg221, the only polar amino acids near 6-mercaptopurine, are highlighted as possible participants in substrate deprotonation. To probe whether these residues are important for catalysis, point mutants were prepared in the human enzyme. Substitution of Arg152 (Arg147 in murine TPMT) with glutamic acid decreases V{sub max} and increases K{sub m} for 6-mercaptopurine but not K{sub m} for S-adenosyl-l-methionine. Substitution at this position with alanine or histidine and similar substitutions of Arg226 (Arg221 in murine TPMT) result in no effect on enzyme activity. The double mutant Arg152Ala/Arg226Ala exhibits a decreased V{sub max} and increased K{sub m} for 6-mercaptopurine. These observations suggest that either Arg152 or Arg226 may participate in some fashion in the TPMT reaction, with one residue compensating when the other is altered, and that Arg152 may interact with substrate more directly than Arg226, consistent with observations in the murine TPMT crystal structure.

  8. Computational study of β-N-acetylhexosaminidase from Talaromyces flavus, a glycosidase with high substrate flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Natallia; Slámová, Kristýna; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Křen, Vladimír

    2015-01-28

    β-N-Acetylhexosaminidase (GH20) from the filamentous fungus Talaromyces flavus, previously identified as a prominent enzyme in the biosynthesis of modified glycosides, lacks a high resolution three-dimensional structure so far. Despite of high sequence identity to previously reported Aspergillus oryzae and Penicilluim oxalicum β-N-acetylhexosaminidases, this enzyme tolerates significantly better substrate modification. Understanding of key structural features, prediction of effective mutants and potential substrate characteristics prior to their synthesis are of general interest. Computational methods including homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations were applied to shad light on the structure-activity relationship in the enzyme. Primary sequence analysis revealed some variable regions able to influence difference in substrate affinity of hexosaminidases. Moreover, docking in combination with consequent molecular dynamics simulations of C-6 modified glycosides enabled us to identify the structural features required for accommodation and processing of these bulky substrates in the active site of hexosaminidase from T. flavus. To access the reliability of predictions on basis of the reported model, all results were confronted with available experimental data that demonstrated the principal correctness of the predictions as well as the model. The main variable regions in β-N-acetylhexosaminidases determining difference in modified substrate affinity are located close to the active site entrance and engage two loops. Differences in primary sequence and the spatial arrangement of these loops and their interplay with active site amino acids, reflected by interaction energies and dynamics, account for the different catalytic activity and substrate specificity of the various fungal and bacterial β-N-acetylhexosaminidases.

  9. Bioprospecting of Thermostable Cellulolytic Enzymes through Modeling and Virtual Screening Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Navanietha Krishnaraj

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cellulolytic enzymes are promising candidates for the use of cellulose in any bioprocess operations and for the disposal of the cellulosic wastes in an environmentally benign manner. Cellulases from thermophiles have the advantage of hydrolyzing cellulose at wider range of operating conditions unlike the normal enzymes. Herein we report the modeled structures of cellulolytic enzymes (endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase and ß-glucosidase from a thermophilic bacterium,Clostridium thermocellumand their validation using Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD and Ramachandran plot analyses. Further, the molecular interactions of the modeled enzyme with cellulose were analyzed using molecular docking technique. The results of molecular docking showed that the endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase and ß-glucosidase had the binding affinities of -10.7, -9.0 and -10.8 kcal/mol, respectively. A correlation between the binding affinity of the endoglucanase with cellulose and the enzyme activity was also demonstrated. The results showed that the binding affinities of cellulases with cellulose could be used as a tool to assess the hydrolytic activity of cellulases. The results obtained could be used in virtual screening of cellulolytic enzymes based on the molecular interactions with the substrate, and aid in developing systems biology models of thermophiles for industrial biotechnology applications.

  10. PENGARUH PERLAKUAN DELIGNIFIKASI DENGAN LARUTAN NAOH DAN KONSENTRASI SUBSTRAT JERAMI PADI TERHADAP PRODUKSI ENZIM SELULASE DARI ASPERGILLUS NIGER NRRL A-II, 264

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IDA BAGUS WAYAN GUNAM

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available his research was done in order to utilize agricultural waste (rice straw as substrate to produce crude cellulase enzyme from Aspergillus niger. This research was conducted in two stages; the first stage was determination of the initial pH and fermentation time by pH treatment (5, 6 and 7 and fermentation time (7, 9 and 11 days. The second stage was determination of concentration of NaOH treatment and concentration of substrate, namely: concentrations of NaOH (2, 4 and 6% and concentrations of substrate (1, 2 and 3% (w/v. The results showed that the fermentation time of 9 days with the initial pH 6.0 was the optimal condition for production of crude cellulase enzyme from A. niger with rice straw as a substrate. The highest enzyme activity derived from interaction of delignification treatment with NaOH concentration of 6% and 2% rice straw substrate which produces endoglukanase enzyme activity (0.037 units/ml, filter paperase activity (0.033 units/ml, soluble protein (0.362 mg/ml, and specific activity of filter paperase (0.123 units/mg.

  11. Thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzymes: from enzymology to metabolic regulation, drug design and disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunik, Victoria I; Tylicki, Adam; Lukashev, Nikolay V

    2013-12-01

    Bringing a knowledge of enzymology into research in vivo and in situ is of great importance in understanding systems biology and metabolic regulation. The central metabolic significance of thiamin (vitamin B1 ) and its diphosphorylated derivative (thiamin diphosphate; ThDP), and the fundamental differences in the ThDP-dependent enzymes of metabolic networks in mammals versus plants, fungi and bacteria, or in health versus disease, suggest that these enzymes are promising targets for biotechnological and medical applications. Here, the in vivo action of known regulators of ThDP-dependent enzymes, such as synthetic structural analogs of the enzyme substrates and thiamin, is analyzed in light of the enzymological data accumulated during half a century of research. Mimicking the enzyme-specific catalytic intermediates, the phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids selectively inhibit particular ThDP-dependent enzymes. Because of their selectivity, use of these compounds in cellular and animal models of ThDP-dependent enzyme malfunctions improves the validity of the model and its predictive power when compared with the nonselective and enzymatically less characterized oxythiamin and pyrithiamin. In vitro studies of the interaction of thiamin analogs and their biological derivatives with potential in vivo targets are necessary to identify and attenuate the analog selectivity. For both the substrate and thiamin synthetic analogs, in vitro reactivities with potential targets are highly relevant in vivo. However, effective concentrations in vivo are often higher than in vitro studies would suggest. The significance of specific inihibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes for the development of herbicides, antibiotics, anticancer and neuroprotective strategies is discussed. © 2013 FEBS.

  12. Characterization of the interaction of yeast enolase with polynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Giery, A G; Brewer, J M

    1992-09-23

    Yeast enolase is inhibited under certain conditions by DNA. The enzyme binds to single-stranded DNA-cellulose. Inhibition was used for routine characterization of the interaction. The presence of the substrate 2-phospho-D-glycerate reduces inhibition and binding. Both yeast enolase isozymes behave similarly. Impure yeast enolase was purified by adsorption onto a single-stranded DNA-cellulose column followed by elution with substrate. Interaction with RNA, double-stranded DNA, or degraded DNA results in less inhibition, suggesting that yeast enolase preferentially binds single-stranded DNA. However, yeast enolase is not a DNA-unwinding protein. The enzyme is inhibited by the short synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides G6, G8 and G10 but not T8 or T6, suggesting some base specificity in the interaction. The interaction is stronger at more acid pH values, with an apparent pK of 5.6. The interaction is prevented by 0.3 M KCl, suggesting that electrostatic factors are important. Histidine or lysine reverse the inhibition at lower concentrations, while phosphate is still more effective. Binding of single-stranded DNA to enolase reduces the reaction of protein histidyl residues with diethylpyrocarbonate. The inhibition of yeast enolase by single-stranded DNA is not total, and suggests the active site is not directly involved in the interaction. Binding of substrate may induce a conformational change in the enzyme that interferes with DNA binding and vice versa.

  13. Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions Trigger a Spin-Flip in Iron(III) Porphyrin Complexes**

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Dipankar; Quesne, Matthew G; de?Visser, Sam P; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2015-01-01

    A key step in cytochrome?P450 catalysis includes the spin-state crossing from low spin to high spin upon substrate binding and subsequent reduction of the heme. Clearly, a weak perturbation in P450 enzymes triggers a spin-state crossing. However, the origin of the process whereby enzymes reorganize their active site through external perturbations, such as hydrogen bonding, is still poorly understood. We have thus studied the impact of hydrogen-bonding interactions on the electronic structure ...

  14. Hydrogen-Bonding Interactions Trigger a Spin-Flip in Iron(III) Porphyrin Complexes**

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Dipankar; Quesne, Matthew G; de Visser, Sam P; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2015-01-01

    A key step in cytochrome P450 catalysis includes the spin-state crossing from low spin to high spin upon substrate binding and subsequent reduction of the heme. Clearly, a weak perturbation in P450 enzymes triggers a spin-state crossing. However, the origin of the process whereby enzymes reorganize their active site through external perturbations, such as hydrogen bonding, is still poorly understood. We have thus studied the impact of hydrogen-bonding interactions on the electronic structure ...

  15. Stability of Benzotriazole Derivatives with Free Cu, Zn, Co and Metal-Containing Enzymes: Binding and Interaction of Methylbenzotriazoles with Superoxide Dismutase and Vitamin B12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudalo, R. A.; AbuDalo, M. A.; Hernandez, M. T.

    2018-02-01

    Benzotriazole derivatives form very strong bonds with transition metals, and are the most widely used type of industrial corrosion inhibitor. Some benzotriazole derivatives have been implicated as hormone regulators which also carry the ability to induce uncoupling responses or otherwise inhibit respiration processes in some microorganisms. However, the mechanisms associated with benzotriazole toxicity and inhibition are unknown. Using Differential Pulse Polarography, the stability constants of commercially significant corrosion inhibitors, 4-and 5-methylbenzotriazole, coordinated with free Cu (II) and Co (III), were determined to be 1015 and 108, respectively. Polarographic analyses were extended to confirm that methylbenzotriazole also binds the copper center(s) in the ubiquitous enzyme superoxide dismutase, and the Corrin site in the coenzyme cobalamin (vitamin B12). These results suggest that the metal-chelating ability of this unique class of compounds may confer inhibition to certain enzyme systems.

  16. Phonon scattering in graphene over substrate steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevinçli, H.; Brandbyge, M.

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the effect on phonon transport of substrate-induced bends in graphene. We consider bending induced by an abrupt kink in the substrate, and provide results for different step-heights and substrate interaction strengths. We find that individual substrate steps reduce thermal conductance in the range between 5% and 47%. We also consider the transmission across linear kinks formed by adsorption of atomic hydrogen at the bends and find that individual kinks suppress thermal conduction substantially, especially at high temperatures. Our analysis show that substrate irregularities can be detrimental for thermal conduction even for small step heights.

  17. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Khiet [Mission Viejo, CA; Ward, Terence G [Redondo Beach, CA; Mann, Brooks S [Redondo Beach, CA; Yankoski, Edward P [Corona, CA; Smith, Gregory S [Woodland Hills, CA

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  18. Cucurbitacin delta 23-reductase from the fruit of Cucurbita maxima var. Green Hubbard. Physicochemical and fluorescence properties and enzyme-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirr, H W; Schabort, J C; Weitz, C

    1986-02-01

    Cucurbitacin delta 23-reductase from Cucurbita maxima var. Green Hubbard fruit displays an apparent Mr of 32,000, a Stokes radius of 263 nm and a diffusion coefficient of 8.93 X 10(-7) cm2 X s-1. The enzyme appears to possess a homogeneous dimeric quaternary structure with a subunit Mr of 15,000. Two tryptophan and fourteen tyrosine residues per dimer were found. Emission spectral properties of the enzyme and fluorescence quenching by iodide indicate the tryptophan residues to be buried within the protein molecule. In the pH range 5-7, where no conformational changes were detected, protonation of a sterically related ionizable group with a pK of approx. 6.0 markedly influenced the fluorescence of the tryptophan residues. Protein fluorescence quenching was employed to determine the dissociation constants for binding of NADPH (Kd 17 microM), NADP+ (Kd 30 microM) and elaterinide (Kd 227 microM). Fluorescence energy transfer between the tryptophan residues and enzyme-bound NADPH was observed.

  19. Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-07-01

    NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key industrial enzyme, the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 cellulase (Cel6A), predict that aromatic residues near the enzyme's active site and at the entrance and exit tunnel perform different functions in substrate binding and catalysis, depending on their location in the enzyme. These results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide variety of binding affinities for diverse functions. Outcomes also suggest that protein engineering strategies in which mutations are made around the binding sites may require tailoring specific to the enzyme family. Cellulase enzymes ubiquitously exhibit tunnels or clefts lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrate polymers to monomers, but the molecular-level role of these aromatic residues remains unknown. In silico mutation of the aromatic residues near the catalytic site of Cel6A has little impact on the binding affinity, but simulation suggests that these residues play a major role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for cleaving glycosidic bonds to produce fermentable sugars. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the cellulase tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity. This suggests that these residues play a role in acquiring cellulose chains from the cellulose crystal and stabilizing the reaction product, respectively. These results illustrate that the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions varies dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, the results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering

  20. Substrate Specificity of Cysteine Proteases Beyond the S2 Pocket: Mutagenesis and Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Fasciola hepatica Cathepsins L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Corvo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are widespread in all life kingdoms, being central to diverse physiological processes based on a broad range of substrate specificity. Paralogous Fasciola hepatica cathepsin