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Sample records for enzyme pro-drug therapy

  1. Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFE-23::CPG2 fusion protein (MFECP1) with 99mTc for quantitation of tumour antibody-enzyme localisation in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, R J; Mather, S J; Chester, K; Sharma, S K; Bhatia, J; Pedley, R B; Waibel, R; Green, A J; Begent, R H J

    2004-08-01

    MFECP1 is a glycosylated recombinant fusion protein composed of MFE-23, a high-affinity anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) single chain Fv (scFv), fused to the enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2), and has been constructed for use in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT). Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFECP1 with technetium-99m was developed for the purpose of determining tumour localisation of MFECP1 in a phase I ADEPT clinical study. The method used was 99mTc-carbonyl [99mTc(H2O)3(CO)3]+ (abbreviated to TcCO) mediated labelling of 99mTc to the hexahistidine (His) tag of MFECP1. MFECP1 fusion protein was labelled with TcCO under a variety of conditions, and this was shown to be a relatively simple and robust method. Tissue biodistribution was assessed in a CEA-expressing LS174T (human colon carcinoma) nude mouse xenograft model. Tissues were taken at 1, 4 and 6 h for assessment of distribution of radioactivity and for measurement of CPG2 enzyme levels. The amount of radioactivity retained by the tumour proved to be an accurate estimation of actual measured enzyme activity, indicating that this radiolabelling method does not appear to damage the antibody-antigen binding or the enzyme activity of MFECP1. However, correlation between CPG2 enzyme activity and measured radioactivity in liver, spleen and kidney was poor, indicating retention of radioactivity in non-tumour sites but loss of enzyme activity. The high retention of technetium radioisotope in normal tissues may limit the clinical applicability of this radiolabelling method for MFECP1; however, these results suggest that this technique does have applicability for measuring the biodistribution of His-tagged recombinant proteins.

  2. Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFE-23::CPG2 fusion protein (MFECP1) with 99mTc for quantitation of tumour antibody-enzyme localisation in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, R.J.; Chester, K.; Sharma, S.K.; Bhatia, J.; Pedley, R.B.; Green, A.J.; Begent, R.H.J.; Mather, S.J.; Waibel, R.

    2004-01-01

    MFECP1 is a glycosylated recombinant fusion protein composed of MFE-23, a high-affinity anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) single chain Fv (scFv), fused to the enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2), and has been constructed for use in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT). Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFECP1 with technetium-99m was developed for the purpose of determining tumour localisation of MFECP1 in a phase I ADEPT clinical study. The method used was 99m Tc-carbonyl [ 99m Tc(H 2 O) 3 (CO) 3 ] + (abbreviated to TcCO) mediated labelling of 99m Tc to the hexahistidine (His) tag of MFECP1. MFECP1 fusion protein was labelled with TcCO under a variety of conditions, and this was shown to be a relatively simple and robust method. Tissue biodistribution was assessed in a CEA-expressing LS174T (human colon carcinoma) nude mouse xenograft model. Tissues were taken at 1, 4 and 6 h for assessment of distribution of radioactivity and for measurement of CPG2 enzyme levels. The amount of radioactivity retained by the tumour proved to be an accurate estimation of actual measured enzyme activity, indicating that this radiolabelling method does not appear to damage the antibody-antigen binding or the enzyme activity of MFECP1. However, correlation between CPG2 enzyme activity and measured radioactivity in liver, spleen and kidney was poor, indicating retention of radioactivity in non-tumour sites but loss of enzyme activity. The high retention of technetium radioisotope in normal tissues may limit the clinical applicability of this radiolabelling method for MFECP1; however, these results suggest that this technique does have applicability for measuring the biodistribution of His-tagged recombinant proteins. (orig.)

  3. Targeted enzyme prodrug therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellmann, N; Deckert, P M; Bachran, D; Fuchs, H; Bachran, C

    2010-09-01

    The cure of cancer is still a formidable challenge in medical science. Long-known modalities including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are successful in a number of cases; however, invasive, metastasized and inaccessible tumors still pose an unresolved and ongoing problem. Targeted therapies designed to locate, detect and specifically kill tumor cells have been developed in the past three decades as an alternative to treat troublesome cancers. Most of these therapies are either based on antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs or tumor site-specific activation of prodrugs. The latter is a two-step procedure. In the first step, a selected enzyme is accumulated in the tumor by guiding the enzyme or its gene to the neoplastic cells. In the second step, a harmless prodrug is applied and specifically converted by this enzyme into a cytotoxic drug only at the tumor site. A number of targeting systems, enzymes and prodrugs were investigated and improved since the concept was first envisioned in 1974. This review presents a concise overview on the history and latest developments in targeted therapies for cancer treatment. We cover the relevant technologies such as antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT), gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) as well as related therapies such as clostridial- (CDEPT) and polymer-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (PDEPT) with emphasis on prodrug-converting enzymes, prodrugs and drugs.

  4. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejerskov, Betina; Jarlstad Olesen, Morten T; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2017-01-01

    Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug administra......Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug...

  5. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, P; Keller, J; Lankisch, P G

    2001-04-01

    Malabsorption due to severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is one of the most important late features of chronic pancreatitis. Generally, steatorrhea is more severe and occurs several years prior to malabsorption of other nutrients because synthesis and secretion of lipase are impaired more rapidly, its intraluminal survival is shorter, and the lack of pancreatic lipase activity is not compensated for by nonpancreatic mechanisms. Patients suffer not only from nutritional deficiencies but also from increased nutrient delivery to distal intestinal sites, causing symptoms by profound alteration of upper gastrointestinal secretory and motor functions. Adequate nutrient absorption requires delivery of sufficient enzymatic activity into the duodenal lumen simultaneously with meal nutrients. The following recommendations are based on modern therapeutic concepts: 25,000 to 40,000 units of lipase per meal using pH-sensitive pancreatin microspheres, with dosage increases, compliance checks, and differential diagnosis in case of treatment failure. Still, in most patients, lipid digestion cannot be completely normalized by current standard therapy, and future developments are needed to optimize treatment.

  6. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Fejerskov

    Full Text Available In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol, β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose - dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  7. Enzyme Replacement Therapy for Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dolores Sanchez-Niño PhD

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is a rare X-linked disease caused by the deficiency of α-galactosidase that leads to the accumulation of abnormal glycolipid. Untreated patients develop potentially lethal complications by age 30 to 50 years. Enzyme replacement therapy is the current standard of therapy for Fabry disease. Two formulations of recombinant human α-galactosidase A (agalsidase are available in most markets: agalsidase-α and agalsidase-β, allowing a choice of therapy. However, the US Food and Drug Administration rejected the application for commercialization of agalsidase-α. The main difference between the 2 enzymes is the dose. The label dose for agalsidase-α is 0.2 mg/kg/2 weeks, while the dose for agalsidase-β is 1.0 mg/kg/2 weeks. Recent evidence suggests a dose-dependent effect of enzyme replacement therapy and agalsidase-β is 1.0 mg/kg/2 weeks, which has been shown to reduce the occurrence of hard end points (severe renal and cardiac events, stroke, and death. In addition, patients with Fabry disease who have developed tissue injury should receive coadjuvant tissue protective therapy, together with enzyme replacement therapy, to limit nonspecific progression of the tissue injury. It is likely that in the near future, additional oral drugs become available to treat Fabry disease, such as chaperones or substrate reduction therapy.

  8. Enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease, towards individualized treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arends, M.

    2017-01-01

    Fabry disease is a very heterogeneous disorder for which expensive enzyme replacement therapy is available since more than 15 years. Because of the variety of symptoms and disease course, individual choices need to be made to improve the appropriate use of therapy. Supported by ZONWM, we have been

  9. The In-Situ One-Step Synthesis of a PDC Macromolecular Pro-Drug and the Fabrication of a Novel Core-Shell Micell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cui-Yun; Yang, Sa; Li, Zhi-Ping; Huang, Can; Ning, Qian; Huang, Wen; Yang, Wen-Tong; He, Dongxiu; Sun, Lichun

    2016-01-01

    The development of slow release nano-sized carriers for efficient antineoplastic drug delivery with a biocompatible and biodegradable pectin-based macromolecular pro-drug for tumor therapy has been reported in this study. Pectin-doxorubicin conjugates (PDC), a macromolecular pro-drug, were prepared via an amide condensation reaction, and a novel amphiphilic core-shell micell based on a PDC macromolecular pro-drug (PDC-M) was self-assembled in situ, with pectin as the hydrophilic shell and doxorubicin (DOX) as the hydrophobic core. Then the chemical structure of the PDC macromolecular pro-drug was identified by both Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR), and proved that doxorubicin combined well with the pectin and formed macromolecular pro-drug. The PDC-M were observed to have an unregularly spherical shape and were uniform in size by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The average particle size of PDC-M, further measured by a Zetasizer nanoparticle analyzer (Nano ZS, Malvern Instruments), was about 140 nm. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading were 57.82% ± 3.7% (n = 3) and 23.852% ±2.3% (n = 3), respectively. The in vitro drug release behaviors of the resulting PDC-M were studied in a simulated tumor environment (pH 5.0), blood (pH 7.4) and a lysosome media (pH 6.8), and showed a prolonged slow release profile. Assays for antiproliferative effects and flow cytometry of the resulting PDC-M in HepG2 cell lines demonstrated greater properties of delayed and slow release as compared to free DOX. A cell viability study against endothelial cells further revealed that the resulting PDC-M possesses excellent cell compatibilities and low cytotoxicities in comparison with that of the free DOX. Hemolysis activity was investigated in rabbits, and the results also demonstrated that the PDC-M has greater compatibility in comparison with free DOX. This shows that the resulting PDC-M can ameliorate the

  10. Imaging reporter gene for monitoring gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beco, V. de; Baillet, G.; Tamgac, F.; Tofighi, M.; Weinmann, P.; Vergote, J.; Moretti, J.L.; Tamgac, G.

    2002-01-01

    Scintigraphic images can be obtained to document gene function at cellular level. This approach is presented here and the use of a reporter gene to monitor gene therapy is described. Two main ways are presented: either the use of a reporter gene coding for an enzyme the action of which will be monitored by radiolabeled pro-drug, or a cellular receptor gene, the action of which is documented by a radio labeled cognate receptor ligand. (author)

  11. Enzyme replacement therapy for murine hypophosphatasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, José Luis; Narisawa, Sonoko; Lemire, Isabelle; Loisel, Thomas P; Boileau, Guy; Leonard, Pierre; Gramatikova, Svetlana; Terkeltaub, Robert; Camacho, Nancy Pleshko; McKee, Marc D; Crine, Philippe; Whyte, Michael P

    2008-06-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is the inborn error of metabolism that features rickets or osteomalacia caused by loss-of-function mutation(s) within the gene that encodes the tissue-nonspecific isozyme of alkaline phosphatase (TNALP). Consequently, natural substrates for this ectoenzyme accumulate extracellulary including inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), an inhibitor of mineralization, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), a co-factor form of vitamin B6. Babies with the infantile form of HPP often die with severe rickets and sometimes hypercalcemia and vitamin B6-dependent seizures. There is no established medical treatment. Human TNALP was bioengineered with the C terminus extended by the Fc region of human IgG for one-step purification and a deca-aspartate sequence (D10) for targeting to mineralizing tissue (sALP-FcD10). TNALP-null mice (Akp2-/-), an excellent model for infantile HPP, were treated from birth using sALP-FcD10. Short-term and long-term efficacy studies consisted of once daily subcutaneous injections of 1, 2, or 8.2 mg/kg sALP-FcD10 for 15, 19, and 15 or 52 days, respectively. We assessed survival and growth rates, circulating levels of sALP-FcD10 activity, calcium, PPi, and pyridoxal, as well as skeletal and dental manifestations using radiography, microCT, and histomorphometry. Akp2-/- mice receiving high-dose sALP-FcD10 grew normally and appeared well without skeletal or dental disease or epilepsy. Plasma calcium, PPi, and pyridoxal concentrations remained in their normal ranges. We found no evidence of significant skeletal or dental disease. Enzyme replacement using a bone-targeted, recombinant form of human TNALP prevents infantile HPP in Akp2-/- mice.

  12. Enzyme Replacement Therapy for Murine Hypophosphatasia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, José Luis; Narisawa, Sonoko; Lemire, Isabelle; Loisel, Thomas P; Boileau, Guy; Leonard, Pierre; Gramatikova, Svetlana; Terkeltaub, Robert; Camacho, Nancy Pleshko; McKee, Marc D; Crine, Philippe; Whyte, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is the inborn error of metabolism that features rickets or osteomalacia caused by loss-of-function mutation(s) within the gene that encodes the tissue-nonspecific isozyme of alkaline phosphatase (TNALP). Consequently, natural substrates for this ectoenzyme accumulate extracellulary including inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), an inhibitor of mineralization, and pyridoxal 5`-phosphate (PLP), a co-factor form of vitamin B6. Babies with the infantile form of HPP often die with severe rickets and sometimes hypercalcemia and vitamin B6-dependent seizures. There is no established medical treatment. Materials and Methods Human TNALP was bioengineered with the C terminus extended by the Fc region of human IgG for one-step purification and a deca-aspartate sequence (D10) for targeting to mineralizing tissue (sALP-FcD10). TNALP-null mice (Akp2−/−), an excellent model for infantile HPP, were treated from birth using sALP-FcD10. Short-term and long-term efficacy studies consisted of once daily subcutaneous injections of 1, 2, or 8.2 mg/kg sALP-FcD10 for 15, 19, and 15 or 52 days, respectively. We assessed survival and growth rates, circulating levels of sALP-FcD10 activity, calcium, PPi, and pyridoxal, as well as skeletal and dental manifestations using radiography, μCT, and histomorphometry. Results Akp2−/− mice receiving high-dose sALP-FcD10 grew normally and appeared well without skeletal or dental disease or epilepsy. Plasma calcium, PPi, and pyridoxal concentrations remained in their normal ranges. We found no evidence of significant skeletal or dental disease. Conclusions Enzyme replacement using a bone-targeted, recombinant form of human TNALP prevents infantile HPP in Akp2−/− mice. PMID:18086009

  13. Enzyme replacement and substrate reduction therapy for Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Elad; Deroma, Laura; Bembi, Bruno; Deegan, Patrick; Hollak, Carla; Weinreb, Neal J; Cox, Timothy M

    2015-03-27

    Gaucher disease, a rare disorder, is caused by inherited deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. It is unique among the ultra-orphan disorders in that four treatments are currently approved by various regulatory authorities for use in routine clinical practice. Hitherto, because of the relatively few people affected worldwide, many of whom started therapy during a prolonged period when there were essentially no alternatives to imiglucerase, these treatments have not been systematically evaluated in studies such as randomized controlled trials now considered necessary to generate the highest level of clinical evidence. To summarize all available randomized controlled study data on the efficacy and safety of enzyme replacement therapies and substrate reduction therapy for treating Gaucher disease. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register. Additional searches were conducted on ClinicalTrials.gov for any ongoing studies with potential interim results, and through PubMed. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 07 August 2014. All randomized and quasi-randomized controlled studies (including open-label studies and cross-over studies) assessing enzyme replacement therapy or substrate reduction therapy, or both, in all types of Gaucher disease were included. Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias in the included studies, and extracted relevant data. Of the 488 studies retrieved by the electronic searches, eight met the inclusion criteria and were analysed (300 participants). Response parameters were restricted to haemoglobin concentration, platelet count, spleen and liver volume and serum biomarkers (chitotriosidase and CCL18). Only one publication reported a 'low risk of bias' score in all parameters assessed, and all studies included were randomized.Four studies reported the responses to enzyme replacement therapy of previously

  14. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for people with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somaraju, Usha Rani; Solis-Moya, Arturo

    2016-11-23

    Most people with cystic fibrosis (80% to 90%) need pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy to prevent malnutrition. Enzyme preparations need to be taken whenever food is taken, and the dose needs to be adjusted according to the food consumed. A systematic review on the efficacy and safety of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is needed to guide clinical practice, as there is variability between centres with respect to assessment of pancreatic function, time of commencing treatment, dose and choice of supplements. This is an updated version of a published review. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in children and adults with cystic fibrosis and to compare the efficacy and safety of different formulations of this therapy and their appropriateness in different age groups. Also, to compare the effects of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in cystic fibrosis according to different diagnostic subgroups (e.g. different ages at introduction of therapy and different categories of pancreatic function). We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Most recent search: 15 July 2016.We also searched an ongoing trials website and the websites of the pharmaceutical companies who manufacture pancreatic enzyme replacements for any additional trials. Most recent search: 22 July 2016. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials in people of any age, with cystic fibrosis and receiving pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, at any dosage and in any formulation, for a period of not less than four weeks, compared to placebo or other pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy preparations. Two authors independently assessed trials and extracted outcome data. They also assessed the risk of bias of the trials included in the review. One

  15. JCL Roundtable: enzyme replacement therapy for lipid storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W Virgil; Desnick, Robert J; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    There are several inherited disorders that involve abnormal storage of lipids in tissues leading to severe compromise of organs. Sadly, these are often accompanied by lifelong morbidity and early mortality. Disorders such as Gaucher, Fabry, and lysosomal acid lipase deficiencies (Wolman and cholesteryl ester storage diseases) have been known for many years, and provide a difficult and frustrating set of problems for patients, their families, and their physicians. With recombinant methods of protein synthesis, it is now possible to literally replace the defective enzymes that underlie the basic pathophysiology of many such disorders. The delivery of these enzymes into the affected cells is possible because of their location in the lysosomes where the natural degradation of their lipid substrates occurs. I have asked 2 well-known investigators to join us for this Roundtable. These are professors who have been involved with the research that has made this type of therapy possible and who have participated in the clinical trials that demonstrated the value of enzyme replacement therapy. They are Dr. Robert Desnick, dean of Genetic and Genomic Medicine and professor and chairman emeritus of the Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, and Dr. Gregory Grabowski, professor of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Pediatrics, at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Dr. Grabowski recently retired from that school to become the chief science officer of Synageva, a company involved in producing enzymes for this type of therapy. Copyright © 2014 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bystander or No Bystander for Gene Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam V. Patterson

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT of cancer aims to improve the selectivity of chemotherapy by gene transfer, thus enabling target cells to convert nontoxic prodrugs to cytotoxic drugs. A zone of cell kill around gene-modified cells due to transfer of toxic metabolites, known as the bystander effect, leads to tumour regression. Here we discuss the implications of either striving for a strong bystander effect to overcome poor gene transfer, or avoiding the bystander effect to reduce potential systemic effects, with the aid of three successful GDEPT systems. This review concentrates on bystander effects and drug development with regard to these enzyme prodrug combinations, namely herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK with ganciclovir (GCV, cytosine deaminase (CD from bacteria or yeast with 5-fluorocytodine (5-FC, and bacterial nitroreductase (NfsB with 5-(azaridin-1-yl-2,4-dinitrobenzamide (CB1954, and their respective derivatives.

  17. Enzyme replacement therapy for infantile-onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Zhang, Lingli; Quan, Shuyan

    2017-11-20

    Infantile-onset Pompe disease is a rare and progressive autosomal-recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). Current treatment involves enzyme replacement therapy (with recombinant human alglucosidase alfa) and symptomatic therapies (e.g. to control secretions). Children who are cross-reactive immunological material (CRIM)-negative require immunomodulation prior to commencing enzyme replacement therapy.Enzyme replacement therapy was developed as the most promising therapeutic approach for Pompe disease; however, the evidence is lacking, especially regarding the optimal dose and dose frequency. To assess the effectiveness, safety and appropriate dose regimen of enzyme replacement therapy for treating infantile-onset Pompe disease. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register, which is compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Embase (Ovid), PubMed and LILACS, and CBM, CNKI, VIP, and WANFANG for literature published in Chinese. In addition, we searched three online registers: WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ClinicalTrials.gov, and www.genzymeclinicalresearch.com. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search of the Group's Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register: 24 November 2016. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of enzyme replacement therapy in children with infantile-onset Pompe disease. Two authors independently selected relevant trials, assessed the risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted investigators to obtain important missing information. We found no trials comparing the effectiveness and safety of enzyme replacement therapy to another intervention, no intervention or placebo.We found one trial (18 participants

  18. Interruption of enzyme replacement therapy in Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, J; Fletcher, J M; McGill, J; Szer, J; Wilson, M

    2016-05-25

    In Australia, 58 patients with Gaucher disease were managed by a Gaucher Disease Advisory Committee (GDAC) through a centrally adminis-tered national programme, the Life Savings Drug Program (LSDP). In June 2009, Genzyme Corporation, which manufactures imiglucerase (Cerezyme), the only enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) registered for the treatment of Gaucher disease in Australia at that time, announced that due to a viral contamination problem there would be no further shipments of Cerezyme to Australia prior to the end of 2009. The GDAC allocated available drug supplies in order to maintain treatment to those most in need on a hierarchal clinical severity basis. A cohort of 24 patients with Type 1 Gaucher disease was withdrawn from therapy, 22 of whom had no discernible clinically significant adverse effects when reviewed off therapy for up to 6 months. In this paper, we review the course of 20 of the patients who have been on imiglucerase for periods of at least 24 months after the end of their 'drug holiday'. No patient experienced a bone crisis nor clinical nor magnetic resonance imaging evidence of new avascular necrosis events during this period. Two years after recommencing ERT after a 6-month drug holiday, no patient had developed an overt irreversible complication of their Gaucher disease, with the majority returning to their previous clinical status.

  19. Parental experience of enzyme replacement therapy for Hunter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buraczewska, M; O'Leary, D; Walsh, O; Monavari, A; Crushell, E

    2013-04-01

    We aimed to establish the profile of Irish patients with Hunter Syndrome (Mucopolysaccharidosis type II, MPS II) receiving weekly intravenous Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT) with recombinant iduronate-2-sulfatase and to assess the social impact and parental opinion of ERT through the use of a parental questionnaire. Nine patients aged 3.5- 14 years have received a mean of 2 (range 0.5-3.5) years of ERT. Treatment was associated with clinical improvements from baseline in hepatosplenomegaly in 6/7 (85%) respiratory manifestations in 4/6 (67%) and a mean reduction in urinary glycosaminoglycan excretion of 62%. Changes noted by parents included increased energy 3/9 (33%) and softening of skin, hair and facial features 8/9 (89%). Parents report that seven hours weekly were spent on hospitalizations for ERT. Parental employment was adversely affected in 8 (89%) families. One day of school/preschool (20%) was lost every week for 8 (89%) children. All parents believed the benefits of ERT out-weigh the difficulties involved. All families would welcome the introduction of home based therapy. In conclusion the social and educational burden of hospital-based ERT on these children and their families is significant. The introduction of home-based therapy is likely to improve overall quality of life for MPSII patients and their families.

  20. Cerebral magnetic resonance findings during enzyme replacement therapy in mucopolysaccharidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Yoshiko; Miyazaki, Osamu; Nosaka, Shunsuke; Kosuga, Motomichi; Okuyama, Torayuki

    2017-01-01

    Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is an effective treatment for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) types I, II, IVA and VI, its effectiveness in children with central nervous system (CNS) disorders is said to be poor because the blood-brain barrier cannot be penetrated by ERT drugs. To assess CNS involvement in mucopolysaccharidosis at the start of enzyme replacement therapy and to investigate the time course of ERT in the central nervous system. We performed brain MRI in 17 children and young adults who underwent ERT. The clinical severity was classified as attenuated or severe by a specialist pediatrician, based on the clinical symptoms and genotypes. At the start of ERT, we scored nine parameters using two- or three-point scales based on the severity of the disease revealed on MRI scans. After the start of ERT, we compared the initial and follow-up MRI scans, and classified the findings as no change, improved or worse. We then compared the results with the changes in clinical findings. At the start of ERT, comparison of the clinical symptoms and image scores revealed differences between severe and attenuated mucopolysaccharidosis. The scores in patients with severe MPS ranged from 9 to 16 (mean 12.2); for patients with attenuated MPS, they ranged from 2 to 11 (mean 6.4). Images of the four patients with severe MPS showed ventricular dilation and brain atrophy. Such findings were made in only 2 of 13 patients with attenuated MPS. The results after the start of ERT showed that 11/17 (65%) patients manifested improvement or no change. All five patients with MPS I experienced improvement in some regions. There were no new lesions. One patient with MPS II experienced worsening of his CNS symptoms, and his MRI findings revealed more severe ventricular dilation, brain atrophy and white matter lesions. Ventricular dilation and brain atrophy on imaging studies might represent useful markers in predicting the severity of mucopolysaccharidosis and worsening of CNS

  1. Cerebral magnetic resonance findings during enzyme replacement therapy in mucopolysaccharidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, Yoshiko [Division of Radiology, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo (Japan); Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hiroshima (Japan); Miyazaki, Osamu; Nosaka, Shunsuke [Division of Radiology, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo (Japan); Kosuga, Motomichi [Division of Medical Genetics, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo (Japan); Okuyama, Torayuki [Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is an effective treatment for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) types I, II, IVA and VI, its effectiveness in children with central nervous system (CNS) disorders is said to be poor because the blood-brain barrier cannot be penetrated by ERT drugs. To assess CNS involvement in mucopolysaccharidosis at the start of enzyme replacement therapy and to investigate the time course of ERT in the central nervous system. We performed brain MRI in 17 children and young adults who underwent ERT. The clinical severity was classified as attenuated or severe by a specialist pediatrician, based on the clinical symptoms and genotypes. At the start of ERT, we scored nine parameters using two- or three-point scales based on the severity of the disease revealed on MRI scans. After the start of ERT, we compared the initial and follow-up MRI scans, and classified the findings as no change, improved or worse. We then compared the results with the changes in clinical findings. At the start of ERT, comparison of the clinical symptoms and image scores revealed differences between severe and attenuated mucopolysaccharidosis. The scores in patients with severe MPS ranged from 9 to 16 (mean 12.2); for patients with attenuated MPS, they ranged from 2 to 11 (mean 6.4). Images of the four patients with severe MPS showed ventricular dilation and brain atrophy. Such findings were made in only 2 of 13 patients with attenuated MPS. The results after the start of ERT showed that 11/17 (65%) patients manifested improvement or no change. All five patients with MPS I experienced improvement in some regions. There were no new lesions. One patient with MPS II experienced worsening of his CNS symptoms, and his MRI findings revealed more severe ventricular dilation, brain atrophy and white matter lesions. Ventricular dilation and brain atrophy on imaging studies might represent useful markers in predicting the severity of mucopolysaccharidosis and worsening of CNS

  2. Engineering of GlcNAc-1-Phosphotransferase for Production of Highly Phosphorylated Lysosomal Enzymes for Enzyme Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Lee, Wang-Sik; Doray, Balraj; Kornfeld, Stuart

    2017-06-16

    Several lysosomal enzymes currently used for enzyme replacement therapy in patients with lysosomal storage diseases contain very low levels of mannose 6-phosphate, limiting their uptake via mannose 6-phosphate receptors on the surface of the deficient cells. These enzymes are produced at high levels by mammalian cells and depend on endogenous GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase α/β precursor to phosphorylate the mannose residues on their glycan chains. We show that co-expression of an engineered truncated GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase α/β precursor and the lysosomal enzyme of interest in the producing cells resulted in markedly increased phosphorylation and cellular uptake of the secreted lysosomal enzyme. This method also results in the production of highly phosphorylated acid β-glucocerebrosidase, a lysosomal enzyme that normally has just trace amounts of this modification.

  3. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  4. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in the 21(st) century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, Tony; Chan, Johanna; Graham, David Y

    2014-09-07

    Restitution of normal fat absorption in exocrine pancreatic insufficiency remains an elusive goal. Although many patients achieve satisfactory clinical results with enzyme therapy, few experience normalization of fat absorption, and many, if not most, will require individualized therapy. Increasing the quantity of lipase administered rarely eliminates steatorrhea but increases the cost of therapy. Enteric coated enzyme microbead formulations tend to separate from nutrients in the stomach precluding coordinated emptying of enzymes and nutrients. Unprotected enzymes mix well and empty with nutrients but are inactivated at pH 4 or below. We describe approaches for improving the results of enzyme therapy including changing to, or adding, a different product, adding non-enteric coated enzymes, (e.g., giving unprotected enzymes at the start of the meal and acid-protected formulations later), use of antisecretory drugs and/or antacids, and changing the timing of enzyme administration. Because considerable lipid is emptied in the first postprandial hour, it is prudent to start therapy with enteric coated microbead prior to the meal so that some enzymes are available during that first hour. Patients with hyperacidity may benefit from adjuvant antisecretory therapy to reduce the duodenal acid load and possibly also sodium bicarbonate to prevent duodenal acidity. Comparative studies of clinical effectiveness of different formulations as well as the characteristics of dispersion, emptying, and dissolution of enteric-coated microspheres of different diameter and density are needed; many such studies have been completed but not yet made public. We discuss the history of pancreatic enzyme therapy and describe current use of modern preparations, approaches to overcoming unsatisfactory clinical responses, as well as studies needed to be able to provide reliably effective therapy.

  5. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, Tony; Chan, Johanna; Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Restitution of normal fat absorption in exocrine pancreatic insufficiency remains an elusive goal. Although many patients achieve satisfactory clinical results with enzyme therapy, few experience normalization of fat absorption, and many, if not most, will require individualized therapy. Increasing the quantity of lipase administered rarely eliminates steatorrhea but increases the cost of therapy. Enteric coated enzyme microbead formulations tend to separate from nutrients in the stomach precluding coordinated emptying of enzymes and nutrients. Unprotected enzymes mix well and empty with nutrients but are inactivated at pH 4 or below. We describe approaches for improving the results of enzyme therapy including changing to, or adding, a different product, adding non-enteric coated enzymes, (e.g., giving unprotected enzymes at the start of the meal and acid-protected formulations later), use of antisecretory drugs and/or antacids, and changing the timing of enzyme administration. Because considerable lipid is emptied in the first postprandial hour, it is prudent to start therapy with enteric coated microbead prior to the meal so that some enzymes are available during that first hour. Patients with hyperacidity may benefit from adjuvant antisecretory therapy to reduce the duodenal acid load and possibly also sodium bicarbonate to prevent duodenal acidity. Comparative studies of clinical effectiveness of different formulations as well as the characteristics of dispersion, emptying, and dissolution of enteric-coated microspheres of different diameter and density are needed; many such studies have been completed but not yet made public. We discuss the history of pancreatic enzyme therapy and describe current use of modern preparations, approaches to overcoming unsatisfactory clinical responses, as well as studies needed to be able to provide reliably effective therapy. PMID:25206255

  6. Overweight, insulin resistance and type II diabetes in type I Gaucher disease patients in relation to enzyme replacement therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, M.; de Fost, M.; Aerts, J. M. F. G.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Hollak, C. E. M.

    2008-01-01

    Type I Gaucher disease, a lysosomal storage disorder is associated with metabolic abnormalities such as high resting energy expenditure, low circulating adiponectin and peripheral insulin resistance. Treatment with enzyme replacement therapy (enzyme therapy) leads to a decrease in resting energy

  7. Combined miglustat and enzyme replacement therapy in two patients with type 1 Gaucher disease: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Dominick; Patterson, Mary Anne

    2018-01-27

    Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy is a first-line therapy for Gaucher disease type 1, and substrate reduction therapy represents an oral treatment alternative. Both enzyme replacement therapy and substrate reduction therapy are generally used as monotherapies in Gaucher disease. However, one randomized study and several case reports have described combination therapy over short time periods. We report two female Gaucher disease type 1 patients of mainly Anglo-Saxon descent, where combined enzyme replacement therapy and miglustat substrate reduction therapy were administered to overcome refractory clinical symptoms. The first patient was diagnosed at age 17 and developed Gaucher disease-related bone manifestations that worsened despite starting imiglucerase enzyme replacement therapy. After switching to miglustat substrate reduction therapy, her bone symptoms improved, but she developed tremors and eventually switched back to enzyme replacement therapy. Miglustat was later recommenced in combination with ongoing enzyme replacement therapy due to continued bone pain, and her bone symptoms improved along with maintained visceral manifestations. Enzyme replacement therapy was subsequently tapered off and the patient has since been successfully maintained on miglustat. The second patient was diagnosed aged 3, and commenced imiglucerase enzyme replacement therapy aged 15. After 9 years on enzyme replacement therapy she switched to miglustat substrate reduction therapy and her core symptoms were maintained/stable for 3 years. Imiglucerase enzyme replacement therapy was later added as a boost to therapy and her symptoms were subsequently maintained over a 2.3-year period. However, miglustat was discontinued due to her relocation, necessitating an increase in enzyme replacement therapy dose. Overall, both patients benefited from combination therapy. While the majority of Gaucher disease type 1 patients will not need treatment with both substrate reduction therapy

  8. Recommendations for initiation and cessation of enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegstraaten, Marieke; Arngrímsson, Reynir; Barbey, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder resulting in progressive nervous system, kidney and heart disease. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) may halt or attenuate disease progression. Since administration is burdensome and expensive, appropriate use is mandatory. We aimed ...

  9. Enzymes in therapy of biofilm-related oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleszczyńska, Małgorzata; Wiater, Adrian; Bachanek, Teresa; Szczodrak, Janusz

    2017-05-01

    Biofilm-related infections of the oral cavity, including dental caries and periodontitis, represent the most prevalent health problems. For years, the treatment thereof was largely based on antibacterial chemical agents. Recently, however, there has been growing interest in the application of more preventive and minimally invasive biotechnological methods. This review focuses on the potential applications of enzymes in the treatment and prevention of oral diseases. Dental plaque is a microbial community that develops on the tooth surface, embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances of bacterial and host origin. Both cariogenic microorganisms and the key components of oral biofilm matrix may be the targets of the enzymes. Oxidative salivary enzymes inhibit or limit the growth of oral pathogens, thereby supporting the natural host defense system; polysaccharide hydrolases (mutanases and dextranases) degrade important carbohydrate components of the biofilm matrix, whereas proteases disrupt bacterial adhesion to oral surfaces or affect cell-cell interactions. The efficiency of the enzymes in in vitro and in vivo studies, advantages and limitations, as well as future perspectives for improving the enzymatic strategy are discussed. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Reconversion of bone marrow in Gaucher disease treated with enzyme therapy documented by MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.W.; James, C.A.; Arnold, G.L.; Stine, K.C.; Becton, D.L.; Bell, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Background. Skeletal complications are responsible for significant morbidity in Gaucher patients. Plain radiographs have been unreliable in assessing bone marrow infiltration and activity. A way to assess bone marrow improvement is needed during enzyme therapy. Objective. The purpose of this paper is to assess the usefulness of MR in following improvement of abnormal bone marrow in Gaucher patients on enzyme therapy. Materials and methods. Three patients aged 2, 7, and 24 years underwent serial MR scans of the lower extremities before and during treatment with Alglucerase (two patients) and Imiglucerase (one patient). T1-weighted, T2-weighted, STIR and FSE T2-weighted images were utilized. Two patients were imaged after 16 months of therapy, and one patient was imaged after 6 months of therapy. Results. All patients had improvement in marrow signal consistent with partial reconversion to fatty marrow during treatment. The findings were more marked after prolonged therapy. T1-weighted images demonstrated findings most clearly. Conclusion. MR consistently showed improvement in marrow signal in Gaucher patients on enzyme therapy. As smaller doses of enzyme therapy are the trend, MR can be utilized to determine if therapy is effecting a change in the bone marrow. (orig.)

  11. Trial watch – inhibiting PARP enzymes for anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistigu, Antonella; Manic, Gwenola; Obrist, Florine; Vitale, Ilio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are a members of family of enzymes that catalyze poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and/or mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation (MARylation), two post-translational protein modifications involved in crucial cellular processes including (but not limited to) the DNA damage response (DDR). PARP1, the most abundant family member, is a nuclear protein that is activated upon sensing distinct types of DNA damage and contributes to their resolution by PARylating multiple DDR players. Recent evidence suggests that, along with DDR, activated PARP1 mediates a series of prosurvival and proapoptotic processes aimed at preserving genomic stability. Despite this potential oncosuppressive role, upregulation and/or overactivation of PARP1 or other PARP enzymes has been reported in a variety of human neoplasms. Over the last few decades, several pharmacologic inhibitors of PARP1 and PARP2 have been assessed in preclinical and clinical studies showing potent antineoplastic activity, particularly against homologous recombination (HR)-deficient ovarian and breast cancers. In this Trial Watch, we describe the impact of PARP enzymes and PARylation in cancer, discuss the mechanism of cancer cell killing by PARP1 inactivation, and summarize the results of recent clinical studies aimed at evaluating the safety and therapeutic profile of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients. PMID:27308587

  12. Cognitive Development in Infantile-Onset Pompe Disease Under Very Early Enzyme Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Jou; Hsu, Ting-Rong; Yang, Chia-Feng; Chen, Shyi-Jou; Chuang, Ya-Chin; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Most patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease die in early infancy before beginning enzyme replacement therapy, which has made it difficult to evaluate the impact of Pompe disease on cognitive development. Patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease can survive with enzyme replacement therapy, and physicians can evaluate cognitive development in these patients. We established an effective newborn screening program with quick clinical diagnostic criteria. Cognitive and motor development were evaluated using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-Third Edition at 6, 12, and 24 months of age. The patients who were treated very early demonstrate normal cognitive development with no significant change in cognition during this period (P = .18 > .05). The cognitive development was positively correlated with motor development (r = 0.533, P = .011). The results indicated that very early enzyme replacement therapy could protect cognitive development in patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease up to 24 months of age. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Resolution of Hydronephrosis in a Patient With Mucopolysaccharidosis Type II With Enzyme Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Kei; Imai, Takashi; Ohkubo, Kazuhiro; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Takada, Hidetoshi

    2017-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is caused by deficiency of lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. Insufficient activity of the enzyme results in accumulation of glycosaminoglycans leading to progressive multisystem pathologies. MPS II is less likely to be complicated by kidney and urinary tract problems. We report a boy with MPS II, who developed left hydronephrosis. His hydronephrosis improved after starting enzyme replacement therapy. It was suggested that MPS II was closely associated with the pathogenesis of hydronephrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Extended interval between enzyme therapy infusions for adult patients with Gaucher′s disease type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Calvo J

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT for Gaucher′s disease with alglucerase or imiglucerase is efficacious, well-tolerated and safe. However, cost considerations, visits to medical facilities, potentially duration of theray for life, are issues of major concern to a proportion of treated patients and has, in some cases, led to the withdrawal of therapy. AIMS: To elucidate whether an extension of the interval between enzyme infusions to once every three weeks is as effective in maintaining the clinical responses achieved with the bi-monthly regimen. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four patients with an optimal response to ERT (at 30 units/kg every two weeks for an average of 27 months, were subjected to enzyme dose/frequency changes that essentially constituted a reduction in cumulative dose over the treatment period. Patients were assessed every 6 months for alterations in haematological parameters, plasma chitotriosidase levels, liver and spleen size, and bone symptoms. RESULTS: All patients had to resume the previous infusion schedule of once every two weeks; one because of new bone marrow infiltrates, two because of visceral enlargement, and the fourth due to progressive anaemia. CONCLUSIONS: This limited experience suggests that a reduction in enzyme dose associated with an extended interval between infusions may lead to variable disease control, and underscores the need for individualization of enzyme therapy.

  15. Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Rosalie H.; Bourdon, Celine; Potani, Isabel; Mhango, Brian; van den Brink, Deborah A.; Mponda, John S.; Kobold, Anneke C. Muller; Bandsma, Robert H.; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele; Voskuijl, Wieger P.

    Objective: To assess the benefits of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition. Study design: We conducted a randomized, controlled trial in 90 children aged 6-60 months with complicated severe acute malnutrition at the Queen Elizabeth

  16. Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Rosalie H.; Bourdon, Céline; Potani, Isabel; Mhango, Brian; van den Brink, Deborah A.; Mponda, John S.; Muller Kobold, Anneke C.; Bandsma, Robert H.; Boele van Hensbroek, Michael; Voskuijl, Wieger P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the benefits of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition. Study design We conducted a randomized, controlled trial in 90 children aged 6-60 months with complicated severe acute malnutrition at the Queen Elizabeth Central

  17. Hearing loss in adult patients with Fabry disease treated with enzyme replacement therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suntjens, Eefje B.; Smid, Bouwien E.; Biegstraaten, Marieke; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Hollak, Carla E. M.; Linthorst, Gabor E.

    2015-01-01

    Data on prevalence, natural history, and effect of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) on hearing loss (HL) in Fabry disease (FD) are scarce. This is a retrospective study with cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Low and high-frequency HL in the Dutch FD cohort was studied in four groups:

  18. Children with Pompe disease: clinical characteristics, peculiar features and effects of enzyme replacement therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.I. van Capelle (Carine)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Pompe disease is a metabolic myopathy. Since the first description of the disease in 1932 by J.C. Pompe,1 tremendous progress has been made from discovering the biochemical and genetic basis of the disease to developing enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). With this

  19. Long term enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease: effectiveness on kidney, heart and brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombach, Saskia M.; Smid, Bouwien E.; Bouwman, Machtelt G.; Linthorst, Gabor E.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Hollak, Carla E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by α-galactosidase A deficiency leading to renal, cardiac, cerebrovascular disease and premature death. Treatment with α-galactosidase A (enzyme replacement therapy, ERT) stabilises disease in some patients, but long term effectiveness

  20. Modulation of porcine biotransformation enzymes by anthelmintic therapy with fenbendazole and flubendazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savlík, M; Fimanová, K; Szotáková, B; Lamka, J; Skálová, L

    2006-06-01

    Fenbendazole (FEN) and flubendazole (FLU) are benzimidazole anthelmintics often used in pig management for the control of nematodoses. The in vivo study presented here was designed to test the influence of FLU and FEN on cytochrome P4501A and other cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase and several carbonyl reducing enzymes. The results indicated that FEN (in a single therapeutic dose as well as in repeated therapeutic doses) caused significant induction of pig CYP1A, while FLU did not show an inductive effect towards this isoform. Some of the other hepatic and intestinal biotransformation enzymes that were assayed were moderately influenced by FEN or FLU. Strong CYP1A induction following FEN therapy in pigs may negatively affect the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of FEN itself or other simultaneously or consecutively administered drugs. From the perspective of biotransformation enzyme modulation, FLU would appear to be a more convenient anthelmintic therapy of pigs than FEN.

  1. The bystander effect of cancer gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lumniczky, K.; Safrany, G.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer gene therapy is a new, promising therapeutic agent. In the clinic, it should be used in combination with existing modalities, such as tumour irradiation. First, we summarise the most important fields of cancer gene therapy: gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy; the activation of an anti-tumour immune attack; restoration of the wild type p53 status; the application of new, replication competent and oncolytic viral vectors; tumour specific, as well as radiation- and hypoxia-induced gene expression. Special emphasizes are put on the combined effect of these modalities with local tumour irradiation. Using the available vector systems, only a small portion of the cancer cells will contain the therapeutic genes under therapeutic situations. Bystander cell killing might contribute to the success of various gene therapy protocols. We summarise the evidences that lethal bystander effects may occur during cancer gene therapy. Bystander effects are especially important in the gene directed enzyme pro-drug therapy. There, bystander cell killing might have different routes: cell communication through gap junction intercellular contacts; release of toxic metabolites into the neighbourhood or to larger distances; phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies; and the activation of the immune system. Bystander cell killing can be enhanced by the introduction of gap junction proteins into the cells, by further activating the immune system with immune-stimulatory molecules, or by introducing genes into the cells that help the transfer of cytotoxic genes and / or metabolites into the bystander cells. In conclusion, there should be additional improvements in cancer gene therapy for the more efficient clinical application. (orig.)

  2. Elevation of antioxidant enzymes in the clinical effects of radon and thermal therapy for bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsunobu, Fumihiro; Hosaki, Yasuhiro; Ashida, Kozo; Tanizaki, Yoshiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Sugita, Katsuhiro; Kojima, Shuji

    2003-01-01

    An increased systemic production of oxygen-free radicals by activated inflammatory cells is thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of asthma. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effects of radon and thermal therapy on asthma in relation to antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxide. Radon and thermal therapy were performed once a week. All subjects went to a hot bathroom with a high concentration of radon, and nasal inhalation of vapor from a hot spring was performed for 40 min once a day under conditions of high humidity. The room temperature was 48 deg C; the room radon concentration was 2,080 Bq/m 3 . Blood samples were collected at 2 h, 14, and 28 days after the first therapy. A blood sample also was collected before the first therapy (at body temperature and background radon level) to be used as the control. The forced expiratory volume in one second (%FEV 1 ) was significantly increased 28 days after the first therapy. On day 28, the catalase (CAT) activity was significantly increased in comparison with the control. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was significantly increased compared to the control after first inhalation. On days 14 and 28, the lipid peroxide level was significantly decreased in comparison with the control. In conclusion, the present pilot study has shown that radon and thermal therapy improved the pulmonary function of asthmatics by increasing the reduced activities of antioxidant enzymes. (author)

  3. Fabry disease: the importance of the enzyme replacement therapy (TRE, treating quickly and efficiently

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Politei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fabry Disease is a lysosomal disorder due to the absence or deficiency of the Alpha galactosidase A enzyme that causes a pathological accumulation of glycosphingolipids mainly in the endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and podocytes among others. Enzyme replacement therapy is the only option for a specific treatment at present. Increasing knowledge of the physiopathological mechanisms has changed the management of the disease and above all, when treatment should begin. At present, beginning treatment at an early age seems to be a way of preventing and in some cases reverting some of the signs and symptoms of Fabry disease.

  4. Does early use of enzyme replacement therapy alter the natural history of mucopolysaccharidosis I? Experience in three siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraway, Sarah; Breen, Catherine; Mercer, Jean; Jones, Simon; Wraith, James E

    2013-07-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy is widely used as treatment for mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I), and there is evidence that this produces improvement in certain clinical domains. There does appear to be variation in the response of clinical features to treatment once these are established. In a reported sibling pair, when enzyme replacement therapy was commenced pre-symptomatically in the younger child, the natural history of the condition appeared to be affected. We present data from three siblings treated with enzyme replacement therapy at different ages which supports this finding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Modelling Gaucher disease progression: long-term enzyme replacement therapy reduces the incidence of splenectomy and bone complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dussen, Laura; Biegstraaten, Marieke; Dijkgraaf, Marcel Gw; Hollak, Carla Em

    2014-01-01

    Long-term complications and associated conditions of type 1 Gaucher Disease (GD) can include splenectomy, bone complications, pulmonary hypertension, Parkinson disease and malignancies. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) reverses cytopenia and reduces organomegaly. To study the effects of ERT on

  6. The Moderating Role of Parental Monitoring on the Influence of Peer Pro-Drug Norms on Alcohol and Cigarette Use among Adolescents in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, David; Castillo, Jason T.; Ayón, Cecilia; Blanchard, Kelly N.

    2014-01-01

    This study utilized data drawn from a study of 980 adolescents living in Tijuana, Mexico, in February 2009 to examine whether parental monitoring had a moderating impact on the influence of peer pro-drug norms on lifetime and past-30-day alcohol and cigarette use among a group of adolescents living along the United States-Mexico border. The…

  7. Dose-response relationships for enzyme replacement therapy with imiglucerase/alglucerase in patients with Gaucher disease type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grabowski, Gregory A.; Kacena, Katherine; Cole, J. Alexander; Hollak, Carla E. M.; Zhang, Lin; Yee, John; Mistry, Pramod K.; Zimran, Ari; Charrow, Joel; vom Dahl, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether enzyme therapy with imiglucerase/ alglucerase demonstrates dose-response relationships with doses and disease parameters used in routine clinical practice for Gaucher disease type 1 patients. Methods: Analyses included all patients with Gaucher disease type 1 on enzyme

  8. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k + ) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k + gene expression where the H S V-1 t k + gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([ 18 F]F H P G; [ 18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([ 123 / 131 I]I V R F U; [ 124 / 131I ]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [ 123 / 131I ]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k + reporter gene will be presented

  9. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, Leonard I. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on `suicide gene therapy` of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k{sup +}) has been use for `suicide` in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene expression where the H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([{sup 18} F]F H P G; [{sup 18} F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([{sup 123}/{sup 131} I]I V R F U; [{sup 124}/{sup 131I}]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [{sup 123}/{sup 131I}]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k{sup +} reporter gene will be presented

  10. Successful switch from enzyme replacement therapy to miglustat in an adult patient with type 1 Gaucher disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, Gaetano; Lombardo, Rita; Di Francesco, Ernesto; Parrinello, Laura; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Fiumara, Agata

    2016-11-08

    Gaucher disease is one of the most common lipid-storage disorders, affecting approximately 1 in 75,000 births. Enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant glucocerebrosidase is currently considered the first-line treatment choice for patients with symptomatic Gaucher disease type 1. Oral substrate reduction therapy is generally considered a second-line treatment option for adult patients with mild to moderate Gaucher disease type 1 who are unable or unwilling to receive lifelong intravenous enzyme infusions. The efficacy and safety of the oral substrate reduction therapy miglustat (Zavesca®) in patients with Gaucher disease type 1 have been established in both short-term clinical trials and long-term, open-label extension studies. Published data indicate that miglustat can be used as maintenance therapy in patients with stable Gaucher disease type 1 switched from previous enzyme replacement therapy. We report a case of a 44-year-old Caucasian man with Gaucher disease type 1 who was initially treated with enzyme replacement therapy but, owing to repeated cutaneous allergic reactions, had to be switched to miglustat after several attempts with enzyme replacement therapy. Despite many attempts, desensitization treatment did not result in improved toleration of imiglucerase infusions, and the patient became unwilling to continue with any intravenous enzyme replacement therapy. He subsequently agreed to switch to oral substrate reduction therapy with miglustat 100 mg twice daily titrated up to 100 mg three times daily over a short period. Long-term miglustat treatment maintained both hemoglobin and platelet levels within acceptable ranges over 8 years. The patient's spleen volume decreased, his plasma chitotriosidase levels stayed at reduced levels, and his bone mineral density findings have remained stable throughout follow-up. The patient's quality of life has remained satisfactory. Miglustat showed good gastrointestinal tolerability in this patient, and no

  11. Potential efficacy of enzyme replacement and substrate reduction therapy in three siblings with Gaucher disease type III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox-Brinkman, J.; van Breemen, M. J.; van Maldegem, B. T.; Bour, L.; Donker, W. E.; Hollak, C. E. M.; Wijburg, F. A.; Aerts, J. M. F. G.

    2008-01-01

    We report three siblings with Gaucher disease type III, born between 1992 and 2004. During this period, new developments resulted in different potential therapies, changing clinical practice. The two eldest siblings received enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) from the age of 24 and 5 months

  12. Pancreatic Enzyme Therapy and Coefficient of Fat Absorption in Children and AdolReplacement escents With Cystic Fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenenk, Janna W; van der Ent, Cornelis K.; Houwen, Roderick H J; van der Ent, CK

    Objectives: Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) is the proven therapy to substantially reduce fat malabsorption in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Few details of the daily practice regarding PERT and the resulting coefficient of fat absorption (CFA) are known. We therefore recorded the

  13. Cost-effectiveness of enzyme replacement therapy with alglucosidase alfa in classic-infantile patients with Pompe disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Kanters (Tim A.); I Hoogenboom-Plug (Iris); M.P.M.H. Rutten-van Mölken (Maureen); W.K. Redekop (Ken); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans); L. van Hakkaart-van Roijen (Leona)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Infantile Pompe disease is a rare metabolic disease. Patients generally do not survive the first year of life. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has proven to have substantial effects on survival in infantile Pompe disease. However, the costs of therapy are very high. In this

  14. HYPOXIA-ACTIVATED PRO-DRUG TH-302 EXHIBITS POTENT TUMOUR SUPPRESSIVE ACTIVITY AND COOPERATES WITH CHEMOTHERAPY AGAINST OSTEOSARCOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapis, Vasilios; Labrinidis, Agatha; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; DeNichilo, Mark; Ingman, Wendy; Atkins, Gerald J.; Findlay, David M.; Zannettino, Andrew CW.; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia is a major cause of treatment failure for a variety of malignancies. However, tumour hypoxia also offers treatment opportunities, exemplified by the development compounds that target hypoxic regions within tumours. TH-302 is a pro-drug created by the conjugation of 2-nitroimidazole to bromo-isophosphoramide (Br-IPM). When TH-302 is delivered to regions of hypoxia, Br-IPM, the DNA cross linking toxin, is released. In this study we assessed the cytotoxic activity of TH-302 against osteosarcoma cells in vitro and evaluated its anticancer efficacy as a single agent, and in combination with doxorubicin, in an orthotopic mouse model of human osteosarcoma (OS). In vitro, TH-302 was potently cytotoxic to osteosarcoma cells selectively under hypoxic conditions, whereas primary normal human osteoblasts were protected. Animals transplanted with OS cells directly into their tibiae and left untreated developed mixed osteolytic/osteosclerotic bone lesions and subsequently developed lung metastases. TH-302 reduced tumor burden in bone and cooperated with doxorubicin to protect bone from osteosarcoma induced bone destruction, while it also reduced lung metastases. TH-302 may therefore be an attractive therapeutic agent with strong activity as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy against OS. PMID:25444931

  15. Hypoxia-activated pro-drug TH-302 exhibits potent tumor suppressive activity and cooperates with chemotherapy against osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapis, Vasilios; Labrinidis, Agatha; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; DeNichilo, Mark; Ingman, Wendy; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a major cause of treatment failure for a variety of malignancies. However, tumor hypoxia also offers treatment opportunities, exemplified by the development compounds that target hypoxic regions within tumors. TH-302 is a pro-drug created by the conjugation of 2-nitroimidazole to bromo-isophosphoramide (Br-IPM). When TH-302 is delivered to regions of hypoxia, Br-IPM, the DNA cross linking toxin, is released. In this study we assessed the cytotoxic activity of TH-302 against osteosarcoma cells in vitro and evaluated its anticancer efficacy as a single agent, and in combination with doxorubicin, in an orthotopic mouse model of human osteosarcoma (OS). In vitro, TH-302 was potently cytotoxic to osteosarcoma cells selectively under hypoxic conditions, whereas primary normal human osteoblasts were protected. Animals transplanted with OS cells directly into their tibiae and left untreated developed mixed osteolytic/osteosclerotic bone lesions and subsequently developed lung metastases. TH-302 reduced tumor burden in bone and cooperated with doxorubicin to protect bone from osteosarcoma induced bone destruction, while it also reduced lung metastases. TH-302 may therefore be an attractive therapeutic agent with strong activity as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy against OS. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Two-step polymer- and liposome-enzyme prodrug therapies for cancer: PDEPT and PELT concepts and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scomparin, Anna; Florindo, Helena F; Tiram, Galia; Ferguson, Elaine L; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit

    2017-09-01

    Polymer-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (PDEPT) and polymer enzyme liposome therapy (PELT) are two-step therapies developed to provide anticancer drugs site-selective intratumoral accumulation and release. Nanomedicines, such as polymer-drug conjugates and liposomal drugs, accumulate in the tumor site due to extravasation-dependent mechanism (enhanced permeability and retention - EPR - effect), and further need to cross the cellular membrane and release their payload in the intracellular compartment. The subsequent administration of a polymer-enzyme conjugate able to accumulate in the tumor tissue and to trigger the extracellular release of the active drug showed promising preclinical results. The development of polymer-enzyme, polymer-drug conjugates and liposomal drugs had undergone a vast advancement over the past decades. Several examples of enzyme mimics for in vivo therapy can be found in the literature. Moreover, polymer therapeutics often present an enzyme-sensitive mechanism of drug release. These nanomedicines can thus be optimal substrates for PDEPT and this review aims to provide new insights and stimuli toward the future perspectives of this promising combination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Gene Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy Using Rabbit Cytochrome P450 4B1 in Murine Colon Adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Joo; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Kyeong Min; Woo, Kwang Sun; Chung, Wee Sup; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo

    2007-01-01

    The conventional cancer therapy is chemotherapy, surgical resection and/or radiotherapy. Chemotherapy using cytotoxic drug has some problems with lack of tumor selectivity resulting in toxicity to normal tissues. To enhance the tumor selectivity of cytotoxic drug, the application of suicidal gene therapy technology was designed. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a non-toxic prodrug into a cytotoxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1- tk) and cytosine deaminase (cd). Recently, a new prodrug-converting enzyme based on rabbit cytochrome P450 4B1 gene (cyp4B1) has been reported for therapy of experimental brain tumor. This enzyme activates the prodrugs such as 4-ipomeanol (4-IM) and 2- aminoanthracene (2-AA) to highly reactive furane epoxide and unsaturated dialdehyde intermediate, respectively. DNA alkylation seems to be the main mechanism of cytotoxicity of these activated drugs. In this study, we isolated cyp4B1 cDNA from rabbit lung, transduced cyp4B1 expression vector into murine colon cancer cell, and then analyzed the cytotoxic properties of cyp4b1-activated 2-AA in cyp4B1 transduced cells to verify the cyp4B1 enzyme system for gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy

  18. Gene Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy Using Rabbit Cytochrome P450 4B1 in Murine Colon Adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Joo; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Kyeong Min; Woo, Kwang Sun; Chung, Wee Sup; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The conventional cancer therapy is chemotherapy, surgical resection and/or radiotherapy. Chemotherapy using cytotoxic drug has some problems with lack of tumor selectivity resulting in toxicity to normal tissues. To enhance the tumor selectivity of cytotoxic drug, the application of suicidal gene therapy technology was designed. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a non-toxic prodrug into a cytotoxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1- tk) and cytosine deaminase (cd). Recently, a new prodrug-converting enzyme based on rabbit cytochrome P450 4B1 gene (cyp4B1) has been reported for therapy of experimental brain tumor. This enzyme activates the prodrugs such as 4-ipomeanol (4-IM) and 2- aminoanthracene (2-AA) to highly reactive furane epoxide and unsaturated dialdehyde intermediate, respectively. DNA alkylation seems to be the main mechanism of cytotoxicity of these activated drugs. In this study, we isolated cyp4B1 cDNA from rabbit lung, transduced cyp4B1 expression vector into murine colon cancer cell, and then analyzed the cytotoxic properties of cyp4b1-activated 2-AA in cyp4B1 transduced cells to verify the cyp4B1 enzyme system for gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy.

  19. Gene therapy/bone marrow transplantation in ADA-deficient mice: roles of enzyme-replacement therapy and cytoreduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiangyang; Wang, Xingchao; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Rozengurt, Nora; Kaufman, Michael L.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Zhou, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R.; Kohn, Donald B.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy (GT) for adenosine deaminase–deficient severe combined immune deficiency (ADA-SCID) can provide significant long-term benefit when patients are given nonmyeloablative conditioning and ADA enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) is withheld before autologous transplantation of γ-retroviral vector-transduced BM CD34+ cells. To determine the contributions of conditioning and discontinuation of ERT to the therapeutic effects, we analyzed these factors in Ada gene knockout mice (Ada−/−). Mice were transplanted with ADA-deficient marrow transduced with an ADA-expressing γ-retroviral vector without preconditioning or after 200 cGy or 900 cGy total-body irradiation and evaluated after 4 months. In all tissues analyzed, vector copy numbers (VCNs) were 100- to 1000-fold greater in mice receiving 900 cGy compared with 200 cGy (P < .05). In mice receiving 200 cGy, VCN was similar whether ERT was stopped or given for 1 or 4 months after GT. In unconditioned mice, there was decreased survival with and without ERT, and VCN was very low to undetectable. When recipients were conditioned with 200 cGy and received transduced lineage-depleted marrow, only recipients receiving ERT (1 or 4 months) had detectable vector sequences in thymocytes. In conclusion, cytoreduction is important for the engraftment of gene-transduced HSC, and short-term ERT after GT did not diminish the capacity of gene-corrected cells to engraft and persist. PMID:22833548

  20. Gene therapy/bone marrow transplantation in ADA-deficient mice: roles of enzyme-replacement therapy and cytoreduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaro, Denise A; Jin, Xiangyang; Wang, Xingchao; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Rozengurt, Nora; Kaufman, Michael L; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Zhou, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R; Kohn, Donald B

    2012-11-01

    Gene therapy (GT) for adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency (ADA-SCID) can provide significant long-term benefit when patients are given nonmyeloablative conditioning and ADA enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) is withheld before autologous transplantation of γ-retroviral vector-transduced BM CD34+ cells. To determine the contributions of conditioning and discontinuation of ERT to the therapeutic effects, we analyzed these factors in Ada gene knockout mice (Ada(-/-)). Mice were transplanted with ADA-deficient marrow transduced with an ADA-expressing γ-retroviral vector without preconditioning or after 200 cGy or 900 cGy total-body irradiation and evaluated after 4 months. In all tissues analyzed, vector copy numbers (VCNs) were 100- to 1000-fold greater in mice receiving 900 cGy compared with 200 cGy (P < .05). In mice receiving 200 cGy, VCN was similar whether ERT was stopped or given for 1 or 4 months after GT. In unconditioned mice, there was decreased survival with and without ERT, and VCN was very low to undetectable. When recipients were conditioned with 200 cGy and received transduced lineage-depleted marrow, only recipients receiving ERT (1 or 4 months) had detectable vector sequences in thymocytes. In conclusion, cytoreduction is important for the engraftment of gene-transduced HSC, and short-term ERT after GT did not diminish the capacity of gene-corrected cells to engraft and persist.

  1. Breast Cancer Gene Therapy: Development of Novel Non-Invasive Magnetic Resonance Assay to Optimize Efficacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mason, Ralph P

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treatment of breast cancer. In particular clinical trials are underway to apply therapeutic genes related to pro-drug activation or to modulate the activity of oncogenes by blocking promoter sites...

  2. Substrate reduction augments the efficacy of enzyme therapy in a mouse model of Fabry disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Marshall

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked glycosphingolipid storage disorder caused by a deficiency in the activity of the lysosomal hydrolase α-galactosidase A (α-gal. This deficiency results in accumulation of the glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (GL-3 in lysosomes. Endothelial cell storage of GL-3 frequently leads to kidney dysfunction, cardiac and cerebrovascular disease. The current treatment for Fabry disease is through infusions of recombinant α-gal (enzyme-replacement therapy; ERT. Although ERT can markedly reduce the lysosomal burden of GL-3 in endothelial cells, variability is seen in the clearance from several other cell types. This suggests that alternative and adjuvant therapies may be desirable. Use of glucosylceramide synthase inhibitors to abate the biosynthesis of glycosphingolipids (substrate reduction therapy, SRT has been shown to be effective at reducing substrate levels in the related glycosphingolipidosis, Gaucher disease. Here, we show that such an inhibitor (eliglustat tartrate, Genz-112638 was effective at lowering GL-3 accumulation in a mouse model of Fabry disease. Relative efficacy of SRT and ERT at reducing GL-3 levels in Fabry mouse tissues differed with SRT being more effective in the kidney, and ERT more efficacious in the heart and liver. Combination therapy with ERT and SRT provided the most complete clearance of GL-3 from all the tissues. Furthermore, treatment normalized urine volume and uromodulin levels and significantly delayed the loss of a nociceptive response. The differential efficacies of SRT and ERT in the different tissues indicate that the combination approach is both additive and complementary suggesting the possibility of an improved therapeutic paradigm in the management of Fabry disease.

  3. Predictors of hepatitis B cure using gene therapy to deliver DNA cleavage enzymes: a mathematical modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua T Schiffer

    Full Text Available Most chronic viral infections are managed with small molecule therapies that inhibit replication but are not curative because non-replicating viral forms can persist despite decades of suppressive treatment. There are therefore numerous strategies in development to eradicate all non-replicating viruses from the body. We are currently engineering DNA cleavage enzymes that specifically target hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA (HBV cccDNA, the episomal form of the virus that persists despite potent antiviral therapies. DNA cleavage enzymes, including homing endonucleases or meganucleases, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs, TAL effector nucleases (TALENs, and CRISPR-associated system 9 (Cas9 proteins, can disrupt specific regions of viral DNA. Because DNA repair is error prone, the virus can be neutralized after repeated cleavage events when a target sequence becomes mutated. DNA cleavage enzymes will be delivered as genes within viral vectors that enter hepatocytes. Here we develop mathematical models that describe the delivery and intracellular activity of DNA cleavage enzymes. Model simulations predict that high vector to target cell ratio, limited removal of delivery vectors by humoral immunity, and avid binding between enzyme and its DNA target will promote the highest level of cccDNA disruption. Development of de novo resistance to cleavage enzymes may occur if DNA cleavage and error prone repair does not render the viral episome replication incompetent: our model predicts that concurrent delivery of multiple enzymes which target different vital cccDNA regions, or sequential delivery of different enzymes, are both potentially useful strategies for avoiding multi-enzyme resistance. The underlying dynamics of cccDNA persistence are unlikely to impact the probability of cure provided that antiviral therapy is given concurrently during eradication trials. We conclude by describing experiments that can be used to validate the model, which

  4. Hepatic Enzyme Alterations in HIV Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy: A Case-Control Study in a Hospital Setting in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakunor, Derick Nii Mensah; Obirikorang, Christian; Fianu, Vincent; Asare, Isaac; Dakorah, Mavis

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing hepatic injury in HIV infection can be a herculean task for clinicians as several factors may be involved. In this study, we sought to determine the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and disease progression on hepatic enzymes in HIV patients. A case-control study conducted from January to May 2014 at the Akwatia Government Hospital, Eastern region, Ghana, The study included 209 HIV patients on ART (designated HIV-ART) and 132 ART-naive HIV patients (designated HIV-Controls). Data gathered included demography, clinical history and results of blood tests for hepatic enzymes. We employed the Fisher's, Chi-square, unpaired t-test and Pearson's correlation in analysis, using GraphPad Prism and SPSS. A P value 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between hepatic enzymes (ALP, ALT, AST and GGT) for both groups (p enzymes for both groups was small. Antiretroviral therapy amongst this population has minimal effects on hepatic enzymes and does not suggest modifications in therapy. Hepatic injury may occur in HIV, even in the absence of ART and other traditional factors. Monitoring of hepatic enzymes is still important in HIV patients.

  5. Efficacy of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in chronic pancreatitis: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia-García, Daniel; Huang, Wei; Szatmary, Peter; Baston-Rey, Iria; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jaime; Prada-Ramallal, Guillermo; Mukherjee, Rajarshi; Nunes, Quentin M; Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique; Sutton, Robert

    2017-08-01

    The benefits of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) in chronic pancreatitis (CP) are inadequately defined. We have undertaken a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials of PERT to determine the efficacy of PERT in exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) from CP. Major databases were searched from 1966 to 2015 inclusive. The primary outcome was coefficient of fat absorption (CFA). Effects of PERT versus baseline and versus placebo, and of different doses, formulations and schedules were determined. A total of 17 studies (511 patients with CP) were included and assessed qualitatively (Jadad score). Quantitative data were synthesised from 14 studies. PERT improved CFA compared with baseline (83.7±6.0 vs 63.1±15.0, pregression analyses revealed that sample size, CP diagnostic criteria, study design and enzyme dose contributed to heterogeneity; data on health inequalities were lacking. PERT is indicated to correct EPI and malnutrition in CP and may be improved by higher doses, enteric coating, administration during food and acid suppression. Further studies are required to determine optimal regimens, the impact of health inequalities and long-term effects on nutrition. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Guidelines to start enzyme replacement therapy in classic Fabry Disease patients in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Politei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fabry disease is a rare inherited X-linked disorder resulting from the absence or deficient activity of the α-galactosidase A enzyme. Objetive: To provide the first guideline on the best time to start enzyme replacement therapy to treat classic Fabry disease, based on the knowledge and experience of experts from ten Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. Methods: The project coordinator designed a survey based on the criteria for starting the treatment which are established in different international guidelines published to date. This document was later sent to all the participants for its evaluation. Results: Fifty experts responded to the survey, whose criteria was divided into 5 sections according to specialty, and they arrived at a consensus. Discussion: The criteria for an early treatment were defined given the growing evidence of a better response and prognosis associated with it. Conclusion: We believe that the importance of this guideline relies on the participation of experts from ten Latin American countries. However, as it deals with a systemic disease whose physiopathological mechanisms and complications are still being described, some manifestations have not been included in the criteria, making it necessary to revise this guideline in order to report any changes that may arise in the future.

  7. Where do the immunostimulatory effects of oral proteolytic enzymes ('systemic enzyme therapy') come from? Microbial proteolysis as a possible starting point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biziulevicius, Gediminas A

    2006-01-01

    Enteric-coated proteolytic enzyme preparations like Wobenzym and Phlogenzym are widely used for the so-called 'systemic enzyme therapy' both in humans and animals. Numerous publications reveal that oral proteolytic enzymes are able to stimulate directly the activity of immune competent cells as well as to increase efficiency of some of their products. But origins of the immunostimulatory effects of oral proteolytic enzymes are still unclear. The hypothesis described here suggests that it may be proteolysis of intestinal microorganisms that makes the immune competent cells to work in the immunostimulatory manner. The hypothesis was largely formed by several scientific observations: First, microbial lysis products (lipopolysaccharides, muropeptides and other peptidoglycan fragments, beta-glucans, etc.) are well known for their immunostimulatory action. Second, a normal human being hosts a mass of intestinal microorganisms equivalent to about 1 kg. The biomass (mainly due to naturally occurring autolysis) continuously supplies the host's organism with immunostimulatory microbial cell components. Third, the immunostimulatory effects resulting from the oral application of exogenously acting antimicrobial (lytic) enzyme preparations, such as lysozyme and lysosubtilin, are likely to be a result of the action of microbial lysis products. Fourth, cell walls of most microorganisms contain a considerable amount of proteins/peptides, a possible target for exogenous proteolytic enzymes. In fact, several authors have already shown that a number of proteases possess an ability to lyse the microbial cells in vitro. Fifth, the pretreatment of microbial cells (at least of some species) in vitro with proteolytic enzymes makes them more sensitive to the lytic action of lysozyme and, otherwise, pretreatment with lysozyme makes them more susceptible to proteolytic degradation. Sixth, exogenous proteases, when in the intestines, may participate in final steps of food-protein digestion

  8. Antibody-mediated enzyme replacement therapy targeting both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Haiqing; Sun, Tao; Armstrong, Dustin; Borneman, Scott; Yang, Chunyu; Austin, Stephanie; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2017-05-01

    Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen primarily in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Mannose-6-phosphate receptor-mediated enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) targets the enzyme to lysosomes and thus is unable to digest cytoplasmic glycogen. Studies have shown that anti-DNA antibody 3E10 penetrates living cells and delivers "cargo" proteins to the cytosol or nucleus via equilibrative nucleoside transporter ENT2. We speculate that 3E10-mediated ERT with GAA will target both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease. A fusion protein (FabGAA) containing a humanized Fab fragment derived from the murine 3E10 antibody and the 110 kDa human GAA precursor was constructed and produced in CHO cells. Immunostaining with an anti-Fab antibody revealed that the Fab signals did not co-localize with the lysosomal marker LAMP2 in cultured L6 myoblasts or Pompe patient fibroblasts after incubation with FabGAA. Western blot with an anti-GAA antibody showed presence of the 150 kDa full-length FabGAA in the cell lysates, in addition to the 95- and 76 kDa processed forms of GAA that were also seen in the rhGAA-treated cells. Blocking of mannose-6-phosphate receptor with mannose-6-phosphate markedly reduced the 95- and the 76 kDa forms but not the 150 kDa form. In GAA-KO mice, FabGAA achieved similar treatment efficacy as rhGAA at an equal molar dose in reducing tissue glycogen contents. Our data suggest that FabGAA retains the ability of rhGAA to treat lysosomal glycogen accumulation and has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to reduce cytoplasmic glycogen storage in Pompe disease. FabGAA can be delivered to both the cytoplasm and lysosomes in cultured cells. FabGAA equally reduced lysosomal glycogen accumulation as rhGAA in GAA-KO mice. FabGAA has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to clear cytoplasmic glycogen. This study suggests a novel antibody-enzyme fusion protein therapy

  9. Enzyme replacement therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I among patients followed within the MPS Brazil Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alícia Dorneles Dornelles

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I is a rare lysosomal disorder caused by deficiency of alph-L-iduronidase. Few clinical trials have assessed the effect of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT for this condition. We conducted an exploratory, open-label, non-randomized, multicenter cohort study of patients with MPS I. Data were collected from questionnaires completed by attending physicians at the time of diagnosis (T1; n = 34 and at a median time of 2.5 years later (T2; n = 24/34. The 24 patients for whom data were available at T2 were allocated into groups: A, no ERT (9 patients; median age at T1 = 36 months; 6 with severe phenotype; B, on ERT (15 patients; median age at T1 = 33 months; 4 with severe phenotype. For all variables in which there was no between-group difference at baseline, a delta of ;±20% was considered clinically relevant. The following clinically relevant differences were identified in group B in T2: lower rates of mortality and reported hospitalization for respiratory infection; lower frequency of hepatosplenomegaly; increased reported rates of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and hearing loss; and stabilization of gibbus deformity. These changes could be due to the effect of ERT or of other therapies which have also been found more frequently in group B. Our findings suggest MPS I patients on ERT also receive a better overall care. ERT may have a positive effect on respiratory morbidity and overall mortality in patients with MPS I. Additional studies focusing on these outcomes and on other therapies should be performed.

  10. Enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease: some answers but more questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Alfadhel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Majid Alfadhel1, Sandra Sirrs21Division of Biochemical Diseases, Department of Paediatrics, BC Children’s and Women’s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2Adult Metabolic Diseases Clinic, Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CanadaAbstract: Fabry disease (FD is a multisystem, X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism caused by enzyme deficiency of α-galactosidase A. Affected patients have symptoms including acroparesthesias, angiokeratomas, and hypohidrosis. More serious manifestations include debilitating pain and gastrointestinal symptoms, proteinuria and gradual deterioration of renal function leading to end-stage renal disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and stroke. Heterozygous females may have symptoms as severe as males with the classic phenotype. Before 2001, treatment of patients with FD was supportive. The successful development of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT has been a great advancement in the treatment of patients with FD and can stabilize renal function and cardiac size, as well as improve pain and quality of life of patients with FD. In this review, we have provided a critical appraisal of the literature on the effects of ERT for FD. This analysis shows that data available on the treatment of FD are often derived from studies which are not controlled, rely on surrogate markers, and are of insufficient power to detect differences on hard clinical endpoints. Further studies of higher quality are needed to answer the questions that remain concerning the efficacy of ERT for FD.Keywords: Fabry disease, agalsidase α, agalsidase β, Replagal, Fabrazyme, critical appraisal, evidence-based medicine

  11. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in cystic fibrosis: dose, variability and coefficient of fat absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Lerma, Joaquim; Martínez-Barona, Sandra; Masip, Etna; Fornés, Victoria; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen

    2017-10-01

    Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) remains a backbone in the nutritional treatment of cystic fibrosis. Currently, there is a lack of an evidence-based tool that allows dose adjustment. To date, no studies have found an association between PERT dose and fat absorption. Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the influence of both the PERT dose and the variability in this dose on the coefficient of fat absorption (CFA). This is a retrospective longitudinal study of 16 pediatric patients (192 food records) with three consecutive visits to the hospital over a twelve-month period. Dietary fat intake and PERT were assessed via a four-day food record and fat content in stools was determined by means of a three-day stool sample collection. A beta regression model was built to explain the association between the CFA and the interaction between the PERT dose (lipase units [LU]/g dietary fat) and the variability in the PERT dose (standard deviation [SD]). The coefficient of fat absorption increased with the PERT dose when the variability in the dose was low. In contrast, even at the highest PERT dose values, the CFA decreased when the variability was high. The confidence interval suggested an association, although the analysis was not statistically significant. The variability in the PERT dose adjustment should be taken into consideration when performing studies on PERT efficiency. A clinical goal should be the maintenance of a constant PERT dose rather than trying to obtain an optimal value.

  12. Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Rosalie H; Bourdon, Céline; Potani, Isabel; Mhango, Brian; van den Brink, Deborah A; Mponda, John S; Muller Kobold, Anneke C; Bandsma, Robert H; Boele van Hensbroek, Michael; Voskuijl, Wieger P

    2017-11-01

    To assess the benefits of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial in 90 children aged 6-60 months with complicated severe acute malnutrition at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Malawi. All children received standard care; the intervention group also received PERT for 28 days. Children treated with PERT for 28 days did not gain more weight than controls (13.7 ± 9.0% in controls vs 15.3 ± 11.3% in PERT; P = .56). Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency was present in 83.1% of patients on admission and fecal elastase-1 levels increased during hospitalization mostly seen in children with nonedematous severe acute malnutrition (P Children who died had low fecal fatty acid split ratios at admission. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency was not improved by PERT, but children receiving PERT were more likely to be discharged with every passing day (P = .02) compared with controls. PERT does not improve weight gain in severely malnourished children but does increase the rate of hospital discharge. Mortality was lower in patients on PERT, a finding that needs to be investigated in a larger cohort with stratification for edematous and nonedematous malnutrition. Mortality in severe acute malnutrition is associated with markers of poor digestive function. ISRCTN.com: 57423639. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Enzyme replacement therapy prevents dental defects in a model of hypophosphatasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, M D; Nakano, Y; Masica, D L; Gray, J J; Lemire, I; Heft, R; Whyte, M P; Crine, P; Millán, J L

    2011-04-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) occurs from loss-of-function mutation in the tissue-non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP) gene, resulting in extracellular pyrophosphate accumulation that inhibits skeletal and dental mineralization. TNALP-null mice (Akp2(-/-)) phenocopy human infantile hypophosphatasia; they develop rickets at 1 week of age, and die before being weaned, having severe skeletal and dental hypomineralization and episodes of apnea and vitamin B(6)-responsive seizures. Delay and defects in dentin mineralization, together with a deficiency in acellular cementum, are characteristic. We report the prevention of these dental abnormalities in Akp2(-/-) mice receiving treatment from birth with daily injections of a mineral-targeting, human TNALP (sALP-FcD(10)). sALP-FcD(10) prevented hypomineralization of alveolar bone, dentin, and cementum as assessed by micro-computed tomography and histology. Osteopontin--a marker of acellular cementum--was immuno-localized along root surfaces, confirming that acellular cementum, typically missing or reduced in Akp2(-/-) mice, formed normally. Our findings provide insight concerning how acellular cementum is formed on tooth surfaces to effect periodontal ligament attachment to retain teeth in their osseous alveolar sockets. Furthermore, they provide evidence that this enzyme-replacement therapy, applied early in post-natal life--where the majority of tooth root development occurs, including acellular cementum formation--could prevent the accelerated tooth loss seen in individuals with HPP.

  14. Modeling of pharmacokinetics of cocaine in human reveals the feasibility for development of enzyme therapies for drugs of abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zheng

    Full Text Available A promising strategy for drug abuse treatment is to accelerate the drug metabolism by administration of a drug-metabolizing enzyme. The question is how effectively an enzyme can actually prevent the drug from entering brain and producing physiological effects. In the present study, we have developed a pharmacokinetic model through a combined use of in vitro kinetic parameters and positron emission tomography data in human to examine the effects of a cocaine-metabolizing enzyme in plasma on the time course of cocaine in plasma and brain of human. Without an exogenous enzyme, cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma are almost linearly dependent on the initial cocaine concentration in plasma. The threshold concentration of cocaine in brain required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 0.22±0.07 µM, and the threshold area under the cocaine concentration versus time curve (AUC value in brain (denoted by AUC2(∞ required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 7.9±2.7 µM·min. It has been demonstrated that administration of a cocaine hydrolase/esterase (CocH/CocE can considerably decrease the cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma, the peak cocaine concentration in brain, and the AUC2(∞. The estimated maximum cocaine plasma concentration which a given concentration of drug-metabolizing enzyme can effectively prevent from entering brain and producing physiological effects can be used to guide future preclinical/clinical studies on cocaine-metabolizing enzymes. Understanding of drug-metabolizing enzymes is key to the science of pharmacokinetics. The general insights into the effects of a drug-metabolizing enzyme on drug kinetics in human should be valuable also in future development of enzyme therapies for other drugs of abuse.

  15. Modeling of pharmacokinetics of cocaine in human reveals the feasibility for development of enzyme therapies for drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2012-01-01

    A promising strategy for drug abuse treatment is to accelerate the drug metabolism by administration of a drug-metabolizing enzyme. The question is how effectively an enzyme can actually prevent the drug from entering brain and producing physiological effects. In the present study, we have developed a pharmacokinetic model through a combined use of in vitro kinetic parameters and positron emission tomography data in human to examine the effects of a cocaine-metabolizing enzyme in plasma on the time course of cocaine in plasma and brain of human. Without an exogenous enzyme, cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma are almost linearly dependent on the initial cocaine concentration in plasma. The threshold concentration of cocaine in brain required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 0.22±0.07 µM, and the threshold area under the cocaine concentration versus time curve (AUC) value in brain (denoted by AUC2(∞)) required to produce physiological effects has been estimated to be 7.9±2.7 µM·min. It has been demonstrated that administration of a cocaine hydrolase/esterase (CocH/CocE) can considerably decrease the cocaine half-lives in both brain and plasma, the peak cocaine concentration in brain, and the AUC2(∞). The estimated maximum cocaine plasma concentration which a given concentration of drug-metabolizing enzyme can effectively prevent from entering brain and producing physiological effects can be used to guide future preclinical/clinical studies on cocaine-metabolizing enzymes. Understanding of drug-metabolizing enzymes is key to the science of pharmacokinetics. The general insights into the effects of a drug-metabolizing enzyme on drug kinetics in human should be valuable also in future development of enzyme therapies for other drugs of abuse.

  16. Respiratory muscle training with enzyme replacement therapy improves muscle strength in late - onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevnikar, Mitja; Kodric, Metka; Cantarutti, Fabiana; Cifaldi, Rossella; Longo, Cinzia; Della Porta, Rossana; Bembi, Bruno; Confalonieri, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase. This deficiency leads to glycogen accumulation in the lysosomes of muscle tissue causing progressive muscular weakness particularly of the respiratory system. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has demonstrated efficacy in slowing down disease progression in infants. Despite the large number of studies describing the effects of physical training in juvenile and adult late onset Pompe disease (LOPD). There are very few reports that analyze the benefits of respiratory muscle rehabilitation or training. The effectiveness of respiratory muscle training was investigated using a specific appliance with adjustable resistance (Threshold). The primary endpoint was effect on respiratory muscular strength by measurements of MIP and MEP. Eight late-onset Pompe patients (aged 13 to 58 years; 4 female, 4 male) with respiratory muscle deficiency on functional respiratory tests were studied. All patients received ERT at the dosage of 20 mg/kg/every 2 weeks and underwent training with Threshold at specified pressures for 24 months. A significant increase in MIP was observed during the follow-up of 24 month: 39.6 cm H 2 O (+ 25.0%) at month 3; 39.5 cm H 2 O (+ 24.9%) at month 6; 39.1 cm H 2 O (+ 23.7%) at month 9; 37.3 cm H 2 O (+ 18.2%) at month 12; and 37.3 cm H 2 O (+ 17.8%) at month 24. Median MEP values also showed a significant increase during the first 9 months: 29.8 cm H 2 O, (+ 14.3%) at month 3; 31.0 cm H 2 O (+ 18.6) at month 6; and 29.5 cm H 2 O (+ 12.9) at month 9. MEP was then shown to be decreased at months 12 and 24; median MEP was 27.2 cm H 2 O (+ 4.3%) at 12 months and 26.6 cm H 2 O (+ 1.9%) at 24 months. The FVC remain stable throughout the study. An increase in respiratory muscular strength was demonstrated with Threshold training when used in combination with ERT.

  17. COMPARING THE ENZYME REPLACEMENT THERAPY COST IN POST PANCREATECTOMY PATIENTS DUE TO PANCREATIC TUMOR AND CHRONIC PANCREATITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso, Anna Victoria; Pedroso, Martha Regina; Herman, Paulo; Montagnini, André Luis

    2016-01-01

    Among late postoperative complications of pancreatectomy are the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiencies. The presence of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency imposes, as standard treatment, pancreatic enzyme replacement. Patients with chronic pancreatitis, with intractable pain or any complications with surgical treatment, are likely to present exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or have this condition worsened requiring adequate dose of pancreatic enzymes. The aim of this study is to compare the required dose of pancreatic enzyme and the enzyme replacement cost in post pancreatectomy patients with and without chronic pancreatitis. Observational cross-sectional study. In the first half of 2015 patients treated at the clinic of the Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery at Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil, who underwent pancreatectomy for at least 6 months and in use of enzyme replacement therapy were included in this series. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of chronic pancreatitis prior to pancreatic surgery. For this study, Ptreatment was R$ 2150.5 ± 729.39; R$ 2118.18 ± 731.02 in patients without pancreatitis and R$ 2217.74 ± 736.30 in patients with pancreatitis. There was no statistically significant difference in the cost of treatment of enzyme replacement post pancreatectomy in patients with or without chronic pancreatitis prior to surgical indication.

  18. Partial resolution of bone lesions. A child with severe combined immunodeficiency disease and adenosine deaminase deficiency after enzyme-replacement therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulish, B.S.; Stern, R.C.; Polmar, S.H.

    1980-01-01

    A child with severe combined immunodeficiency disease and adenosine deaminase deficiency, with characteristic bone dysplasia, was treated with transfusions of frozen irradiated RBCs as a means of enzyme replacement. This therapy resulted in restoration of immunologic competence and partial resolution of the bone lesions. Although the natural history of these lesions without therapy is not known, enzyme-replacement therapy may have played a role in the resolution of this patient's bone lesions

  19. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in cystic fibrosis: dose, variability and coefficient of fat absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Calvo-Lerma

    Full Text Available Objectives: Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT remains a backbone in the nutritional treatment of cystic fibrosis. Currently, there is a lack of an evidence-based tool that allows dose adjustment. To date, no studies have found an association between PERT dose and fat absorption. Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the influence of both the PERT dose and the variability in this dose on the coefficient of fat absorption (CFA. Methods: This is a retrospective longitudinal study of 16 pediatric patients (192 food records with three consecutive visits to the hospital over a twelve-month period. Dietary fat intake and PERT were assessed via a four-day food record and fat content in stools was determined by means of a three-day stool sample collection. A beta regression model was built to explain the association between the CFA and the interaction between the PERT dose (lipase units [LU]/g dietary fat and the variability in the PERT dose (standard deviation [SD]. Results: The coefficient of fat absorption increased with the PERT dose when the variability in the dose was low. In contrast, even at the highest PERT dose values, the CFA decreased when the variability was high. The confidence interval suggested an association, although the analysis was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The variability in the PERT dose adjustment should be taken into consideration when performing studies on PERT efficiency. A clinical goal should be the maintenance of a constant PERT dose rather than trying to obtain an optimal value.

  20. AAV Gene Therapy for Alcoholism: Inhibition of Mitochondrial Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Enzyme Expression in Hepatoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Anamaria C; Li, Chengwen; Andrews, Barbara; Asenjo, Juan A; Samulski, R Jude

    2017-09-01

    Most ethanol is broken down in the liver in two steps by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) enzymes, which metabolize down ethanol into acetaldehyde and then acetate. Some individuals from the Asian population who carry a mutation in the aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (ALDH2*2) cannot metabolize acetaldehyde as efficiently, producing strong effects, including facial flushing, dizziness, hypotension, and palpitations. This results in an aversion to alcohol intake and protection against alcoholism. The large prevalence of this mutation in the human population strongly suggests that modulation of ALDH2 expression by genetic technologies could result in a similar phenotype. scAAV2 vectors encoding ALDH2 small hairpin RNA (shRNA) were utilized to validate this hypothesis by silencing ALDH2 gene expression in human cell lines. Human cell lines HEK-293 and HepG2 were transduced with scAAV2/shRNA, showing a reduction in ALDH2 RNA and protein expression with the two viral concentration assayed (1 × 10 4 and 1 × 10 5 vg/cell) at two different time points. In both cell lines, ALDH2 RNA levels were reduced by 90% and protein expression was inhibited by 90% and 52%, respectively, 5 days post infection. Transduced HepG2 VL17A cells (ADH+) exposed to ethanol resulted in a 50% increase in acetaldehyde levels. These results suggest that gene therapy could be a useful tool for the treatment of alcoholism by knocking down ALDH2 expression using shRNA technology delivered by AAV vectors.

  1. Development of Targeted, Enzyme-Activated Nano-Conjugates for Hepatic Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Sibu Philip

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5th most commonly-occurring cancer worldwide and the 2nd highest cause for cancer-related deaths globally. The current treatment strategy is the direct injection of a chemotherapeutic agent (e.g. doxorubicin; DOX) into the hepatic artery, through a process called hepatic arterial infusion (HAI). Unfortunately, HAI is severely hindered by limited therapeutic efficacy against the tumor and high systemic toxicity to surrounding organs (e.g. cardiotoxicity). This thesis focuses on the development of a targeted, nanoparticle-based drug delivery system aimed to improve the clinical treatment of HCC. In particular, we employ generation 5 (G5) poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers targeted to hepatic cancer cells via N-acetylgalactosamine (NAcGal) ligands attached to the surface through a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brush. DOX is attached to the G5 surface through two different enzyme-sensitive linkages, L3 or L4, to achieve controllable release of the drug inside hepatic cancer cells. The combination of NAcGal-PEG targeting branches with either L3- or L4-DOX linkages led to the development of P1 and P2 particles, respectively. In Part 1, we discuss the development of these particles and measure their ability to target and kill hepatic cancer cells in vitro. In Part 2, we investigate the antitumor activity of P1 and P2 particles in tumor-bearing mice in comparison to the free drug, and we measure the cardiac function of mice undergoing treatment to assess differences in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Finally, in Part 3, we explore multi-valent targeting of G5 dendrimers in pursuit of further improving their specificity to hepatic cancer cells. Ultimately, this thesis provides insight into the utility of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems that can potentially be translated to the clinic to improve cancer therapy.

  2. A distinct urinary biomarker pattern characteristic of female Fabry patients that mirrors response to enzyme replacement therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas D Kistler

    Full Text Available Female patients affected by Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, exhibit a wide spectrum of symptoms, which renders diagnosis, and treatment decisions challenging. No diagnostic test, other than sequencing of the alpha-galactosidase A gene, is available and no biomarker has been proven useful to screen for the disease, predict disease course and monitor response to enzyme replacement therapy. Here, we used urine proteomic analysis based on capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry and identified a biomarker profile in adult female Fabry patients. Urine samples were taken from 35 treatment-naïve female Fabry patients and were compared to 89 age-matched healthy controls. We found a diagnostic biomarker pattern that exhibited 88.2% sensitivity and 97.8% specificity when tested in an independent validation cohort consisting of 17 treatment-naïve Fabry patients and 45 controls. The model remained highly specific when applied to additional control patients with a variety of other renal, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Several of the 64 identified diagnostic biomarkers showed correlations with measures of disease severity. Notably, most biomarkers responded to enzyme replacement therapy, and 8 of 11 treated patients scored negative for Fabry disease in the diagnostic model. In conclusion, we defined a urinary biomarker model that seems to be of diagnostic use for Fabry disease in female patients and may be used to monitor response to enzyme replacement therapy.

  3. The outcome of clinical parameters in adults with severe Type I Gaucher disease using very low dose enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Callum; Spearing, Ruth; Teague, Lochie; Robertson, Patsy; Blacklock, Hilary

    2007-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy is now well established as the treatment of choice in Type I Gaucher disease. Historically higher dosage regimens have been used in preference to lower doses despite the little clinical evidence in the way of large controlled clinical trials to support this. Moreover, the extraordinary cost of therapy means that not all eligible patients are able to be treated at the higher dose. Twelve type I adult patients with relatively severe disease were commenced on a very low dose of 7.5U of alglucerase/imiglucerase per kg every two weeks (initially given thrice weekly and later weekly). Follow-up 5 year data reveal a good visceral and haematological response with outcomes consistent with recently published treatment guidelines. Satisfactory clinical and radiological skeletal improvement was also demonstrated in most patients. Three patients had an inadequate overall skeletal response to therapy. Biomarkers also steadily improved although perhaps not quite at the same rate as that seen in higher doses. Very low dose enzyme replacement therapy may be appropriate for adult type I Gaucher patients with mild-moderate skeletal disease.

  4. Renal function predicts long-term outcome on enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenders, Malte; Schmitz, Boris; Stypmann, Jörg; Duning, Thomas; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Kurschat, Christine; Brand, Eva

    2017-12-01

    Renal and cardiac involvement is responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality in Fabry disease (FD). We analysed the incidence of FD-related renal, cardiac and neurologic end points in patients with FD on long-term enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from two German FD centres was performed. The impact of renal and cardiac function at ERT-naïve baseline on end point development despite ERT was analysed. Fifty-four patients (28 females) receiving ERT (mean 81 ± 21 months) were investigated. Forty per cent of patients were diagnosed with clinical end points before ERT initiation and 50% of patients on ERT developed new clinical end points. In patients initially diagnosed with an end point before ERT initiation, the risk for an additional end point on ERT was increased {hazard ratio [HR] 3.83 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.61-9.08]; P = 0.0023}. A decreased glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≤75 mL/min/1.73 m2 in ERT-naïve patients at baseline was associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular end points [HR 3.59 (95% CI 1.15-11.18); P = 0.0273] as well as for combined renal, cardiac and neurologic end points on ERT [HR 4.77 (95% CI 1.93-11.81); P = 0.0007]. In patients with normal kidney function, left ventricular hypertrophy at baseline predicted a decreased end point-free survival [HR 6.90 (95% CI 2.04-23.27); P = 0.0018]. The risk to develop an end point was independent of sex. In addition to age, even moderately impaired renal function determines FD progression on ERT. In patients with FD, renal and cardiac protection is warranted to prevent patients from deleterious manifestations of the disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  5. COMPARING THE ENZYME REPLACEMENT THERAPY COST IN POST PANCREATECTOMY PATIENTS DUE TO PANCREATIC TUMOR AND CHRONIC PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Victoria FRAGOSO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background - Among late postoperative complications of pancreatectomy are the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiencies. The presence of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency imposes, as standard treatment, pancreatic enzyme replacement. Patients with chronic pancreatitis, with intractable pain or any complications with surgical treatment, are likely to present exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or have this condition worsened requiring adequate dose of pancreatic enzymes. Objective - The aim of this study is to compare the required dose of pancreatic enzyme and the enzyme replacement cost in post pancreatectomy patients with and without chronic pancreatitis. Methods - Observational cross-sectional study. In the first half of 2015 patients treated at the clinic of the Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery at Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil, who underwent pancreatectomy for at least 6 months and in use of enzyme replacement therapy were included in this series. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of chronic pancreatitis prior to pancreatic surgery. For this study, P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results - The annual cost of the treatment was R$ 2150.5 ± 729.39; R$ 2118.18 ± 731.02 in patients without pancreatitis and R$ 2217.74 ± 736.30 in patients with pancreatitis. Conclusion - There was no statistically significant difference in the cost of treatment of enzyme replacement post pancreatectomy in patients with or without chronic pancreatitis prior to surgical indication.

  6. Bioprinting cell-laden matrigel for radioprotection study of liver by pro-drug conversion in a dual-tissue microfluidic chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, J E; Hamid, Q; Wang, C; Chang, R; Sun, W; Emami, K; Wu, H

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce a novel cell printing and microfluidic system to serve as a portable ground model for the study of drug conversion and radiation protection of living liver tissue analogs. The system is applied to study behavior in ground models of space stress, particularly radiation. A microfluidic environment is engineered by two cell types to prepare an improved higher fidelity in vitro micro-liver tissue analog. Cell-laden Matrigel printing and microfluidic chips were used to test radiation shielding to liver cells by the pro-drug amifostine. In this work, the sealed microfluidic chip regulates three variables of interest: radiation exposure, anti-radiation drug treatment and single- or dual-tissue culture environments. This application is intended to obtain a scientific understanding of the response of the multi-cellular biological system for long-term manned space exploration, disease models and biosensors.

  7. Bioprinting cell-laden matrigel for radioprotection study of liver by pro-drug conversion in a dual-tissue microfluidic chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, J E; Hamid, Q; Wang, C; Chang, R; Sun, W [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Emami, K; Wu, H, E-mail: sunwei@drexel.edu, E-mail: weisun@tsinghua.edu.cn [Radiation Biophysics Lab, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77586 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The objective of this paper is to introduce a novel cell printing and microfluidic system to serve as a portable ground model for the study of drug conversion and radiation protection of living liver tissue analogs. The system is applied to study behavior in ground models of space stress, particularly radiation. A microfluidic environment is engineered by two cell types to prepare an improved higher fidelity in vitro micro-liver tissue analog. Cell-laden Matrigel printing and microfluidic chips were used to test radiation shielding to liver cells by the pro-drug amifostine. In this work, the sealed microfluidic chip regulates three variables of interest: radiation exposure, anti-radiation drug treatment and single- or dual-tissue culture environments. This application is intended to obtain a scientific understanding of the response of the multi-cellular biological system for long-term manned space exploration, disease models and biosensors.

  8. Survival, Quality of Life and Effects of Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Adults with Pompe Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Güngör (Deniz)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPompe disease, or glycogen storage disorder type II, is a rare inherited metabolic disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase. This results in accumulation of glycogen in cells throughout the body, particularly muscle cells. The disease presents

  9. Enzyme-triggered nanomedicine: Drug release strategies in cancer therapy (Invited Review)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Thomas Lars; Thompson, David H.; Kaasgaard, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    -based strategies are particularly interesting as they require no prior knowledge of the tumour localization. The basis of this review is an evaluation of the current status of drug delivery strategies focused on triggered drug release by disease-associated enzymes. We limit ourselves to reviewing the liposome...

  10. Oral pharmacological chaperone migalastat compared with enzyme replacement therapy in Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, Derralynn A.; Nicholls, Kathleen; Shankar, Suma P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by GLA mutations, resulting in α-galactosidase (α-Gal) deficiency and accumulation of lysosomal substrates. Migalastat, an oral pharmacological chaperone being developed as an alternative to intravenous enzyme replacement t...

  11. Photobiomodulation Therapy Decreases Oxidative Stress in the Lung Tissue after Formaldehyde Exposure: Role of Oxidant/Antioxidant Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Silva Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is ubiquitous pollutant that induces oxidative stress in the lung. Several lung diseases have been associated with oxidative stress and their control is necessary. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT has been highlighted as a promissory treatment, but its mechanisms need to be better investigated. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of PBMT on the oxidative stress generated by FA exposure. Male Wistar rats were submitted to FA exposure of 1% or vehicle (3 days and treated or not with PBMT (1 and 5 h after each FA exposure. Rats treated only with laser were used as control. Twenty-four hours after the last FA exposure, we analyzed the effects of PBMT on the generation of nitrites and hydrogen peroxide, oxidative burst, glutathione reductase, peroxidase, S-transferase enzyme activities, the gene expression of nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase, superoxide dismutase, the catalase enzyme, and heme oxygenase-1. PBMT reduced the generation of nitrites and hydrogen peroxide and increased oxidative burst in the lung cells. A decreased level of oxidant enzymes was observed which were concomitantly related to an increased level of antioxidants. This study provides new information about the antioxidant mechanisms of PBMT in the lung and might constitute an important tool for lung disease treatment.

  12. Comparative impact of AAV and enzyme replacement therapy on respiratory and cardiac function in adult Pompe mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin J Falk

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme responsible for degradation of lysosomal glycogen (acid α-glucosidase (GAA. Cardiac dysfunction and respiratory muscle weakness are primary features of this disorder. To attenuate the progressive and rapid accumulation of glycogen resulting in cardiorespiratory dysfunction, adult Gaa−/− mice were administered a single systemic injection of rAAV2/9-DES-hGAA (AAV9-DES or bimonthly injections of recombinant human GAA (enzyme replacement therapy (ERT. Assessment of cardiac function and morphology was measured 1 and 3 months after initiation of treatment while whole-body plethysmography and diaphragmatic contractile function was evaluated at 3 months post-treatment in all groups. Gaa−/− animals receiving either AAV9-DES or ERT demonstrated a significant improvement in cardiac function and diaphragmatic contractile function as compared to control animals. AAV9-DES treatment resulted in a significant reduction in cardiac dimension (end diastolic left ventricular mass/gram wet weight; EDMc at 3 months postinjection. Neither AAV nor ERT therapy altered minute ventilation during quiet breathing (eupnea. However, breathing frequency and expiratory time were significantly improved in AAV9-DES animals. These results indicate systemic delivery of either strategy improves cardiac function but AAV9-DES alone improves respiratory parameters at 3 months post-treatment in a murine model of Pompe disease.

  13. [Effect of components and some protocols of anti-ulcer therapy on content and activity of monooxigenase system enzymes of the stomach mucosa in experimental stomach ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakubov, A V; Pattakhova, M Kh

    2009-01-01

    The influence of components and some schemata of antiulcerous therapy on content and activity of monooxigenase system's enzymes in mucous membrane of stomach are studied on the model of experimental stomach ulcer in rats. It is established, that among components of antiulcerous therapy such as omeprazole, clarithromycin and metronidazole inhibit content and activity of MOS enzymes. Tinidazol, amoxicillin and azithromycin do not affect the function of MOS. Rifampicin and pantoprazole induce enzyme system of monooxigenase. In triple therapy with omeprazole, clarithromycin and metronidazole the inhibit effect of preparations to system of MOS is exponentiated and it leads to suppression of mucous cytoprotaction of gastro duodenal zone. Triple therapy of ulcerous disease with pantoprazole, rifampicin and azithromycin is effective planning to stimulate defense mechanisms of the organism.

  14. Survival, Quality of Life and Effects of Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Adults with Pompe Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Güngör, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPompe disease, or glycogen storage disorder type II, is a rare inherited metabolic disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase. This results in accumulation of glycogen in cells throughout the body, particularly muscle cells. The disease presents with (progressive) muscle weakness and can hence be categorized as a lysosomal storage disorder, a glycogen storage disorder and also a neuromuscular disorder. Pompe disease was the first neuromuscular disorde...

  15. Towards the development of an enzyme replacement therapy for the metabolic disorder propionic acidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Darvish-Damavandi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Propionic acidemia (PA is a life-threatening disease caused by the deficiency of a mitochondrial biotin-dependent enzyme known as propionyl coenzyme-A carboxylase (PCC. This enzyme is responsible for degrading the metabolic intermediate, propionyl coenzyme-A (PP-CoA, derived from multiple metabolic pathways. Currently, except for drastic surgical and dietary intervention that can only provide partial symptomatic relief, no other form of therapeutic option is available for this genetic disorder. Here, we examine a novel approach in protein delivery by specifically targeting and localizing our protein candidate of interest into the mitochondrial matrix of the cells. In order to test this concept of delivery, we have utilized cell penetrating peptides (CPPs and mitochondria targeting sequences (MTS to form specific fusion PCC protein, capable of translocating and localizing across cell membranes. In vitro delivery of our candidate fusion proteins, evaluated by confocal images and enzymatic activity assay, indicated effectiveness of this strategy. Therefore, it holds immense potential in creating a new paradigm in site-specific protein delivery and enzyme replacement therapeutic for PA.

  16. Rapid intranasal delivery of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in the active form to different brain regions as a model for enzyme therapy in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appu, Abhilash P; Arun, Peethambaran; Krishnan, Jishnu K S; Moffett, John R; Namboodiri, Aryan M A

    2016-02-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is critical for maintaining central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis by restricting entry of potentially toxic substances. However, the BBB is a major obstacle in the treatment of neurotoxicity and neurological disorders due to the restrictive nature of the barrier to many medications. Intranasal delivery of active enzymes to the brain has therapeutic potential for the treatment of numerous CNS enzyme deficiency disorders and CNS toxicity caused by chemical threat agents. The aim of this work is to provide a sensitive model system for analyzing the rapid delivery of active enzymes into various regions of the brain with therapeutic bioavailability. We tested intranasal delivery of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), a relatively large (75kD) enzyme, in its active form into different regions of the brain. CAT was delivered intranasally to anaesthetized rats and enzyme activity was measured in different regions using a highly specific High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HP-TLC)-radiometry coupled assay. Active enzyme reached all examined areas of the brain within 15min (the earliest time point tested). In addition, the yield of enzyme activity in the brain was almost doubled in the brains of rats pre-treated with matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Intranasal administration of active enzymes in conjunction with MMP-9 to the CNS is both rapid and effective. The present results suggest that intranasal enzyme therapy is a promising method for counteracting CNS chemical threat poisoning, as well as for treating CNS enzyme deficiency disorders. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Diameter-dependent release of a cisplatin pro-drug from small and large functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Laura; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Russier, Julie; Li, Jian; Chin, Chee Fei; Ang, Wee Han; Pastorin, Giorgia; Risuleo, Gianfranco; Bianco, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The use of platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs in cancer therapy still suffers from severe disadvantages, such as lack of appropriate selectivity for tumor tissues and insurgence of multi-drug resistance. Moreover, drug efficacy can be attenuated by several mechanisms such as premature drug inactivation, reduced drug uptake inside cells and increased drug efflux once internalized. The use of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as chemotherapeutic drug delivery systems is a promising strategy to overcome such limitations due to their ability to enhance cellular internalization of poorly permeable drugs and thus increase the drug bioavailability at the diseased site, compared to the free drug. Furthermore, the possibility to encapsulate agents in the nanotubes' inner cavity can protect the drug from early inactivation and their external functionalizable surface is useful for selective targeting. In this study, a hydrophobic platinum(iv) complex was encapsulated within the inner space of two different diameter functionalized multi-walled CNTs (Pt(iv)@CNTs). The behavior of the complexes, compared to the free drug, was investigated on both HeLa human cancer cells and RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Both CNT samples efficiently induced cell death in HeLa cancer cells 72 hours after the end of exposure to CNTs. Although the larger diameter CNTs were more cytotoxic on HeLa cells compared to both the free drug and the smaller diameter nanotubes, the latter allowed a prolonged release of the encapsulated drug, thus increasing its anticancer efficacy. In contrast, both Pt(iv)@CNT constructs were poorly cytotoxic on macrophages and induced negligible cell activation and no pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Both CNT samples were efficiently internalized by the two types of cells, as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy observations and flow cytometry analysis. Finally, the platinum levels found in the cells after Pt(iv)@CNT exposure demonstrate that they can

  18. Enhanced combined tumor-specific oncolysis and suicide gene therapy for prostate cancer using M6 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, M; Lee, S-J; Li, X; Jiménez, J A; Zhang, Y-P; Bae, K-H; Mohammadi, Y; Kao, C; Gardner, T A

    2009-01-01

    Enzyme pro-drug suicide gene therapy has been hindered by inefficient viral delivery and gene transduction. To further explore the potential of this approach, we have developed AdIU1, a prostate-restricted replicative adenovirus (PRRA) armed with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK). In our previous Ad-OC-TK/ACV phase I clinical trial, we demonstrated safety and proof of principle with a tissue-specific promoter-based TK/pro-drug therapy using a replication-defective adenovirus for the treatment of prostate cancer metastases. In this study, we aimed to inhibit the growth of androgen-independent (AI), PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer cells by AdIU1. In vitro the viability of an AI- PSA/PSMA-expressing prostate cancer cell line, CWR22rv, was significantly inhibited by treatment with AdIU1 plus GCV (10 microg ml(-1)), compared with AdIU1 treatment alone and also cytotoxicity was observed following treatment with AdIU1 plus GCV only in PSA/PSMA-positive CWR22rv and C4-2 cells, but not in the PSA/PSMA-negative cell line, DU-145. In vivo assessment of AdIU1 plus GCV treatment revealed a stronger therapeutic effect against CWR22rv tumors in nude mice than treatment with AdIU1 alone, AdE4PSESE1a alone or in combination with GCV. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of specific-oncolysis and suicide gene therapy for AI-PSA/PSMA-positive prostate cancer gene therapy.

  19. Wild-type and mutated IDH1/2 enzymes and therapy responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Remco J; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Wilmink, Johanna W; van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2018-04-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) are key enzymes in cellular metabolism, epigenetic regulation, redox states, and DNA repair. IDH1/2 mutations are causal in the development and/or progression of various types of cancer due to supraphysiological production of D-2-hydroxyglutarate. In various tumor types, IDH1/2-mutated cancers predict for improved responses to treatment with irradiation or chemotherapy. The present review discusses the molecular basis of the sensitivity of IDH1/2-mutated cancers with respect to the function of mutated IDH1/2 in cellular processes and their interactions with novel IDH1/2-mutant inhibitors. Finally, lessons learned from IDH1/2 mutations for future clinical applications in IDH1/2 wild-type cancers are discussed.

  20. Case report of unexpected gastrointestinal involvement in type 1 Gaucher disease: comparison of eliglustat tartrate treatment and enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoo-Mi; Shin, Dong Hoon; Park, Su Bum; Cheon, Chong Kun; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2017-05-15

    Gastrointestinal involvement in Gaucher disease is very rare, and appears to be unresponsive to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Here, we describe identical twin, splenectomized, non-neuronopathic Gaucher patients on long-term ERT for 9 years, who complained of epigastric discomfort due to Gaucher cell infiltration of the gastroduodenal mucosa. Rare compound heterozygous mutations (p.Arg48Trp and p.Arg257Gln) of the GBA gene were found in both. Improvement in the gastroduodenal infiltration and reduced chitotriosidase levels were observed in one who switched to eliglustat tartrate for 1 year, whereas the other one who maintained ERT showed no improvement of chitotriosidase level and persistent duodenal lesions. This shows that eliglustat might be an effective treatment for Gaucher disease patients having lesions resistant to ERT.

  1. AB073. Classic infantile-onset Pompe disease: phenotypes and outcomes of 5 Vietnamese patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khanh Ngoc; Do, Mai Thi Thanh; Can, Ngoc Thi Bich; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Vu, Dung Chi

    2017-01-01

    Background Pompe disease (PD) or glycogen storage disease type II is a lysosomal storage disorder, caused by mutations of GAA gene which results in deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) enzyme that involves in metabolism of glycogen in the lysosomes. Its incidence is 1/14,000–1/100,000. PD is divided into three types: classic infantile onset, non-classic infantile onset, and late onset. Early enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) before developing respiratory distress may lead to good outcome. Since 2013, we have identified 16 cases with classic infantile-onset and 5 cases were treated with ERT. Herein, we describe phenotypes and outcomes of five infantile-onset PD patients who received ERT. Methods GAA enzyme assay was done at National Taiwan University Hospital. Results Ages of diagnosis were 12, 38 and 70 days, 5 and 9 months of age. Clinical presentations included macroglossia (5/5), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (5/5), failure to thrive (5/5), facial weakness and hypotonia (3 patients diagnosed after 70 days of age), respiratory failure (1 patient diagnosed at 9 months of age). All patients had mildly elevated plasma CK (270–380 UI/L) and transaminase (60–260 UI/l). Ages at starting ERT were 28 and 58 days, 3, 6 and 10 months. The time intervals from diagnosis to starting ERT were between 14 days and 1 month. The durations of ERT were 4–22 months. The outcomes were good. All patients had improvement of cardiac functions shown on echocardiography, respiratory status, and motor development. The patient who first received ERT at 10 months of age was reportedly dead at home due to food obstruction at 18 months of age. Current ages of the survivors were 5–24 months. Conclusions Patients with classic infantile-onset PD will have good outcomes if ERT is started early. Newborn screening for this disease is necessary to yield an early diagnosis.

  2. Virus-directed enzyme prodrug therapy and the assessment of the cytotoxic impact of some benzimidazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczuk, Michał; Boguszewska, Karolina; Żebrowska, Marta; Balcerczak, Ewa; Stasiak, Marta; Świątkowska, Maria; Błaszczak-Świątkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2017-07-01

    Virus-directed enzyme prodrug therapy is one of the major strategy of increasing cytotoxicity of bioreductive agents. This research intended to examine new selected benzimidazole derivatives as a substrate for nitroreductase, the enzyme involved in nitroreduction which is responsible to the production of cytotoxic metabolites. In this way, the selectivity and strength of cytotoxicity can be raised. The effect of benzimidazoles on virus transfected cells and non-virus transfected cells A549 cell line was established by Annexin V + propidium iodide test, western blot, and polymerase chain reaction analysis of specific pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the corresponding gene expression and additionally nitroreductase gene expression. Our results proved the pro-apoptotic properties of all tested compounds in normoxia and hypoxia, especially according to virused A549 cells where the time of exposition was reduced from 48 to 4 h. In this shorten period of time, the strongest activity was shown by N-oxide compounds with nitro-groups. The apoptosis was confirmed by generation of BAX gene and protein and reduction of BCL2 gene and protein.

  3. Analysis of enzyme targeting intraoperative radiosensitization therapy (KORTUC-IORT) for abdominal malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Akihito; Kariya, Shinji; Kataoka, Y.; Miyatake, Kana; Tadokoro, Michiko; Hamada, Norihiko; Kubota, Kei; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    We developed a new radiosensitizer injection containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate just followed by intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer, named KORTUC-IORT (Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas+IORT). Fourteen patients were treated with KORTUC-IORT, external beam radiotherapy, and systemic chemotherapy. All treatments related with KORTUC-IORT were well tolerated, with few adverse effects. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 75% and 25%, respectively. The median survival period is 15 months. The present formulation can be delivered safely and effectively under the conditions used. (author)

  4. Hypoxia-Inducible Regulation of a Prodrug-Activating Enzyme for Tumor-Specific Gene Therapy

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    Toru Shibata

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that tumor hypoxia could be exploited for cancer gene therapy. Using hypoxia-responsive elements derived from the human vascular endothelial growth factor gene, we have generated vectors expressing a bacterial nitroreductase. (20NTR gene that can activate the anticancer prodrug CB1954. Stable transfectants of human HT1080 tumor cells with hypoxia-inducible vectors were established with G418 selection. Hypoxic induction of NTR protein correlated with increased sensitivity to in vitro exposure of HT 1080 cells to the prodrug. Growth delay assays were performed with established tumor xenografts derived from the same cells to detect the in vivo efficacy of CB1954 conversion to its cytotoxic form. Significant antitumor effects were achieved with intraperitoneal injections of CB1954 both in tumors that express NTR constitutively or with a hypoxia-inducible promoter. In addition, respiration of 10% O2 increased tumor hypoxia in vivo and enhanced the antitumor effects. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hypoxia-inducible vectors may be useful for tumor-selective gene therapy, although the problem of delivery of the vector to the tumors, particularly to the hypoxic cells in the tumors, is not addressed by these studies.

  5. The impact of the immune system on the safety and efficiency of enzyme replacement therapy in lysosomal storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broomfield, A; Jones, S A; Hughes, S M; Bigger, B W

    2016-07-01

    In the light of clinical experience in infantile onset Pompe patients, the immunological impact on the tolerability and long-term efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for lysosomal storage disorders has come under renewed scrutiny. This article details the currently proposed immunological mechanisms involved in the development of anti-drug antibodies and the current therapies used in their treatment. Given the current understanding of the adaptive immune response, it focuses particularly on T cell dependent mechanisms and the paradigm of using lymphocytic negative selection as a predictor of antibody formation. This concept originally postulated in the 1970s, stipulated that the genotypically determined lack of production or production of a variant protein determines an individual's lymphocytic repertoire. This in turn is the key factor in determining the potential severity of an individual's immunological response to ERT. It also highlights the need for immunological assay standardization particularly those looking at describing the degree of functional impact, robust biochemical or clinical endpoints and detailed patient subgroup identification if the true evaluations of impact are to be realised.

  6. Timing of initiation of enzyme replacement therapy after diagnosis of type 1 Gaucher disease: effect on incidence of avascular necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Pramod K; Deegan, Patrick; Vellodi, Ashok; Cole, J Alexander; Yeh, Michael; Weinreb, Neal J

    2009-01-01

    Data from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group Gaucher Registry were analysed to assess the relationship between enzyme replacement therapy with imiglucerase (ERT) and incidence of avascular necrosis (AVN) in type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1), and to determine whether the time interval between diagnosis and initiation of ERT influences the incidence rate of AVN. All patients with GD1 enrolled in the Gaucher Registry who received ERT and did not report AVN prior to starting therapy (n = 2700) were included. The incidence rate of AVN following initiation of ERT was determined. An incidence rate of AVN of 13·8 per 1000 person-years was observed in patients receiving ERT. Patients who initiated ERT within 2 years of diagnosis had an incidence rate of 8·1 per 1000 person-years; patients who started ERT ≥2 years after diagnosis had an incidence rate of 16·6 per 1000 person-years. The adjusted incidence rate ratio was 0·59 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·36–0·96, P = 0·0343]. Splenectomy was an independent risk factor for AVN (adjusted incidence rate ratio 2·23, 95% CI 1·61–3·08, P < 0·0001). In conclusion, the risk of AVN was reduced among patients who initiated ERT within 2 years of diagnosis, compared to initiating treatment ≥2 years after diagnosis. A higher risk of AVN was observed among patients who had previously undergone splenectomy. PMID:19732054

  7. Safety and efficacy of enzyme targeting intraoperative radiosensitization therapy (KORTUC-IORT) for advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Akihito; Hamada, Norihiko; Kariya, Shinji; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We developed a new radiosensitizer injection containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate just followed by intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer, named KORTUC-IORT (Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinoma + IORT). Fourteen patients were treated with KORTUC-IORT, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and systemic chemotherapy. With KORTUC-IORT, the agent containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate, was injected into tumor tissue just prior to administration of IORT under ultrasonic guidance. All treatments related with KORTUC-IORT were well tolerated, with few adverse effects. One year survival rate is 67% and median survival period is 15 months. The present formulation can be delivered safely and effectively under the conditions used. (author)

  8. Imminent angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor from microbial source for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lida Ebrahimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drugs targeting Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE have been used broadly in cancer chemotherapy. The recent past coupled with our results demonstrates the effective use of ACE inhibitors (ACEi as anticancer agents, and they are potentially relevant in deriving new inhibitors. Methods: Bacterial strains were isolated from cow milk collected in Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India and plated on nutrient agar medium. The identity of the strain was ascertained by 16s rRNA gene sequencing method and was submitted to the NCBI GenBank nucleotide database. Various substrates were screened for ACEi production by the fermentation with the isolated strain. ACEi was purified by sequential steps of ethanol precipitation, ion exchange column chromatography and gel filtration column chromatography. The apparent molecular mass was determined by SDS-PAGE. The anticancer property was analyzed by studying the cytotoxicity effects of ACEi using Breast cancer MCF-7 cell lines Results: The isolate coded as BUCTL09 was selected and identified as Micrococcus luteus. Among the seven substrates, only beef extract fermented broth showed an inhibition of 79% and was reported as the best substrate. The peptide was purified and molecular mass was determined. The IC50 value of peptide was found to be 59.5 μg/ ml. The purified peptide has demonstrated to induce apoptosis of cancer cell.Conclusions: The results of this study revealed that Peptide has been determined as an active compound that inhibited the activity of ACE. These properties indicate the possibilities of the use of purified protein as a potent anticancer agent.

  9. Activity of the hypoxia-activated pro-drug TH-302 in hypoxic and perivascular regions of solid tumors and its potential to enhance therapeutic effects of chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggar, Jasdeep K; Tannock, Ian F

    2014-06-01

    Many chemotherapy drugs have poor therapeutic activity in regions distant from tumor blood vessels because of poor tissue penetration and low cytotoxic activity against slowly-proliferating cells. The hypoxia-activated pro-drug TH-302 may have selective toxicity for hypoxic and neighboring cells in tumors. Here we characterize the spatial distribution and ability of TH-302 to selectively target hypoxic regions and complement the effect of doxorubicin and docetaxel by modifying biomarker distribution. Athymic nude mice bearing human breast MCF-7 or prostate PC-3 tumors were treated with doxorubicin or docetaxel respectively and TH-302 alone or in combination. Biomarkers of drug effect including γH2aX (a marker of DNA damage), cleaved caspase-3 or -6 (markers of apoptosis) and reduction in Ki-67 (a marker of cell proliferation) were quantified in tumor sections in relation to functional blood vessels (recognized by DiOC7) and hypoxia (recognized by EF5) using immunohistochemistry. γH2aX expression at 10 min and cleaved caspase-3 or -6 at 24 hr after doxorubicin or docetaxel decreased with increasing distance from tumor blood vessels, with minimal expression in hypoxic regions; maximum reduction in Ki67 levels was observed in regions closest to vasculature at 24 hr. TH-302 induced maximal cell damage in hypoxic and neighboring regions, but was also active in tumor regions closer to blood vessels. TH-302 given 4 hr before doxorubicin or docetaxel increased DNA damage and apoptosis throughout the tumor compared to chemotherapy alone. When given with doxorubicin or docetaxel, TH-302 complements and enhances anticancer effects in both perivascular and hypoxic regions but also increases toxicity. © 2013 UICC.

  10. Effects of anti-proteinuric therapy with angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibition on renal protein catabolism in the adriamycin-induced nephrotic rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, M; de Jong, PE; Moolenaar, F; Meijer, DKF; de Zeeuw, D

    A direct consequence of glomerular protein leakage is an increased exposure of proximal tubular cells to proteins. The aim of the present study was to examine whether chronic proteinuria affects the tubular handling of proteins and whether anti-proteinuric therapy by angiotensin-converting-enzyme

  11. Response of women with Fabry disease to enzyme replacement therapy: comparison with men, using data from FOS--the Fabry Outcome Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, Derralynn A.; Barba Romero, Miguel-Ángel; Hollak, Carla E. M.; Giugliani, Roberto; Deegan, Patrick B.

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease (α-galactosidase A deficiency) is an X-linked disorder. Women who are heterozygous for disease-causing mutations often manifest signs and symptoms of Fabry disease, but most studies of the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) have included only men. To date, no direct comparison

  12. Intrathecal enzyme replacement therapy reduces lysosomal storage in the brain and meninges of the canine model of MPS I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkis, E; McEntee, M; Vogler, C; Le, S; Levy, B; Belichenko, P; Mobley, W; Dickson, P; Hanson, S; Passage, M

    2004-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been developed for several lysosomal storage disorders, including mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I), and is effective at reducing lysosomal storage in many tissues and in ameliorating clinical disease. However, intravenous ERT does not adequately treat storage disease in the central nervous system (CNS), presumably due to effects of the blood-brain barrier on enzyme distribution. To circumvent this barrier, we studied whether intrathecal (IT) recombinant human alpha-L-iduronidase (rhIDU) could penetrate and treat the brain and meninges. An initial dose-response study showed that doses of 0.46-4.14 mg of IT rhIDU successfully penetrated the brain of normal dogs and reached tissue levels 5.6 to 18.9-fold normal overall and 2.7 to 5.9-fold normal in deep brain sections lacking CSF contact. To assess the efficacy and safety in treating lysosomal storage disease, four weekly doses of approximately 1 mg of IT rhIDU were administered to MPS I-affected dogs resulting in a mean 23- and 300-fold normal levels of iduronidase in total brain and meninges, respectively. Quantitative glycosaminoglycan (GAG) analysis showed that the IT treatment reduced mean total brain GAG to normal levels and achieved a 57% reduction in meningeal GAG levels accompanied by histologic improvement in lysosomal storage in all cell types. The dogs did develop a dose-dependent immune response against the recombinant human protein and a meningeal lymphocytic/plasmacytic infiltrate. The IT route of ERT administration may be an effective way to treat the CNS disease in MPS I and could be applicable to other lysosomal storage disorders.

  13. Fabry disease under enzyme replacement therapy-new insights in efficacy of different dosages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Johannes; Lenders, Malte; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Nordbeck, Peter; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Blaschke, Daniela; Duning, Thomas; Reiermann, Stefanie; Stypmann, Jörg; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Gottschling, Timo; Störk, Stefan; Wanner, Christoph; Sommer, Claudia; Brand, Eva; Weidemann, Frank

    2017-11-23

    Fabry patients on reduced dose of agalsidase-beta or after switch to agalsidase-alfa show a decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and an increase of the Mainz Severity Score Index. In this prospective observational study, we assessed end-organ damage and clinical symptoms in 112 patients who had received agalsidase-beta (1.0 mg/kg) for >1 year, who were (i) non-randomly assigned to continue this treatment regime (regular-dose group, n = 37); (ii) received a reduced dose of agalsidase-beta and subsequent switch to agalsidase-alfa (0.2 mg/kg) or a direct switch to 0.2 mg/kg agalsidase-alfa (switch group, n = 38); or (iii) were re-switched to agalsidase-beta after receiving agalsidase-alfa for at least 12 months (re-switch group, n = 37) with a median follow-up of 53 (38-57) months. eGFR of patients in the regular-dose group remained stable. Patients in the switch group showed an annual eGFR loss of - 4.6  ±  9.1 mL/min/1.73 m2 (P risk 0.42; 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.93; P = 0.02). Lyso-Gb3 remained stable in the switch (P = 0.97) and the regular-dose (P = 0.48) groups, but decreased in the re-switch group after change of the therapy regimen (P < 0.05). After switch to agalsidase-alfa, Fabry patients experienced a continuous decline in eGFR, while this decline was attenuated in patients who were re-switched to agalsidase-beta. Decreasing lyso-Gb3 levels may indicate a better treatment response in the latter group. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  14. Improved management of lysosomal glucosylceramide levels in a mouse model of type 1 Gaucher disease using enzyme and substrate reduction therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John; McEachern, Kerry Anne; Chuang, Wei-Lien; Hutto, Elizabeth; Siegel, Craig S; Shayman, James A; Grabowski, Greg A; Scheule, Ronald K; Copeland, Diane P; Cheng, Seng H

    2010-06-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (acid beta-glucosidase), with consequent cellular accumulation of glucosylceramide (GL-1). The disease is managed by intravenous administrations of recombinant glucocerebrosidase (imiglucerase), although symptomatic patients with mild to moderate type 1 Gaucher disease for whom enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is not an option may also be treated by substrate reduction therapy (SRT) with miglustat. To determine whether the sequential use of both ERT and SRT may provide additional benefits, we compared the relative pharmacodynamic efficacies of separate and sequential therapies in a murine model of Gaucher disease (D409V/null). As expected, ERT with recombinant glucocerebrosidase was effective in reducing the burden of GL-1 storage in the liver, spleen, and lung of 3-month-old Gaucher mice. SRT using a novel inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthase (Genz-112638) was also effective, albeit to a lesser degree than ERT. Animals administered recombinant glucocerebrosidase and then Genz-112638 showed the lowest levels of GL-1 in all the visceral organs and a reduced number of Gaucher cells in the liver. This was likely because the additional deployment of SRT following enzyme therapy slowed the rate of reaccumulation of GL-1 in the affected organs. Hence, in patients whose disease has been stabilized by intravenously administered recombinant glucocerebrosidase, orally administered SRT with Genz-112638 could potentially be used as a convenient maintenance therapy. In patients naïve to treatment, ERT followed by SRT could potentially accelerate clearance of the offending substrate.

  15. Bone marrow involvement in Gaucher disease at MRI: what long-term evolution can we expect under enzyme replacement therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedida, Benjamin; Touraine, Sebastien; Laredo, Jean-Denis; Stirnemann, Jerome; Belmatoug, Nadia; Petrover, David

    2015-01-01

    To study the long-term evolution of the bone marrow burden (BMB) score at MRI in patients with Gaucher disease (GD) under enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Forty patients treated for GD were retrospectively studied in a referral centre. BMB scores were assessed on spine and femur MR examinations performed between January 2003 and June 2014. The long-term evolution of the BMB scores was analyzed using a linear mixed model. A total of 121 MRI examinations were performed during the study period with a mean follow-up of 7.1 years ± 5.6, an average rate of 3.1 MR examinations ± 1.7 per patient and an interval of 2.3 years ± 1.1 between examinations. Patients had received ERT during 12 years on average ± 6.7. The trend of BMB scores with time decreased significantly by 15 % (P = 0.008) during the total study period and 39 % (P = 0.01) during the first 5 years of treatment. No changes in BMB scores were observed after five years of treatment. In Gaucher patients, the trend of MRI BMB scores with time decreased significantly under ERT the first 5 years of treatment before a long-term stabilization. (orig.)

  16. Histological characterisation of visceral changes in a patient with type 2 Gaucher disease treated with enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, Yuko; Fukuda, Mitsumasa; Watanabe, Shohei; Nakano, Takeshi; Okamoto, Kentaro; Kuzume, Kazuyo; Yano, Yoshiaki; Eguchi, Mariko; Ishimae, Minenori; Ishii, Eiichi; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko

    2018-02-01

    Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glucocerebroside. Three major sub-types have been described, type 2 is an acute neurological form that exhibits serious general symptoms and poor prognosis, compared with the other types. This case was a girl diagnosed with type 2 Gaucher disease at 12months of age who presented with poor weight gain from infancy, stridor, hypertonia, hepatosplenomegaly, trismus and an eye movement disorder. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) was administered, but she had frequent myoclonus and developmental regression. She needed artificial ventilation because of respiratory failure. She died at 11years of age. An autopsy demonstrated infiltrating CD68-positive large cells containing abundant lipids in alveoli, while in the liver, kidney and bone marrow CD68-positive cells were small and round. In the bone marrow, myelodysplastic changes were present without Gaucher cells. The infiltration of Gaucher cells in alveoli was marked, suggesting that ERT was relatively ineffective in pulmonary involvement, particularly intra-alveolar. Additional treatments are necessary to improve the neurological and pulmonary prognosis of type 2Gaucher disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. HDAC inhibition amplifies gap junction communication in neural progenitors: Potential for cell-mediated enzyme prodrug therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Zahidul; Akhtar, Monira; Asklund, Thomas; Juliusson, Bengt; Almqvist, Per M.; Ekstroem, Tomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Enzyme prodrug therapy using neural progenitor cells (NPCs) as delivery vehicles has been applied in animal models of gliomas and relies on gap junction communication (GJC) between delivery and target cells. This study investigated the effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors on GJC for the purpose of facilitating transfer of therapeutic molecules from recombinant NPCs. We studied a novel immortalized midbrain cell line, NGC-407 of embryonic human origin having neural precursor characteristics, as a potential delivery vehicle. The expression of gap junction protein connexin 43 (C x 43) was analyzed by western blot and immunocytochemistry. While C x 43 levels were decreased in untreated differentiating NGC-407 cells, the HDAC inhibitor 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB) increased C x 43 expression along with increased membranous deposition in both proliferating and differentiating cells. Simultaneously, Ser 279/282-phosphorylated form of C x 43 was declined in both culture conditions by 4-PB. The 4-PB effect in NGC-407 cells was verified by using HNSC.100 human neural progenitors and Trichostatin A. Improved functional GJC is of imperative importance for therapeutic strategies involving intercellular transport of low molecular-weight compounds. We show here an enhancement by 4-PB, of the functional GJC among NGC-407 cells, as well as between NGC-407 and human glioma cells, as indicated by increased fluorescent dye transfer

  18. Effects of Estrogen Replacement Therapy on Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities of Ovariectomized and Ovariectomized-Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı F. Ceylan-Işık

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause and diabetes are conditions producing free radicals independently from each other. Estrogen replacement therapy which widely used in postmenopausal period has beneficial effects because of its antioxidant property. The study groups were as follows: ovariectomy (n=8, ovariectomy+17-östradiol (n=8, ovariectomy+diabetes (n=10 and ovariectomy+diabetes+17-östradiol (n=8. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (45 mg/kg i.p. and the treatment with 17-östradiol (0.1 mg/kg/day was started a week after ovariectomy. After–week long experimental period aortic and uterine tissues were collected from the animals and the malondialdehyde concentration, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities were quantified. The treatment did not effect blood glucose concentrations, but increased plasma estradiol concentrations. Increased malondialdehyde concentrations were reduced by the treatment in aorta from diabetics and nondiabetics, but the treatment increased malondialdehyde concentrations in nondiabetic uterine while were reducing in diabetic uterine. The treatment also reduced the increased activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase in aorta from diabetics and nondiabetics, on the other hand the treatment increased the activities of those enzymes in uterine from diabetics and nondiabetics. Our results suggested that estrogen acts as an antioxidant or prooxidant depending on the tissues.

  19. Bone marrow involvement in Gaucher disease at MRI: what long-term evolution can we expect under enzyme replacement therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedida, Benjamin; Touraine, Sebastien; Laredo, Jean-Denis [Hopital Lariboisiere, AP-HP, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Paris (France); Stirnemann, Jerome [Universite Paris-Diderot Hopital Bichat, AP-HP, Department of Biostatistics and Medical Data Processing, INSERM UMR 738, Paris (France); Geneva University Hospital, Division of General Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Belmatoug, Nadia [Hopital Beaujon, AP-HP, Referral Center for Lysosomal Diseases (RCLD), Clichy (France); Hopital Beaujon, AP-HP, Department of Internal Medicine, Clichy (France); Petrover, David [Hopital Lariboisiere, AP-HP, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Paris (France); Hopital Beaujon, AP-HP, Referral Center for Lysosomal Diseases (RCLD), Clichy (France)

    2015-10-15

    To study the long-term evolution of the bone marrow burden (BMB) score at MRI in patients with Gaucher disease (GD) under enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Forty patients treated for GD were retrospectively studied in a referral centre. BMB scores were assessed on spine and femur MR examinations performed between January 2003 and June 2014. The long-term evolution of the BMB scores was analyzed using a linear mixed model. A total of 121 MRI examinations were performed during the study period with a mean follow-up of 7.1 years ± 5.6, an average rate of 3.1 MR examinations ± 1.7 per patient and an interval of 2.3 years ± 1.1 between examinations. Patients had received ERT during 12 years on average ± 6.7. The trend of BMB scores with time decreased significantly by 15 % (P = 0.008) during the total study period and 39 % (P = 0.01) during the first 5 years of treatment. No changes in BMB scores were observed after five years of treatment. In Gaucher patients, the trend of MRI BMB scores with time decreased significantly under ERT the first 5 years of treatment before a long-term stabilization. (orig.)

  20. Association of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy and comorbidity in diabetes: results from the Vermont diabetes information system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacLean Charles D

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors reduce peripheral vascular resistance via blockage of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE. ACE inhibitors are commonly used to treat congestive heart failure and high blood pressure, but other effects have been reported. In this study, we explored the association between ACE inhibitor therapy and the prevalence of comorbid conditions in adults with diabetes Methods We surveyed 1003 adults with diabetes randomly selected from community practices. Patients were interviewed at home and self-reported their personal and clinical characteristics including comorbidity. Current medications were obtained by direct observation of medication containers. We built logistic regression models with the history of comorbidities as the outcome variable and the current use of ACE inhibitors as the primary predictor variable. We adjusted for possible confounding by social (age, sex, alcohol drinking, cigarette smoking and clinical factors (systolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI, glycosolated hemoglobin (A1C, number of comorbid conditions, and number of prescription medications. Results ACE users reported a history of any cancer (except the non-life-threatening skin cancers less frequently than non-users (10% vs. 15%; odd ratio = 0.59; 95% confidence interval [0.39, 0.89]; P = 0.01; and a history of stomach ulcers or peptic ulcer disease less frequently than non-users (12% vs. 16%, odd ratio = 0.70, [0.49, 1.01], P = 0.06. After correcting for potential confounders, ACE inhibitors remained significantly inversely associated with a personal history of cancer (odds ratio = 0.59, [0.39, 0.89]; P = 0.01 and peptic ulcer disease (odd ratio = 0.68, [0.46, 1.00], P = 0.05. Conclusion ACE inhibitor use is associated with a lower likelihood of a history of cancer and peptic ulcers in patients with diabetes. These findings are limited by the cross sectional study design, self-report of comorbid

  1. Weight loss for reduction of proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy: Comparison with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of weight in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM individuals is emerging as a significant strategy in the reduction of proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy along with control of hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The objective was to evaluate the reduction in 24-h proteinuria in T2DM patients with nephropathy by weight loss, with conventional therapy (angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitors as the control arm. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted between June 2010 and May 2011. T2DM patients with confirmed nephropathy by 24-h urinary protein estimation with a body mass index (BMI of >25 kg/m 2 were studied. Patients who had nondiabetic nephropathy, uncontrolled hypertension (>125/75 mmHg irrespective of antihypertensive drugs, excess weight due to edema or obesity due to other specific diseases, alcoholics, smokers, and patients who were on hemodialysis were excluded from the study. The patients were divided into three groups, namely, group A, patients on ACE inhibitor therapy; group B, patients on lifestyle modifications for weight loss; and group C, patients on an antiobesity drug (orlistat and lifestyle modifications. At the end of 6 months, all the three groups were compared. Data were analyzed using software SPSS version 15.0. This study encompassed a total of 88 patients; 12 patients were dropped during the study period and 76 (group A: 22, group B: 23, and group C: 31 patients remained. The mean age of the patients was 58.36 ± 10.87 years (range: 30-70 years. At baseline, age, gender, mean BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, and 24-h proteinuria did not vary significantly among the three groups. At 6 months, the mean BMI significantly decreased in group C ( P < 0.001 compared to that in the other two groups. Among the parameters BMI and WHR, the proportional form of BMI correlated well with the degree of reduction in proteinuria (r = 0.397, P = 0.01. Reduction in weight using lifestyle

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone marrow changes in Gaucher disease during enzyme replacement therapy: first German long-term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poll, L.W.; Koch, J.A.; Scherer, A.; Boerner, D.; Moedder, U.; Dahl, S. vom; Niederau, C.; Haeussinger, D.; Willers, R.

    2001-01-01

    Objective:. Since 1991, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been available for patients with Gaucher disease in Germany. The aim of this study was to analyse the MR pattern of bone marrow involvement and response to ERT in Gaucher disease type I. Patients and design:. Thirty patients with Gaucher disease type I had MRI examinations prior to initiation of ERT with alglucerase/imiglucerase and during follow-up. Median MR follow-up and duration of ERT were 36 months. Coronal T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images of the lower extremities were obtained to evaluate changes in the appearance of yellow marrow. MR images were categorized as having either a homogeneous (type A) or non-homogeneous patchy (type B) appearance of bone involvement and response to ERT was assessed by two radiologists. Results:. Overall, 19 of 30 patients (63%) showed an increased signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images after 36 months of ERT, consistent with partial reconversion of fatty marrow during treatment. Focal bone lesions surrounded by a low signal intensity (SI) rim did not respond to ERT, suggesting bone infarcts. Of the 11 patients with bone infarcts (low SI rim lesion), 82% had the non-homogeneous type B pattern (P=0.0021). In 86% of patients with splenectomy, bone infarcts were seen (P<0.05). Conclusions:. MRI using T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences is a valuable, non-invasive method for monitoring bone marrow response in patients receiving ERT. A non- homogeneous patchy signal intensity of bone marrow involvement correlates with the presence of bone infarcts (P=0.0021). (orig.)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone marrow changes in Gaucher disease during enzyme replacement therapy: first German long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poll, L.W.; Koch, J.A.; Scherer, A.; Boerner, D.; Moedder, U. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Dahl, S. vom; Niederau, C.; Haeussinger, D. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Fakultaet; Willers, R. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Rechenzentrum

    2001-09-01

    Objective:. Since 1991, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been available for patients with Gaucher disease in Germany. The aim of this study was to analyse the MR pattern of bone marrow involvement and response to ERT in Gaucher disease type I. Patients and design:. Thirty patients with Gaucher disease type I had MRI examinations prior to initiation of ERT with alglucerase/imiglucerase and during follow-up. Median MR follow-up and duration of ERT were 36 months. Coronal T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images of the lower extremities were obtained to evaluate changes in the appearance of yellow marrow. MR images were categorized as having either a homogeneous (type A) or non-homogeneous patchy (type B) appearance of bone involvement and response to ERT was assessed by two radiologists. Results:. Overall, 19 of 30 patients (63%) showed an increased signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images after 36 months of ERT, consistent with partial reconversion of fatty marrow during treatment. Focal bone lesions surrounded by a low signal intensity (SI) rim did not respond to ERT, suggesting bone infarcts. Of the 11 patients with bone infarcts (low SI rim lesion), 82% had the non-homogeneous type B pattern (P=0.0021). In 86% of patients with splenectomy, bone infarcts were seen (P<0.05). Conclusions:. MRI using T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences is a valuable, non-invasive method for monitoring bone marrow response in patients receiving ERT. A non- homogeneous patchy signal intensity of bone marrow involvement correlates with the presence of bone infarcts (P=0.0021). (orig.)

  4. Divergent clinical outcomes of alpha-glucosidase enzyme replacement therapy in two siblings with infantile-onset Pompe disease treated in the symptomatic or pre-symptomatic state

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Takashi; Miwa, Yoshiyuki; Tajika, Makiko; Sawada, Madoka; Fujimaki, Koichiro; Soga, Takashi; Tomita, Hideshi; Uemura, Shigeru; Nishino, Ichizo; Fukuda, Tokiko; Sugie, Hideo; Kosuga, Motomichi; Okuyama, Torayuki; Umeda, Yoh

    2016-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal glycogen storage disease caused by acid ?-glucosidase deficiency. Infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD) is the most severe form and is characterized by cardiomyopathy, respiratory distress, hepatomegaly, and skeletal muscle weakness. Untreated, IOPD generally results in death within the first year of life. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid alpha glucosidase (rhGAA) has been shown to markedly improve the life expectan...

  5. The role of arginine and the modified arginine deiminase enzyme ADI-PEG 20 in cancer therapy with special emphasis on Phase I/II clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synakiewicz, Anna; Stachowicz-Stencel, Teresa; Adamkiewicz-Drozynska, Elzbieta

    2014-11-01

    The metabolic differences between normal, healthy cells and neoplastic cells have been exploited by anticancer therapies targeting metabolic pathways. Various studies of malignant processes have demonstrated disturbances in both arginine synthesis and metabolism that enhance or inhibit tumor cell growth. Consequently, there has been an increased interest in the arginine-depleting enzyme arginine deiminase (ADI) as a potential antineoplastic therapy. This review summarizes the literature on the potential anti-cancer therapeutics arginine and ADI, an arginine-catabolizing enzyme. The authors searched the MEDLINE database PubMed using the key words: 'arginine, 'ADI', 'arginine in cancer' and 'ADI and cancer'. The authors evaluate prospective randomized studies on cancer patients between 2004 and 2013 as well as ongoing research found through the US National Institutes of Health trial database. The results of current studies are promising but do not give unequivocal answers and so it is impossible to recommend arginine or its enzyme ADI as a therapeutic. In the opinion of the authors, further identification of arginine-dependent malignant tumors and their metabolism should be investigated. Furthermore, the use of these chemicals, in combination with other chemotherapeutics drugs, should be investigated and indeed may improve the success of arginine-depleting enzymes such as pegylated ADI (ADI-PEG20).

  6. Severe hepatic encephalopathy in a patient with liver cirrhosis after administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin II receptor blocker combination therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podda Mauro

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A combination therapy of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers has been used to control proteinuria, following initial demonstration of its efficacy. However, recently concerns about the safety of this therapy have emerged, prompting several authors to urge for caution in its use. In the following case report, we describe the occurrence of a serious and unexpected adverse drug reaction after administration of a combination of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to a patient with nephrotic syndrome and liver cirrhosis with severe portal hypertension. Case presentation We administered this combination therapy to a 40-year-old Caucasian man with liver cirrhosis in our Hepatology Clinic, given the concomitant presence of glomerulopathy associated with severe proteinuria. While the administration of one single drug appeared to be well-tolerated, our patient developed severe acute encephalopathy after the addition of the second one. Discontinuation of the therapy led to the disappearance of the side-effect. A tentative rechallenge with the same drug combination led to a second episode of acute severe encephalopathy. Conclusion We speculate that this adverse reaction may be directly related to the effect of angiotensin II on the excretion of blood ammonia. Therefore, we suggest that patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension are at risk of developing clinically relevant encephalopathy when angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin II receptor blocker combination therapy is administered, thus indicating the need for a careful clinical follow-up. In addition, the incidence of this serious side-effect should be rigorously evaluated in all patients with liver cirrhosis administered with this common treatment combination.

  7. Comparing Effects of Medication Therapy and Exercise Training with Diet on Liver enzyme Levels and Liver Sonography in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Nabizadeh Haghighi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, characterized by the deposition of fat in liver cells, can cause fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver cell damage if not controlled. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of medication therapy and exercise training with diet on liver enzyme levels and liver sonography in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Materials & Methods :In this quasi-experimental study, female patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver were randomly divided into two groups: medication therapy (n = 10 and exercise therapy (n = 10 for 8 weeks. During this period, the exercise group performed exercise training three days a week for 90 minutes per session. The drug was given to the medication group. In both groups, the diet was 500 calories less than their daily energy. Before and after intervention, blood tests and liver sonography were executed. All statistical analyses were done using SPSS for Windows version 20. Comparisons between and within groups were performed by Student's t-test and Wilcoxon test on paired and unpaired data. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results :In both groups, liver enzyme levels and disease severity in sonography reduced significantly (p<0.05. Conclusion: The findings of the present research showed that both methods of therapy have the same effect on reducing the severity of NAFLD.

  8. Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI on enzyme replacement therapy since infancy: Six years follow-up of four children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafne D.G. Horovitz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and biochemical improvements are reported on Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI patients on Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT with rhASB (galsulfase, Naglazyme®, and preclinical and clinical studies have shown clinical benefits of early initiation. We report four unrelated MPS VI children who began ERT as infants (ages 5 days–10 months. The three older patients showed the first clinical signs of MPS VI at baseline, also presenting different degrees of dysostosis multiplex, and two had mild heart disease. The two oldest also had mild facial coarseness, one had hearing conduction deficit and sleep disorder and the other corneal clouding at baseline. After six years on ERT, all four patients have normal urinary GAG values. Although they all showed normal motor and mental development, brain and cervical spine MRI images available from two of the older patients showed abnormalities, while the youngest child continues having normal images. The four patients presented slower progression of bone and joint disease when compared to their affected older siblings. It should be noticed that only two patients in this sample are currently below the 3rd percentile for height: the youngest who has a constitutional factor associated and the eldest who already presented frank dysostosis at 10 months of age. These findings confirm previous studies that report that skeletal features of the disease cannot be completely prevented despite early ERT. Heart disease already present in two of the four infants at baseline got worse over time and appeared in another patient, but the youngest child on ERT introduction still has a normal echocardiogram at six years of age; he also is the only one without corneal clouding after six years follow-up. Our results also suggest that early ERT prevented storage in spleen and liver and may also have improved or prevented progression of facial dysmorphic features, corroborating similar findings seen in previous studies

  9. Long term clinical history of an Italian cohort of infantile onset Pompe disease treated with enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parini, Rossella; De Lorenzo, Paola; Dardis, Andrea; Burlina, Alberto; Cassio, Alessandra; Cavarzere, Paolo; Concolino, Daniela; Della Casa, Roberto; Deodato, Federica; Donati, Maria Alice; Fiumara, Agata; Gasperini, Serena; Menni, Francesca; Pagliardini, Veronica; Sacchini, Michele; Spada, Marco; Taurisano, Roberta; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Di Rocco, Maja; Bembi, Bruno

    2018-02-08

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has deeply modified the clinical history of Infantile Onset Pompe Disease (IOPD). However, its long-term effectiveness is still not completely defined. Available data shows a close relationship between clinical outcome and patients' cross-reactive immunological status (CRIM), being CRIM-negative status a negative prognostic factor. At the same time limited data are available on the long-term treatment in CRIM-positive infants. A retrospective multicentre observational study was designed to analyse the long-term effectiveness of ERT in IOPD. Thirteen Italian centres spread throughout the country were involved and a cohort of 28 patients (15 females, 13 males, born in the period: February 2002-January 2013) was enrolled. IOPD diagnosis was based on clinical symptoms, enzymatic and molecular analysis. All patients received ERT within the first year of life. Clinical, laboratory, and functional data (motor, cardiac and respiratory) were collected and followed for a median period of 71 months (5 years 11 months). Median age at onset, diagnosis and start of ERT were 2, 3 and 4 months, respectively. CRIM status was available for 24/28 patients: 17/24 (71%) were CRIM-positive. Nineteen patients (67%) survived > 2 years: 4 were CRIM-negative, 14 CRIM-positive and one unknown. Six patients (5 CRIM-positive and one unknown) never needed ventilation support (21,4%) and seven (6 CRIM-positive and one unknown: 25%) developed independent ambulation although one subsequently lost this function. Brain imaging study was performed in 6 patients and showed peri-ventricular white matter abnormalities in all of them. Clinical follow-up confirmed the better prognosis for CRIM-positive patients, though a slow, progressive worsening of motor and/or respiratory functions was detected in 8 patients. These data are the result of the longest independent retrospective study on ERT in IOPD reported so far outside clinical trials. The data obtained

  10. The Flavin Reductase MsuE Is a Novel Nitroreductase that Can Efficiently Activate Two Promising Next-Generation Prodrugs for Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Laura K.; Storey, Mathew A. [School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Kelburn Parade, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Williams, Elsie M. [School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Kelburn Parade, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Victoria University Centre for Biodiscovery, School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Patterson, Adam V.; Smaill, Jeff B. [Maurice Wilkins Centre for Molecular Biodiscovery, School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, Grafton, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Copp, Janine N.; Ackerley, David F., E-mail: david.ackerley@vuw.ac.nz [School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Kelburn Parade, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Victoria University Centre for Biodiscovery, School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Maurice Wilkins Centre for Molecular Biodiscovery, School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

    2013-08-08

    Bacterial nitroreductase enzymes that can efficiently catalyse the oxygen-independent reduction of prodrugs originally developed to target tumour hypoxia offer great potential for expanding the therapeutic range of these molecules to aerobic tumour regions, via the emerging cancer strategy of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT). Two promising hypoxia prodrugs for GDEPT are the dinitrobenzamide mustard PR-104A, and the nitrochloromethylbenzindoline prodrug nitro-CBI-DEI. We describe here use of a nitro-quenched fluorogenic probe to identify MsuE from Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a novel nitroreductase candidate for GDEPT. In SOS and bacteria-delivered enzyme prodrug cytotoxicity assays MsuE was less effective at activating CB1954 (a first-generation GDEPT prodrug) than the “gold standard” nitroreductases NfsA and NfsB from Escherichia coli. However, MsuE exhibited comparable levels of activity with PR-104A and nitro-CBI-DEI, and is the first nitroreductase outside of the NfsA and NfsB enzyme families to do so. These in vitro findings suggest that MsuE is worthy of further evaluation in in vivo models of GDEPT.

  11. The Flavin Reductase MsuE Is a Novel Nitroreductase that Can Efficiently Activate Two Promising Next-Generation Prodrugs for Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Laura K.; Storey, Mathew A.; Williams, Elsie M.; Patterson, Adam V.; Smaill, Jeff B.; Copp, Janine N.; Ackerley, David F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial nitroreductase enzymes that can efficiently catalyse the oxygen-independent reduction of prodrugs originally developed to target tumour hypoxia offer great potential for expanding the therapeutic range of these molecules to aerobic tumour regions, via the emerging cancer strategy of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT). Two promising hypoxia prodrugs for GDEPT are the dinitrobenzamide mustard PR-104A, and the nitrochloromethylbenzindoline prodrug nitro-CBI-DEI. We describe here use of a nitro-quenched fluorogenic probe to identify MsuE from Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a novel nitroreductase candidate for GDEPT. In SOS and bacteria-delivered enzyme prodrug cytotoxicity assays MsuE was less effective at activating CB1954 (a first-generation GDEPT prodrug) than the “gold standard” nitroreductases NfsA and NfsB from Escherichia coli. However, MsuE exhibited comparable levels of activity with PR-104A and nitro-CBI-DEI, and is the first nitroreductase outside of the NfsA and NfsB enzyme families to do so. These in vitro findings suggest that MsuE is worthy of further evaluation in in vivo models of GDEPT

  12. Effect of loading-dose ticagrelor on coronary blood flow, left ventricular remodeling and myocardial enzyme spectrum in patients with acute myocardial infarction after interventional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Rui Xie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of loading-dose ticagrelor on coronary blood flow, left ventricular remodeling and myocardial enzyme spectrum in patients with acute myocardial infarction after interventional therapy. Methods: A total of 86 patients with acute myocardial infarction who received emergency PCI in our hospital between May 2013 and May 2016 were selected and randomly divided into two groups, ticagrelor group received perioperative ticagrelor therapy and clopidogrel group received perioperative clopidogrel therapy. After PCI, coronary blood flow reperfusion was evaluated, serum myocardial remodeling indexes and myocardial enzymes were determined, and cardiac color Doppler ultrasonography was conducted to determine the cardiac function indexes. Results: TIMI grading and TMPG grading of ticagrelor group after PCI were significantly higher than those of clopidogrel group; serum MMP9, BNP, CITP, PICP, PIIINP, CK, CK-MB, cTnI and cTnT content of ticagrelor group 24h after operation were significantly lower than those of clopidogrel group; LVEDD, LVSED and LVMI of ticagrelor group 2 weeks after operation were significantly lower than those of clopidogrel group while LVEF was significantly higher than that of clopidogrel group. Conclusion: Peri-PCI loading-dose ticagrelor can improve coronary blood perfusion and reduce ventricular remodeling and myocardial injury in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  13. Recombinant enzyme therapy for Fabry disease: Absence of editing of human alpha-galactosidase A mRNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Daniël; Speijer, Dave; Linthorst, Gabor E.; Donker-Koopman, Wilma G.; Strijland, Anneke; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2003-01-01

    For more than a decade, protein-replacement therapy has been employed successfully for the treatment of Gaucher disease. Recently, a comparable therapy has become available for the related lipid-storage disorder Fabry disease. Two differently produced recombinant alpha-galactosidase A (alpha-gal A)

  14. Drug-gene interaction between the insertion/deletion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and antihypertensive therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelleman, Hedi; Klungel, Olaf H; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Hofman, Albert; de Boer, Anthonius; Stricker, Bruno H Ch

    BACKGROUND: Despite the availability of a variety of effective drugs, inadequate control of blood pressure is common. There are some indications that the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene modifies the response to antihypertensive drugs, but the results have been inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: To

  15. Intracellular implantation of enzymes in hollow silica nanospheres for protein therapy: cascade system of superoxide dismutase and catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Peng; Chen, Yi-Ping; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2014-11-01

    An approach for enzyme therapeutics is elaborated with cell-implanted nanoreactors that are based on multiple enzymes encapsulated in hollow silica nanospheres (HSNs). The synthesis of HSNs is carried out by silica sol-gel templating of water-in-oil microemulsions so that polyethyleneimine (PEI) modified enzymes in aqueous phase are encapsulated inside the HSNs. PEI-grafted superoxide dismutase (PEI-SOD) and catalase (PEI-CAT) encapsulated in HSNs are prepared with quantitative control of the enzyme loadings. Excellent activities of superoxide dismutation by PEI-SOD@HSN are found and transformation of H2 O2 to water by PEI-CAT@HSN. When PEI-SOD and PEI-CAT are co-encapsulated, cascade transformation of superoxide through hydrogen peroxide to water was facile. Substantial fractions of HSNs exhibit endosome escape to cytosol after their delivery to cells. The production of downstream reactive oxygen species (ROS) and COX-2/p-p38 expression show that co-encapsulated SOD/CAT inside the HSNs renders the highest cell protection against the toxicant N,N'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride (paraquat). The rapid cell uptake and strong detoxification effect on superoxide radicals by the SOD/CAT-encapsulated hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles demonstrate the general concept of implanting catalytic nanoreactors in biological cells with designed functions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Comparison of gallium-67 scanning, bronchoalveolar lavage, and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme levels in pulmonary sarcoidosis. Predicting response to therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baughman, R.P.; Fernandez, M.; Bosken, C.H.; Mantil, J.; Hurtubise, P.

    1984-01-01

    Patients with active pulmonary sarcoidosis underwent bronchoalveolar lavage, gallium scan, and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) level determination prior to treatment with corticosteroids. Pulmonary function was tested before and after therapy. Increase in vital capacity after treatment ranged from 40 to 1,030 ml; 12 of the 16 patients studied had an increase of more than 200 ml. There was a close correlation between the percentage uptake of gallium scan and the increase of the vital capacity after therapy (r . 0.95, p less than 0.01). There was no relationship between the percentage of lymphocytes obtained on lavage and the changes in vital capacity with therapy (r . 0.05). There was a positive correlation between the changes in vital capacity and the ratio of T4(+):T8(+)lymphocytes (r . 0.62, p less than 0.05) and number of T4 (+) lymphocytes (r . 0.92, p less than 0.01) in the bronchoalveolar fluid. There was a low correlation between the pretreatment ACE level and the change in vital capacity (r . 0.368, p greater than 0.05)

  17. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  18. Residual glycosaminoglycan accumulation in mitral and aortic valves of a patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome after 6 years of enzyme replacement therapy: Implications for early diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Sato

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS is an inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of the enzymes needed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG degradation. MPS type I is caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-l-iduronidase and is classified into Hurler syndrome, Scheie syndrome, and Hurler–Scheie syndrome based on disease severity and onset. Cardiac complications such as left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac valve disease, and coronary artery disease are often observed in MPS type I. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT has been available for MPS type I, but the efficacy of this treatment for cardiac valve disease is unknown. We report on a 56-year-old female patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome who developed aortic and mitral stenosis and coronary artery narrowing. The cardiac valve disease progressed despite ERT and she finally underwent double valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting. The pathology of the cardiac valves revealed GAG accumulation and lysosomal enlargement in both the mitral and aortic valves. Zebra body formation was also confirmed using electron microscopy. Our results suggest that ERT had limited efficacy in previously established cardiac valve disease. Early diagnosis and initiation of ERT is crucial to avoid further cardiac complications in MPS type I.

  19. Long-term enzyme replacement therapy is associated with reduced proteinuria and preserved proximal tubular function in women with Fabry disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabakaran, Thaneas; Birn, Henrik; Bibby, Bo M

    2014-01-01

    dysfunction in women with Fabry disease treated with ERT. METHODS: A retrospective, single centre, cohort study evaluated the long-term association between ERT, albuminuria and eGFR in 13 women with Fabry disease and mild renal involvement. In particular, we analysed the changes in the proteinuric profile...... to end-stage renal failure. In women with Fabry disease, accumulation of GL-3 in the glomerular podocytes and other renal cells induces progressive, proteinuric nephropathy, but not as severe as in men. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant α-Gal A reduces cellular GL-3 deposits in podocytes...... in albuminuria was paralleled by a decrease in both glomerular and tubular urine protein markers. CONCLUSIONS: The data indicate that long-term ERT is associated with a reduction in albuminuria and glomerular and tubular urinary protein markers in women with Fabry disease and mild renal manifestations....

  20. Evaluation of treatment response to enzyme replacement therapy with Velaglucerase alfa in patients with Gaucher disease using whole-body magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudemann, K; Moos, L; Mengel, E; Lollert, A; Hoffmann, C; Brixius-Huth, M; Wagner, D; Düber, C; Staatz, G

    2016-03-01

    This was a retrospective data analysis to evaluate the treatment response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with Velaglucerase alfa using whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A baseline and follow-up MRI were performed on 18 Gaucher Type 1 patients at an interval of 11.6 months. The MRI score systems determined the Bone-Marrow-Burden (BMB) score, the Düsseldorf-Gaucher score (DGS), and the Vertebra-Disc-Ratio (VDR). The Severity Score Index Type 1 (GD-DS3) was also assessed. The baseline MRI medians were: BMB, 7.00; DGS, 3.00; and VDR: 1.70; while, the follow-up MRI medians were: BMB, 7.00; DGS, 3.00; and VDR: 1.73. The baseline GD-DS3 median was 2.40 (BMB excl.: 0.50) and the follow-up median was 2.00 (BMB excl.: 0.50). There was weak statistical significance with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for the DGS (p=0.034) and GD-DS3 (p=0.047) between both MRIs. Velaglucerase alfa therapy is a effective long-term treatment for Gaucher Type 1 patients who are newly diagnosed or switching therapies. Measurements with whole-body MRI and an objective scoring system were reliable tools for detecting early stage bone marrow activity. Further research is needed to evaluate the "Booster-Effect" of Velaglucerase alfa therapy in Gaucher skeletal disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel β-lactamase-random peptide fusion libraries for phage display selection of cancer cell-targeting agents suitable for enzyme prodrug therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Girja S.; Krag, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Novel phage-displayed random linear dodecapeptide (X12) and cysteine-constrained decapeptide (CX10C) libraries constructed in fusion to the amino-terminus of P99 β-lactamase molecules were used for identifying β-lactamase-linked cancer cell-specific ligands. The size and quality of both libraries were comparable to the standards of other reported phage display systems. Using the single-round panning method based on phage DNA recovery, we identified severalβ-lactamase fusion peptides that specifically bind to live human breast cancer MDA-MB-361 cells. The β-lactamase fusion to the peptides helped in conducting the enzyme activity-based clone normalization and cell-binding screening in a very time- and cost-efficient manner. The methods were suitable for 96-well readout as well as microscopic imaging. The success of the biopanning was indicated by the presence of ~40% cancer cell-specific clones among recovered phages. One of the binding clones appeared multiple times. The cancer cell-binding fusion peptides also shared several significant motifs. This opens a new way of preparing and selecting phage display libraries. The cancer cell-specific β-lactamase-linked affinity reagents selected from these libraries can be used for any application that requires a reporter for tracking the ligand molecules. Furthermore, these affinity reagents have also a potential for their direct use in the targeted enzyme prodrug therapy of cancer. PMID:19751096

  2. High-throughput hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the optimized quantification of the anti-Gram-negatives antibiotic colistin A/B and its pro-drug colistimethate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Thomas; Tissot, Fréderic; Gardiol, Céline; Corti, Natascia; Wehrli, Stéphane; Guidi, Monia; Csajka, Chantal; Buclin, Thierry; Couet, William; Marchetti, Oscar; Decosterd, Laurent A

    2014-11-21

    Colistin is a last resort's antibacterial treatment in critically ill patients with multi-drug resistant Gram-negative infections. As appropriate colistin exposure is the key for maximizing efficacy while minimizing toxicity, individualized dosing optimization guided by therapeutic drug monitoring is a top clinical priority. Objective of the present work was to develop a rapid and robust HPLC-MS/MS assay for quantification of colistin plasma concentrations. This novel methodology validated according to international standards simultaneously quantifies the microbiologically active compounds colistin A and B, plus the pro-drug colistin methanesulfonate (colistimethate, CMS). 96-well micro-Elution SPE on Oasis Hydrophilic-Lipophilic-Balanced (HLB) followed by direct analysis by Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography (HILIC) with Ethylene Bridged Hybrid--BEH--Amide phase column coupled to tandem mass spectrometry allows a high-throughput with no significant matrix effect. The technique is highly sensitive (limit of quantification 0.014 and 0.006 μg/mL for colistin A and B), precise (intra-/inter-assay CV 0.6-8.4%) and accurate (intra-/inter-assay deviation from nominal concentrations -4.4 to +6.3%) over the clinically relevant analytical range 0.05-20 μg/mL. Colistin A and B in plasma and whole blood samples are reliably quantified over 48 h at room temperature and at +4°C (<6% deviation from nominal values) and after three freeze-thaw cycles. Colistimethate acidic hydrolysis (1M H2SO4) to colistin A and B in plasma was completed in vitro after 15 min of sonication while the pro-drug hydrolyzed spontaneously in plasma ex vivo after 4 h at room temperature: this information is of utmost importance for interpretation of analytical results. Quantification is precise and accurate when using serum, citrated or EDTA plasma as biological matrix, while use of heparin plasma is not appropriate. This new analytical technique providing optimized quantification in real

  3. Elosulfase alfa enzyme replacement therapy attenuates disease progression in a non-ambulatory Japanese patient with Morquio A syndrome (case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misako Hiramatsu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT with elosulfase alfa is the only approved therapy in Japan for patients with Morquio A syndrome, a lysosomal storage disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. The experience with ERT in severely affected, non-ambulatory patients has not been reported in previous studies. This case report describes clinical evidence for the 1-year efficacy and safety of ERT with elosulfase alfa in a severely affected, non-ambulatory, 47-year-old patient with Morquio A syndrome who needs intensive respiratory management. ERT with elosulfase alfa was well tolerated in this patient. Because of the possibility of potential hypersensitivity adverse events, special attention is needed when using ERT in patients with respiratory disorders. However, under the appropriate management of specialists, the patient in this case report showed significant respiratory improvement after starting ERT, and abdominal bloating was improved by gas evacuation. In addition, the patient was able to lift up her arms, reach behind her back, and move her legs slightly, and she recovered her grip strength. Her hearing loss improved and she could hear without a hearing aid. This report shows that ERT with elosulfase alfa can be used with appropriate respiratory care in patients with severe respiratory dysfunction.

  4. Hunter syndrome in an 11-year old girl on enzyme replacement therapy with idursulfase: brain magnetic resonance imaging features and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, Renzo; Rampazzo, Angelica; Cananzi, Mara; Salviati, Leonardo; Mardari, Rodica; Drigo, Paola; Tomanin, Rosella; Gasparotto, Nicoletta; Priante, Elena; Scarpa, Maurizio

    2010-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS-II, Hunter disease) is a X-linked recessive disorder. Affected females are extremely rare, mostly due to skewed X chromosome inactivation. A few papers outline MPS-II brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) "gestalt" in males, but neuroradiological reports on females are still lacking. We present an 11-year-old girl affected by the severe form of MPS-II who was followed up over a time span of 8 years, focusing on clinical and brain MRI evolution. In the last 2.5 years, the patient has been treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with idursulfase (Elaprase™, Shire Human Genetic Therapies AB, Sweden). On brain and cervical MRI examination, abnormalities in our patient did not differ from those detected in male patients: J-shaped pituitary sella, enlargement of perivascular spaces, brain atrophy, mild T2-hyperintensity in the paratrigonal white matter, diffuse platyspondylia, and mild odontoid dysplasia with odontoid cup. Brain atrophy progressed despite ERT introduction, whereas perivascular space enlargement did not change significantly before and after ERT. Cognitive impairment worsened independently from the course of white matter abnormality. Despite a profound knowledge of genetic and biochemical aspects in MPS-II, neuroradiology is still poorly characterized, especially in female patients. Spinal and brain involvement and its natural course and evolution after ERT introduction still need to be clarified.

  5. Intra-articular enzyme replacement therapy with rhIDUA is safe, well-tolerated, and reduces articular GAG storage in the canine model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Raymond Y; Aminian, Afshin; McEntee, Michael F; Kan, Shih-Hsin; Simonaro, Calogera M; Lamanna, William C; Lawrence, Roger; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Guerra, Catalina; Le, Steven Q; Dickson, Patricia I; Esko, Jeffrey D

    2014-08-01

    Treatment with intravenous enzyme replacement therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type I does not address joint disease, resulting in persistent orthopedic complications and impaired quality of life. A proof-of-concept study was conducted to determine the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of intra-articular recombinant human iduronidase (IA-rhIDUA) enzyme replacement therapy in the canine MPS I model. Four MPS I dogs underwent monthly rhIDUA injections (0.58 mg/joint) into the right elbow and knee for 6 months. Contralateral elbows and knees concurrently received normal saline. No intravenous rhIDUA therapy was administered. Monthly blood counts, chemistries, anti-rhIDUA antibody titers, and synovial fluid cell counts were measured. Lysosomal storage of synoviocytes and chondrocytes, synovial macrophages and plasma cells were scored at baseline and 1 month following the final injection. All injections were well-tolerated without adverse reactions. One animal required prednisone for spinal cord compression. There were no clinically significant abnormalities in blood counts or chemistries. Circulating anti-rhIDUA antibody titers gradually increased in all dogs except the prednisone-treated dog; plasma cells, which were absent in all baseline synovial specimens, were predominantly found in synovium of rhIDUA-treated joints at study-end. Lysosomal storage in synoviocytes and chondrocytes following 6 months of IA-rhIDUA demonstrated significant reduction compared to tissues at baseline, and saline-treated tissues at study-end. Mean joint synovial GAG levels in IA-rhIDUA joints were 8.62 ± 5.86 μg/mg dry weight and 21.6 ± 10.4 μg/mg dry weight in control joints (60% reduction). Cartilage heparan sulfate was also reduced in the IA-rhIDUA joints (113 ± 39.5 ng/g wet weight) compared to saline-treated joints (142 ± 56.4 ng/g wet weight). Synovial macrophage infiltration, which was present in all joints at baseline, was

  6. Adenoviral delivery of pan-caspase inhibitor p35 enhances bystander killing by P450 gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy using cyclophosphamide+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doloff, Joshua C; Su, Ting; Waxman, David J

    2010-01-01

    Cytochrome P450-based suicide gene therapy for cancer using prodrugs such as cyclophosphamide (CPA) increases anti-tumor activity, both directly and via a bystander killing mechanism. Bystander cell killing is essential for the clinical success of this treatment strategy, given the difficulty of achieving 100% efficient gene delivery in vivo using current technologies. Previous studies have shown that the pan-caspase inhibitor p35 significantly increases CPA-induced bystander killing by tumor cells that stably express P450 enzyme CYP2B6 (Schwartz et al, (2002) Cancer Res. 62: 6928-37). To further develop this approach, we constructed and characterized a replication-defective adenovirus, Adeno-2B6/p35, which expresses p35 in combination with CYP2B6 and its electron transfer partner, P450 reductase. The expression of p35 in Adeno-2B6/p35-infected tumor cells inhibited caspase activation, delaying the death of the CYP2B6 'factory' cells that produce active CPA metabolites, and increased bystander tumor cell killing compared to that achieved in the absence of p35. Tumor cells infected with Adeno-2B6/p35 were readily killed by cisplatin and doxorubicin, indicating that p35 expression is not associated with acquisition of general drug resistance. Finally, p35 did not inhibit viral release when the replication-competent adenovirus ONYX-017 was used as a helper virus to facilitate co-replication and spread of Adeno-2B6/p35 and further increase CPA-induced bystander cell killing. The introduction of p35 into gene therapeutic regimens constitutes an effective approach to increase bystander killing by cytochrome P450 gene therapy. This strategy may also be used to enhance other bystander cytotoxic therapies, including those involving the production of tumor cell toxic protein products

  7. Ligand-conjugated mesoporous silica nanorattles based on enzyme targeted prodrug delivery system for effective lung cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundarraj, Shenbagamoorthy, E-mail: sundarrajbu09@gmail.com [Proteomics and Molecular Cell Physiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, TN (India); Thangam, Ramar [Proteomics and Molecular Cell Physiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, TN (India); Department of Virology, King Institute of Preventive Medicine and Research, Guindy, Chennai 600 032, TN (India); Sujitha, Mohanan V.; Vimala, Karuppaiya [Proteomics and Molecular Cell Physiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, TN (India); Kannan, Soundarapandian, E-mail: skperiyaruniv@gmail.com [Proteomics and Molecular Cell Physiology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046, TN (India); Department of Zoology, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, TN (India)

    2014-03-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (EGFRAb) conjugated silica nanorattles (SNs) were synthesized and used to develop receptor mediated endocytosis for targeted drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy. The present study determined that the rate of internalization of silica nanorattles was found to be high in lung cancer cells when compared with the normal lung cells. EGFRAb can specifically bind to EGFR, a receptor that is highly expressed in lung cancer cells, but is expressed at low levels in other normal cells. Furthermore, in vitro studies clearly substantiated that the cPLA{sub 2}α activity, arachidonic acid release and cell proliferation were considerably reduced by pyrrolidine-2 loaded EGFRAb-SN in H460 cells. The cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were significantly induced by the treatment of pyrrolidine-2 loaded EGFRAb-SN when compared with free pyrrolidine-2 and pyrrolidine-2 loaded SNs in human non-small cell lung cancer cells. An in vivo toxicity assessment showed that silica nanorattles and EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 exhibited low systemic toxicity in healthy Balb/c mice. The EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 showed a much better antitumor activity (38%) with enhanced tumor inhibition rate than the pyrrolidine-2 on the non-small cell lung carcinoma subcutaneous model. Thus, the present findings validated the low toxicity and high therapeutic potentials of EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2, which may provide a convincing evidence of the silica nanorattles as new potential carriers for targeted drug delivery systems. - Highlights: • EGFRAb-SN developed for receptor-mediated Drug delivery system (DDS). • EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 targeted DDS for cPLA2α inhibition in NSLC. • Study indicates EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 as an efficient in target dug delivery carrier. • Study explains entire efficiency of EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 in vitro and in vivo models.

  8. Radiolabeled enzyme inhibitors and binding agents targeting PSMA: Effective theranostic tools for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, Maroor Raghavan Ambikalmajan; Nanabala, Raviteja; Joy, Ajith; Sasikumar, Arun; Knapp, Furn F.

    2016-01-01

    Because of the broad incidence, morbidity and mortality associated with prostate-derived cancer, the development of more effective new technologies continues to be an important goal for the accurate detection and treatment of localized prostate cancer, lymphatic involvement and metastases. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA; Glycoprotein II) is expressed in high levels on prostate-derived cells and is an important target for visualization and treatment of prostate cancer. Radiolabeled peptide targeting technologies have rapidly evolved over the last decade and have focused on the successful development of radiolabeled small molecules that act as inhibitors to the binding of the N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG) substrate to the PSMA molecule. A number of radiolabeled PSMA inhibitors have been described in the literature and labeled with SPECT, PET and therapeutic radionuclides. Clinical studies with these agents have demonstrated the improved potential of PSMA-targeted PET imaging agents to detect metastatic prostate cancer in comparison with conventional imaging technologies. Although many of these agents have been evaluated in humans, by far the most extensive clinical literature has described use of the 68 Ga and 177 Lu agents. This review describes the design and development of these agents, with a focus on the broad clinical introduction of PSMA targeting motifs labeled with 68 Ga for PET-CT imaging and 177 Lu for therapy. In particular, because of availability from the long-lived 68 Ge (T 1/2 = 270 days)/ 68 Ga (T 1/2 = 68 min) generator system and increasing availability of PET-CT, the 68 Ga-labeled PSMA targeted agent is receiving widespread interest and is one of the fastest growing radiopharmaceuticals for PET-CT imaging.

  9. Ligand-conjugated mesoporous silica nanorattles based on enzyme targeted prodrug delivery system for effective lung cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundarraj, Shenbagamoorthy; Thangam, Ramar; Sujitha, Mohanan V.; Vimala, Karuppaiya; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (EGFRAb) conjugated silica nanorattles (SNs) were synthesized and used to develop receptor mediated endocytosis for targeted drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy. The present study determined that the rate of internalization of silica nanorattles was found to be high in lung cancer cells when compared with the normal lung cells. EGFRAb can specifically bind to EGFR, a receptor that is highly expressed in lung cancer cells, but is expressed at low levels in other normal cells. Furthermore, in vitro studies clearly substantiated that the cPLA 2 α activity, arachidonic acid release and cell proliferation were considerably reduced by pyrrolidine-2 loaded EGFRAb-SN in H460 cells. The cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were significantly induced by the treatment of pyrrolidine-2 loaded EGFRAb-SN when compared with free pyrrolidine-2 and pyrrolidine-2 loaded SNs in human non-small cell lung cancer cells. An in vivo toxicity assessment showed that silica nanorattles and EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 exhibited low systemic toxicity in healthy Balb/c mice. The EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 showed a much better antitumor activity (38%) with enhanced tumor inhibition rate than the pyrrolidine-2 on the non-small cell lung carcinoma subcutaneous model. Thus, the present findings validated the low toxicity and high therapeutic potentials of EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2, which may provide a convincing evidence of the silica nanorattles as new potential carriers for targeted drug delivery systems. - Highlights: • EGFRAb-SN developed for receptor-mediated Drug delivery system (DDS). • EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 targeted DDS for cPLA2α inhibition in NSLC. • Study indicates EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 as an efficient in target dug delivery carrier. • Study explains entire efficiency of EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 in vitro and in vivo models

  10. Insulin dependence and pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy are independent prognostic factors for long-term survival after operation for chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winny, Markus; Paroglou, Vagia; Bektas, Hüseyin; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Reichert, Benedikt; Zachau, Lea; Kleine, Moritz; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Schrem, Harald

    2014-02-01

    This retrospective, single-center, observational study on postoperative long-term results aims to define yet unknown factors for long-term outcome after operation for chronic pancreatitis. We analyzed 147 consecutive patients operated for chronic pancreatitis from 2000 to 2011. Mean follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1 month to 12.7 years). Complete long-term survival data were provided by the German citizen registration authorities for all patients. A quality-of-life questionnaire was sent to surviving patients after a mean follow-up of 5.7 years. Surgical principles were resection (n = 86; 59%), decompression (n = 29; 20%), and hybrid procedures (n = 32; 21%). No significant influences of different surgical principles and operative procedures on survival, long-term quality of life and pain control could be detected. Overall 30-day mortality was 2.7%, 1-year survival 95.9%, and 3-year survival 90.8%. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that only postoperative insulin dependence at the time of hospital discharge (P = .027; Exp(B) = 2.111; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.089-4.090) and the absence of pancreas enzyme replacement therapy at the time of hospital discharge (P = .039; Exp(B) = 2.102; 95% CI, 1.037-4.262) were significant, independent risk factors for survival with significant hazard ratios for long-term survival. Long-term improvement in quality of life was reported by 55 of 76 long-term survivors (73%). Pancreatic enzyme replacement should be standard treatment after surgery for chronic pancreatitis at the time of hospital discharge, even when no clinical signs of exocrine pancreatic failure exist. This study underlines the potential importance of early operative intervention in chronic pancreatitis before irreversible endocrine dysfunction is present. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitor therapy in adolescents with type 1 diabetes in a regional cohort: Auckland, New Zealand from 2006 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Rosalie J; Reed, Peter W; Mouat, Fran; Jefferies, Craig; Gunn, Alistair J; Hofman, Paul L

    2018-05-01

    To review indications and use of angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitor (ACEI) therapy for the treatment of persistent microalbuminuria (MA) and/or hypertension (HTN) in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Retrospective chart review of adolescent patients with T1DM seen within the paediatric diabetes service in Auckland, New Zealand, from 2006 to 2016. MA, HTN, patient demographic characteristics and ACEI prescribing and monitoring indices were examined. Five hundred adolescents with T1DM were included. There were 26 patients (5%) with MA and/or HTN. MA alone was present in 16, HTN alone in 3 and both HTN and MA in 7. The 5-year MA/HTN-free rate was 98%, and the 10-year MA/HTN-free rate was 93%. Longer disease duration and earlier diagnosis were predictors of MA/HTN. There was no significant difference in standard clinical indices between study patients and others. ACEI was prescribed for 17 of 26 patients for either HTN or MA. Within 6 weeks of ACEI commencement, less than half of the subjects had repeat serum creatinine and MA screens and no record of repeat blood pressure measurement. Despite this, all patients had 3-monthly reviews within outpatient clinics where adjustments of ACEI doses were made. In our regional adolescent population with T1DM, there were low rates of both MA and/or HTN. In those who required treatment with ACEI, clinical monitoring post-commencement of therapy was inconsistent. Local consensus guidelines for the management of persistent MA in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus were developed in response to this study. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  12. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Promoter-Containing Retroviral Promoter Conversion Vectors for Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy are Functional in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Klein

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene directed-enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT is an approach for sensitization of tumor cells to an enzymatically activated, otherwise nontoxic, prodrug. Cytochrome P450 2B1 (CYP2B1 metabolizes the prodrugs cyclophosphamide (CPA and ifosfamide (IFA to produce the cytotoxic substances phosphoramide mustard and isophosphoramide mustard as well as the byproduct acrolein. We have constructed a retroviral promoter conversion (ProCon vector for breast cancer GDEPT. The vector allows expression of CYP2B1 from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV promoter known to be active in the mammary glands of transgenic animals. It is anticipated to be used for the generation of encapsulated viral vector producing cells which, when placed inside or close to a tumor, will act as suppliers of the therapeutic CYP2B1 protein as well as of the therapeutic vector itself. The generated vector was effectively packaged by virus producing cells and allowed the production of high levels of enzymatically active CYP2B1 in infected cells which sensitized them to killing upon treatment with both IFA and CPA. Determination of the respective IC50 values demonstrated that the effective IFA dose was reduced by sixteen folds. Infection efficiencies in vivo were determined using a reporter gene-bearing vector in a mammary cancer cell-derived xenograft tumor mouse model.

  13. The use of port-a-caths in adult patients with Lysosomal Storage Disorders receiving Enzyme Replacement Therapy-one centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairead McLoughlin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Port-a-cath is a widely used device in patients with long-term venous access demand such as frequent or continuous administration of medications such as Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT, chemotherapy delivery, blood transfusions, blood products, and fluids. Patients with Lysosomal Storage Diseases (LSDs often require recurrent courses of ERT. We reviewed our experience of using port-a-caths in patients with LSDs with the focus on challenges and complications associated with these catheters. Among 245 adult patients who were treated with ERT, twenty patients (8.2% had a port-a-cath inserted due to poor venous access. Six patients were using their first port whereas five other patients had their port-a-caths replaced at least once. The remaining six patients had inactive port-a-caths. The majority of patients with active port-a-caths never missed more than one consecutive infusion, although one patient missed 2 consecutive infusions whilst on holiday. We identified significant gaps in patients' and their families' understanding of the management of port-a-caths and risks associated with them. It resulted in producing a leaflet and designing an educational program for our LSD patients.

  14. [Shift of focus in the financing of Hungarian drugs. Reimbursement for orphan drugs for treating rare diseases: financing of enzyme replacement therapy in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szegedi, Márta; Molnár, Mária Judit; Boncz, Imre; Kosztolányi, György

    2014-11-02

    Focusing on the benefits of patients with rare disease the authors analysed the aspects of orphan medicines financed in the frame of the Hungarian social insurance system in 2012 in order to make the consumption more rational, transparent and predictable. Most of the orphan drugs were financed in the frame of compassionate use by the reimbursement system. Consequently, a great deal of crucial problems occurred in relation to the unconventional subsidized method, especially in the case of the highest cost enzyme replacement therapies. On the base of the findings, proposals of the authors are presented for access to orphan drugs, fitting to the specific professional, economical and ethical aspects of this unique field of the health care system. The primary goal is to provide a suitable subsidized method for the treatment of rare disease patients with unmet medical needs. The financial modification of orphans became indispensible in Hungary. Professionals from numerous fields dealing with rare disease patients' care expressed agreement on the issue. Transforming the orphan medicines' financial structure has been initiated according to internationally shared principles.

  15. Enzyme Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  16. Divergent clinical outcomes of alpha-glucosidase enzyme replacement therapy in two siblings with infantile-onset Pompe disease treated in the symptomatic or pre-symptomatic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takashi; Miwa, Yoshiyuki; Tajika, Makiko; Sawada, Madoka; Fujimaki, Koichiro; Soga, Takashi; Tomita, Hideshi; Uemura, Shigeru; Nishino, Ichizo; Fukuda, Tokiko; Sugie, Hideo; Kosuga, Motomichi; Okuyama, Torayuki; Umeda, Yoh

    2016-12-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal glycogen storage disease caused by acid α-glucosidase deficiency. Infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD) is the most severe form and is characterized by cardiomyopathy, respiratory distress, hepatomegaly, and skeletal muscle weakness. Untreated, IOPD generally results in death within the first year of life. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid alpha glucosidase (rhGAA) has been shown to markedly improve the life expectancy of patients with IOPD. However, the efficacy of ERT in patients with IOPD is affected by the presence of symptoms and cross-reactive immunologic material (CRIM) status. We have treated two siblings with IOPD with ERT at different ages: the first was symptomatic and the second was asymptomatic. The female proband (Patient 1) was diagnosed with IOPD and initiated ERT at 4 months of age. Her younger sister (Patient 2) was diagnosed with IOPD at 10 days of age and initiated ERT at Day 12. Patient 1, now 6 years old, is alive but bedridden, and requires 24-hour invasive ventilation due to gradually progressive muscle weakness. In Patient 2, typical symptoms of IOPD, including cardiac failure, respiratory distress, progressive muscle weakness, hepatomegaly and myopathic facial features were largely absent during the first 12 months of ERT. Her cardiac function and mobility were well-maintained for the first 3 years, and she had normal motor development. However, she developed progressive hearing impairment and muscle weakness after 3 years of ERT. Both siblings have had low anti-rhGAA immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers during ERT and have tolerated the treatment well. These results suggest that initiation of ERT during the pre-symptomatic period can prevent and/or attenuate the progression of IOPD, including cardiomyopathy, respiratory distress, and muscle weakness for first several years of ERT. However, to improve the long-term efficacy of ERT for IOPD, new strategies

  17. Use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate cardiac structure, function and fibrosis in children with infantile Pompe disease on enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Piers C A; Pasquali, Sara K; Darty, Stephen; Ing, Richard J; Li, Jennifer S; Kim, Raymond J; DeArmey, Stephanie; Kishnani, Priya S; Campbell, Michael J

    2010-12-01

    Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase deficiency) is one of several lysosomal storage diseases amenable to treatment with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). While echocardiography (echo) has been the standard method to evaluate the cardiac response to ERT, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has the advantage of a better tissue definition and characterization of myocardial fibrosis. However, CMR for Pompe disease is not frequently performed due to a high risk of sedation. We report the first use of CMR in a feasible protocol to quantify left ventricular (LV) mass, function, and the presence of myocardial fibrosis in the Pompe population. Children with Pompe disease on ERT were assessed with transthoracic echo and CMR over a 3 year period at a single institution. Echocardiography was performed using standard techniques without sedation. CMR was performed using retrospectively gated and real-time imaging, with and without sedation. LV mass indexed to body surface area (LVMI) and ejection fraction (EF) were measured by both echo and CMR, and evaluated for change over time. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed by CMR with delayed enhancement imaging 5-10 min after gadolinium contrast using single shot inversion recovery sequences with inversion time set to null the signal from normal myocardium. Seventeen CMR scans were successfully performed in 10 subjects with Pompe disease (median age at first CMR is 9 months, range 1-38 months, 80% male), with sedation only performed in 4 studies. There was a median interval of 5 months (range 0-34 months) from the start of ERT to first CMR (baseline). At baseline, the median indexed LVMI by CMR (140.0 g/m(2), range 43.8-334.0) tended to be lower than that assessed by echo (median 204.0 g/m(2), range 52.0-385.0), but did not reach statistical significance. At baseline, CMR EF was similar to that assessed by echo (55% vs. 55%). Overall, there was no significant decrease in CMR measured LVMI over time (CMR median LVMI at baseline 94 g

  18. Transformation in pretreatment manifestations of Gaucher disease type 1 during two decades of alglucerase/imiglucerase enzyme replacement therapy in the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Gaucher Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Pramod K; Batista, Julie L; Andersson, Hans C; Balwani, Manisha; Burrow, Thomas Andrew; Charrow, Joel; Kaplan, Paige; Khan, Aneal; Kishnani, Priya S; Kolodny, Edwin H; Rosenbloom, Barry; Scott, C Ronald; Weinreb, Neal

    2017-09-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that the prevalence of severe clinical manifestations in Gaucher disease type 1 (GD1) patients at the time of treatment initiation has changed since alglucerase/imiglucerase enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) was approved in the United States (US) in 1991. US alglucerase/imiglucerase-treated GD1 patients from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group Gaucher Registry clinicaltrials.gov NCT00358943 were stratified by age at ERT initiation (<18, 18 to <50, ≥50 years), era of ERT initiation (1991-1995, 1996-2000, 2001-2005, 2006-2009), and splenectomy status pre-ERT. Prevalence of splenectomy decreased dramatically across the eras among all age groups. Bone manifestations were more prevalent in splenectomized patients than non-splenectomized patients in all age groups. Prevalence of bone manifestations differed across eras in certain age groups: non-splenectomized patients had a lower prevalence of ischemic bone events (pediatric patients) and bone crisis (pediatric patients and adults 18 to <50 years) in later eras; splenectomized adult (18 to <50 years) patients had a lower prevalence of ischemic bone events and bone crisis in later eras. Over two decades after the introduction of ERT, the prevalence of splenectomy and associated skeletal complications has declined dramatically. Concomitantly, the interval between diagnosis and initiation of ERT has decreased, most strikingly in pediatric patients who have the most severe disease. Together, these findings suggest that since the introduction of alglucerase/imiglucerase ERT, optimal standard of care has become established in the US to prevent destructive complications of GD1. © 2017 The Authors American Journal of Hematology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effect of enzyme replacement therapy with alglucosidase alfa (Myozyme®) in 12 patients with advanced late-onset Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Constantinos; Orlikowski, David; Prigent, Hélène; Lacour, Arnaud; Tard, Céline; Furby, Alain; Praline, Julien; Solé, Guilhem; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; De Antonio, Marie; Semplicini, Claudio; Deibener-Kaminsky, Joelle; Kaminsky, Pierre; Eymard, Bruno; Taouagh, Nadjib; Perniconi, Barbara; Hamroun, Dalil; Laforêt, Pascal

    2017-09-01

    The efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in patients at an advanced stage of Pompe disease has only been addressed in a few studies. Our objective was to assess the long term effects of ERT in a cohort of patients with severe Pompe disease. We identified patients from the French Pompe Registry with severe respiratory failure and permanent wheelchair use (assisted walk for a few meters was allowed) when starting ERT. Patients' medical records were collected and reviewed and respiratory and motor functions, before ERT initiation and upon last evaluation were compared. Twelve patients (7 males) were identified. Median age at symptom onset was 24years [IQR=15.5; 36.0]. At baseline ventilation was invasive in 11 patients and noninvasive in one, with a median ventilation time of 24h [IQR=21.88; 24.00] (min 20; max 24). ERT was initiated at a median age of 52.5years [IQR=35.75; 66.50]. Median treatment duration was 55months [IQR=39.5; 81.0]. During observational period no adverse reaction to ERT was recorded, five patients (41.67%) died, three decreased their ventilation time by 30, 60 and 90min and two increased their assisted walking distance, by 80 and 20m. Some patients at a very advanced stage of Pompe disease may show a mild benefit from ERT, in terms of increased time of autonomous ventilation and of enlarged distance in assisted walk. ERT can be initiated in these patients in order to retain their current level of independence and ability to perform daily life activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Epigenetic mismatches with mutated transcribing genes at leukemogenic S-phase binding/start sites--potential targets for therapy with enzyme inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prindull, Gregor

    2012-11-01

    This review focuses on gene transcription patterns of leukemogenic S-phases in mitotic cell cycles for identification of enzymatic reactions as potential targets for epigenetics-based drug therapy. Transcription of leukemic genes is triggered by reprogrammed transcription factors (TFs) mediated by chromatin histones. Reprogrammed TFs originate from transcriptional alterations of CpG methylation patterns of mutated epigenetic genes. They preserve memory information of earlier leukemogenic exposures, even transgenerationally via the zygote, through small (e.g. pi)RNA transmitted between cells by exosomes. Normally, reprogrammed TFs are enzymatically silenced and stored as markers in heterochromatic domains. Failure of intra S-phase surveillance (IS) permits the formation and continual operation of DNA replication forks in spite of persisting genotoxic stress. Silenced TFs are re-activated by euchromatin, most likely through leakages of insulator barriers of cis-regulating chromatin modulators (CRM) that normally separate hetero- from euchromatin domains. During transport by sliding nucleosomes, reprogrammed leukemogenic TFs are misplaced at transcription factor binding-/starting-sites (TFBS /TSS) allowing them to interact with and trigger replication of mutated leukemic genes. Interactions of enzymatically reprogrammed TFs, transcribed from mutated epigenetic genes, with replicating leukemic genes at TFBS/TSSs are key driving forces in leukemogenesis. Probably, epigenetic genes, although mutated, still retain their control of replication of leukemic genes. Epigenetics-based enzyme inhibitors must target reprogrammed TFs. Prudently, therapeutic corrections should be introduced within the frame of conventional, cytoreductive treatment protocols. Alternatively, reprogrammed TFs could be replaced by cell populations with regular TF production. Clinically, classification of leukemias should be based on their epigenetic presentation.

  1. Enzyme replacement therapy for Anderson-Fabry disease: A complementary overview of a Cochrane publication through a linear regression and a pooled analysis of proportions from cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Dib, Regina; Gomaa, Huda; Ortiz, Alberto; Politei, Juan; Kapoor, Anil; Barreto, Fellype

    2017-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked recessive inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. Renal failure, heart and cerebrovascular involvement reduce survival. A Cochrane review provided little evidence on the use of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). We now complement this review through a linear regression and a pooled analysis of proportions from cohort studies. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ERT for AFD. For the systematic review, a literature search was performed, from inception to March 2016, using Medline, EMBASE and LILACS. Inclusion criteria were cohort studies, patients with AFD on ERT or natural history, and at least one patient-important outcome (all-cause mortality, renal, cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events, and adverse events) reported. The pooled proportion and the confidence interval (CI) are shown for each outcome. Simple linear regressions for composite endpoints were performed. 77 cohort studies involving 15,305 participants proved eligible. The pooled proportions were as follows: a) for renal complications, agalsidase alfa 15.3% [95% CI 0.048, 0.303; I2 = 77.2%, p = 0.0005]; agalsidase beta 6% [95% CI 0.04, 0.07; I2 = not applicable]; and untreated patients 21.4% [95% CI 0.1522, 0.2835; I2 = 89.6%, plinear regression showed that Fabry patients receiving agalsidase alfa are more likely to have higher rates of composite endpoints compared to those receiving agalsidase beta. Agalsidase beta is associated to a significantly lower incidence of renal, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events than no ERT, and to a significantly lower incidence of cerebrovascular events than agalsidase alfa. In view of these results, the use of agalsidase beta for preventing major organ complications related to AFD can be recommended.

  2. Facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia are common in patients with classic infantile Pompe disease treated with enzyme therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelder, C M; van Capelle, C I; Ebbink, B J; Moor-van Nugteren, I; van den Hout, J M P; Hakkesteegt, M M; van Doorn, P A; de Coo, I F M; Reuser, A J J; de Gier, H H W; van der Ploeg, A T

    2012-05-01

    Classic infantile Pompe disease is an inherited generalized glycogen storage disorder caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase. If left untreated, patients die before one year of age. Although enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) has significantly prolonged lifespan, it has also revealed new aspects of the disease. For up to 11 years, we investigated the frequency and consequences of facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia in long-term survivors. Sequential photographs were used to determine the timing and severity of facial-muscle weakness. Using standardized articulation tests and fibreoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, we investigated speech and swallowing function in a subset of patients. This study included 11 patients with classic infantile Pompe disease. Median age at the start of ERT was 2.4 months (range 0.1-8.3 months), and median age at the end of the study was 4.3 years (range 7.7 months -12.2 years). All patients developed facial-muscle weakness before the age of 15 months. Speech was studied in four patients. Articulation was disordered, with hypernasal resonance and reduced speech intelligibility in all four. Swallowing function was studied in six patients, the most important findings being ineffective swallowing with residues of food (5/6), penetration or aspiration (3/6), and reduced pharyngeal and/or laryngeal sensibility (2/6). We conclude that facial-muscle weakness, speech disorders and dysphagia are common in long-term survivors receiving ERT for classic infantile Pompe disease. To improve speech and reduce the risk for aspiration, early treatment by a speech therapist and regular swallowing assessments are recommended.

  3. Enzyme Replacement Therapy and/or Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation at diagnosis in patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis type I: results of a European consensus procedure

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    de Ru, Minke H

    2011-08-10

    Abstract Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disorder that results in the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans causing progressive multi-organ dysfunction. Its clinical spectrum is very broad and varies from the severe Hurler phenotype (MPS I-H) which is characterized by early and progressive central nervous system (CNS) involvement to the attenuated Scheie phenotype (MPS I-S) with no CNS involvement. Indication, optimal timing, safety and efficacy of the two available treatment options for MPS I, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), are subject to continuing debate. A European consensus procedure was organized to reach consensus about the use of these two treatment strategies. Methods A panel of specialists, including 8 specialists for metabolic disorders and 7 bone marrow transplant physicians, all with acknowledged expertise in MPS I, participated in a modified Delphi process to develop consensus-based statements on MPS I treatment. Fifteen MPS I case histories were used to initiate the discussion and to anchor decisions around either treatment mode. Before and at the meeting all experts gave their opinion on the cases (YES\\/NO transplantation) and reasons for their decisions were collected. A set of draft statements on MPS I treatment options composed by a planning committee were discussed and revised during the meeting until full consensus. Results Full consensus was reached on several important issues, including the following: 1) The preferred treatment for patients with MPS I-H diagnosed before age 2.5 yrs is HSCT; 2) In individual patients with an intermediate phenotype HSCT may be considered if there is a suitable donor. However, there are no data on efficacy of HSCT in patients with this phenotype; 3) All MPS I patients including those who have not been transplanted or whose graft has failed may benefit significantly from ERT; 4) ERT should be started at diagnosis and may be

  4. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), other catecholamine-related enzymes, and their human genes in relation to the drug and gene therapies of Parkinson's disease (PD): historical overview and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatsu, Toshiharu; Nagatsu, Ikuko

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), which was discovered at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1964, is a tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)-requiring monooxygenase that catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of catecholamines (CAs), such as dopamine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline. Since deficiencies of dopamine and noradrenaline in the brain stem, caused by neurodegeneration of dopamine and noradrenaline neurons, are mainly related to non-motor and motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), we have studied human CA-synthesizing enzymes [TH; BH4-related enzymes, especially GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GCH1); aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC); dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH); and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT)] and their genes in relation to PD in postmortem brains from PD patients, patients with CA-related genetic diseases, mice with genetically engineered CA neurons, and animal models of PD. We purified all human CA-synthesizing enzymes, produced their antibodies for immunohistochemistry and immunoassay, and cloned all human genes, especially the human TH gene and the human gene for GCH1, which synthesizes BH4 as a cofactor of TH. This review discusses the historical overview of TH, BH4-, and other CA-related enzymes and their genes in relation to the pathophysiology of PD, the development of drugs, such as L-DOPA, and future prospects for drug and gene therapy for PD, especially the potential of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

  5. Harnessing cellular differentiation to improve ALA-based photodynamic therapy in an artificial skin model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytin, Edward; Anand, Sanjay; Sato, Nobuyuki; Mack, Judith; Ortel, Bernhard

    2005-04-01

    During ALA-based photodynamic therapy (PDT), a pro-drug (aminolevulinic acid; ALA) is taken up by tumor cells and metabolically converted to a photosensitizing intermediate (protoporphyrin IX; PpIX). ALA-based PDT, while an emerging treatment modality, remains suboptimal for most cancers (e.g. squamous cell carcinoma of the skin). Many treatment failures may be largely due to insufficient conversion of ALA to PpIX within cells. We discovered a novel way to increase the conversion of ALA to PpIX, by administering agents that can drive terminal differentiation (i.e., accelerate cellular maturation). Terminally-differentiated epithelial cells show higher levels of intracellular PpIX, apparently via increased levels of a rate-limiting enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO). To study these mechanisms in a three-dimensional tissue, we developed an organotypic model that mimics true epidermal physiology in a majority of respects. A line of rat epidermal keratinocytes (REKs), when grown in raft cultures, displays all the features of a fully-differentiated epidermis. Addition of ALA to the culture medium results in ALA uptake and PpIX synthesis, with subsequent death of keratinocytes upon exposure to blue light. Using this model, we can manipulate cellular differentiation via three different approaches. (1) Vitamin D, a hormone that enhances keratinocyte differentiation; (2) Hoxb13, a nuclear transcription factor that affects the genetically-controlled differentiation program of stratifying cells (3) Hyaluronan, an abundant extracellular matrix molecule that regulates epidermal differentiation. Because the raft cultures contain only a single cell type (no blood, fibroblasts, etc.) the effects of terminal differentiation upon CPO, PpIX, and keratinocyte cell death can be specifically defined.

  6. A rapid non invasive L-DOPA-¹³C breath test for optimally suppressing extracerebral AADC enzyme activity - toward individualizing carbidopa therapy in Parkinson’s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, Anil; Durso, Raymon; Josephs, Ephraim; Rosen, David

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral carbidopa (CD) levels directly impact on central dopamine (DA) production in Parkinson disease (PD) through extracerebral inhibition of dopa decarboxylase (AADC) resulting in an increase in levodopa (LD) bioavailability. Recent data suggests that higher CD doses than those presently used in PD treatment may result in improved clinical response. Optimizing CD doses in individual patients may, therefore, result in ideal individualized treatment. A single center, randomized, double-blind study was carried out recruiting 5 Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients already on LD/CD and 1 treatment näve PD patient using stable isotope labeled LD-1-¹³C as a substrate for a noninvasive breath test to evaluate individual AADC enzyme activity. Each patient was studied five times, receiving 200 mg LD-¹³C at each visit along with one of five randomized CD doses (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg). The metabolite ¹³CO₂ in breath was measured for evaluating AADC enzyme activity and plasma metabolite levels for LD-¹³C and homovanillic acid (HVA) were measured for 4 hours. HVA in plasma and ¹³CO₂ in breath are metabolic products of LD. We found a significant positive correlation of ¹³CO₂ DOB AUC0-240 with serum HVA AUC0-240 following the oral dose of LD-1-¹³C for all 5 doses of CD (r² = 0.9378). With increasing inhibition of AADC enzyme activity with CD, we observed an increase in the plasma concentration of LD.We found an inverse correlation of the 13CO2 DOB AUC with serum LD-¹³C AUC. Our studies indicate the optimal dose of CD for maximal suppression of AADC enzyme activity can be determined for each individual from ¹³CO₂ generation in breath. The LD-breath test can be a useful noninvasive diagnostic tool for evaluation of AADC enzyme activity using the biomarker ¹³CO₂ in breath, a first step in personalizing CD doses for PD patients.

  7. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Renin-Angiotensin Aldosterone Biomarkers Following Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibition Therapy with Benazepril in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochel, Jonathan P; Fink, Martin; Peyrou, Mathieu; Soubret, Antoine; Giraudel, Jérôme M; Danhof, Meindert

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this research was to provide a comprehensive description of the effect of benazepril on the dynamics of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) in dogs. Blood specimens for renin activity (RA), angiotensin II (AII), and aldosterone (ALD) quantitation in plasma were drawn from 12 healthy adult beagle dogs randomly allocated to 2 treatment groups: (i) benazepril 5 mg PO, q24 h (n: 6) and (ii) placebo (n: 6), in a cross-over design. A mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model, which includes the periodic nature of RA, AII, and ALD during placebo treatment and the subsequent changes in dynamics following repeated dosing with benazepril, was developed. The disposition kinetics of benazepril active metabolite, benazeprilat, was characterized using a saturable binding model to the angiotensin converting enzyme. The modulatory effect of benazeprilat on the RAAS was described using a combination of immediate response models. Our data show that benazepril noticeably influences the dynamics of the renin cascade, resulting in a substantial decrease in AII and ALD, while increasing RA throughout the observation span. The model provides a quantitative framework for better understanding the effect of ACE inhibition on the dynamics of the systemic RAAS in dogs.

  8. Therapeutic Enzymes: Applications and Approaches to Pharmacological Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Maryam; Ghoshoon, Mohammad B; Vakili, Bahareh; Ghasemi, Younes

    2017-01-01

    Among therapeutic proteins, enzymes represent small and of course profitable market. They can be used to treat important, rare, and deadly diseases. Enzyme therapy is the only available treatment for certain disorders. Here, pharmaceutical enzymes are reviewed. They are categorized in four main groups, enzymes in replacement therapy, enzymes in cancer treatment, enzymes for fibrinolysis, and finally enzymes that are used topically for various treatments. Furthermore, enzyme gene therapy and future perspective of therapeutic enzymes are mentioned in brief. There are many important approved enzymes in pharmaceutical market. Several approaches such as point mutation, fusion protein designing, glycoengineering, and PEGylation were used to achieve improved enzymes. Although sometimes enzymes were engineered to facilitate production and purification process, appropriate delivery to target sites, extending half-life, and reducing immunogenicity are among the main goals of engineering approaches. Overall, enzymes play a critical role in treatment of common and rare diseases. Evaluation of new enzymes as well as improvement of approved enzymes are of the most important challenges in biotechnology. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Prolonged Expression of Secreted Enzymes in Dogs After Liver-Directed Delivery of Sleeping Beauty Transposons: Implications for Non-Viral Gene Therapy of Systemic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronovich, Elena L; Hyland, Kendra A; Hall, Bryan C; Bell, Jason B; Olson, Erik R; Rusten, Myra Urness; Hunter, David W; Ellinwood, N Matthew; McIvor, R Scott; Hackett, Perry B

    2017-07-01

    The non-viral, integrating Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system is efficient in treating systemic monogenic disease in mice, including hemophilia A and B caused by deficiency of blood clotting factors and mucopolysaccharidosis types I and VII caused by α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) and β-glucuronidase (GUSB) deficiency, respectively. Modified approaches of the hydrodynamics-based procedure to deliver transposons to the liver in dogs were recently reported. Using the transgenic canine reporter secreted alkaline phosphatase (cSEAP), transgenic protein in the plasma was demonstrated for up to 6 weeks post infusion. This study reports that immunosuppression of dogs with gadolinium chloride (GdCl 3 ) prolonged the presence of cSEAP in the circulation up to 5.5 months after a single vector infusion. Transgene expression declined gradually but appeared to stabilize after about 2 months at approximately fourfold baseline level. Durability of transgenic protein expression in the plasma was inversely associated with transient increase of liver enzymes alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase in response to the plasmid delivery procedure, which suggests a deleterious effect of hepatocellular toxicity on transgene expression. GdCl 3 treatment was ineffective for repeat vector infusions. In parallel studies, dogs were infused with potentially therapeutic transposons. Activities of transgenic IDUA and GUSB in plasma peaked at 50-350% of wildtype, but in the absence of immunosuppression lasted only a few days. Transposition was detectable by excision assay only when the most efficient transposase, SB100X, was used. Dogs infused with transposons encoding canine clotting factor IX (cFIX) were treated with GdCl 3 and showed expression profiles similar to those in cSEAP-infused dogs, with expression peaking at 40% wt (2 μg/mL). It is concluded that GdCl 3 can support extended transgene expression after hydrodynamic introduction of SB transposons in dogs, but that alternative

  10. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...... by that enzyme...

  11. Does the Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE gene insertion/deletion polymorphism modify the response to ACE inhibitor therapy? – A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perna Annalisa

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacogenetic testing to individualize ACE inhibitor therapy remains controversial. We conducted a systematic review to assess the effect modification of the insertion/deletion (I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene on any outcome in patients treated with ACE inhibitors for cardiovascular and/or renal disease. Methods Our systematic review involved searching six electronic databases, then contacting the investigators (and pharmaceutical industry representatives responsible for the creation of these databases. Two reviewers independently selected relevant randomized, placebo-controlled trials and abstracted from each study details on characteristics and quality. Results Eleven studies met our inclusion criteria. Despite repeated efforts to contact authors, only four of the eleven studies provided sufficient data to quantify the effect modification by genotypes. We observed a trend towards better response to ACE inhibitors in Caucasian DD carriers compared to II carriers, in terms of blood pressure, proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate, ACE activity and progression to end-stage renal failure. Pooling of the results was inappropriate, due to heterogeneity in ethnicity, clinical domains and outcomes. Conclusion Lack of sufficient genetic data from the reviewed studies precluded drawing any convincing conclusions. Better reporting of genetic data are needed to confirm our preliminary observations concerning better response to ACE inhibitors among Caucasian DD carriers as compared to II carriers.

  12. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  13. Silica-Immobilized Enzyme Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Silica-IMERs 14 implicated in neurological disorders such as Schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease.[86] Drug discovery for targets that can alter the...primarily the activation of prodrugs and proantibiotics for cancer treatments or antibiotic therapy , respectively.[87] Nitrobenzene nitroreductase was...BuChE) Monolith disks* Packed Silica Biosilica Epoxide- Silica Silica-gel Enzyme Human AChE Human AChE Human AChE Equine BuChE Human

  14. Effect of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor/Calcium Antagonist Combination Therapy on Renal Function in Hypertensive Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: Chikushi Anti-Hypertension Trial - Benidipine and Perindopril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Tetsu; Okamura, Keisuke; Shirai, Kazuyuki; Urata, Hidenori

    2018-02-01

    Appropriate blood pressure control suppresses progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). If an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor is ineffective, adding a calcium antagonist is recommended. We compared the long-term effect of two ACE inhibitor/calcium antagonist combinations on renal function in hypertensive patients with CKD. Patients who failed to achieve the target blood pressure (systolic/diastolic: < 130/80 mm Hg) with perindopril monotherapy were randomized to either combined therapy with perindopril and the L-type calcium antagonist amlodipine (group A) or perindopril and the T/L type calcium antagonist benidipine (group B). The primary endpoint was the change of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after 2 years. Eligible patients had a systolic pressure ≥ 130 mm Hg and/or diastolic pressure ≥ 80 mm Hg and CKD (urine protein (+) or higher, eGFR < 60 min/mL/1.73 m 2 ). After excluding 38 patients achieving the target blood pressure with perindopril monotherapy, 121 patients were analyzed (62 in group A and 59 in group B). Blood pressure decreased significantly in both groups, but there was no significant change of the eGFR. However, among patients with diabetes, eGFR unchanged in group B (n = 37, 59.1 ± 15.1 vs. 61.2 ± 27.9, P = 0.273), whereas decreased significantly in group A (n = 31, 57.3 ± 16.0 vs. 53.7 ± 16.7, P = 0.005). In hypertensive patients with diabetic nephropathy, combined therapy with an ACE inhibitor and T/L type calcium antagonist may prevent deterioration of renal function more effectively than an ACE inhibitor/L type calcium antagonist combination.

  15. Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Reduce the Risk of Symptomatic Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer After Definitive Radiation Therapy? Analysis of a Single-Institution Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongmei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, P.R. of China (China); Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan; Xu, Ting; Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Levy, Lawrence B.; O' Reilly, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gold, Kathryn A. [Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have suggested that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) can mitigate radiation-induced lung injury. We sought here to investigate possible associations between ACEI use and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) among patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients who received definitive radiation therapy for stages I to III NSCLC between 2004 and 2010 at a single tertiary cancer center. Patients must have received a radiation dose of at least 60 Gy for a single primary lung tumor and have had imaging and dosimetric data available for analysis. RP was quantified according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess potential associations between ACEI use and risk of symptomatic RP. Results: Of 413 patients analyzed, 65 were using ACEIs during RT. In univariate analysis, the rate of RP grade ≥2 seemed lower in ACEI users than in nonusers (34% vs 46%), but this apparent difference was not statistically significant (P=.06). In multivariate analysis of all patients, ACEI use was not associated with the risk of symptomatic RP (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.66; P=.07) after adjustment for sex, smoking status, mean lung dose (MLD), and concurrent carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy. Subgroup analysis showed that ACEI use did have a protective effect from RP grade ≥2 among patients who received a low (≤20-Gy) MLD (P<.01) or were male (P=.04). Conclusions: A trend toward reduction in symptomatic RP among patients taking ACEIs during RT for NSCLC was not statistically significant on univariate or multivariate analyses, although certain subgroups may benefit from use (ie, male patients and those receiving low MLD). The evidence at this point is insufficient to establish whether the use of ACEIs does or does not reduce the risk of RP.

  16. Somatic mosaicism caused by monoallelic reversion of a mutation in T cells of a patient with ADA-SCID and the effects of enzyme replacement therapy on the revertant phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada-Vélez, M; Vélez-Ortega, A; Orrego, J; Santisteban, I; Jagadeesh, J; Olivares, M; Olaya, N; Hershfield, M; Candotti, F; Franco, J

    2011-11-01

    Patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency exhibit spontaneous and partial clinical remission associated with somatic reversion of inherited mutations. We report a child with severe combined immunodeficiency (T-B- SCID) due to ADA deficiency diagnosed at the age of 1 month, whose lymphocyte counts including CD4+ and CD8+ T and NK cells began to improve after several months with normalization of ADA activity in Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), as a result of somatic mosaicism caused by monoallelic reversion of the causative mutation in the ADA gene. He was not eligible for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) or gene therapy (GT); therefore he was placed on enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with bovine PEG-ADA. The follow-up of metabolic and immunologic responses to ERT included gradual improvement in ADA activity in erythrocytes and transient expansion of most lymphocyte subsets, followed by gradual stabilization of CD4+ and CD8+ T (with naïve phenotype) and NK cells, and sustained expansion of TCRγδ+ T cells. This was accompanied by the disappearance of the revertant T cells as shown by DNA sequencing from PBL. Although the patient's clinical condition improved marginally, he later developed a germinal cell tumour and eventually died at the age of 67 months from sepsis. This case adds to our current knowledge of spontaneous reversion of mutations in ADA deficiency and shows that the effects of the ERT may vary among these patients, suggesting that it could depend on the cell and type in which the somatic mosaicism is established upon reversion. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. A pan-inhibitor of DASH family enzymes induces immune-mediated regression of murine sarcoma and is a potent adjuvant to dendritic cell vaccination and adoptive T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Brynn B; Highfill, Steven L; Qin, Haiying; Bouchkouj, Najat; Larabee, Shannon; Zhao, Peng; Woznica, Iwona; Liu, Yuxin; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Lai, Jack H; Jones, Barry; Mackall, Crystal L; Bachovchin, William W; Fry, Terry J

    2013-10-01

    Multimodality therapy consisting of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation will fail in approximately 40% of patients with pediatric sarcomas and result in substantial long-term morbidity in those who are cured. Immunotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of solid tumors typically generate antigen-specific responses too weak to overcome considerable tumor burden and tumor suppressive mechanisms and are in need of adjuvant assistance. Previous work suggests that inhibitors of DASH (dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity and/or structural homologs) enzymes can mediate tumor regression by immune-mediated mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that the DASH inhibitor, ARI-4175, can induce regression and eradication of well-established solid tumors, both as a single agent and as an adjuvant to a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine and adoptive cell therapy (ACT) in mice implanted with the M3-9-M rhabdomyosarcoma cell line. Treatment with effective doses of ARI-4175 correlated with recruitment of myeloid (CD11b) cells, particularly myeloid DCs, to secondary lymphoid tissues and with reduced frequency of intratumoral monocytic (CD11bLy6-CLy6-G) myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In immunocompetent mice, combining ARI-4175 with a DC vaccine or ACT with tumor-primed T cells produced significant improvements in tumor responses against well-established M3-9-M tumors. In M3-9-M-bearing immunodeficient (Rag1) mice, ACT combined with ARI-4175 produced greater tumor responses and significantly improved survival compared with either treatment alone. These studies warrant the clinical investigation of ARI-4175 for treatment of sarcomas and other malignancies, particularly as an adjuvant to tumor vaccines and ACT.

  18. Vitamin D for combination photodynamic therapy of skin cancer in individuals with vitamin D deficiency: Insights from a preclinical study in a mouse model of squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sanjay; Thomas, Erik; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2016-03-01

    Combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) in which vitamin D (VD) is given prior to aminolevulinate, a precursor (pro-drug) for protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), is an approach developed in our laboratory. We previously showed that 1α,25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol), given prior to PDT, enhances accumulation of PpIX and improves cell death post-PDT in a mouse skin cancer model. However, since calcitriol poses a risk for hypercalcemia, we replaced systemic calcitriol with oral cholecalciferol (D3), administered as a high (tenfold, "10K") diet over a ten-day period. Here, we ask whether VD deficiency might alter the response to cPDT. Nude mice were fed a VD-deficient diet for at least 4 weeks ("deficient"); controls were fed a normal 1,000 IU/kg diet ("1K"). Human A431 cells were implanted subcutaneously and mice were switched to the 10K diet or continued on their baseline diets (controls). In other experiments, mice received a human equivalent dose of 50,000 IU D3 by oral gavage, to simulate administration of a single, high-dose VD pill. At various times, tumors were harvested and serum was collected to measure levels of VD metabolic intermediates. A significant increase in PpIX levels and in the expression of differentiation and proliferation markers in tumor tissue was observed after VD supplementation of both the deficient and 1K mice. Further results describing mechanistic details of PpIX enhancement through alteration of heme- and VD-metabolic enzyme levels will be presented. Based on these results, a clinical study using oral vitamin D prior to PDT for human skin cancer should be performed.

  19. Enzyme replacement therapy for alpha-mannosidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line Gutte; Dali, Christine I.; Fogh, J

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-mannosidosis (OMIM 248500) is a rare lysosomal storage disease (LSD) caused by alpha-mannosidase deficiency. Manifestations include intellectual disabilities, facial characteristics and hearing impairment. A recombinant human alpha-mannosidase (rhLAMAN) has been developed for weekly...

  20. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes...

  1. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  2. Immobilized enzymes and cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucke, C; Wiseman, A

    1981-04-04

    This article reviews the current state of the art of enzyme and cell immobilization and suggests advances which might be made during the 1980's. Current uses of immobilized enzymes include the use of glucoamylase in the production of glucose syrups from starch and glucose isomerase in the production of high fructose corn syrup. Possibilities for future uses of immobilized enzymes and cells include the utilization of whey and the production of ethanol.

  3. Profiling the orphan enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Next Generation Sequencing generates an incredible amount of sequence and great potential for new enzyme discovery. Despite this huge amount of data and the profusion of bioinformatic methods for function prediction, a large part of known enzyme activities is still lacking an associated protein sequence. These particular activities are called “orphan enzymes”. The present review proposes an update of previous surveys on orphan enzymes by mining the current content of public databases. While the percentage of orphan enzyme activities has decreased from 38% to 22% in ten years, there are still more than 1,000 orphans among the 5,000 entries of the Enzyme Commission (EC) classification. Taking into account all the reactions present in metabolic databases, this proportion dramatically increases to reach nearly 50% of orphans and many of them are not associated to a known pathway. We extended our survey to “local orphan enzymes” that are activities which have no representative sequence in a given clade, but have at least one in organisms belonging to other clades. We observe an important bias in Archaea and find that in general more than 30% of the EC activities have incomplete sequence information in at least one superkingdom. To estimate if candidate proteins for local orphans could be retrieved by homology search, we applied a simple strategy based on the PRIAM software and noticed that candidates may be proposed for an important fraction of local orphan enzymes. Finally, by studying relation between protein domains and catalyzed activities, it appears that newly discovered enzymes are mostly associated with already known enzyme domains. Thus, the exploration of the promiscuity and the multifunctional aspect of known enzyme families may solve part of the orphan enzyme issue. We conclude this review with a presentation of recent initiatives in finding proteins for orphan enzymes and in extending the enzyme world by the discovery of new

  4. Agreement between the results of meta-analyses from case reports and from clinical studies regarding the efficacy of laronidase therapy in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type I who initiated enzyme replacement therapy in adult age: An example of case reports meta-analyses as an useful tool for evidence-based medicine in rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampayo-Cordero, Miguel; Miguel-Huguet, Bernat; Pardo-Mateos, Almudena; Moltó-Abad, Marc; Muñoz-Delgado, Cecilia; Pérez-López, Jordi

    2018-02-01

    Case reports might have a prominent role in the rare diseases field, due to the small number of patients affected by one such disease. A previous systematic review regarding the efficacy of laronidase therapy in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS-I) who initiated enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in adult age has been published. The review included a meta-analysis of 19 clinical studies and the description of eleven case reports. It was of interest to perform a meta-analysis of those case reports to explore the role of such meta-analyses as a tool for evidence-based medicine in rare diseases. The study included all case reports with standard treatment regimen. Primary analysis was the percentage of case reports showing an improvement in a specific outcome. Only when that percentage was statistically higher than 5%, the improvement was confirmed as such. The outcomes that accomplished this criterion were ranked and compared to the GRADE criteria obtained by those same outcomes in the previous meta-analysis of clinical studies. There were three outcomes that had a significant improvement: Urine glycosaminoglycans, liver volume and 6-minute walking test. Positive and negative predictive values, sensitivity and specificity for the results of the meta-analysis of case reports as compared to that of clinical studies were 100%, 88.9%, 75% and 100%, respectively. Accordingly, absolute (Rho=0.82, 95%CI: 0.47 to 0.95) and relative agreement (Kappa=0.79, 95%CI: 0.593 to 0.99) between the number of case reports with improvement in a specific outcome and the GRADE evidence score for that outcome were good. Sensitivity analysis showed that agreement between the meta-analysis of case reports and that of the clinical studies were good only when using a strong confirmatory strategy for outcome improvement in case reports. We found an agreement between the results of meta-analyses from case reports and from clinical studies in the efficacy of laronidase therapy in

  5. Artificial Enzymes, "Chemzymes"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Rousseau, Cyril Andre Raphaël; Pedersen, Lavinia Georgeta M

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models that successf......Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models...... that successfully perform Michaelis-Menten catalysis under enzymatic conditions (i.e., aqueous medium, neutral pH, ambient temperature) and for those that do, very high rate accelerations are seldomly seen. This review will provide a brief summary of the recent developments in artificial enzymes, so called...... "Chemzymes", based on cyclodextrins and other molecules. Only the chemzymes that have shown enzyme-like activity that has been quantified by different methods will be mentioned. This review will summarize the work done in the field of artificial glycosidases, oxidases, epoxidases, and esterases, as well...

  6. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna, E-mail: kristyna.pospiskova@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Safarik, Ivo, E-mail: ivosaf@yahoo.com [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Nanobiotechnology, Institute of Nanobiology and Structural Biology of GCRC, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (−20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Cross-linked enzyme powders were prepared in various liquid media. • Insoluble enzymes were magnetized using iron oxides particles. • Magnetic iron oxides particles were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • Magnetic modification was performed under low (freezing) temperature. • Cross-linked powdered trypsin and lipase can be used repeatedly for reaction.

  7. Enzymes in Fermented Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giyatmi; Irianto, H E

    Fermented fish products are very popular particularly in Southeast Asian countries. These products have unique characteristics, especially in terms of aroma, flavor, and texture developing during fermentation process. Proteolytic enzymes have a main role in hydrolyzing protein into simpler compounds. Fermentation process of fish relies both on naturally occurring enzymes (in the muscle or the intestinal tract) as well as bacteria. Fermented fish products processed using the whole fish show a different characteristic compared to those prepared from headed and gutted fish. Endogenous enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and aminopeptidase are the most involved in the fermentation process. Muscle tissue enzymes like cathepsins, peptidases, transaminases, amidases, amino acid decarboxylases, glutamic dehydrogenases, and related enzymes may also play a role in fish fermentation. Due to the decreased bacterial number during fermentation, contribution of microbial enzymes to proteolysis may be expected prior to salting of fish. Commercial enzymes are supplemented during processing for specific purposes, such as quality improvement and process acceleration. In the case of fish sauce, efforts to accelerate fermentation process and to improve product quality have been studied by addition of enzymes such as papain, bromelain, trypsin, pepsin, and chymotrypsin. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of Bee Venom Enzymes on Diseases and Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossen, Md Sakib; Shapla, Ummay Mahfuza; Gan, Siew Hua; Khalil, Md Ibrahim

    2016-12-27

    Bee venom (BV) is used to treat many diseases and exhibits anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, antimutagenic, radioprotective, anti-nociceptive immunity promoting, hepatocyte protective and anti-cancer activity. According to the literature, BV contains several enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2), phospholipase B, hyaluronidase, acid phosphatase and α-glucosidase. Recent studies have also reported the detection of different classes of enzymes in BV, including esterases, proteases and peptidases, protease inhibitors and other important enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Nevertheless, the physiochemical properties and functions of each enzyme class and their mechanisms remain unclear. Various pharmacotherapeutic effects of some of the BV enzymes have been reported in several studies. At present, ongoing research aims to characterize each enzyme and elucidate their specific biological roles. This review gathers all the current knowledge on BV enzymes and their specific mechanisms in regulating various immune responses and physiological changes to provide a basis for future therapies for various diseases.

  9. Impact of Bee Venom Enzymes on Diseases and Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Sakib Hossen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bee venom (BV is used to treat many diseases and exhibits anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, antimutagenic, radioprotective, anti-nociceptive immunity promoting, hepatocyte protective and anti-cancer activity. According to the literature, BV contains several enzymes, including phospholipase A2 (PLA2, phospholipase B, hyaluronidase, acid phosphatase and α-glucosidase. Recent studies have also reported the detection of different classes of enzymes in BV, including esterases, proteases and peptidases, protease inhibitors and other important enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Nevertheless, the physiochemical properties and functions of each enzyme class and their mechanisms remain unclear. Various pharmacotherapeutic effects of some of the BV enzymes have been reported in several studies. At present, ongoing research aims to characterize each enzyme and elucidate their specific biological roles. This review gathers all the current knowledge on BV enzymes and their specific mechanisms in regulating various immune responses and physiological changes to provide a basis for future therapies for various diseases.

  10. Activity assessment of microbial fibrinolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Essam

    2013-08-01

    Conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin inside blood vessels results in thrombosis, leading to myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. In general, there are four therapy options: surgical operation, intake of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, or fibrinolytic enzymes. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes have attracted much more attention than typical thrombolytic agents because of the expensive prices and the side effects of the latter. The fibrinolytic enzymes were successively discovered from different microorganisms, the most important among which is the genus Bacillus. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes, especially those from food-grade microorganisms, have the potential to be developed as functional food additives and drugs to prevent or cure thrombosis and other related diseases. There are several assay methods for these enzymes; this may due to the insolubility of substrate, fibrin. Existing assay methods can be divided into three major groups. The first group consists of assay of fibrinolytic activity with natural proteins as substrates, e.g., fibrin plate methods. The second and third groups of assays are suitable for kinetic studies and are based on the determination of hydrolysis of synthetic peptide esters. This review will deal primarily with the microorganisms that have been reported in literature to produce fibrinolytic enzymes and the first review discussing the methods used to assay the fibrinolytic activity.

  11. Enzymic lactose hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J J; Brand, J C

    1980-01-01

    Acid or enzymic hydrolysis can be used to hydrolyze lactose. Advantages of both are compared and details of enzymic hydrolysis using yeast or fungal enzymes given. The new scheme outlined involves recycling lactase. Because lactose and lactase react to ultrafiltration (UF) membranes differently separation is possible. Milk or milk products are ultrafiltered to separate a concentrate from a lactose-rich permeate which is treated with lactase in a reactor until hydrolysis reaches a required level. The lactase can be removed by UF as it does not permeate the membrane, and it is recycled back to the reactor. Permeate from the second UF stage may or may not be recombined with the concentrate from the first stage to produce a low lactose product (analysis of a typical low-lactose dried whole milk is given). Batch or continuous processes are explained and a batch process without enzyme recovery is discussed. (Refs. 4).

  12. Indicators: Sediment Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment enzymes are proteins that are produced by microorganisms living in the sediment or soil. They are indicators of key ecosystem processes and can help determine which nutrients are affecting the biological community of a waterbody.

  13. Enzyme Vs. Extremozyme -32 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Enzymes are biocatalytic protein molecules that enhance the rates of ... to physical forces (hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic 1, electrostatic and Van der ... conformation. In 1995 ... surface against 14.7% in Klenow poll (some of the hydrophobic.

  14. Overproduction of ligninolytic enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Torok, Tamas

    2014-06-17

    Methods, compositions, and systems for overproducing ligninolytic enzymes from the basidiomycetous fungus are described herein. As described, the method can include incubating a fungal strain of Cerrena unicolor IBB 303 in a fermentation system having growth medium which includes lignocellulosic material and then cultivating the fungal strain in the fermentation system under conditions wherein the fungus expresses the ligninolytic enzymes. In some cases, the lignocellulosic material is mandarin peel, ethanol production residue, walnut pericarp, wheat bran, wheat straw, or banana peel.

  15. Measurement of enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T K; Keshwani, M M

    2009-01-01

    To study and understand the nature of living cells, scientists have continually employed traditional biochemical techniques aimed to fractionate and characterize a designated network of macromolecular components required to carry out a particular cellular function. At the most rudimentary level, cellular functions ultimately entail rapid chemical transformations that otherwise would not occur in the physiological environment of the cell. The term enzyme is used to singularly designate a macromolecular gene product that specifically and greatly enhances the rate of a chemical transformation. Purification and characterization of individual and collective groups of enzymes has been and will remain essential toward advancement of the molecular biological sciences; and developing and utilizing enzyme reaction assays is central to this mission. First, basic kinetic principles are described for understanding chemical reaction rates and the catalytic effects of enzymes on such rates. Then, a number of methods are described for measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rates, which mainly differ with regard to techniques used to detect and quantify concentration changes of given reactants or products. Finally, short commentary is given toward formulation of reaction mixtures used to measure enzyme activity. Whereas a comprehensive treatment of enzymatic reaction assays is not within the scope of this chapter, the very core principles that are presented should enable new researchers to better understand the logic and utility of any given enzymatic assay that becomes of interest.

  16. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  17. Matrix Metalloproteinase Enzyme Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases play an important role in many biological processes such as embriogenesis, tissue remodeling, wound healing, and angiogenesis, and in some pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, arthritis and cancer. Currently, 24 genes have been identified in humans that encode different groups of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes. This review discuss the members of the matrix metalloproteinase family and their substrate specificity, structure, function and the regulation of their enzyme activity by tissue inhibitors. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 209-220

  18. The surface science of enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2002-01-01

    One of the largest challenges to science in the coming years is to find the relation between enzyme structure and function. Can we predict which reactions an enzyme catalyzes from knowledge of its structure-or from its amino acid sequence? Can we use that knowledge to modify enzyme function......? To solve these problems we must understand in some detail how enzymes interact with reactants from its surroundings. These interactions take place at the surface of the enzyme and the question of enzyme function can be viewed as the surface science of enzymes. In this article we discuss how to describe...... catalysis by enzymes, and in particular the analogies between enzyme catalyzed reactions and surface catalyzed reactions. We do this by discussing two concrete examples of reactions catalyzed both in nature (by enzymes) and in industrial reactors (by inorganic materials), and show that although analogies...

  19. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospišková, K.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 380, APR 2015 (2015), s. 197-200 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : enzyme powders * cross-linking * magnetic modification * magnetic separation * magnetic iron oxides particles * microwave-assisted synthesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.357, year: 2015

  20. Enzyme with rhamnogalacturonase activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kofod, L.V.; Andersen, L.N.; Dalboge, H.; Kauppinen, M.S.; Christgau, S.; Heldt-Hansen, H.P.; Christophersen, C.; Nielsen, P.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Schols, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    An enzyme exhibiting rhamnogalacturonase activity, capable of cleaving a rhamnogalacturonan backbone in such a manner that galacturonic acids are left as the non-reducing ends, and which exhibits activity on hairy regions from a soy bean material and/or on saponified hairy regions from a sugar beet

  1. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Advances in enzyme bioelectrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRESSA R. PEREIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bioelectrochemistry can be defined as a branch of Chemical Science concerned with electron-proton transfer and transport involving biomolecules, as well as electrode reactions of redox enzymes. The bioelectrochemical reactions and system have direct impact in biotechnological development, in medical devices designing, in the behavior of DNA-protein complexes, in green-energy and bioenergy concepts, and make it possible an understanding of metabolism of all living organisms (e.g. humans where biomolecules are integral to health and proper functioning. In the last years, many researchers have dedicated itself to study different redox enzymes by using electrochemistry, aiming to understand their mechanisms and to develop promising bioanodes and biocathodes for biofuel cells as well as to develop biosensors and implantable bioelectronics devices. Inside this scope, this review try to introduce and contemplate some relevant topics for enzyme bioelectrochemistry, such as the immobilization of the enzymes at electrode surfaces, the electron transfer, the bioelectrocatalysis, and new techniques conjugated with electrochemistry vising understand the kinetics and thermodynamics of redox proteins. Furthermore, examples of recent approaches in designing biosensors and biofuel developed are presented.

  3. Cold-Adapted Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georlette, D.; Bentahir, M.; Claverie, P.; Collins, T.; D'amico, S.; Delille, D.; Feller, G.; Gratia, E.; Hoyoux, A.; Lonhienne, T.; Meuwis, M.-a.; Zecchinon, L.; Gerday, Ch.

    In the last few years, increased attention has been focused on enzymes produced by cold-adapted micro-organisms. It has emerged that psychrophilic enzymes represent an extremely powerful tool in both protein folding investigations and for biotechnological purposes. Such enzymes are characterised by an increased thermosensitivity and, most of them, by a higher catalytic efficiency at low and moderate temperatures, when compared to their mesophilic counterparts. The high thermosensitivity probably originates from an increased flexibility of either a selected area of the molecular edifice or the overall protein structure, providing enhanced abilities to undergo conformational changes during catalysis at low temperatures. Structure modelling and recent crystallographic data have allowed to elucidate the structural parameters that could be involved in this higher resilience. It was demonstrated that each psychrophilic enzyme adopts its own adaptive strategy. It appears, moreover, that there is a continuum in the strategy of protein adaptation to temperature, as the previously mentioned structural parameters are implicated in the stability of thermophilic proteins. Additional 3D crystal structures, site-directed and random mutagenesis experiments should now be undertaken to further investigate the stability-flexibility-activity relationship.

  4. Embedded enzymes catalyse capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentish, Sandra

    2018-05-01

    Membrane technologies for carbon capture can offer economic and environmental advantages over conventional amine-based absorption, but can suffer from limited gas flux and selectivity to CO2. Now, a membrane based on enzymes embedded in hydrophilic pores is shown to exhibit combined flux and selectivity that challenges the state of the art.

  5. Photoperiodism and Enzyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Orlando; Morel, Claudine

    1974-01-01

    Metabolic readjustments after a change from long days to short days appear, in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, to be achieved through the operation of two main mechanisms: variation in enzyme capacity, and circadian rhythmicity. After a lag time, capacity in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and capacity in aspartate aminotransferase increase exponentially and appear to be allometrically linked during 50 to 60 short days; then a sudden fall takes place in the activity of the former. Malic enzyme and alanine aminotransferase behave differently. Thus, the operation of the two sections of the pathway (before and after the malate step) give rise to a continuously changing functional compartmentation in the pathway. Circadian rhythmicity, on the other hand, produces time compartmentation through phase shifts and variation in amplitude, independently for each enzyme. These characteristics suggest that the operation of a so-called biological clock would be involved. We propose the hypothesis that feedback regulation would be more accurate and efficient when applied to an already oscillating, clock-controlled enzyme system. PMID:16658749

  6. ISFET based enzyme sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoot, Bart H.; Bergveld, Piet

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the results that have been reported on ISFET based enzyme sensors. The most important improvement that results from the application of ISFETs instead of glass membrane electrodes is in the method of fabrication. Problems with regard to the pH dependence of the response and the

  7. The Enzyme Function Initiative†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlt, John A.; Allen, Karen N.; Almo, Steven C.; Armstrong, Richard N.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Cronan, John E.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C. Dale; Raushel, Frank M.; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily-specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include: 1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation); 2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia; 3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy; 4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization; and 5) dissemination of data via the EFI’s website, enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal and pharmaceutical efforts. PMID

  8. The Enzyme Function Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlt, John A; Allen, Karen N; Almo, Steven C; Armstrong, Richard N; Babbitt, Patricia C; Cronan, John E; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J; Jacobson, Matthew P; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C Dale; Raushel, Frank M; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2011-11-22

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic, we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include (1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation), (2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia, (3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy, (4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization, and (5) dissemination of data via the EFI's Website, http://enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal, and pharmaceutical efforts.

  9. Effect of Various Diets on the Expression of Phase-I Drug Metabolizing Enzymes in Livers of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Cui, Julia Yue; Lu, Hong; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that diets can alter the metabolism of drugs; however, it is difficult to compare the effects of multiple diets on drug metabolism among different experimental settings. Phase-I related genes play a major role in the biotransformation of pro-drugs and drugs.In the current study, effects of nine diets on the mRNA expression of phase-I drug-metabolizing enzymes in livers of mice were simultaneously investigated. Compared to the AIN-93M purified diet (control), 73 of the 132 critical phase-I drug metabolizing genes were differentially regulated by at least one diet. Diet restriction produced the most number of changed genes (51), followed by the atherogenic diet (27), high-fat diet (25), standard rodent chow (21), western diet (20), high-fructose diet (5), EFA deficient diet (3), and low n-3 FA diet (1). The mRNAs of the Fmo family changed most, followed by Cyp2b and 4a subfamilies, as well as Por (From 1121 to 21-fold increase of theses mRNAs). There were 59 genes not altered by any of these diets.The present results may improve the interpretation of studies with mice and aid in determining effective and safe doses for individuals with different nutritional diets. PMID:25733028

  10. NRSA enzyme decomposition model data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme activities measured at more than 2000 US streams and rivers. These enzyme data were then used to predict organic matter decomposition and microbial...

  11. Cellulase enzyme and biomass utilization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... human population grows and economic development. However, the current .... conditions and the production cost of the related enzyme system. Therefore ... Given the importance of this enzyme to these so many industries,.

  12. Isoprostane 8-epi-PGF2alpha is frequently increased in patients with muscle pain and/or CK-elevation after HMG-Co-enzyme-A-reductase inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinzinger, H; Lupattelli, G; Chehne, F; Oguogho, A; Furberg, C D

    2001-08-01

    Muscle pains with or without CK-elevation are among the most frequently observed side-effects in patients with hyperlipoproteinemia on various statins. The pathophysiological background, however, remains obscure. We examined isoprostane 8-epi-PGF2alpha, a marker of in-vivo oxidation injury, in plasma, serum and urine in these patients at baseline, when muscle problems manifested and different time intervals after withdrawing the respective statin. A healthy control group and a group of untreated patients with hyperlipoproteinemia were run as controls. The majority of patients with muscular side-effects show elevated 8-epi-PGF2alpha in plasma and urine, whereas serum values were elevated only to a lesser extent. Stopping statin therapy or successfully changing to another member of this family of compounds resulted in a normalization of the values in all patients. These findings indicate a significant involvement of oxidative injury in the muscular side-effects of statins in patients suffering from hyperlipoproteinemia.

  13. Enzyme recycling in lignocellulosic biorefineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henning; Pinelo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    platform. Cellulases are the most important enzymes required in this process, but the complex nature of lignocellulose requires several other enzymes (hemicellulases and auxiliary enzymes) for efficient hydrolysis. Enzyme recycling increases the catalytic productivity of the enzymes by reusing them...... for several batches of hydrolysis, and thereby reduces the overall cost associated with the hydrolysis. Research on this subject has been ongoing for many years and several promising technologies and methods have been developed and demonstrated. But only in a very few cases have these technologies been...... upscaled and tested in industrial settings, mainly because of many difficulties with recycling of enzymes from the complex lignocellulose hydrolyzate at industrially relevant conditions, i.e., high solids loadings. The challenges are associated with the large number of different enzymes required...

  14. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Melike Dönertaş

    Full Text Available The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG. Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution.

  15. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  16. Measuring the Enzyme Activity of Arabidopsis Deubiquitylating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowska, Kamila; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Isono, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitylating enzymes, or DUBs, are important regulators of ubiquitin homeostasis and substrate stability, though the molecular mechanisms of most of the DUBs in plants are not yet understood. As different ubiquitin chain types are implicated in different biological pathways, it is important to analyze the enzyme characteristic for studying a DUB. Quantitative analysis of DUB activity is also important to determine enzyme kinetics and the influence of DUB binding proteins on the enzyme activity. Here, we show methods to analyze DUB activity using immunodetection, Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining, and fluorescence measurement that can be useful for understanding the basic characteristic of DUBs.

  17. Enzyme Molecules in Solitary Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela B. Liebherr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  18. DGAT enzymes and triacylglycerol biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Stone, Scot J.; Koliwad, Suneil; Harris, Charles; Farese, Robert V.

    2008-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (triglycerides) (TGs) are the major storage molecules of metabolic energy and FAs in most living organisms. Excessive accumulation of TGs, however, is associated with human diseases, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and steatohepatitis. The final and the only committed step in the biosynthesis of TGs is catalyzed by acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzymes. The genes encoding two DGAT enzymes, DGAT1 and DGAT2, were identified in the past decade, and the use of molecular tools, including mice deficient in either enzyme, has shed light on their functions. Although DGAT enzymes are involved in TG synthesis, they have distinct protein sequences and differ in their biochemical, cellular, and physiological functions. Both enzymes may be useful as therapeutic targets for diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of DGAT enzymes, focusing on new advances since the cloning of their genes, including possible roles in human health and diseases. PMID:18757836

  19. Enzyme stabilization for pesticide degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivers, D.B.; Frazer, F.R. III; Mason, D.W.; Tice, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Enzymes offer inherent advantages and limitations as active components of formulations used to decontaminate soil and equipment contaminated with toxic materials such as pesticides. Because of the catalytic nature of enzymes, each molecule of enzyme has the potential to destroy countless molecules of a contaminating toxic compound. This degradation takes place under mild environmental conditions of pH, temperature, pressure, and solvent. The basic limitation of enzymes is their degree of stability during storage and application conditions. Stabilizing methods such as the use of additives, covalent crosslinking, covalent attachment, gel entrapment, and microencapsulation have been directed developing an enzyme preparation that is stable under extremes of pH, temperature, and exposure to organic solvents. Initial studies were conducted using the model enzymes subtilisin and horseradish peroxidase.

  20. Research Applications of Proteolytic Enzymes in Molecular Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Tőzsér

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzymes (also termed peptidases, proteases and proteinases are capable of hydrolyzing peptide bonds in proteins. They can be found in all living organisms, from viruses to animals and humans. Proteolytic enzymes have great medical and pharmaceutical importance due to their key role in biological processes and in the life-cycle of many pathogens. Proteases are extensively applied enzymes in several sectors of industry and biotechnology, furthermore, numerous research applications require their use, including production of Klenow fragments, peptide synthesis, digestion of unwanted proteins during nucleic acid purification, cell culturing and tissue dissociation, preparation of recombinant antibody fragments for research, diagnostics and therapy, exploration of the structure-function relationships by structural studies, removal of affinity tags from fusion proteins in recombinant protein techniques, peptide sequencing and proteolytic digestion of proteins in proteomics. The aim of this paper is to review the molecular biological aspects of proteolytic enzymes and summarize their applications in the life sciences.

  1. Direct comparison of enzyme histochemical and immunohistochemical methods to localize an enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2002-01-01

    Immunohistochemical localization of enzymes is compared directly with localization of enzyme activity with (catalytic) enzyme histochemical methods. The two approaches demonstrate principally different aspects of an enzyme. The immunohistochemical method localizes the enzyme protein whether it is

  2. Enzyme Mimics: Advances and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuah, Evelyn; Toh, Seraphina; Yee, Jessica; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-13

    Enzyme mimics or artificial enzymes are a class of catalysts that have been actively pursued for decades and have heralded much interest as potentially viable alternatives to natural enzymes. Aside from having catalytic activities similar to their natural counterparts, enzyme mimics have the desired advantages of tunable structures and catalytic efficiencies, excellent tolerance to experimental conditions, lower cost, and purely synthetic routes to their preparation. Although still in the midst of development, impressive advances have already been made. Enzyme mimics have shown immense potential in the catalysis of a wide range of chemical and biological reactions, the development of chemical and biological sensing and anti-biofouling systems, and the production of pharmaceuticals and clean fuels. This Review concerns the development of various types of enzyme mimics, namely polymeric and dendrimeric, supramolecular, nanoparticulate and proteinic enzyme mimics, with an emphasis on their synthesis, catalytic properties and technical applications. It provides an introduction to enzyme mimics and a comprehensive summary of the advances and current standings of their applications, and seeks to inspire researchers to perfect the design and synthesis of enzyme mimics and to tailor their functionality for a much wider range of applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Phage lytic enzymes: a history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudil, David

    2015-02-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of 'bacteria-eaters' or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well (Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specific disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay (Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes-from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  4. [The rise of enzyme engineering in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaoxiang

    2015-06-01

    Enzyme engineering is an important part of the modern biotechnology. Industrial biocatalysis is considered the third wave of biotechnology following pharmaceutical and agricultural waves. In 25 years, China has made a mighty advances in enzyme engineering research. This review focuses on enzyme genomics, enzyme proteomics, biosynthesis, microbial conversion and biosensors in the Chinese enzyme engineering symposiums and advances in enzyme preparation industry in China.

  5. Enzyme structure, enzyme function and allozyme diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In estimates of population genetic diversity based on allozyme heterozygosity, some enzymes are regularly more variable than others. Evolutionary theory suggests that functionally less important molecules, or parts of molecules, evolve more rapidly than more important ones; the latter enzymes should then theoretically be ...

  6. Computational enzyme design: transitioning from catalytic proteins to enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Wai Shun; Siegel, Justin B

    2014-08-01

    The widespread interest in enzymes stem from their ability to catalyze chemical reactions under mild and ecologically friendly conditions with unparalleled catalytic proficiencies. While thousands of naturally occurring enzymes have been identified and characterized, there are still numerous important applications for which there are no biological catalysts capable of performing the desired chemical transformation. In order to engineer enzymes for which there is no natural starting point, efforts using a combination of quantum chemistry and force-field based protein molecular modeling have led to the design of novel proteins capable of catalyzing chemical reactions not catalyzed by naturally occurring enzymes. Here we discuss the current status and potential avenues to pursue as the field of computational enzyme design moves forward. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Immobilized enzymes: understanding enzyme - surface interactions at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoarau, Marie; Badieyan, Somayesadat; Marsh, E Neil G

    2017-11-22

    Enzymes immobilized on solid supports have important and industrial and medical applications. However, their uses are limited by the significant reductions in activity and stability that often accompany the immobilization process. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular level interactions between proteins and supporting surfaces that contribute to changes in stability and activity. This understanding has been facilitated by the application of various surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques that allow the structure and orientation of enzymes at the solid/liquid interface to be probed, often with monolayer sensitivity. An appreciation of the molecular interactions between enzyme and surface support has allowed the surface chemistry and method of enzyme attachement to be fine-tuned such that activity and stability can be greatly enhanced. These advances suggest that a much wider variety of enzymes may eventually be amenable to immobilization as green catalysts.

  8. Stability of Enzymes in Granular Enzyme Products for Laundry Detergents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biran, Suzan; Bach, Poul; Simonsen, Ole

    Enzymes have long been of interest to the detergent industry due to their ability to improve the cleaning efficiency of synthetic detergents, contribute to shortening washing times, and reduce energy and water consumption, provision of environmentally friendlier wash water effluents and fabric care....... However, incorporating enzymes in detergent formulations gives rise to numerous practical problems due to their incompatibility with and stability against various detergent components. In powdered detergent formulations, these issues can be partly overcome by physically isolating the enzymes in separate...... particles. However, enzymes may loose a significant part of their activity over a time period of several weeks. Possible causes of inactivation of enzymes in a granule may be related to the release of hydrogen peroxide from the bleaching chemicals in a moisture-containing atmosphere, humidity, autolysis...

  9. Enzymes in Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, David C; German, J Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Milk proteins are a complex and diverse source of biological activities. Beyond their function, intact milk proteins also act as carriers of encrypted functional sequences that, when released as peptides, exert biological functions, including antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity, which could contribute to the infant's competitive success. Research has now revealed that the release of these functional peptides begins within the mammary gland itself. A complex array of proteases produced in mother's milk has been shown to be active in the milk, releasing these peptides. Moreover, our recent research demonstrates that these milk proteases continue to digest milk proteins within the infant's stomach, possibly even to a larger extent than the infant's own proteases. As the neonate has relatively low digestive capacity, the activity of milk proteases in the infant may provide important assistance to digesting milk proteins. The coordinated release of these encrypted sequences is accomplished by selective proteolytic action provided by an array of native milk proteases and infant-produced enzymes. The task for scientists is now to discover the selective advantages of this protein-protease-based peptide release system. © 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Digestive enzymes of some earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, P C; Dash, M C

    1980-10-15

    4 species of tropical earthworms differed with regard to enzyme activity. The maximum activity of protease and of cellulase occurred in the posterior region of the gut of the earthworms. On the average Octochaetona surensis shows maximum activity and Drawida calebi shows minimum activity for all the enzymes studied.

  11. Photoreactivating enzyme from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snapka, R.M.; Fuselier, C.O.

    1977-01-01

    Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) has been purified in large amounts from an E.coli strain lysogenic for a defective lambda bacteriophage carrying the phr gene. The resulting enzyme had a pH optimum of 7.2 and an ionic strength optimum of 0.18. It consisted of an apoprotein and cofactor, both of which were necessary for catalytic activity. The apoprotein had a monomer molecular weight of 35,200 and showed stable aggregates under denaturing conditions. The amino acid analysis of the E.coli enzyme was very similar to that of the photoreactivating enzyme from orchid seedlings (Cattelya aurantiaca). Both had arginine at the amino terminus. The cofactor, like the holoenzyme, showed absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and emission properties indicative of an adenine moiety. Although the isolated enzyme had an action spectrum which peaked at about 360 nm, neither the cofactor, apoenzyme nor holoenzyme showed any detectable absorption between 300 and 400 nm. (author)

  12. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imagining and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography

  13. Photoreactivating enzyme from Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snapka, R M; Fuselier, C O [California Univ., Irvine (USA)

    1977-05-01

    Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) has been purified in large amounts from an E.coli strain lysogenic for a defective lambda bacteriophage carrying the phr gene. The resulting enzyme had a pH optimum of 7.2 and an ionic strength optimum of 0.18. It consisted of an apoprotein and cofactor, both of which were necessary for catalytic activity. The apoprotein had a monomer molecular weight of 35,200 and showed stable aggregates under denaturing conditions. The amino acid analysis of the E.coli enzyme was very similar to that of the photoreactivating enzyme from orchid seedlings (Cattelya aurantiaca). Both had arginine at the amino terminus. The cofactor, like the holoenzyme, showed absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and emission properties indicative of an adenine moiety. Although the isolated enzyme had an action spectrum which peaked at about 360 nm, neither the cofactor, apoenzyme nor holoenzyme showed any detectable absorption between 300 and 400 nm.

  14. Optimal therapy in Gaucher disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goker-Alpan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ozlem Goker-AlpanLysosomal Diseases Research and Treatment Unit, Center for Clinical Trials, O&O Alpan LLC, Springfield, VA, USAAbstract: Gaucher disease (GD, the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, presents with a wide range of symptoms of varying severity, and primarily affects the skeletal, hematologic and nervous systems. To date, the standard of care has included enzyme replacement therapy with imiglucerase. Although imiglucerase is highly effective in reversing the visceral and hematologic manifestations, skeletal disease is slow to respond, pulmonary involvement is relatively resistant, and the CNS involvement is not impacted. Because of the recent manufacturing and processing problems, the research and development of alternative therapeutics has become more pressing. The divergent phenotypes and the heterogeneity involving different organ systems implicates the involvement of several pathological processes that include enzyme deficiency, substrate accumulation, protein misfolding, and macrophage activation, that differ in each patient with GD. Thus, the therapy should be tailored individually in order to target multiple pathways that interplay in GD.Keywords: glucocerebrosidase, enzyme replacement therapy, substrate reduction therapy, protein misfolding and chaperone therapy, macrophage

  15. BAKERY ENZYMES IN CEREAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Koman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE Bread is the most common and traditional food in the world. For years, enzymes such as malt and fungal alpha-amylase have been used in bread making. Due to the changes in the baking industry and the ever-increasing demand for more natural products, enzymes have gained real importance in bread-making. If an enzyme is added, it is often destroyed by the heat during the baking process. For generations, enzymes have been used for the improvement of texture and appearance, enhancement of nutritional values and generation of appealing flavours and aromas. Enzymes used in bakery industry constitute nearly one third of the market. The bakery products have undergone radical improvements in quality over the past years in terms of flavour, texture and shelf-life. The the biggest contributor for these improvementsis the usage of enzymes. Present work seeks to systematically describe bakery enzymes, their classification, benefits, usage and chemical reactions in the bread making process.doi:10.5219/193

  16. [Automated analyzer of enzyme immunoassay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, S

    1995-09-01

    Automated analyzers for enzyme immunoassay can be classified by several points of view: the kind of labeled antibodies or enzymes, detection methods, the number of tests per unit time, analytical time and speed per run. In practice, it is important for us consider the several points such as detection limits, the number of tests per unit time, analytical range, and precision. Most of the automated analyzers on the market can randomly access and measure samples. I will describe the recent advance of automated analyzers reviewing their labeling antibodies and enzymes, the detection methods, the number of test per unit time and analytical time and speed per test.

  17. Lysosomal enzyme delivery by ICAM-1-targeted nanocarriers bypassing glycosylation- and clathrin-dependent endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Silvia; Schuchman, Edward H; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2006-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy, a state-of-the-art treatment for many lysosomal storage disorders, relies on carbohydrate-mediated binding of recombinant enzymes to receptors that mediate lysosomal delivery via clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Suboptimal glycosylation of recombinant enzymes and deficiency of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in some lysosomal enzyme-deficient cells limit delivery and efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy for lysosomal disorders. We explored a novel delivery strategy utilizing nanocarriers targeted to a glycosylation- and clathrin-independent receptor, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, a glycoprotein expressed on diverse cell types, up-regulated and functionally involved in inflammation, a hallmark of many lysosomal disorders. We targeted recombinant human acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), deficient in types A and B Niemann-Pick disease, to ICAM-1 by loading this enzyme to nanocarriers coated with anti-ICAM. Anti-ICAM/ASM nanocarriers, but not control ASM or ASM nanocarriers, bound to ICAM-1-positive cells (activated endothelial cells and Niemann-Pick disease patient fibroblasts) via ICAM-1, in a glycosylation-independent manner. Anti-ICAM/ASM nanocarriers entered cells via CAM-mediated endocytosis, bypassing the clathrin-dependent pathway, and trafficked to lysosomes, where delivered ASM displayed stable activity and alleviated lysosomal lipid accumulation. Therefore, lysosomal enzyme targeting using nanocarriers targeted to ICAM-1 bypasses defunct pathways and may improve the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy for lysosomal disorders, such as Niemann-Pick disease.

  18. Terapia de reposição enzimática para as mucopolissacaridoses I, II e VI: recomendações de um grupo de especialistas brasileiros Enzyme replacement therapy for mucopolysaccharidoses I, II and VI: recommendations from a group of Brazilian F experts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Giugliani

    2010-01-01

    já está em desenvolvimento clínico, com perspectivas para o tratamento da MPS III A e do déficit cognitivo na MPS II através de administração da enzima diretamente no sistema nervoso central (SNC. Um grande número de centros brasileiros, incluindo serviços de todas as regiões do país, já têm experiência com TRE para MPS I, II e VI. Essa experiência foi adquirida não só com o tratamento de pacientes como também com a participação de alguns grupos em ensaios clínicos envolvendo TRE para essas condições. Somados os três tipos de MPS, mais de 250 pacientes já foram tratados com TRE em nosso país. A experiência dos profissionais brasileiros, somada aos dados disponíveis na literatura internacional, permitiu elaborar este documento, produzido com o objetivo de reunir e harmonizar as informações disponíveis sobre o tratamento destas doenças graves e progressivas, mas que, felizmente, são hoje tratáveis, uma realidade que traz novas perspectivas para os pacientes brasileiros afetados por essas condições.Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS are rare genetic diseases caused by deficiency of specific lysosomal enzymes that affect catabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAG. Accumulation of GAG in various organs and tissues in MPS patients results in a series of signs and symptoms, producing a multisystemic condition affecting bones and joints, the respiratory and cardiovascular systems and many other organs and tissues, including in some cases, cognitive performance. So far, eleven enzyme defects that cause seven different types of MPS have been identified. Before introduction of therapies to restore deficient enzyme activity, treatment of MPS focused primnarily on prevention and care of complications, still a very important aspect in the management of these patients. In the 80's treatment of MPS with bone marrow transplantation/hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (BMT/HSCT was proposed and in the 90's, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT,began to be

  19. Multi-enzyme Process Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade Santacoloma, Paloma de Gracia

    are affected (in a positive or negative way) by the presence of the other enzymes and compounds in the media. In this thesis the concept of multi-enzyme in-pot term is adopted for processes that are carried out by the combination of enzymes in a single reactor and implemented at pilot or industrial scale...... features of the process and provides the information required to structure the process model by using a step-by-step procedure with the required tools and methods. In this way, this framework increases efficiency of the model development process with respect to time and resources needed (fast and effective....... In this way the model parameters that drives the main dynamic behavior can be identified and thus a better understanding of this type of processes. In order to develop, test and verify the methodology, three case studies were selected, specifically the bi-enzyme process for the production of lactobionic acid...

  20. PIXE analysis of Zn enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, C.; Oliver, A.; Andrade, E.; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J.L.; Romero, I.; Celis, H.

    1999-01-01

    Zinc is a necessary component in the action and structural stability of many enzymes. Some of them are well characterized, but in others, Zn stoichiometry and its association is not known. PIXE has been proven to be a suitable technique for analyzing metallic proteins embedded in electrophoresis gels. In this study, PIXE has been used to investigate the Zn content of enzymes that are known to carry Zn atoms. These include the carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme well characterized by other methods and the cytoplasmic pyrophosphatase of Rhodospirillum rubrum that is known to require Zn to be stable but not how many metal ions are involved or how they are bound to the enzyme. Native proteins have been purified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and direct identification and quantification of Zn in the gel bands was performed with an external proton beam of 3.7 MeV energy

  1. GRE Enzymes for Vector Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme data that were collected during the 2004-2006 EMAP-GRE program. These data were then used by Moorhead et al (2016) in their ecoenzyme vector...

  2. Watching Individual Enzymes at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Kerstin; Rocha, Susana; De Cremer, Gert; Roeffaers, Maarten B. J.; Uji-i, Hiroshi; Hofkens, Johan

    Single-molecule fluorescence experiments are a powerful tool to analyze reaction mechanisms of enzymes. Because of their unique potential to detect heterogeneities in space and time, they have provided unprecedented insights into the nature and mechanisms of conformational changes related to the catalytic reaction. The most important finding from experiments with single enzymes is the generally observed phenomenon that the catalytic rate constants fluctuate over time (dynamic disorder). These fluctuations originate from conformational changes occurring on time scales, which are similar to or slower than that of the catalytic reaction. Here, we summarize experiments with enzymes that show dynamic disorder and introduce new experimental strategies showing how single-molecule fluorescence experiments can be applied to address other open questions in medical and industrial enzymology, such as enzyme inactivation processes, reactant transfer in cascade reactions, and the mechanisms of interfacial catalysis.

  3. Photosynthetic fuel for heterologous enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo

    2017-01-01

    of reducing power. Recent work on the metabolic engineering of photosynthetic organisms has shown that the electron carriers such as ferredoxin and flavodoxin can be used to couple heterologous enzymes to photosynthetic reducing power. Because these proteins have a plethora of interaction partners and rely...... on electrostatically steered complex formation, they form productive electron transfer complexes with non-native enzymes. A handful of examples demonstrate channeling of photosynthetic electrons to drive the activity of heterologous enzymes, and these focus mainly on hydrogenases and cytochrome P450s. However......, competition from native pathways and inefficient electron transfer rates present major obstacles, which limit the productivity of heterologous reactions coupled to photosynthesis. We discuss specific approaches to address these bottlenecks and ensure high productivity of such enzymes in a photosynthetic...

  4. DGAT enzymes and triacylglycerol biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Stone, Scot J.; Koliwad, Suneil; Harris, Charles; Farese, Robert V.

    2008-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (triglycerides) (TGs) are the major storage molecules of metabolic energy and FAs in most living organisms. Excessive accumulation of TGs, however, is associated with human diseases, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and steatohepatitis. The final and the only committed step in the biosynthesis of TGs is catalyzed by acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzymes. The genes encoding two DGAT enzymes, DGAT1 and DGAT2, were identified in the past decade, ...

  5. Enzymes: principles and biotechnological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes are biological catalysts (also known as biocatalysts) that speed up biochemical reactions in living organisms, and which can be extracted from cells and then used to catalyse a wide range of commercially important processes. This chapter covers the basic principles of enzymology, such as classification, structure, kinetics and inhibition, and also provides an overview of industrial applications. In addition, techniques for the purification of enzymes are discussed. PMID:26504249

  6. CNS-directed gene therapy for lysosomal storage diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sands, Mark S; Haskins, Mark E

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherited metabolic disorders usually caused by deficient activity of a single lysosomal enzyme. As most lysosomal enzymes are ubiquitously expressed, a deficiency in a single enzyme can affect multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system (CNS). At least 75% of all LSDs have a significant CNS component. Approaches such as bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) can effectively treat the systemic dis...

  7. CLINICAL USE OF ENZYMES IN PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.N. Surkov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High incidence of various pediatric gastroenterologic diseases including congenital still remains an important issue for a Russian healthcare. The latter may be attended by relative or total excretory pancreatic failure with the following symptoms: stool abnormalities, abdominal pain, meteorism, weakness, low appetite and physical exercise, weight reduction and growth retardation. Pancreatic enzymes that contribute to protein, lipids and carbohydrates digestion are often used as a replacement therapy in pediatric care. Nowadays there is a plenty of choice among enzymatic medications. However, not all aforesaid medications can ensure adequate replacement treatment especially in children with chronic pancreatic failure. That is why among agents of choice are modern and highly effective microgranulated encapsulated pancreatines. For example Micrazim.Key words: children, pancreas, pancreatic failure, enzymotherapy.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (3: 114–118

  8. de novo computational enzyme design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanghellini, Alexandre

    2014-10-01

    Recent advances in systems and synthetic biology as well as metabolic engineering are poised to transform industrial biotechnology by allowing us to design cell factories for the sustainable production of valuable fuels and chemicals. To deliver on their promises, such cell factories, as much as their brick-and-mortar counterparts, will require appropriate catalysts, especially for classes of reactions that are not known to be catalyzed by enzymes in natural organisms. A recently developed methodology, de novo computational enzyme design can be used to create enzymes catalyzing novel reactions. Here we review the different classes of chemical reactions for which active protein catalysts have been designed as well as the results of detailed biochemical and structural characterization studies. We also discuss how combining de novo computational enzyme design with more traditional protein engineering techniques can alleviate the shortcomings of state-of-the-art computational design techniques and create novel enzymes with catalytic proficiencies on par with natural enzymes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Engineering Cellulase Enzymes for Bioenergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Meera Elizabeth

    Sustainable energy sources, such as biofuels, offer increasingly important alternatives to fossil fuels that contribute less to global climate change. The energy contained within cellulosic biofuels derives from sunlight energy stored in the form of carbon-carbon bonds comprising sugars such as glucose. Second-generation biofuels are produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks, including agricultural waste products and non-food crops like Miscanthus, that contain lignin and the polysaccharides hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulose is the most abundant biological material on Earth; it is a polymer of glucose and a structural component of plant cell walls. Accessing the sugar is challenging, as the crystalline structure of cellulose resists degradation; biochemical and thermochemical means can be used to depolymerize cellulose. Cellulase enzymes catalyze the biochemical depolymerization of cellulose into glucose. Glucose can be used as a carbon source for growth of a biofuel-producing microorganism. When it converts glucose to a hydrocarbon fuel, this microbe completes the biofuels process of transforming sunlight energy into accessible, chemical energy capable of replacing non-renewable transportation fuels. Due to strong intermolecular interactions between polymer chains, cellulose is significantly more challenging to depolymerize than starch, a more accessible polymer of glucose utilized in first-generation biofuels processes (often derived from corn). While most mammals cannot digest cellulose (dietary fiber), certain fungi and bacteria produce cellulase enzymes capable of hydrolyzing it. These organisms secrete a wide variety of glycoside hydrolase and other classes of enzymes that work in concert. Because cellulase enzymes are slow-acting and expensive to produce, my aim has been to improve the properties of these enzymes as a means to make a cellulosic biofuels process possible that is more efficient and, consequently, more economical than current

  10. Sphingolipid metabolism enzymes as targets for anticancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, JW; Sietsma, H

    Treatment with anti-cancer agents in most cases ultimately results in apoptotic cell death of the target tumour cells. Unfortunately, tumour cells can develop multidrug resistance, e.g., by a reduced propensity to engage in apoptosis by which they become insensitive to multiple chemotherapeutics.

  11. Ethosuximide: liver enzyme induction and D-glucaric acid excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, J C; Scott, A K; Galloway, D B; Petrie, J C

    1974-06-01

    1 A study has been carried out to determine if ethosuximide induces liver enzymes. 2 Ethosuximide did not affect the urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid by healthy adult subjects nor was the mean daily D-glucaric acid excretion of three epileptic children on long term ethosuximide therapy different from that of three matched controls. 3 Ethosuximide (10 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg daily) did not influence D-glucaric acid excretion or liver microsomal protein and cytochrome P450 contents of guinea pigs but at a dose of 100 mg/kg daily in rats it increased liver microsomal protein and cytochrome P450 without altering D-glucaric acid excretion. 4 These results suggest that at anticonvulsant doses ethosuximide is unlikely to induce liver enzymes. The precise relationship between D-glucaric acid excretion and liver enzyme induction remains in doubt.

  12. Substrate reduction therapy of glycosphingolipid storage disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; Hollak, Carla E. M.; Boot, Rolf G.; Groener, Johanna E. M.; Maas, Mario

    2006-01-01

    In the last 15 years enormous progress has been made regarding therapy of type I Gaucher disease, a severely disabling disorder characterized by intralysosomal storage of glucosylceramide in tissue macrophages. Effective enzyme replacement therapy of type I Gaucher disease, based on chronic

  13. Quantitative liver functions in Turner syndrome with and without hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Poulsen, H.E.; Ott, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Studies have documented elevated levels of liver enzymes in many females with Turner syndrome (TS). Histology has shown a range of changes. Treatment with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces liver enzymes.......Studies have documented elevated levels of liver enzymes in many females with Turner syndrome (TS). Histology has shown a range of changes. Treatment with female hormone replacement therapy (HRT) reduces liver enzymes....

  14. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex therapy Overview Sex therapy is a type of psychotherapy — a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a mental health professional. Through sex therapy, you can address concerns about sexual function, ...

  15. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family therapy Overview Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that can help family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided by a psychologist, ...

  16. Enzymes and Enzyme Activity Encoded by Nonenveloped Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Kimi; Banerjee, Manidipa; Johnson, John E

    2017-09-29

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that rely on host cell machineries for their replication and survival. Although viruses tend to make optimal use of the host cell protein repertoire, they need to encode essential enzymatic or effector functions that may not be available or accessible in the host cellular milieu. The enzymes encoded by nonenveloped viruses-a group of viruses that lack any lipid coating or envelope-play vital roles in all the stages of the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the structural, biochemical, and mechanistic information available for several classes of enzymes and autocatalytic activity encoded by nonenveloped viruses. Advances in research and development of antiviral inhibitors targeting specific viral enzymes are also highlighted.

  17. The Endosome-associated Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP8 Regulates BACE1 Enzyme Ubiquitination and Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Eniola Funmilayo Aduke; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-07-22

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of amyloid-β, the toxic peptide that accumulates in the brain of subjects affected by Alzheimer disease. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that that depletion of the trafficking molecule Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF-binding protein 3 (GGA3) results in increased BACE1 levels and activity because of impaired lysosomal degradation. We also determined that GGA3 regulation of BACE1 levels requires its ability to bind ubiquitin. Accordingly, we reported that BACE1 is ubiquitinated at lysine 501 and that lack of ubiquitination at lysine 501 produces BACE1 stabilization. Ubiquitin conjugation is a reversible process mediated by deubiquitinating enzymes. The ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8), an endosome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, regulates the ubiquitination, trafficking, and lysosomal degradation of several plasma membrane proteins. Here, we report that RNAi-mediated depletion of USP8 reduced levels of both ectopically expressed and endogenous BACE1 in H4 human neuroglioma cells. Moreover, USP8 depletion increased BACE1 ubiquitination, promoted BACE1 accumulation in the early endosomes and late endosomes/lysosomes, and decreased levels of BACE1 in the recycling endosomes. We also found that decreased BACE1 protein levels were accompanied by a decrease in BACE1-mediated amyloid precursor protein cleavage and amyloid-β levels. Our findings demonstrate that USP8 plays a key role in the trafficking and degradation of BACE1 by deubiquitinating lysine 501. These studies suggest that therapies able to accelerate BACE1 degradation (e.g. by increasing BACE1 ubiquitination) may represent a potential treatment for Alzheimer disease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. The Endosome-associated Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP8 Regulates BACE1 Enzyme Ubiquitination and Degradation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Eniola Funmilayo Aduke; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of amyloid-β, the toxic peptide that accumulates in the brain of subjects affected by Alzheimer disease. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that that depletion of the trafficking molecule Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF-binding protein 3 (GGA3) results in increased BACE1 levels and activity because of impaired lysosomal degradation. We also determined that GGA3 regulation of BACE1 levels requires its ability to bind ubiquitin. Accordingly, we reported that BACE1 is ubiquitinated at lysine 501 and that lack of ubiquitination at lysine 501 produces BACE1 stabilization. Ubiquitin conjugation is a reversible process mediated by deubiquitinating enzymes. The ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8), an endosome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, regulates the ubiquitination, trafficking, and lysosomal degradation of several plasma membrane proteins. Here, we report that RNAi-mediated depletion of USP8 reduced levels of both ectopically expressed and endogenous BACE1 in H4 human neuroglioma cells. Moreover, USP8 depletion increased BACE1 ubiquitination, promoted BACE1 accumulation in the early endosomes and late endosomes/lysosomes, and decreased levels of BACE1 in the recycling endosomes. We also found that decreased BACE1 protein levels were accompanied by a decrease in BACE1-mediated amyloid precursor protein cleavage and amyloid-β levels. Our findings demonstrate that USP8 plays a key role in the trafficking and degradation of BACE1 by deubiquitinating lysine 501. These studies suggest that therapies able to accelerate BACE1 degradation (e.g. by increasing BACE1 ubiquitination) may represent a potential treatment for Alzheimer disease. PMID:27302062

  19. Rethinking fundamentals of enzyme action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrop, D B

    1999-01-01

    Despite certain limitations, investigators continue to gainfully employ concepts rooted in steady-state kinetics in efforts to draw mechanistically relevant inferences about enzyme catalysis. By reconsidering steady-state enzyme kinetic behavior, this review develops ideas that allow one to arrive at the following new definitions: (a) V/K, the ratio of the maximal initial velocity divided by the Michaelis-Menten constant, is the apparent rate constant for the capture of substrate into enzyme complexes that are destined to yield product(s) at some later point in time; (b) the maximal velocity V is the apparent rate constant for the release of substrate from captured complexes in the form of free product(s); and (c) the Michaelis-Menten constant K is the ratio of the apparent rate constants for release and capture. The physiologic significance of V/K is also explored to illuminate aspects of antibiotic resistance, the concept of "perfection" in enzyme catalysis, and catalytic proficiency. The conceptual basis of congruent thermodynamic cycles is also considered in an attempt to achieve an unambiguous way for comparing an enzyme-catalyzed reaction with its uncatalyzed reference reaction. Such efforts promise a deeper understanding of the origins of catalytic power, as it relates to stabilization of the reactant ground state, stabilization of the transition state, and reciprocal stabilizations of ground and transition states.

  20. Subcellular localization of pituitary enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    A cytochemical procedure is reported for identifying subcellular sites of enzymes hydrolyzing beta-naphthylamine substrates, and to study the sites of reaction product localization in cells of various tissues. Investigations using the substrate Leu 4-methoxy-8-naphthylamine, a capture with hexonium pararosaniline, and the final chelation of osmium have identified the hydrolyzing enzyme of rat liver cells; this enzyme localized on cell membranes with intense deposition in the areas of the parcanaliculi. The study of cells in the anterior pituitary of the rat showed the deposition of reaction product on cell membrane; and on the membranes of secretion granules contained within the cell. The deposition of reaction product on the cell membrane however showed no increase or decrease with changes in the physiological state of the gland and release of secretion granules from specific cells.

  1. Enzymes in CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Gladis, Arne; Thomsen, Kaj

    The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) can accelerate the absorption rate of CO2 into aqueous solutions by several-fold. It exist in almost all living organisms and catalyses different important processes like CO2 transport, respiration and the acid-base balances. A new technology in the field...... of carbon capture is the application of enzymes for acceleration of typically slow ternary amines or inorganic carbonates. There is a hidden potential to revive currently infeasible amines which have an interesting low energy consumption for regeneration but too slow kinetics for viable CO2 capture. The aim...... of this work is to discuss the measurements of kinetic properties for CA promoted CO2 capture solvent systems. The development of a rate-based model for enzymes will be discussed showing the principles of implementation and the results on using a well-known ternary amine for CO2 capture. Conclusions...

  2. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  3. Curious Cases of the Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusu, Nuriye Nuray

    2015-07-01

    Life as we know it heavily relies on biological catalysis, in fact, in a very nonromantic version of it, life could be considered as a series of chemical reactions, regulated by the guarding principles of thermodynamics. In ancient times, a beating heart was a good sign of vitality, however, to me, it is actually the presence of active enzymes that counts… Though we do not usually pay attention, the history of enzymology is as old as humanity itself, and dates back to the ancient times. This paper is dedicated to these early moments of this remarkable science that touched our lives in the past and will make life a lot more efficient for humanity in the future. There was almost always a delicate, fundamentally essential relationship between mankind and the enzymes. Challenged by a very alien and hostile Nature full of predators, prehistoric men soon discovered the medicinal properties of the plants, through trial and error. In fact, they accidently discovered the enzyme inhibitors and thus, in crude terms, kindled a sparkling area of research. These plant-derivatives that acted as enzyme inhibitors helped prehistoric men in their pursuit of survival and protection from predators; in hunting and fishing… Later in history, while the underlying purposes of survival and increasing the quality of life stayed intact, the ways and means of enzymology experienced a massive transformation, as the 'trial and error' methodology of the ancients is now replaced with rational scientific theories.

  4. Enzymes with activity toward Xyloglucan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vincken, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    Xyloglucans are plant cell wall polysaccharides, which belong to the hemicellulose class. Here the structural variations of xyloglucans will be reviewed. Subsequently, the anchoring of xyloglucan in the plant cell wall will be discussed. Enzymes involved in degradation or modification of xyloglucan

  5. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be safe...

  6. Heavy enzymes--experimental and computational insights in enzyme dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderek, Katarzyna; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2014-08-01

    The role of protein motions in the chemical step of enzyme-catalyzed reactions is the subject of an open debate in the scientific literature. The systematic use of isotopically substituted enzymes has been revealed as a useful tool to quantify the role of these motions. According to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, changing the mass of the protein does not change the forces acting on the system but alters the frequencies of the protein motions, which in turn can affect the rate constant. Experimental and theoretical studies carried out in this field are presented in this article and discussed in the framework of Transition State Theory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Enzyme technology: Key to selective biorefining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    to the reaction is a unique trait of enzyme catalysis. Since enzyme selectivity means that a specific reaction is catalysed between particular species to produce definite products, enzymes are particularly fit for converting specific compounds in mixed biomass streams. Since enzymes are protein molecules...... their rational use in biorefinery processes requires an understanding of the basic features of enzymes and reaction traits with respect to specificity, kinetics, reaction optima, stability and structure-function relations – we are now at a stage where it is possible to use nature’s enzyme structures as starting...... point and then improve the functional traits by targeted mutation of the protein. The talk will display some of our recent hypotheses related to enzyme action, recently obtained results within knowledge-based enzyme improvements as well as cast light on research methods used in optimizing enzyme...

  8. Study of DNA reconstruction enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiguchi, M [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1976-12-01

    Description was made of the characteristics and mechanism of 3 reconstructive enzymes which received from M. luteus or E. coli or T4, and of which natures were clarified as reconstructive enzymes of DNA irradiated with ultraviolet rays. As characteristics, the site of breaking, reaction, molecular weight, electric charge in the neutrality and a specific adhesion to DNA irradiated with ultraviolet rays were mentioned. As to mutant of ultraviolet ray sensitivity, hereditary control mechanism of removal and reconstruction by endo-nuclease activation was described, and suggestion was referred to removal and reconstruction of cells of xedoderma pigmentosum which is a hereditary disease of human. Description was also made as to the mechanism of exonuclease activation which separates dimer selectively from irradiated DNA.

  9. Metrological aspects of enzyme production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerber, T M; Pereira-Meirelles, F V; Dellamora-Ortiz, G M

    2010-01-01

    Enzymes are frequently used in biotechnology to carry out specific biological reactions, either in industrial processes or for the production of bioproducts and drugs. Microbial lipases are an important group of biotechnologically valuable enzymes that present widely diversified applications. Lipase production by microorganisms is described in several published papers; however, none of them refer to metrological evaluation and the estimation of the uncertainty in measurement. Moreover, few of them refer to process optimization through experimental design. The objectives of this work were to enhance lipase production in shaken-flasks with Yarrowia lipolytica cells employing experimental design and to evaluate the uncertainty in measurement of lipase activity. The highest lipolytic activity obtained was about three- and fivefold higher than the reported activities of CRMs BCR-693 and BCR-694, respectively. Lipase production by Y. lipolytica cells aiming the classification as certified reference material is recommended after further purification and stability studies

  10. Consumer attitudes to enzymes in food production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Helle Alsted; Grunert, Klaus G.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    The use of enzymes in food production has potential benefits for both food manufacturers and consumers. A central question is how consumers react to new ways of producing foods with enzymes. This study investigates the formation of consumer attitudes to different enzyme production methods in three...... European countries. Results show that consumers are most positive towards non-GM enzyme production methods. The enzyme production method is by far the most important factor for the formation of buying intentions compared to price and benefits. Results also show that environmental concern and attitudes...... to technological progress are the socio-political attitudes that have the highest predictive value regarding attitudes to enzyme production methods....

  11. Research progress of nanoparticles as enzyme mimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, XiaoNa; Liu, JianBo; Hou, Shuai; Wen, Tao; Liu, WenQi; Zhang, Ke; He, WeiWei; Ji, YingLu; Ren, HongXuan; Wang, Qi; Wu, XiaoChun

    2011-10-01

    Natural enzymes as biological catalysts possess remarkable advantages, especially their highly efficient and selective catalysis under mild conditions. However, most natural enzymes are proteins, thus exhibiting an inherent low durability to harsh reaction conditions. Artificial enzyme mimetics have been pursued extensively to avoid this drawback. Quite recently, some inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) have been found to exhibit unique enzyme mimetics. In addition, their much higher stability overcomes the inherent disadvantage of natural enzymes. Furthermore, easy mass-production and low cost endow them more benefits. As a new member of artificial enzyme mimetics, they have received intense attention. In this review article, major progress in this field is summarized and future perspectives are highlighted.

  12. Allosteric regulation of epigenetic modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucconi, Beth E; Cole, Philip A

    2017-08-01

    Epigenetic enzymes including histone modifying enzymes are key regulators of gene expression in normal and disease processes. Many drug development strategies to target histone modifying enzymes have focused on ligands that bind to enzyme active sites, but allosteric pockets offer potentially attractive opportunities for therapeutic development. Recent biochemical studies have revealed roles for small molecule and peptide ligands binding outside of the active sites in modulating the catalytic activities of histone modifying enzymes. Here we highlight several examples of allosteric regulation of epigenetic enzymes and discuss the biological significance of these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Guanidinylated Neomycin Conjugation Enhances Intranasal Enzyme Replacement in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wenyong; Dwyer, Chrissa A; Thacker, Bryan E; Glass, Charles A; Brown, Jillian R; Hamill, Kristina; Moremen, Kelley W; Sarrazin, Stéphane; Gordts, Philip L S M; Dozier, Lara E; Patrick, Gentry N; Tor, Yitzhak; Esko, Jeffrey D

    2017-12-06

    Iduronidase (IDUA)-deficient mice accumulate glycosaminoglycans in cells and tissues and exhibit many of the same neuropathological symptoms of patients suffering from Mucopolysaccharidosis I. Intravenous enzyme-replacement therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis I ameliorates glycosaminoglycan storage and many of the somatic aspects of the disease but fails to treat neurological symptoms due to poor transport across the blood-brain barrier. In this study, we examined the delivery of IDUA conjugated to guanidinoneomycin (GNeo), a molecular transporter. GNeo-IDUA and IDUA injected intravenously resulted in reduced hepatic glycosaminoglycan accumulation but had no effect in the brain due to fast clearance from the circulation. In contrast, intranasally administered GNeo-IDUA entered the brain rapidly. Repetitive intranasal treatment with GNeo-IDUA reduced glycosaminoglycan storage, lysosome size and number, and neurodegenerative astrogliosis in the olfactory bulb and primary somatosensory cortex, whereas IDUA was less effective. The enhanced efficacy of GNeo-IDUA was not the result of increased nose-to-brain delivery or enzyme stability, but rather due to more efficient uptake into neurons and astrocytes. GNeo conjugation also enhanced glycosaminoglycan clearance by intranasally delivered sulfamidase to the brain of sulfamidase-deficient mice, a model of Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA. These findings suggest the general utility of the guanidinoglycoside-based delivery system for restoring missing lysosomal enzymes in the brain. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Immobilised enzymes in biorenewable production

    OpenAIRE

    Franssen, M.C.R.; Steunenberg, P.; Scott, E.L.; Zuilhof, H.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Oils, fats, carbohydrates, lignin, and amino acids are all important raw materials for the production of biorenewables. These compounds already play an important role in everyday life in the form of wood, fabrics, starch, paper and rubber. Enzymatic reactions do, in principle, allow the transformation of these raw materials into biorenewables under mild and sustainable conditions. There are a few examples of processes using immobilised enzymes that are already applied on an industrial scale, ...

  15. Immobilization of enzymes by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaetsu, I.; Kumakura, M.; Yoshida, M.; Asano, M.; Himei, M.; Tamura, M.; Hayashi, K.

    1979-01-01

    Immobilization of various enzymes was performed by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomers at low temperatures. Alpha-amylase and glucoamylase were effectively immobilized in hydrophilic polymer carrier such as poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and also in rather hydrophobic carrier such as poly(tetraethylene-glycol diacrylate). Immobilized human hemoglobin underwent the reversible oxygenation concomitantly with change of oxygen concentration outside of the matrices. (author)

  16. Lignin-degrading enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-ru; Sarkanen, Simo; Wang, Yun-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the activities of four kinds of enzyme have been purported to furnish the mechanistic foundations for macromolecular lignin depolymerization in decaying plant cell walls. The pertinent fungal enzymes comprise lignin peroxidase (with a relatively high redox potential), manganese peroxidase, an alkyl aryl etherase, and laccase. The peroxidases and laccase, but not the etherase, are expressed extracellularly by white-rot fungi. A number of these microorganisms exhibit a marked preference toward lignin in their degradation of lignocellulose. Interestingly, some white-rot fungi secrete both kinds of peroxidase but no laccase, while others that are equally effective express extracellular laccase activity but no peroxidases. Actually, none of these enzymes has been reported to possess significant depolymerase activity toward macromolecular lignin substrates that are derived with little chemical modification from the native biopolymer. Here, the assays commonly employed for monitoring the traditional fungal peroxidases, alkyl aryl etherase, and laccase are described in their respective contexts. A soluble native polymeric substrate that can be isolated directly from a conventional milled-wood lignin preparation is characterized in relation to its utility in next-generation lignin-depolymerase assays.

  17. Immobilised enzymes in biorenewables production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Maurice C R; Steunenberg, Peter; Scott, Elinor L; Zuilhof, Han; Sanders, Johan P M

    2013-08-07

    Oils, fats, carbohydrates, lignin, and amino acids are all important raw materials for the production of biorenewables. These compounds already play an important role in everyday life in the form of wood, fabrics, starch, paper and rubber. Enzymatic reactions do, in principle, allow the transformation of these raw materials into biorenewables under mild and sustainable conditions. There are a few examples of processes using immobilised enzymes that are already applied on an industrial scale, such as the production of High-Fructose Corn Syrup, but these are still rather rare. Fortunately, there is a rapid expansion in the research efforts that try to improve this, driven by a combination of economic and ecological reasons. This review focusses on those efforts, by looking at attempts to use fatty acids, carbohydrates, proteins and lignin (and their building blocks), as substrates in the synthesis of biorenewables using immobilised enzymes. Therefore, many examples (390 references) from the recent literature are discussed, in which we look both at the specific reactions as well as to the methods of immobilisation of the enzymes, as the latter are shown to be a crucial factor with respect to stability and reuse. The applications of the renewables produced in this way range from building blocks for the pharmaceutical and polymer industry, transport fuels, to additives for the food industry. A critical evaluation of the relevant factors that need to be improved for large-scale use of these examples is presented in the outlook of this review.

  18. Self-powered enzyme micropumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Samudra; Patra, Debabrata; Ortiz-Rivera, Isamar; Agrawal, Arjun; Shklyaev, Sergey; Dey, Krishna K.; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo; Mallouk, Thomas E.; Sen, Ayusman

    2014-05-01

    Non-mechanical nano- and microscale pumps that function without the aid of an external power source and provide precise control over the flow rate in response to specific signals are needed for the development of new autonomous nano- and microscale systems. Here we show that surface-immobilized enzymes that are independent of adenosine triphosphate function as self-powered micropumps in the presence of their respective substrates. In the four cases studied (catalase, lipase, urease and glucose oxidase), the flow is driven by a gradient in fluid density generated by the enzymatic reaction. The pumping velocity increases with increasing substrate concentration and reaction rate. These rechargeable pumps can be triggered by the presence of specific analytes, which enables the design of enzyme-based devices that act both as sensor and pump. Finally, we show proof-of-concept enzyme-powered devices that autonomously deliver small molecules and proteins in response to specific chemical stimuli, including the release of insulin in response to glucose.

  19. Antioxidant enzymes as potential targets in cardioprotection and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Enzyme antioxidants: the next stage of pharmacological counterwork to the oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Vavaev

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The focus in antioxidant research is on enzyme derivative investigations. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD is of particular interest, as it demonstrates in vivo the protective action against development of atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus. The reliable association of coronary artery disease with decreased level of heparin-released EC-SOD was established in clinical research. To create a base for and to develop antioxidant therapy, various SOD isozymes, catalase (CAT, methods of gene therapy, and combined applications of enzymes are used. Covalent bienzyme SOD-CHS-CAT conjugate (CHS, chondroitin sulphate showed high efficacy and safety as the drug candidate. There is an evident trend to use the components of glycocalyx and extracellular matrix for target delivery of medical substances. Development of new enzyme antioxidants for therapeutic application is closely connected with progress in medical biotechnology, pharmaceutical industry, and bioeconomy.

  20. Feminist Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, Toni; Malmo, Cheryl

    1991-01-01

    Traces roots of feminist therapy and its independence from traditional and prevalent theories and therapy practices. Asserts that Freudian theory and humanistic assumptions are sexist and contribute to powerlessness of women. In contrast, feminist therapy is seen as dealing directly with client-counselor relationships, trust, advocacy, and…

  1. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  2. Electro-ultrafiltration of industrial enzyme solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Ann Dorrit; Hansen, Erik Børresen; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2007-01-01

    To reduce the problems with fouling and concentration polarization during crossflow ultrafiltration of industrial enzyme solutions an electric field is applied across the membrane. The filtration performance during electro-ultrafiltration (EUF) has been tested with several enzymes. Results show...

  3. Biochemical characterization of thermostable cellulase enzyme from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... tested for their ability to produce cellulase complex enzyme by growing on a defined substrates as well ... In the current industrial processes, cellulolytic enzymes ... energy sources such as glucose, ethanol, hydrogen and.

  4. Epigenetics of dominance for enzyme activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    dimer over a wide range of H+ concentrations accounts for the epigenetics of dominance for enzyme activity. [Trehan K S ... The present study has been carried on acid phosphatase .... enzyme activity over mid parent value (table 3, col. 13),.

  5. Castor Oil Transesterification Catalysed by Liquid Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade, Thalles; Errico, Massimiliano; Christensen, Knud Villy

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, biodiesel production by reaction of non-edible castor oil with methanol under enzymatic catalysis is investigated. Two liquid enzymes were tested: Eversa Transform and Resinase HT. Reactions were performed at 35 °C and with a molar ratio of methanol to oil of 6:1. The reaction...... time was 8 hours. Stepwise addition of methanol was necessary to avoid enzyme inhibition by methanol. In order to minimize the enzyme costs, the influence of enzyme activity loss during reuse of both enzymes was evaluated under two distinct conditions. In the former, the enzymes were recovered...... and fully reused; in the latter, a mixture of 50 % reused and 50 % fresh enzymes was tested. In the case of total reuse after three cycles, both enzymes achieved only low conversions. The biodiesel content in the oil-phase using Eversa Transform was 94.21 % for the first cycle, 68.39 % in the second, and 33...

  6. Zymography methods for visualizing hydrolytic enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Vandooren, Jennifer; Geurts, Nathalie; Martens, Erik; Van den Steen, Philippe E.; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2013-01-01

    Zymography is a technique for studying hydrolytic enzymes on the basis of substrate degradation. It is a powerful., but often misinterpreted, tool. yielding information on potential. hydrolytic activities, enzyme forms and the locations of active enzymes. In this Review, zymography techniques are compared in terms of advantages, limitations and interpretations. With in gel zymography, enzyme forms are visualized according to their molecular weights. Proteolytic activities are localized in tis...

  7. Biomedical Applications of Enzymes From Marine Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamala, K; Sivaperumal, P

    Marine microbial enzyme technologies have progressed significantly in the last few decades for different applications. Among the various microorganisms, marine actinobacterial enzymes have significant active properties, which could allow them to be biocatalysts with tremendous bioactive metabolites. Moreover, marine actinobacteria have been considered as biofactories, since their enzymes fulfill biomedical and industrial needs. In this chapter, the marine actinobacteria and their enzymes' uses in biological activities and biomedical applications are described. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Telomerase – future drug target enzyme?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Langerholc

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Eucaryotic chromosome endings (telomeres replication problem was solved in the 1980’s by discovery of the telomerase enzyme. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded in 2009 for the discovery of telomerase. Altered telomerase expression in cancer, and human dream of eternal youth have accelerated the development of pharmacological telomerase inhibitors and activators. However, after 15 years of development they are still not available on the market. In the present article we reviewed pharmacological agents that target telomerase activity, which have entered clinical trials. Current drugs in development are mostly not intended to be used alone, as telomerase inhibitors under clinical trials are used in combination with the existing chemotherapeutics and anti-telomerase vaccines in combination with immuno-stimulants. Apart from cancer and aging, there are other diseases linked to deregulated activity of telomerase/telomeres and we also discuss technical and legal problems that researchers encounter in developing anti-telomerase therapy. Given the pace of development, first anti-telomerase drugs might appear on the market in the next 5 years.

  9. Cellulolytic enzyme compositions and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Prashant; Gaspar, Armindo Ribiero; Croonenberghs, James; Binder, Thomas P.

    2017-07-25

    The present invention relates enzyme composition comprising a cellulolytic preparation and an acetylxylan esterase (AXE); and the used of cellulolytic enzyme compositions for hydrolyzing acetylated cellulosic material. Finally the invention also relates to processes of producing fermentation products from acetylated cellulosic materials using a cellulolytic enzyme composition of the invention.

  10. Immobilization of Enzymes in Polymer Supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Hugh D.; Walt, David R.

    1986-01-01

    Two experiments in which an enzyme is immobilized onto a polymeric support are described. The experiments (which also demonstrate two different polymer preparations) involve: (1) entrapping an enzyme in an acrylamide polymer; and (2) reacting the amino groups on the enzyme's (esterase) lysine residues with an activated polymer. (JN)

  11. Purification and characterization of extracellular amylolytic enzyme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, the amylase enzyme producing potential of four different Aspergillus species was analyzed. The extracted amylase enzyme was purified by diethyl amino ethyl (DEAE) cellulose and Sephadex G-50 column chromatography and the enzyme activity was measured by using synthetic substrate starch.

  12. Activation of interfacial enzymes at membrane surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Halperin, Avi

    2006-01-01

    A host of water-soluble enzymes are active at membrane surfaces and in association with membranes. Some of these enzymes are involved in signalling and in modification and remodelling of the membranes. A special class of enzymes, the phospholipases, and in particular secretory phospholipase A2 (s...

  13. PROCESS FOR DUST-FREE ENZYME MANUFACTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andela, C.; Feijen, Jan; Dillissen, Marc

    1994-01-01

    New enzyme granules are provided with improved properties. The granules are based on core particles having a good pore size and pore size distribution to allow an enzyme solution to enter into the particle. Accordingly, the core material comprises the enzyme in liquid form, thus eliminating the

  14. Transdermal iontophoresis of dopaminergic (pro) drugs : from formulation to in vivo application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ackaert, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Pharmacotherapy is the first line symptomatic treatment of this neurological disease. Currently Levodopa (L-DOPA) is still considered the drug of first choice, but its possible neurotoxicity and the induction of movement

  15. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  16. Enzyme structure and interaction with inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    This article reviews some of the results of studies on the 13 C-labeled enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are used in combination with isotopic labeling to learn about the structure and dynamics of this enzyme. 13 C-labeling is used for the purpose of studying enzyme/substrate and enzyme/inhibitor interactions. A second set of studies with DHFR was designed to investigate the basis for the high affinity between the inhibitor methotrexate and DHFR. The label was placed on the inhibitor, rather than the enzyme

  17. Avaliação de dois anos de tratamento da doença de Gaucher tipo 1 com terapia de reposição enzimática em pacientes do estado de São Paulo, Brasil Evaluation of two years of treatment with enzyme replacement therapy in type 1 Gaucher disease patients of São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa A. P. Sobreira

    2008-01-01

    marrow. The symptoms are heterogeneous and include hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, bone marrow infiltration, and skeletal lesions. We evaluated the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT on anemia, thrombocytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, growth retardation (children and adolescents and bone pain among 90 patients with type 1 Gaucher's disease treated during 24 months in Sao Paulo State. Baseline signs and symptoms were anemia (50%, thrombocytopenia (59%, hepatomegaly (97%, splenomegaly (96%, growth retardation (46% and bone pain (62%. The mean dose of ERT was 35 U/kg every two weeks. Reduction in anemia, thrombocytopenia and bone pain was greatest during the first six months of ERT and of hepatosplenomegaly and growth retardation within 18 months. Improvements were sustained by most of the patients during the follow-up. Within 24 months of ERT, therapeutic goals were achieved in at least 88% of patients with anemia, 80% with thrombocytopenia, 34% with hepatosplenomegaly, 77% with growth retardation and 76% with bone pain. Other studies are needed to evaluate the treatment efficacy over a longer period, mainly for skeletal lesions and growth retardation, which may present a slower recovery due to low penetration of imiglucerase in bones.

  18. Applications of Microbial Enzymes in Food Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Parameswaran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of enzymes or microorganisms in food preparations is an age-old process. With the advancement of technology, novel enzymes with wide range of applications and specificity have been developed and new application areas are still being explored. Microorganisms such as bacteria, yeast and fungi and their enzymes are widely used in several food preparations for improving the taste and texture and they offer huge economic benefits to industries. Microbial enzymes are the preferred source to plants or animals due to several advantages such as easy, cost-effective and consistent production. The present review discusses the recent advancement in enzyme technology for food industries. A comprehensive list of enzymes used in food processing, the microbial source of these enzymes and the wide range of their application are discussed.

  19. DNA-Based Enzyme Reactors and Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veikko Linko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, the possibility to create custom biocompatible nanoshapes using DNA as a building material has rapidly emerged. Further, these rationally designed DNA structures could be exploited in positioning pivotal molecules, such as enzymes, with nanometer-level precision. This feature could be used in the fabrication of artificial biochemical machinery that is able to mimic the complex reactions found in living cells. Currently, DNA-enzyme hybrids can be used to control (multi-enzyme cascade reactions and to regulate the enzyme functions and the reaction pathways. Moreover, sophisticated DNA structures can be utilized in encapsulating active enzymes and delivering the molecular cargo into cells. In this review, we focus on the latest enzyme systems based on novel DNA nanostructures: enzyme reactors, regulatory devices and carriers that can find uses in various biotechnological and nanomedical applications.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme: an encouraging target for various inflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia, Malkeet S; Silakari, Om

    2010-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha is one of the most common pro-inflammatory cytokines responsible for various inflammatory disorders. It plays an important role in the origin and progression of rheumatoid arthritis and also in other autoimmune disease conditions. Some anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies like Enbrel, Humira and Remicade have been successfully used in these disease conditions as antagonists of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Inhibition of generation of active form of tumor necrosis factor alpha is a promising therapy for various inflammatory disorders. Therefore, the inhibition of an enzyme (tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme), which is responsible for processing inactive form of tumor necrosis factor alpha into its active soluble form, is an encouraging target. Many tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme inhibitors have been the candidates of clinical trials but none of them have reached in to the market because of their broad spectrum inhibitory activity for other matrix metalloproteases. Selectivity of tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme inhibition over matrix metalloproteases is of utmost importance. If selectivity is achieved successfully, side-effects can be over-ruled and this approach may become a novel therapy for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. This cytokine not only plays a pivotal role in inflammatory conditions but also in some cancerous conditions. Thus, successful targeting of tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme may result in multifunctional therapy.

  1. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  2. Trends in co-prescribing of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wan Md Adnan, Wan A H

    2011-03-01

    (i) To examine the trends in co-prescribing of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and angiotensin-II receptor blocker (ARB) therapy and (ii) to examine the influence of major clinical trials (CALM, COOPERATE, VALIANT and ONTARGET) on co-prescribing.

  3. Ethanologenic Enzymes of Zymomonas mobilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, Lonnie O' Neal

    1999-03-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a unique microorganism in being both obligately fermentative and utilizing a Entner-Doudoroff pathway for glycolysis. Glycolytic flux in this organism is readily measured as evolved carbon dioxide, ethanol, or glucose consumed and exceeds 1 {micro}mole glucose/min per mg cell protein. To support this rapid glycolysis, approximately 50% of cytoplasmic protein is devoted to the 13 glycolytic and fermentative enzymes which constitute this central catabolic pathway. Only 1 ATP (net) is produced from each glucose metabolized. During the past grant period, we have completed the characterization of 11 of the 13 glycolytic genes from Z. mobilis together with complementary but separate DOE-fimded research by a former post-dot and collaborator, Dr. Tyrrell Conway. Research funded in my lab by DOE, Division of Energy Biosciences can be divided into three sections: A. Fundamental studies; B. Applied studies and utility; and C. Miscellaneous investigations.

  4. CELLULOSE DEGRADATION BY OXIDATIVE ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  5. [Personalized medicine in transplantation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Kaname

    2013-05-01

    Personalized medicine based on pharmacogenomics is being developed at the clinical stage. Various evidence is accumulating in transplantation therapy. Tacrolimus, a calcineurin inhibitor, is usually used for immunosuppressive therapy after transplantation. Tacrolimus is mainly metabolized by cytochrome P450 isozymes, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, expressed in the intestine as well as in the liver. Recent studies of pharmacogenomics have reported that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CYP3A5 are correlated with gene expression and enzyme activity. Phenotypes of CYP3A5 are typed as expressors (*1/*1 and *1/*3) or non-expressors (*3/*3) . In living-donor liver transplantation, CYP3A5 phenotypes could predict the blood concentration of tacrolimus. In particular, preoperative assessment of CYP3A5 genotypes in both recipients (intestine) and donors (graft liver) is required for predicting tacrolimus pharmacokinetics. In kidney transplantation, blood tacrolimus concentrations were significantly different between expressors and non-expressors. Genotyping and phenotyping of recipients were useful to predict blood tacrolimus levels in early phase of post-transplantation. Furthermore, phenotypes of CYP3A5 could predict the initial dose of tacrolimus. Combination therapy was performed after bone marrow transplantation to prevent complications. Genotyping and phenotyping of metabolic enzymes for combination dugs would be useful for predicting drug actions. In conclusion, phenotyping based on pharmacogenomics supports personalized medicine in transplantation therapy. In future, multiplex testing should be developed to support personalized medicine in various fields.

  6. Prediction of Wild-type Enzyme Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz-Hansen, Henrik Marcus

    of biotechnology, including enzyme discovery and characterization. This work presents two articles on sequence-based discovery and functional annotation of enzymes in environmental samples, and two articles on analysis and prediction of enzyme thermostability and cofactor requirements. The first article presents...... a sequence-based approach to discovery of proteolytic enzymes in metagenomes obtained from the Polar oceans. We show that microorganisms living in these extreme environments of constant low temperature harbour genes encoding novel proteolytic enzymes with potential industrial relevance. The second article...... presents a web server for the processing and annotation of functional metagenomics sequencing data, tailored to meet the requirements of non-bioinformaticians. The third article presents analyses of the molecular determinants of enzyme thermostability, and a feature-based prediction method of the melting...

  7. Toward mechanistic classification of enzyme functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonacid, Daniel E; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2011-06-01

    Classification of enzyme function should be quantitative, computationally accessible, and informed by sequences and structures to enable use of genomic information for functional inference and other applications. Large-scale studies have established that divergently evolved enzymes share conserved elements of structure and common mechanistic steps and that convergently evolved enzymes often converge to similar mechanisms too, suggesting that reaction mechanisms could be used to develop finer-grained functional descriptions than provided by the Enzyme Commission (EC) system currently in use. Here we describe how evolution informs these structure-function mappings and review the databases that store mechanisms of enzyme reactions along with recent developments to measure ligand and mechanistic similarities. Together, these provide a foundation for new classifications of enzyme function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. How Do Enzymes 'Meet' Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Zeng, Guangming; Xu, Piao; Lai, Cui; Tang, Lin

    2017-11-01

    Enzymes are fundamental biological catalysts responsible for biological regulation and metabolism. The opportunity for enzymes to 'meet' nanoparticles and nanomaterials is rapidly increasing due to growing demands for applications in nanomaterial design, environmental monitoring, biochemical engineering, and biomedicine. Therefore, understanding the nature of nanomaterial-enzyme interactions is becoming important. Since 2014, enzymes have been used to modify, degrade, or make nanoparticles/nanomaterials, while numerous nanoparticles/nanomaterials have been used as materials for enzymatic immobilization and biosensors and as enzyme mimicry. Among the various nanoparticles and nanomaterials, metal nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials have received extensive attention due to their fascinating properties. This review provides an overview about how enzymes meet nanoparticles and nanomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Production of Enzymes from Marine Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X Q; Xu, X N; Chen, L Y

    Marine actinobacteria are well recognized for their capabilities to produce valuable natural products, which have great potential for applications in medical, agricultural, and fine chemical industries. In addition to producing unique enzymes responsible for biosynthesis of natural products, many marine actinobacteria also produce hydrolytic enzymes which are able to degrade various biopolymers, such as cellulose, xylan, and chitin. These enzymes are important to produce biofuels and biochemicals of interest from renewable biomass. In this chapter, the recent reports of novel enzymes produced by marine actinobacteria are reviewed, and advanced technologies that can be applied to search for novel marine enzymes as well as for improved enzyme production by marine actinobacteria are summarized, which include ribosome engineering, genome mining, as well as synthetic biology studies. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of pressure tuning of enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naghshineh, Mahsa

    and high energy consumption. Therefore, searching for an environmentally friendly method of pectin extraction is a task for science and industry. Employment of hydrolytic enzymes may represent a green approach to obtain intact pectin polymer. However, the low stability/activity of enzymes, and low polymer...... yield of enzymatic extraction limits the application of enzyme in pectin production. There is evidence that emerging technology of high hydrostatic pressure processing can result in stabilization and activation of some enzymes. Therefore, the use of high hydrostatic pressure in combination with enzyme...... (cellulase/xylanase: 50/0, 50/25, 50/50, 25/50, and 0/50 U/g lime peel) at ambient pressure, 100 and 200 MPa were used to extract pectin from dried lime peel waste. It was found that pressure level, type and concentration of enzyme significantly influenced pectin yield and degree of esterification (DE...

  11. Model for Quantitative Evaluation of Enzyme Replacement Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radeva B.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal disorder. Its enzyme replacement treatment was the new progress of modern biotechnology, successfully used in the last years. The evaluation of optimal dose of each patient is important due to health and economical reasons. The enzyme replacement is the most expensive treatment. It must be held continuously and without interruption. Since 2001, the enzyme replacement therapy with Cerezyme*Genzyme was formally introduced in Bulgaria, but after some time it was interrupted for 1-2 months. The dose of the patients was not optimal. The aim of our work is to find a mathematical model for quantitative evaluation of ERT of Gaucher disease. The model applies a kind of software called "Statistika 6" via the input of the individual data of 5-year-old children having the Gaucher disease treated with Cerezyme. The output results of the model gave possibilities for quantitative evaluation of the individual trends in the development of the disease of each child and its correlation. On the basis of this results, we might recommend suitable changes in ERT.

  12. Enzyme Enzyme activities in relation to sugar accumulation in tomato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, M.J.; Rahman, M.H.; Mamun, M.A.; Islam, K.

    2006-01-01

    Enzyme activities in tomato juice of five different varieties viz. Ratan, Marglove, BARI-1, BARI-5 and BARI-6, in relation to sugar accumulation were investigated at different maturity stages. The highest amount of invertase and beta-galactosidase was found in Marglove and the lowest in BARI- 6 at all maturity stages. Total soluble sugar and sucrose contents were highest in BARI-1 and lowest in BARI-6. The activity of amylase was maximum in Ratan and minimum in Marglove. Protease activity was highest in Ratan and lowest in BARI-6. BARI-1 contained the highest cellulase activity and the lowest in BARI-5. The amount of total soluble sugar and sucrose increased moderately from premature to ripe stage. The activities of amylase and cellulase increased up to the mature stage and then decreased drastically in the ripe stage. The activities of invertase and protease increased sharply from the premature to the ripe stage while the beta-galactosidase activity decreased remarkably. No detectable amount of reducing sugar was present in the premature stage in all cultivars of tomato but increased thereafter upto the ripe stage. The highest reducing sugar was present in BARI-5 in all of the maturity stages. (author)

  13. ENZYME RESISTANCE OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED STARCH POTATOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sh. Mannapova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here in this article the justification of expediency of enzyme resistant starch use in therapeutic food products is presented . Enzyme resistant starch is capable to resist to enzymatic hydrolysis in a small intestine of a person, has a low glycemic index, leads to decrease of postprandial concentration of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides in blood and insulin reaction, to improvement of sensitivity of all organism to insulin, to increase in sense of fulness and to reduction of adjournment of fats. Resistant starch makes bifidogenшс impact on microflora of a intestine of the person, leads to increase of a quantity of lactobacillus and bifidobacterium and to increased production of butyric acid in a large intestine. In this regard the enzyme resistant starch is an important component in food for prevention and curing of human diseases such as diabetes, obesity, colitis, a cancer of large and direct intestine. One method is specified by authors for imitation of starch digestion in a human body. This method is based on the definition of an enzyme resistance of starch in vitro by its hydrolysis to glucose with application of a glucoamylase and digestive enzyme preparation Pancreatin. This method is used in researches of an enzyme resistance of starch, of genetically modified potato, high amylose corn starch Hi-Maize 1043 and HYLON VII (National Starch Food Innovation, USA, amylopectin and amylose. It is shown that the enzyme resistance of the starch emitted from genetically modified potatoes conforms to the enzyme resistance of the high amylose corn starch “Hi-Maize 1043 and HYLON VII starch”, (National Starch Food Innovation, the USA relating to the II type of enzyme resistant starch. It is established that amylopectin doesn't have the enzyme resistant properties. The results of researches are presented. They allow us to make the following conclusion: amylose in comparison with amylopectin possesses higher enzyme resistance and gives to

  14. [Advances on enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Feng-Hua; Ye, Jian-Qing; Chen, Zuan-Guang; Cheng, Zhi-Yi

    2010-06-01

    With the continuous development in microfluidic fabrication technology, microfluidic analysis has evolved from a concept to one of research frontiers in last twenty years. The research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors based on microfluidic devices has also made great progress. Microfluidic technology improved greatly the analytical performance of the research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors by reducing the consumption of reagents, decreasing the analysis time, and developing automation. This review focuses on the development and classification of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices.

  15. Zymography methods for visualizing hydrolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandooren, Jennifer; Geurts, Nathalie; Martens, Erik; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2013-03-01

    Zymography is a technique for studying hydrolytic enzymes on the basis of substrate degradation. It is a powerful, but often misinterpreted, tool yielding information on potential hydrolytic activities, enzyme forms and the locations of active enzymes. In this Review, zymography techniques are compared in terms of advantages, limitations and interpretations. With in gel zymography, enzyme forms are visualized according to their molecular weights. Proteolytic activities are localized in tissue sections with in situ zymography. In vivo zymography can pinpoint proteolytic activity to sites in an intact organism. Future development of novel substrate probes and improvement in detection and imaging methods will increase the applicability of zymography for (reverse) degradomics studies.

  16. Detoxification enzymes activities in deltamethrin and bendiocarb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detoxification enzymes activities in deltamethrin and bendiocarb resistant and susceptible malarial vectors ( Anopheles gambiae ) breeding in Bichi agricultural and residential sites, Kano state, Nigeria.

  17. Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme: purification and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snapka, R.M.; Sutherland, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    Researchers have purified large quantities of Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme to apparent homogeneity and have studied its physical and chemical properties. The enzyme has a molecular weight of 36,800 and a S/sub 20,w/ 0 of 3.72 S. Amino acid analysis revealed an apparent absence of tryptophan, a low content of aromatic residues, and the presence of no unusual amino acids. The N terminus is arginine. The purified enzyme contained up to 13% carbohydrate by weight. The carbohydrate was composed of mannose, galactose, glucose, and N-acetylglucosamine. The enzyme is also associated with RNA containing uracil, adenine, guanine, and cytosine with no unusual bases detected

  18. Thermometric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay: TELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiasson, B; Borrebaeck, C; Sanfridson, B; Mosbach, K

    1977-08-11

    A new method, thermometric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (TELISA), for the assay of endogenous and exogenous compounds in biological fluids is described. It is based on the previously described enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technique, ELISA, but utilizes enzymic heat formation which is measured in an enzyme thermistor unit. In the model system studied determination of human serum albumin down to a concentration of 10(-10) M (5 ng/ml) was achieved, with both normal and catalase labelled human serum albumin competing for the binding sites on the immunosorbent, which was rabbit antihuman serum albumin immobilized onto Sepharose CL-4B.

  19. The mechanisms of Excited states in enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Frederic Nicolas Rønne; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Enzyme catalysis is studied on the basis of excited state processes, which are of electronic, vibrational and thermal nature. The ways of achieving the excited state, such as photo-absorption and ligand binding, are discussed and exemplified by various cases of enzymes.......Enzyme catalysis is studied on the basis of excited state processes, which are of electronic, vibrational and thermal nature. The ways of achieving the excited state, such as photo-absorption and ligand binding, are discussed and exemplified by various cases of enzymes....

  20. Theranostic Imaging of Cancer Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Thillai V; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) is a promising therapeutic approach for treating cancers of various phenotypes. This strategy is independent of various other chemotherapeutic drugs used for treating cancers where the drugs are mainly designed to target endogenous cellular mechanisms, which are different in various cancer subtypes. In GDEPT an external enzyme, which is different from the cellular proteins, is expressed to convert the injected prodrug in to a toxic metabolite, that normally kill cancer cells express this protein. Theranostic imaging is an approach used to directly monitor the expression of these gene therapy enzymes while evaluating therapeutic effect. We recently developed a dual-GDEPT system where we combined mutant human herpes simplex thymidine kinase (HSV1sr39TK) and E. coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme, to improve therapeutic efficiency of cancer gene therapy by simultaneously injecting two prodrugs at a lower dose. In this approach we use two different prodrugs such as ganciclovir (GCV) and CB1954 to target two different cellular mechanisms to kill cancer cells. The developed dual GDEPT system was highly efficacious than that of either of the system used independently. In this chapter, we describe the complete protocol involved for in vitro and in vivo imaging of therapeutic cancer gene therapy evaluation.

  1. Mucopolysaccharidosis enzyme production by bone marrow and dental pulp derived human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matilda; Derrick Roberts, Ainslie; Martin, Ellenore; Rout-Pitt, Nathan; Gronthos, Stan; Byers, Sharon

    2015-04-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are inherited metabolic disorders that arise from a complete loss or a reduction in one of eleven specific lysosomal enzymes. MPS children display pathology in multiple cell types leading to tissue and organ failure and early death. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) give rise to many of the cell types affected in MPS, including those that are refractory to current treatment protocols such as hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) based therapy. In this study we compared multiple MPS enzyme production by bone marrow derived (hBM) and dental pulp derived (hDP) MSCs to enzyme production by HSCs. hBM MSCs produce significantly higher levels of MPS I, II, IIIA, IVA, VI and VII enzyme than HSCs, while hDP MSCs produce significantly higher levels of MPS I, IIIA, IVA, VI and VII enzymes. Higher transfection efficiency was observed in MSCs (89%) compared to HSCs (23%) using a lentiviral vector. Over-expression of four different lysosomal enzymes resulted in up to 9303-fold and up to 5559-fold greater levels in MSC cell layer and media respectively. Stable, persistent transduction of MSCs and sustained over-expression of MPS VII enzyme was observed in vitro. Transduction of MSCs did not affect the ability of the cells to differentiate down osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic lineages, but did partially delay differentiation down the non-mesodermal neurogenic lineage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Spectroscopic studies of copper enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, D.M.; Moog, R.; Zumft, W.; Koenig, S.H.; Scott, R.A.; Cote, C.E.; McGuirl, M.

    1986-01-01

    Several spectroscopic methods, including absorption, circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), X-ray absorption, resonance Raman, EPR, NMR, and quasi-elastic light-scattering spectroscopy, have been used to probe the structures of copper-containing amine oxidases, nitrite reductase, and nitrous oxide reductase. The basic goals are to determine the copper site structure, electronic properties, and to generate structure-reactivity correlations. Collectively, the results on the amine oxidases permit a detailed model for the Cu(II) sites in these enzymes to be constructed that, in turn, rationalizes the ligand-binding chemistry. Resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazine and 2,4-dinitrophenyl-hydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase and models for its organic cofactor, e.g. pyridoxal, methoxatin, are most consistent with methoxatin being the intrinsic cofactor. The structure of the Cu(I) forms of the amine oxidases have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS); the copper coordination geometry is significantly different in the oxidized and reduced forms. Some anomalous properties of the amine oxidases in solution are explicable in terms of their reversible aggregation, which the authors have characterized via light scattering. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases display several novel spectral properties. The data suggest that new types of copper sites are present

  3. Expression of eicosanoid biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes in peritoneal endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousse, J-C; Defrère, S; Colette, S; Van Langendonckt, A; Donnez, J

    2010-03-01

    Increased peritoneal eicosanoid concentrations have been reported in endometriosis patients and might be important in disease-associated pain and inflammation. Here, we evaluated the expression of key biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes involved in this abnormal eicosanoid production in peritoneal macrophages and endometriotic lesions. Peritoneal macrophages, endometriotic lesions and matched eutopic endometrium were collected from endometriosis patients (n = 40). Peritoneal macrophages and eutopic endometrium samples were also collected from disease-free women (n = 25). Expression of type IIA secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)-IIA), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) was quantified by real-time PCR, and these five key enzymes were localized by immunohistochemistry. sPLA(2)-IIA, COX-2 and mPGES-1 mRNA was significantly increased in peritoneal macrophages of endometriosis patients compared with controls (P = 0.006, P = 0.016 and P = 0.025, respectively). In endometriosis patients, sPLA(2)-IIA, mPGES-1 and 15-PGDH mRNA was significantly enhanced in peritoneal lesions compared with matched eutopic endometrium (P endometriosis group compared with controls (P = 0.023). Finally, sPLA(2)-IIA, COX-2, mPGES-1 and 15-PGDH immunostaining was found mainly in endometrial glands, whereas 5-LO was distributed throughout the glands and stroma. Our study highlights an imbalance between eicosanoid biosynthesis and degradation in endometriosis patients. Both peritoneal macrophages and endometriotic lesions may be involved. Research into new molecules inhibiting biosynthetic enzymes (such as sPLA(2)-IIA and mPGES-1) and/or activating catabolic enzymes (such as 15-PGDH) may prove to be a major field of investigation in the development of targeted medical therapies.

  4. Direct Electron Transfer of Enzymes in a Biologically Assembled Conductive Nanomesh Enzyme Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Ki-Young; Song, Yong-Won; Choi, Won Kook; Chang, Joonyeon; Yi, Hyunjung

    2016-02-24

    Nondestructive assembly of a nanostructured enzyme platform is developed in combination of the specific biomolecular attraction and electrostatic coupling for highly efficient direct electron transfer (DET) of enzymes with unprecedented applicability and versatility. The biologically assembled conductive nanomesh enzyme platform enables DET-based flexible integrated biosensors and DET of eight different enzyme with various catalytic activities. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Play Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawver, Timothy; Blankenship, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Play therapy is a treatment modality in which the therapist engages in play with the child. Its use has been documented in a variety of settings and with a variety of diagnoses. Treating within the context of play brings the therapist and the therapy to the level of the child. By way of an introduction to this approach, a case is presented of a six-year-old boy with oppositional defiant disorder. The presentation focuses on the events and interactions of a typical session with an established patient. The primary issues of the session are aggression, self worth, and self efficacy. These themes manifest themselves through the content of the child’s play and narration of his actions. The therapist then reflects these back to the child while gently encouraging the child toward more positive play. Though the example is one of nondirective play therapy, a wide range of variation exists under the heading of play therapy. PMID:19724720

  6. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it also can be a sign of endometrial cancer. All bleeding after menopause should be evaluated. Other side effects reported by women who take hormone therapy include fluid retention and breast soreness. This soreness usually lasts for a short ...

  7. Enzyme Activity Experiments Using a Simple Spectrophotometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbut, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Experimental procedures for studying enzyme activity using a Spectronic 20 spectrophotometer are described. The experiments demonstrate the effect of pH, temperature, and inhibitors on enzyme activity and allow the determination of Km, Vmax, and Kcat. These procedures are designed for teaching large lower-level biochemistry classes. (MR)

  8. The use of enzymes for beer brewing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van Laura H.G.; Mostert, Joost; Zisopoulos, Filippos K.; Boom, Remko M.; Goot, van der Atze Jan

    2016-01-01

    The exergetic performance of beer produced by the conventional malting and brewing process is compared with that of beer produced using an enzyme-assisted process. The aim is to estimate if the use of an exogenous enzyme formulation reduces the environmental impact of the overall brewing process.

  9. Lignocellulose biotechnology: issues of bioconversion and enzyme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lignocellulose biotechnology: issues of bioconversion and enzyme production. ... and secondly to highlight some of the modern approaches which potentially could be used to tackle one of the major impediments, namely high enzyme cost, to speed-up the extensive commercialisation of the lignocellulose bioprocessing.

  10. Illustrating Enzyme Inhibition Using Gibbs Energy Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearne, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Gibbs energy profiles have great utility as teaching and learning tools because they present students with a visual representation of the energy changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. Unfortunately, most textbooks divorce discussions of traditional kinetic topics, such as enzyme inhibition, from discussions of these same topics in terms of…

  11. Enzyme Catalysis and the Gibbs Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Addison

    2009-01-01

    Gibbs-energy profiles are often introduced during the first semester of organic chemistry, but are less often presented in connection with enzyme-catalyzed reactions. In this article I show how the Gibbs-energy profile corresponds to the characteristic kinetics of a simple enzyme-catalyzed reaction. (Contains 1 figure and 1 note.)

  12. Enzyme Engineering for In Situ Immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Fabian B H; Chen, Shuxiong; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2016-10-14

    Enzymes are used as biocatalysts in a vast range of industrial applications. Immobilization of enzymes to solid supports or their self-assembly into insoluble particles enhances their applicability by strongly improving properties such as stability in changing environments, re-usability and applicability in continuous biocatalytic processes. The possibility of co-immobilizing various functionally related enzymes involved in multistep synthesis, conversion or degradation reactions enables the design of multifunctional biocatalyst with enhanced performance compared to their soluble counterparts. This review provides a brief overview of up-to-date in vitro immobilization strategies while focusing on recent advances in enzyme engineering towards in situ self-assembly into insoluble particles. In situ self-assembly approaches include the bioengineering of bacteria to abundantly form enzymatically active inclusion bodies such as enzyme inclusions or enzyme-coated polyhydroxyalkanoate granules. These one-step production strategies for immobilized enzymes avoid prefabrication of the carrier as well as chemical cross-linking or attachment to a support material while the controlled oriented display strongly enhances the fraction of accessible catalytic sites and hence functional enzymes.

  13. Utilization of enzyme supplemented Telfairia occidentalis stalk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An eight (8) week feeding trial was carried out to assess the use of enzyme natuzyme supplemented Telfairia occidentalis stalk extract as growth inducer in the practical diet for Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings. Five isonitrogenous (35% crude protein) diets at 0 ml of stalk extract and enzyme (TRT 1), 15 ml (TRT 2) and 30 ...

  14. Bacterial Enzymes and Antibiotic Resistance- Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Lauren [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β-lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes.

  15. Application of radiopolymerization for immobilization of enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higa, O.Z.; Mastro, N.L. del; Castagnet, A.C.G.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrophilic glass-forming monomers were used in an application of irradiation technology for the immobilization of cellulase and cellobiase. Experiments to observe the effect of additives such as silicates and polyethylene glycol in the enzyme entrapment are reported on. In all cases, enzymatic activity was maintained for more than fifteen batch enzyme reactions. (Author) [pt

  16. Enzyme-Catalyzed Transetherification of Alkoxysilanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter G. Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first evidence of an enzyme-catalyzed transetherification of model alkoxysilanes. During an extensive enzymatic screening in the search for new biocatalysts for silicon-oxygen bond formation, we found that certain enzymes promoted the transetherification of alkoxysilanes when tert-butanol or 1-octanol were used as the reaction solvents.

  17. Enzymes from Higher Eukaryotes for Industrial Biocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The industrial production of fine chemicals, feed and food ingredients, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and their respective intermediates relies on an increasing application of biocatalysis, i.e. on enzyme or whole-cell catalyzed conversions of molecules. Simple procedures for discovery, cloning and over-expression as well as fast growth favour fungi, yeasts and especially bacteria as sources of biocatalysts. Higher eukaryotes also harbour an almost unlimited number of potential biocatalysts, although to date the limited supply of enzymes, the high heterogeneity of enzyme preparations and the hazard of infectious contaminants keep some interesting candidates out of reach for industrial bioprocesses. In the past only a few animal and plant enzymes from agricultural waste materials were employed in food processing. The use of bacterial expression strains or non-conventional yeasts for the heterologous production of efficient eukaryotic enzymes can overcome the bottleneck in enzyme supply and provide sufficient amounts of homogenous enzyme preparations for reliable and economically feasible applications at large scale. Ideal enzymatic processes represent an environmentally friendly, »near-to-completion« conversion of (mostly non-natural substrates to pure products. Recent developments demonstrate the commercial feasibility of large-scale biocatalytic processes employing enzymes from higher eukaryotes (e.g. plants, animals and also their usefulness in some small-scale industrial applications.

  18. Biocatalytic material comprising multilayer enzyme coated fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

    2009-11-03

    The present invention relates generally to high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials and processes for using the same. The materials comprise enzyme aggregate coatings having high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environment. These new materials provide a new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

  19. 21 CFR 864.4400 - Enzyme preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enzyme preparations. 864.4400 Section 864.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Specimen Preparation Reagents § 864.4400 Enzyme...

  20. Loop 7 of E2 enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papaleo, Elena; Casiraghi, Nicola; Arrigoni, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin (Ub) system controls almost every aspect of eukaryotic cell biology. Protein ubiquitination depends on the sequential action of three classes of enzymes (E1, E2 and E3). E2 Ub-conjugating enzymes have a central role in the ubiquitination pathway, interacting with both E1 and E3...

  1. Enzyme adsorption at solid-liquid interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duinhoven, S.

    1992-01-01

    Enzymes are proteins with the capacity of catalysing various reactions. Nowadays two types of enzymes, proteases and lipases, are available for use in detergent formulations for household and industrial laundry washing. Proteases are capable of catalysing the hydrolysis of proteins while

  2. [Potentialization of antibiotics by lytic enzymes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisou, J; Babin, P; Babin, R

    1975-01-01

    Few lytic enzymes, specially papaine and lysozyme, acting on the membrane and cell wall structures facilitate effects of bacitracine, streptomycine and other antibiotics. Streptomycino resistant strains became sensibles to this antibiotic after contact with papaine and lysozyme. The results of tests in physiological suspensions concern only the lytic activity of enzymes. The results on nutrient medium concern together lytic, and antibiotic activities.

  3. Manual Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hakgüder, Aral; Kokino, Siranuş

    2002-01-01

    Manual therapy has been used in the treatment of pain and dysfunction of spinal and peripheral joints for more than a hundred years. Manual medicine includes manipulation, mobilization, and postisometric relaxation techniques. The aim of manual therapy is to enhance restricted movement caused by blockage of joints keeping postural balance, restore function and maintain optimal body mechanics. Anatomic, biomechanical, and neurophysiological evaluations of the leucomotor system is essential for...

  4. Enzyme activity assay of glycoprotein enzymes based on a boronate affinity molecularly imprinted 96-well microplate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhen

    2014-12-16

    Enzyme activity assay is an important method in clinical diagnostics. However, conventional enzyme activity assay suffers from apparent interference from the sample matrix. Herein, we present a new format of enzyme activity assay that can effectively eliminate the effects of the sample matrix. The key is a 96-well microplate modified with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared according to a newly proposed method called boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a glycoprotein enzyme that has been routinely used as an indicator for several diseases in clinical tests, was taken as a representative target enzyme. The prepared MIP exhibited strong affinity toward the template enzyme (with a dissociation constant of 10(-10) M) as well as superb tolerance for interference. Thus, the enzyme molecules in a complicated sample matrix could be specifically captured and cleaned up for enzyme activity assay, which eliminated the interference from the sample matrix. On the other hand, because the boronate affinity MIP could well retain the enzymatic activity of glycoprotein enzymes, the enzyme captured by the MIP was directly used for activity assay. Thus, additional assay time and possible enzyme or activity loss due to an enzyme release step required by other methods were avoided. Assay of ALP in human serum was successfully demonstrated, suggesting a promising prospect of the proposed method in real-world applications.

  5. Enzymic oxidation of carbon monoxide. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, T

    1959-01-01

    An enzyme which catalyzes the oxidation of carbon monoxide into carbon dioxide was obtained in a cell free state from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. The enzyme activity was assayed manometrically by measuring the rate of gas uptake under the atmosphere of carbon monoxide in the presence of benzyl-viologen as an oxidant. The optimum pH range was 7 to 8. The activity was slightly suppressed by illumination. The enzyme was more stable than hydrogenase or formate dehydrogenase against the heat treatment, suggesting that it is a different entity from these enzymes. In the absence of an added oxidant, the enzyme preparation produced hydrogen gas under the atmosphere of carbon monoxide. The phenomenon can be explained assuming the reductive decomposition of water. 17 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Enzymes - important players in green chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Tarczykowska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry has become a worldwide approach that leads to sustainable growth through application and development of its principles. A lot of work has to be put into designing new processes comprising of materials which do not emit pollutants to the atmosphere. Inventing new safer methods and finding less harmful products can be challenging. Enzymes are a great hope of scientists in the field of green chemistry. Enzymes as catalysts require mild conditions therefore it is a great way of saving resources such as energy or water. Processes with the use of enzymes have become more feasible by being more cost effective and eco friendly. Taking into account the benefits of green chemistry, enzyme biocatalysis has quickly replaced traditional chemical processes in several fields, and this substitution is going to reach even more areas because of new emerging technologies in enzyme engineering.

  7. Practical steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are key components of most biological processes. Characterization of enzymes is therefore frequently required during the study of biological systems. Steady-state kinetics provides a simple and rapid means of assessing the substrate specificity of an enzyme. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis (see Site-Directed Mutagenesis), it can be used to probe the roles of particular amino acids in the enzyme in substrate recognition and catalysis. Effects of interaction partners and posttranslational modifications can also be assessed using steady-state kinetics. This overview explains the general principles of steady-state enzyme kinetics experiments in a practical, rather than theoretical, way. Any biochemistry textbook will have a section on the theory of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, including derivations of the relevant equations. No specific enzymatic assay is described here, although a method for monitoring product formation or substrate consumption over time (an assay) is required to perform the experiments described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of thermostable enzymes for bioethanol processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Pernille Anastasia

    of fermentable sugars (glucose) as cellulose is tightly linked to hemicellulose and lignin. Lignocellulose is disrupted during pretreatment, but to degrade cellulose to single sugars, lignocellulolytic enzymes such as cellulases and hemicellulases are needed. Lignocellulolytic enzymes are costly...... for the ioethanol production, but the expenses can be reduced by using thermostable enzymes, which are known for their increased stability and inhibitor olerance. However, the advantage of using thermostable enzymes has not been studied thoroughly and more knowledge is needed for development of bioethanol processes....... Enzymes are added to the bioethanol process after pretreatment. For an efficient sugar and ethanol yield, the solids content of biomass is normally increased, which results in highly viscous slurries that are difficult to mix. Therefore, the first enzymatic challenge is to ensure rapid reduction...

  9. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Application of Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khusainova, Alsu

    Enzymes have recently been reported as effective enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agents. Both laboratory and field tests demonstrated significant increase in the ultimate oil production. Up to16% of additional oil was produced in the laboratory conditions and up to 269 barrels of additional oil per day...... were recovered in the field applications. The following mechanisms were claimed to be responsible for the enhancement of the oil production due to enzymes: wettability improvement of the rock surface; formation of the emulsions; reduction of oil viscosity; and removal of high molecular weight paraffins....... However, the positive effect of enzymes on oil recovery is not that obvious. In most of the studies commercial enzyme products composed of enzymes, surfactants and stabilisers were used. Application of such samples makes it difficult to assign a positive EOR effect to a certain compound, as several...

  10. Fungal enzymes in the attine ant symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Schiøtt, Morten; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    the more basal attine genera use substrates such as flowers, plant debris, small twigs, insect feces and insect carcasses. This diverse array of fungal substrates across the attine lineage implies that the symbiotic fungus needs different enzymes to break down the plant material that the ants provide...... or different efficiencies of enzyme function. Fungal enzymes that degrade plant cell walls may have functionally co-evolved with the ants in this scenario. We explore this hypothesis with direct measurements of enzyme activity in fungus gardens in 12 species across 8 genera spanning the entire phylogeny...... and diversity of life-styles within the attine clade. We find significant differences in enzyme activity between different genera and life-styles of the ants. How these findings relate to attine ant coevolution and crop optimization are discussed....

  11. Production of cellulolytic enzymes from ascomycetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gustav Hammerich; Lübeck, Mette; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing production of cellulose degrading enzymes is of great interest in order to increase the feasibility of constructing biorefinery facilities for a sustainable supply of energy and chemical products. The ascomycete phylum has a large potential for the production of cellulolytic enzymes....... Although numerous enzymatic profiles have already been unraveled, the research has been covering only a limited number of species and genera, thus leaving many ascomycetes to be analyzed. Such analysis requires choosing appropriate media and cultivation methods that ensure enzyme profiles with high...... specificities and activities. However, the choice of media, cultivation methods and enzyme assays highly affect the enzyme activity profile observed. This review provides an overview of enzymatic profiles for several ascomycetes covering phylogenetically distinct genera and species. The profiles of cellulose...

  12. Autophagy and Mis-targeting of Therapeutic Enzyme in Skeletal Muscle in Pompe Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Tokiko; Ahearn, Meghan; Roberts, Ashley; Mattaliano, Robert J.; Zaal, Kristien; Ralston, Evelyn; Plotz, Paul H.; Raben, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) became a reality for patients with Pompe disease, a fatal cardiomyopathy and skeletal muscle myopathy caused by a deficiency of glycogen-degrading lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). The therapy, which relies on receptor-mediated endocytosis of recombinant human GAA (rhGAA), appears to be effective in cardiac muscle, but less so in skeletal muscle. We have previously shown a profound disturbance of the lysosomal degradative pathway (autophagy) in therapy-resistant muscle of GAA knockout mice (KO). Our findings here demonstrate a progressive age-dependent autophagic build-up in addition to enlargement of glycogen-filled lysosomes in multiple muscle groups in the KO. Trafficking and processing of the therapeutic enzyme along the endocytic pathway appear to be affected by the autophagy. Confocal microscopy of live single muscle fibers exposed to fluorescently labeled rhGAA indicates that a significant portion of the endocytosed enzyme in the KO was trapped as a partially processed form in the autophagic areas instead of reaching its target – the lysosomes. A fluid-phase endocytic marker was similarly mis-targeted and accumulated in vesicular structures within the autophagic areas. These findings may explain why ERT often falls short of reversing the disease process, and point to new avenues for the development of pharmacological intervention. PMID:17008131

  13. Enzymes of industrial purpose - review of the market of enzyme preparations and prospects for its development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Tolkacheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial enzyme preparations are increasingly replacing conventional chemical catalysts in a number of industrial processes. Such drugs, in addition to environmental friendliness and high activity, have a number of advantages over enzyme preparations of vegetable and animal origin, namely: the production of microbial enzymes in bioreactors is easily controlled and predictable; excreted microbiological enzymes are more stable than intracellular animals and plant enzymes; the genetic diversity of microorganisms makes it possible to produce enzyme preparations with a wide range of specificity; microbiological enzymes can be synthesized year-round, in contrast to the production of plant enzymes, which is often seasonal. The leaders of the world market of enzymes are proteases and amylases, which account for 25% and 15%, respectively. Over the past five years, the world market for carbohydrases, including mainly amylases, cellulases and xylanases, has been the fastest growing segment of the enzyme market with an aggregate annual growth rate of more than 7.0%. Another major product of the industrial enzyme market, which has a great potential for growth, is lipases. From the point of view of designation, the main part is represented by food and food enzymes. The Russian market continues to be unsaturated - the current supply is not able to meet the needs of the Russian feed and food industry in enzyme preparations. Enzyme preparations of domestic producers are in demand in forage production, while food industrial enterprises prefer imported products. The most significant enterprises in the enzymatic industry in Russia at the moment are Sibbiofarm, AgroSistema, Agroferment. In the light of the Russian policy of increasing food security, the development of the domestic enzyme industry is an extremely topical task.

  14. Different angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have similar clinical efficacy after myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten L; Gislason, Gunnar H; Køber, Lars

    2008-01-01

    What is already known about this subject: Treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor benefits many patients with cardiovascular disease. ACE inhibitors are generally assumed to be equally effective, but this has never been fully verified in clinical trials. What this study adds...... important and not which ACE inhibitor is used. AIM: Therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors is common after myocardial infarction (MI). Given the lack of randomized trials comparing different ACE inhibitors, the association among ACE inhibitors after MI in risk for mortality...

  15. Expanding the Halohydrin Dehalogenase Enzyme Family: Identification of Novel Enzymes by Database Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallmey, Marcus; Koopmeiners, Julia; Wells, Elizabeth; Wardenga, Rainer; Schallmey, Anett

    2014-12-01

    Halohydrin dehalogenases are very rare enzymes that are naturally involved in the mineralization of halogenated xenobiotics. Due to their catalytic potential and promiscuity, many biocatalytic reactions have been described that have led to several interesting and industrially important applications. Nevertheless, only a few of these enzymes have been made available through recombinant techniques; hence, it is of general interest to expand the repertoire of these enzymes so as to enable novel biocatalytic applications. After the identification of specific sequence motifs, 37 novel enzyme sequences were readily identified in public sequence databases. All enzymes that could be heterologously expressed also catalyzed typical halohydrin dehalogenase reactions. Phylogenetic inference for enzymes of the halohydrin dehalogenase enzyme family confirmed that all enzymes form a distinct monophyletic clade within the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. In addition, the majority of novel enzymes are substantially different from previously known phylogenetic subtypes. Consequently, four additional phylogenetic subtypes were defined, greatly expanding the halohydrin dehalogenase enzyme family. We show that the enormous wealth of environmental and genome sequences present in public databases can be tapped for in silico identification of very rare but biotechnologically important biocatalysts. Our findings help to readily identify halohydrin dehalogenases in ever-growing sequence databases and, as a consequence, make even more members of this interesting enzyme family available to the scientific and industrial community. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. An overview of technologies for immobilization of enzymes and surface analysis techniques for immobilized enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Nur Royhaila; Marzuki, Nur Haziqah Che; Buang, Nor Aziah; Huyop, Fahrul; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The current demands of sustainable green methodologies have increased the use of enzymatic technology in industrial processes. Employment of enzyme as biocatalysts offers the benefits of mild reaction conditions, biodegradability and catalytic efficiency. The harsh conditions of industrial processes, however, increase propensity of enzyme destabilization, shortening their industrial lifespan. Consequently, the technology of enzyme immobilization provides an effective means to circumvent these concerns by enhancing enzyme catalytic properties and also simplify downstream processing and improve operational stability. There are several techniques used to immobilize the enzymes onto supports which range from reversible physical adsorption and ionic linkages, to the irreversible stable covalent bonds. Such techniques produce immobilized enzymes of varying stability due to changes in the surface microenvironment and degree of multipoint attachment. Hence, it is mandatory to obtain information about the structure of the enzyme protein following interaction with the support surface as well as interactions of the enzymes with other proteins. Characterization technologies at the nanoscale level to study enzymes immobilized on surfaces are crucial to obtain valuable qualitative and quantitative information, including morphological visualization of the immobilized enzymes. These technologies are pertinent to assess efficacy of an immobilization technique and development of future enzyme immobilization strategies. PMID:26019635

  17. Adaptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatenby, Robert A; Silva, Ariosto S; Gillies, Robert J; Frieden, B Roy

    2009-06-01

    A number of successful systemic therapies are available for treatment of disseminated cancers. However, tumor response is often transient, and therapy frequently fails due to emergence of resistant populations. The latter reflects the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment as well as the evolutionary capacity of cancer phenotypes to adapt to therapeutic perturbations. Although cancers are highly dynamic systems, cancer therapy is typically administered according to a fixed, linear protocol. Here we examine an adaptive therapeutic approach that evolves in response to the temporal and spatial variability of tumor microenvironment and cellular phenotype as well as therapy-induced perturbations. Initial mathematical models find that when resistant phenotypes arise in the untreated tumor, they are typically present in small numbers because they are less fit than the sensitive population. This reflects the "cost" of phenotypic resistance such as additional substrate and energy used to up-regulate xenobiotic metabolism, and therefore not available for proliferation, or the growth inhibitory nature of environments (i.e., ischemia or hypoxia) that confer resistance on phenotypically sensitive cells. Thus, in the Darwinian environment of a cancer, the fitter chemosensitive cells will ordinarily proliferate at the expense of the less fit chemoresistant cells. The models show that, if resistant populations are present before administration of therapy, treatments designed to kill maximum numbers of cancer cells remove this inhibitory effect and actually promote more rapid growth of the resistant populations. We present an alternative approach in which treatment is continuously modulated to achieve a fixed tumor population. The goal of adaptive therapy is to enforce a stable tumor burden by permitting a significant population of chemosensitive cells to survive so that they, in turn, suppress proliferation of the less fit but chemoresistant

  18. Metagenomics as a Tool for Enzyme Discovery: Hydrolytic Enzymes from Marine-Related Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Ana; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Tran, Hai; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Yakimov, Michail M; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses metagenomics and its application for enzyme discovery, with a focus on hydrolytic enzymes from marine metagenomic libraries. With less than one percent of culturable microorganisms in the environment, metagenomics, or the collective study of community genetics, has opened up a rich pool of uncharacterized metabolic pathways, enzymes, and adaptations. This great untapped pool of genes provides the particularly exciting potential to mine for new biochemical activities or novel enzymes with activities tailored to peculiar sets of environmental conditions. Metagenomes also represent a huge reservoir of novel enzymes for applications in biocatalysis, biofuels, and bioremediation. Here we present the results of enzyme discovery for four enzyme activities, of particular industrial or environmental interest, including esterase/lipase, glycosyl hydrolase, protease and dehalogenase.

  19. Expression of lignocellulolytic enzymes in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellitzer Andrea

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sustainable utilization of plant biomass as renewable source for fuels and chemical building blocks requires a complex mixture of diverse enzymes, including hydrolases which comprise the largest class of lignocellulolytic enzymes. These enzymes need to be available in large amounts at a low price to allow sustainable and economic biotechnological processes. Over the past years Pichia pastoris has become an attractive host for the cost-efficient production and engineering of heterologous (eukaryotic proteins due to several advantages. Results In this paper codon optimized genes and synthetic alcohol oxidase 1 promoter variants were used to generate Pichia pastoris strains which individually expressed cellobiohydrolase 1, cellobiohydrolase 2 and beta-mannanase from Trichoderma reesei and xylanase A from Thermomyces lanuginosus. For three of these enzymes we could develop strains capable of secreting gram quantities of enzyme per liter in fed-batch cultivations. Additionally, we compared our achieved yields of secreted enzymes and the corresponding activities to literature data. Conclusion In our experiments we could clearly show the importance of gene optimization and strain characterization for successfully improving secretion levels. We also present a basic guideline how to correctly interpret the interplay of promoter strength and gene dosage for a successful improvement of the secretory production of lignocellulolytic enzymes in Pichia pastoris.

  20. Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ri-Hui; Tao, Ran

    2017-01-01

    This chapter first summarizes the therapy of addiction disorder, and elaborates on the progress of medication. First, the difference between dependency and addiction are introduced. The basic principles of the therapy of substance and non-substance addiction are then put forward. It is also pointed out in this chapter that with the progress of the study, the goal of addiction disorder therapy is expected to transfer from reducing the relapse and harm of the addiction to completely eliminating and recovering from it. This chapter also introduces the progress of psychological addiction elimination technology, especially the "Unconditioned Stimulus Retrieval Extinction Paradigm and Conditioned Stimulus Retrieval Extinction Paradigm" and PITDH technology. Finally it is pointed out that in addiction disorder therapy, comprehensive intervention has become a trend. With regard to the medication for addiction disorders, this chapter also includes the progress and deficiencies of substance and non-substance addiction. In terms of addiction disorder rehabilitation, the foundation of substance addiction is medication which is, however, limited for non-substance addiction. The key to the rehabilitation of addiction disorder is psycho-behavioral therapy, which is especially effective in eliminating craving.

  1. Neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesler, Rudi

    1995-01-01

    Standard radiotherapy uses Xrays or electrons which have low LET (linear energy transfer); in contrast, particles such as neutrons with high LET have different radiobiological responses. In the late 1960s, clinical trials by Mary Catterall at the Hammersmith Hospital in London indicated that fast neutron radiation had clinical advantages for certain malignant tumours. Following these early clinical trials, several cyclotron facilities were built in the 1980s for fast neutron therapy, for example at the University of Washington, Seattle, and at UCLA. Most of these newer machines use extracted cyclotron proton beams in the range 42 to 66 MeV with beam intensities of 15 to 60 microamps. The proton beams are transported to dedicated therapy rooms, where neutrons are produced from beryllium targets. Second-generation clinical trials showed that accurate neutron beam delivery to the tumour site is more critical than for photon therapy. In order to achieve precise beam geometries, the extracted proton beams have to be transported through a gantry which can rotate around the patient and deliver beams from any angle; also the neutron beam outline (''field shape'') must be adjusted to extremely irregular shapes using a flexible collimation system. A therapy procedure has to be appropriately organized, with physicians, radiotherapists, nurses, medical physicists and other staff in attendance; other specialized equipment, such as CT or MRI scanners and radiation simulators must be made available. Neutron therapy is usually performed only in radiation oncology departments of major medical centres

  2. Immobilized enzyme studies in a microscale bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Francis; Forrest, Scott; Palmer, Jim; Lu, Zonghuan; Elmore, John; Elmore, Bill B

    2004-01-01

    Novel microreactors with immobilized enzymes were fabricated using both silicon and polymer-based microfabrication techniques. The effectiveness of these reactors was examined along with their behavior over time. Urease enzyme was successfully incorporated into microchannels of a polymeric matrix of polydimethylsiloxane and through layer-bylayer self-assembly techniques onto silicon. The fabricated microchannels had cross-sectional dimensions ranging from tens to hundreds of micrometers in width and height. The experimental results for continuous-flow microreactors are reported for the conversion of urea to ammonia by urease enzyme. Urea conversions of >90% were observed.

  3. Enzyme-based antifouling coatings: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stefan Møller; Pedersen, Leif Toudal; Laursen, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    A systematic overview is presented of the literature that reports the antifouling (AF) protection of underwater structures via the action of enzymes. The overall aim of this review is to assess the state of the art of enzymatic AF technology, and to highlight the obstacles that have to be overcome...... for successful development of enzymatic AF coatings. The approaches described in the literature are divided into direct and indirect enzymatic AF, depending on the intended action of the enzymes. Direct antifouling is used when the enzymes themselves are active antifoulants. Indirect antifouling refers...

  4. Enzymic hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes to glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spano, L A; Medeiros, J; Mandels, M

    1976-01-01

    An enzymic process for the conversion of cellulose to glucose is based on the use of a specific enzyme derived from mutant strains of the fungus trichoderma viride which is capable of reacting with the crystalline fraction of the cellulose molecule. The production and mode of action of the cellulase complex produced during the growth of trichoderma viride is discussed as well as the application of such enzymes for the conversion of cellulosic wastes to crude glucose syrup for use in production of chemical feedstocks, single-cell proteins, fuels, solvents, etc.

  5. Dibromine radical anion reactions with heme enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicka, L.; Gebicki, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Reactions of Br 2 radical anion with heme enzymes, catalase horseradish peroxidase, have been studied by pulse radiolysis. It has been found that Br 2 - does not react with the heme centre of investigated enzymes. Dibromine radical anion reacts with tryptophan residues of catalase without any influence on the activity of catalase. It is suggested that in pulse radiolysis studies, where horseradish peroxidase is at about tenfold excess toward Br 2 - , the enzyme is modified rather by Br 2 , than by Br 2 - . (author). 26 refs., 3 figs

  6. Dimeric assembly of enterocyte brush border enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M

    1994-01-01

    The noncovalent, dimeric assembly of small intestinal brush border enzymes was studied by sedimentation analysis in density gradients of extracts of pulse-labeled pig jejunal mucosal explants. Like aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2), sucrase-isomaltase (EC 3.2.1.48-10), aminopeptidase A (EC 3...... appearance of the liposome-reconstituted enzyme [Norén et al. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 12306-12309], showing only the inner, membrane-anchored domains of the monomers to be in close contact with one another while the outer domains are far apart. In contrast to the other brush border enzymes studied...

  7. Art Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibeke; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Based on a Jungian approach, this article will introduce an integrative model to therapeutic change using art therapy methods as practical tools, with the aim of improving quality of life and in the prevention of depression. In a research study involving six participants, painting, clay...... work and drumming were used together with imagination and personal dialogues linked to the artwork. These art therapy processes attempted to combine the participant’s experience of inner and outer reality. The effect of gaining more knowledge about their inner reality using dreams and symbols......, was that participants gained a new understanding about their personal life. In addition, some participants were able to continue to use art therapy experiences as selfdevelopmental tools after the research study terminated. Jung’s description of the interactive relationship between the two living parts of the psyche...

  8. Oxygen Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Solmes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available LTOT is prescribed for people with chronic lung disease in whom there is a decrease in the ability of the lungs to supply enough oxygen to the body. The heart is obliged to pump faster to meet the body's oxygen requirements. This may place undue stress on the heart, resulting in palpitations, dizziness and fatigue. A low oxygen level in arterial blood is also harmful to the heart, the brain and the pulmonary blood vessels. Oxygen therapy is used to break this cycle. A person with low blood oxygen will often be able to accomplish more with less fatigue with the help of supplemental oxygen therapy. Shortness of breath is a mechanical problem resulting from the effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Oxygen therapy may or may not reduce shortness of breath, but it will help the lungs and heart to function with less stress.

  9. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  10. Process for preparing multilayer enzyme coating on a fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

    2009-11-03

    A process for preparing high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials is disclosed and processes for using the same. The process involves coating of a material or fiber with enzymes and enzyme aggregate providing a material or fiber with high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environments. In one illustrative approach, enzyme "seeds" are covalently attached to polymer nanofibers followed by treatment with a reagent that crosslinks additional enzyme molecules to the seed enzymes forming enzyme aggregates thereby improving biocatalytic activity due to increased enzyme loading and enzyme stability. This approach creates a useful new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with potential applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

  11. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschel, R.E; Fisher, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The new insights and controversies concerning the radiobiological properties of malignant melanoma and how these relate to new clinical approaches are reviewed. The recent clinical experience with large individual fraction sizes is analyzed. The treatment of malignant melanoma in certain specialized sites is also described. An attempt is made to place in perspective the usefulness of radiation therapy in the treatment of this complex disease. Finally, certain new applications for radiation therapy both alone and in combustion with other treatment modalities are proposed that may ultimately prove appropriate for clinical trials

  12. Dietary modulation of thymic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susana, Feliu María; Paula, Perris; Slobodianik, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is a complex syndrome caused by an inadequate intake of energy, protein, minerals and vitamins which affects the immune system. Nutritional imbalances, present in children with energy-protein malnutrition and infections, make defining the specific effects of each of them on the thymus difficult. For this reason, it is necessary to design an experimental model in animals that could define a single variable. As the thymus atrophy described in humans is similar to that observed in murines, a rat experimental model makes the extrapolation to man possible. Some authors suggest that the activity of Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) and Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP)--involved in purine metabolism--have an influence on T lymphocyte development and the immune system, due to intracellular accumulation of toxic levels of deoxynucleotides. Studies in our group, performed in an experimental model on Wistar growing rats, have demonstrated that protein deficiency or imbalance in the profile of essential amino acids in the diet, produce loss of thymus weight, reduction in the number of thymocytes, a diminished proportion of T cells presenting the W3/13 antigenic determinant and DNA content with concomitant increase in cell size, and the proportion of immature T cells and activity of ADA and PNP, without modifying the activity of 5´Nucleotidase in the thymus. It is important to point out that there were neither differences in energy intake between experimental groups and their controls, nor clinical symptoms of deficiency of other nutrients. The increase in these thymic enzyme activities was an alternative mechanism to avoid the accumulation of high levels of deoxynucleotides, which would be toxic for T lymphocytes. On the other hand, the administration of a recovery diet, with a high amount of high quality protein, was able to reverse the mentioned effects. The quick reply of Adenosine Deaminase to nutritional disorders and the following nutritional recovery, points

  13. Highly efficient enzyme encapsulation in a protein nanocage: towards enzyme catalysis in a cellular nanocompartment mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonen, Lise; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; van Hest, Jan C. M.

    2016-07-01

    The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions.The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures for the cloning, expression, and purification of all proteins, as well as supplementary figures and calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04181g

  14. Impact of enzyme loading on the efficacy and recovery of cellulolytic enzymes immobilized on enzymogel nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaratunga, Ashani; Kudina, Olena; Nahar, Nurun; Zakharchenko, Andrey; Minko, Sergiy; Voronov, Andriy; Pryor, Scott W

    2015-03-01

    Cellulase and β-glucosidase were adsorbed on a polyacrylic acid polymer brush grafted on silica nanoparticles to produce enzymogels as a form of enzyme immobilization. Enzyme loading on the enzymogels was increased to a saturation level of approximately 110 μg (protein) mg(-1) (particle) for each enzyme. Enzymogels with varied enzyme loadings were then used to determine the impact on hydrolysis rate and enzyme recovery. Soluble sugar concentrations during the hydrolysis of filter paper and Solka-Floc with the enzymogels were 45 and 53%, respectively, of concentrations when using free cellulase. β-Glucosidase enzymogels showed lower performance; hydrolyzate glucose concentrations were just 38% of those using free enzymes. Increasing enzyme loading on the enzymogels did not reduce net efficacy for cellulase and improved efficacy for β-glucosidase. The use of free cellulases and cellulase enzymogels resulted in hydrolyzates with different proportions of cellobiose and glucose, suggesting differential attachment or efficacy of endoglucanases, exoglucanases, and β-glucosidases present in cellulase mixtures. When loading β-glucosidase individually, higher enzyme loadings on the enzymogels produced higher hydrolyzate glucose concentrations. Approximately 96% of cellulase and 66 % of β-glucosidase were recovered on the enzymogels, while enzyme loading level did not impact recovery for either enzyme.

  15. Role of antioxidant scavenging enzymes and extracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ChithrashreeGS

    2012-08-23

    Aug 23, 2012 ... peroxidase are two important antioxidant scavenging enzymes involved in ... Catalase was assayed using the method of Beers and Sizer. (1951) with .... yeast dextrose calcium carbonate agar (YDC) medium. Catalase and ...

  16. Involvement of methyltransferases enzymes during the energy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    INVOLVEMENT OF METHYLTRANSFERASES ENZYMES DURING THE. ENERGY METABOLISM OF ..... cell extract still exhibited relatively high methanogenesis with methanol (Fig ... product CH3-CoM into methane (see Fig. 1). The HS-CoM ...

  17. Enzymes: The possibility of production and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petronijević Živomir B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes are biological catalysts with increasing application in the food pharmaceutical, cosmetic, textile and chemical industry. They are also important as reagents in chemical analysis, leather fabrications and as targets for the design of new drugs. Keeping in mind the growing need to replace classical chemical processes by alternative ones, because of ever growing environmental pollution, it is important that enzyme and other biotechnological processes are economical. Therefore, price decrease and stability and enzyme preparation efficiency increase are required more and more. This paper presents a short review of methods for yield increase and the improvement of the quality of enzyme products as commercial products, as well as a review of the possibilities of their application.

  18. Optimizing culture medium for debittering constitutive enzyme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... enzyme naringinase production by Aspergillus oryzae. JMU316. Dong-xiao .... even though industrial applications of naringinase are becoming more and ... guidance for industry. MATERIALS AND ..... For economic reasons,.

  19. distribution, abundance and properties of restriction enzymes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA of granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) I and II with a view to ... properties for manipulation of the genes for production of modified starch. .... procurement, storage and handling of the ..... been made on restriction enzymes of potato,.

  20. Novel enzymes for the degradation of cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Svein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The bulk terrestrial biomass resource in a future bio-economy will be lignocellulosic biomass, which is recalcitrant and challenging to process. Enzymatic conversion of polysaccharides in the lignocellulosic biomass will be a key technology in future biorefineries and this technology is currently the subject of intensive research. We describe recent developments in enzyme technology for conversion of cellulose, the most abundant, homogeneous and recalcitrant polysaccharide in lignocellulosic biomass. In particular, we focus on a recently discovered new type of enzymes currently classified as CBM33 and GH61 that catalyze oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides. These enzymes promote the efficiency of classical hydrolytic enzymes (cellulases by acting on the surfaces of the insoluble substrate, where they introduce chain breaks in the polysaccharide chains, without the need of first “extracting” these chains from their crystalline matrix.

  1. Enzymes in Poultry and Swine Nutrition

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Poultry production in China and the potential for using enzyme preparations .... The feed manufacturers produce about 310 × 106t of high-quality feed, saving about 30%, ...... Chickens and experimental designs used in the three experiments.

  2. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in "extreme" conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches.

  3. Polyphenol Oxidase Enzyme and Inactivation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leman Yılmaz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidase enzyme is found in vegetables and fruits, as well as in some animal organs and microorganisms. Polyphenol oxidase enzyme responsible for enzymatic browning is a group of copper proteins that catalyses the oxidation of phenolic compounds to quinones, which produce brown pigments, commonly found in fruits and vegetables. During the industrial preparation of fruits and vegetables, results of catalytic effect of polyphenol oxidase causes enzymatic browning. Enzymatic browning impairs the appearance of products containing phenolic compounds along with undesirable colour, odor and taste formation and significant loss of nutritional value of the products. This affects the acceptability of the products by the consumers and causes economic losses. In this review, some characteristics of polyphenol oxidase enzyme in different fruits and vegetables have been reviewed and information about chemical antibrowning agents, thermal applications, irradiation applications and alternative methods such as high pressure processing, pulse electric field, supercritical carbon dioxide and ultrasound applications to inactivate this enzyme has been presented.

  4. Radioimmunoassay of polypeptide hormones and enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felber, J.P.

    1974-01-01

    General principles of radioimmunoassay are reviewed. Detailed procedures are reviewed for the following hormones: insulin, pituitary hormones, gonadotropins, parathyroid hormone, ACTH, glucagon, gastrin, and peptide hormones. Radioimmunoassay of enzymes is also discussed. (U.S.)

  5. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Findlay, Stuart G.; Follstad Shah, Jennifer J.; Hill, Brian H.; Kuehn, Kevin A.; Kuske, Cheryl; Litvak, Marcy E.; Martinez, Noelle G.; Moorhead, Daryl L.; Warnock, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimilation of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus by diverse aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities (1160 cases). Regression analyses were conducted by habitat (aquatic and terrestrial), enzyme class (hydrolases and oxidoreductases) and assay methodology (low affinity and high affinity substrates) to relate potential reaction rates to substrate availability. Across enzyme classes and habitats, the scaling relationships between apparent Vmax and apparent Km followed similar power laws with exponents of 0.44 to 0.67. These exponents, called elasticities, were not statistically distinct from a central value of 0.50, which occurs when the Km of an enzyme equals substrate concentration, a condition optimal for maintenance of steady state. We also conducted an ecosystem scale analysis of ten extracellular hydrolase activities in relation to soil and sediment organic carbon (2,000–5,000 cases/enzyme) that yielded elasticities near 1.0 (0.9 ± 0.2, n = 36). At the metabolomic scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions is the proportionality constant that connects the C:N:P stoichiometries of organic matter and ecoenzymatic activities. At the ecosystem scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions shows that organic matter ultimately limits effective enzyme binding sites. Our findings suggest that one mechanism by which microbial communities maintain homeostasis is regulating extracellular enzyme expression to optimize the short-term responsiveness of substrate acquisition. The analyses also show that, like elemental stoichiometry, the fundamental attributes of enzymatic reactions can be extrapolated from biochemical to community and ecosystem scales.

  6. Purification and characterization of protease enzyme from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The enzyme was active in pH range 5 to11 and temperature of 30 to 80°C. The optimum pH and the temperature for protease activity were recorded to be pH 8 and 50°C, respectively. The enzyme was stable up to 40°C and pH 9. The protease activity was inhibited by Zn2+, Ni2+ and Sn2+ and increased by Ca2+, Mg2+ ...

  7. Enzyme-driven mechanisms in biocorrosion

    OpenAIRE

    Basséguy, Régine

    2007-01-01

    Objectives (abstract of presentation): Recent works carried out in our team concerning enzymes and biocorrosion are presented at the meeting. For aerobic conditions, the direct catalysis of the reduction of oxygen on steel by enzymes or porphyrin was proved and a local electrochemical analysis technique (SVET) was developed to visualize the localization of the catalysis. On anaerobic conditions, the influence of phosphate species and other weak acids on the water reduction on steel was shown....

  8. A stochastic model of enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanini, Marianne; Newman, Timothy; McKane, Alan

    2003-10-01

    Enzyme kinetics is generally modeled by deterministic rate equations, and in the simplest case leads to the well-known Michaelis-Menten equation. It is plausible that stochastic effects will play an important role at low enzyme concentrations. We have addressed this by constructing a simple stochastic model which can be exactly solved in the steady-state. Throughout a wide range of parameter values Michaelis-Menten dynamics is replaced by a new and simple theoretical result.

  9. Enzyme Technology for Shipboard Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    sucrose to the sweeter invert sugar by the enzyme invertase is a well established process, as is the conversion of starch to glucose by the enzyme...aspects of our health and daily lives. Recent advances in fundamental and applied enzymology indicate that we have already started in that direction. At a...Chemtech, p. 677 (Nov 1973) 11 - Bungay, H. P., "Applied Enzymology ," Worthington, Biochemical Corp., Notes for an AIChE Lecture, Washington, D. C. (Dec

  10. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Keiichi; Miyoshi, Makoto; Jinguu, Ken-ichi

    1982-01-01

    Of the cases of lung cancer in which radiation therapy was given between 1961 and November 1981, 399 cases for which histological type was confirmed, and irradiated as follows were reviewed. The cases of squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma irradiated with more than 5,000 rad or more, those of undifferentiated carcinoma irradiated with 3,000 rad or more, and those irradiated pre- and post-operatively with 3,000 rad or more. The actual 5 year survival rate for stages I, II, III and IV were 29.6, 9.3, 7.5 and 1.9% respectively, and the survival rate tended to be better for adenocarcinoma than squamous cell carcinoma at stages I, II and III, but not different at stage IV. There was no difference between large cell, small cell and squamous cell carcinomas. Irradiation with 200 rad every other day or 150 rad daily was better than that with 200 rad, and daily irradiation with 150 rad was used since 1976. The therapy of stage III small cell carcinoma at the age of up to 80 years was improved with the combination of anticancer agents, maintenance therapy and immunotherapy, but these combined therapies were not significantly effective for the cancers with other histological types or at other stages. Although there was no significant difference in statistics for resectable cases, clinically, the results were experienced to be better after resection, and surgery was done in combination as much as possible. (Kaihara, S.)

  11. Dance Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Marcia B.

    1980-01-01

    Dance therapy deals with personal growth via body-mind interaction. A change in movement expression is believed to result in a personality or behavior change. The therapist is trained to become sensitive to movement expression as it relates to the psychological, motor, and cognitive development of the child. (JN)

  12. Shock therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Erin

    2016-02-03

    Therapies administered by mental health nurses, aimed at "curing" gay people of their sexual preference were still in common use in the UK in the 1960s and early 1970s. Some nurses tried to avoid participating in these practices, but many believed that they were helping their patients, as a new book reveals.

  13. Enzyme sensitive liposomes in chemotherapy and potentiation of immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østrem, Ragnhild Garborg

    efficacy and induction of severe adverse effects. Interestingly, the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of drugs can be substantially altered by encapsulation in liposomal drug delivery vehicles. The first chapter of this thesis gives a brief introduction to cancer followed by a discussion...... of the applicability of liposomes as drug delivery vehicles in cancer therapy. The second chapter describes the development of a liposome system with an inbuilt release mechanism triggered by secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2). This enzyme is expressed at elevated levels in many human cancers, and as such represents...... with an introduction to the cancer-immunity cycle and to how treatment approaches can aid this interplay. Subsequently it demonstrates that the presence of a functional immune system is important in the efficacy of liposomal oxaliplatin, and that this efficacy can be substantially enhanced by combination with...

  14. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  15. The ultrasound technology for modifying enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meliza Lindsay Rojas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes are protein complexes compounds widely studied and used due to their ability to catalyze reactions. The food processing mainly a ims the inactivation of enzymes due to various undesirable effects. However, there are many processes that can be optimized by its catalytic activity. In this context, different technologies have been applied both to inactivate or to improve the enzymes ef ficiency. The Ultrasound technology emerges as an alternative mainly applied to achieve the enzyme inactivation. On the contrary, very few investigations show the ability of this technology under certain conditions to achieve the opposite effect (i.e. increase the catalytic activity of enzymes. The objective of this study was to correlate the ultrasonic energy delivered to the sample (J/mL with the residual enzymatic activity and explain the possible mechanisms which results in the enzymatic activation/in activation complex behavior. The activity of POD in coconut water was evaluated as a model. The enzymatic activity initially increased, followed by reduction with a trend to enzyme inactivation. This complex behavior is directly related to the applied ultr asonic energy and their direct mechanical effects on the product, as well as the effect in the enzymatic infinite intermediate states and its structural conformation changes. The obtained results are useful for both academic and industrial perspectives.

  16. The ultrasound technology for modifying enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meliza Lindsay

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes are protein complexes compounds widely studied and used due to their ability to catalyze reactions. The food processing mainly aims the inactivation of enzymes due to various undesirable effects. However, there are many processes that can be optimized by its catalytic activity. In this context, different technologies have been applied both to inactivate or to improve the enzymes efficiency. The Ultrasound technology emerges as an alternative mainly applied to achieve the enzyme inactivation. On the contrary, very few investigations show the ability of this technology under certain conditions to achieve the opposite effect (i.e. increase the catalytic activity of enzymes. The objective of this study was to correlate the ultrasonic energy delivered to the sample (J/mL with the residual enzymatic activity and explain the possible mechanisms which results in the enzymatic activation/inactivation complex behavior. The activity of POD in coconut water was evaluated as a model. The enzymatic activity initially increased, followed by reduction with a trend to enzyme inactivation. This complex behavior is directly related to the applied ultrasonic energy and their direct mechanical effects on the product, as well as the effect in the enzymatic infinite intermediate states and its structural conformation changes. The obtained results are useful for both academic and industrial perspectives.

  17. Directed evolution of enzymes using microfluidic chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilát, Zdeněk.; Ježek, Jan; Šmatlo, Filip; Kaůka, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-12-01

    Enzymes are highly versatile and ubiquitous biological catalysts. They can greatly accelerate large variety of reactions, while ensuring appropriate catalytic activity and high selectivity. These properties make enzymes attractive biocatalysts for a wide range of industrial and biomedical applications. Over the last two decades, directed evolution of enzymes has transformed the field of protein engineering. We have devised microfluidic systems for directed evolution of haloalkane dehalogenases in emulsion droplets. In such a device, individual bacterial cells producing mutated variants of the same enzyme are encapsulated in microdroplets and supplied with a substrate. The conversion of a substrate by the enzyme produced by a single bacterium changes the pH in the droplet which is signalized by pH dependent fluorescence probe. The droplets with the highest enzymatic activity can be separated directly on the chip by dielectrophoresis and the resultant cell lineage can be used for enzyme production or for further rounds of directed evolution. This platform is applicable for fast screening of large libraries in directed evolution experiments requiring mutagenesis at multiple sites of a protein structure.

  18. Lysosomal enzyme activation in irradiated mammary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, C.; Wills, E.D.

    1976-01-01

    Lysosomal enzyme activity of C3H mouse mammary tumors was measured quantitatively by a histochemical method. Following whole-body doses of 3600 rad or less no changes were observed in the lysosomal enzyme activity for 12 hr after the irradiation, but very large increases in acid phosphatase and β-naphthylamidase activity were, however, observed 24 hr after irradiation. Significant increases in enzyme activity were detected 72 hr after a dose of 300 rad and the increases of enzyme activity were dose dependent over the range 300 to 900 rad. Testosterone (80 mg/kg) injected into mice 2 hr before irradiation (850 rad) caused a significant increase of lysosomal enzyme activity over and above that of the same dose of irradiation alone. If the tumor-bearing mice were given 95 percent oxygen/5 percent carbon dioxide to breathe for 8 min before irradiation the effect of 850 rad on lysosomal acid phosphatase was increased to 160 percent/that of the irradiation given alone. Activitation of lysosomal enzymes in mammary tumors is an important primary or secondary consequence of radiation

  19. Enzymes for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasiri, Hamidreza

    2011-04-15

    Primary oil recovery by reservoir pressure depletion and secondary oil recovery by waterflooding usually result in poor displacement efficiency. As a consequence there is always some trapped oil remaining in oil reservoirs. Oil entrapment is a result of complex interactions between viscous, gravity and capillary forces. Improving recovery from hydrocarbon fields typically involves altering the relative importance of the viscous and capillary forces. The potential of many EOR methods depends on their influence on fluid/rock interactions related to wettability and fluid/fluid interactions reflected in IFT. If the method has the potential to change the interactions favorably, it may be considered for further investigation, i.e. core flooding experiment, pilot and reservoir implementation. Enzyme-proteins can be introduced as an enhanced oil recovery method to improve waterflood performance by affecting interactions at the oil-water-rock interfaces. An important part of this thesis was to investigate how selected enzymes may influence wettability and capillary forces in a crude oil-brine-rock system, and thus possibly contribute to enhanced oil recovery. To investigate further by which mechanisms selected enzyme-proteins may contribute to enhance oil recovery, groups of enzymes with different properties and catalytic functions, known to be interfacially active, were chosen to cover a wide range of possible effects. These groups include (1) Greenzyme (GZ) which is a commercial EOR enzyme and consists of enzymes and stabilizers (surfactants), (2) The Zonase group consists of two types of pure enzyme, Zonase1 and Zonase2 which are protease enzymes and whose catalytic functions are to hydrolyze (breakdown) peptide bonds, (3) The Novozyme (NZ) group consists of three types of pure enzyme, NZ2, NZ3 and NZ6 which are esterase enzymes and whose catalytic functions are to hydrolyze ester bonds, and (4) Alpha-Lactalbumin ( -La) which is an important whey protein. The effect of

  20. Computational Biochemistry-Enzyme Mechanisms Explored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culka, Martin; Gisdon, Florian J; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Understanding enzyme mechanisms is a major task to achieve in order to comprehend how living cells work. Recent advances in biomolecular research provide huge amount of data on enzyme kinetics and structure. The analysis of diverse experimental results and their combination into an overall picture is, however, often challenging. Microscopic details of the enzymatic processes are often anticipated based on several hints from macroscopic experimental data. Computational biochemistry aims at creation of a computational model of an enzyme in order to explain microscopic details of the catalytic process and reproduce or predict macroscopic experimental findings. Results of such computations are in part complementary to experimental data and provide an explanation of a biochemical process at the microscopic level. In order to evaluate the mechanism of an enzyme, a structural model is constructed which can be analyzed by several theoretical approaches. Several simulation methods can and should be combined to get a reliable picture of the process of interest. Furthermore, abstract models of biological systems can be constructed combining computational and experimental data. In this review, we discuss structural computational models of enzymatic systems. We first discuss various models to simulate enzyme catalysis. Furthermore, we review various approaches how to characterize the enzyme mechanism both qualitatively and quantitatively using different modeling approaches. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  2. Enzyme-MOF (metal-organic framework) composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xizhen; Fang, Yu; Joseph, Elizabeth; Wang, Qi; Li, Jialuo; Banerjee, Sayan; Lollar, Christina; Wang, Xuan; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2017-06-06

    The ex vivo application of enzymes in various processes, especially via enzyme immobilization techniques, has been extensively studied in recent years in order to enhance the recyclability of enzymes, to minimize enzyme contamination in the product, and to explore novel horizons for enzymes in biomedical applications. Possessing remarkable amenability in structural design of the frameworks as well as almost unparalelled surface tunability, Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have been gaining popularity as candidates for enzyme immobilization platforms. Many MOF-enzyme composites have achieved unprecedented results, far outperforming free enzymes in many aspects. This review summarizes recent developments of MOF-enzyme composites with special emphasis on preparative techniques and the synergistic effects of enzymes and MOFs. The applications of MOF-enzyme composites, primarily in transferation, catalysis and sensing, are presented as well. The enhancement of enzymatic activity of the composites over free enzymes in biologically incompatible conditions is emphasized in many cases.

  3. Kinetics of enzyme action: essential principles for drug hunters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stein, Ross L

    2011-01-01

    ... field. Beginning with the most basic principles pertaining to simple, one-substrate enzyme reactions and their inhibitors, and progressing to a thorough treatment of two-substrate enzymes, Kinetics of Enzyme Action...

  4. Exploring the functional significance of sterol glycosyltransferase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gaurav; Dhar, Yogeshwar Vikram; Asif, Mehar Hasan; Misra, Pratibha

    2018-01-01

    Steroidal alkaloids (SAs) are widely synthesized and distributed in plants manifesting as natural produce endowed with potential for medicinal, pesticidal and other high-value usages. Glycosylation of these SAs raises complex and diverse glycosides in plant cells that indeed govern numerous functional aspects. During the glycosylation process of these valuable metabolites, the addition of carbohydrate molecule(s) is catalyzed by enzymes known as sterol glycosyltransferases (SGTs), commonly referred to as UGTs, leading to the production of steryl glycosides (SGs). The ratio of SGs and nonglyco-conjugated SAs are different in different plant species, however, their biosynthesis in the cell is controlled by different environmental factors. The aim of this review is to evaluate the current SGT enzyme research and the functional consequences of glycomodification of SAs on the physiology and plant development, which together are associated with the plant's primary processes. Pharmaceutical, industrial, and other potential uses of saponins have also been discussed and their use in therapeutics has been unveiled by in silico analysis. The field of biotransformation or conversion of nonglycosylated to glycosylated phytosterols by the activity of SGTs, making them soluble, available and more useful for humankind is the new field of interest towards drug therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Liposome based radiosensitizer cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pourhassan, Houman

    Liposome-encapsulated chemotherapeutics have been used in the treatment of a variety of cancers and are feasible for use as mono-therapeutics as well as for combination therapy in conjunction with other modalities. Despite widespread use of liposomal drugs in cancer patient care, insufficient drug...... biomolecules. By modulating the liposomal membrane, liposomes can become sensitive towards enzymatically-driven destabilization and/or functionalization, thereby allowing control of the release of encapsulated therapeutics within the diseased tissue upon intrinsic stimulation from tumor-associated enzymes...... in tumor-bearing mice.The safety and efficacy of sPLA2-sensitive liposomal L-OHP was assessed in sPLA2-deficient FaDu hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma and sPLA2-expressing Colo205 colorectal adenocarcinoma. Also, the feasibility of multimodal cancer therapy employing L-OHP encapsulated in MMP...

  6. The evolution of renin-angiotensin blockade: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as the starting point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Domenic A

    2010-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin system has been a target in the treatment of hypertension for close to three decades. Several medication classes that block specific aspects of this system have emerged as useful therapies, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and, most recently, direct renin inhibitors. There has been a natural history to the development of each of these three drug classes, starting with their use as antihypertensive agents; thereafter, in each case they have been employed as end-organ protective agents. To date, there has been scant evidence to favor angiotensin receptor blockers or direct renin inhibitors over angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in treating hypertension or in affording end-organ protection; thus, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors remain the standard of care when renin-angiotensin system blockade is warranted.

  7. Continuous enzyme reactions with immobilized enzyme tubes prepared by radiation cast-polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru; Kaetsu, Isao

    1986-01-01

    Immobilized glucose oxidase tubes were prepared by radiation cast-polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and tetraethyleneglycol diacrylate monomer at low temperatures. The immobilized enzyme tubes which were spirally set in a water bath were used as reactor, in which the enzyme activity varied with tube size and flow rate of the substrate. The conversion yield of the substrate in continuous enzyme reaction was about 80%. (author)

  8. Art Therapy: What Is Art Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individual, couples, family, and group therapy formats. Art therapy is an effective treatment for people experiencing developmental, medical, educational, and social or psychological impairment. Individuals who benefit from art therapy include ...

  9. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation ... Inc. All rights reserved. Page 2 of 5 Physical and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria ...

  10. Music Therapy: A Career in Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Music Therapy & Music Therapy Training M usic therapy is a healthcare profession that uses music to help individuals of all ages improve physical, cognitive, emotional, and social functioning. Music therapists work with children and adults with developmental ...

  11. Particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  12. Radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J.F. Jr.; Deliso, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ( 131 I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  13. Particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics

  14. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondalen, Gro; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2012-01-01

    music therapy orientations/models (Guided Imagery and Music, Nordoff-Robbins, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-behavioral etc), their theoretical foundations and their practical approaches to health and wellbeing or ‘health musicking’. The relational context – the interplay of (expressive as well as receptive......Music therapy (MT) is most commonly defined as an intervention where “the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them” (Bruscia 1998). Also other definitions of MT agree that a therapeutic relationship is important for a music...... intervention to be considered MT. Other interventions that “use music for health-related goals, but in ways that do not qualify as music therapy” (Gold 2009), may be described as music medicine, or simply as music listening. In this text we elaborate on an overview chapter covering some of the different major...

  15. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfi, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    may cause detrimental long-term effects. Three studies have examined the effect of music therapy procedural support (MTPS) under needle procedures. Consequently, this study aims at examining the effects of MTPS in an RCT. Moreover, the study addresses clinical aspects of the applied MT intervention...... and provides research-based clinical tools. Methods 41 children (1 to 10 years) were enrolled and underwent a single PIVA procedure. The children were randomly assigned to either an MT or a comparable control group receiving PIVA. In addition, the music therapy (MT) group received individualised MTPS (i.......e. music alternate engagement) before, during, and after PIVA. The intervention was performed by a trained music therapist and comprised preferred songs, improvised songs/music, and instrument playing. The study was carried out in accordance with the rules in force regarding research ethics and clinical MT...

  16. Radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Jr, J F; Deliso, H B

    1993-12-31

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ({sup 131}I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  17. Stabilization of enzymes in ionic liquids via modification of enzyme charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordwald, Erik M; Kaar, Joel L

    2013-09-01

    Due to the propensity of ionic liquids (ILs) to inactivate enzymes, the development of strategies to improve enzyme utility in these solvents is critical to fully exploit ILs for biocatalysis. We have developed a strategy to broadly improve enzyme utility in ILs based on elucidating the effect of charge modifications on the function of enzymes in IL environments. Results of stability studies in aqueous-IL mixtures indicated a clear connection between the ratio of enzyme-containing positive-to-negative sites and enzyme stability in ILs. Stability studies of the effect of [BMIM][Cl] and [EMIM][EtSO4 ] on chymotrypsin specifically found an optimum ratio of positively-charged amine-to-negatively-charged acid groups (0.39). At this ratio, the half-life of chymotrypsin was increased 1.6- and 4.3-fold relative to wild-type chymotrypsin in [BMIM][Cl] and [EMIM][EtSO4 ], respectively. The half-lives of lipase and papain were similarly increased as much as 4.0 and 2.4-fold, respectively, in [BMIM][Cl] by modifying the ratio of positive-to-negative sites of each enzyme. More generally, the results of stability studies found that modifications that reduce the ratio of enzyme-containing positive-to-negative sites improve enzyme stability in ILs. Understanding the impact of charge modification on enzyme stability in ILs may ultimately be exploited to rationally engineer enzymes for improved function in IL environments. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Comparison of Enzymes / Non-Enzymes Proteins Classification Models Based on 3D, Composition, Sequences and Topological Indices

    OpenAIRE

    Munteanu, Cristian Robert

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of Enzymes / Non-Enzymes Proteins Classification Models Based on 3D, Composition, Sequences and Topological Indices, German Conference on Bioinformatics (GCB), Potsdam, Germany (September, 2007)

  19. Enzymic conversion of starch to glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-08-19

    Corn is steeped in a SO/sub 2/ solution for 30 to 40 hours, coarsely ground, separated from the germ, and filtered. A 35% suspension of the germ-free corn, still containing fibers, hull, and gluten, is treated with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to raise the pH to 6.5 to 7.0. A starch-liquifying enzyme is added and after a 2 hours treatment at 85/sup 0/ the liquefied starch is cooled to 60/sup 0/ and the pH is adjusted to 4.5 to 5.0 with H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. A saccharifying enzyme is now added. After 40 to 81 hours, a raw glucose solution is obtained and is freed from fibers and gluten by filtration. The commercial starch-liquifying enzymes are designated HT-1000 and Neozyme 3 LC (liquid). The saccharifying enzymes are Diazyme or Diazyme L 30 (liquid). The solid enzymes are used at a level up to 0.1% by weight of the starch. Up to 100% conversion of starch into glucose is achieved.

  20. Thermophilic archaeal enzymes and applications in biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2011-01-01

    Thermophilic enzymes have advantages for their use in commercial applications and particularly for the production of chiral compounds to produce optically pure pharmaceuticals. They can be used as biocatalysts in the application of 'green chemistry'. The thermophilic archaea contain enzymes that have already been used in commercial applications such as the L-aminoacylase from Thermococcus litoralis for the resolution of amino acids and amino acid analogues. This enzyme differs from bacterial L-aminoacylases and has similarities to carboxypeptidases from other archaeal species. An amidase/γ-lactamase from Sulfolobus solfataricus has been used for the production of optically pure γ-lactam, the building block for antiviral carbocyclic nucleotides. This enzyme has similarities to the bacterial signature amidase family. An alcohol dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix has been used for the production of optically pure alcohols and is related to the zinc-containing eukaryotic alcohol dehydrogenases. A transaminase and a dehalogenase from Sulfolobus species have also been studied. The archaeal transaminase is found in a pathway for serine synthesis which is found only in eukaryotes and not in bacteria. It can be used for the asymmetric synthesis of homochiral amines of high enantioselective purity. The L-2-haloacid dehalogenase has applications both in biocatalysis and in bioremediation. All of these enzymes have increased thermostability over their mesophilic counterparts.

  1. Concentration profiles near an activated enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soohyung; Agmon, Noam

    2008-09-25

    When a resting enzyme is activated, substrate concentration profile evolves in its vicinity, ultimately tending to steady state. We use modern theories for many-body effects on diffusion-influenced reactions to derive approximate analytical expressions for the steady-state profile and the Laplace transform of the transient concentration profiles. These show excellent agreement with accurate many-particle Brownian-dynamics simulations for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The steady-state profile has a hyperbolic dependence on the distance of the substrate from the enzyme, albeit with a prefactor containing the complexity of the many-body effects. These are most conspicuous for the substrate concentration at the surface of the enzyme. It shows an interesting transition as a function of the enzyme turnover rate. When it is high, the contact concentration decays monotonically to steady state. However, for slow turnover it is nonmonotonic, showing a minimum due to reversible substrate binding, then a maximum due to diffusion of new substrate toward the enzyme, and finally decay to steady state. Under certain conditions one can obtain a good estimate for the critical value of the turnover rate constant at the transition.

  2. Physical Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Physical Therapy KidsHealth / For Parents / Physical Therapy Print en español Terapia física Physical Therapy Basics Doctors often recommend physical therapy (PT) ...

  3. Development and validation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the quantification of trastuzumab in human serum and plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, Carola W. N.; de Groot, Els R.; Heij, Marianne; Boss, David S.; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Rosing, Hilde; Beijnen, Jos H.; Aarden, Lucien A.

    2009-01-01

    Trastuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, is used for the treatment of breast cancer patients who overexpress the HER2 receptor. To optimize therapy, pharmacokinetic studies are necessary. The aim of this study was to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for trastuzumab to

  4. Determinants of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) intolerance and angioedema in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoudpour, Seyed Hamidreza; Baranova, Ekaterina Vitalievna; Souverein, Patrick C.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; de Boer, Anthonius; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse

    2016-01-01

    AimThe aim of the present study was to describe the occurrence and determinants of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (ACEI) intolerance and angioedema (AE) among patients initiating ACEI therapy in a real-world primary care population. MethodsTwo nested case-control studies were

  5. Evaluation of the Combined Therapy of DA-7218, a New Oxazolidinone, and Trimethoprim/ Sulfamethoxazole in the Treatment of Experimental Actinomycetoma by Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Gonzalez, N A; Welsh, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J; Said-Fernandez, S; Lozano-Garza, G; Choi, S H; Vera-Cabrera, L

    2010-07-01

    Currently, for actinomycetoma, combined antimicrobial therapy is preferred to the use of a single compound. This is in order to provide a broader-spectrum coverage due to a combinatory or synergistic effect between the drugs, and to decrease the possibility of emergence of natural resistant strains. A new oxazolidinone pro-drug, DA-7218 [(R)-3-(4-(2-(2-methyltetrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-5-yl)-3-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-5-oxazolidinyl) methyl-disodium-phosphate] (recently re-named TR-701), has shown very good in vitro and in vivo activities against several gram-positive bacteria including Nocardia spp. In the present work we evaluated the effect of DA-7218 at two different doses, alone and combined with trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole (SXT), in an experimental Nocardia brasiliensis actinomycetoma murine model. We also included a negative and a positive control group (linezolid and saline solution respectively). At the end of the treatment period, we observed a clinically and statistically significant difference among the drug receiving groups (combined, alone and linezolid) and the control group (P=0.004). The difference was higher (P= 0.004) between the groups receiving DA-7218 (25mg/kg) alone or combined with SXT, and the control group (saline solution). In this work we proved that DA-7218 alone and combined with SXT is effective in the treatment of experimental actinomycetoma by Nocardia brasiliensis and that it could be potentially useful in the treatment of human actinomycetoma.

  6. Book review: Safety of Biologics Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robak T

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tadeusz Robak Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz and Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, PolandSafety of Biologics Therapy: Monoclonal Antibodies, Cytokines, Fusion Proteins, Hormones, Enzymes, Coagulation Proteins, Vaccines, Botulinum Toxins (Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing; 2016 by Brian A Baldo from the Molecular Immunology Unit, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Royal North Shore Hospital of Sydney, and the Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Australia, is a book that belongs on the shelf of everyone in the field of biologic therapies research and clinical practice. In writing this book, the author’s intention was to produce an up-to-date text book on approved biologic therapies, as far as that is possible in this time of rapidly evolving developments in biotherapeutic research and the introduction of new and novel agents for clinical use.The monograph comprises 610 pages in 13 chapters, each including a summary and further reading suggestions. All chapters include a discussion of basic and clinical material. Well-designed, comprehensive tables and color figures are present throughout the book. The book itself examines the biologic products that have regulatory approval in the USA and/or European Union and that show every indication of remaining important therapies. It covers in great detail all the latest work on peptide hormones and enzymes, monoclonal antibodies, fusion proteins, and cytokine therapies. Beyond that, it also presents the latest information on blood coagulation proteins, vaccines, botulinum neurotoxins, and biosimilars. 

  7. Development of enzymes and enzyme systems by genetic engineering to convert biomass to sugars

    Science.gov (United States)

    TITLE Development of Enzymes and Enzyme Systems by Genetic Engineering to Convert Biomass to Sugars ABSTRACT Plant cellulosic material is one of the most viable renewable resources for the world’s fuel and chemical feedstock needs. Currently ethanol derived from corn starch is the most common li...

  8. Nanomaterials with enzyme-like characteristics (nanozymes): next-generation artificial enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Wang, Erkang

    2013-07-21

    Over the past few decades, researchers have established artificial enzymes as highly stable and low-cost alternatives to natural enzymes in a wide range of applications. A variety of materials including cyclodextrins, metal complexes, porphyrins, polymers, dendrimers and biomolecules have been extensively explored to mimic the structures and functions of naturally occurring enzymes. Recently, some nanomaterials have been found to exhibit unexpected enzyme-like activities, and great advances have been made in this area due to the tremendous progress in nano-research and the unique characteristics of nanomaterials. To highlight the progress in the field of nanomaterial-based artificial enzymes (nanozymes), this review discusses various nanomaterials that have been explored to mimic different kinds of enzymes. We cover their kinetics, mechanisms and applications in numerous fields, from biosensing and immunoassays, to stem cell growth and pollutant removal. We also summarize several approaches to tune the activities of nanozymes. Finally, we make comparisons between nanozymes and other catalytic materials (other artificial enzymes, natural enzymes, organic catalysts and nanomaterial-based catalysts) and address the current challenges and future directions (302 references).

  9. Microbial genetic engineering and enzyme technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollenberg, C.P.; Sahm, H.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of up-to-date contributions BIOTEC 1 has experts discussing the current topics in microbial gene technology and enzyme technology and speculating on future developments. Bacterial and yeast systems for the production of interferons, growth hormone or viral antigenes are described as well as the impact of gene technology on plants. Exciting is the prospect of degrading toxic compounds in our environment by microorganisms tuned in the laboratory. Enzymes are the most effective catalysts we know. They exhibit a very high substrate- and stereospecificity. These properties make enzymes extremely attractive as industrial catalysts, leading to new production processes that are non-polluting and save both energy and raw materials. (orig.) With 135 figs., 36 tabs.

  10. Ultrasound in Enzyme Activation and Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Raymond; Gamage, Mala; Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Knoerzer, Kai

    As discussed in previous chapters, most effects due to ultrasound arise from cavitation events, in particular, collapsing cavitation bubbles. These collapsing bubbles generate very high localized temperatures and pressure shockwaves along with micro-streaming that is associated with high shear forces. These effects can be used to accelerate the transport of substrates and reaction products to and from enzymes, and to enhance mass transfer in enzyme reactor systems, and thus improve efficiency. However, the high velocity streaming, together with the formation of hydroxy radicals and heat generation during collapsing of bubbles, may also potentially affect the biocatalyst stability, and this can be a limiting factor in combined ultrasound/enzymatic applications. Typically, enzymes can be readily denatured by slight changes in environmental conditions, including temperature, pressure, shear stress, pH and ionic strength.

  11. Enzyme Histochemistry for Functional Histology in Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cima, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    In invertebrates, enzyme histochemistry has recently found a renaissance regarding its applications in morphology and ecology. Many enzyme activities are useful for the morphofunctional characterization of cells, as biomarkers of biological and pathologic processes, and as markers of the response to environmental stressors. Here, the adjustments to classic techniques, including the most common enzymes used for digestion, absorption, transport, and oxidation, as well as techniques for azo-coupling, metal salt substitution and oxidative coupling polymerization, are presented in detail for various terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates. This chapter also provides strategies to solve the problems regarding anesthesia, small body size, the presence of an exo- or endoskeleton and the search for the best fixative in relation to the internal fluid osmolarity. These techniques have the aim of obtaining good results for both the pre- and post-embedding labeling of specimens, tissue blocks, sections, and hemolymph smears using both light and transmission electron microscopy.

  12. Intestinal enzyme distribution after supralethal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becciolini, A; Gerber, G B; Buracchi, A; Deroo, J [Florence Univ. (Italy). Istituto di Radiologia; Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium). Dept. de Radiobiologie)

    1977-07-01

    The activity of some intestinal enzymes has been studied after 2 kR irradiation. Brush border enzymes, maltase and leucineaminopeptidase (LAP) show an increase 20 hours after irradiation, while after 72 hours their activities are reduced to very low levels. Lysosomal enzymes show a completely different behaviour: acid phosphatase activity increases only 72 hours after irradiation, whereas ..beta.. glucuronidase increases significantly after 20 hours and reaches values two or three times higher than controls after 72 hours. The histologic picture at the first interval after irradiation shows gross alterations in the crypt region, but the villi appear nearly normal. Seventy-two hours after irradiation the whole epithelium is affected and very numerous leukocytes are present in the stroma.

  13. Arabinogalactan proteins: focus on carbohydrate active enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eKnoch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs are a highly diverse class of cell surface proteoglycans that are commonly found in most plant species. AGPs play important roles in many cellular processes during plant development, such as reproduction, cell proliferation, pattern formation and growth, and in plant-microbe interaction. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their function. Numerous studies using monoclonal antibodies that recognize different AGP glycan epitopes have shown the appearance of a slightly altered AGP glycan in a specific stage of development in plant cells. Therefore, it is anticipated that the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycan is tightly regulated during development. Until recently, however, little was known about the enzymes involved in the metabolism of AGP glycans. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy; http://www.cazy.org/ involved in the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycans, and we discuss the biological role of these enzymes in plant development.

  14. Radiation and enzyme degradation of cellulose materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchacek, V.

    1983-01-01

    The results are summed up of a study of the effect of gamma radiation on pure cellulose and on wheat straw. The irradiation of cellulose yields acid substances - formic acid and polyhydroxy acids, toxic malondialdehyde and the most substantial fraction - the saccharides xylose, arabinose, glucose and certain oligosaccharides. A ten-fold reduction of the level of cellulose polymerization can be caused by relatively small doses - (up to 250 kGy). A qualitative analysis was made of the straw before and after irradiation and it was shown that irradiation had no significant effect on the qualitative composition of the straw. A 48 hour enzyme hydrolysis of the cellulose and straw were made after irradiation and an economic evaluation of the process was made. Radiation pretreatment is technically and economically advantageous; the production of fodder using enzyme hydrolysis of irradiated straw is not economically feasible due to the high cost of the enzyme. (M.D.)

  15. Engineering of pectinolytic enzymes for enhanced thermostability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorte Møller

    Conversion of waste materials into valuable compounds is promising concerning transformation of byproduct streams such as sugar beet and potato pulp. In order to obtain those compounds with reduced energy consumption, carbohydrate active enzymes can be used as catalysts. Sugar beet and potato pulp...... consist of pectin that can be converted into beneficial polymeric and oligomeric carbohydrates requiring enzymes such as pectin lyases, rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) lyases, polygalacturonases and galactanases. Enzymatic conversion of such pectinaceous biomasses at high temperatures is advantageous...... as it gives rise to lower substrate viscosity, easier mixing, higher substrate solubility and lowers the risk of contamination. The overall objective of this thesis was to discover enzymes for degradation of RGI structures in pectin and further engineer for enhanced thermostability. The hypotheses were...

  16. Translational control of an intestinal microvillar enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Cowell, G M; Sjöström, H

    1986-01-01

    The rates of biosynthesis of adult and foetal pig small-intestinal aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) were compared to determine at which level the expression of the microvillar enzyme is developmentally controlled. In organ-cultured explants, the rate of biosynthesis of foetal aminopeptidase N is only...... about 3% of the adult rate. The small amount synthesized occurs in a high-mannose-glycosylated, membrane-bound, form that is processed to the mature, complex-glycosylated, form at a markedly slower rate than that of the adult enzyme. Extracts of total RNA from adult and foetal intestine contained...

  17. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Application of Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Khusainova, Alsu; Shapiro, Alexander; Woodley, John

    2016-01-01

    Enzymer er for nylig blevet rapporteret, som effektive stoffer for forbedret olieindvinding(EOR). Både laboratorie undersøgelser og felttest viste en markant stigning af olieproduktion. Op til ekstra 16 % af olien blev produceret i laboratorie eksperimenter og op til ekstra 269 tønder olie per dag blev fremstillet under feltforsøg. Det var foreslået, at følgende mekanismer har medvirket tiløget olieproduktionen på grund af enzymer: forbedringer af bjergartsoverfladens befugtningsevne;dannelse...

  18. Immobilized enzyme reactor chromatography: Optimization of protein retention and enzyme activity in monolithic silica stationary phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besanger, Travis R.; Hodgson, Richard J.; Green, James R.A.; Brennan, John D.

    2006-01-01

    Our group recently reported on the application of protein-doped monolithic silica columns for immobilized enzyme reactor chromatography, which allowed screening of enzyme inhibitors present in mixtures using mass spectrometry for detection. The enzyme was immobilized by entrapment within a bimodal meso/macroporous silica material prepared by a biocompatible sol-gel processing route. While such columns proved to be useful for applications such as screening of protein-ligand interactions, significant amounts of entrapped proteins leached from the columns owing to the high proportion of macropores within the materials. Herein, we describe a detailed study of factors affecting the morphology of protein-doped bioaffinity columns and demonstrate that specific pH values and concentrations of poly(ethylene glycol) can be used to prepare essentially mesoporous columns that retain over 80% of initially loaded enzyme in an active and accessible form and yet still retain sufficient porosity to allow pressure-driven flow in the low μL/min range. Using the enzyme γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT), we further evaluated the catalytic constants of the enzyme entrapped in capillary columns with different silica morphologies as a function of flowrate and backpressure using the enzyme reactor assay mode. It was found that the apparent activity of the enzyme was highest in mesoporous columns that retained high levels of enzyme. In such columns, enzyme activity increased by ∼2-fold with increases in both flowrate (from 250 to 1000 nL/min) and backpressure generated (from 500 to 2100 psi) during the chromatographic activity assay owing to increases in k cat and decreases in K M , switching from diffusion controlled to reaction controlled conditions at ca. 2000 psi. These results suggest that columns with minimal macropore volumes (<5%) are advantageous for the entrapment of soluble proteins for bioaffinity and bioreactor chromatography

  19. [Gestalt therapy.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, J; Poupard, D

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe Gestalt Therapy. They retrace its fundamental theoretical axes. These are psychoanalysis, character analysis, the german Gestalt theory of perception, existentialism, and the Orient. Some principal concepts are then elaborated more fully such as the cycle of awareness, desensitization, excitation anxiety and the five defense mechanisms: retroflection, introjection, projection, deflection, and confluence. The nature and goals of the therapeutic process are also described before the presentation of some techniques specific to this approach such as enactment and role playing. Finally, certain basic Gestalt rules, which aim at facilitating and intensifying the communication process among group members, are enunciated.

  20. 21 CFR 862.2500 - Enzyme analyzer for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enzyme analyzer for clinical use. 862.2500 Section... Instruments § 862.2500 Enzyme analyzer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An enzyme analyzer for clinical use is a device intended to measure enzymes in plasma or serum by nonkinetic or kinetic measurement of...

  1. 21 CFR 864.9400 - Stabilized enzyme solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stabilized enzyme solution. 864.9400 Section 864... and Blood Products § 864.9400 Stabilized enzyme solution. (a) Identification. A stabilized enzyme... enzyme solutions include papain, bromelin, ficin, and trypsin. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  2. Review of the biochemical basis of enzyme immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingler, W.

    1982-01-01

    The ever increasing number of radioimmunological determination poses problems allied with the handling of radioactive substances. In recent years various non-radioactive methods have been developed, among which the enzyme immunoassay is already in routine use. Homogeneous and heterogeneous enzyme immunoassays are described. Criteria for enzymes, substrates and enzyme-substrate reactions are listed. (orig.) [de

  3. Seeing & Feeling How Enzymes Work Using Tangible Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kwok-chi

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a tangible model used to help students tackle some misconceptions about enzyme actions, particularly the induced-fit model, enzyme-substrate complementarity, and enzyme inhibition. The model can simulate how substrates induce a change in the shape of the active site and the role of attraction force during enzyme-substrate…

  4. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation oncologist encounters the critically ill immunosuppressed patient in four settings. First, the newly diagnosed cancer patient presents for initial evaluation and treatment, with immunosuppression from the cancer itself, malnutrition, concomitant infectious disease, prior drug or alcohol abuse or other medical problems. Second, the previously treated cancer patient presents with metastatic or recurrent primary cancer causing local symptoms. Immune dysfunction in this setting may be due to prior chemotherapy and/or radiation as well as any of the original factors. Third, the patient previously treated with radiation presents with a life-threatening problem possibly due to complications of prior therapy. In this setting, the radiation oncologist is asked to evaluate the clinical problem and to suggest whether radiation might be causing part or all of the problem and what can be done to treat these sequelae of radiation. Fourth, the patient with a benign diagnosis (not cancer) is seen with a problem potentially emeliorated by radiation (e.g., kidney transplant rejection, preparation for transplant, or intractable rheumatoid arthritis). This chapter reviews these four issues and presents clinical and radiobiologic principles on which recommendations for therapy are based

  5. Purification, characterization of phytase enzyme from Lactobacillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purification, characterization of phytase enzyme from Lactobacillus plantarum bacteria and determination of its kinetic properties. ... Many of the cereal grains, legumes and oilseeds store phosphorus in phytate form. Phytases can be produced by plants, animals and microorganisms. However, the ones with microbial origin ...

  6. Enzyme catalysis by entropy without Circe effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Masoud; Himo, Fahmi; Åqvist, Johan

    2016-03-01

    Entropic effects have often been invoked to explain the extraordinary catalytic power of enzymes. In particular, the hypothesis that enzymes can use part of the substrate-binding free energy to reduce the entropic penalty associated with the subsequent chemical transformation has been very influential. The enzymatic reaction of cytidine deaminase appears to be a distinct example. Here, substrate binding is associated with a significant entropy loss that closely matches the activation entropy penalty for the uncatalyzed reaction in water, whereas the activation entropy for the rate-limiting catalytic step in the enzyme is close to zero. Herein, we report extensive computer simulations of the cytidine deaminase reaction and its temperature dependence. The energetics of the catalytic reaction is first evaluated by density functional theory calculations. These results are then used to parametrize an empirical valence bond description of the reaction, which allows efficient sampling by molecular dynamics simulations and computation of Arrhenius plots. The thermodynamic activation parameters calculated by this approach are in excellent agreement with experimental data and indeed show an activation entropy close to zero for the rate-limiting transition state. However, the origin of this effect is a change of reaction mechanism compared the uncatalyzed reaction. The enzyme operates by hydroxide ion attack, which is intrinsically associated with a favorable activation entropy. Hence, this has little to do with utilization of binding free energy to pay the entropic penalty but rather reflects how a preorganized active site can stabilize a reaction path that is not operational in solution.

  7. Biochemical assessement of liver enzymes in immunocompromised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: This study aims at the estimation of serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and glutmyltransferase GGT (Liver enzymes) in Human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) and/or Acquired immune deficiency syndrome(AIDS) patients in parts of Edo State, Nigeria.

  8. Enzyme specific activity in functionalized nanoporous supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Chenghong; Soares, Thereza A; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu Jun; Ackerman, Eric J

    2008-01-01

    Here we reveal that enzyme specific activity can be increased substantially by changing the protein loading density (P LD ) in functionalized nanoporous supports so that the enzyme immobilization efficiency (I e , defined as the ratio of the specific activity of the immobilized enzyme to the specific activity of the free enzyme in solution) can be much higher than 100%. A net negatively charged glucose oxidase (GOX) and a net positively charged organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) were entrapped spontaneously in NH 2 - and HOOC-functionalized mesoporous silica (300 A, FMS) respectively. The specific activity of GOX entrapped in FMS increased with decreasing P LD . With decreasing P LD , I e of GOX in FMS increased from 150%. Unlike GOX, OPH in HOOC-FMS showed increased specific activity with increasing P LD . With increasing P LD , the corresponding I e of OPH in FMS increased from 100% to>200%. A protein structure-based analysis of the protein surface charges directing the electrostatic interaction-based orientation of the protein molecules in FMS demonstrates that substrate access to GOX molecules in FMS is limited at high P LD , consequently lowering the GOX specific activity. In contrast, substrate access to OPH molecules in FMS remains open at high P LD and may promote a more favorable confinement environment that enhances the OPH activity

  9. Exogenous fibrolytic enzymes to unlock nutrients: Histological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a need for a better understanding of the mode-of-action of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE) used as additives in ruminant feeds. Four forages, treated with EFE, were evaluated in vitro and histologically, in an attempt to determine the effect of EFE on tissue degradation. Weeping love grass, kikuyu leaf material, ...

  10. Microbial nitrilases: versatile, spiral forming, industrial enzymes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thuku, RN

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available such case is the NAD+ synthetase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Bellinzoni et al., 2005). This enzyme relies on an associated amino-terminal amidase domain in order to utilize glutamine as a source of nitrogen and liberate ammonia which is required...

  11. A Comprehensive Enzyme Kinetic Exercise for Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Janice S.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a comprehensive treatment of experimental enzyme kinetics strongly coupled to electronic data acquisition and use of spreadsheets to organize data and perform linear and nonlinear least-squares analyses, all in a manner that promotes development of important reasoning skills. Kinetic parameters are obtained for the stable…

  12. A Qualitative Approach to Enzyme Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Grover L.

    2009-01-01

    Most general biochemistry textbooks present enzyme inhibition by showing how the basic Michaelis-Menten parameters K[subscript m] and V[subscript max] are affected mathematically by a particular type of inhibitor. This approach, while mathematically rigorous, does not lend itself to understanding how inhibition patterns are used to determine the…

  13. Enzyme Kinetics? Elementary, my dear 3 -8 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    research interests are in the areas of protein- ... rate constant for the formation of products, k3 is significantly of some enzymes. ... tissue at different stages of development. .... represent the only values of Km and V max that satisfy all of the sets.

  14. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Gene Polymorphism: An Observational Study among Diabetic Hypertensive Subjects in Malaysia. ... Methods: The pharmacological effect of ACE inhibition on mean arterial pressure (MAP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were observed among a total of 62 subjects for ...

  15. Protein engineering of enzymes for process applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodley, John M

    2013-01-01

    opportunities will be targeted on modification to enable process application. This article discusses the challenges involved in enzyme modification focused on process requirements, such as the need to fulfill reaction thermodynamics, specific activity under the required conditions, kinetics at required...... concentrations, and stability. Finally, future research directions are discussed, including the integration of biocatalysis with neighboring chemical steps....

  16. Enzyme activity of a Phanerochaete chrysosporium cellobiohydrolase

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to produce a secreted, heterologously expressed Phanerochaete chrysosporium cellobiohydrolase (CBHI.1) protein that required no in vitro chemical refolding and to investigate the cellulolytic activity of the clone expressing the glutathione S-transferase (GST) fused CBHI.1 protein. Plate enzyme ...

  17. Detergents - Zeolites and Enzymes Excel Cleaning Power

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Presently used detergent formulations generally consist of surfactants, builder and cobuilder, bleaching agents, addi- tives for secondary benefits and enzymes. Zeolites are basically hydrated crystalline aluminium silicates which function as ion exchangers and make the water soft by removing calcium, magnesium and ...

  18. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Furin is a chemokine-modifying enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hensbergen, Paul J; Verzijl, Dennis; Balog, Crina I A

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines comprise a class of structurally related proteins that are involved in many aspects of leukocyte migration under basal and inflammatory conditions. In addition to the large number of genes, limited processing of these proteins by a variety of enzymes enhances the complexity of the tota...

  20. Ligninolytic enzyme complex of Armillaria spp

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stoychev, I.; Nerud, František

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2000), s. 248-250 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : lignin olytic enzyme * lignin peroxidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2000

  1. Involvement of methyltransferases enzymes during the energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The methyl group transfer from dimethylsulfide (DMS), trimethylamine and methanol to 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (coenzyme M) were investigated from cell extracts of Methanosarcina semesiae sp. nov. to evaluate whether the enzyme systems involved were constitutive or inductive. The extracts from cells grown on ...

  2. Computationally designed libraries for rapid enzyme stabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijma, Hein J.; Floor, Robert J.; Jekel, Peter A.; Baker, David; Marrink, Siewert J.; Janssen, Dick B.

    The ability to engineer enzymes and other proteins to any desired stability would have wide-ranging applications. Here, we demonstrate that computational design of a library with chemically diverse stabilizing mutations allows the engineering of drastically stabilized and fully functional variants

  3. Role of antioxidant scavenging enzymes and extracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present work, we studied the role of antioxidant scavenging enzymes of plant pathogenic bacteria: catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and a virulence factor; extracelluar polysaccharide production in determining the virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) isolates and its differential reaction to rice cultivars.

  4. Novel Industrial Enzymes from Uncultured Arctic Microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede

    , and reduce the risk of contaminations. Cold- and alkaline-active enzymes can be found in microorganisms adapted to living in natural environments with these conditions, which are extremely rare but found in the unique ikaite columns from SW Greenland (4-6 °C, pH >10). It is estimated that less than 1...

  5. Microbial nitrilases: versatile, spiral forming, industrial enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuku, R N; Brady, D; Benedik, M J; Sewell, B T

    2009-03-01

    The nitrilases are enzymes that convert nitriles to the corresponding acid and ammonia. They are members of a superfamily, which includes amidases and occur in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The superfamily is characterized by having a homodimeric building block with a alpha beta beta alpha-alpha beta beta alpha sandwich fold and an active site containing four positionally conserved residues: cys, glu, glu and lys. Their high chemical specificity and frequent enantioselectivity makes them attractive biocatalysts for the production of fine chemicals and pharmaceutical intermediates. Nitrilases are also used in the treatment of toxic industrial effluent and cyanide remediation. The superfamily enzymes have been visualized as dimers, tetramers, hexamers, octamers, tetradecamers, octadecamers and variable length helices, but all nitrilase oligomers have the same basic dimer interface. Moreover, in the case of the octamers, tetradecamers, octadecamers and the helices, common principles of subunit association apply. While the range of industrially interesting reactions catalysed by this enzyme class continues to increase, research efforts are still hampered by the lack of a high resolution microbial nitrilase structure which can provide insights into their specificity, enantioselectivity and the mechanism of catalysis. This review provides an overview of the current progress in elucidation of structure and function in this enzyme class and emphasizes insights that may lead to further biotechnological applications.

  6. Enzymes and Ecosystems -- Where Do They Overlap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard E. Dickson

    1996-01-01

    The whole plant is not the sum of its enzyme systems. This book demonstrates the importance of whole-plant physiology by examining carbon-nitrogen interactions and how these interactions are influenced by demands of the whole plant. In some aspects it is a timely response to the current, strong reductionist trends in plant physiology associated with advances in...

  7. Transition state theory for enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an essay that discusses the concepts underlying the application of modern transition state theory to reactions in enzymes. Issues covered include the potential of mean force, the quantization of vibrations, the free energy of activation, and transmission coefficients to account for nonequilibrium effect, recrossing, and tunneling. PMID:26008760

  8. Synthetic Applications of Nitrile-Converting Enzymes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martínková, Ludmila; Mylerová, Veronika

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 7, - (2003), s. 1279-1295 ISSN 1385-2728 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4020213 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : nitrile * converting * enzymes Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.521, year: 2003

  9. Enzyme kinetic characterization of protein tyrosine phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Branner, S.; Møller, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play a central role in cellular signaling processes, resulting in an increased interest in modulating the activities of PTPs. We therefore decided to undertake a detailed enzyme kinetic evaluation of various transmembrane and cytosolic PTPs (PTPalpha, PTPbeta...

  10. Chitinolytic enzymes produces by ovine rumen bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopečný, Jan; Hodrová, Blanka

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 5 (2000), s. 465-468 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/97/1221 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : chitinolytic enzymes Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2000

  11. growth and extracellular enzyme production by microorganisms

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okorie

    2013-06-26

    Jun 26, 2013 ... 1Federal Institute of Industrial Research Oshodi, Lagos, Nigeria. 2Department of ... of Bacillus subtilis (Bs2) were able to produce lipase enzyme. The study ... However, most commercial starter cultures originated from those ... The traditional method of preparing Ugba was employed in the laboratory to ...

  12. Laccase Enzymes in Inocula Pleurotus spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora García-Oduardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of edible and medicinal mushrooms Pleurotus has been aimed at promoting alternative management for agricultural products. This basidiomicete has been the subject of numerous studies because of its fruiting body constitutes a food, being a producer of enzymes with industrial interest and for its ability of biotransformation of lignocellulosic substrates. Pleurotus inocula in the established technology for growing edible and medicinal mushrooms in the CEBI Research- Production Plant were performed using sorghum or wheat. However, it is possible to expand the possibilities with other substrates. In this paper, the results of laccase enzymes production in inocula prepared with sorghum, corn and coffee pulp with two strains Pleurotus ostreatus CCEBI 3021 and Pleurotus ostreatus CCEBI 3024 are presented. The period of preparation of seed reaches 15-21 days, the measurements of laccase activity were performed in periods of seven days. Extraction of crude enzyme was performed in aqueous phase, the determination of the laccase enzyme activity, using guaiacol as substrate. The results obtained in this work with studies in previous work using sorghum as inocula are compared. It is found that higher yields are obtained laccase in coffee pulp. This study contributes to the theoretical knowledge and to provide alternatives for securing the production process of the plant.

  13. Lignocellulose degradation, enzyme production and protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial conversion of corn stover by white rot fungi has the potential to increase its ligninolysis and nutritional value, thereby transforming it into protein-enriched animal feed. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize conditions for the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes by Trametes versicolor during ...

  14. Imbalance between pulmonary angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activity in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Bos, Albert P.; Bem, Reinout A.; Dierdorp, Barbara S.; Dekker, Tamara; van Goor, Harry; Kamilic, Jelena; van der Loos, Chris M.; van den Berg, Elske; Bruijn, Martijn; van Woensel, Job B.; Lutter, René

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme and its effector peptide angiotensin II have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Recently, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 was identified as the counter-regulatory enzyme of angiotensin-converting enzyme that converts angiotensin

  15. Imbalance between pulmonary angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activity in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wosten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Bos, Albert; Bem, Reinout A.; Dierdorp, Barbara S.; Dekker, Tamara; van Goor, Harry; Kamilic, Jelena; van der Loos, Chris M.; van den Berg, Elske; Bruijn, Martijn; van Woensel, Job B.; Lutter, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Angiotensin-converting enzyme and its effector peptide angiotensin II have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Recently, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 was identified as the counter-regulatory enzyme of angiotensin-converting enzyme that converts

  16. Thermodynamic activity-based intrinsic enzyme kinetic sheds light on enzyme-solvent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosch, Jan-Hendrik; Wagner, David; Nistelkas, Vasilios; Spieß, Antje C

    2017-01-01

    The reaction medium has major impact on biocatalytic reaction systems and on their economic significance. To allow for tailored medium engineering, thermodynamic phenomena, intrinsic enzyme kinetics, and enzyme-solvent interactions have to be discriminated. To this end, enzyme reaction kinetic modeling was coupled with thermodynamic calculations based on investigations of the alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis (LbADH) in monophasic water/methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) mixtures as a model solvent. Substrate concentrations and substrate thermodynamic activities were varied separately to identify the individual thermodynamic and kinetic effects on the enzyme activity. Microkinetic parameters based on concentration and thermodynamic activity were derived to successfully identify a positive effect of MTBE on the availability of the substrate to the enzyme, but a negative effect on the enzyme performance. In conclusion, thermodynamic activity-based kinetic modeling might be a suitable tool to initially curtail the type of enzyme-solvent interactions and thus, a powerful first step to potentially understand the phenomena that occur in nonconventional media in more detail. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:96-103, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Adsorption of monocomponent enzymes in enzyme mixture analyzed quantitatively during hydrolysis of lignocellulose substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Várnai, Anikó; Viikari, Liisa; Marjamaa, Kaisa; Siika-aho, Matti

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of purified Trichoderma reesei cellulases (TrCel7A, TrCel6A and TrCel5A) and xylanase TrXyn11 and Aspergillus niger β-glucosidase AnCel3A was studied in enzyme mixture during hydrolysis of two pretreated lignocellulosic materials, steam pretreated and catalytically delignified spruce, along with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). The enzyme mixture was compiled to resemble the composition of commercial cellulase preparations. The hydrolysis was carried out at 35 °C to mimic the temperature of the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Enzyme adsorption was followed by analyzing the activity and the protein amount of the individual free enzymes in the hydrolysis supernatant. Most enzymes adsorbed quickly at early stages of the hydrolysis and remained bound throughout the hydrolysis, although the conversion reached was fairly high. Only with the catalytically oxidized spruce samples, the bound enzymes started to be released as the hydrolysis degree reached 80%. The results based on enzyme activities and protein assay were in good accordance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of irradiation on immobilized enzymes compared with that on enzymes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachinger, L.; Schippel, C.; Altmann, E.; Diepold, B.; Yang, C.; Jaenike, M.; Hochhaeuser, E.

    1985-01-01

    Glucose oxidase and catalase were immobilized by attaching them to nylon fibers that had been treated with triethyloxonium-tetrafluoroborate, diaminohexane and glutaraldialdehyde according to Morris, Campell and Hornby (1975). This method assures that the enzymes are bound to a side chain of the polyamide structure. Enzyme activity (as measured by the O 2 -uptake and by microcalorimetry) was found to be unchanged after 2 years. The apparent Ksub(m)-constants of the immobilized enzymes with glucose were the same as those for enzymes in solution. GOD and catalase immobilized in poly(acrylamide) gel had the same Ksub(m)-value. Despite the high stability during storage, the radiation induced inactivation of enzymes immobilized on gel or chromosorb, an inorganic carrier, was of the same order of magnitude as that of the dissolved enzymes. The enzymes bound to nylon fibers showed a higher radiation sensitivity. This might have been caused by an additional attack on the binding site of the carrier. (orig.)

  19. Nanoarmored Enzymes for Organic Enzymology: Synthesis and Characterization of Poly(2-Alkyloxazoline)-Enzyme Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leurs, Melanie; Tiller, Joerg C

    2017-01-01

    The properties of enzymes can be altered significantly by modification with polymers. Numerous different methods are known to obtain such polymer-enzyme conjugates (PECs). However, there is no universal method to render enzymes into PECs that are fully soluble in organic solvents. Here, we present a method, which achieves such high degree of modification of proteins that the majority of modified enzymes will be soluble in organic solvents. This is achieved by preparing poly(2-alkyloxazoline)s (POx) with an NH 2 end group and coupling this functional polymer via pyromellitic acid dianhydride onto the amino groups of the respective protein. The resulting PECs are capable of serving as surfactants for unmodified proteins, rendering the whole mixture organosoluble. Depending on the nature of the POx and the molecular weight and the nature of the enzyme, the PECs are soluble in chloroform or even toluene. Another advantage of this method is that the poly(2-alkyloxazoline) can be activated with the coupling agent and used for the enzyme conjugation without further purification. The POx-enzyme conjugates generated by this modification strategy show modulated catalytic activity in both, aqueous and organic, systems. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative gene expression of intestinal metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ho-Chul; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Cho, Hee-Jung; Yi, Hee; Cho, Soo-Min; Lee, Dong-Goo; Abd El-Aty, A M; Kim, Jin-Suk; Sun, Duxin; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the expression profiles of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the intestine of mouse, rat and human. Total RNA was isolated from the duodenum and the mRNA expression was measured using Affymetrix GeneChip oligonucleotide arrays. Detected genes from the intestine of mouse, rat and human were ca. 60% of 22690 sequences, 40% of 8739 and 47% of 12559, respectively. Total genes of metabolizing enzymes subjected in this study were 95, 33 and 68 genes in mouse, rat and human, respectively. Of phase I enzymes, the mouse exhibited abundant gene expressions for Cyp3a25, Cyp4v3, Cyp2d26, followed by Cyp2b20, Cyp2c65 and Cyp4f14, whereas, the rat showed higher expression profiles of Cyp3a9, Cyp2b19, Cyp4f1, Cyp17a1, Cyp2d18, Cyp27a1 and Cyp4f6. However, the highly expressed P450 enzymes were CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP4F3, CYP2C18, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A7, CYP11B1 and CYP2B6 in the human. For phase II enzymes, glucuronosyltransferase Ugt1a6, glutathione S-transferases Gstp1, Gstm3 and Gsta2, sulfotransferase Sult1b1 and acyltransferase Dgat1 were highly expressed in the mouse. The rat revealed predominant expression of glucuronosyltransferases Ugt1a1 and Ugt1a7, sulfotransferase Sult1b1, acetyltransferase Dlat and acyltransferase Dgat1. On the other hand, in human, glucuronosyltransferases UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, glutathione S-transferases MGST3, GSTP1, GSTA2 and GSTM4, sulfotransferases ST1A3 and SULT1A2, acetyltransferases SAT1 and CRAT, and acyltransferase AGPAT2 were dominantly detected. Therefore, current data indicated substantial interspecies differences in the pattern of intestinal gene expression both for P450 enzymes and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. This genomic database is expected to improve our understanding of interspecies variations in estimating intestinal prehepatic clearance of oral drugs.

  1. Non-homologous isofunctional enzymes: a systematic analysis of alternative solutions in enzyme evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelchenko, Marina V; Galperin, Michael Y; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2010-04-30

    Evolutionarily unrelated proteins that catalyze the same biochemical reactions are often referred to as analogous - as opposed to homologous - enzymes. The existence of numerous alternative, non-homologous enzyme isoforms presents an interesting evolutionary problem; it also complicates genome-based reconstruction of the metabolic pathways in a variety of organisms. In 1998, a systematic search for analogous enzymes resulted in the identification of 105 Enzyme Commission (EC) numbers that included two or more proteins without detectable sequence similarity to each other, including 34 EC nodes where proteins were known (or predicted) to have distinct structural folds, indicating independent evolutionary origins. In the past 12 years, many putative non-homologous isofunctional enzymes were identified in newly sequenced genomes. In addition, efforts in structural genomics resulted in a vastly improved structural coverage of proteomes, providing for definitive assessment of (non)homologous relationships between proteins. We report the results of a comprehensive search for non-homologous isofunctional enzymes (NISE) that yielded 185 EC nodes with two or more experimentally characterized - or predicted - structurally unrelated proteins. Of these NISE sets, only 74 were from the original 1998 list. Structural assignments of the NISE show over-representation of proteins with the TIM barrel fold and the nucleotide-binding Rossmann fold. From the functional perspective, the set of NISE is enriched in hydrolases, particularly carbohydrate hydrolases, and in enzymes involved in defense against oxidative stress. These results indicate that at least some of the non-homologous isofunctional enzymes were recruited relatively recently from enzyme families that are active against related substrates and are sufficiently flexible to accommodate changes in substrate specificity.

  2. Genotype of metabolic enzymes and the benefit of tamoxifen in postmenopausal breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegman, Pia; Vainikka, Linda; Stål, Olle; Nordenskjöld, Bo; Skoog, Lambert; Rutqvist, Lars-Erik; Wingren, Sten

    2005-01-01

    Tamoxifen is widely used as endocrine therapy for oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer. However, many of these patients experience recurrence despite tamoxifen therapy by incompletely understood mechanisms. In the present report we propose that tamoxifen resistance may be due to differences in activity of metabolic enzymes as a result of genetic polymorphism. Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) and sulfotransferase 1A1 (SULT1A1) are polymorphic and are involved in the metabolism of tamoxifen. The CYP2D6*4 and SULT1A1*2 genotypes result in decreased enzyme activity. We therefore investigated the genotypes of CYP2D6 and SULT1A1 in 226 breast cancer patients participating in a trial of adjuvant tamoxifen treatment in order to validate the benefit from the therapy. The patients were genotyped using PCR followed by cleavage with restriction enzymes. Carriers of the CYP2D6*4 allele demonstrated a decreased risk of recurrence when treated with tamoxifen (relative risk = 0.28, 95% confidence interval = 0.11–0.74, P = 0.0089). A similar pattern was seen among the SULT1A1*1 homozygotes (relative risk = 0.48, 95% confidence interval = 0.21–1.12, P = 0.074). The combination of CYP2D6*4 and/or SULT1A1*1/*1 genotypes comprised 60% of the patients and showed a 62% decreased risk of distant recurrence with tamoxifen (relative risk = 0.38, 95% confidence interval = 0.19–0.74, P = 0.0041). The present study suggests that genotype of metabolic enzymes might be useful as a guide for adjuvant endocrine treatment of postmenopausal breast cancer patients. However, results are in contradiction to prior hypotheses and the present sample size is relatively small. Findings therefore need to be confirmed in a larger cohort

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L.I.

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses the utilization of three very distinct enzyme systems for imaging in oncology. The first of these is an enzyme encoded by a viral gene that is not present in non-infected mammalian cells. This enzyme is a nucleoside kinase that converts selected unnatural nucleosides to nucleotides in virus-infected or gene-transfected cells, but not in normal cells. The most commonly used viral kinase in gene therapy today is Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV tk). The imaging applications of this gene therapy system are demonstrated using data from a murine tumour gene therapy model, with 123 IVFRU as the diagnostic radiopharmaceutical. The second enzyme system is endogenous to mammalian cells, but is found in highest concentrations in tissues of neutral crest derivation. The overall biochemical pathway of interest involves the conversion of tyrosine to either dopamine (neurotransmitter pathway), or to melanin (pigmentation pathway). In this system tyrosinase is the 'branching' enzyme, converting dopa to dopaquinone, thereby averting its conversion to dopamine. With selective agents, the tracer can be trapped in this 'melanin pathway', which is particularly active in melanomas. Data on the development of radioiodinated tyrosinase substrates, based on S-cysteaminyl phenol (SCAP), a highly specific tyrosinase substrate, are presented to illustrate this concept. The final example is that of endogenous enzymes that are virtually ubiquitous in biodistribution. One class of enzymes, the reductases, are particularly active in the liver and their activity is amplified in tissues that are hypoxic. They are important in radiotherapy, where they can be utilized to bioreductively activate compounds that can restore the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells. The 2-nitroimidazoles are of special interest because they are easily reducible by a number of reductases, a process that is made selective by the reversibility of reduction in the presence of cellular

  4. The Alzheimer's disease β-secretase enzyme, BACE1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassar Robert

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is highly complex. While several pathologies characterize this disease, amyloid plaques, composed of the β-amyloid peptide are hallmark neuropathological lesions in Alzheimer's disease brain. Indeed, a wealth of evidence suggests that β-amyloid is central to the pathophysiology of AD and is likely to play an early role in this intractable neurodegenerative disorder. The BACE1 enzyme is essential for the generation of β-amyloid. BACE1 knockout mice do not produce β-amyloid and are free from Alzheimer's associated pathologies including neuronal loss and certain memory deficits. The fact that BACE1 initiates the formation of β-amyloid, and the observation that BACE1 levels are elevated in this disease provide direct and compelling reasons to develop therapies directed at BACE1 inhibition thus reducing β-amyloid and its associated toxicities. However, new data indicates that complete abolishment of BACE1 may be associated with specific behavioral and physiological alterations. Recently a number of non-APP BACE1 substrates have been identified. It is plausible that failure to process certain BACE1 substrates may underlie some of the reported abnormalities in the BACE1-deficient mice. Here we review BACE1 biology, covering aspects ranging from the initial identification and characterization of this enzyme to recent data detailing the apparent dysregulation of BACE1 in Alzheimer's disease. We pay special attention to the putative function of BACE1 during healthy conditions and discuss in detail the relationship that exists between key risk factors for AD, such as vascular disease (and downstream cellular consequences, and the pathogenic alterations in BACE1 that are observed in the diseased state.

  5. An angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor in the combination treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Komarova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors have anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative properties and can affect the processes of angiogenesis, by reducing the effects of angiotensin II (ATII. The use of ACE inhibitors in the combination therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA can be also effective for monitoring disease activity and for reducing a cardiovascular risk.Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of an ACE inhibitor in the combination therapy of RA.Patients and methods. Eighty-four patients with RA and endothelial dysfunction were examined; the mean age was 40.12±10.2 years; the mean disease duration was 4.22±3.43 years. All the patients had a blood level of ATII of >9 pg/ml. Enzyme immunoassay was used to measure the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α (Vector-Best, Russia, intercellular adhesion molecules 1 (ICAM-1 (Diaclone, France, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and ATII (Diagnostic, Canada. Wrist ultrasonography using the Doppler ultrasound apparatus ESAOTE MyLAB40 was carried out to assess synovial vascularization. The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included 43 patients who were assigned to receive standard therapy for RA according to the rheumatic disease treatment protocols; Group 2 comprised 41 patients who received the standard therapy plus ACE inhibitors 2.5–5 mg/day.Results. The use of ACE inhibitors in the 12-month combination therapy of RA patients led to an improvement in the endothelial regulation of vascular tone, to a decrease in the blood concentration of ICAM-1, to a reduction in the intensity of synovial angiogenesis and in the blood level of VEGF by 39%, and a more significant drop in the levels of CRP and TNF-? and in DAS28 by 1.2 scores as compared to those in the standard therapy.

  6. Does Music Therapy Improve Anxiety and Depression in Alzheimer's Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rubia Ortí, José Enrique; García-Pardo, María Pilar; Iranzo, Carmen Cabañés; Madrigal, José Joaquin Cerón; Castillo, Sandra Sancho; Rochina, Mariano Julián; Gascó, Vicente Javier Prado

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation of a short protocol of music therapy as a tool to reduce stress and improve the emotional state in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease. A sample of 25 patients with mild Alzheimer's received therapy based on the application of a music therapy session lasting 60 min. Before and after the therapy, patient saliva was collected to quantify the level of salivary cortisol using the Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) immunoassay technique and a questionnaire was completed to measure anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). The results show that the application of this therapy lowers the level of stress and decreases significantly depression and anxiety, establishing a linear correlation between the variation of these variables and the variation of cortisol. A short protocol of music therapy can be an alternative medicine to improve emotional variables in Alzheimer patients.

  7. Future pharmacological therapy in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Merrill H; Lavie, Carl J; Ventura, Hector O

    2018-04-26

    Hypertension (HTN) is a widespread and growing disease, with medication intolerance and side-effect present among many. To address these obstacles novel pharmacotherapy is an active area of drug development. This review seeks to explore future drug therapy for HTN in the preclinical and clinical arenas. The future of pharmacological therapy in HTN consists of revisiting old pathways to find new targets and exploring wholly new approaches to provide additional avenues of treatment. In this review, we discuss the current status of the most recent drug therapy in HTN. New developments in well trod areas include novel mineralocorticoid antagonists, aldosterone synthase inhibitors, aminopeptidase-A inhibitors, natriuretic peptide receptor agonists, or the counter-regulatory angiotensin converting enzyme 2/angiotensin (Ang) (1-7)/Mas receptor axis. Neprilysin inhibitors popularized for heart failure may also still hold HTN potential. Finally, we examine unique systems in development never before used in HTN such as Na/H exchange inhibitors, vasoactive intestinal peptide agonists, and dopamine beta hydroxylase inhibitors. A concise review of future directions of HTN pharmacotherapy.

  8. Interplay Between Oncoproteins and Antioxidant Enzymes in Esophageal Carcinoma Treated Without and With Chemoradiotherapy: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Tranum; Gupta, Rajesh; Vaiphei, Kim; Kapoor, Rakesh; Gupta, N.M.; Khanduja, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze p53, bcl-2, c-myc, and cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression changes and examine their relationship with various antioxidant enzymes in esophageal carcinoma patients. Methods and Materials: Patients in Group 1 underwent transhiatal esophagectomy and those in Group 2 were administered chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery after 4 weeks of neoadjuvant therapy. Results: The relationship analysis among the various protein markers and antioxidant enzymes showed an inverse correlation between bcl-2 and superoxide dismutase/catalase in tumor tissues, irrespective of the treatment arm followed. An important positive association was observed between bcl-2 and reduced glutathione levels in the tumor tissue of patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy. Another apoptosis-modulating marker, c-myc, in the tumor tissue of Group 2 patients showed similar pattern levels (high and low) as that of superoxide dismutase/catalase. The association of cyclooxygenase-2 and p53 with various antioxidant enzymes showed a significant positive correlation between cyclooxygenase-2 expression and catalase activity and an inverse trend between p53 expression and superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in the tumor tissue of patients given neoadjuvant therapy. In addition, patients with overexpressed p53 protein levels had lower glutathione peroxidase enzyme levels and vice versa in the tumor tissue of patients who had undergone surgery as their main mode of treatment. Conclusion: The results of this study broaden the insight into the relationships shared among oncoproteins and the antioxidant defense system, and this could be helpful in the clinical management of esophageal carcinoma

  9. Immobilization of enzymes using non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs): Surface and enzyme effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Keeran; Xi, Jingshu; Stuckey, David C

    2015-12-01

    The use of non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs) as a support for enzyme immobilisation was investigated. Formulation required the mixing of an aqueous-surfactant solution with a relatively non-polar solvent-surfactant solution, forming a solvent droplet surrounded by a thin stabilised aqueous film (soapy shell). Studies utilising anionic surfactants have showed increased retention, however, very little have been understood about the forces governing immobilisation. This study seeks to determine the effects of enzyme properties on CLA immobilisation by examining a non-ionic/non-polar solvent system comprised of two non-ionic surfactants, Tween 20 and 80, mineral oil and the enzymes lipase, aprotinin and α-chymotrypsin. From these results it was deduced that hydrophobic interactions strongly governed immobilisation. Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CSLM) revealed that immobilisation was predominantly achieved by surface adsorption attributed to hydrophobic interactions between the enzyme and the CLA surface. Enzyme surface affinity was found to increase when added directly to the formulation (pre-manufacture addition), as opposed to the bulk continuous phase (post-manufacture addition), with α-chymotrypsin and aprotinin being the most perturbed, while lipase was relatively unaffected. The effect of zeta potential on immobilisation showed that enzymes adsorbed better closer to their pI, indicating that charge minimisation was necessary for immobilisation. Finally, the effect of increasing enzyme concentration in the aqueous phase resulted in an increase in adsorption for all enzymes due to cooperativity between protein molecules, with saturation occurring faster at higher adsorption rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Glyco-engineering strategies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-08-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherent diseases characterized by massive accumulation of undigested compounds in lysosomes, which is caused by genetic defects resulting in the deficiency of a lysosomal hydrolase. Currently, enzyme replacement therapy has been successfully used for treatment of 7 LSDs with 10 approved therapeutic enzymes whereas new approaches such as pharmacological chaperones and gene therapy still await evaluation in clinical trials. While therapeutic enzymes for Gaucher disease have N-glycans with terminal mannose residues for targeting to macrophages, the others require N-glycans containing mannose-6-phosphates that are recognized by mannose-6-phosphate receptors on the plasma membrane for cellular uptake and targeting to lysosomes. Due to the fact that efficient lysosomal delivery of therapeutic enzymes is essential for the clearance of accumulated compounds, the suitable glycan structure and its high content are key factors for efficient therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, glycan remodeling strategies to improve lysosomal targeting and tissue distribution have been highlighted. This review describes the glycan structures that are important for lysosomal targeting and provides information on recent glyco-engineering technologies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy.

  11. Enzyme Immobilization: An Overview on Methods, Support Material, and Applications of Immobilized Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisha, V L; Jain, Ankita; Jain, Amita

    Immobilized enzymes can be used in a wide range of processes. In recent years, a variety of new approaches have emerged for the immobilization of enzymes that have greater efficiency and wider usage. During the course of the last two decades, this area has rapidly expanded into a multidisciplinary field. This current study is a comprehensive review of a variety of literature produced on the different enzymes that have been immobilized on various supporting materials. These immobilized enzymes have a wide range of applications. These include applications in the sugar, fish, and wine industries, where they are used for removing organic compounds from waste water. This study also reviews their use in sophisticated biosensors for metabolite control and in situ measurements of environmental pollutants. Immobilized enzymes also find significant application in drug metabolism, biodiesel and antibiotic production, bioremediation, and the food industry. The widespread usage of immobilized enzymes is largely due to the fact that they are cheaper, environment friendly, and much easier to use when compared to equivalent technologies. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Coccolithophores: Functional Biodiversity, Enzymes and Bioprospecting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Allen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Emiliania huxleyi is a single celled, marine phytoplankton with global distribution. As a key species for global biogeochemical cycling, a variety of strains have been amassed in various culture collections. Using a library consisting of 52 strains of E. huxleyi and an ‘in house‘ enzyme screening program, we have assessed the functional biodiversity within this species of fundamental importance to global biogeochemical cycling, whilst at the same time determining their potential for exploitation in biocatalytic applications. Here, we describe the screening of E. huxleyi strains, as well as a coccolithovirus infected strain, for commercially relevant biocatalytic enzymes such as acid/alkali phosphodiesterase, acid/alkali phosphomonoesterase, EC1.1.1-type dehydrogenase, EC1.3.1-type dehydrogenase and carboxylesterase.

  13. Enzymic saccharification of some pretreated agricultural wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gammal, S.M.A.; Sadek, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Cellulosie wastes, artichoke leaves and stalks, sugar-cane bagasse and fennel seeds after extraction of essential oils were treated with various concentrations of peracetic acid at 100/sup 0/C, 60/sup 0/C and room temperature several times, washed with water and ethanol and air dried. The degree of enzymatic solubilization of each treated cellulosic waste was measured with Aspergillus niger cellulase (Endo-1,4-B-Glucanase; 1,4-(1,3; 1,4)-..beta..-D-glucan 4-glucanohydrolase; EC 3. 2.1.4). Artichoke waste and sugar-cane bagasse were solubilized more efectively by the enzymethan fennel waste. Data are presented describing the effect of time, enzyme and substrate concentration on the rate of enzymic hydrolysis. Infrared spectra of the treated and untreated cellulosic materials were recorded.

  14. Hydrolytic enzyme activity enhanced by Barium supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Muñoz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis of polymers is a first and often limiting step during the degradation of plant residues. Plant biomass is generally a major component of waste residues and a major renewable resource to obtain a variety of secondary products including biofuels. Improving the performance of enzymatic hydrolysis of plant material with minimum costs and limiting the use of additional microbial biomass or hydrolytic enzymes directly influences competitiveness of these green biotechnological processes. In this study, we cloned and expressed a cellulase and two esterases recovered from environmental thermophilic soil bacterial communities and characterize their optimum activity conditions including the effect of several metal ions. Results showed that supplementing these hydrolytic reactions with Barium increases the activity of these extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. This observation represents a simple but major improvement to enhance the efficiency and competitiveness of this process within an increasingly important biotechnological sector.

  15. (Hyper)thermophilic enzymes: production and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcicchio, Pierpaolo; Levisson, Mark; Kengen, Servé W M; Koutsopoulos, Sotirios

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms, thriving at environmental temperatures near or above 100 °C, has revolutionized our ideas about the upper temperature limit at which life can exist. The characterization of (hyper)thermostable proteins has broadened our understanding and presented new opportunities for solving one of the most challenging problems in biophysics: how is structural stability and biological function maintained at high temperatures where "normal" proteins undergo dramatic structural changes? In our laboratory we have purified and studied many thermostable and hyperthermostable proteins in an attempt to determine the molecular basis of heat stability. Here, we present methods to express such proteins and enzymes in E. coli and provide a general protocol for overproduction and purification. The ability to produce enzymes that retain their stability and activity at elevated temperatures creates exciting opportunities for a wide range of biocatalytic applications.

  16. A thermodynamic and theoretical view for enzyme regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinyi

    2015-01-01

    Precise regulation is fundamental to the proper functioning of enzymes in a cell. Current opinions about this, such as allosteric regulation and dynamic contribution to enzyme regulation, are experimental models and substantially empirical. Here we proposed a theoretical and thermodynamic model of enzyme regulation. The main idea is that enzyme regulation is processed via the regulation of abundance of active conformation in the reaction buffer. The theoretical foundation, experimental evidence, and experimental criteria to test our model are discussed and reviewed. We conclude that basic principles of enzyme regulation are laws of protein thermodynamics and it can be analyzed using the concept of distribution curve of active conformations of enzymes.

  17. The biotechnological potential of fibrinolytic enzymes in the dissolution of endogenous blood thrombi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Essam

    2014-01-01

    Formation of endogenous thrombi in blood vessels is one of the leading causes of death in our modern life. According to data provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2000, heart diseases are responsible for 29% of the total mortality rate in the world. For this, a tremendous amount of research has been done in the area of prevention and treatment of these diseases. The classical therapy of these thrombi relies upon the use of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, or even surgeries. Relatively recently, the fibrinolytic enzymes produced by microorganisms, snakes, earthworms, insects, plants, and other organisms are being successfully used in the treatment of blood clots, especially with regard to the direct dissolving action on fibrin in tandem with less cost and side effects in comparison with the first-generation thrombolytic agents, streptokinase and urokinase. Furthermore, recombinant DNA technology has succeeded in improving and decreasing the undesirable effects of the first generation of enzymes. Recombinant PAs or rt-PAs like alteplase, retelase, saruplase, tenecteplase, lanoteplase, and desmoteplase became available in the drug markets with advantages of less binding loci with PAI-1 to avoid degradation while providing faster and more complete reperfusion in a greater number of patients with less risk of bleeding and intracranial hemorrhage. This review is the first to cover all the natural and recombinant thrombolytic agents used in enzyme therapy. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  18. Mercaptopurine/Methotrexate Maintenance Therapy of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Nielsen, Stine N; Frandsen, Thomas L

    2014-01-01

    implementation of pharmacogenomics into treatment, the sole exception being dramatic 6MP dose reductions in patients who are homozygous deficient for thiopurine methyltransferase, the enzyme that methylates 6MP and several of its metabolites. In conclusion, maintenance therapy is as important as the more...

  19. Ethanol from wood. Cellulase enzyme production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szengyel, Zsolt

    2000-03-01

    Conversion of biomass to liquid fuels, such as ethanol, has been investigated during the past decades. First due to the oil crisis of the 1970s and lately because of concerns about greenhouse effect, ethanol has been found to be a suitable substitute for gasoline in transportation. Although ethanol is produced in large quantities from corn starch, the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol is rather problematic. However, cellulosic raw materials are important as they are available in large quantities from agriculture and forestry. One of the most extensively investigated processes is the enzymatic process, in which fungal cellulolytic enzymes are used to convert the cellulose content of the biomass to glucose, which is then fermented to ethanol. In order to make the raw material accessible to biological attack, it has to be pretreated first. The most successful method, which has been evaluated for various lignocellulosic materials, is the steam pretreatment. In this thesis the utilization of steam pretreated willow (hardwood) and spruce (softwood) was examined for enzyme production using a filamentous fungus T. reesei RUT C30. Various carbon sources originating from the steam pretreated materials have been investigated. The replacement of the solid carbon source with a liquid carbon source, as well as the effect of pH, was studied. The effect of toxic compounds generated during pretreatment was also examined. Comparative study of softwood and hardwood showed that steam pretreated hardwood is a better carbon source than softwood. The hydrolytic potential of enzyme solutions produced on wood derived carbon sources was better compared to commercial cellulases. Also enzyme solutions produced on steam pretreated spruce showed less sensitivity towards toxic compounds formed during steam pretreatment.

  20. Substrates and method for determining enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.E.; Bissell, E.R.

    1981-10-13

    A method is disclosed for determining the presence of an enzyme in a biological fluid, which includes the steps of contacting the fluid with a synthetic chromogenic substrate, which is an amino acid derivative of 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin; incubating the substrate-containing fluid to effect enzymatic hydrolysis; and fluorometrically determining the presence of the free 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin chromophore in the hydrolyzate. No Drawings