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Sample records for enzyme kinetic studies

  1. Stochastic theory of interfacial enzyme kinetics: A kinetic Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Stochastic theory of interfacial enzyme kinetics is formulated. Numerical results of macroscopic phenomenon of lag-burst kinetics is obtained by using a kinetic Monte Carlo approach to single enzyme activity. Highlights: ► An enzyme is attached with the fluid state phospholipid molecules on the Langmuir monolayer. ► Through the diffusion, the enzyme molecule reaches the gel–fluid interface. ► After hydrolysing a phospholipid molecule it predominantly leaves the surface in the lag phase. ► The enzyme is strictly attached to the surface with scooting mode of motion and the burst phase appears. - Abstract: In the spirit of Gillespie’s stochastic approach we have formulated a theory to explore the advancement of the interfacial enzyme kinetics at the single enzyme level which is ultimately utilized to obtain the ensemble average macroscopic feature, lag-burst kinetics. We have provided a theory of the transition from the lag phase to the burst phase kinetics by considering the gradual development of electrostatic interaction among the positively charged enzyme and negatively charged product molecules deposited on the phospholipid surface. It is shown that the different diffusion time scales of the enzyme over the fluid and product regions are responsible for the memory effect in the correlation of successive turnover events of the hopping mode in the single trajectory analysis which again is reflected on the non-Gaussian distribution of turnover times on the macroscopic kinetics in the lag phase unlike the burst phase kinetics.

  2. Flow-Based Systems for Rapid and High-Precision Enzyme Kinetics Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supaporn Kradtap Hartwell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme kinetics studies normally focus on the initial rate of enzymatic reaction. However, the manual operation of steps of the conventional enzyme kinetics method has some drawbacks. Errors can result from the imprecise time control and time necessary for manual changing the reaction cuvettes into and out of the detector. By using the automatic flow-based analytical systems, enzyme kinetics studies can be carried out at real-time initial rate avoiding the potential errors inherent in manual operation. Flow-based systems have been developed to provide rapid, low-volume, and high-precision analyses that effectively replace the many tedious and high volume requirements of conventional wet chemistry analyses. This article presents various arrangements of flow-based techniques and their potential use in future enzyme kinetics applications.

  3. The renneting of milk : a kinetic study of the enzymic and aggregation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooydonk, van A.C.M.

    1987-01-01

    The rennet-induced clotting of milk was studied under various conditions. The kinetics of the enzymic and aggregation reactions was analysed separately and, where possible, related to the physico-chemical properties of the casein micelle and its environment.

    The effects of important

  4. Practical steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are key components of most biological processes. Characterization of enzymes is therefore frequently required during the study of biological systems. Steady-state kinetics provides a simple and rapid means of assessing the substrate specificity of an enzyme. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis (see Site-Directed Mutagenesis), it can be used to probe the roles of particular amino acids in the enzyme in substrate recognition and catalysis. Effects of interaction partners and posttranslational modifications can also be assessed using steady-state kinetics. This overview explains the general principles of steady-state enzyme kinetics experiments in a practical, rather than theoretical, way. Any biochemistry textbook will have a section on the theory of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, including derivations of the relevant equations. No specific enzymatic assay is described here, although a method for monitoring product formation or substrate consumption over time (an assay) is required to perform the experiments described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Proteomic analyses for profiling regulated proteins/enzymes by Fucus vesiculosus fucoidan in B16 melanoma cells: A combination of enzyme kinetics functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Jiang; Zheng, Li; Yang, Jun-Mo; Kang, Yani; Park, Yong-Doo

    2018-06-01

    Fucoidans are complex sulfated polysaccharides that have a wide range of biological activities. Previously, we reported the various effects of Fucus vesiculosus fucoidan on tyrosinase and B16 melanoma cells. In this study, to identify fucoidan-targeted proteins in B16 melanoma cells, we performed a proteomics study and integrated enzyme kinetics. We detected 19 candidate proteins dysregulated by fucoidan treatment. Among the probed proteins, the enzyme kinetics of two candidate enzymes, namely lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as an upregulated protein and superoxide dismutase (SOD) as a downregulated enzyme, were determined. The enzyme kinetics results showed that Fucus vesiculosus fucoidan significantly inhibited LDH catalytic function while it did not affect SOD activity even at a high dose, while only slightly decreased activity (up to 10%) at a low dose. Based on our previous and present observations, fucoidan could inhibit B16 melanoma cells growth via regulating proteins/enzymes expression levels such as LDH and SOD known as cell survival biomarkers. Interestingly, both expression level and enzyme catalytic activity of LDH were regulated by fucoidan, which could directly induce the apoptotic effect on B16 melanoma cells along with SOD downregulation. This study highlights how combining proteomics with enzyme kinetics can yield valuable insights into fucoidan targets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Interactions of nitrite with catalase: Enzyme activity and reaction kinetics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2017-06-01

    Catalase, a heme enzyme, which catalyzes decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, is one of the main enzymes of the antioxidant defense system of the cell. Nitrite, used as a food preservative has long been regarded as a harmful compound due to its ability to form carcinogenic nitrosamines. Recently, much evidence has been presented that nitrite plays a protective role as a nitric oxide donor under hypoxic conditions. In this work the effect of nitrite on the catalytic reactions of catalase was studied. Catalase was inhibited by nitrite, and this process was pH-dependent. IC 50 values varied from about 1μM at pH5.0 to about 150μM of nitrite at pH7.4. The presence of chloride significantly enhanced nitrite-induced catalase inhibition, in agreement with earlier observations. The kinetics of the reactions of nitrite with ferric catalase, its redox intermediate, Compound I, and catalase inactive form, Compound II, was also studied. Possible mechanisms of nitrite-induced catalase inhibition are analyzed and the biological consequences of the reactions of catalase with nitrite are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition and kinetic studies of lignin degrading enzymes of Ganoderma boninense by naturally occurring phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Arthy; Siddiqui, Yasmeen; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Ali, Nusaibah Syd; Manickam, Sivakumar

    2018-05-22

    Lignolytic (Lignin degrading) enzyme, from oil palm pathogen Ganoderma boninense Pat. (Syn G. orbiforme (Ryvarden), is involved in the detoxification and the degradation of lignin in the oil palm and is the rate-limiting step in the infection process of this fungus. Active inhibition of lignin degrading enzymes secreted by G. boninense by various naturally occurring phenolic compounds and estimation of efficiency on pathogen suppression was aimed at. In our work, ten naturally occurring phenolic compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory potential towards the lignolytic enzymes of G.boninense. Additionally, the lignin degrading enzymes were characterised. Most of the peholic compounds exhibited an uncompetitive inhibition towards the lignin degrading enzymes. Benzoic acid was the superior inhibitor to the production of lignin degrading enzymes, when compared between the ten phenolic compounds. The inhibitory potential of the phenolic compounds toward the lignin degrading enzymes are higher than that of the conventional metal ion inhibitor. The lignin degrading enzymes were stable in a wide range of pH but were sensitive to higher to temperature. The study demonstrated the inhibitor potential of ten naturally occurring phenolic compounds toward the lignin degrading enzymes of G. boninense with different efficacies. The study has shed a light towards a new management strategy to control BSR in oil palm. It serves as replacement for the existing chemical control. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition and kinetic studies of cellulose- and hemicellulose-degrading enzymes of Ganoderma boninense by naturally occurring phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, A; Siddiqui, Y; Ali, N S; Manickam, S

    2018-06-01

    Ganoderma sp, the causal pathogen of the basal stem rot (BSR) disease of oil palm, secretes extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. These play an important role in the pathogenesis of BSR by nourishing the pathogen through the digestion of cellulose and hemicellulose of the host tissue. Active suppression of hydrolytic enzymes secreted by Ganoderma boninense by various naturally occurring phenolic compounds and estimation of their efficacy on pathogen suppression is focused in this study. Ten naturally occurring phenolic compounds were assessed for their inhibitory effect on the hydrolytic enzymes of G. boninense. The enzyme kinetics (V max and K m ) and the stability of the hydrolytic enzymes were also characterized. The selected compounds had shown inhibitory effect at various concentrations. Two types of inhibitions namely uncompetitive and noncompetitive were observed in the presence of phenolic compounds. Among all the phenolic compounds tested, benzoic acid was the most effective compound suppressive to the growth and production of hydrolytic enzymes secreted by G. boninense. The phenolic compounds as inhibitory agents can be a better replacement for the metal ions which are known as conventional inhibitors till date. The three hydrolytic enzymes were stable in a wide range of pH and temperature. These findings highlight the efficacy of the applications of phenolic compounds to control Ganoderma. The study has proved a replacement for chemical controls of G. boninense with naturally occurring phenolic compounds. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Computer controlled automated assay for comprehensive studies of enzyme kinetic parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Bonowski

    Full Text Available Stability and biological activity of proteins is highly dependent on their physicochemical environment. The development of realistic models of biological systems necessitates quantitative information on the response to changes of external conditions like pH, salinity and concentrations of substrates and allosteric modulators. Changes in just a few variable parameters rapidly lead to large numbers of experimental conditions, which go beyond the experimental capacity of most research groups. We implemented a computer-aided experimenting framework ("robot lab assistant" that allows us to parameterize abstract, human-readable descriptions of micro-plate based experiments with variable parameters and execute them on a conventional 8 channel liquid handling robot fitted with a sensitive plate reader. A set of newly developed R-packages translates the instructions into machine commands, executes them, collects the data and processes it without user-interaction. By combining script-driven experimental planning, execution and data-analysis, our system can react to experimental outcomes autonomously, allowing outcome-based iterative experimental strategies. The framework was applied in a response-surface model based iterative optimization of buffer conditions and investigation of substrate, allosteric effector, pH and salt dependent activity profiles of pyruvate kinase (PYK. A diprotic model of enzyme kinetics was used to model the combined effects of changing pH and substrate concentrations. The 8 parameters of the model could be estimated from a single two-hour experiment using nonlinear least-squares regression. The model with the estimated parameters successfully predicted pH and PEP dependence of initial reaction rates, while the PEP concentration dependent shift of optimal pH could only be reproduced with a set of manually tweaked parameters. Differences between model-predictions and experimental observations at low pH suggest additional protonation

  10. A Comprehensive Enzyme Kinetic Exercise for Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Janice S.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a comprehensive treatment of experimental enzyme kinetics strongly coupled to electronic data acquisition and use of spreadsheets to organize data and perform linear and nonlinear least-squares analyses, all in a manner that promotes development of important reasoning skills. Kinetic parameters are obtained for the stable…

  11. Brownian dynamic study of an enzyme metabolon in the TCA cycle: Substrate kinetics and channeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ming M; Huber, Gary A; Wang, Nuo; Minteer, Shelley D; McCammon, J Andrew

    2018-02-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and citrate synthase (CS) are two pacemaking enzymes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Oxaloacetate (OAA) molecules are the intermediate substrates that are transferred from the MDH to CS to carry out sequential catalysis. It is known that, to achieve a high flux of intermediate transport and reduce the probability of substrate leaking, a MDH-CS metabolon forms to enhance the OAA substrate channeling. In this study, we aim to understand the OAA channeling within possible MDH-CS metabolons that have different structural orientations in their complexes. Three MDH-CS metabolons from native bovine, wild-type porcine, and recombinant sources, published in recent work, were selected to calculate OAA transfer efficiency by Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations and to study, through electrostatic potential calculations, a possible role of charges that drive the substrate channeling. Our results show that an electrostatic channel is formed in the metabolons of native bovine and recombinant porcine enzymes, which guides the oppositely charged OAA molecules passing through the channel and enhances the transfer efficiency. However, the channeling probability in a suggested wild-type porcine metabolon conformation is reduced due to an extended diffusion length between the MDH and CS active sites, implying that the corresponding arrangements of MDH and CS result in the decrease of electrostatic steering between substrates and protein surface and then reduce the substrate transfer efficiency from one active site to another. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  12. Internal Diffusion-Controlled Enzyme Reaction: The Acetylcholinesterase Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyun; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sangyoub

    2012-02-14

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme with a very high turnover rate; it quenches the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, at the synapse. We have investigated the kinetics of the enzyme reaction by calculating the diffusion rate of the substrate molecule along an active site channel inside the enzyme from atomic-level molecular dynamics simulations. In contrast to the previous works, we have found that the internal substrate diffusion is the determinant of the acetylcholinesterase kinetics in the low substrate concentration limit. Our estimate of the overall bimolecular reaction rate constant for the enzyme is in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the present calculation provides a reasonable explanation for the effects of the ionic strength of solution and the mutation of surface residues of the enzyme. The study suggests that internal diffusion of the substrate could be a key factor in understanding the kinetics of enzymes of similar characteristics.

  13. Polyol specificity of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana sorbitol dehydrogenase studied by enzyme kinetics and in silico modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Francisca eAguayo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyols are enzymatically-produced plant compounds which can act as compatible solutes during periods of abiotic stress. NAD+-dependent SORBITOL DEHYDROGENASE (SDH, E.C. 1.1.1.14 from Arabidopsis thaliana L. (AtSDH is capable of oxidizing several polyols including sorbitol, ribitol and xylitol. In the present study, enzymatic assays using recombinant AtSDH demonstrated a higher specificity constant for xylitol compared to sorbitol and ribitol, all of which are C2 (S and C4 (R polyols. Enzyme activity was reduced by preincubation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, indicating a requirement for zinc ions. In humans, it has been proposed that sorbitol becomes part of a pentahedric coordination sphere of the catalytic zinc during the reaction mechanism. In order to determine the validity of this pentahedric coordination model in a plant SDH, homology modeling and Molecular Dynamics simulations of AtSDH ternary complexes with the three polyols were performed using crystal structures of human and Bemisia argentifolii (Genn. (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae SDHs as scaffolds. The results indicate that the differences in interaction with structural water molecules correlate very well with the observed enzymatic parameters, validate the proposed pentahedric coordination of the catalytic zinc ion in a plant SDH, and provide an explanation for why AtSDH shows a preference for polyols with a chirality of C2 (S and C4 (R.

  14. A stochastic model of enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanini, Marianne; Newman, Timothy; McKane, Alan

    2003-10-01

    Enzyme kinetics is generally modeled by deterministic rate equations, and in the simplest case leads to the well-known Michaelis-Menten equation. It is plausible that stochastic effects will play an important role at low enzyme concentrations. We have addressed this by constructing a simple stochastic model which can be exactly solved in the steady-state. Throughout a wide range of parameter values Michaelis-Menten dynamics is replaced by a new and simple theoretical result.

  15. Acetazolamide Inhibits the Level of Tyrosinase and Melanin: An Enzyme Kinetic, In Vitro, In Vivo, and In Silico Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Qamar; Raza, Hussain; Hassan, Mubashir; Phull, Abdul Rehman; Kim, Song Ja; Seo, Sung-Yum

    2017-09-01

    Melanin is the major factor that determines skin color and protects from ultraviolet radiation. In present study we evaluated the anti-melanogenesis effect of acetazolamide (ACZ) using four different approaches: enzyme kinetic, in vitro, in vivo and in silico. ACZ demonstrated significant inhibitory activity (IC 50 7.895 ± 0.24 μm) against tyrosinase as compared to the standard drug kojic acid (IC 50 16.84 ± 0.64 μm) and kinetic analyses showed that ACZ is a non-competitive inhibitor without cytotoxic effect. In in vitro experiments, A375 human melanoma cells were treated with 20 or 40 μm of ACZ with or without 50 μm of l-DOPA. Western blot results showed that ACZ significantly (P melanin and it could be used as a lead for developing the drugs for hyperpigmentary disorders and skin whitening. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  16. Enzyme kinetic characterization of protein tyrosine phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Branner, S.; Møller, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play a central role in cellular signaling processes, resulting in an increased interest in modulating the activities of PTPs. We therefore decided to undertake a detailed enzyme kinetic evaluation of various transmembrane and cytosolic PTPs (PTPalpha, PTPbeta...

  17. An Inverse Michaelis–Menten Approach for Interfacial Enzyme Kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kari, Jeppe; Andersen, Morten; Borch, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Interfacial enzyme reactions are ubiquitous both in vivo and in technical applications, but analysis of their kinetics remains controversial. In particular, it is unclear whether conventional Michaelis–Menten theory, which requires a large excess of substrate, can be applied. Here, an extensive...... experimental study of the enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose indeed showed that the conventional approach had a limited applicability. Instead we argue that, unlike bulk reactions, interfacial enzyme catalysis may reach a steady-state condition in the opposite experimental limit, where...... for kinetic analyses of interfacial enzyme reactions and that its analogy to established theory provides a bridge to the accumulated understanding of steady-state enzyme kinetics. Finally, we show that the ratio of parameters from conventional and inverted Michaelis–Menten analysis reveals the density...

  18. Problems Students Experience with Inquiry Processes in the Study of Enzyme Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrés Gurt, Concepció; Marbà Tallada, Anna

    2018-01-01

    This case study describes a classroom-based questionnaire that was carried out with a group of 36 high school students (17-18 years old) in Catalonia. The aim was to examine the usefulness of questionnaires focused on scientific inquiry, both to evaluate students' inquiry abilities and for their potential as tools to improve the understanding of…

  19. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Findlay, Stuart G.; Follstad Shah, Jennifer J.; Hill, Brian H.; Kuehn, Kevin A.; Kuske, Cheryl; Litvak, Marcy E.; Martinez, Noelle G.; Moorhead, Daryl L.; Warnock, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimilation of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus by diverse aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities (1160 cases). Regression analyses were conducted by habitat (aquatic and terrestrial), enzyme class (hydrolases and oxidoreductases) and assay methodology (low affinity and high affinity substrates) to relate potential reaction rates to substrate availability. Across enzyme classes and habitats, the scaling relationships between apparent Vmax and apparent Km followed similar power laws with exponents of 0.44 to 0.67. These exponents, called elasticities, were not statistically distinct from a central value of 0.50, which occurs when the Km of an enzyme equals substrate concentration, a condition optimal for maintenance of steady state. We also conducted an ecosystem scale analysis of ten extracellular hydrolase activities in relation to soil and sediment organic carbon (2,000–5,000 cases/enzyme) that yielded elasticities near 1.0 (0.9 ± 0.2, n = 36). At the metabolomic scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions is the proportionality constant that connects the C:N:P stoichiometries of organic matter and ecoenzymatic activities. At the ecosystem scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions shows that organic matter ultimately limits effective enzyme binding sites. Our findings suggest that one mechanism by which microbial communities maintain homeostasis is regulating extracellular enzyme expression to optimize the short-term responsiveness of substrate acquisition. The analyses also show that, like elemental stoichiometry, the fundamental attributes of enzymatic reactions can be extrapolated from biochemical to community and ecosystem scales.

  20. Kinetics of enzyme action: essential principles for drug hunters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stein, Ross L

    2011-01-01

    ... field. Beginning with the most basic principles pertaining to simple, one-substrate enzyme reactions and their inhibitors, and progressing to a thorough treatment of two-substrate enzymes, Kinetics of Enzyme Action...

  1. Development of ultrasonically levitated drops as microreactors for study of enzyme kinetics and potential as a universal portable analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeline, A.; Pierre, Z.; Field, C. R.; Ginsberg, M. D.

    2009-05-01

    Development of microfluidics has focused on carrying out chemical synthesis and analysis in ever-smaller volumes of solution. In most cases, flow systems are made of either quartz, glass, or an easily moldable polymer such as polydimethylsiloxane (Whitesides 2006). As the system shrinks, the ratio of surface area to volume increases. For studies of either free radical chemistry or protein chemistry, this is undesirable. Proteins stick to surfaces, biofilms grow on surfaces, and radicals annihilate on walls (Lewis et al. 2006). Thus, under those circumstances where small amounts of reactants must be employed, typical microfluidic systems are incompatible with the chemistry one wishes to study. We have developed an alternative approach. We use ultrasonically levitated microliter drops as well mixed microreactors. Depending on whether capillaries (to form the drop) and electrochemical sensors are in contact with the drop or whether there are no contacting solids, the ratio of solid surface area to volume is low or zero. The only interface seen by reactants is a liquid/air interface (or, more generally, liquid/gas, as any gas may be used to support the drop). While drop levitation has been reported since at least the 1940's, we are the second group to carry out enzyme reactions in levitated drops, (Weis; Nardozzi 2005) and have fabricated the lowest power levitator in the literature (Field; Scheeline 2007). The low consumption aspects of ordinary microfluidics combine with a contact-free determination cell (the levitated drop) that ensures against cross-contamination, minimizes the likelihood of biofilm formation, and is robust to changes in temperature and humidity (Lide 1992). We report kinetics measurements in levitated drops and explain how outgrowths of these accomplishments will lead to portable chemistry/biology laboratories well suited to detection of a wide range of chemical and biological agents in the asymmetric battlefield environment.

  2. The influence of carbon nanotubes on enzyme activity and structure: investigation of different immobilization procedures through enzyme kinetics and circular dichroism studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cang-Rong, Jason Teng; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2009-01-01

    In the last decade, many environmental organizations have devoted their efforts to identifying renewable biosystems, which could provide sustainable fuels and thus enhance energy security. Amidst the myriad of possibilities, some biofuels make use of different types of waste biomasses, and enzymes are often employed to hydrolyze these biomasses and produce sugars that will be subsequently converted into ethanol. In this project, we aimed to bridge nanotechnology and biofuel production: here we report on the activity and structure of the enzyme amyloglucosidase (AMG), physically adsorbed or covalently immobilized onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). In fact, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present several properties that render them ideal support systems, without the diffusion limitations displayed by porous material and with the advantage of being further functionalizable at their surface. Chemical ligation was achieved both on oxidized nanotubes (via carbodiimide chemistry), as well as on amino-functionalized nanotubes (via periodate-oxidized AMG). Results showed that AMG retained a certain percentage of its specific activity for all enzyme-carbon nanotubes complexes prepared, with the physically adsorbed samples displaying better catalytic efficiency than the covalently immobilized samples. Analysis of the enzyme's structure through circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy revealed significant structural changes in all samples, the degree of change being consistent with the activity profiles. This study proves that AMG interacts differently with carbon nanotubes depending on the method employed. Due to the higher activity reported by the enzyme physically adsorbed onto CNTs, these samples demonstrated a vast potential for further development. At the same time, the possibility of inducing magnetic properties into CNTs offers the opportunity to easily separate them from the original solution. Hence, substances to which they

  3. The mechanism distinguishability problem in biochemical kinetics: the single-enzyme, single-substrate reaction as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Santiago; Chappell, Michael J; Evans, Neil D; Roussel, Marc R

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the distinguishability problem of two rival models of the single enzyme-single substrate reaction, the Michaelis-Menten and Henri mechanisms, is presented. We also outline a general approach for analysing the structural indistinguishability between two mechanisms. The approach involves constructing, if possible, a smooth mapping between the two candidate models. Evans et al. [N.D. Evans, M.J. Chappell, M.J. Chapman, K.R. Godfrey, Structural indistinguishability between uncontrolled (autonomous) nonlinear analytic systems, Automatica 40 (2004) 1947-1953] have shown that if, in addition, either of the mechanisms satisfies a particular criterion then such a transformation always exists when the models are indistinguishable from their experimentally observable outputs. The approach is applied to the single enzyme-single substrate reaction mechanism. In principle, mechanisms can be distinguished using this analysis, but we show that our ability to distinguish mechanistic models depends both on the precise measurements made, and on our knowledge of the system prior to performing the kinetics experiments.

  4. Adsorption of Trametes versicolor laccase to soil iron and aluminum minerals: enzyme activity, kinetics and stability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Jiang, Ying; Jiao, Jiaguo; Liu, Manqiang; Hu, Feng; Griffiths, Bryan S; Li, Huixin

    2014-02-01

    Laccases play an important role in the degradation of soil phenol or phenol-like substance and can be potentially used in soil remediation through immobilization. Iron and aluminum minerals can adsorb extracellular enzymes in soil environment. In the present study, we investigated the adsorptive interaction of laccase, from the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor, with soil iron and aluminum minerals and characterized the properties of the enzyme after adsorption to minerals. Results showed that both soil iron and aluminum minerals adsorbed great amount of laccase, independent of the mineral specific surface areas. Adsorbed laccases retained 26-64% of the activity of the free enzyme. Compared to the free laccase, all adsorbed laccases showed higher Km values and lower Vmax values, indicating a reduced enzyme-substrate affinity and a lower rate of substrate conversion in reactions catalyzed by the adsorbed laccase. Adsorbed laccases exhibited increased catalytic activities compared to the free laccase at low pH, implying the suitable application of iron and aluminum mineral-adsorbed T. versicolor laccase in soil bioremediation, especially in acid soils. In terms of the thermal profiles, adsorbed laccases showed decreased thermal stability and higher temperature sensitivity relative to the free laccase. Moreover, adsorption improved the resistance of laccase to proteolysis and extended the lifespan of laccase. Our results implied that adsorbed T. versicolor laccase on soil iron and aluminum minerals had promising potential in soil remediation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermodynamic Activity-Based Progress Curve Analysis in Enzyme Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiss, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    Macrokinetic Michaelis-Menten models based on thermodynamic activity provide insights into enzyme kinetics because they separate substrate-enzyme from substrate-solvent interactions. Kinetic parameters are estimated from experimental progress curves of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Three pitfalls are discussed: deviations between thermodynamic and concentration-based models, product effects on the substrate activity coefficient, and product inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Measurement of Enzyme Kinetics by Use of a Blood Glucometer: Hydrolysis of Sucrose and Lactose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzerling, Peter; Schrader, Frank; Schanze, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    An alternative analytical method for measuring the kinetic parameters of the enzymes invertase and lactase is described. Invertase hydrolyzes sucrose to glucose and fructose and lactase hydrolyzes lactose to glucose and galactose. In most enzyme kinetics studies, photometric methods or test strips are used to quantify the derivates of the…

  7. Enzyme kinetics of hevamine, a chitinase from the rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokma, Evert; Barends, Thomas; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Beintema, Jaap J.

    2000-01-01

    The enzyme kinetics of hevamine, a chitinase from the rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis, were studied in detail with a new enzyme assay. In this assay, the enzyme reaction products were derivatized by reductive coupling to a chromophore, Products mere separated by HPLC and the amount of product was

  8. Current IUBMB recommendations on enzyme nomenclature and kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athel Cornish-Bowden

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The International Union of Biochemistry (IUB, now IUBMB prepared recommendations for describing the kinetic behaviour of enzymes in 1981. Despite the more than 30 years that have passed since these have not subsequently been revised, though in various respects they do not adequately cover current needs. The IUBMB is also responsible for recommendations on the naming and classification of enzymes. In contrast to the case of kinetics, these recommendations are kept continuously up to date.

  9. Reexamining Michaelis-Menten Enzyme Kinetics for Xanthine Oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassingthwaighte, James B.; Chinn, Tamara M.

    2013-01-01

    Abbreviated expressions for enzyme kinetic expressions, such as the Michaelis-Menten (M-M) equations, are based on the premise that enzyme concentrations are low compared with those of the substrate and product. When one does progress experiments, where the solute is consumed during conversion to form a series of products, the idealized conditions…

  10. A century of enzyme kinetic analysis, 1913 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth A

    2013-09-02

    This review traces the history and logical progression of methods for quantitative analysis of enzyme kinetics from the 1913 Michaelis and Menten paper to the application of modern computational methods today. Following a brief review of methods for fitting steady state kinetic data, modern methods are highlighted for fitting full progress curve kinetics based upon numerical integration of rate equations, including a re-analysis of the original Michaelis-Menten full time course kinetic data. Finally, several illustrations of modern transient state kinetic methods of analysis are shown which enable the elucidation of reactions occurring at the active sites of enzymes in order to relate structure and function. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis, enzyme inhibitory kinetics mechanism and computational study of N-(4-methoxyphenethyl-N-(substituted-4-methylbenzenesulfonamides as novel therapeutic agents for Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Athar Abbasi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study comprises the synthesis of a new series of sulfonamides derived from 4-methoxyphenethylamine (1. The synthesis was initiated by the reaction of 1 with 4-methylbenzenesulfonyl chloride (2 in aqueous sodium carbonate solution at pH 9 to yield N-(4-methoxyphenethyl-4-methylbenzensulfonamide (3.This parent molecule 3 was subsequently treated with various alkyl/aralkyl halides, (4a–j, using N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF as solvent and LiH as activator to produce a series of new N-(4-methoxyphenethyl-N-(substituted-4-methylbenzenesulfonamides (5a–j. The structural characterization of these derivatives was carried out by spectroscopic techniques like IR, 1H-NMR, and 13C-NMR. The elemental analysis data was also coherent with spectral data of these molecules. The inhibitory effects on acetylcholinesterase and DPPH were evaluated and it was observed that N-(4-Methoxyphenethyl-4-methyl-N-(2-propylbenzensulfonamide (5c showed acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity 0.075 ± 0.001 (IC50 0.075 ± 0.001 µM comparable to Neostigmine methylsulfate (IC50 2.038 ± 0.039 µM.The docking studies of synthesized ligands 5a–j were also carried out against acetylcholinesterase (PDBID 4PQE to compare the binding affinities with IC50 values. The kinetic mechanism analyzed by Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that compound (5c inhibits the acetylcholinesterase competitively to form an enzyme inhibitor complex. The inhibition constants Ki calculated from Dixon plots for compound (5c is 2.5 µM. It was also found from kinetic analysis that derivative 5c irreversible enzyme inhibitor complex. It is proposed on the basis of our investigation that title compound 5c may serve as lead structure for the design of more potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.

  12. Enzyme Kinetics? Elementary, my dear 3 -8 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    research interests are in the areas of protein- ... rate constant for the formation of products, k3 is significantly of some enzymes. ... tissue at different stages of development. .... represent the only values of Km and V max that satisfy all of the sets.

  13. Transition state theory for enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an essay that discusses the concepts underlying the application of modern transition state theory to reactions in enzymes. Issues covered include the potential of mean force, the quantization of vibrations, the free energy of activation, and transmission coefficients to account for nonequilibrium effect, recrossing, and tunneling. PMID:26008760

  14. Bioethanol from lignocellulose - pretreatment, enzyme immobilization and hydrolysis kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsai, Chien Tai

    , the cost of enzyme is still the bottle neck, re-using the enzyme is apossible way to reduce the input of enzyme in the process. In the point view of engineering, the prediction of enzymatic hydrolysis kinetics under different substrate loading, enzyme combination is usful for process design. Therefore...... lignocellulose is the required high cellulase enzyme dosages that increase the processing costs. One method to decrease the enzyme dosage is to re-use BG, which hydrolyze the soluble substrate cellobiose. Based on the hypothesis that immobilized BG can be re-used, how many times the enzyme could be recycled...... liquid and pretreatment time can be reduced, the influence of substrate concentration, pretreatment time and temperature were investigated and optimized. Pretreatment of barley straw by [EMIM]Ac, correlative models were constructed using 3 different pretreatment parameters (temperature, time...

  15. Kinetic memory based on the enzyme-limited competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tetsuhiro S; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-08-01

    Cellular memory, which allows cells to retain information from their environment, is important for a variety of cellular functions, such as adaptation to external stimuli, cell differentiation, and synaptic plasticity. Although posttranslational modifications have received much attention as a source of cellular memory, the mechanisms directing such alterations have not been fully uncovered. It may be possible to embed memory in multiple stable states in dynamical systems governing modifications. However, several experiments on modifications of proteins suggest long-term relaxation depending on experienced external conditions, without explicit switches over multi-stable states. As an alternative to a multistability memory scheme, we propose "kinetic memory" for epigenetic cellular memory, in which memory is stored as a slow-relaxation process far from a stable fixed state. Information from previous environmental exposure is retained as the long-term maintenance of a cellular state, rather than switches over fixed states. To demonstrate this kinetic memory, we study several models in which multimeric proteins undergo catalytic modifications (e.g., phosphorylation and methylation), and find that a slow relaxation process of the modification state, logarithmic in time, appears when the concentration of a catalyst (enzyme) involved in the modification reactions is lower than that of the substrates. Sharp transitions from a normal fast-relaxation phase into this slow-relaxation phase are revealed, and explained by enzyme-limited competition among modification reactions. The slow-relaxation process is confirmed by simulations of several models of catalytic reactions of protein modifications, and it enables the memorization of external stimuli, as its time course depends crucially on the history of the stimuli. This kinetic memory provides novel insight into a broad class of cellular memory and functions. In particular, applications for long-term potentiation are discussed

  16. Kinetic Studies on Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Oxidation of Glucose, Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide and Their Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhimin; Raffel, Ryan A.; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Goodisman, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of the glucose oxidase-catalyzed reaction of glucose with O2, which produces gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the catalase-assisted breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen, have been measured via the rate of O2 depletion or production. The O2 concentrations in air-saturated phosphate-buffered salt solutions were monitored by measuring the decay of phosphorescence from a Pd phosphor in solution; the decay rate was obtained by fitting the tail of the phosphorescence intensity profile to an exponential. For glucose oxidation in the presence of glucose oxidase, the rate constant determined for the rate-limiting step was k = (3.0 ± 0.7) ×104 M−1s−1 at 37°C. For catalase-catalyzed H2O2 breakdown, the reaction order in [H2O2] was somewhat greater than unity at 37°C and well above unity at 25°C, suggesting different temperature dependences of the rate constants for various steps in the reaction. The two reactions were combined in a single experiment: addition of glucose oxidase to glucose-rich cell-free media caused a rapid drop in [O2], and subsequent addition of catalase caused [O2] to rise and then decrease to zero. The best fit of [O2] to a kinetic model is obtained with the rate constants for glucose oxidation and peroxide decomposition equal to 0.116 s−1 and 0.090 s−1 respectively. Cellular respiration in the presence of glucose was found to be three times as rapid as that in glucose-deprived cells. Added NaCN inhibited O2 consumption completely, confirming that oxidation occurred in the cellular mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:19348778

  17. A Chimeric LysK-Lysostaphin Fusion Enzyme Lysing Staphylococcus aureus Cells: a Study of Both Kinetics of Inactivation and Specifics of Interaction with Anionic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, Lyubov Y; Donovan, David M; Ishnazarova, Nadiya T; Foster-Frey, Juli A; Becker, Stephen C; Pugachev, Vladimir G; Balabushevich, Nadezda G; Dmitrieva, Natalia F; Klyachko, Natalia L

    2016-10-01

    A staphylolytic fusion protein (chimeric enzyme K-L) was created, harboring three unique lytic activities composed of the LysK CHAP endopeptidase, and amidase domains, and the lysostaphin glycyl-glycine endopeptidase domain. To assess the potential of possible therapeutic applications, the kinetic behavior of chimeric enzyme K-L was investigated. As a protein antimicrobial, with potential antigenic properties, the biophysical effect of including chimeric enzyme K-L in anionic polymer matrices that might help reduce the immunogenicity of the enzyme was tested. Chimeric enzyme K-L reveals a high lytic activity under the following optimal ( opt ) conditions: pH opt 6.0-10.0, t opt 20-30 °C, NaCl opt 400-800 mM. At the working temperature of 37 °C, chimeric enzyme K-L is inactivated by a monomolecular mechanism and possesses a high half-inactivation time of 12.7 ± 3.0 h. At storage temperatures of 22 and 4 °C, a complex mechanism (combination of monomolecular and bimolecular mechanisms) is involved in the chimeric enzyme K-L inactivation. The optimal storage conditions under which the enzyme retains 100 % activity after 140 days of incubation (4 °C, the enzyme concentration of 0.8 mg/mL, pH 6.0 or 7.5) were established. Chimeric enzyme K-L is included in complexes with block-copolymers of poly-L-glutamic acid and polyethylene glycol, while the enzyme activity and stability are retained, thus suggesting methods to improve the application of this fusion as an effective antimicrobial agent.

  18. Mesoscopic dynamics of diffusion-influenced enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-01-28

    A particle-based mesoscopic model for enzyme kinetics is constructed and used to investigate the influence of diffusion on the reactive dynamics. Enzymes and enzyme-substrate complexes are modeled as finite-size soft spherical particles, while substrate, product, and solvent molecules are point particles. The system is evolved using a hybrid molecular dynamics-multiparticle collision dynamics scheme. Both the nonreactive and reactive dynamics are constructed to satisfy mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws, and reversible reaction steps satisfy detailed balance. Hydrodynamic interactions among the enzymes and complexes are automatically accounted for in the dynamics. Diffusion manifests itself in various ways, notably in power-law behavior in the evolution of the species concentrations. In accord with earlier investigations, regimes where the product production rate exhibits either monotonic or nonmonotonic behavior as a function of time are found. In addition, the species concentrations display both t(-1/2) and t(-3/2) power-law behavior, depending on the dynamical regime under investigation. For high enzyme volume fractions, cooperative effects influence the enzyme kinetics. The time dependent rate coefficient determined from the mass action rate law is computed and shown to depend on the enzyme concentration. Lifetime distributions of substrate molecules newly released in complex dissociation events are determined and shown to have either a power-law form for rebinding to the same enzyme from which they were released or an exponential form for rebinding to different enzymes. The model can be used and extended to explore a variety of issues related concentration effects and diffusion on enzyme kinetics.

  19. Mesoscopic dynamics of diffusion-influenced enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    A particle-based mesoscopic model for enzyme kinetics is constructed and used to investigate the influence of diffusion on the reactive dynamics. Enzymes and enzyme-substrate complexes are modeled as finite-size soft spherical particles, while substrate, product, and solvent molecules are point particles. The system is evolved using a hybrid molecular dynamics-multiparticle collision dynamics scheme. Both the nonreactive and reactive dynamics are constructed to satisfy mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws, and reversible reaction steps satisfy detailed balance. Hydrodynamic interactions among the enzymes and complexes are automatically accounted for in the dynamics. Diffusion manifests itself in various ways, notably in power-law behavior in the evolution of the species concentrations. In accord with earlier investigations, regimes where the product production rate exhibits either monotonic or nonmonotonic behavior as a function of time are found. In addition, the species concentrations display both t^{-1/2} and t^{-3/2} power-law behavior, depending on the dynamical regime under investigation. For high enzyme volume fractions, cooperative effects influence the enzyme kinetics. The time dependent rate coefficient determined from the mass action rate law is computed and shown to depend on the enzyme concentration. Lifetime distributions of substrate molecules newly released in complex dissociation events are determined and shown to have either a power-law form for rebinding to the same enzyme from which they were released or an exponential form for rebinding to different enzymes. The model can be used and extended to explore a variety of issues related concentration effects and diffusion on enzyme kinetics.

  20. Thermodynamic activity-based intrinsic enzyme kinetic sheds light on enzyme-solvent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosch, Jan-Hendrik; Wagner, David; Nistelkas, Vasilios; Spieß, Antje C

    2017-01-01

    The reaction medium has major impact on biocatalytic reaction systems and on their economic significance. To allow for tailored medium engineering, thermodynamic phenomena, intrinsic enzyme kinetics, and enzyme-solvent interactions have to be discriminated. To this end, enzyme reaction kinetic modeling was coupled with thermodynamic calculations based on investigations of the alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis (LbADH) in monophasic water/methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) mixtures as a model solvent. Substrate concentrations and substrate thermodynamic activities were varied separately to identify the individual thermodynamic and kinetic effects on the enzyme activity. Microkinetic parameters based on concentration and thermodynamic activity were derived to successfully identify a positive effect of MTBE on the availability of the substrate to the enzyme, but a negative effect on the enzyme performance. In conclusion, thermodynamic activity-based kinetic modeling might be a suitable tool to initially curtail the type of enzyme-solvent interactions and thus, a powerful first step to potentially understand the phenomena that occur in nonconventional media in more detail. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:96-103, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  1. Enzyme activity and kinetics in substrate-amended river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duddridge, J E; Wainwright, M

    1982-01-01

    In determining the effects of heavy metals in microbial activity and litter degradation in river sediments, one approach is to determine the effects of these pollutants on sediment enzyme activity and synthesis. Methods to assay amylase, cellulase and urease activity in diverse river sediments are reported. Enzyme activity was low in non-amended sediments, but increased markedly when the appropriate substrate was added, paralleling both athropogenic and natural amendment. Linear relationships between enzyme activity, length of incubation, sample size and substrate concentration were established. Sediment enzyme activity generally obeyed Michaelis-Menton kinetics, but of the three enzymes, urease gave least significant correlation coefficients when the data for substrate concentration versus activity was applied to the Eadie-Hofstee transformation of the Michaelis-Menten equation. K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ for amylase, cellulase and urease in sediments are reported. (JMT)

  2. [Enzyme kinetic glucose determination by the glucose dehydrogenase method. Enzyme kinetic substrate determination using competitive inhibitors, II (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Matthesius, R

    1975-05-01

    The sensitivity of enzyme kinetic substrate determinations can be improved with the aid of competitive inhibitors. As an example, the determination of glucose dehydrogenase in the presence of potassium thiocyanate is described. The method has the advantage of rapid operation with satisfactory precision.

  3. Modeling physiological processes in plankton on enzyme kinetic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Packard

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Many ecologically important chemical transformations in the ocean are controlled by biochemical enzyme reactions in plankton. Nitrogenase regulates the transformation of N2 to ammonium in some cyanobacteria and serves as the entryway for N2 into the ocean biosphere. Nitrate reductase controls the reduction of NO3 to NO2 and hence new production in phytoplankton. The respiratory electron transfer system in all organisms links the carbon oxidation reactions of intermediary metabolism with the reduction of oxygen in respiration. Rubisco controls the fixation of CO2 into organic matter in phytoplankton and thus is the major entry point of carbon into the oceanic biosphere. In addition to these, there are the enzymes that control CO2 production, NH4 excretion and the fluxes of phosphate. Some of these enzymes have been recognized and researched by marine scientists in the last thirty years. However, until recently the kinetic principles of enzyme control have not been exploited to formulate accurate mathematical equations of the controlling physiological expressions. Were such expressions available they would increase our power to predict the rates of chemical transformations in the extracellular environment of microbial populations whether this extracellular environment is culture media or the ocean. Here we formulate from the principles of bisubstrate enzyme kinetics, mathematical expressions for the processes of NO3 reduction, O2 consumption, N2 fixation, total nitrogen uptake.

  4. Enzyme Kinetics and Molecular Docking Studies on Cytochrome 2B6, 2C19, 2E1, and 3A4 Activities by Sauchinone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Chae Gong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sauchinone, an active lignan isolated from the aerial parts of Saururus chinensis (Saururaceae, exhibits anti-inflammatory, anti-obesity, anti-hyperglycemic, and anti-hepatic steatosis effects. As herb–drug interaction (HDI through cytochrome P450s (CYPs-mediated metabolism limits clinical application of herbs and drugs in combination, this study sought to explore the enzyme kinetics of sauchinone towards CYP inhibition in in vitro human liver microsomes (HLMs and in vivo mice studies and computational molecular docking analysis. In in vitro HLMs, sauchinone reversibly inhibited CYP2B6, 2C19, 2E1, and 3A4 activities in non-competitive modes, showing inhibition constant (Ki values of 14.3, 16.8, 41.7, and 6.84 μM, respectively. Also, sauchinone time-dependently inhibited CYP2B6, 2E1 and 3A4 activities in vitro HLMs. Molecular docking study showed that sauchinone could be bound to a few key amino acid residues in the active site of CYP2B6, 2C19, 2E1, and 3A4. When sibutramine, clopidogrel, or chlorzoxazone was co-administered with sauchinone to mice, the systemic exposure of each drug was increased compared to that without sauchinone, because sauchinone reduced the metabolic clearance of each drug. In conclusion, when sauchinone was co-treated with drugs metabolized via CYP2B6, 2C19, 2E1, or 3A4, sauchinone–drug interactions occurred because sauchinone inhibited the CYP-mediated metabolic activities.

  5. A Sensitive and Robust Enzyme Kinetic Experiment Using Microplates and Fluorogenic Ester Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Jeremy; Hoops, Geoffrey C.; Savas, Christopher J.; Kartje, Zachary; Lavis, Luke D.

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics measurements are a standard component of undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. The combination of serine hydrolases and fluorogenic enzyme substrates provides a rapid, sensitive, and general method for measuring enzyme kinetics in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. In this method, the kinetic activity of multiple protein…

  6. On enzyme kinetic parameters modification of gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferdes, O.S.; Ferdes, M.; Turcu, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of gamma-ray action on biomolecules there were investigated the modifications in activity and other kinetic parameters for some enzymes irradiated in pure dry state at relative high doses. There were considered bacterial and fungal α-amylases, glucoamylase and Mucor sp. protease irradiated by a 60 Co gamma-ray source in the dose range 1.0-30.0 kGy, at different dose-rates between 0.5-2.0 kGy/h, at room temperature. Considering the enzyme inactivation in this dose range, the dose-effect relationships have an expected form and depend on the irradiation conditions but not significantly on the dose rate. The catalytic properties of enzymes were modified by irradiation. By usual methods it is evidenced a direct correlation between the enzymatic activities, Michaelis-Menten constant, K m , reaction velocities, v, and the irradiation dose. These experimental findings can support a self-consistent theoretical approach on biophysical radiation action on biological active molecules like enzymes. At the same time, some enzyme behaviour to irradiation could be considered like a good biological indicator of radiation response. (Author) 4 Figs., 19 Refs

  7. Enzyme catalyzed oxidative gelation of sugar beet pectin: Kinetics and rheology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Chronakis, Ioannis S.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    Sugar beet pectin (SBP) is a marginally utilized co-processing product from sugar production from sugar beets. In this study, the kinetics of oxidative gelation of SBP, taking place via enzyme catalyzed cross-linking of ferulic acid moieties (FA), was studied using small angle oscillatory...

  8. Explaining the atypical reaction profiles of heme enzymes with a novel mechanistic hypothesis and kinetic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelath Murali Manoj

    Full Text Available Many heme enzymes show remarkable versatility and atypical kinetics. The fungal extracellular enzyme chloroperoxidase (CPO characterizes a variety of one and two electron redox reactions in the presence of hydroperoxides. A structural counterpart, found in mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP, uses molecular oxygen plus NADPH for the oxidative metabolism (predominantly hydroxylation of substrate in conjunction with a redox partner enzyme, cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we employ the two above-mentioned heme-thiolate proteins to probe the reaction kinetics and mechanism of heme enzymes. Hitherto, a substrate inhibition model based upon non-productive binding of substrate (two-site model was used to account for the inhibition of reaction at higher substrate concentrations for the CYP reaction systems. Herein, the observation of substrate inhibition is shown for both peroxide and final substrate in CPO catalyzed peroxidations. Further, analogy is drawn in the "steady state kinetics" of CPO and CYP reaction systems. New experimental observations and analyses indicate that a scheme of competing reactions (involving primary product with enzyme or other reaction components/intermediates is relevant in such complex reaction mixtures. The presence of non-selective reactive intermediate(s affords alternate reaction routes at various substrate/product concentrations, thereby leading to a lowered detectable concentration of "the product of interest" in the reaction milieu. Occam's razor favors the new hypothesis. With the new hypothesis as foundation, a new biphasic treatment to analyze the kinetics is put forth. We also introduce a key concept of "substrate concentration at maximum observed rate". The new treatment affords a more acceptable fit for observable experimental kinetic data of heme redox enzymes.

  9. Kinetics of Single-Enzyme Reactions on Vesicles: Role of Substrate Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2015-03-01

    Enzymatic reactions occurring in vivo on lipid membranes can be influenced by various factors including macromolecular crowding in general and substrate aggregation in particular. In academic studies, the role of these factors can experimentally be clarified by tracking single-enzyme kinetics occurring on individual lipid vesicles. To extend the conceptual basis for such experiments, we analyze herein the corresponding kinetics mathematically with emphasis on the role of substrate aggregation. In general, the aggregation may occur on different length scales. Small aggregates may e.g. contain a few proteins or peptides while large aggregates may be mesoscopic as in the case of lipid domains which can be formed in the membranes composed of different lipids. We present a kinetic model describing comprehensively the effect of aggregation of the former type on the dependence of the reaction rate on substrate membrane concentration. The results obtained with physically reasonable parameters indicate that the aggregation-related deviations from the conventional Michaelis-Menten kinetics may be appreciable. Special Issue Comments: This theoretical article is focused on single-enzyme reactions occurring in parallel with substrate aggregation on individual vesicles. This subject is related to a few Special Issue articles concerning enzyme dynamics6,7 and function8 and mathematical aspects of stochastic kinetics.9

  10. Enzyme Kinetics Experiment with the Multienzyme Complex Viscozyme L and Two Substrates for the Accurate Determination of Michaelian Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Nelson Pérez

    2017-01-01

    A laboratory experiment in which students study the kinetics of the Viscozyme-L-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose and starch comparatively was designed for an upper-division biochemistry laboratory. The main objective of this experiment was to provide an opportunity to perform enhanced enzyme kinetics data analysis using appropriate informatics…

  11. Kinetic studies of the acylation of pig muscle–d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase by 1,3-diphosphoglycerate and of proton uptake and release in the overall enzyme mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, P. J.; Trentham, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the presence of NAD+ the acylation by 1,3-diphosphoglycerate of the four active sites of pig muscle d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase can be monitored at 365nm by the disappearance of the absorption band present in the binary complex of NAD+ and the enzyme. A non-specific salt effect decreased the acylation rate 25-fold when the ionic strength was increased from 0.10 to 1.0. This caused acylation to be the rate-limiting process in the enzyme-catalysed reductive dephosphorylation of 1,3-diphosphoglycerate at high ionic strength at pH8. The salt effect permitted investigation of the acylation over a wide range of conditions. Variation of pH from 5.4 to 8.6 produced at most a two-fold change in the acylation rate. One proton was taken up per site acylated at pH8.0. By using a chromophoric H+ indicator the rate of proton uptake could be monitored during the acylation and was also almost invariant in the pH range 5.5–8.5. Transient kinetic studies of the overall enzyme-catalysed reaction indicated that acylation was the process involving proton uptake at pH8.0. The enzyme mechanism is discussed in the light of these results. PMID:4360248

  12. Kinetics based reaction optimization of enzyme catalyzed reduction of formaldehyde to methanol with synchronous cofactor regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marpani, Fauziah; Sárossy, Zsuzsa; Pinelo, Manuel; Meyer, Anne S

    2017-12-01

    Enzymatic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to methanol (CH 3 OH) can be accomplished using a designed set-up of three oxidoreductases utilizing reduced pyridine nucleotide (NADH) as cofactor for the reducing equivalents electron supply. For this enzyme system to function efficiently a balanced regeneration of the reducing equivalents during reaction is required. Herein, we report the optimization of the enzymatic conversion of formaldehyde (CHOH) to CH 3 OH by alcohol dehydrogenase, the final step of the enzymatic redox reaction of CO 2 to CH 3 OH, with kinetically synchronous enzymatic cofactor regeneration using either glucose dehydrogenase (System I) or xylose dehydrogenase (System II). A mathematical model of the enzyme kinetics was employed to identify the best reaction set-up for attaining optimal cofactor recycling rate and enzyme utilization efficiency. Targeted process optimization experiments were conducted to verify the kinetically modeled results. Repetitive reaction cycles were shown to enhance the yield of CH 3 OH, increase the total turnover number (TTN) and the biocatalytic productivity rate (BPR) value for both system I and II whilst minimizing the exposure of the enzymes to high concentrations of CHOH. System II was found to be superior to System I with a yield of 8 mM CH 3 OH, a TTN of 160 and BPR of 24 μmol CH 3 OH/U · h during 6 hr of reaction. The study demonstrates that an optimal reaction set-up could be designed from rational kinetics modeling to maximize the yield of CH 3 OH, whilst simultaneously optimizing cofactor recycling and enzyme utilization efficiency. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Use of Mushroom Tyrosinase to Introduce Michaelis-Menten Enzyme Kinetics to Biochemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flurkey, William H.; Inlow, Jennifer K.

    2017-01-01

    An inexpensive enzyme kinetics laboratory exercise for undergraduate biochemistry students is described utilizing tyrosinase from white button mushrooms. The exercise can be completed in one or two three-hour lab sessions. The optimal amounts of enzyme, substrate (catechol), and inhibitor (kojic acid) are first determined, and then kinetic data is…

  14. Kinetics of leather dyeing pretreated with enzymes: role of acid protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanth, Swarna Vinodh; Venba, Rajangam; Jayakumar, Gladstone Christopher; Chandrababu, Narasimhan Kannan

    2009-04-01

    In the present investigation, kinetics of dyeing involving pretreatment with acid protease has been presented. Application of acid protease in dyeing process resulted in increased absorption and diffusion of dye into the leather matrix. Enzyme treatment at 1% concentration, 60 min duration and 50 degrees C resulted in maximum of 98% dye exhaustion and increased absorption rate constants. The final exhaustion (C(infinity)) for the best fit of CI Acid Black 194 dye has been 98.5% with K and r2 values from the modified Cegarra-Puente isotherm as 0.1033 and 0.0631. CI Acid Black 194 being a 2:1 metal complex acid dye exhibited higher absorption rate than the acid dye CI Acid Black 210. A reduction in 50% activation energy calculated from Arrhenius equation has been observed in enzyme assisted dyeing process of both the dyes that substantiates enhanced dye absorption. The absorption rate constant calculated with modified Cegarra-Puente equation confirm higher rate constants and faster kinetics for enzyme assisted dyeing process. Enzyme treated leather exhibited richness of color and shade when compared with control. The present study substantiates the essential role of enzyme pretreatment as an eco-friendly leather dyeing process.

  15. Quantitative kinetics of proteolytic enzymes determined by a surface concentration-based assay using peptide arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Se-Hui; Kong, Deok-Hoon; Park, Seoung-Woo; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2012-08-21

    Peptide arrays have emerged as a key technology for drug discovery, diagnosis, and cell biology. Despite the promise of these arrays, applications of peptide arrays to quantitative analysis of enzyme kinetics have been limited due to the difficulty in obtaining quantitative information of enzymatic reaction products. In this study, we developed a new approach for the quantitative kinetics analysis of proteases using fluorescence-conjugated peptide arrays, a surface concentration-based assay with solid-phase peptide standards using dry-off measurements, and compared it with an applied concentration-based assay. For fabrication of the peptide arrays, substrate peptides of cMMP-3, caspase-3, caspase-9, and calpain-1 were functionalized with TAMRA and cysteine, and were immobilized onto amine-functionalized arrays using a heterobifunctional linker, N-[γ-maleimidobutyloxy]succinimide ester. The proteolytic activities of the four enzymes were quantitatively analyzed by calculating changes induced by enzymatic reactions in the concentrations of peptides bound to array surfaces. In addition, this assay was successfully applied for calculating the Michaelis constant (K(m,surf)) for the four enzymes. Thus, this new assay has a strong potential for use in the quantitative evaluation of proteases, and for drug discovery through kinetics studies including the determination of K(m) and V(max).

  16. Enzyme-catalyzed synthesis and kinetics of ultrasonic-assisted biodiesel production from waste tallow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewale, Peter; Dumont, Marie-Josée; Ngadi, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The use of ultrasonic processing was evaluated for its ability to achieve adequate mixing while providing sufficient activation energy for the enzymatic transesterification of waste tallow. The effects of ultrasonic parameters (amplitude, cycle and pulse) and major reaction factors (molar ratio and enzyme concentration) on the reaction kinetics of biodiesel generation from waste tallow bio-catalyzed by immobilized lipase [Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB)] were investigated. Three sets of experiments namely A, B, and C were conducted. In experiment set A, two factors (ultrasonic amplitude and cycle) were investigated at three levels; in experiment set B, two factors (molar ratio and enzyme concentration) were examined at three levels; and in experiment set C, two factors (ultrasonic amplitude and reaction time) were investigated at five levels. A Ping Pong Bi Bi kinetic model approach was employed to study the effect of ultrasonic amplitude on the enzymatic transesterification. Kinetic constants of transesterification reaction were determined at different ultrasonic amplitudes (30%, 35%, 40%, 45%, and 50%) and enzyme concentrations (4, 6, and 8 wt.% of fat) at constant molar ratio (fat:methanol); 1:6, and ultrasonic cycle; 5 Hz. Optimal conditions for ultrasound-assisted biodiesel production from waste tallow were fat:methanol molar ratio, 1:4; catalyst level 6% (w/w of fat); reaction time, 20 min (30 times less than conventional batch processes); ultrasonic amplitude 40% at 5 Hz. The kinetic model results revealed interesting features of ultrasound assisted enzyme-catalyzed transesterification (as compared to conventional system): at ultrasonic amplitude 40%, the reaction activities within the system seemed to be steady after 20 min which means the reaction could proceed with or without ultrasonic mixing. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography indicated the biodiesel yield to be 85.6±0.08%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Hands-On Classroom Simulation to Demonstrate Concepts in Enzyme Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    A classroom exercise is described to introduce enzyme kinetics in an undergraduate biochemistry or chemistry course. The exercise is a simulation in which a student acts as an enzyme that "catalyzes" the unscrewing of a nut from a bolt. With other students assisting, the student enzyme carries out reactions with bolt-nut substrates under different…

  18. A Kinetic Modelling of Enzyme Inhibitions in the Central Metabolism of Yeast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasbawati; Kalondeng, A.; Aris, N.; Erawaty, N.; Azis, M. I.

    2018-03-01

    Metabolic regulation plays an important role in the metabolic engineering of a cellular process. It is conducted to improve the productivity of a microbial process by identifying the important regulatory nodes of a metabolic pathway such as fermentation pathway. Regulation of enzymes involved in a particular pathway can be held to improve the productivity of the system. In the central metabolism of yeast cell, some enzymes are known as regulating enzymes that can be inhibited to increase the production of ethanol. In this research we study the kinetic modelling of the enzymes in the central pathway of yeast metabolism by taking into consideration the enzyme inhibition effects to the ethanol production. The existence of positive steady state solution and the stability of the system are also analysed to study the property and dynamical behaviour of the system. One stable steady state of the system is produced if some conditions are fulfilled. The conditions concern to the restriction of the maximum reactions of the enzymes in the pyruvate and acetaldehyde branch points. There exists a certain time of fermentation reaction at which a maximum and a minimum ethanol productions are attained after regulating the system. Optimal ethanol concentration is also produced for a certain initial concentration of inhibitor.

  19. Some Investigations on Protease Enzyme Production Kinetics Using Bacillus licheniformis BBRC 100053 and Effects of Inhibitors on Protease Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ghobadi Nejad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to great commercial application of protease, it is necessary to study kinetic characterization of this enzyme in order to improve design of enzymatic reactors. In this study, mathematical modeling of protease enzyme production kinetics which is derived from Bacillus licheniformis BBRC 100053 was studied (at 37°C, pH 10 after 73 h in stationary phase, and 150 rpm. The aim of the present paper was to determine the best kinetic model and kinetic parameters for production of protease and calculating Ki (inhibition constant of different inhibitors to find the most effective one. The kinetic parameters Km (Michaelis-Menten constant and Vm (maximum rate were calculated 0.626 mM and 0.0523 mM/min. According to the experimental results, using DFP (diisopropyl fluorophosphate and PMSF (phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride as inhibitors almost 50% of the enzyme activity could be inhibited when their concentrations were 0.525 and 0.541 mM, respectively. Ki for DFP and PMSF were 0.46 and 0.56 mM, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that the Lineweaver-Burk model was the best fitting model for protease production kinetics DFP was more effective than PMSF and both of them should be covered in the group of noncompetitive inhibitors.

  20. A chimeric LysK-lysostaphin fusion enzyme lysing Staphylococcus aureus cells: a study of both kinetics of inactivation and specifics of interaction with anionic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A staphylolytic fusion protein (K-L) was created, harboring three unique lytic activities comprised of the LysK CHAP endopeptidase, and amidase domains, and the lysostaphin glycyl-glycine endopeptidase domain. To assess the potential of possible therapeutic applications, the kinetic behavior of K-L...

  1. Emergence of dynamic cooperativity in the stochastic kinetics of fluctuating enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Chatterjee, Sambarta; Nandi, Mintu; Dua, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic co-operativity in monomeric enzymes is characterized in terms of a non-Michaelis-Menten kinetic behaviour. The latter is believed to be associated with mechanisms that include multiple reaction pathways due to enzymatic conformational fluctuations. Recent advances in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy have provided new fundamental insights on the possible mechanisms underlying reactions catalyzed by fluctuating enzymes. Here, we present a bottom-up approach to understand enzyme turnover kinetics at physiologically relevant mesoscopic concentrations informed by mechanisms extracted from single-molecule stochastic trajectories. The stochastic approach, presented here, shows the emergence of dynamic co-operativity in terms of a slowing down of the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics resulting in negative co-operativity. For fewer enzymes, dynamic co-operativity emerges due to the combined effects of enzymatic conformational fluctuations and molecular discreteness. The increase in the number of enzymes, however, suppresses the effect of enzymatic conformational fluctuations such that dynamic co-operativity emerges solely due to the discrete changes in the number of reacting species. These results confirm that the turnover kinetics of fluctuating enzyme based on the parallel-pathway MM mechanism switches over to the single-pathway MM mechanism with the increase in the number of enzymes. For large enzyme numbers, convergence to the exact MM equation occurs in the limit of very high substrate concentration as the stochastic kinetics approaches the deterministic behaviour.

  2. Emergence of dynamic cooperativity in the stochastic kinetics of fluctuating enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Chatterjee, Sambarta; Nandi, Mintu; Dua, Arti, E-mail: arti@iitm.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2016-08-28

    Dynamic co-operativity in monomeric enzymes is characterized in terms of a non-Michaelis-Menten kinetic behaviour. The latter is believed to be associated with mechanisms that include multiple reaction pathways due to enzymatic conformational fluctuations. Recent advances in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy have provided new fundamental insights on the possible mechanisms underlying reactions catalyzed by fluctuating enzymes. Here, we present a bottom-up approach to understand enzyme turnover kinetics at physiologically relevant mesoscopic concentrations informed by mechanisms extracted from single-molecule stochastic trajectories. The stochastic approach, presented here, shows the emergence of dynamic co-operativity in terms of a slowing down of the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics resulting in negative co-operativity. For fewer enzymes, dynamic co-operativity emerges due to the combined effects of enzymatic conformational fluctuations and molecular discreteness. The increase in the number of enzymes, however, suppresses the effect of enzymatic conformational fluctuations such that dynamic co-operativity emerges solely due to the discrete changes in the number of reacting species. These results confirm that the turnover kinetics of fluctuating enzyme based on the parallel-pathway MM mechanism switches over to the single-pathway MM mechanism with the increase in the number of enzymes. For large enzyme numbers, convergence to the exact MM equation occurs in the limit of very high substrate concentration as the stochastic kinetics approaches the deterministic behaviour.

  3. Emergence of dynamic cooperativity in the stochastic kinetics of fluctuating enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Chatterjee, Sambarta; Nandi, Mintu; Dua, Arti

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic co-operativity in monomeric enzymes is characterized in terms of a non-Michaelis-Menten kinetic behaviour. The latter is believed to be associated with mechanisms that include multiple reaction pathways due to enzymatic conformational fluctuations. Recent advances in single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy have provided new fundamental insights on the possible mechanisms underlying reactions catalyzed by fluctuating enzymes. Here, we present a bottom-up approach to understand enzyme turnover kinetics at physiologically relevant mesoscopic concentrations informed by mechanisms extracted from single-molecule stochastic trajectories. The stochastic approach, presented here, shows the emergence of dynamic co-operativity in terms of a slowing down of the Michaelis-Menten (MM) kinetics resulting in negative co-operativity. For fewer enzymes, dynamic co-operativity emerges due to the combined effects of enzymatic conformational fluctuations and molecular discreteness. The increase in the number of enzymes, however, suppresses the effect of enzymatic conformational fluctuations such that dynamic co-operativity emerges solely due to the discrete changes in the number of reacting species. These results confirm that the turnover kinetics of fluctuating enzyme based on the parallel-pathway MM mechanism switches over to the single-pathway MM mechanism with the increase in the number of enzymes. For large enzyme numbers, convergence to the exact MM equation occurs in the limit of very high substrate concentration as the stochastic kinetics approaches the deterministic behaviour.

  4. Automated Determination of Oxygen-Dependent Enzyme Kinetics in a Tube-in-Tube Flow Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringborg, Rolf H; Toftgaard Pedersen, Asbjørn; Woodley, John M

    2017-09-08

    Enzyme-mediated oxidation is of particular interest to synthetic organic chemists. However, the implementation of such systems demands knowledge of enzyme kinetics. Conventionally collecting kinetic data for biocatalytic oxidations is fraught with difficulties such as low oxygen solubility in water and limited oxygen supply. Here, we present a novel method for the collection of such kinetic data using a pressurized tube-in-tube reactor, operated in the low-dispersed flow regime to generate time-series data, with minimal material consumption. Experimental development and validation of the instrument revealed not only the high degree of accuracy of the kinetic data obtained, but also the necessity of making measurements in this way to enable the accurate evaluation of high K MO enzyme systems. For the first time, this paves the way to integrate kinetic data into the protein engineering cycle.

  5. Modeling nitrous oxide production and reduction in soil through explicit representation of denitrification enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianqiu; Doskey, Paul V

    2015-02-17

    An enzyme-explicit denitrification model with representations for pre- and de novo synthesized enzymes was developed to improve predictions of nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulations in soil and emissions from the surface. The metabolic model of denitrification is based on dual-substrate utilization and Monod growth kinetics. Enzyme synthesis/activation was incorporated into each sequential reduction step of denitrification to regulate dynamics of the denitrifier population and the active enzyme pool, which controlled the rate function. Parameterizations were developed from observations of the dynamics of N2O production and reduction in soil incubation experiments. The model successfully reproduced the dynamics of N2O and N2 accumulation in the incubations and revealed an important regulatory effect of denitrification enzyme kinetics on the accumulation of denitrification products. Pre-synthesized denitrification enzymes contributed 20, 13, 43, and 62% of N2O that accumulated in 48 h incubations of soil collected from depths of 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, and 15-25 cm, respectively. An enzyme activity function (E) was defined to estimate the relative concentration of active enzymes and variation in response to environmental conditions. The value of E allows for activities of pre-synthesized denitrification enzymes to be differentiated from de novo synthesized enzymes. Incorporating explicit representations of denitrification enzyme kinetics into biogeochemical models is a promising approach for accurately simulating dynamics of the production and reduction of N2O in soils.

  6. Thymidine kinase 2 enzyme kinetics elucidate the mechanism of thymidine-induced mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ren; Wang, Liya

    2014-10-07

    Mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) is a nuclear gene-encoded protein, synthesized in the cytosol and subsequently translocated into the mitochondrial matrix, where it catalyzes the phosphorylation of thymidine (dT) and deoxycytidine (dC). The kinetics of dT phosphorylation exhibits negative cooperativity, but dC phosphorylation follows hyperbolic Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The two substrates compete with each other in that dT is a competitive inhibitor of dC phosphorylation, while dC acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of dT phosphorylation. In addition, TK2 is feedback inhibited by dTTP and dCTP. TK2 also phosphorylates a number of pyrimidine nucleoside analogues used in antiviral and anticancer therapy and thus plays an important role in mitochondrial toxicities caused by nucleoside analogues. Deficiency in TK2 activity due to genetic alterations causes devastating mitochondrial diseases, which are characterized by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion or multiple deletions in the affected tissues. Severe TK2 deficiency is associated with early-onset fatal mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, while less severe deficiencies result in late-onset phenotypes. In this review, studies of the enzyme kinetic behavior of TK2 enzyme variants are used to explain the mechanism of mtDNA depletion caused by TK2 mutations, thymidine overload due to thymidine phosphorylase deficiency, and mitochondrial toxicity caused by antiviral thymidine analogues.

  7. An Integrated Circuit for Chip-Based Analysis of Enzyme Kinetics and Metabolite Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Boon Chong; Macdonald, Alasdair Iain; Martin, Christopher; Streklas, Angelos J; Campbell, Gordon; Al-Rawhani, Mohammed A; Nemeth, Balazs; Grant, James P; Barrett, Michael P; Cumming, David R S

    2016-06-01

    We have created a novel chip-based diagnostic tools based upon quantification of metabolites using enzymes specific for their chemical conversion. Using this device we show for the first time that a solid-state circuit can be used to measure enzyme kinetics and calculate the Michaelis-Menten constant. Substrate concentration dependency of enzyme reaction rates is central to this aim. Ion-sensitive field effect transistors (ISFET) are excellent transducers for biosensing applications that are reliant upon enzyme assays, especially since they can be fabricated using mainstream microelectronics technology to ensure low unit cost, mass-manufacture, scaling to make many sensors and straightforward miniaturisation for use in point-of-care devices. Here, we describe an integrated ISFET array comprising 2(16) sensors. The device was fabricated with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. Unlike traditional CMOS ISFET sensors that use the Si3N4 passivation of the foundry for ion detection, the device reported here was processed with a layer of Ta2O5 that increased the detection sensitivity to 45 mV/pH unit at the sensor readout. The drift was reduced to 0.8 mV/hour with a linear pH response between pH 2-12. A high-speed instrumentation system capable of acquiring nearly 500 fps was developed to stream out the data. The device was then used to measure glucose concentration through the activity of hexokinase in the range of 0.05 mM-231 mM, encompassing glucose's physiological range in blood. Localised and temporal enzyme kinetics of hexokinase was studied in detail. These results present a roadmap towards a viable personal metabolome machine.

  8. Automated Determination of Oxygen-Dependent Enzyme Kinetics in a Tube-in-Tube Flow Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringborg, Rolf Hoffmeyer; Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard; Woodley, John

    2017-01-01

    revealed not only the high degree of accuracy of the kinetic data obtained, but also the necessity of making measurements in this way to enable the accurate evaluation of high KMO enzyme systems. For the first time, this paves the way to integrate kinetic data into the protein engineering cycle....

  9. The role of Val-265 for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding in pyruvate oxidase: FTIR, kinetic, and crystallographic studies on the enzyme variant V265A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Georg; Ritter, Michaela; Weiss, Manfred S; König, Stephan; Mäntele, Werner; Hübner, Gerhard

    2005-04-05

    In pyruvate oxidase (POX) from Lactobacillus plantarum, valine 265 participates in binding the cofactor FAD and is responsible for the strained conformation of its isoalloxazine moiety that is visible in the crystal structure of POX. The contrasting effects of the conservative amino acid exchange V265A on the enzyme's catalytic properties, cofactor affinity, and protein structure were investigated. The most prominent effect of the exchange was observed in the 2.2 A crystal structure of the mutant POX. While the overall structures of the wild-type and the variant are similar, flavin binding in particular is clearly different. Local disorder at the isoalloxazine binding site prevents modeling of the complete FAD cofactor and two protein loops of the binding site. Only the ADP moiety shows well-defined electron density, indicating an "anchor" function for this part of the molecule. This notion is corroborated by competition experiments where ADP was used to displace FAD from the variant enzyme. Despite the fact that the affinity of FAD binding in the variant is reduced, the catalytic properties are very similar to the wild-type, and the redox potential of the bound flavin is the same for both proteins. The rate of electron transfer toward the flavin during turnover is reduced to one-third compared to the wild-type, but k(cat) remains unchanged. Redox-triggered FTIR difference spectroscopy of free FAD shows the nu(C(10a)=N(1)) band at 1548 cm(-)(1). In POX-V265A, this band is found at 1538 cm(-)(1) and thus shifted less strongly than in wild-type POX where it is found at 1534 cm(-)(1). Taking these observations together, the conservative exchange V265A in POX has a surprisingly small effect on the catalytic properties of the enzyme, whereas the effect on the three-dimensional structure is rather big.

  10. Mechanistic studies on β-ketoacyl thiolase from Zoogloea ramigera: Identification of the active-site nucleophile as Cys89, its mutation to Ser89, and kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of wild-type and mutant enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.; Mayerl, F.; Walsh, C.T.; Peoples, O.P.; Masamune, S.; Sinskey, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    Thiolase proceeds via covalent catalysis involving an acetyl-S-enzyme. The active-site thiol nucleophile is identified as Cys 89 by acetylation with [ 14 C]acetyl-CoA, rapid denaturation, tryptic digestion, and sequencing of the labeled peptide. The native acetyl enzyme is labile to hydrolytic decomposition with t 1/2 of 2 min at pH 7, 25 degree C. Cys 89 has been converted to the alternate nucleophile Ser 89 by mutagenesis and the C89S enzyme overproduced, purified, and assessed for activity. The Ser 89 enzyme retains 1% of the V max of the Cys 89 enzyme in the direction of acetoacetyl-CoA thiolytic cleavage and 0.05% of the V max in the condensation of two acetyl-CoA molecules. A covalent acetyl-O-enzyme intermediate is detected on incubation with [ 14 C]acetyl-CoA and isolation of the labeled Ser 89 -containing tryptic peptide. Comparisons of the Cys 89 and Ser 89 enzymes have been made for kinetic and thermodynamic stability of the acetyl enzyme intermediates both by isolation and by analysis of [ 32 P]CoASH/acetyl-CoA partial reactions and for rate-limiting steps in catalysis with trideuterioacetyl-CoA

  11. SigrafW: An Easy-to-Use Program for Fitting Enzyme Kinetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Francisco Assis; Baranauskas, Jose Augusto; Furriel, Rosa Prazeres Melo; Borin, Ivana Aparecida

    2005-01-01

    SigrafW is Windows-compatible software developed using the Microsoft[R] Visual Basic Studio program that uses the simplified Hill equation for fitting kinetic data from allosteric and Michaelian enzymes. SigrafW uses a modified Fibonacci search to calculate maximal velocity (V), the Hill coefficient (n), and the enzyme-substrate apparent…

  12. Enzyme kinetics and identification of the rate-limiting step of enzymatic arabinoxylan degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Louise Enggaard; Xu, Cheng; Sørensen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the kinetics of multi-enzymatic degradation of soluble wheat arabinoxylan by monitoring the release of xylose and arabinose during designed treatments with mono-component enzymes at different substrate concentrations. The results of different combinations of α...... α-l-arabinofuranosidases catalyze liberation of arabinose residues linked 1→3 to singly (AFAn) or doubly (AFBa) substituted xyloses in arabinoxylan, respectively. When added to arabinoxylan at equimolar levels, the AFBa enzyme catalyzed the release of more arabinose, i.e. had a higher rate constant...... than AFAn, but with respect to the xylose release, AFAn – as expected – exhibited a better synergistic effect than AFBa with β-xylosidase. This synergistic effect with AFAn was estimated to increase the number of β-xylosidase catalyzed cuts from ∼3 (with β-xylosidase alone) to ∼7 in each arabinoxylan...

  13. More Nuts and Bolts of Michaelis-Menten Enzyme Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01

    Several additions to a classroom activity are proposed in which an "enzyme" (the student) converts "substrates" (nut-bolt assemblies) into "products" (separated nuts and bolts) by unscrewing them. (Contains 1 table.)

  14. Combined pressure and cosolvent effects on enzyme activity - a high-pressure stopped-flow kinetic study on α-chymotrypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Trung Quan; Winter, Roland

    2015-09-21

    We investigated the combined effects of cosolvents and pressure on the hydrolysis of a model peptide catalysed by α-chymotrypsin. The enzymatic activity was measured in the pressure range from 0.1 to 200 MPa using a high-pressure stopped-flow systems with 10 ms time resolution. A kosmotropic (trimethalymine-N-oxide, TMAO) and chaotropic (urea) cosolvent and mixtures thereof were used as cosolvents. High pressure enhances the hydrolysis rate as a consequence of a negative activation volume, ΔV(#), which, depending on the cosolvent system, amounts to -2 to -4 mL mol(-1). A more negative activation volume can be explained by a smaller compression of the ES complex relative to the transition state. Kinetic constants, such as kcat and the Michaelis constant KM, were determined for all solution conditions as a function of pressure. With increasing pressure, kcat increases by about 35% and its pressure dependence by a factor of 1.9 upon addition of 2 M urea, whereas 1 M TMAO has no significant effect on kcat and its pressure dependence. Similarly, KM increases upon addition of urea 6-fold. Addition of TMAO compensates the urea-effect on kcat and KM to some extent. The maximum rate of the enzymatic reaction increases with increasing pressure in all solutions except in the TMAO : urea 1 : 2 mixture, where, remarkably, pressure is found to have no effect on the rate of the enzymatic reaction anymore. Our data clearly show that compatible solutes can easily override deleterious effects of harsh environmental conditions, such as high hydrostatic pressures in the 100 MPa range, which is the maximum pressure encountered in the deep biosphere on Earth.

  15. An Enzyme Kinetics Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Robert J.; Olsen, Julie A.; Giles, Greta A.

    2010-01-01

    An experiment using [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy to observe the kinetics of the acylase 1-catalyzed hydrolysis of "N"-acetyl-DL-methionine has been developed for the organic laboratory. The L-enantiomer of the reactant is hydrolyzed completely in less than 2 h, and [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopic data from a single sample can be worked up…

  16. Enzyme-catalyzed and binding reaction kinetics determined by titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lee D; Transtrum, Mark K; Quinn, Colette; Demarse, Neil

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal calorimetry allows monitoring of reaction rates via direct measurement of the rate of heat produced by the reaction. Calorimetry is one of very few techniques that can be used to measure rates without taking a derivative of the primary data. Because heat is a universal indicator of chemical reactions, calorimetry can be used to measure kinetics in opaque solutions, suspensions, and multiple phase systems and does not require chemical labeling. The only significant limitation of calorimetry for kinetic measurements is that the time constant of the reaction must be greater than the time constant of the calorimeter which can range from a few seconds to a few minutes. Calorimetry has the unique ability to provide both kinetic and thermodynamic data. This article describes the calorimetric methodology for determining reaction kinetics and reviews examples from recent literature that demonstrate applications of titration calorimetry to determine kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed and ligand binding reactions. A complete model for the temperature dependence of enzyme activity is presented. A previous method commonly used for blank corrections in determinations of equilibrium constants and enthalpy changes for binding reactions is shown to be subject to significant systematic error. Methods for determination of the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions and for simultaneous determination of thermodynamics and kinetics of ligand binding reactions are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Drying characteristic, enzyme inactivation and browning pigmentation kinetics of controlled humidity-convective drying of banana slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpong, Frederick; Yu, Xiaojie; Zhou, Cunshan; Oteng-Darko, Patricia; Amenorfe, Leticia Peace; Wu, Bengang; Bai, Junwen; Ma, Haile

    2018-04-01

    Investigating the kinetics of enzyme activities and browning indexes in food are very essential in understanding the enzyme inactivation and browning pigmentation reaction during drying processing. In order to understand and predict accurately the enzyme inactivation and browning pigmentation of banana slices using Relative Humidity (RH)-convective hot air dryer aided by ultrasound (US) pretreatment, this study was conducted. Drying was carried out with 20 kHz frequency of US-pretreatment using three durations (10 20 and 30 min) and RH (10 20 and 30%) conditions at 70 °C and 2.0 m/s air velocity. The kinetic study of both enzyme inactivation and browning pigmentation results were compared to their relevance of fit in terms of coefficient of correlation (R2), the root mean square error (RMSE) and the reduced chi-square (χ 2). First order and second-order polynomial kinetic model fitted well for enzyme inactivation and browning indexes respectively. Both enzymes inactivation kinetics and enzymatic browning index (EBI) declined significantly (p drying time in all drying conditions and rate of decrease intensified in longer US-pretreatment duration and lower RH conditions. However, shorter US-pretreatment duration and higher RH conditions reduced the non- enzymatic browning index (NBI) significantly. Again, longer US-pretreatment duration and lower RH shortened the drying time but adversely created more microspores from the micrograph study. Longer US pretreatment and lower RH decrease significantly (p < 0.05) the L* and b* values whereas the a* values was increased.

  18. Kinetics based reaction optimization of enzyme catalysed reduction of formaldehyde to methanol with synchronous cofactor regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marpani, Fauziah Binti; Sárossy, Zsuzsa; Pinelo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    regeneration of the reducing equivalents during reaction is required. Herein, we report the optimization of the enzymatic conversion of formaldehyde (CHOH) to CH3 OH by alcohol dehydrogenase, the final step of the enzymatic redox reaction of CO2 to CH3 OH, with kinetically synchronous enzymatic cofactor...... regeneration using either glucose dehydrogenase (System I) or xylose dehydrogenase (System II). A mathematical model of the enzyme kinetics was employed to identify the best reaction set-up for attaining optimal cofactor recycling rate and enzyme utilization efficiency. Targeted process optimization...... experiments were conducted to verify the kinetically modelled results. Repetitive reaction cycles were shown to enhance the yield of CH3 OH, increase the total turnover number (TTN) and the biocatalytic productivity rate (BPR) value for both system I and II whilst minimizing the exposure of the enzymes...

  19. Diameter dependent electron transfer kinetics in semiconductor-enzyme complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katherine A; Song, Qing; Mulder, David W; King, Paul W

    2014-10-28

    Excited state electron transfer (ET) is a fundamental step for the catalytic conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. To understand the properties controlling ET between photoexcited nanoparticles and catalysts, the ET kinetics were measured for solution-phase complexes of CdTe quantum dots and Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase I (CaI) using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Over a 2.0-3.5 nm diameter range of CdTe nanoparticles, the observed ET rate (kET) was sensitive to CaI concentration. To account for diameter effects on CaI binding, a Langmuir isotherm and two geometric binding models were created to estimate maximal CaI affinities and coverages at saturating concentrations. Normalizing the ET kinetics to CaI surface coverage for each CdTe diameter led to k(ET) values that were insensitive to diameter, despite a decrease in the free energy for photoexcited ET (ΔGET) with increasing diameter. The turnover frequency (TOF) of CaI in CdTe-CaI complexes was measured at several molar ratios. Normalization for diameter-dependent changes in CaI coverage showed an increase in TOF with diameter. These results suggest that k(ET) and H2 production for CdTe-CaI complexes are not strictly controlled by ΔG(ET) and that other factors must be considered.

  20. New types of experimental data shape the use of enzyme kinetics for dynamic network modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummler, Katja; Lubitz, Timo; Schelker, Max; Klipp, Edda

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of Leonor Michaelis and Maude Menten's paper on the reaction kinetics of the enzyme invertase in 1913, molecular biology has evolved tremendously. New measurement techniques allow in vivo characterization of the whole genome, proteome or transcriptome of cells, whereas the classical enzyme essay only allows determination of the two Michaelis-Menten parameters V and K(m). Nevertheless, Michaelis-Menten kinetics are still commonly used, not only in the in vitro context of enzyme characterization but also as a rate law for enzymatic reactions in larger biochemical reaction networks. In this review, we give an overview of the historical development of kinetic rate laws originating from Michaelis-Menten kinetics over the past 100 years. Furthermore, we briefly summarize the experimental techniques used for the characterization of enzymes, and discuss web resources that systematically store kinetic parameters and related information. Finally, describe the novel opportunities that arise from using these data in dynamic mathematical modeling. In this framework, traditional in vitro approaches may be combined with modern genome-scale measurements to foster thorough understanding of the underlying complex mechanisms. © 2013 FEBS.

  1. The alteration of intracellular enzymes. III. The effect of temperature on the kinetics of altered and unaltered yeast catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FRASER, M J; KAPLAN, J G

    1955-03-20

    the case of catalase, of desorbing the enzyme from the interface into its rolled-up, soluble, highly specific configuration. While the interfacial hypothesis has successfully withstood this experimental attack, the present data do not provide its unequivocal proof, since they are consistent with any hypothesis of alteration in which the unaltered, intracellular enzyme is in a relatively disordered state by comparison to the altered enzyme. While evidence of an interfacial process in enzyme alteration has been adduced previously, critical proof of the interfacial hypothesis awaits creation of a model system, in which most of the aspects of intracellular alteration can be reproduced. 6. Certain of the changes in kinetic properties following alteration of the intracellular enzyme, such as increased activity and the modified energies and entropies of activation of both enzyme-substrate system and heat destruction of the catalase itself, might be explained by a decrease (two orders of magnitude) in the effective hydrogen ion concentration, allowing the intracellular enzyme to be brought to the same pH as the extracellular medium. If such a pH change does, in fact, occur, it is necessary to invoke the interfacial hypothesis to explain why the unaltered, intracellular enzyme is in equilibrium with a medium whose pH is approximately 2 units lower than that of the cytoplasm itself. 7. It is concluded that kinetic data of this kind may be used to shed light on the structure of a soluble, cytoplasmic enzyme, not attached to any of the formed elements within the cell, yet organized within it in a condition of relatively low structural specificity; further, that information obtained exclusively from a study of the kinetics of the extracted or crystalline enzymes may not, in the case of this enzyme, at least, be extrapolated to the same enzyme within the intact cell.

  2. ENZYMATIC KINETIC STUDY HYDROLASE FROM CITRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Hernández

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the degrading activity of enzymes derived from orange peels (Citrus x sinensis, grapefruit (Citrus paradise and pineapple (Ananas comosus on the organic matter in wastewater is evaluated. This activity is measured indirectly by quantifying the biochemical oxygen demand (COD before and after degradation process based on a period of time using the HACH DR / 2010, and then the kinetic study was performed by the differential method and integral with the experimental data, obtaining a reaction order of 1 to pectinase (orange, and order 2 for bromelain (pineapple.

  3. Simulation of the kinetics of enzymic hydrolysis of starch in standard apparatus used in alcohol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovinskii, L A; Yarovenko, V L

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model is described for kinetics of enzymic hydrolysis of starch in standard apparatus used in alcohol fermentation. The apparatus with uniform mixing and displacement was highly superior compared with other apparatuses. Differences of temperature with the apparatus significantly affects the rate of starch hydrolysis compared with constant temperature.

  4. A quenched-flow system for measuring heterogeneous enzyme kinetics with sub-second time resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Johan Pelck; Kari, Jeppe; Borch, Kim

    2017-01-01

    of insoluble substrate. Perhaps for this reason, transient kinetics has rarely been reported for heterogeneous enzyme reactions. Here, we describe a quenched-flow system using peristaltic pumps and stirred substrate suspensions with a dead time below 100 ms. The general performance was verified by alkali...

  5. Enzyme allocation problems in kinetic metabolic networks: Optimal solutions are elementary flux modes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller, Stefan; Regensburger, G.; Steuer, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 347, APR 2014 (2014), s. 182-190 ISSN 0022-5193 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0256 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : metabolic optimization * enzyme kinetics * oriented matroid * elementary vector * conformal sum Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.116, year: 2014

  6. Study on platelet kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yui, Tokuo

    1981-01-01

    Fundamental study: Factors influencing the labeling on human platelets were evaluated and optimal labeling conditions were chosen. Then, platelet survival times were measured and organ distribution of labeled platelets was observed in rat by four different methods. These results were compared with each other. Based on the findings of those studies, the protocol of human platelet labeling with 111 In-oxine for clinical use was established. Clinical study: In normal cases, a platelet survival time and a platelet turnover rate were quite similar to the results from 51 Cr method. In gamma camera imaging, a radioactivity on the heart decreased with the lapse of time, while that on the spleen and liver gradually increased. In patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, platelet survival time was markedly shortened and both a platelet turnover rate and an effective production increased. In patient with congestive splenomegaly, a platelet survival time was normal, whereas a platelet pooling on the spleen markedly increased. In patients who were implanted dacron-graft for abdominal aortic aneurysm, a radioactivity accumulated to the graft and a platelet survival time shortened. In a patient with myocardial infarction, the camera imaging clearly showed the thrombus in the left ventricular aneurysm. In three patients with mitral stenosis, thrombi in left atrium were observed at the camera images. Imaging of a platelet distribution and measurement of platelet survival time using 111 In-oxine labeled platelets are considered to be an excellent method for the diagnosis and decision of treatment on various disorders with thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. (J.P.N.)

  7. Functional Enzyme-Based Approach for Linking Microbial Community Functions with Biogeochemical Process Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minjing [School; Qian, Wei-jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Gao, Yuqian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Shi, Liang [School; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; School

    2017-09-28

    The kinetics of biogeochemical processes in natural and engineered environmental systems are typically described using Monod-type or modified Monod-type models. These models rely on biomass as surrogates for functional enzymes in microbial community that catalyze biogeochemical reactions. A major challenge to apply such models is the difficulty to quantitatively measure functional biomass for constraining and validating the models. On the other hand, omics-based approaches have been increasingly used to characterize microbial community structure, functions, and metabolites. Here we proposed an enzyme-based model that can incorporate omics-data to link microbial community functions with biogeochemical process kinetics. The model treats enzymes as time-variable catalysts for biogeochemical reactions and applies biogeochemical reaction network to incorporate intermediate metabolites. The sequences of genes and proteins from metagenomes, as well as those from the UniProt database, were used for targeted enzyme quantification and to provide insights into the dynamic linkage among functional genes, enzymes, and metabolites that are necessary to be incorporated in the model. The application of the model was demonstrated using denitrification as an example by comparing model-simulated with measured functional enzymes, genes, denitrification substrates and intermediates

  8. Kinetics and spatial distribution of enzymes of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in earthworm biopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang Thi Thu, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2016-04-01

    Earthworms boost microbial activities and consequently form hotspots in soil. The distribution of enzyme activities inside the earthworm biopores is completely unknown. For the first time, we analyzed enzyme kinetics and visualized enzyme distribution inside and outside biopores by in situ soil zymography. Kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) of 6 enzymes β-glucosidase (GLU), cellobiohydrolase (CBH), xylanase (XYL), chitinase (NAG), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and acid phosphatase (APT) were determined in biopores formed by Lumbricus terrestris L.. The spatial distributions of GLU, NAG and APT become visible via zymograms in comparison between earthworm-inhabited and earthworm-free soil. Zymography showed heterogeneous distribution of hotspots in the rhizosphere and biopores. The hotspot areas were 2.4 to 14 times larger in the biopores than in soil without earthworms. The significantly higher Vmax values for GLU, CBH, XYL, NAG and APT in biopores confirmed the stimulation of enzyme activities by earthworms. For CBH, XYL and NAG, the 2- to 3-fold higher Km values in biopores indicated different enzyme systems with lower substrate affinity compared to control soil. The positive effects of earthworms on Vmax were cancelled by the Km increase for CBH, XYL and NAG at a substrate concentration below 20 μmol g-1 soil. The change of enzyme systems reflected a shift in dominant microbial populations toward species with lower affinity to holo-celluloses and to N-acetylglucosamine, and with higher affinity to proteins as compared to the biopores-free soil. We conclude that earthworm biopores are microbial hotspots with much higher and dense distribution of enzyme activities compared to bulk soil. References Spohn M, Kuzyakov Y. (2014) Spatial and temporal dynamics of hotspots of enzyme activity in soil as affected by living and dead roots - a soil zymography analysis, Plant Soil 379: 67-77. Blagodatskaya, E., Kuzyakov, Y., 2013. Review paper: Active microorganisms in soil

  9. Kinetic analysis of enzyme systems with suicide substrate in the presence of a reversible competitive inhibitor, tested by simulated progress curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moruno-Dávila, M A; Garrido-del Solo, C; García-Moreno, M; Havsteen, B H; Garcia-Sevilla, F; Garcia-Cánovas, F; Varón, R

    2001-02-01

    The use of suicide substrates remains a very important and useful method in enzymology for studying enzyme mechanisms and designing potential drugs. Suicide substrates act as modified substrates for the target enzymes and bind to the active site. Therefore the presence of a competitive reversible inhibitor decreases the rate of substrate-induced inactivation and protects the enzyme from this inactivation. This lowering on the inactivation rate has evident physiological advantages, since it allows the easy acquisition of experimental data and facilitates kinetic data analysis by providing another variable (inhibitor concentration). However despite the importance of the simultaneous action of a suicide substrate and a competitive reversible inhibition, to date no corresponding kinetic analysis has been carried out. Therefore we present a general kinetic analysis of a Michaelis-Menten reaction mechanism with double inhibition caused by both, a suicide substrate and a competitive reversible inhibitor. We assume rapid equilibrium of the reversible reaction steps involved, while the time course equations for the reaction product have been derived with the assumption of a limiting enzyme. The goodness of the analytical solutions has been tested by comparison with the simulated curves obtained by numerical integration. A kinetic data analysis to determine the corresponding kinetic parameters from the time progress curve of the product is suggested. In conclusion, we present a complete kinetic analysis of an enzyme reaction mechanism as described above in an attempt to fill a gap in the theoretical treatment of this type of system.

  10. Purification of SUMO conjugating enzymes and kinetic analysis of substrate conjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Ali A.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMO conjugation to protein substrates requires the concerted action of a dedicated E2 ubiquitin conjugation enzyme (Ubc9) and associated E3 ligases. Although Ubc9 can directly recognize and modify substrate lysine residues that occur within a consensus site for SUMO modification, E3 ligases can redirect specificity and enhance conjugation rates during SUMO conjugation in vitro and in vivo. In this chapter, we will describe methods utilized to purify SUMO conjugating enzymes and model substrates which can be used for analysis of SUMO conjugation in vitro. We will also describe methods to extract kinetic parameters during E3-dependent or E3-independent substrate conjugation. PMID:19107417

  11. A Numerical Procedure for Model Identifiability Analysis Applied to Enzyme Kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daele, Timothy, Van; Van Hoey, Stijn; Gernaey, Krist

    2015-01-01

    The proper calibration of models describing enzyme kinetics can be quite challenging. In the literature, different procedures are available to calibrate these enzymatic models in an efficient way. However, in most cases the model structure is already decided on prior to the actual calibration...... and Pronzato (1997) and which can be easily set up for any type of model. In this paper the proposed approach is applied to the forward reaction rate of the enzyme kinetics proposed by Shin and Kim(1998). Structural identifiability analysis showed that no local structural model problems were occurring......) identifiability problems. By using the presented approach it is possible to detect potential identifiability problems and avoid pointless calibration (and experimental!) effort....

  12. Empirical evaluation of a virtual laboratory approach to teach lactate dehydrogenase enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Christine; Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Bellinson, Zack; Maguire, Danni; Zimitat, Craig; Abraham, Joyce; Eri, Rajaraman

    2016-06-01

    Personalised instruction is increasingly recognised as crucial for efficacious learning today. Our seminal work delineates and elaborates on the principles, development and implementation of a specially-designed adaptive, virtual laboratory. We strived to teach laboratory skills associated with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme kinetics to 2nd-year biochemistry students using our adaptive learning platform. Pertinent specific aims were to:(1)design/implement a web-based lesson to teach lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) enzyme kinetics to 2nd-year biochemistry students(2)determine its efficacious in improving students' comprehension of enzyme kinetics(3)assess their perception of its usefulness/manageability(vLab versus Conventional Tutorial). Our tools were designed using HTML5 technology. We hosted the program on an adaptive e-learning platform (AeLP). Provisions were made to interactively impart informed laboratory skills associated with measuring LDH enzyme kinetics. A series of e-learning methods were created. Tutorials were generated for interactive teaching and assessment. The learning outcomes herein were on par with that from a conventional classroom tutorial. Student feedback showed that the majority of students found the vLab learning experience "valuable"; and the vLab format/interface "well-designed". However, there were a few technical issues with the 1st roll-out of the platform. Our pioneering effort resulted in productive learning with the vLab, with parity with that from a conventional tutorial. Our contingent discussion emphasises not only the cornerstone advantages, but also the shortcomings of the AeLP method utilised. We conclude with an astute analysis of possible extensions and applications of our methodology.

  13. Real-Time Label-Free Direct Electronic Monitoring of Topoisomerase Enzyme Binding Kinetics on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaro, Laura; Tesauro, Cinzia; Kurkina, Tetiana; Fiorani, Paola; Yu, Hak Ki; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Kern, Klaus; Desideri, Alessandro; Balasubramanian, Kannan

    2015-11-24

    Monolayer graphene field-effect sensors operating in liquid have been widely deployed for detecting a range of analyte species often under equilibrium conditions. Here we report on the real-time detection of the binding kinetics of the essential human enzyme, topoisomerase I interacting with substrate molecules (DNA probes) that are immobilized electrochemically on to monolayer graphene strips. By monitoring the field-effect characteristics of the graphene biosensor in real-time during the enzyme-substrate interactions, we are able to decipher the surface binding constant for the cleavage reaction step of topoisomerase I activity in a label-free manner. Moreover, an appropriate design of the capture probes allows us to distinctly follow the cleavage step of topoisomerase I functioning in real-time down to picomolar concentrations. The presented results are promising for future rapid screening of drugs that are being evaluated for regulating enzyme activity.

  14. Study of DNA reconstruction enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiguchi, M [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1976-12-01

    Description was made of the characteristics and mechanism of 3 reconstructive enzymes which received from M. luteus or E. coli or T4, and of which natures were clarified as reconstructive enzymes of DNA irradiated with ultraviolet rays. As characteristics, the site of breaking, reaction, molecular weight, electric charge in the neutrality and a specific adhesion to DNA irradiated with ultraviolet rays were mentioned. As to mutant of ultraviolet ray sensitivity, hereditary control mechanism of removal and reconstruction by endo-nuclease activation was described, and suggestion was referred to removal and reconstruction of cells of xedoderma pigmentosum which is a hereditary disease of human. Description was also made as to the mechanism of exonuclease activation which separates dimer selectively from irradiated DNA.

  15. Purification, kinetic behavior, and regulation of NAD(P)+ malic enzyme of tumor mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Lehninger, A L

    1984-05-25

    The purification and kinetic characterization of an NAD(P)+-malic enzyme from 22aH mouse hepatoma mitochondria are described. The enzyme was purified 328-fold with a final yield of 51% and specific activity of 38.1 units/mg of protein by employing DEAE-cellulose chromatography and an ATP affinity column. Sephadex G-200 chromatography yielded a native Mr = 240,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a major subunit with Mr = 61,000, suggesting a tetrameric structure, and also showed that the preparation contained less than 10% polypeptide impurities. Use of the ATP affinity column required the presence of MnCl2 and fumarate (an allosteric activator) in the elution buffers. In the absence of fumarate, the Michaelis constants for malate, NAD+, and NADP+ were 3.6 mM, 55 microM, and 72 microM, respectively; in the presence of fumarate (2 mM), the constants were 0.34 mM, 9 microM, and 13 microM, respectively. ATP was shown to be an allosteric inhibitor, competitive with malate. However, the inhibition by ATP displayed hyperbolic competitive kinetics with a KI (ATP) of 80 microM (minus fumarate) and 0.5 mM (plus 2 mM fumarate). The allosteric properties of the enzyme are integrated into a rationale for its specific role in the pathways of malate and glutamate oxidation in tumor mitochondria.

  16. [Treatment of surface burns with proteolytic enzymes: mathematic description of lysis kinetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domogatskaia, A S; Domogatskiĭ, S P; Ruuge, E K

    2003-01-01

    The lysis of necrotic tissue by a proteolytic enzyme applied to the surface of a burn wound was studied. A mathematical model was proposed, which describes changes in the thickness of necrotic tissue as a function of the proteolytic activity of the enzyme. The model takes into account the inward-directed diffusion of the enzyme, the counterflow of interstitial fluid (exudates) containing specific inhibitors, and the extracellular matrix proteolysis. It was shown in terms of the quasi-stationary approach that the thickness of the necrotic tissue layer decreases exponentially with time; i.e., the lysis slows down as the thickness of the necrotic tissue layer decreases. The dependence of the characteristic time of this decrease on enzyme concentration was obtained. It was shown that, at high enzyme concentrations (more than 5 mg/ml), the entire time of lysis (after the establishment of quasi-stationary equilibrium) is inversely proportional to the concentration of the enzyme.

  17. Enzyme Kinetics By Directly Imaging A Porous Silicon Microfluidic Reactor Using Desorption/Ionization on Silicon Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nichols, K.P.F.; Azoz, Seyla; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2008-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics were obtained in a porous silicon microfluidic channel by combining an enzyme and substrate droplet, allowing them to react and deposit a small amount of residue on the channel walls, and then analyzing this residue by directly ionizing the channel walls using a matrix assisted laser

  18. Determination Of Enzyme Kinetic Parameters on Sago Starch Hydrolysis By Linearized Graphical Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, L.W.; Teo, C.L.; Suzana Wahidin; Mohamad Suffian Mohamad Annuar

    2014-01-01

    Amyloglucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.3) from Aspergillus niger was used to hydrolyze the sago (Metro xylon sagu) starch into reducing sugars. The experiment was conducted at constant temperature, 55 degree Celsius; pH, 4.5 and enzyme amount, 0.2 U/ ml, respectively. In this investigation, the substrate concentration was varied ranging from 1.0 - 7.0 g/ L. The obtained data were then fixed into linearized plots namely Lineweaver-Burk and Langmuir models to calculate enzyme kinetic parameters, K m and V max . Both of the K m and V max (mM, mol/min) values from each plot were: Lineweaver-Burk (26.53, 3.31) and Langmuir (13.52, 2.35). Among the linearized models, K m and V max values acquired from Langmuir plot was chosen. (author)

  19. Large-scale ruthenium- and enzyme-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution of (rac-1-phenylethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bäckvall Jan-E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The scale-up of the ruthenium- and enzyme-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR of (rac-1-phenylethanol (2 is addressed. The immobilized lipase Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB was employed for the resolution, which shows high enantioselectivity in the transesterification. The ruthenium catalyst used, (η 5-C5Ph5RuCl(CO2 1, was shown to possess very high reactivity in the "in situ" redox racemization of 1-phenylethanol (2 in the presence of the immobilized enzyme, and could be used in 0.05 mol% with high efficiency. Commercially available isopropenyl acetate was employed as acylating agent in the lipase-catalyzed transesterifications, which makes the purification of the product very easy. In a successful large-scale DKR of 2, with 0.05 mol% of 1, (R-1-phenylethanol acetate (3 was obtained in 159 g (97% yield in excellent enantiomeric excess (99.8% ee.

  20. Quantitative production of compound I from a cytochrome P450 enzyme at low temperatures. Kinetics, activation parameters, and kinetic isotope effects for oxidation of benzyl alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Sheng, Xin; Horner, John H; Newcomb, Martin

    2009-08-05

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes are commonly thought to oxidize substrates via an iron(IV)-oxo porphyrin radical cation transient termed Compound I, but kinetic studies of P450 Compounds I are essentially nonexistent. We report production of Compound I from cytochrome P450 119 (CYP119) in high conversion from the corresponding Compound II species at low temperatures in buffer mixtures containing 50% glycerol by photolysis with 365 nm light from a pulsed lamp. Compound I was studied as a reagent in oxidations of benzyl alcohol and its benzylic mono- and dideuterio isotopomers. Pseudo-first-order rate constants obtained at -50 degrees C with concentrations of substrates between 1.0 and 6.0 mM displayed saturation kinetics that gave binding constants for the substrate in the Compound I species (K(bind)) and first-order rate constants for the oxidation reactions (k(ox)). Representative results are K(bind) = 214 M(-1) and k(ox) = 0.48 s(-1) for oxidation of benzyl alcohol. For the dideuterated substrate C(6)H(5)CD(2)OH, kinetics were studied between -50 and -25 degrees C, and a van't Hoff plot for complexation and an Arrhenius plot for the oxidation reaction were constructed. The H/D kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) at -50 degrees C were resolved into a large primary KIE (P = 11.9) and a small, inverse secondary KIE (S = 0.96). Comparison of values extrapolated to 22 degrees C of both the rate constant for oxidation of C(6)H(5)CD(2)OH and the KIE for the nondeuterated and dideuterated substrates to values obtained previously in laser flash photolysis experiments suggested that tunneling could be a significant component of the total rate constant at -50 degrees C.

  1. [Enzyme kinetic analysis of Oncomelania hupensis exposed to active ingredient of Buddleja lindleyana (AIBL)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang-Xing, Han; Jun, Chen

    2016-07-01

    To analyze the enzyme kinetics of active ingredient of Buddleja lindleyana (AIBL) against Oncomelania hupensis , the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum . O . hupensis snails were placed in 1 000 ml of 3.55 mg/L AIBL solution for 24, 48 h and 72 h, respectively, and the enzyme kinetics of alanine aminotransferase (GPT) was determined by Reitman-Frankel assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) by the chemical inhibition lactic acid substrate method, alkaline phosphatase (AKP) by the disodium phenyl phosphate colorimetric method, acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and malate dehydrogenas (MDH) by ELISA, and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) by the phenazine methyl sulfate reaction method (PMS) in the soft tissues of O. hupensis before and after AIBL treatment. Following exposure to 3.55 mg/L AIBL solution for 24 h, the GPT, LDH, and AKP activities significantly improved in the soft tissues of O. hupensis , while the SDH and MDH activities were significantly lowered in the head-foot and liver. However, AIBL treatment did not cause significant effect on AChE activity in O. hupensis . AIBL causes significant damages to O. hupensis liver and can efficiently act on anaerobic and aerobic respiration loci, which will hinder energy metabolism, and cause inadequate energy supply in cells used for normal secretion, eventually leading to O. hupensis death.

  2. Microbial respiration and kinetics of extracellular enzymes activities through rhizosphere and detritusphere at agricultural site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löppmann, Sebastian; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Rhizosphere and detritusphere are soil microsites with very high resource availability for microorganisms affecting their biomass, composition and functions. In the rhizosphere low molecular compounds occur with root exudates and low available polymeric compounds, as belowground plant senescence. In detritusphere the substrate for decomposition is mainly a polymeric material of low availability. We hypothesized that microorganisms adapted to contrasting quality and availability of substrates in the rhizosphere and detritusphere are strongly different in affinity of hydrolytic enzymes responsible for decomposition of organic compounds. According to common ecological principles easily available substrates are quickly consumed by microorganisms with enzymes of low substrate affinity (i.e. r-strategists). The slow-growing K-strategists with enzymes of high substrate affinity are better adapted for growth on substrates of low availability. Estimation of affinity of enzyme systems to the substrate is based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics, reflecting the dependency of decomposition rates on substrate amount. As enzymes-mediated reactions are substrate-dependent, we further hypothesized that the largest differences in hydrolytic activity between the rhizosphere and detritusphere occur at substrate saturation and that these differences are smoothed with increasing limitation of substrate. Affected by substrate limitation, microbial species follow a certain adaptation strategy. To achieve different depth gradients of substrate availability 12 plots on an agricultural field were established in the north-west of Göttingen, Germany: 1) 4 plots planted with maize, reflecting lower substrate availability with depth; 2) 4 unplanted plots with maize litter input (0.8 kg m-2 dry maize residues), corresponding to detritusphere; 3) 4 bare fallow plots as control. Maize litter was grubbed homogenously into the soil at the first 5 cm to ensure comparable conditions for the herbivore and

  3. Spectroscopic studies of copper enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, D.M.; Moog, R.; Zumft, W.; Koenig, S.H.; Scott, R.A.; Cote, C.E.; McGuirl, M.

    1986-01-01

    Several spectroscopic methods, including absorption, circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), X-ray absorption, resonance Raman, EPR, NMR, and quasi-elastic light-scattering spectroscopy, have been used to probe the structures of copper-containing amine oxidases, nitrite reductase, and nitrous oxide reductase. The basic goals are to determine the copper site structure, electronic properties, and to generate structure-reactivity correlations. Collectively, the results on the amine oxidases permit a detailed model for the Cu(II) sites in these enzymes to be constructed that, in turn, rationalizes the ligand-binding chemistry. Resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazine and 2,4-dinitrophenyl-hydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase and models for its organic cofactor, e.g. pyridoxal, methoxatin, are most consistent with methoxatin being the intrinsic cofactor. The structure of the Cu(I) forms of the amine oxidases have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS); the copper coordination geometry is significantly different in the oxidized and reduced forms. Some anomalous properties of the amine oxidases in solution are explicable in terms of their reversible aggregation, which the authors have characterized via light scattering. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases display several novel spectral properties. The data suggest that new types of copper sites are present

  4. Application of HPLC to study the kinetics of a branched bi-enzyme system consisting of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and xanthine oxidase--an important biochemical system to evaluate the efficiency of the anticancer drug 6-mercaptopurine in ALL cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sukirti; Paul, Manash K; Balaram, Hemalatha; Mukhopadhyay, Anup Kumar

    2007-05-01

    The thiopurine antimetabolite 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) is an important chemotherapeutic drug in the conventional treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). 6MP is mainly catabolized by both hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and xanthine oxidase (XOD) to form thioinosinic monophosphate (TIMP) (therapeutically active metabolite) and 6-thiouric acid (6TUA) (inactive metabolite), respectively. The activity of both the enzymes varies among ALL patients governing the active and the inactive metabolite profile within the immature lymphocytes. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the kinetic nature of the branched bi-enzyme system acting on 6MP and to quantitate TIMP and 6TUA formed when the two enzymes are present in equal and variable ratios. The quantification of the branched kinetics using spectrophotometric method presents problem due to the closely apposed lambda(max) of the substrates and products. Hence, employing an HPLC method, the quantification of the products was done with the progress of time. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of substrate was found to be 10nM and for products as 50 nM. The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 1 nM for the substrate and the products. The method exhibited linearity in the range of 0.01-100 microM for 6MP and 0.05-100 microM for both 6TUA and TIMP. The amount of TIMP formed was higher than that of 6TUA in the bi-enzyme system when both the enzymes were present in equivalent enzymatic ratio. It was further found that enzymatic ratios play an important role in determining the amounts of TIMP and 6TUA. This method was further validated using actively growing T-ALL cell line (Jurkat) to study the branched kinetics, wherein it was observed that treatment of 50 microM 6MP led to the generation of 12 microM TIMP and 0.8 microM 6TUA in 6 h at 37 degrees C.

  5. Kinetic study of enzymatic hydrolysis of potato starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Fernando Castellanos Domínguez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the kinetic study of potato starch enzymatic hydrolysis using soluble enzymes (Novo Nordisk. Different assays divided into four groups were used: reaction time (with which it was possible to reduce the 48-72 hour duration reported in the literature to 16 hours with comparable productivity levels; selecting the set of enzymes to be used (different types were evaluated - BAN and Termamyl as alfa-amylases during dextrinisation stage, and AMG, Promozyme and Fungamyl for sacarification reaction- identifying those presenting the best performance during hydrolysis.Reaction conditions were optimised for the process's two stages (destrinisation and sacarification. Enzyme dose, calcium cofactor concentration, pH, temperature and agitation speed were studied for the first stage. Enzyme ratio, pH and agitation speed were studied for sacarification; the latter parameter reported values having no antecedents in the literature (60 rpm and 30 rpm for first and second reactions, respectively. Michaelis Menten kinetics were calculated once conditions had been optimised, varying substrate from 10-50% P/V, obtaining km and Vmax kinetic parameters for each reaction. A kinetic model was found according to local working conditions which was able to explain potato starch conversion to glucose syrup, achieving 96 dextrose equivalents by the end of the reaction, being well within the maximum range reported in the literature (94-98.Laboratory equipment was constructed prior to carrying out assays which was able to reproduce and improve the conditions reported in the literature, making it a useful, reliable tool for use in assays returning good results.

  6. Kinetic studies on leucite precursors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrázová, M.; Kloužková, A.; Kohoutková, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2009), s. 205-210 ISSN 1895-1066 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : leucite * crystallization kinetics * hydrothermal Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.065, year: 2009

  7. Deduction of kinetic mechanism in multisubstrate enzyme reactions from tritium isotope effects. Application to dopamine beta-hydroxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinman, J.P.; Humphries, H.; Voet, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Primary tritium isotope effects have been measured for the hydroxylation of [2-3H] dopamine catalyzed by dopamine beta-hydroxylase. Experimental values vary from 8.8 +/- 1.4 at 0.02 mM oxygen to 4.1 +/- 0.6 at 1.0 mM oxygen. It is shown that the observed dependence of the isotope effect on oxygen concentration provides unequivocal evidence for a kinetically significant dissociation of both dopamine and oxygen from enzyme, ternary complex. This approach, which is applicable to any multisubstrate enzyme characterized by detectable kinetic isotope effects, provides an alternate to classical methods for the elucidation of kinetic order in enzyme-catalyzed reactions

  8. Thermodynamics of information processing based on enzyme kinetics: An exactly solvable model of an information pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuansheng; Gong, Zongping; Quan, H T

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by the recent proposed models of the information engine [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 11641 (2012)] and the information refrigerator [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 030602 (2013)], we propose a minimal model of the information pump and the information eraser based on enzyme kinetics. This device can either pump molecules against the chemical potential gradient by consuming the information to be encoded in the bit stream or (partially) erase the information initially encoded in the bit stream by consuming the Gibbs free energy. The dynamics of this model is solved exactly, and the "phase diagram" of the operation regimes is determined. The efficiency and the power of the information machine is analyzed. The validity of the second law of thermodynamics within our model is clarified. Our model offers a simple paradigm for the investigating of the thermodynamics of information processing involving the chemical potential in small systems.

  9. Thermodynamics of information processing based on enzyme kinetics: An exactly solvable model of an information pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuansheng; Gong, Zongping; Quan, H. T.

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by the recent proposed models of the information engine [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 109, 11641 (2012), 10.1073/pnas.1204263109] and the information refrigerator [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 030602 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.030602], we propose a minimal model of the information pump and the information eraser based on enzyme kinetics. This device can either pump molecules against the chemical potential gradient by consuming the information to be encoded in the bit stream or (partially) erase the information initially encoded in the bit stream by consuming the Gibbs free energy. The dynamics of this model is solved exactly, and the "phase diagram" of the operation regimes is determined. The efficiency and the power of the information machine is analyzed. The validity of the second law of thermodynamics within our model is clarified. Our model offers a simple paradigm for the investigating of the thermodynamics of information processing involving the chemical potential in small systems.

  10. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  11. Sugarcane bagasse pretreatment using three imidazolium-based ionic liquids; mass balances and enzyme kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatzos Sergios

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective pretreatment is key to achieving high enzymatic saccharification efficiency in processing lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars, biofuels and value-added products. Ionic liquids (ILs, still relatively new class of solvents, are attractive for biomass pretreatment because some demonstrate the rare ability to dissolve all components of lignocellulosic biomass including highly ordered (crystalline cellulose. In the present study, three ILs, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C4mim]Cl, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C2mim]Cl, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim]OAc are used to dissolve/pretreat and fractionate sugarcane bagasse. In these IL-based pretreatments the biomass is completely or partially dissolved in ILs at temperatures greater than 130°C and then precipitated by the addition of an antisolvent to the IL biomass mixture. For the first time mass balances of IL-based pretreatments are reported. Such mass balances, along with kinetics data, can be used in process modelling and design. Results Lignin removals of 10% mass of lignin in bagasse with [C4mim]Cl, 50% mass with [C2mim]Cl and 60% mass with [C2mim]OAc, are achieved by limiting the amount of water added as antisolvent to 0.5 water:IL mass ratio thus minimising lignin precipitation. Enzyme saccharification (24 h, 15FPU yields (% cellulose mass in starting bagasse from the recovered solids rank as: [C2mim]OAc(83% > >[C2mim]Cl(53% = [C4mim]Cl(53%. Composition of [C2mim]OAc-treated solids such as low lignin, low acetyl group content and preservation of arabinosyl groups are characteristic of aqueous alkali pretreatments while those of chloride IL-treated solids resemble aqueous acid pretreatments. All ILs are fully recovered after use (100% mass as determined by ion chromatography. Conclusions In all three ILs regulated addition of water as an antisolvent effected a polysaccharide enriched precipitate since some of the lignin

  12. Kinetic studies of alkaline phosphatase extracted from rabbit (Lepus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    activity, and the kinetic constants-maximum enzyme velocity (Vmax) and Michealis-Menten constant (Km) were evaluated. ... the enzyme a readily available parameter for diagnostic and research .... procedure while treatment means were separated by the least .... mammalian enzymes are responsible for this increase in ...

  13. Rapid Determination of Enzyme Kinetics from Fluorescence: Overcoming the Inner Filter Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmier, Mark O.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence change is convenient for monitoring enzyme kinetics. Unfortunately, it looses linearity as the absorbance of the fluorescent substrate increases with concentration. When the sum of absorbance at excitation and emission wavelengths exceeds 0.08, this inner filtering effect (IFE) alters apparent initial velocities, Km, and kcat. The IFE distortion of apparent initial velocities can be corrected without doing fluorophore dilution assays. Using the substrate’s extinction coefficients at excitation and emission wavelengths, the inner filter effect can be modeled during curve fitting for more accurate Michaelis-Menten parameters. A faster and simpler approach is to derive kcat and Km from progress curves. Strategies to obtain reliable and reproducible estimates of kcat and Km from only two or three progress curves are illustrated using matrix metalloproteinase-12 and alkaline phosphatase. Accurate estimates of concentration of enzyme active sites and specificity constant kcat/Km (from one progress curve with [S] ≪ Km) confer accuracy, freedom of choices of [S], and robustness to kcat and Km globally fitted to a few progress curves. The economies of the progress curve approach make accurate kcat and Km more accessible from fluorescence measurements. PMID:17706587

  14. Photoperiodism and enzyme rhythms: Kinetic characteristics of the photoperiodic induction of Crassulacean acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulfert, J; Guerrier, D; Queiroz, O

    1975-01-01

    The effect of photoperiod on Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poellniz, cv. Tom Thumb, has characteristics similar to its effect on flowering in this plant (although these two phenomena are not causally related). The photoperiodic control of CAM is based on (a) dependance on phytochrome, (b) an endogenous circadian rhythm of sensitivity to photoperiodic signals, (c) a balance between specific positive (increase in enzyme capacity) and negative (inhibitory substances) effects of the photoperiod. Variations in malate content, capacity of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, and capacity of CAM inhibitors in young leaves were measured under photoperiodic conditions noninductive for CAM and after transfer into photoperiodic conditions inductive for CAM. Essential characteristics of the photoperiodic induction of CAM are: 1) lag time for malate accumulation; 2) after-effect of the inductive photoperiod on the malate accumulation, on the increase in PEP carboxylase capacity, and on the decrease in the level of long-day produced inhibitors; final levels of malate, enzyme capacity and inhibitor are proportional to the number of inductive day-night cycles; 3) cireadian rhythm in PEP carboxylase capacity with a fixed phase under noninductive photoperiods and a continuously shifting phase under inductive photoperiods, after complex advancing and delaying transients. Kinetic similarities indicate that photoperiodic control of different physiological functions, namely, CAM and flowering, may be achieved through similar mechanisms. Preliminary results with species of Bryophyllum and Sedum support this hypothesis. Phase relationships suggest different degrees of coupling between endogenous enzymic rhythm and photoperiod, depending on whether the plants are under long days or short days.

  15. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  16. Impact of pH and Total Soluble Solids on Enzyme Inactivation Kinetics during High Pressure Processing of Mango (Mangifera indica) Pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Neelima; Nadella, Tejaswi; Rao, P Srinivasa

    2015-11-01

    This study was undertaken with an aim to enhance the enzyme inactivation during high pressure processing (HPP) with pH and total soluble solids (TSS) as additional hurdles. Impact of mango pulp pH (3.5, 4.0, 4.5) and TSS (15, 20, 25 °Brix) variations on the inactivation of pectin methylesterase (PME), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), and peroxidase (POD) enzymes were studied during HPP at 400 to 600 MPa pressure (P), 40 to 70 °C temperature (T), and 6- to 20-min pressure-hold time (t). The enzyme inactivation (%) was modeled using second order polynomial equations with a good fit that revealed that all the enzymes were significantly affected by HPP. Response surface and contour models predicted the kinetic behavior of mango pulp enzymes adequately as indicated by the small error between predicted and experimental data. The predicted kinetics indicated that for a fixed P and T, higher pulse pressure effect and increased isobaric inactivation rates were possible at lower levels of pH and TSS. In contrast, at a fixed pH or TSS level, an increase in P or T led to enhanced inactivation rates, irrespective of the type of enzyme. PPO and POD were found to have similar barosensitivity, whereas PME was found to be most resistant to HPP. Furthermore, simultaneous variation in pH and TSS levels of mango pulp resulted in higher enzyme inactivation at lower pH and TSS during HPP, where the effect of pH was found to be predominant than TSS within the experimental domain. Exploration of additional hurdles such as pH, TSS, and temperature for enzyme inactivation during high pressure processing of fruits is useful from industrial point of view, as these parameters play key role in preservation process design. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Development of an LC-MS based enzyme activity assay for MurC: application to evaluation of inhibitors and kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gejing; Gu, Rong-Fang; Marmor, Stephen; Fisher, Stewart L; Jahic, Haris; Sanyal, Gautam

    2004-06-29

    An enzyme activity assay, based on mass spectrometric (MS) detection of specific reaction product following HPLC separation, has been developed to evaluate pharmaceutical hits identified from primary high throughput screening (HTS) against target enzyme Escherichia coli UDP-N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanine ligase (MurC), an essential enzyme in the bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway, and to study the kinetics of the enzyme. A comparative analysis of this new liquid chromatographic-MS (LC-MS) based assay with a conventional spectrophotometric Malachite Green (MG) assay, which detects phosphate produced in the reaction, was performed. The results demonstrated that the LC-MS assay, which determines specific ligase activity of MurC, offers several advantages including a lower background (0.2% versus 26%), higher sensitivity (> or = 10 fold), lower limit of quantitation (LOQ) (0.02 microM versus 1 microM) and wider linear dynamic range (> or = 4 fold) than the MG assay. Good precision for the LC-MS assay was demonstrated by the low intraday and interday coefficient of variation (CV) values (3 and 6%, respectively). The LC-MS assay, free of the artifacts often seen in the Malachite Green assay, offers a valuable secondary assay for hit evaluation in which the false positives from the primary high throughput screening can be eliminated. In addition, the applicability of this assay to the study of enzyme kinetics has also been demonstrated. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Kinetic Studies on Trichoderna Viride Cellulase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw Aung; Oo Aung; Aung Myint

    2002-02-01

    Studies on cellulase enzyme (EC 3.2.1.4), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of. cellulose to yield glucose, were made. Cellulase from a fungus source, Trichoderma viride was cultivated on Czapek's agar medium and enzyme production broth medium was employed for parameter tests. The microscopic examination and cellulase hydrolysis test on subcultured fungi were applied to confirm the T. viride species. A calibration curve for standard glucose was plotted by using visible spectroscopy. Dinitrosalicylic acid was used as enzyme reaction inhibitor and the colour intensity was measured in a UV-visible spectrophotometer at a λ max of 570 nm. The parameters such as optimum pH, optimum temperature, effect of substrate concentration, effect, of enzyme concentration, enzyme unit (EU), reaction order (n), maximum velocity (V max ), Michaelis-Menten constant (K m ) using various substrates, viz., carboxy methylcellulose, cotton fibre and filter paper determined. (author)

  19. Kinetic Study of Curcumin on Modal Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Naser Md. Ahsanul Haque

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic study of curcumin on modal fabric was carried out using an initial dye concentration of 1 g/L at three different temperatures, 70 °C, 85 °C and 100 °C, at pH 7 and an material to liquor ratio of 1:20. Pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order kinetics were applied, and it was found that the adsorption kinetics of curcumin on modal fabric matched the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The activation energy was found to be equal to 71.14 kJ/mol, while the enthalpy and entropy of activation were 68.16 kJ/mol and –66.02 J/molK respectively.

  20. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Characterization of Peroxidase-Like π-Cation Radical Pinch-Porphyrin-Iron(III Reaction Intermediate Models of Peroxidase Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Hernández Anzaldo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectroscopic and kinetic characterization of two intermediates from the H2O2 oxidation of three dimethyl ester [(proto, (meso, (deuteroporphyrinato (picdien]Fe(III complexes ([FePPPic], [FeMPPic] and [FeDPPic], respectively pinch-porphyrin peroxidase enzyme models, with s = 5/2 and 3/2 Fe(III quantum mixed spin (qms ground states is described herein. The kinetic study by UV/Vis at λmax = 465 nm showed two different types of kinetics during the oxidation process in the guaiacol test for peroxidases (1–3 + guaiacol + H2O2 → oxidation guaiacol products. The first intermediate was observed during the first 24 s of the reaction. When the reaction conditions were changed to higher concentration of pinch-porphyrins and hydrogen peroxide only one type of kinetics was observed. Next, the reaction was performed only between pinch-porphyrins-Fe(III and H2O2, resulting in only two types of kinetics that were developed during the first 0–4 s. After this time a self-oxidation process was observed. Our hypotheses state that the formation of the π-cation radicals, reaction intermediates of the pinch-porphyrin-Fe(III family with the ligand picdien [N,N’-bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-propane-1,3-diamine], occurred with unique kinetics that are different from the overall process and was involved in the oxidation pathway. UV-Vis, 1H-NMR and ESR spectra confirmed the formation of such intermediates. The results in this paper highlight the link between different spectroscopic techniques that positively depict the kinetic traits of artificial compounds with enzyme-like activity.

  1. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  2. Kinetic Studies on Microbial Production of Tannase Using Redgram Husk

    OpenAIRE

    S. K. Mohan; T. Viruthagiri; C. Arunkumar

    2015-01-01

    Tannase (tannin acyl hydrolase, E.C.3.1.1.20) is an important hydrolysable enzyme with innumerable applications and industrial potential. In the present study, a kinetic model has been developed for the batch fermentation used for the production of tannase by A.flavus MTCC 3783. Maximum tannase activity of 143.30 U/ml was obtained at 96 hours under optimum operating conditions at 35oC, an initial pH of 5.5 and with an inducer tannic acid concentration of 3% (w/v) for a fe...

  3. Solution of non-steady-state substrate concentration in the action of biosensor response at mixed enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthamarai, R.; Jana Ranjani, R.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model of an amperometric biosensor at mixed enzyme kinetics and diffusion limitation in the case of substrate inhibition has been developed. The model is based on time dependent reaction diffusion equation containing a non -linear term related to non -Michaelis - Menten kinetics of the enzymatic reaction. Solution for the concentration of the substrate has been derived for all values of parameters using the homotopy perturbation method. All the approximate analytic expressions of substrate concentration are compared with simulation results using Scilab/Matlab program. Finally, we have given a satisfactory agreement between them.

  4. Occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes: analysis for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and assessment of numerical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Félix Monteiro; Oliveira, Samuel Conceição

    2016-11-01

    In this article, the occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes is analyzed for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. An assessment of numerical methods is performed to solve the boundary value problem generated by the mathematical modeling of diffusion and reaction processes under steady state and isothermal conditions. Two classes of numerical methods were employed: shooting and collocation. The shooting method used the ode function from Scilab software. The collocation methods included: that implemented by the bvode function of Scilab, the orthogonal collocation, and the orthogonal collocation on finite elements. The methods were validated for simplified forms of the Michaelis-Menten equation (zero-order and first-order kinetics), for which analytical solutions are available. Among the methods covered in this article, the orthogonal collocation on finite elements proved to be the most robust and efficient method to solve the boundary value problem concerning Michaelis-Menten kinetics. For this enzyme kinetics, it was found that the dead core can occur when verified certain conditions of diffusion-reaction within the catalytic particle. The application of the concepts and methods presented in this study will allow for a more generalized analysis and more accurate designs of heterogeneous enzymatic reactors.

  5. Lithium hydride hydrolysis: experimental and kinetic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charton, S.; Maupoix, C.; Brevet, A.; Delaunay, F.; Heintz, O.; Saviot, L.

    2006-01-01

    In this work has been studied the contribution of various analyses techniques in the framework, on the one hand of revealing the mechanisms implied in lithium hydride hydrolysis, and on the other hand of studying the kinetics of hydrogen production. Among the methods recently investigated, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and SIMS seem to be particularly attractive. (O.M.)

  6. Evaluation of reaction mechanisms and the kinetic parameters for the transesterification of castor oil by liquid enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade, Thalles Allan; Errico, Massimiliano; Christensen, Knud Villy

    2017-01-01

    of the transesterification of castor oil with methanol using the enzyme Eversa® Transform as catalyst were investigated. Reactions were carried out for 8 hours at 35 °C with: an alcohol-to-oil molar ratio equal to 6:1, a 5 wt% of liquid enzyme solution and addition of 5 wt% of water by weight of castor oil. From...... methanolysis rates of glycerides obtained, indicated that transesterification dominates over hydrolysis. The mechanism among the four models proposed that gave the best fit could be simplified, eliminating the kinetic parameters with negligible effects on the reaction rates. This model was able to fit...

  7. Radioisotope-enzymes and cancer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luyen, T. van

    2008-01-01

    Cancer is a pathological sign, when the abnormal cells appear in certain human tissues or organs. These cells can reproduce beyond the control of normal biological protection mechanism. Because they reproduce very fast, the metabolic process is accelerated, which causes the extreme need for more energy, substrate and catalyzing enzymes. Based on these needs, we can control the metabolic process by: Stopping supplying the energy. Stopping supplying the substrate and the materials to build up the cell's structure. Stopping operating catalysis by breaking out the enzyme's structure. Destroying the tumor cell by extra agents such as radiations and chemicals. All of these methods have been studied for a long time, which costs too much money, time and labor. Although we succeeded in some ways, the results are still not satisfactory. There are many reasons for this situation but the main one is the lack of information to understand all the processes taking place in the cell and our body. However, as far as we studied, we would like to propose the method to break the structure of the enzyme by nuclear decay process. (author)

  8. Kinetic and structural characterization of amyloid-β peptide hydrolysis by human angiotensin-1-converting enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmuth, Kate M; Masuyer, Geoffrey; Douglas, Ross G; Schwager, Sylva L; Acharya, K Ravi; Sturrock, Edward D

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE), a zinc metallopeptidase, consists of two homologous catalytic domains (N and C) with different substrate specificities. Here we report kinetic parameters of five different forms of human ACE with various amyloid beta (Aβ) substrates together with high resolution crystal structures of the N-domain in complex with Aβ fragments. For the physiological Aβ(1-16) peptide, a novel ACE cleavage site was found at His14-Gln15. Furthermore, Aβ(1-16) was preferentially cleaved by the individual N-domain; however, the presence of an inactive C-domain in full-length somatic ACE (sACE) greatly reduced enzyme activity and affected apparent selectivity. Two fluorogenic substrates, Aβ(4-10)Q and Aβ(4-10)Y, underwent endoproteolytic cleavage at the Asp7-Ser8 bond with all ACE constructs showing greater catalytic efficiency for Aβ(4-10)Y. Surprisingly, in contrast to Aβ(1-16) and Aβ(4-10)Q, sACE showed positive domain cooperativity and the double C-domain (CC-sACE) construct no cooperativity towards Aβ(4-10)Y. The structures of the Aβ peptide-ACE complexes revealed a common mode of peptide binding for both domains which principally targets the C-terminal P2' position to the S2' pocket and recognizes the main chain of the P1' peptide. It is likely that N-domain selectivity for the amyloid peptide is conferred through the N-domain specific S2' residue Thr358. Additionally, the N-domain can accommodate larger substrates through movement of the N-terminal helices, as suggested by the disorder of the hinge region in the crystal structures. Our findings are important for the design of domain selective inhibitors as the differences in domain selectivity are more pronounced with the truncated domains compared to the more physiological full-length forms. The atomic coordinates and structure factors for N-domain ACE with Aβ peptides 4-10 (5AM8), 10-16 (5AM9), 1-16 (5AMA), 35-42 (5AMB) and (4-10)Y (5AMC) complexes have been deposited in the

  9. Hybrid quantum and classical methods for computing kinetic isotope effects of chemical reactions in solutions and in enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiali; Major, Dan T; Fan, Yao; Lin, Yen-Lin; Ma, Shuhua; Wong, Kin-Yiu

    2008-01-01

    A method for incorporating quantum mechanics into enzyme kinetics modeling is presented. Three aspects are emphasized: 1) combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical methods are used to represent the potential energy surface for modeling bond forming and breaking processes, 2) instantaneous normal mode analyses are used to incorporate quantum vibrational free energies to the classical potential of mean force, and 3) multidimensional tunneling methods are used to estimate quantum effects on the reaction coordinate motion. Centroid path integral simulations are described to make quantum corrections to the classical potential of mean force. In this method, the nuclear quantum vibrational and tunneling contributions are not separable. An integrated centroid path integral-free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM) method along with a bisection sampling procedure was summarized, which provides an accurate, easily convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. In the ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (EA-VTST/MT), these three aspects of quantum mechanical effects can be individually treated, providing useful insights into the mechanism of enzymatic reactions. These methods are illustrated by applications to a model process in the gas phase, the decarboxylation reaction of N-methyl picolinate in water, and the proton abstraction and reprotonation process catalyzed by alanine racemase. These examples show that the incorporation of quantum mechanical effects is essential for enzyme kinetics simulations.

  10. The maximum entropy production and maximum Shannon information entropy in enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobovišek, Andrej; Markovič, Rene; Brumen, Milan; Fajmut, Aleš

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate that the maximum entropy production principle (MEPP) serves as a physical selection principle for the description of the most probable non-equilibrium steady states in simple enzymatic reactions. A theoretical approach is developed, which enables maximization of the density of entropy production with respect to the enzyme rate constants for the enzyme reaction in a steady state. Mass and Gibbs free energy conservations are considered as optimization constraints. In such a way computed optimal enzyme rate constants in a steady state yield also the most uniform probability distribution of the enzyme states. This accounts for the maximal Shannon information entropy. By means of the stability analysis it is also demonstrated that maximal density of entropy production in that enzyme reaction requires flexible enzyme structure, which enables rapid transitions between different enzyme states. These results are supported by an example, in which density of entropy production and Shannon information entropy are numerically maximized for the enzyme Glucose Isomerase.

  11. Structural and Kinetic Properties of the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase NahF, a Broad Substrate Specificity Enzyme for Aldehyde Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coitinho, Juliana B; Pereira, Mozart S; Costa, Débora M A; Guimarães, Samuel L; Araújo, Simara S; Hengge, Alvan C; Brandão, Tiago A S; Nagem, Ronaldo A P

    2016-09-27

    The salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase (NahF) catalyzes the oxidation of salicylaldehyde to salicylate using NAD(+) as a cofactor, the last reaction of the upper degradation pathway of naphthalene in Pseudomonas putida G7. The naphthalene is an abundant and toxic compound in oil and has been used as a model for bioremediation studies. The steady-state kinetic parameters for oxidation of aliphatic or aromatic aldehydes catalyzed by 6xHis-NahF are presented. The 6xHis-NahF catalyzes the oxidation of aromatic aldehydes with large kcat/Km values close to 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The active site of NahF is highly hydrophobic, and the enzyme shows higher specificity for less polar substrates than for polar substrates, e.g., acetaldehyde. The enzyme shows α/β folding with three well-defined domains: the oligomerization domain, which is responsible for the interlacement between the two monomers; the Rossmann-like fold domain, essential for nucleotide binding; and the catalytic domain. A salicylaldehyde molecule was observed in a deep pocket in the crystal structure of NahF where the catalytic C284 and E250 are present. Moreover, the residues G150, R157, W96, F99, F274, F279, and Y446 were thought to be important for catalysis and specificity for aromatic aldehydes. Understanding the molecular features responsible for NahF activity allows for comparisons with other aldehyde dehydrogenases and, together with structural information, provides the information needed for future mutational studies aimed to enhance its stability and specificity and further its use in biotechnological processes.

  12. Kinetic studies of anomalous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.

    1990-11-01

    Progress in achieving a physics-based understanding of anomalous transport in toroidal systems has come in large part from investigations based on the proposition that low frequency electrostatic microinstabilities are dominant in the bulk (''confinement'') region of these plasmas. Although the presence here of drift-type modes dependent on trapped particle and ion temperature gradient driven effects appears to be consistent with a number of important observed confinement trends, conventional estimates for these instabilities cannot account for the strong current (I p ) and /or q-scaling frequently found in empirically deduced global energy confinement times for auxiliary-heated discharges. The present paper deals with both linear and nonlinear physics features, ignored in simpler estimates, which could introduce an appreciable local dependence on current. It is also pointed out that while the thermal flux characteristics of drift modes have justifiably been the focus of experimental studies assessing their relevance, other transport properties associated with these microinstabilities should additionally be examined. Accordingly, the present paper provides estimates and discusses the significance of anomalous energy exchange between ions and electrons when fluctuations are present. 19 refs., 3 figs

  13. Understanding system dynamics of an adaptive enzyme network from globally profiled kinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Austin W T; Liu, Wei-Chung; Charusanti, Pep; Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2014-01-15

    A major challenge in mathematical modeling of biological systems is to determine how model parameters contribute to systems dynamics. As biological processes are often complex in nature, it is desirable to address this issue using a systematic approach. Here, we propose a simple methodology that first performs an enrichment test to find patterns in the values of globally profiled kinetic parameters with which a model can produce the required system dynamics; this is then followed by a statistical test to elucidate the association between individual parameters and different parts of the system's dynamics. We demonstrate our methodology on a prototype biological system of perfect adaptation dynamics, namely the chemotaxis model for Escherichia coli. Our results agreed well with those derived from experimental data and theoretical studies in the literature. Using this model system, we showed that there are motifs in kinetic parameters and that these motifs are governed by constraints of the specified system dynamics. A systematic approach based on enrichment statistical tests has been developed to elucidate the relationships between model parameters and the roles they play in affecting system dynamics of a prototype biological network. The proposed approach is generally applicable and therefore can find wide use in systems biology modeling research.

  14. Effect of pulsed electric field treatment on enzyme kinetics and thermostability of endogenous ascorbic acid oxidase in carrots (Daucus carota cv. Nantes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Sze Ying; Oey, Indrawati

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this research was to study the enzyme kinetics and thermostability of endogenous ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO) in carrot purée (Daucus carota cv. Nantes) after being treated with pulsed electric field (PEF) processing. Various PEF treatments using electric field strength between 0.2 and 1.2kV/cm and pulsed electrical energy between 1 and 520kJ/kg were conducted. The enzyme kinetics and the kinetics of AAO thermal inactivation (55-70°C) were described using Michaelis-Menten model and first order reaction model, respectively. Overall, the estimated Vmax and KM values were situated in the same order of magnitude as the untreated carrot purée after being exposed to pulsed electrical energy between 1 and 400kJ/kg, but slightly changed at pulsed electrical energy above 500kJ/kg. However, AAO presented different thermostability depending on the electric field strength applied. After PEF treatment at the electric field strength between 0.2 and 0.5kV/cm, AAO became thermolabile (i.e. increase in inactivation rate (k value) at reference temperature) but the temperature dependence of k value (Ea value) for AAO inactivation in carrot purée decreased, indicating that the changes in k values were less temperature dependent. It is obvious that PEF treatment affects the temperature stability of endogenous AAO. The changes in enzyme kinetics and thermostability of AAO in carrot purée could be related to the resulting carrot purée composition, alteration in intracellular environment and the effective concentration of AAO released after being subjected to PEF treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Temperature sensitivity of extracellular enzyme kinetics in subtropical wetland soils under different nutrient and water level conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, S.; Inglett, K.; Inglett, P.

    2012-12-01

    Microbial extracellular enzymes play an important role in the initial steps of soil organic matter decomposition and are involved in regulating nutrient cycle processes. Moreover, with the recent concern of climate change, microbial extracellular enzymes may affect the functioning (C losses, C sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, vegetation changes) of different ecosystems. Hence, it is imperative to understand the biogeochemical processes that may be climate change sensitive. Here, we have measured the Michaelis Menten Kinetics [maximal rate of velocity (Vmax) and half-saturation constant (Km)] of 6 enzymes involved in soil organic matter decomposition (phosphatase, phosphodiesterase, β-D-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, leucine aminopeptidase, N-Acetyl-β-D glucosaminidase) in different nutrient(P) concentration both aerobically and anaerobically in Everglade water conservation area 2A (F1, F4-slough and U3-slough). Temperature sensitivity of different enzymes is assessed within soil of different P concentrations. We hypothesized that the temperature sensitivity of the enzyme changes with the biogeochemical conditions including water level and nutrient condition. Furthermore, we have tested specific hypothesis that higher P concentration will initiate more C demand for microbes leading to higher Vmax value for carbon processing enzymes in high P site. We found temperature sensitivity of all enzymes for Vmax and Km under both aerobic and anaerobic condition ranges from 0.6 to 3.2 for Vmax and 0.5 to 2.5 for Km. Q10 values of Km for glucosidase indicate more temperature sensitivity under anaerobic condition. Under aerobic condition higher temperature showed significant effect on Vmax for bisphosphatase between high P and low P site. Decreasing P concentration from F1 site to U3-S site had showed significant effect in all temperature on carbon processing enzyme. This suggests that in high P site, microbes will use more carbon-processing enzyme to get more carbon

  16. Kinetic characterization of glucose aerodehydrogenase from Aspergillus niger EMS-150-F after optimizing the dose of mutagen for enhanced production of enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Umbreen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study enhanced production of glucose aerodehydrogenase from Aspergillus niger has been achieved after optimizing the dose of chemical mutagen ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS that has not been reported earlier. Different doses of mutagen were applied and a strain was developed basing upon the best production. The selected strain Aspergillus niger EMS-150-F was optimized for nutrient requirements in order to produce enzyme through fermentation and the results showed the best yield at 2% corn steep liquor (CSL, 36 hours fermentation time, pH 5, 30°C temperature, 0.3% KH2PO4, 0.3% urea and 0.06% CaCO3. The enzyme was then purified and resulted in 57.88 fold purification with 52.12% recovery. On kinetic characterization, the enzyme showed optimum activity at pH 6 and temperature 30°C. The Michaelis-Menton constants (Km, Vmax, Kcat and Kcat/Km were 20 mM, 45.87 U mL-1, 1118.81 s-1 and 55.94 s-1 mM-1, respectively. The enzyme was found to be thermaly stable and the enthalpy and free energy showed an increase with increase in temperature and ΔS* was highly negative proving the enzyme from A. niger EMS-150-F resistant to temperature and showing a very little disorderliness.

  17. Kinetic study on Iranian furfural extract hydrocracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarkesh, J.; Akbarnejad, M. M. [NIOC Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorasheh, F. [Sharif Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Badakhshan, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    1998-05-01

    Upgrading heavy crude oil to light crude oil is one of the most important refining processes. Familiarity with the kinetics and related kinetic models is one of the important aspects of developing expertise in this field. This joint study between the NIOC Institute of Research of the Petroleum Industry and Sharif University was undertaken to determine the most appropriate upgrading process for Iranian heavy feed stock and to predict the conversion and product distribution in commercial hydrocracking units. The study involved the evaluation of stoichiometry of the hydrocracking process, focusing on the catalytic hydrocracking of furfural extract (a by-product of the lubricating oil plant) of the Tehran refinery. A pilot plant reactor was used. Good correspondence between model predictions and theoretical values was obtained.

  18. Kinetic catalytic studies of scorpion's hemocyanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queinnec, E.; Vuillaume, M.; Gardes-Albert, M.; Ferradini, C.; Ducancel, F.

    1991-01-01

    Hemocyanins are copper proteins which function as oxygen carriers in the haemolymph of Molluscs and Arthropods. They possess enzymatic properties: peroxidatic and catalatic activities, although they have neither iron nor porphyrin ring at the active site. The kinetics of the catalytic reaction is described. The reaction of superoxide anion with hemocyanin has been studied using pulse radiolysis at pH 9. The catalytic rate constant is 3.5 X 10 7 mol -1 .l.s -1 [fr

  19. An artificial-intelligence technique for qualitatively deriving enzyme kinetic mechanisms from initial-velocity measurements and its application to hexokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkel, L; Cohen, D M; Soo, V W; Garfinkel, D; Kulikowski, C A

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a computer method based on artificial-intelligence techniques for qualitatively analysing steady-state initial-velocity enzyme kinetic data. We have applied our system to experiments on hexokinase from a variety of sources: yeast, ascites and muscle. Our system accepts qualitative stylized descriptions of experimental data, infers constraints from the observed data behaviour and then compares the experimentally inferred constraints with corresponding theoretical model-based constraints. It is desirable to have large data sets which include the results of a variety of experiments. Human intervention is needed to interpret non-kinetic information, differences in conditions, etc. Different strategies were used by the several experimenters whose data was studied to formulate mechanisms for their enzyme preparations, including different methods (product inhibitors or alternate substrates), different experimental protocols (monitoring enzyme activity differently), or different experimental conditions (temperature, pH or ionic strength). The different ordered and rapid-equilibrium mechanisms proposed by these experimenters were generally consistent with their data. On comparing the constraints derived from the several experimental data sets, they are found to be in much less disagreement than the mechanisms published, and some of the disagreement can be ascribed to different experimental conditions (especially ionic strength). PMID:2690819

  20. [Molecular-kinetic parameters of thiamine enzymes and the mechanism of antivitamin action of hydroxythiamine in animal organisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovskiĭ KuM; Voskoboev, A I; Gorenshtenĭn, B I; Dosta, G A

    1979-09-01

    The molecula-kinetic parameters (Km, Ki) of three thiamine enzymes, e. g. thiamine pyrophosphokinase (EC 2.7.6.2), pyruvate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.4.1) and transketolase (EC 2.2.1.1) with respect to the effects of the thiamine antimetabolite hydroxythiamine in the whole animal organism have been compared. It has been shown that only the first two enzymes, which interact competitively with the vitamin, antivitamin or their pyrophosphate ethers, obey the kinetic parameters obtained for the purified enzymes in vitro. The anticoenzymic effect of hydroxythiamine pyrophosphate with respect to transketolase is not observed in vivo at maximal concentration of the anticoenzyme in tissues due to the absence of competitive interactions with thiamine pyrophosphate. The incorporation of the true and false coenzymes into transketolase occurs only during de novo transketolase synthesis (the apoform is absent in tissues, with the exception of erythrocytes) and proceeds slowly with a half-life time equal to 24--30 hrs. After a single injection of hydroxythiamine at a large dose (70--400 mg/kg) the maximal inhibition of the transketolase activity in tissues (liver, heart, kidney, muscle, spleen, lungs adrenal grands) manifests itself by the 48th--72nd hour, when the concentration of free hydroxythiamine and its pyrophosphate is minimal and the whole anticoenzyme is tightly bound to the protein, forming the false holoenzyme. The use of hydroxythiamine for inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase or transketolase in animal organism is discussed.

  1. Kinetic characteristics of polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyzing galacturonic acid oligomers using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid chains found in pectin. Interest in polygalacturonase enzymes continues as they are useful in a number of industrial processes and conversely, detrimental, as they are involved in maceration of economically important crops. While a good...

  2. Enzymes or redox couples? The kinetics of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin reactions in a systems biology context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillay, Ché S.; Hofmeyr, Jan Hendrik S; Olivier, Brett G.; Snoep, Jacky L.; Rohwer, Johann M.

    2009-01-01

    Systems biology approaches, such as kinetic modelling, could provide valuable insights into how thioredoxins, glutaredoxins and peroxiredoxins (here collectively called redoxins), and the systems that reduce these molecules are regulated. However, it is not clear whether redoxins should be described

  3. Approaching a Conceptual Understanding of Enzyme Kinetics and Inhibition: Development of an Active Learning Inquiry Activity for Prehealth and Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Chloe; Meades, Glen; Linenberger, Kimberly J.

    2016-01-01

    Presented is a guided inquiry activity designed to be conducted with prenursing students using an analogous system to help develop a conceptual understanding of factors impacting enzyme kinetics and the various types of enzyme inhibition. Pre- and postconceptual understanding evaluations and effectiveness of implementation surveys were given to…

  4. Purification of PON1 from human serum and assessment of enzyme kinetics against metal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Deniz; Beydemir, Sükrü

    2010-06-01

    Paraoxonase-1 (PON1) is an organophosphate hydrolyser enzyme which has also antioxidant properties in metabolism. Due to its crucial functions, inhibition of the enzyme is undesirable and very dangerous. PON1 enzyme activity should not be altered in any case. Inhibitory investigations of this enzyme are therefore important and useful. Metal toxicology of enzymes has become popular in the recent years. Here, we report the in vitro inhibitory effects of some metal ions, including Pb(+2), Cr(+2), Fe(+2), and Zn(+2), on the activity of human serum PON1 (hPON1; EC 3.1.8.1.). For this purpose, we purified the enzyme from human serum and analyzed the alterations in the enzyme activity in the presence of metal ions. The results show that metal ions exhibit inhibitory effects on hPON1 at low concentrations with IC (50) values ranging from 0.838 to 7.410 mM. Metal ions showed different inhibition mechanisms: lead and iron were competitive, chrome was noncompetitive, and zinc was uncompetitive. Lead was determined to be the most effective inhibitor.

  5. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutman, D. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  6. Magnetic enzyme reactors for isolation and study of heterogeneous glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korecka, Lucie; Jezova, Jana; Bilkova, Zuzana; Benes, Milan; Horak, Daniel; Hradcova, Olga; Slovakova, Marcela; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2005-01-01

    The newly developed magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with defined hydrophobicity and porosity were used for the preparation of magnetic enzyme reactors. Magnetic particles with immobilized proteolytic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin and papain and with enzyme neuraminidase were used to study the structure of heterogeneous glycoproteins. Factors such as the type of carrier, immobilization procedure, operational and storage stability, and experimental conditions were optimized

  7. Immobilized enzyme studies in a microscale bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Francis; Forrest, Scott; Palmer, Jim; Lu, Zonghuan; Elmore, John; Elmore, Bill B

    2004-01-01

    Novel microreactors with immobilized enzymes were fabricated using both silicon and polymer-based microfabrication techniques. The effectiveness of these reactors was examined along with their behavior over time. Urease enzyme was successfully incorporated into microchannels of a polymeric matrix of polydimethylsiloxane and through layer-bylayer self-assembly techniques onto silicon. The fabricated microchannels had cross-sectional dimensions ranging from tens to hundreds of micrometers in width and height. The experimental results for continuous-flow microreactors are reported for the conversion of urea to ammonia by urease enzyme. Urea conversions of >90% were observed.

  8. Plackett-Burman Design for rGILCC1 Laccase Activity Enhancement in Pichia pastoris: Concentrated Enzyme Kinetic Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin D. Morales-Álvarez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laccases are multicopper oxidases that catalyze aromatic and nonaromatic compounds with concomitant reduction of molecular oxygen to water. They are of great interest due to their potential biotechnological applications. In this work we statistically improved culture media for recombinant GILCC1 (rGILCC1 laccase production at low scale from Ganoderma lucidum containing the construct pGAPZαA-GlucPost-Stop in Pichia pastoris. Temperature, pH stability, and kinetic parameter characterizations were determined by monitoring concentrate enzyme oxidation at different ABTS substrate concentrations. Plackett-Burman Design allowed improving enzyme activity from previous work 36.08-fold, with a laccase activity of 4.69 ± 0.39 UL−1 at 168 h of culture in a 500 mL shake-flask. Concentrated rGILCC1 remained stable between 10 and 50°C and retained a residual enzymatic activity greater than 70% at 60°C and 50% at 70°C. In regard to pH stability, concentrated enzyme was more stable at pH 4.0 ± 0.2 with a residual activity greater than 90%. The lowest residual activity greater than 55% was obtained at pH 10.0 ± 0.2. Furthermore, calculated apparent enzyme kinetic parameters were a Vmax of 6.87 × 10−5 mM s−1, with an apparent Km of 5.36 × 10−2 mM. Collectively, these important stability findings open possibilities for applications involving a wide pH and temperature ranges.

  9. Fibrolytic enzyme and ammonia application effects on the nutritive value, intake, and digestion kinetics of bermudagrass hay in beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, J J; Zarate, M A; Queiroz, O C M; Han, J H; Shin, J H; Staples, C R; Brown, W F; Adesogan, A T

    2013-09-01

    The objectives were to compare the effect of exogenous fibrolytic enzyme (Biocellulase A20) or anhydrous ammonia (4% DM) treatment on the nutritive value, voluntary intake, and digestion kinetics of bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon cultivar Coastal) hay harvested after 2 maturities (5- and 13-wk regrowths). Six individually housed, ruminally cannulated Brangus steers (BW 325 ± 10 kg) were used in an experiment with a 6 × 6 Latin square design with a 3 (additives) × 2 (maturities) factorial arrangement of treatments. Each period consisted of 14 d of adaptation and 7, 4, 1, 1, and 4 d for measuring in vivo digestibility, in situ degradability, no measurements, rumen liquid fermentation and passage indices, and rate of solid passage, respectively. Steers were fed hay for ad libitum intake and supplemented with sugarcane molasses and distillers grain (supplement total of 2.88 kg DM/d). Enzyme did not affect the nutritional composition of hay but ammonia treatment decreased hay NDF, hemicellulose, and ADL concentrations and increased the CP concentration particularly for the mature lignified 13-wk hay. The enzyme increased NDF and hemicellulose digestibility of the 5-wk hay but decreased those of the 13-wk hay. Ammoniation decreased intake of hay but increased digestibility of DM, OM, NDF, hemicellulose, ADF, and cellulose and increased the ruminal in situ soluble and potentially digestible fractions and the rate of DM degradation of the 13-wk hay. Also, ammoniation increased the concentrations of ruminal NH3, total VFA, acetate, and butyrate but enzyme treatment did not. Neither enzyme addition nor ammoniation affected rate of liquid and solid passage. In conclusion, ammoniation decreased the concentration of most fiber fractions, decreased the intake of hays, and increased their CP concentration, in vivo digestibility, and in situ degradability at both maturities whereas enzyme application increased fiber digestibility of the 5-wk hay but decreased it in the case of

  10. Single lipid vesicle assay for characterizing single-enzyme kinetics of phospholipid hydrolysis in a complex biological fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaei, Seyed R; Rabe, Michael; Zetterberg, Henrik; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Höök, Fredrik

    2013-09-25

    Imaging of individual lipid vesicles is used to track single-enzyme kinetics of phospholipid hydrolysis. The method is employed to quantify the catalytic activity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in both pure and complex biological fluids. The measurements are demonstrated to offer a subpicomolar limit of detection (LOD) of human secretory PLA2 (sPLA2) in up to 1000-fold-diluted cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). An additional new feature provided by the single-enzyme sensitivity is that information about both relative concentration variations of active sPLA2 in CSF and the specific enzymatic activity can be simultaneously obtained. When CSF samples from healthy controls and individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are analyzed, the specific enzymatic activity is found to be preserved within 7% in the different CSF samples whereas the enzyme concentration differs by up to 56%. This suggests that the previously reported difference in PLA2 activity in CSF samples from healthy and AD individuals originates from differences in the PLA2 expression level rather than from the enzyme activity. Conventional ensemble averaging methods used to probe sPLA2 activity do not allow one to obtain such information. Together with an improvement in the LOD of at least 1 order of magnitude compared to that of conventional assays, this suggests that the method will become useful in furthering our understanding of the role of PLA2 in health and disease and in detecting the pharmacodynamic effects of PLA2-targeting drug candidates.

  11. Kinetic properties of a sex pheromone-degrading enzyme: the sensillar esterase of Antheraea polyphemus.

    OpenAIRE

    Vogt, R G; Riddiford, L M; Prestwich, G D

    1985-01-01

    Behavioral and electrophysiological evidence has suggested that sex pheromone is rapidly inactivated within the sensory hairs soon after initiation of the action-potential spike. We report the isolation and characterization of a sex-pheromone-degrading enzyme from the sensory hairs of the silkmoth Antheraea polyphemus. In the presence of this enzyme at physiological concentration, the pheromone [(6E,11Z)-hexadecadienyl acetate] has an estimated half-life of 15 msec. Our findings suggest a mol...

  12. Inhibition study of alanine aminotransferase enzyme using sequential online capillary electrophoresis analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lina; Chen, Yuanfang; Yang, Li

    2014-12-15

    We report the study of several inhibitors on alanine aminotransferase (ALT) enzyme using sequential online capillary electrophoresis (CE) assay. Using metal ions (Na(+) and Mg(2+)) as example inhibitors, we show that evolution of the ALT inhibition reaction can be achieved by automatically and simultaneously monitoring the substrate consumption and product formation as a function of reaction time. The inhibition mechanism and kinetic constants of ALT inhibition with succinic acid and two traditional Chinese medicines were derived from the sequential online CE assay. Our study could provide valuable information about the inhibition reactions of ALT enzyme. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed cross-linking of feruloylated arabinan from sugar beet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Arnous, Anis; Holck, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    the kinetics of HRP catalyzed cross-linking of FA esterified to α-(1,5)-linked arabinans are affected by the length of the arabinan chains carrying the feruloyl substitutions. The kinetics of the HRP-catalyzed cross-linking of four sets of arabinan samples from sugar beet pulp, having different molecular...... weights and hence different degrees of polymerization, were monitored by the disappearance of FA absorbance at 316 nm. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS analysis confirmed that the sugar beet arabinans were feruloyl-substituted, and HPLC analysis verified that the amounts of diFAs increased when FA levels decreased...

  14. Kinetic Study of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Fermentation in Continuous Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Edward A.; Mesbah, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation by clostridia has shown promise for industrial-scale production of biobutanol. However, the continuous ABE fermentation suffers from low product yield, titer, and productivity. Systems analysis of the continuous ABE fermentation will offer insights into its metabolic pathway as well as into optimal fermentation design and operation. For the ABE fermentation in continuous Clostridium acetobutylicum culture, this paper presents a kinetic model that includes the effects of key metabolic intermediates and enzymes as well as culture pH, product inhibition, and glucose inhibition. The kinetic model is used for elucidating the behavior of the ABE fermentation under the conditions that are most relevant to continuous cultures. To this end, dynamic sensitivity analysis is performed to systematically investigate the effects of culture conditions, reaction kinetics, and enzymes on the dynamics of the ABE production pathway. The analysis provides guidance for future metabolic engineering and fermentation optimization studies. PMID:27486663

  15. Stochastic optimization-based study of dimerization kinetics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To this end, we study dimerization kinetics of protein as a model system. We follow the dimerization kinetics using a stochastic simulation algorithm and ... optimization; dimerization kinetics; sensitivity analysis; stochastic simulation ... tion in large molecules and clusters, or the design ..... An unbiased strategy of allocating.

  16. Kinetic studies on the hafnium nad deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bing Wenzeng; Long Xinggui; Zhu Zuliang

    2009-04-01

    Through the method of reaction rate analysis in a constant volume reactor, the time dependence of the pressure drop of the hafnium deuteride formation are studied over a temperature range 573-873 K on a metal hydride thermodynamic and kinetic parameters measuring apparatus. The rate constants of the hafnium deuteride formation, which are 0.0530 s -1 , 0.0452 s -1 , 0.0319 s -1 , 0.0261 s -1 , are calculated at a serial temperatures of 573 K, 673 K, 773 K, 873 K and the initial pressure of 13 kPa. The activation energy of the reaction is (-10.1±1.5) kJ·mol -1 . Comparing the above results with those of titanium deuteride formation on the same measuring apparatus, the kinetic mechanism of the deuteride formation of hafnium and titanium is considered different. It is concluded that the reaction rate of hafnium absorbing deuterium may be controlled by phase transformation and surface oxidation. (authors)

  17. Using enzyme folding to explore the mechanism of therapeutic touch: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Mallory L; Boylan, Helen M

    2010-07-01

    The goal of this research is to design a novel model using protein folding to study Therapeutic Touch, a noncontact form of energy manipulation healing. Presented is a feasibility study suggesting that the denaturation path of ribonuclease A may be a useful model to study the energy exchange underlying therapeutic touch. The folding of ribonuclease A serves as a controlled energy-requiring system in which energy manipulation can be measured by the degree of folding achieved. A kinetic assay and fluorescence spectroscopy are used to assess the enzyme-folding state. The data suggest that the kinetic assay is a useful means of assessing the degree of refolding, and specifically, the enzyme function. However, fluorescence spectroscopy was not shown to be an effective measurement of enzyme structure for the purposes of this work. More research is needed to assess the underlying mechanism of therapeutic touch to complement the existing studies. An enzyme-folding model may provide a useful means of studying the energy exchange in therapeutic touch.

  18. Studies on the nature of intermediates in enzyme mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction pathway followed by malate synthase has been studied by the double isotope fractionation method to determine whether the reaction is stepwise or concerted. A primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect ( D V/K) of 1.3 ± 0.1 has been found using [ 2 H 3 ]acetyl-CoA as substrate. The 13 C isotope effect at the aldehydic carbon of glyoxylate has also been measured. For this determination, the malate product was quantitatively transformed into a new sample of malate having the carbon of interest at C-4. This material was decarboxylated to produce the appropriate CO 2 for isotope ratio mass spectrometric analysis. If the essential Zn(II) ion of yeast aldolase interacts with the carbonyl groups of bound substrates, we can expect that these will be more reactive toward reduction by borohydrides than those free in solution. Tritiated sodium borohydride was therefore used to reduce the substrates of yeast aldolase in the presence and absence of enzyme, and the enantiomeric and diastereomeric ratios of the products were analyzed. Experiments were conducted in an effort to distinguish between endocyclic and exocyclic cleavage in the hydrolysis catalyzed by lysozyme. Tritiated sodium borohydride was used in an attempt to trap the putative oxocarbonium intermediate

  19. Kinetic and structural evidences on human prolidase pathological mutants suggest strategies for enzyme functional rescue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Besio

    Full Text Available Prolidase is the only human enzyme responsible for the digestion of iminodipeptides containing proline or hydroxyproline at their C-terminal end, being a key player in extracellular matrix remodeling. Prolidase deficiency (PD is an intractable loss of function disease, characterized by mutations in the prolidase gene. The exact causes of activity impairment in mutant prolidase are still unknown. We generated three recombinant prolidase forms, hRecProl-231delY, hRecProl-E412K and hRecProl-G448R, reproducing three mutations identified in homozygous PD patients. The enzymes showed very low catalytic efficiency, thermal instability and changes in protein conformation. No variation of Mn(II cofactor affinity was detected for hRecProl-E412K; a compromised ability to bind the cofactor was found in hRecProl-231delY and Mn(II was totally absent in hRecProl-G448R. Furthermore, local structure perturbations for all three mutants were predicted by in silico analysis. Our biochemical investigation of the three causative alleles identified in perturbed folding/instability, and in consequent partial prolidase degradation, the main reasons for enzyme inactivity. Based on the above considerations we were able to rescue part of the prolidase activity in patients' fibroblasts through the induction of Heath Shock Proteins expression, hinting at new promising avenues for PD treatment.

  20. Application of A Microfluidic Tool for the Determination of Enzyme Kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringborg, Rolf H.

    thermodynamics, inhibition and stability. It is a difficult task to assess where the current bottle neck is for a desired process. Moreover, it cannot be expected that a single solution to the limitations can be found and rather an integrated solution of all of the problems should be the future aim. All...... alreadyexist and can be found in common text books. These models do however require mutant specific data and must be collected with the target reaction. In this thesis a novel way of collecting kinetic data is created, this is carried out by combining existing technology and enables the analysis of aqueous...

  1. Binding of Cimetidine to Balb/C Mouse Liver Catalase; Kinetics and Conformational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangirvand, Mahboubeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Razmi, Nematollah

    2016-01-01

    Catalase is responsible for converting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water and oxygen in cells. This enzyme has high affinity for hydrogen peroxide and can protect the cells from oxidative stress damage. Catalase is a tetramer protein and each monomer contains a heme group. Cimetidine is a histamine H2 receptor blocker which inhibits acid release from stomach and is used for gasterointestinal diseases. In this research, effect of cimetidine on the activity of liver catalase was studied and the kinetic parameters of this enzyme and its conformational changes were investigated. Cell free extract of mouse liver was used for the catalase assay. The activity of the catalase was detected in the absence and presence of cimetidine by monitoring hydrogen peroxide reduction absorbance at 240 nm. The purified enzyme was used for conformational studies by Fluorescence spectrophotometry. The data showed that cimetidine could inhibit the enzyme in a non-competitive manner. Ki and IC50 values of the drug were determined to be about 0.75 and 0.85 uM, respectively. The Arrhenius plot showed that activation energy was 6.68 and 4.77 kJ/mol in the presence and absence of the drug, respectively. Fluorescence spectrophotometry revealed that the binding of cimetidine to the purified enzyme induced hyperchromicity and red shift which determined the conformational change on the enzyme. Cimetidine could non-competitively inhibit the liver catalase with high affinity. Binding of cimetidine to the enzyme induced conformational alteration in the enzyme.

  2. Optimizing electrode-attached redox-peptide systems for kinetic characterization of protease action on immobilized substrates. Observation of dissimilar behavior of trypsin and thrombin enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne, Agnès; Chovin, Arnaud; Demaille, Christophe

    2012-06-12

    In this work, we experimentally address the issue of optimizing gold electrode attached ferrocene (Fc)-peptide systems for kinetic measurements of protease action. Considering human α-thrombin and bovine trypsin as proteases of interest, we show that the recurring problem of incomplete cleavage of the peptide layer by these enzymes can be solved by using ultraflat template-stripped gold, instead of polished polycrystalline gold, as the Fc-peptide bearing electrode material. We describe how these fragile surfaces can be mounted in a rotating disk configuration so that enzyme mass transfer no longer limits the overall measured cleavage kinetics. Finally, we demonstrate that, once the system has been optimized, in situ real-time cyclic voltammetry monitoring of the protease action can yield high-quality kinetic data, showing no sign of interfering effects. The cleavage progress curves then closely match the Langmuirian variation expected for a kinetically controlled surface process. Global fit of the progress curves yield accurate values of the peptide cleavage rate for both trypsin and thrombin. It is shown that, whereas trypsin action on the surface-attached peptide closely follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, thrombin displays a specific and unexpected behavior characterized by a nearly enzyme-concentration-independent cleavage rate in the subnanomolar enzyme concentration range. The reason for this behavior has still to be clarified, but its occurrence may limit the sensitivity of thrombin sensors based on Fc-peptide layers.

  3. Enzyme kinetics in acoustically levitated droplets of supercooled water: a novel approach to cryoenzymology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, David D; Nardozzi, Jonathan D

    2005-04-15

    The rate of the alkaline phosphatase-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferone phosphate was measured in acoustically levitated droplets of aqueous tris (50 mM) at pH 8.5 at 22 +/- 2 degrees C and in supercooled solution at -6 +/- 2 degrees C. At 22 degrees C, the rate of product formation was in excellent agreement with the rate observed in bulk solution in a cuvette, indicating that the acoustic levitation process does not alter the enzyme activity. The rate of the reaction decreased 6-fold in supercooled solution at -6 +/- 2 degrees C. The acoustic levitator apparatus is described in detail.

  4. Utilization of integrated Michaelis-Menten equations for enzyme inhibition diagnosis and determination of kinetic constants using Solver supplement of Microsoft Office Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Rui M F; Fraga, Irene; Dias, Albino A

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme kinetic parameters are usually determined from initial rates nevertheless, laboratory instruments only measure substrate or product concentration versus reaction time (progress curves). To overcome this problem we present a methodology which uses integrated models based on Michaelis-Menten equation. The most severe practical limitation of progress curve analysis occurs when the enzyme shows a loss of activity under the chosen assay conditions. To avoid this problem it is possible to work with the same experimental points utilized for initial rates determination. This methodology is illustrated by the use of integrated kinetic equations with the well-known reaction catalyzed by alkaline phosphatase enzyme. In this work nonlinear regression was performed with the Solver supplement (Microsoft Office Excel). It is easy to work with and track graphically the convergence of SSE (sum of square errors). The diagnosis of enzyme inhibition was performed according to Akaike information criterion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of residuals from enzyme kinetic and protein folding experiments in the presence of correlated experimental noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmic, Petr; Lorenz, Thorsten; Reinstein, Jochen

    2009-12-01

    Experimental data from continuous enzyme assays or protein folding experiments often contain hundreds, or even thousands, of densely spaced data points. When the sampling interval is extremely short, the experimental data points might not be statistically independent. The resulting neighborhood correlation invalidates important theoretical assumptions of nonlinear regression analysis. As a consequence, certain goodness-of-fit criteria, such as the runs-of-signs test and the autocorrelation function, might indicate a systematic lack of fit even if the experiment does agree very well with the underlying theoretical model. A solution to this problem is to analyze only a subset of the residuals of fit, such that any excessive neighborhood correlation is eliminated. Substrate kinetics of the HIV protease and the unfolding kinetics of UMP/CMP kinase, a globular protein from Dictyostelium discoideum, serve as two illustrative examples. A suitable data-reduction algorithm has been incorporated into software DYNAFIT [P. Kuzmic, Anal. Biochem. 237 (1996) 260-273], freely available to all academic researchers from http://www.biokin.com.

  6. Influence of the metal ion on the enzyme activity and kinetics of PepA from Lactobacillus delbrueckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Jacob; Glück, Claudia; Strasdeit, Henry; Fischer, Lutz; Stressler, Timo

    2018-03-01

    The aminopeptidase A (PepA; EC 3.4.11.7) belongs to the group of metallopeptidases with two bound metal ions per subunit (M1M2(PepA)) and is specific for the cleavage of N-terminal glutamic (Glu) and aspartic acid (Asp) and, in low amounts, serine (Ser) residues. Our group recently characterized the first PepA from a Lactobacillus strain. However, the characterization was performed using synthetic para-nitroaniline substrates and not original peptide substrates, as was done in the current study. Prior to the characterization using original peptide substrates, the PepA purified was converted to its inactive apo-form and eight different metal ions were tested to restore its activity. It was found that five of the metal ions were able to reactivate apo-PepA: Co 2+ , Cu 2+ , Mn 2+ , Ni 2+ and Zn 2+ . Interestingly, depending on the metal ion used for reactivation, the activity and the pH and temperature profile differed. Exemplarily, MnMn(PepA), NiNi(PepA) and ZnZn(PepA) had an activity optimum using MES buffer (50mM, pH 6.0) and 60°C, whereas the activity optimum changed to Na/K-phosphate-buffer (50mM, pH 7.0) and 55°C for CuCu(PepA). However, more important than the changes in optimum pH and temperature, the kinetic properties of PepA were affected by the metal ion used. While all PepA variants could release N-terminal Glu or Asp, only CoCo(PepA), NiNi(PepA) and CuCu(PepA) could release Ser from the particular peptide substrate. In addition, it was found that the enzyme efficiency (V max /K M ) and catalytic mechanism (positive cooperative binding (Hill coefficent; n), substrate inhibition (K IS )) were influenced by the metal ion. Exemplarily, a high cooperativity (n>2),K IS value >20mM and preference for N-terminal Glu were detected for CuCu(PepA). In summary, the results suggested that an exchange of the metal ion can be used for tailoring the properties of PepA for specific hydrolysis requirements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bilirubin glucuronidation revisited: proper assay conditions to estimate enzyme kinetics with recombinant UGT1A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Tracy, Timothy S; Remmel, Rory P

    2010-11-01

    Bilirubin, an end product of heme catabolism, is primarily eliminated via glucuronic acid conjugation by UGT1A1. Impaired bilirubin conjugation, caused by inhibition of UGT1A1, can result in clinical consequences, including jaundice and kernicterus. Thus, evaluation of the ability of new drug candidates to inhibit UGT1A1-catalyzed bilirubin glucuronidation in vitro has become common practice. However, the instability of bilirubin and its glucuronides presents substantial technical challenges to conduct in vitro bilirubin glucuronidation assays. Furthermore, because bilirubin can be diglucuronidated through a sequential reaction, establishment of initial rate conditions can be problematic. To address these issues, a robust high-performance liquid chromatography assay to measure both bilirubin mono- and diglucuronide conjugates was developed, and the incubation conditions for bilirubin glucuronidation by human embryonic kidney 293-expressed UGT1A1 were carefully characterized. Our results indicated that bilirubin glucuronidation should be assessed at very low protein concentrations (0.05 mg/ml protein) and over a short incubation time (5 min) to assure initial rate conditions. Under these conditions, bilirubin total glucuronide formation exhibited a hyperbolic (Michaelis-Menten) kinetic profile with a K(m) of ∼0.2 μM. In addition, under these initial rate conditions, the relative proportions between the total monoglucuronide and the diglucuronide product were constant across the range of bilirubin concentration evaluated (0.05-2 μM), with the monoglucuronide being the predominant species (∼70%). In conclusion, establishment of appropriate incubation conditions (i.e., very low protein concentrations and short incubation times) is necessary to properly characterize the kinetics of bilirubin glucuronidation in a recombinant UGT1A1 system.

  8. Lipase-catalyzed synthesis of palmitanilide: Kinetic model and antimicrobial activity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuan-Miao; Liu, Kuan-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic syntheses of fatty acid anilides are important owing to their wide range of industrial applications in detergents, shampoo, cosmetics, and surfactant formulations. The amidation reaction of Mucor miehei lipase Lipozyme IM20 was investigated for direct amidation of triacylglycerol in organic solvents. The process parameters (reaction temperature, substrate molar ratio, enzyme amount) were optimized to achieve the highest yield of anilide. The maximum yield of palmitanilide (88.9%) was achieved after 24 h of reaction at 40 °C at an enzyme concentration of 1.4% (70 mg). Kinetics of lipase-catalyzed amidation of aniline with tripalmitin has been investigated. The reaction rate could be described in terms of the Michaelis-Menten equation with a Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism and competitive inhibition by both the substrates. The kinetic constants were estimated by using non-linear regression method using enzyme kinetic modules. The enzyme operational stability study showed that Lipozyme IM20 retained 38.1% of the initial activity for the synthesis of palmitanilide (even after repeated use for 48 h). Palmitanilide, a fatty acid amide, exhibited potent antimicrobial activity toward Bacillus cereus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Kinetics of enzymatic high-solid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass studied by calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Søren N; Lumby, Erik; McFarland, Kc; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of high-solid biomass (>10% w/w dry mass) has become increasingly important as a key step in the production of second-generation bioethanol. To this end, development of quantitative real-time assays is desirable both for empirical optimization and for detailed kinetic analysis. In the current work, we have investigated the application of isothermal calorimetry to study the kinetics of enzymatic hydrolysis of two substrates (pretreated corn stover and Avicel) at high-solid contents (up to 29% w/w). It was found that the calorimetric heat flow provided a true measure of the hydrolysis rate with a detection limit of about 500 pmol glucose s(-1). Hence, calorimetry is shown to be a highly sensitive real-time method, applicable for high solids, and independent on the complexity of the substrate. Dose-response experiments with a typical cellulase cocktail enabled a multidimensional analysis of the interrelationships of enzyme load and the rate, time, and extent of the reaction. The results suggest that the hydrolysis rate of pretreated corn stover is limited initially by available attack points on the substrate surface (conversion) but becomes proportional to enzyme dosage (excess of attack points) at later stages (>10% conversion). This kinetic profile is interpreted as an increase in polymer end concentration (substrate for CBH) as the hydrolysis progresses, probably due to EG activity in the enzyme cocktail. Finally, irreversible enzyme inactivation did not appear to be the source of reduced hydrolysis rate over time.

  10. Re-evaluating the kinetics of ATP hydrolysis during initiation of DNA sliding by Type III restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Júlia; Bollins, Jack; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2015-12-15

    DNA cleavage by the Type III restriction enzymes requires long-range protein communication between recognition sites facilitated by thermally-driven 1D diffusion. This 'DNA sliding' is initiated by hydrolysis of multiple ATPs catalysed by a helicase-like domain. Two distinct ATPase phases were observed using short oligoduplex substrates; the rapid consumption of ∼10 ATPs coupled to a protein conformation switch followed by a slower phase, the duration of which was dictated by the rate of dissociation from the recognition site. Here, we show that the second ATPase phase is both variable and only observable when DNA ends are proximal to the recognition site. On DNA with sites more distant from the ends, a single ATPase phase coupled to the conformation switch was observed and subsequent site dissociation required little or no further ATP hydrolysis. The overall DNA dissociation kinetics (encompassing site release, DNA sliding and escape via a DNA end) were not influenced by the second phase. Although the data simplifies the ATP hydrolysis scheme for Type III restriction enzymes, questions remain as to why multiple ATPs are hydrolysed to prepare for DNA sliding. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Effect of morin on pharmacokinetics of piracetam in rats, in vitro enzyme kinetics and metabolic stability assay using rapid UPLC method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Kapendra; Shaharyar, Mohammad; Siddiqui, Anees A

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Morin on the pharmacokinetics of Piracetam in rats, in vitro enzyme kinetics and metabolic stability (high throughput) studies using human liver microsomes in UPLC. For pharmacokinetics studies, male Wistar rats were pretreated with Morin (10 mg/kg) for one week and on the last day, a single dose of Piracetam (50 mg/kg) was given orally. In another group, both Morin and Piracetam were co-administered to evaluate the acute effect of Morin on Piracetam. The control group received oral distilled water for one week and administered with Piracetam on the last day. As Morin is an inhibitor of P- Glycoprotein (P-gp) and CYP 3A, it was anticipated to improve the bioavailability of Piracetam. Amazingly, relative to control, the areas under the concentration time curve and peak plasma concentration of Piracetam were 1.50- and 1.45-fold, respectively, greater in the Morin-pretreated group. However, co-administration of Morin had no significant effect on these parameters. Apart from the aforementioned merits, the results of this study are further confirmed by clinical trials; Piracetam dosages should be adjusted to avoid potential drug interaction when Piracetam is used clinically in combination with Morin and Morin-containing dietary supplements. The in vitro enzyme kinetics were performed to determined km, Vmax & CLins . The in vitro metabolic stability executed for the estimation of metabolic rate constant and half-life of Piracetam. These studies also extrapolate to in vivo intrinsic hepatic clearance (Clint, in vivo ) from in vitro intrinsic hepatic clearance (CLint, in vitro ). Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Methane production from cellulosic wastes: kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goma, G; De La Torre, I; Maugheri, F; Yameogo, T

    1979-09-01

    The anaerobic fermentation is studied on lignocellulosic materials and sucrose as substrate. With the lignocellulosic material cellulolysis is rate limiting. The reducing sugar concentration in the fermentation broth is less than 15 mgl/sup -1/. With rumen bacteria, 50% of the initial polyoside are used and 12% of the lignin is solubilized. With sucrose studies on the kinetic behaviour of the mixed population responsible of the acidogenesis step permite to find the optimal temperature (40/sup 0/C) feed substrate concentration (50 gl/sup -1/) residence time (60 hours) and pH (5,5 - 6). The better technology is a plug flow fermentor with cell recycling. Modeling of the behaviour of this reactor was performed. The use of this reactor for the selection of acido resistant bacteria is discussed. For methanogenesis, in continuous culture, the ideal technology seems to be an association of two reactors. In the first step, a plug flow reactor must be used for acidogenesis, and in the second step a well mixed reactor permit the conversion of organic acids in methane.

  13. Studies on the enzymes produced by Basidiomycetes. Part 1. The production of crude enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, J. S.; Kim, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Cellulase, protease, and xylanase, formation by the basidiomycetes, Pleurotus ostreatus 301 and Lentinus edodes 3-1 in growth on rice straw medium were studied. Cultural conditions adequate for enzyme production and effects of various materials and inorganic salts added to the rice straw media were investigated. Lentinus edodes 3-1 was an excellent producer of cellulase and xylanase, and Pleurotus ostreatus 301 of protease. The optimum conditions for enzyme production were 30 degrees for cellulase production and at 25 degrees for xylanase and protease production, with 75% moisture content and initial pH of 5.0-6.0. The appropriate incubation times for enzyme production were 30 days and 35 days for Pleurotus ostreatus 301 and Lentinus edodes 3-1, respectively. Among the various materials added, defatted soybean, defatted rape seed, or defatted sesame were all effective in enzyme production but reduced mycelial growth. Rice bran was also effective, particularly at a 30% concentration. The addition of inorganic salts enhanced enzyme production. Among inorganic salts, the optimum concentration of CaCO3 was 5%, and that of CaSO4 was 2%.

  14. Combustion Kinetic Studies of Gasolines and Surrogates

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2016-11-01

    Future thrusts for gasoline engine development can be broadly summarized into two categories: (i) efficiency improvements in conventional spark ignition engines, and (ii) development of advance compression ignition (ACI) concepts. Efficiency improvements in conventional spark ignition engines requires downsizing (and turbocharging) which may be achieved by using high octane gasolines, whereas, low octane gasolines fuels are anticipated for ACI concepts. The current work provides the essential combustion kinetic data, targeting both thrusts, that is needed to develop high fidelity gasoline surrogate mechanisms and surrogate complexity guidelines. Ignition delay times of a wide range of certified gasolines and surrogates are reported here. These measurements were performed in shock tubes and rapid compression machines over a wide range of experimental conditions (650 – 1250 K, 10 – 40 bar) relevant to internal combustion engines. Using the measured the data and chemical kinetic analyses, the surrogate complexity requirements for these gasolines in homogeneous environments are specified. For the discussions presented here, gasolines are classified into three categories: (i)\\tLow octane gasolines including Saudi Aramco’s light naphtha fuel (anti-knock index, AKI = (RON + MON)/2 = 64; Sensitivity (S) = RON – MON = 1), certified FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasoline I and J (AKI ~ 70, S = 0.7 and 3 respectively), and their Primary Reference Fuels (PRF, mixtures of n-heptane and iso-octane) and multi-component surrogates. (ii)\\t Mid octane gasolines including FACE A and C (AKI ~ 84, S ~ 0 and 1 respectively) and their PRF surrogates. Laser absorption measurements of intermediate and product species formed during gasoline/surrogate oxidation are also reported. (iii)\\t A wide range of n-heptane/iso-octane/toluene (TPRF) blends to adequately represent the octane and sensitivity requirements of high octane gasolines including FACE gasoline F and G

  15. Study of internal oxidation kinetics of molybdenum base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krushinskij, Yu.Yu.; Belyakov, B.G.; Belomyttsev, M.Yu.

    1989-01-01

    Metallographic and microdurometric method as well as new technique were used to study kinetics of internal oxidation (IO). It is shown that study of IO kinetics on the base of metallographic measurements of layers depth is not correct because it is related with insufficient sensitivity of the method. IO kinetics under conditions of formation of molybdenum oxide layer on saturated material surface as well as IO of alloy with high carbon content were investigated. Oxide film formation does not affect the IO kinetics; decarburization observed along with oxidation increases the apparent activation energy and K exponent on time dependence of diffusion layer depth

  16. The relative importance of kinetic mechanisms and variable enzyme abundances for the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism--insights from mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulik, Sascha; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Berndt, Nikolaus

    2016-03-02

    Adaptation of the cellular metabolism to varying external conditions is brought about by regulated changes in the activity of enzymes and transporters. Hormone-dependent reversible enzyme phosphorylation and concentration changes of reactants and allosteric effectors are the major types of rapid kinetic enzyme regulation, whereas on longer time scales changes in protein abundance may also become operative. Here, we used a comprehensive mathematical model of the hepatic glucose metabolism of rat hepatocytes to decipher the relative importance of different regulatory modes and their mutual interdependencies in the hepatic control of plasma glucose homeostasis. Model simulations reveal significant differences in the capability of liver metabolism to counteract variations of plasma glucose in different physiological settings (starvation, ad libitum nutrient supply, diabetes). Changes in enzyme abundances adjust the metabolic output to the anticipated physiological demand but may turn into a regulatory disadvantage if sudden unexpected changes of the external conditions occur. Allosteric and hormonal control of enzyme activities allow the liver to assume a broad range of metabolic states and may even fully reverse flux changes resulting from changes of enzyme abundances alone. Metabolic control analysis reveals that control of the hepatic glucose metabolism is mainly exerted by enzymes alone, which are differently controlled by alterations in enzyme abundance, reversible phosphorylation, and allosteric effects. In hepatic glucose metabolism, regulation of enzyme activities by changes of reactants, allosteric effects, and reversible phosphorylation is equally important as changes in protein abundance of key regulatory enzymes.

  17. KID - an algorithm for fast and efficient text mining used to automatically generate a database containing kinetic information of enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schomburg Dietmar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of available biological information is rapidly increasing and the focus of biological research has moved from single components to networks and even larger projects aiming at the analysis, modelling and simulation of biological networks as well as large scale comparison of cellular properties. It is therefore essential that biological knowledge is easily accessible. However, most information is contained in the written literature in an unstructured way, so that methods for the systematic extraction of knowledge directly from the primary literature have to be deployed. Description Here we present a text mining algorithm for the extraction of kinetic information such as KM, Ki, kcat etc. as well as associated information such as enzyme names, EC numbers, ligands, organisms, localisations, pH and temperatures. Using this rule- and dictionary-based approach, it was possible to extract 514,394 kinetic parameters of 13 categories (KM, Ki, kcat, kcat/KM, Vmax, IC50, S0.5, Kd, Ka, t1/2, pI, nH, specific activity, Vmax/KM from about 17 million PubMed abstracts and combine them with other data in the abstract. A manual verification of approx. 1,000 randomly chosen results yielded a recall between 51% and 84% and a precision ranging from 55% to 96%, depending of the category searched. The results were stored in a database and are available as "KID the KInetic Database" via the internet. Conclusions The presented algorithm delivers a considerable amount of information and therefore may aid to accelerate the research and the automated analysis required for today's systems biology approaches. The database obtained by analysing PubMed abstracts may be a valuable help in the field of chemical and biological kinetics. It is completely based upon text mining and therefore complements manually curated databases. The database is available at http://kid.tu-bs.de. The source code of the algorithm is provided under the GNU General Public

  18. Enzyme kinetics, inhibitors, mutagenesis and electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of dual-affinity nitrate reductase in unicellular N(2)-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tung-Hei; Chen, Yung-Han; Huang, Jine-Yung; Liu, Kang-Cheng; Ke, Shyue-Chu; Chu, Hsiu-An

    2011-11-01

    The assimilatory nitrate reductase (NarB) of N(2)-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 is a monomeric enzyme with dual affinity for substrate nitrate. We purified the recombinant NarB of Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 and further investigated it by enzyme kinetics analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, inhibitor kinetics analysis, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The NarB showed 2 kinetic regimes at pH 10.5 or 8 and electron-donor conditions methyl viologen or ferredoxin (Fd). Fd-dependent NR assay revealed NarB with very high affinity for nitrate (K(m)1, ∼1μM; K(m)2, ∼270μM). Metal analysis and EPR results showed that NarB contains a Mo cofactor and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. In addition, the R352A mutation on the proposed nitrate-binding site of NarB greatly altered both high- and low-affinity kinetic components. Furthermore, the effect of azide on the NarB of Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 was more complex than that on the NarB of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 with its single kinetic regime. With 1mM azide, the kinetics of the wild-type NarB was transformed from 2 kinetic regimes to hyperbolic kinetics, and its activity was enhanced significantly under medium nitrate concentrations. Moreover, EPR results also suggested a structural difference between the two NarBs. Taken together, our results show that the NarB of Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 contains only a single Mo-catalytic center, and we rule out that the enzyme has 2 independent, distinct catalytic sites. In addition, the NarB of Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 may have a regulatory nitrate-binding site. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The purification and steady-state kinetic behaviour of rabbit heart mitochondrial NAD(P)+ malic enzyme.

    OpenAIRE

    Davisson, V J; Schulz, A R

    1985-01-01

    The mitochondrial NAD(P)+ malic enzyme [EC 1.1.1.39, L-malate:NAD+ oxidoreductase (decarboxylating)] was purified from rabbit heart to a specific activity of 7 units (mumol/min)/mg at 23 degrees C. A study of the reductive carboxylation reaction indicates that this enzymic reaction is reversible. The rate of the reductive carboxylation reaction appears to be completely inhibited at an NADH concentration of 0.92 mM. A substrate saturation curve of this reaction with NADH as the varied substrat...

  20. Influence of temperature and solvent concentration on the kinetics of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase in carbon capture technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne; Deslauriers, Maria Gundersen; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2017-01-01

    In this study the effect of carbonic anhydrase addition on the absorption of CO2 was investigated in a wetted wall column apparatus. Four different solvents: the primary amine monoethanolamine (MEA), the sterically hindered primary amine 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP), the tertiary amine N......-methyl-diethanolamine (MDEA) and the carbonate salt solution K2CO3 were compared in concentrations from 5 to 50 wt% in a temperature range of 298–328 K with and without enzyme. Necessary mass transfer parameters such as liquid side mass transfer coefficient and solvent and enzyme reaction rates were determined...

  1. Real-Time Enzyme Kinetics by Quantitative NMR Spectroscopy and Determination of the Michaelis-Menten Constant Using the Lambert-W Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her, Cheenou; Alonzo, Aaron P.; Vang, Justin Y.; Torres, Ernesto; Krishnan, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme kinetics is an essential part of a chemistry curriculum, especially for students interested in biomedical research or in health care fields. Though the concept is routinely performed in undergraduate chemistry/biochemistry classrooms using other spectroscopic methods, we provide an optimized approach that uses a real-time monitoring of the…

  2. Kinetic study of solid-state processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, Jiri; Mitsuhashi, Takefumi

    2003-01-01

    A simple method for kinetic analysis of solid-state processes has been developed and the criteria capable of classifying different processes are explored. They provide a useful tool for the determination of the most suitable kinetic model. The method has been applied to the analysis of calorimetric data corresponding to the crystallization processes in amorphous ZrO 2 . It is found that the crystallization kinetics of amorphous powder sample exhibits a complex behavior under non-isothermal conditions. A two-parameter model provides a satisfactory description of the crystallization process for isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. This enables better control of crystallization extent in fine ZrO 2 powders that is important for preparation of zirconia ceramics with defined properties. (author)

  3. Inhibitory and enzyme-kinetic investigation of chelerythrine and lupeol isolated from Zanthoxylum rhoifolium against krait snake venom acetylcholinesterase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Mustaq, E-mail: mushtaq213@yahoo.com [University of Science and Technology, Bannu, (Pakistan). Department of Biotechnology; Weber, Andrea D.; Zanon, Graciane; Tavares, Luciana de C.; Ilha, Vinicius; Dalcol, Ionara I.; Morel, Ademir F., E-mail: ademirfariasm@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2014-01-15

    The in vitro activity of chelerythrine and lupeol, two metabolites isolated from Zanthoxylum rhoifolium were studied against the venom of the snake Bungarus sindanus (Elapidae). The venom, which is highly toxic to humans, consists mainly by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Both compounds showed activity against the venom, and the alkaloid chelerythrine presented higher activity than did triterpene lupeol. (author)

  4. Kinetic study of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase in a flow-mix microcalorimetric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidaleo, Marcello; Lavecchia, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by the enzyme catalase was studied at pH 7.4 in the temperature range 10-30 deg. C. Experiments were performed by the LKB-2277 Thermal Activity Monitor equipped with a flow-mix cylinder. The calorimetric reaction unit was schematised as a tubular reactor operating under plug-flow conditions. A first-order kinetic expression, with respect to both the substrate and the enzyme, was used to describe the rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition. Regression analysis of calorimetric data provided a molar reaction enthalpy of -87.55 kJ mol -1 and an activation energy of 11 kJ mol -1 . Analysis of model residuals and the normal probability plot indicated that the results obtained were statistically significant

  5. Combustion Kinetic Studies of Gasolines and Surrogates

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2016-01-01

    . These measurements were performed in shock tubes and rapid compression machines over a wide range of experimental conditions (650 – 1250 K, 10 – 40 bar) relevant to internal combustion engines. Using the measured the data and chemical kinetic analyses, the surrogate

  6. Mechanistic studies with solubilized rat liver steroid 5 alpha-reductase: Elucidation of the kinetic mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, M.A.; Brandt, M.; Greway, A.T.

    1990-01-01

    A solubilized preparation of steroid 5 alpha-reductase from rat liver has been used in studies focused toward an understanding of the kinetic mechanism associated with enzyme catalysis. From the results of analyses with product and dead-end inhibitors, a preferentially ordered binding of substrates and release of products from the surface of the enzyme is proposed. The observations from these experiments were identical with those using the steroid 5 alpha-reductase activity associated with rat liver microsomes. The primary isotope effects on steady-state kinetic parameters when [4S-2H]NADPH was used also were consistent with an ordered kinetic mechanism. Normal isotope effects were observed for all three kinetic parameters (Vm/Km for both testosterone and NADPH and Vm) at all substrate concentrations used experimentally. Upon extrapolation to infinite concentration of testosterone, the isotope effect on Vm/Km for NADPH approached unity, indicating that the nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate is the first substrate binding to and the second product released from the enzyme. The isotope effects on Vm/Km for testosterone at infinite concentration of cofactor and on Vm were 3.8 +/- 0.5 and 3.3 +/- 0.4, respectively. Data from the pH profiles of these three steady-state parameters and the inhibition constants (1/Ki) of competitive inhibitors versus both substrates indicate that the binding of nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate involves coordination of its anionic 2'-phosphate to a protonated enzyme-associated base with an apparent pK near 8.0. From these results, relative limits have been placed on several of the internal rate constants used to describe the ordered mechanism of the rat liver steroid 5 alpha-reductase

  7. Effect of bleaching on mercury release from amalgam fillings and antioxidant enzyme activities: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Filiz Yalcin; Ergin, Esra; Gurgan, Sevil; Sabuncuoglu, Suna; Arpa, Cigdem Sahin; Tokgoz, İlknur; Ozgunes, Hilal; Kiremitci, Arlin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this pilot clinical study was to determine the mercury release from amalgam fillings and antioxidant enzyme activities (Superoxide Dismutase [SOD] and Catalase[CAT] ) in body fluids after exposure to two different vital tooth bleaching systems. Twenty eight subjects with an average age of 25.6 years (18-41) having at least two but not more than four Class II amalgam fillings on each quadrant arch in the mouth participated in the study. Baseline concentrations of mercury levels in whole blood, urine, and saliva were measured by a Vapor Generation Accessory connected to an Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. Erythrocyte enzymes, SOD, and CAT activities in blood were determined kinetically. Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups of 14 volunteers. Group 1 was treated with an at-home bleaching system (Opalescence PF 35% Carbamide Peroxide, Ultradent), and Group 2 was treated with a chemically activated office bleaching system (Opalescence Xtra Boost 38% Hydrogen Peroxide, Ultradent) according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Twenty-four hours after bleaching treatments, concentrations of mercury and enzymes were remeasured. There were no significant differences on mercury levels in blood, urine, and saliva before and after bleaching treatments (p > 0.05). No differences were also found in the level of antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD and CAT) before and after treatments (p > 0.05). Mercury release did not affect the enzyme activities (p > 0.05). Bleaching treatments either office or home did not affect the amount of mercury released from amalgam fillings in blood, urine, and saliva and the antioxidant-enzyme activities in blood. Bleaching treatments with the systems tested in this pilot study have no deleterious effect on the mercury release from amalgam fillings and antioxidant enzymes in body fluids. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. ²H kinetic isotope effects and pH dependence of catalysis as mechanistic probes of rat monoamine oxidase A: comparisons with the human enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Edmondson, Dale E

    2011-09-06

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) is a mitochondrial outer membrane-bound flavoenzyme important in the regulation of serotonin and dopamine levels. Because the rat is extensively used as an animal model in drug studies, it is important to understand how rat MAO A behaves in comparison with the more extensively studied human enzyme. For many reversible inhibitors, rat MAO A exhibits K(i) values similar to those of human MAO A. The pH profile of k(cat) for rat MAO A shows a pK(a) of 8.2 ± 0.1 for the benzylamine ES complex and pK(a) values of 7.5 ± 0.1 and 7.6 ± 0.1 for the ES complexes with p-CF(3)-(1)H- and p-CF(3)-(2)H-benzylamine, respectively. In contrast to the human enzyme, the rat enzyme exhibits a single pK(a) value (8.3 ± 0.1) with k(cat)/K(m) for benzylamine versus pH and pK(a) values of 7.8 ± 0.1 and 8.1 ± 0.2 for the ascending limbs, respectively, of k(cat)/K(m) versus pH profiles for p-CF(3)-(1)H- and p-CF(3)-(2)H-benzylamine and 9.3 ± 0.1 and 9.1 ± 0.2 for the descending limbs, respectively. The oxidation of para-substituted benzylamine substrate analogues by rat MAO A has large deuterium kinetic isotope effects on k(cat) and on k(cat)/K(m). These effects are pH-independent and range from 7 to 14, demonstrating a rate-limiting α-C-H bond cleavage step in catalysis. Quantitative structure-activity correlations of log k(cat) with the electronic substituent parameter (σ) at pH 7.5 and 9.0 show a dominant contribution with positive ρ values (1.2-1.3) and a pH-independent negative contribution from the steric term. Quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis of the binding affinities of the para-substituted benzylamine analogues for rat MAO A shows an increased van der Waals volume (V(w)) increases the affinity of the deprotonated amine for the enzyme. These results demonstrate that rat MAO A exhibits functional properties similar but not identical with those of the human enzyme and provide additional support for C-H bond cleavage via a polar

  9. Large deviation theory for the kinetics and energetics of turnover of enzyme catalysis in a chemiostatic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2018-05-01

    In the framework of large deviation theory, we have characterized nonequilibrium turnover statistics of enzyme catalysis in a chemiostatic flow with externally controllable parameters, like substrate injection rate and mechanical force. In the kinetics of the process, we have shown the fluctuation theorems in terms of the symmetry of the scaled cumulant generating function (SCGF) in the transient and steady state regime and a similar symmetry rule is reflected in a large deviation rate function (LDRF) as a property of the dissipation rate through boundaries. Large deviation theory also gives the thermodynamic force of a nonequilibrium steady state, as is usually recorded experimentally by a single molecule technique, which plays a key role responsible for the dynamical symmetry of the SCGF and LDRF. Using some special properties of the Legendre transformation, here, we have provided a relation between the fluctuations of fluxes and dissipation rates, and among them, the fluctuation of the turnover rate is routinely estimated but the fluctuation in the dissipation rate is yet to be characterized for small systems. Such an enzymatic reaction flow system can be a very good testing ground to systematically understand the rare events from the large deviation theory which is beyond fluctuation theorem and central limit theorem.

  10. The Non-Linear Child: Ontogeny, Isoniazid Concentration, and NAT2 Genotype Modulate Enzyme Reaction Kinetics and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Zoe; Hiruy, Hiwot; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Mbowane, Chris; Adamson, John; Ngotho, Lihle; Karim, Farina; Jeena, Prakash; Bishai, William; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2016-09-01

    N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) catalyzes the acetylation of isoniazid to N-acetylisoniazid. NAT2 polymorphism explains 88% of isoniazid clearance variability in adults. We examined the effects of clinical and genetic factors on Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetic constants of maximum velocity (V max ) and affinity (K m ) in children 0-10years old. We measured the rates of isoniazid elimination and N-acetylisoniazid production in the blood of 30 children. Since maturation effects could be non-linear, we utilized a pharmacometric approach and the artificial intelligence method, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), to identify factors predicting NAT2 V max and K m by examining clinical, genetic, and laboratory factors in toto. Isoniazid concentration predicted both V max and K m and superseded the contribution of NAT2 genotype. Age non-linearly modified the NAT2 genotype contribution until maturation at ≥5.3years. Thus, enzyme efficiency was constrained by substrate concentration, genes, and age. Since MARS output is in the form of basis functions and equations, it allows multiscale systems modeling from the level of cellular chemical reactions to whole body physiological parameters, by automatic selection of significant predictors by the algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Forschungsgesellschaft für Arbeitsphysiologie und Arbeitschutz e.V. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Non-Linear Child: Ontogeny, Isoniazid Concentration, and NAT2 Genotype Modulate Enzyme Reaction Kinetics and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Rogers

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 catalyzes the acetylation of isoniazid to N-acetylisoniazid. NAT2 polymorphism explains 88% of isoniazid clearance variability in adults. We examined the effects of clinical and genetic factors on Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetic constants of maximum velocity (Vmax and affinity (Km in children 0–10 years old. We measured the rates of isoniazid elimination and N-acetylisoniazid production in the blood of 30 children. Since maturation effects could be non-linear, we utilized a pharmacometric approach and the artificial intelligence method, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS, to identify factors predicting NAT2 Vmax and Km by examining clinical, genetic, and laboratory factors in toto. Isoniazid concentration predicted both Vmax and Km and superseded the contribution of NAT2 genotype. Age non-linearly modified the NAT2 genotype contribution until maturation at ≥5.3 years. Thus, enzyme efficiency was constrained by substrate concentration, genes, and age. Since MARS output is in the form of basis functions and equations, it allows multiscale systems modeling from the level of cellular chemical reactions to whole body physiological parameters, by automatic selection of significant predictors by the algorithm.

  12. Kinetic modelling of in vitro data of PI3K, mTOR1, PTEN enzymes and on-target inhibitors Rapamycin, BEZ235, and LY294002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsov, Alexey; Tashkandi, Ghassan; Langdon, Simon P; Harrison, David J; Bown, James L

    2017-01-15

    The phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin-1 (mTOR1) are two key targets for anti-cancer therapy. Predicting the response of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR1 signalling pathway to targeted therapy is made difficult because of network complexities. Systems biology models can help explore those complexities but the value of such models is dependent on accurate parameterisation. Motivated by a need to increase accuracy in kinetic parameter estimation, and therefore the predictive power of the model, we present a framework to integrate kinetic data from enzyme assays into a unified enzyme kinetic model. We present exemplar kinetic models of PI3K and mTOR1, calibrated on in vitro enzyme data and founded on Michaelis-Menten (MM) approximation. We describe the effects of an allosteric mTOR1 inhibitor (Rapamycin) and ATP-competitive inhibitors (BEZ235 and LY294002) that show dual inhibition of mTOR1 and PI3K. We also model the kinetics of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which modulates sensitivity of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR1 pathway to these drugs. Model validation with independent data sets allows investigation of enzyme function and drug dose dependencies in a wide range of experimental conditions. Modelling of the mTOR1 kinetics showed that Rapamycin has an IC 50 independent of ATP concentration and that it is a selective inhibitor of mTOR1 substrates S6K1 and 4EBP1: it retains 40% of mTOR1 activity relative to 4EBP1 phosphorylation and inhibits completely S6K1 activity. For the dual ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR1 and PI3K, LY294002 and BEZ235, we derived the dependence of the IC 50 on ATP concentration that allows prediction of the IC 50 at different ATP concentrations in enzyme and cellular assays. Comparison of drug effectiveness in enzyme and cellular assays showed that some features of these drugs arise from signalling modulation beyond the on-target action and MM approximation and require a systems-level consideration of the whole PI3K

  13. Isothermal, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on basic dye sorption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isothermal, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on basic dye sorption onto tartaric acid esterified wheat straw. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... esterified wheat straw (EWS), was originally prepared by solid phase thermochemistry method.

  14. Kinetic Studies of Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Kinetic Studies of Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene Using Chromium VI Oxide in. Acetic Acid ... respect to the oxidant using pseudo-order approximation method. .... making the concentration of the cyclohexene in ..... on Titanium Silicate.

  15. kinetic studies of colour and phenol removal from wastewater using

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Kinetic studies by batch technique were carried out using activated carbon prepared from mango seed ... and the rate controlling steps of sorption which ... as follows (Lagergren, 1898): … ... plot of t /qt against t of Equation (6) should give a.

  16. Kinetics of ethylcyclohexane pyrolysis and oxidation: An experimental and detailed kinetic modeling study

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhandong; Zhao, Long; Wang, Yu; Bian, Huiting; Zhang, Lidong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Yuyang; Sarathy, Mani; Qi, Fei

    2015-01-01

    species were evaluated, and good agreement was observed between the PIMS and GC data sets. Furthermore, a fuel-rich burner-stabilized laminar premixed ECH/O2/Ar flame at 30Torr was studied using synchrotron VUV PIMS. A detailed kinetic model for ECH high

  17. Mechanistic study of manganese-substituted glycerol dehydrogenase using a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Baishan; Niu, Jin; Ren, Hong; Guo, Yingxia; Wang, Shizhen

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic insights regarding the activity enhancement of dehydrogenase by metal ion substitution were investigated by a simple method using a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. By profiling the binding energy of both the substrate and product, the metal ion's role in catalysis enhancement was revealed. Glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) from Klebsiella pneumoniae sp., which demonstrated an improvement in activity by the substitution of a zinc ion with a manganese ion, was used as a model for the mechanistic study of metal ion substitution. A kinetic model based on an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism was proposed considering the noncompetitive product inhibition of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) and the competitive product inhibition of NADH. By obtaining preliminary kinetic parameters of substrate and product inhibition, the number of estimated parameters was reduced from 10 to 4 for a nonlinear regression-based kinetic parameter estimation. The simulated values of time-concentration curves fit the experimental values well, with an average relative error of 11.5% and 12.7% for Mn-GDH and GDH, respectively. A comparison of the binding energy of enzyme ternary complex for Mn-GDH and GDH derived from kinetic parameters indicated that metal ion substitution accelerated the release of dioxyacetone. The metal ion's role in catalysis enhancement was explicated.

  18. Mechanistic study of manganese-substituted glycerol dehydrogenase using a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baishan Fang

    Full Text Available Mechanistic insights regarding the activity enhancement of dehydrogenase by metal ion substitution were investigated by a simple method using a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. By profiling the binding energy of both the substrate and product, the metal ion's role in catalysis enhancement was revealed. Glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH from Klebsiella pneumoniae sp., which demonstrated an improvement in activity by the substitution of a zinc ion with a manganese ion, was used as a model for the mechanistic study of metal ion substitution. A kinetic model based on an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism was proposed considering the noncompetitive product inhibition of dihydroxyacetone (DHA and the competitive product inhibition of NADH. By obtaining preliminary kinetic parameters of substrate and product inhibition, the number of estimated parameters was reduced from 10 to 4 for a nonlinear regression-based kinetic parameter estimation. The simulated values of time-concentration curves fit the experimental values well, with an average relative error of 11.5% and 12.7% for Mn-GDH and GDH, respectively. A comparison of the binding energy of enzyme ternary complex for Mn-GDH and GDH derived from kinetic parameters indicated that metal ion substitution accelerated the release of dioxyacetone. The metal ion's role in catalysis enhancement was explicated.

  19. A new study of the kinetics of curd production in the process of cheese manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Susana Vargas; Torres, Maykel González; Guerrero, Francisco Quintanilla; Talavera, Rogelio Rodríguez

    2017-11-01

    We studied the role played by temperature and rennet concentration in the coagulation process for cheese manufacture and the evaluation of their kinetics. We concluded that temperature is the main factor that determines the kinetics. The rennet concentration was unimportant probably due to the fast action of the enzyme chymosin. The Dynamic light scattering technique allowed measuring the aggregate's size and their formation kinetics. The volume fraction of solids was determined from viscosity measurements, showing profiles that are in agreement with the size profiles. The results indicate that the formation of the aggregates for rennet cheese is strongly dependent on temperature and rennet concentration. The results revealed that at 35·5 °C the volume fraction of solids has the maximum slope, indicating that at this temperature the curd is formed rapidly. The optimal temperature throughout the process was established. Second-order kinetics were obtained for the process. We observed a quadratic dependence between the rennet volume and the volume fraction of solids (curd), thereby indicating that the kinetics of the curd production should be of order two.

  20. KrF laser kinetics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandl, A.; Klimek, D.; Parks, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    A series of measurements characterizing an e beam pumped KrF* laser was carried out using a 200-nsec e-beam pulse having a rise time of 25 nsec at current densities up to 50 A/cm 2 . These pump conditions are relevent for inertial confinement fusion laser drivers. The measurements include fluorescence efficiency, sidelight suppression of the fluorescence during lasing, and laser energy output over a wide range of laser parameters including: total density 0.5--2.0 amagats, temperature 300--400 K, fluorine density 0.15%--0.5%, current density 38--50 A/cm 2 and various mirror transmissions. This data was used to verify and refine a model of KrF* kinetics which was then used to estimate the performance of an angular multiplexed power amplifier suitable for laser fusion applications

  1. Kinetics of ethylcyclohexane pyrolysis and oxidation: An experimental and detailed kinetic modeling study

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhandong

    2015-07-01

    Ethylcyclohexane (ECH) is a model compound for cycloalkanes with long alkyl side-chains. A preliminary investigation on ECH (Wang et al., Proc. Combust. Inst., 35, 2015, 367-375) revealed that an accurate ECH kinetic model with detailed fuel consumption mechanism and aromatic growth pathways, as well as additional ECH pyrolysis and oxidation data with detailed species concentration covering a wide pressure and temperature range are required to understand the ECH combustion kinetics. In this work, the flow reactor pyrolysis of ECH at various pressures (30, 150 and 760Torr) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) and gas chromatography (GC). The mole fraction profiles of numerous major and minor species were evaluated, and good agreement was observed between the PIMS and GC data sets. Furthermore, a fuel-rich burner-stabilized laminar premixed ECH/O2/Ar flame at 30Torr was studied using synchrotron VUV PIMS. A detailed kinetic model for ECH high temperature pyrolysis and oxidation was developed and validated against the pyrolysis and flame data performed in this work. Further validation of the kinetic model is presented against literature data including species concentrations in jet-stirred reactor oxidation, ignition delay times in a shock tube, and laminar flame speeds at various pressures and equivalence ratios. The model well predicts the consumption of ECH, the growth of aromatics, and the global combustion properties. Reaction flux and sensitivity analysis were utilized to elucidate chemical kinetic features of ECH combustion under various reaction conditions. © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  2. Kinetic, Thermodynamic and Structural Studies of Native and N-Bromosuccinimide-Modified Mushroom Tyrosinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Emami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Mushroom tyrosinase (MT as a metalloenzyme is a good model for mechanistic studies of melanogenesis. To recognize the mechanism of MT action, it is important to investigate its inhibition, activation, mutation, and modification properties. Objectives In this study, the chemical modification of MT tryptophan residues was carried out by using N-bromosuccinimide (NBS and then, the activity, stability, and structure of the native and modified enzymes were compared. Methods Chemical modification of MT tryptophan residues was accomplished by enzyme incubation with different concentrations of NBS. The relative activity of native and modified MT was investigated through catecholase enzyme reaction in presence of dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-Dopa as substrate. Thermodynamic parameters including standard Gibbs free energy change (∆G25°C and Melting temperature (Tm were obtained from thermal denaturation of the native and modified enzymes. The circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence techniques were used to study secondary and tertiary structure of MT, respectively. All experiments were conducted in 2015 in biophysical laboratory of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences and Islamic Azad University, Science and Research Branch, Tehran. Results The relative activity reduced from 100% for native enzyme to 10%, 7.9%, and 6.4% for modified MT with different NBS of concentrations 2, 10, and 20 mM, respectively. Thermal instability of modified enzyme was confirmed by decreased Tm and ∆G25°C values after modification. In accordance with kinetic and thermodynamic results, the lower stability of modified MT was observed from the changes occurred on its secondary and tertiary structures. Conclusions Chemical modification of tryptophan residues with NBS reduces the activity and stability of MT simultaneously with its structural change. Thus, this study emphasizes the crucial role of tryptophan residues in the structure-function relationship of MT

  3. Crossed beam studies related to gas kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buss, R.J.; Lee, Y.T.

    1979-01-01

    Recent advances in methods of quantum mechanical calculations, electronic computer capabilities, and microscopic experimental methods have put us in a position to understand, evaluate, and extend our current knowledge of elementary chemical reactions. It is certain that, in the future, information derived from first principles will become more important in understanding chemical processes, although chemistry will remain largely an experimental science. Microscopic experiments, such as molecular beam methods, are not the general means for obtaining precise data on rate constants. They are designed not only to reveal detailed information on reaction dynamics with which to gain a clear understanding of macroscopic phenomena, but also to provide a benchmark for the future development of quantum chemical methods for solving the problems of chemical kinetics. Actually, collection of rate constants alone is not sufficient to understand many chemical phenomena. For example, in the modeling of chemical lasers, it is necessary to have detailed information on reaction dynamics. We will discuss contributions which crossed molecular beams have made to our understanding of elementary chemical reactions. It is likely that the advancement of crossed beam methods will make it an important tool for obtaining new chemical information in the future

  4. Kinetic studies on the inhibition of Proteus vulgaris beta-lactamase by imipenem.

    OpenAIRE

    Hashizume, T; Yamaguchi, A; Hirata, T; Sawai, T

    1984-01-01

    Imipenem was found to inhibit Proteus vulgaris beta-lactamase in a progressive manner. Kinetic experiments confirmed that the inactivated enzyme was not completely recovered after intact imipenem had been exhausted.

  5. Kinetic Uptake Studies of Powdered Materials in Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Challenges exist for the study of time dependent sorption processes for heterogeneous systems, especially in the case of dispersed nanomaterials in solvents or solutions because they are not well suited to conventional batch kinetic experiments. In this study, a comparison of batch versus a one-pot setup in two variable configurations was evaluated for the study of uptake kinetics in heterogeneous (solid/solution systems: (i conventional batch method; (ii one-pot system with dispersed adsorbent in solution with a semi-permeable barrier (filter paper or dialysis tubing for in situ sampling; and (iii one-pot system with an adsorbent confined in a semi-permeable barrier (dialysis tubing or filter paper barrier with ex situ sampling. The sorbent systems evaluated herein include several cyclodextrin-based polyurethane materials with two types of phenolic dyes: p-nitrophenol and phenolphthalein. The one-pot kinetics method with in situ (Method ii or ex situ (Method iii sampling described herein offers significant advantages for the study of heterogeneous sorption kinetics of highly dispersed sorbent materials with particles sizes across a range of dimensions from the micron to nanometer scale. The method described herein will contribute positively to the development of advanced studies for heterogeneous sorption processes where an assessment of the relative uptake properties is required at different experimental conditions. The results of this study will be advantageous for the study of nanomaterials with significant benefits over batch kinetic studies for a wide range of heterogeneous sorption processes.

  6. KINETICS OF MODULATORY ROLE OF Cyperus esculentus L. ON THE SPECIFIC ACTIVITY OF KEY CARBOHYDRATE METABOLIZING ENZYMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiu, Saheed; Ajani, Emmanuel Oladipo; Sunmonu, Taofik Olatunde; Ashafa, Anofi Omotayo Tom

    2017-01-01

    The continuous search for new lead compounds as viable inhibitors of specific enzymes linked to carbohydrate metabolism has intensified. Cyperus esculentus L. is one of the therapeutically implicated botanicals against several degenerative diseases including diabetes mellitus. This study evaluated the antioxidant and mechanism(s) of inhibitory potential of aqueous extract of C. esculentus on α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro . The extract was investigated for its radical scavenging and hypoglycaemic potentials using standard experimental procedures. Lineweaver-Burke plot was used to predict the manner in which the enzymes were inhibited. The data obtained revealed that the extract moderately and potently inhibited the specific activities of α -amylase and α -glucosidase, respectively. The inhibition was concentration-related with respective IC 50 values of 5.19 and 0.78 mg/mL relative to that of the control (3.72 and 3.55 mg/mL). The extract also significantly scavenged free radicals and the effects elicited could be ascribed to its phytoconstituents. The respective competitive and non-competitive mode of action of the extract is due to its inhibitory potentials on the activities of α -amylase and α -glucosidase. Going forward, in addition to completely characterize the exact compound(s) responsible for the elicited activity in this study, pertinent attention will be given to the in vivo evaluation of the identified constituents.

  7. Spectroscopic and kinetic study of bismuth dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Robert Eugene

    1997-08-01

    The spectroscopy of high rotational levels in Bi2 X(0g+) and A(0u+) was investigated for 2/le v/prime'/le5 and 0/le v/sp/prime/le4 by observing total fluorescence from laser excitation with a scanning, continuous wave, narrow linewidth ring laser. Rotational levels with J/le211 were accessed. Dunham coefficients were derived that fit all observed rotational lines to within 0.01 cm-1. From these coefficients, Franck-Condon factors were calculated that accurately reflect a set of experimentally determined Franck-Condon factors originating from the initially populated levels 0/le v/sp/prime/le5. Vibrational energy transfer in the low-lying vibrational levels (v/sp/prime/le4) of the A(0u+) state of Bi2 was investigated using spectrally resolved, continuous wave laser induced fluorescence. Spectrally resolved emissions from collisionally populated Bi2(A) vibrational levels were observed for rare gas collision partners. Vibrational transfer promoted rapid thermalization of the excited A state molecules. Landau- Teller scaling of vibrational transfer rates was found to be an acceptable model for the scaling of transfer rates with vibrational quantum number. Fundamental transfer rate coefficients ranged from kv(1,0)=5.29/pm0.73×10-12/ [ cm]3/molec-sec for helium to kv(1,0)=2.38/pm0.36×10-12/ [ cm]3/molec-sec for krypton. Electronic quenching and multi-quantum transfer rates were found to be approximately an order of magnitude slower than the corresponding single quantum transfer rates. Rotational energy transfer in high rotational levels of the A state of Bi2 was also investigated by spectrally resolved, continuous wave laser induced fluorescence. Spectrally resolved emissions from collisionally populated Bi2(A) rotational levels were observed for collisions with helium, neon and argon after laser excitation of J/sp/prime=171,201,231. Rotational energy transfer was the most efficient kinetic process in Bi2(A) and is adequately modeled by the energy based statistical

  8. Kinetic and Related Determinants of Plasma Triglyceride Concentration in Abdominal Obesity: Multicenter Tracer Kinetic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borén, Jan; Watts, Gerald F; Adiels, Martin; Söderlund, Sanni; Chan, Dick C; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Nina; Matikainen, Niina; Kahri, Juhani; Vergès, Bruno; Barrett, P Hugh R; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta

    2015-10-01

    Patients with obesity and diabetes mellitus have increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A major cause is an atherogenic dyslipidemia related primarily to elevated plasma concentrations of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. The aim of this study was to clarify determinants of plasma triglyceride concentration. We focused on factors that predict the kinetics of very-low density lipoprotein 1 (VLDL1) triglycerides. A multicenter study using dual stable isotopes (deuterated leucine and glycerol) and multicompartmental modeling was performed to elucidate the kinetics of triglycerides and apoB in VLDL1 in 46 subjects with abdominal obesity and additional cardiometabolic risk factors. Results showed that plasma triglyceride concentrations were dependent on both the secretion rate (r=0.44, Ptriglycerides and VLDL1-apoB. Liver fat mass was independently and directly associated with secretion rates of VLDL1-triglycerides (r=0.56, Ptriglycerides (r=0.48, Ptriglyceride concentrations in abdominal obesity are determined by the kinetics of VLDL1 subspecies, catabolism being mainly dependent on apoC-III concentration and secretion on liver fat content. Reduction in liver fat and targeting apoC-III may be an effective approach for correcting triglyceride metabolism atherogenic dyslipidemia in obesity. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Kinetic studies of acid inactivation of alpha-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Morten; Nielsen, Jens Bredal; Villadsen, John

    1996-01-01

    The stability of alpha-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae has been studied at different pH. The enzyme is extremely stable at neutral pH (pH 5-8), whereas outside this pH-range a substantial loss of activity is observed. The acid-inactivation of alpha-amylase from A. oryzae was monitored on...... regains part of its activity, and the reactivation process also follows first-order kinetics. The irreversible loss of activity is found not to result from a protease contamination of the protein samples. A proposed model, where irreversibly inactivated a-amylase is formed both directly from the active...

  10. Kinetic study on UV-absorber photodegradation under different conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bubev, Emil, E-mail: ebubev@my.uctm.edu [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Physical Chemistry (Bulgaria); Georgiev, Anton [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Organic Chemistry (Bulgaria); Machkova, Maria [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Physical Chemistry (Bulgaria)

    2016-09-12

    The photodegradation kinetics of two benzophenone derivative UV-absorbers (UVAs)-BP-4 (benzophenone-4) and 4-HBP (4-hydroxybenzophenone), as additives in polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) films, were studied. Solution-processed PVAc films were irradiated in different environments in order to study oxygen and atmospheric humidity influence on UVA photodegradation. Photodegradation was traced by absorption intensity loss via UV–vis spectroscopy. Both UVAs exhibited excellent photostability in an inert atmosphere. Rate constants showed that BP-4 has better permanence in absence of oxygen. Both film types experienced rapid absorption loss, when irradiated in an oxygen containing atmosphere. UVA degradation was treated as a two-stage process. The photodegradation kinetics in the first stage agreed with the adopted complex rate law, but the second stage was best described by pseudo-first order kinetics. BP-4 exhibited better stability. Oxygen was established as the main accelerating factor for photodegradation of benzophenone derivatives UV-absorbers in thin PVAc films.

  11. Phenol oxidation by mushroom waste extracts: a kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigatto, Gisele; Lodi, Alessandra; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Converti, Attilio; da Silva, Regildo Marcio Gonçalves; Palma, Mauri Sérgio Alves

    2013-09-01

    Tyrosinase activity of mushroom extracts was checked for their ability to degrade phenol. Phenol oxidation kinetics was investigated varying temperature from 10 to 60 °C and the initial values of pH, enzyme activity and phenol concentration in the ranges 4.5-8.5, 1.43-9.54 U/mL and 50-600 mg/L, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters of phenol oxidation and tyrosinase reversible inactivation were estimated. Tyrosinase thermostability was also investigated through residual activity tests after extracts exposition at 20-50 °C, whose results allowed exploring the thermodynamics of enzyme irreversible thermoinactivation. This study is the first attempt to separate the effects of reversible unfolding and irreversible denaturation of tyrosinase on its activity. Extracts were finally tested on a real oil mill wastewater. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Studies on the kinetics and intraparticle diffusivities of BOD, colour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, this study reveals that boiler fly ash can effectively be used as an adsorbent for POME treatment and also established the kinetic and mechanisms of the sorption process. Also, the results of this study could serve as effective design parameters for a treatment plant to further reduce BOD, colour and TSS from ...

  13. Biochemical approaches to C4 photosynthesis evolution studies: the case of malic enzymes decarboxylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigo, Mariana; Tronconi, Marcos A; Gerrard Wheeler, Mariel C; Alvarez, Clarisa E; Drincovich, María F; Andreo, Carlos S

    2013-11-01

    C4 photosynthesis enables the capture of atmospheric CO2 and its concentration at the site of RuBisCO, thus counteracting the negative effects of low atmospheric levels of CO2 and high atmospheric levels of O2 (21 %) on photosynthesis. The evolution of this complex syndrome was a multistep process. It did not occur by simply recruiting pre-exiting components of the pathway from C3 ancestors which were already optimized for C4 function. Rather it involved modifications in the kinetics and regulatory properties of pre-existing isoforms of non-photosynthetic enzymes in C3 plants. Thus, biochemical studies aimed at elucidating the functional adaptations of these enzymes are central to the development of an integrative view of the C4 mechanism. In the present review, the most important biochemical approaches that we currently use to understand the evolution of the C4 isoforms of malic enzyme are summarized. It is expected that this information will help in the rational design of the best decarboxylation processes to provide CO2 for RuBisCO in engineering C3 species to perform C4 photosynthesis.

  14. Linear and nonlinear kinetic-stability studies in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.; Chance, M.S.; Chen, L.; Krommes, J.A.; Lee, W.W.; Rewoldt, G.

    1982-09-01

    This paper presents results of theoretical investigations on important linear kinetic properties of low frequency instabilities in toroidal systems and on nonlinear processes which could significantly influence their impact on anomalous transport. Analytical and numerical methods and also particle simulations have been employed to carry out these studies. In particular, the following subjects are considered: (1) linear stability analysis of kinetic instabilities for realistic tokamak equilibria and the application of such calculations to the PDX and PLT tokamak experiments including the influence of a hot beam-ion component; (2) determination of nonlinearly saturated, statistically steady states of three interacting drift modes; and (3) gyrokinetic particle simulation of drift instabilities

  15. Kinetic-energy functionals studied by surface calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Kollár, J.

    1998-01-01

    The self-consistent jellium model of metal surfaces is used to study the accuracy of a number of semilocal kinetic-energy functionals for independent particles. It is shown that the poor accuracy exhibited by the gradient expansion approximation and most of the semiempirical functionals in the lo...... density, high gradient limit may be subtantially improved by including locally a von Weizsacker term. Based on this, we propose a simple one-parameter Pade's approximation, which reproduces the exact Kohn-Sham surface kinetic energy over the entire range of metallic densities....

  16. Mechanism and activation for allosteric adenosine 5'-monophosphate nucleosidase. Kinetic alpha-deuterium isotope effects for the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of adenosine 5'-monophosphate and nicotinamide mononucleotide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoog, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetic alpha-deuterium isotope effect on Vmax/Km for hydrolysis of NMN catalyzed by AMP nucleosidase at saturating concentrations of the allosteric activator MgATP2- is kH/kD = 1.155 +/- 0.012. This value is close to that reported previously for the nonenzymatic hydrolysis of nucleosides of related structure, suggesting that the full intrinsic isotope effect for enzymatic NMN hydrolysis is expressed under these conditions; that is, bond-changing reactions are largely or completely rate-determining and the transition state has marked oxocarbonium ion character. The kinetic alpha-deuterium isotope effect for this reaction is unchanged when deuterium oxide replaces water as solvent, corroborating this conclusion. Furthermore, this isotope effect is independent of pH over the range 6.95-9.25, for which values of Vmax/Km change by a factor of 90, suggesting that the isotope-sensitive and pH-sensitive steps for AMP-nucleosidase-catalyzed NMN hydrolysis are the same. Values of kH/kD for AMP nucleosidase-catalyzed hydrolysis of NMN decrease with decreasing saturation of enzyme with MgATP2- and reach unity when the enzyme is less than half-saturated with this activator. This requires that the rate-determining step changes from cleavage of the covalent C-N bond to one which is isotope-independent. In contrast to the case for NMN hydrolysis, AMP nucleosidase-catalyzed hydrolysis of AMP at saturating concentrations of MgATP2- shows a kinetic alpha-deuterium isotope effect of unity. Thus, covalent bond-changing reactions are largely or completely rate-determining for hydrolysis of a poor substrate, NMN, but make little or no contribution to rate-determining step for hydrolysis of a good substrate, AMP, by maximally activated enzyme. This behavior has several precedents

  17. Kinetic Studies of Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyclohexene was oxidized using chromium (VI) oxide (CrO3) in pure acetic acid medium. The products of oxidation were analysed using simple qualitative analysis, IR spectroscopy and Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Kinetics studies were carried out to determine the order of reaction, rate constant and ...

  18. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies on Adsorption of Sulphate from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DELL USER

    22, No. 1, 2017. 39. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies on Adsorption of Sulphate from Aqueous Solution by. Magnetite ... poison catalysts, and affect the .... C for 1 h in a stainless steel reactor placed in a furnace ... N2 gas for 30 min. 50 ml of ...... adsorption for designing and evaluating the ... is the equilibrium liquid-phase.

  19. In vitro antioxidant activity, enzyme kinetics, biostability and cellular SOD mimicking ability of 1:1 curcumin-copper (II) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunwar, A.; Mishra, B.; Barik, A.; Priyadarsini, K.I.; Narang, H.; Krishna, M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro antioxidant activity of 1:1 curcumin copper (II) complex was evaluated by following the inhibition of γ-radiation induced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in model systems. The SOD enzyme kinetic parameters K m and V max values and the turn over number of the complex were determined. The complex is stable in bio-fluids and prevents oxidation of lipid and protein solution in presence of H 2 O 2 and showed reduction in MnSOD level in spleen cells without having any effect on cell viability. (author)

  20. In vitro antioxidant activity, enzyme kinetics, biostability and cellular SOD mimicking ability of 1:1 curcumin-copper (II) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunwar, A; Mishra, B; Barik, A; Priyadarsini, K I [Radiation and Photochemistry Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Narang, H; Krishna, M [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2008-01-15

    In vitro antioxidant activity of 1:1 curcumin copper (II) complex was evaluated by following the inhibition of {gamma}-radiation induced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in model systems. The SOD enzyme kinetic parameters K{sub m} and V{sub max} values and the turn over number of the complex were determined. The complex is stable in bio-fluids and prevents oxidation of lipid and protein solution in presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and showed reduction in MnSOD level in spleen cells without having any effect on cell viability. (author)

  1. A kinetic study of solar wind electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lie-Svendsen, Oeystein; Leer, Egil

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of the distribution function for a test population of electrons in an isothermal electron-proton corona has been studied using a Fokker-Planck description. The aim is to investigate whether a suprathermal tail forms due to the energy dependence of the Coulomb cross section. We find that a Maxwellian test population, injected into this background close to the coronal base with a temperature equal to that of the background electrons, maintains its shape throughout the transition from collision-dominated to collisionless flow. No significant suprathermal tail in the electron distribution function is seen in the outer corona

  2. The use of dimethylsulfoxide as a solvent in enzyme inhibition studies: the case of aldose reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misuri, Livia; Cappiello, Mario; Balestri, Francesco; Moschini, Roberta; Barracco, Vito; Mura, Umberto; Del-Corso, Antonella

    2017-12-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) is an enzyme devoted to cell detoxification and at the same time is strongly involved in the aetiology of secondary diabetic complications and the amplification of inflammatory phenomena. AR is subjected to intense inhibition studies and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is often present in the assay mixture to keep the inhibitors in solution. DMSO was revealed to act as a weak but well detectable AR differential inhibitor, acting as a competitive inhibitor of the L-idose reduction, as a mixed type of non-competitive inhibitor of HNE reduction and being inactive towards 3-glutathionyl-4-hydroxynonanal transformation. A kinetic model of DMSO action with respect to differently acting inhibitors was analysed. Three AR inhibitors, namely the flavonoids neohesperidin dihydrochalcone, rutin and phloretin, were used to evaluate the effects of DMSO on the inhibition studies on the reduction of L-idose and HNE.

  3. A Comparative Study of New Aspergillus Strains for Proteolytic Enzymes Production by Solid State Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastón Ezequiel Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the proteolytic enzymes production using twelve Aspergillus strains previously unused for this purpose was performed by solid state fermentation. A semiquantitative and quantitative evaluation of proteolytic activity were carried out using crude enzymatic extracts obtained from the fermentation cultures, finding seven strains with high and intermediate level of protease activity. Biochemical, thermodynamics, and kinetics features such as optimum pH and temperature values, thermal stability, activation energy (Ea, quotient energy (Q10, Km, and Vmax were studied in four enzymatic extracts from the selected strains that showed the highest productivity. Additionally, these strains were evaluated by zymogram analysis obtaining protease profiles with a wide range of molecular weight for each sample. From these four strains with the highest productivity, the proteolytic extract of A. sojae ATCC 20235 was shown to be an appropriate biocatalyst for hydrolysis of casein and gelatin substrates, increasing its antioxidant activities in 35% and 125%, respectively.

  4. Cell kinetic studies on radiation induced leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Isamu; Suzuki, Gen; Imai, Yasufumi; Kawase, Yoshiko; Nose, Masako; Hirashima, Kunitake; Bessho, Masami

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to determine the clonal origin of radiation-induced thymic lymphoma in mice with cellular mosaicism for phosphoglycerate kinase; (2) to determine the incidence and latent period of myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma induced by whole-body exposure to median doses (3.0 Gy or less) in RFM/MsNrs-2 mice; and (3) to examine the influence of human recombinant interleukin-2 (hrIL-2). Thymic lymphoma was of a single cell origin. The incidence of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma in RFM mice increased in a dose dependent fashion. Mean latent periods of both myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma after irradiation became shorter in proportion to radiation doses. When hrIL-2 was injected to RFM mice receiving 3.0 Gy, mean survivals were shorter in thymoma-bearing mice than the control mice. This suggested that hrIL-2 shortens the promotion step of thymoma. Administration of hrIL-2 failed to alter the incidence of myeloid leukemia or the mean survival of mice having myeloid leukemia, indicating that the protocol of hrIL-2 administration was not so sufficient as to alter the myeloid leukemogenesis. (Namekawa, K)

  5. Molecular determinants of enzyme cold adaptation: comparative structural and computational studies of cold- and warm-adapted enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleo, Elena; Tiberti, Matteo; Invernizzi, Gaetano; Pasi, Marco; Ranzani, Valeria

    2011-11-01

    The identification of molecular mechanisms underlying enzyme cold adaptation is a hot-topic both for fundamental research and industrial applications. In the present contribution, we review the last decades of structural computational investigations on cold-adapted enzymes in comparison to their warm-adapted counterparts. Comparative sequence and structural studies allow the definition of a multitude of adaptation strategies. Different enzymes carried out diverse mechanisms to adapt to low temperatures, so that a general theory for enzyme cold adaptation cannot be formulated. However, some common features can be traced in dynamic and flexibility properties of these enzymes, as well as in their intra- and inter-molecular interaction networks. Interestingly, the current data suggest that a family-centered point of view is necessary in the comparative analyses of cold- and warm-adapted enzymes. In fact, enzymes belonging to the same family or superfamily, thus sharing at least the three-dimensional fold and common features of the functional sites, have evolved similar structural and dynamic patterns to overcome the detrimental effects of low temperatures.

  6. Rye Bran Modified with Cell Wall-Degrading Enzymes Influences the Kinetics of Plant Lignans but Not of Enterolignans in Multicatheterized Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolvig, Anne K; Nørskov, Natalja P; van Vliet, Sophie; Foldager, Leslie; Curtasu, Mihai V; Hedemann, Mette S; Sørensen, Jens F; Lærke, Helle N; Bach Knudsen, Knud E

    2017-12-01

    Background: Whole-grain intake is associated with a lower risk of chronic Western-style diseases, possibly brought about by the high concentration of phytochemicals, among them plant lignans (PLs), in the grains. Objective: We studied whether treatment of rye bran with cell wall-degrading enzymes changed the solubility and kinetics of PLs in multicatheterized pigs. Methods: Ten female Duroc × Danish Landrace × Yorkshire pigs (60.3 ± 2.3 kg at surgery) fitted with permanent catheters were included in an incomplete crossover study. The pigs were fed 2 experimental diets for 1-7 d. The diets were rich in PLs and based on nontreated lignan-rich [LR; lignan concentration: 20.2 mg dry matter (DM)/kg] or enzymatically treated lignan-rich (ENZLR; lignan concentration: 27.8 mg DM/kg) rye bran. Plasma concentrations of PLs and enterolignans were quantified with the use of targeted LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Data were log transformed and analyzed with mixed-effects, 1-compartment, and asymptotic regression models. Results: The availability of PLs was 38% greater in ENZLR than in LR, and the soluble fraction of PLs was 49% in ENZLR compared with 35% in LR diets. PLs appeared in the circulation 30 min after intake of both the ENZLR and LR diets. Postprandially, consumption of ENZLR resulted in a 4-times-greater ( P concentration compared with LR. The area under the curve (AUC) measured 0-360 min after ENZLR intake was ∼2 times higher than after LR intake. A 1-compartment model could describe the postprandial increase in plasma concentration after ENZLR intake, whereas an asymptotic regression model described the plasma concentrations after LR intake. Despite increased available and soluble PLs, ENZLR did not increase plasma enterolignans. Conclusion: The modification of rye bran with cell wall-degrading enzymes resulted in significantly greater plasma concentrations of PLs and the 4-h AUC, particularly syringaresinol, in multicatheterized pigs. © 2017 American Society

  7. Kinetic study and thermal decomposition behavior of viscoelastic memory foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido, María A.; Font, Rafael; Conesa, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The thermal degradation has been studied under three different atmospheres. • Pyrolysis and combustion kinetic models have been proposed. • Evolved products under different atmospheres have been analyzed by TG-FTIR and TG-MS. - Abstract: A systematic investigation of the thermal decomposition of viscoelastic memory foam (VMF) was performed using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to obtain the kinetic parameters, and thermogravimetric analysis coupled to Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectrometry (TGA-FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis coupled to Mass Spectrometry (TGA-MS) to obtain detailed information of evolved products on pyrolysis and oxidative degradations. Two consecutive nth-order reactions were employed to correlate the experimental data from dynamic and isothermal runs performed at three different heating rates (5, 10 and 20 K/min) under an inert atmosphere. On the other hand, for the kinetic study of the oxidative decomposition, the data from combustion (synthetic air) and poor oxygen combustion (N_2:O_2 = 9:1) runs, at three heating rates and under dynamic and isothermal conditions, were correlated simultaneously. A kinetic model consisting of three consecutive reactions presented a really good correlation in all runs. TGA-FTIR analysis showed that the main gases released during the pyrolysis of VMF were determined as ether and aliphatic hydrocarbons, whereas in combustion apart from the previous gases, aldehydes, amines and CO_2 have also been detected as the main gases. These results were confirmed by the TGA-MS.

  8. Microbial and biochemical studies on phytase enzyme in some microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelbary, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    Mixed calcium and magnesium salts of phytic acid myoinositol hexa phosphoric acid are widely distributed in food stuffs of plant origin, they may bind essential proteins, phospholipids and microelements to form indigestible compounds. In this concern, destruction of phytic acid and its salts by different methods is very important, one of them is by using microbial phytase. This study aims to produce phytase enzyme from microorganisms and study the best conditions of production and purification and also the properties of the partially purified phytase. 22 figs., 29 tabs., 61 refs

  9. Study on the agglomeration kinetics of uranium peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, M.; Mojica Rodriguez, L.A. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, RadioChemistry and Process Department, 17171, Bagnols-sur-Ceze 30207 (France); Muhr, H.; Plasari, E. [Reaction and Process Engineering Laboratory, CNRS, University of Lorraine. 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451, Nancy 54001 (France); Auger, F. [Areva Mines/SEPA. 2 route de Lavaugrasse, Bessines-sur-Gartempe 87250 (France)

    2016-07-01

    Considering the previous study dealing with thermodynamic and kinetic phenomena (nucleation and crystal growth) during the uranium peroxide precipitation, this work focuses on the agglomeration mechanism. It provides the results obtained from the experiments carried out in a mixed suspension - mixed product removal (MSMPR) mixer operating at steady state. The influence of the operating parameters on the uranium peroxide agglomerates was studied in order to identify the agglomeration kernel. The method is based on the resolution of the population balance equation using the method of moments and the experimental particle size distributions. The results lead to a size-independent kernel directly proportional to the crystal growth rate. Under the stirring conditions studied, the agglomeration appears to be significantly reduced by mixing which results in a kernel inversely proportional to the average shear rate. The agglomeration kinetic law obtained in this study will be used for the process modelling in a further study. (authors)

  10. Study on the agglomeration kinetics of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, M.; Mojica Rodriguez, L.A.; Muhr, H.; Plasari, E.; Auger, F.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the previous study dealing with thermodynamic and kinetic phenomena (nucleation and crystal growth) during the uranium peroxide precipitation, this work focuses on the agglomeration mechanism. It provides the results obtained from the experiments carried out in a mixed suspension - mixed product removal (MSMPR) mixer operating at steady state. The influence of the operating parameters on the uranium peroxide agglomerates was studied in order to identify the agglomeration kernel. The method is based on the resolution of the population balance equation using the method of moments and the experimental particle size distributions. The results lead to a size-independent kernel directly proportional to the crystal growth rate. Under the stirring conditions studied, the agglomeration appears to be significantly reduced by mixing which results in a kernel inversely proportional to the average shear rate. The agglomeration kinetic law obtained in this study will be used for the process modelling in a further study. (authors)

  11. Isotope partitioning for NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum confirms a steady-state random kinetic mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.Y.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    Isotope partitioning studies beginning with E-[ 14 C]NAD, E-[ 14 C] malate, E-[ 14 C] NAD-Mg 2+ , and E-Mg-[ 14 C]malate suggest a steady-state random mechanism for the NAD-malic enzyme. Isotope trapping beginning with E-[ 14 C]NAD and with varying concentrations of Mg 2+ and malate in the chase solution indicates that Mg 2+ is added in rapid equilibrium and must be added prior to malate for productive ternary complex formation. Equal percentage trapping from E-[ 14 C]NAD-Mg and E-Mg-[ 14 C] malate indicates the mechanism is steady-state random with equal off-rates for NAD and malate from E-NAD-Mg-malate. The off-rates for both do not change significantly in the ternary E-Mg-malate and E-NAD-Mg complexes, nor does the off-rate change for NAD from E-NAD. No trapping of malate was obtained from E-[ 14 C] malate, suggesting that this complex is nonproductive. A quantitative analysis of the data allows an estimation of values for a number of the rate constants along the reaction pathway

  12. A Study on the Kinetic Characteristics of Transmutation Process Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chang Hyun; You, Young Woo; Cho, Jae seon; Huh, Chang Wook; Kim, Doh Hyung [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the transient heat transfer characteristics of liquid mental as the coolant used in accelerator-driven transmutation process reactor which is related the disposal of high-level radioactive nuclide. At current stage, the accelerator-driven transmutation process is investigated as the most appropriate method among many transmutation process methods. In this study, previous research works are investigated especially about the thermal hydraulics and kinetic behavior of coolant material including heat transfer of coolant in transmutation process reactor. A study on the heat transfer characteristics of liquid metal is performed based on the thermal hydraulic kinetic characteristics of liquid metal reactor which uses liquid metal coolant. Based on this study, the most appropriate material for the coolant of transmutation reactor will be recommended. 53 refs., 15 tabs., 33 figs. (author)

  13. Kinetic properties of two Rhizopus exo-polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyzing galacturonic acid oligomers using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The kinetic characteristics of two Rhizopus oryzae exo-polygalacturonases acting on galacturonic acid oligomers (GalpA) were determined using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). RPG15 hydrolyzing (GalpA)2 demonstrated a Km of 55 uM and kcat of 10.3 s^-1^ while RPG16 was shown to have greater af...

  14. Determination of glutamate dehydrogenase activity and its kinetics in mouse tissues using metabolic mapping (quantitative enzyme histochemistry)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botman, Dennis; Tigchelaar, Wikky; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyses the reversible conversion of glutamate into α-ketoglutarate with the concomitant reduction of NAD(P)(+) to NAD(P)H or vice versa. GDH activity is subject to complex allosteric regulation including substrate inhibition. To determine GDH kinetics in situ, we

  15. A kinetic study of pyrolysis in pitch impregnated electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocaefe, D.; Charette, A.; Ferland, J.; Couderc, P.; Saint-Romain, J.L. (Universite du Quebec a Chicoutini, Chicoutini, PQ (Canada))

    1990-12-01

    A study was conducted on carbon electrodes which were impregnated with three different pitches. The focus of the study was to investigate the pyrolysis of pitch impregnated electrodes. For the purposes of the research an experimental technique and calculation procedure were developed. A kinetic model was used to interpret the data, comparison of model predictions and experimental data showed good agreement. 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Measuring the Enzyme Activity of Arabidopsis Deubiquitylating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowska, Kamila; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Isono, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitylating enzymes, or DUBs, are important regulators of ubiquitin homeostasis and substrate stability, though the molecular mechanisms of most of the DUBs in plants are not yet understood. As different ubiquitin chain types are implicated in different biological pathways, it is important to analyze the enzyme characteristic for studying a DUB. Quantitative analysis of DUB activity is also important to determine enzyme kinetics and the influence of DUB binding proteins on the enzyme activity. Here, we show methods to analyze DUB activity using immunodetection, Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining, and fluorescence measurement that can be useful for understanding the basic characteristic of DUBs.

  17. A kinetic study of the electrochemical hydrogenation of ethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedighi, S.; Gardner, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we have examined the kinetics of the electrochemical hydrogenation of ethylene in a PEM reactor. While in itself this reaction is of little industrial interest, this reaction can be looked upon as a model reaction for many of the important hydrogenation processes including the refining of heavy oils and the hydrogenation of vegetable oils. To study the electrochemical hydrogenation of ethylene, several experimental techniques have been used including polarization measurements, measurement of the composition of the exit gases and potential step, transient measurements. The results show that the hydrogenation reaction proceeds rapidly and essentially to completion. By fitting the experimental transient data to the results from a zero-dimensional mathematical model of the process, a set of kinetic parameters for the reactions has been obtained that give generally good agreement with the experimental results. It seems probable that similar experimental techniques could be used to study the electrochemical hydrogenation of other unsaturated organic molecules of more industrial significance.

  18. Kinetic Study on Pyrolysis of Oil Palm Frond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soon, V S Y; Chin, B L F; Lim, A C R

    2016-01-01

    The pyrolysis of oil palm frond is studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. The present study investigates the thermal degradation behaviour and determination of the kinetic parameters such as the activation energy (E A ) and pre-exponential factor (A) values of oil palm frond under pyrolysis condition. The kinetic data is produced based on first order rate of reaction. In this study, the experiments are conducted at different heating rates of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 K/min in the temperature range of 323-1173 K under non-isothermal condition. Argon gas is used as an inert gas to remove any entrapment of gases in the TGA equipment. (paper)

  19. Unchanged content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers and V˙O2 kinetics after intensified training in trained cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Gunnarsson, Thomas Gunnar Petursson; Thomassen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    perturbation during INT. Pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics was determined in eight trained male cyclists (V˙O2-max: 59 ± 4 (means ± SD) mL min(-1) kg(-1)) during MOD (205 ± 12 W ~65% V˙O2-max) and INT (286 ± 17 W ~85% V˙O2-max) exercise before and after a 7-week HIT period (30-sec sprints and 4-min intervals) with a 50...... DW(-1) min(-1)) of CS (56 ± 8 post-HIT vs. 59 ± 10 pre-HIT), HAD (27 ± 6 vs. 29 ± 3) and PFK (340 ± 69 vs. 318 ± 105) and the capillary to fiber ratio (2.30 ± 0.16 vs. 2.38 ± 0.20) was unaltered following HIT. V˙O2 kinetics was unchanged with HIT and the speed of the primary response did not differ...... of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch fibers, and did not change V˙O2 kinetics....

  20. Kinetic studies on the transesterification of sunflower oil with 1-butanol catalyzed by Rhizomucor miehei lipase in a biphasic aqueous-organic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilmi, Miftahul; Hommes, Arne; Winkelman, Jozef; Hidayat, C.; Heeres, Hero

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of sunflower oil transesterification with 1-butanol using a homogeneous lipase (Rhizomucor miehei) in an aqueous-organic biphasic system were studied in a stirred batch reactor set-up. An initial screening study was performed to optimize relevant process conditions (enzyme

  1. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is an enzyme with unusual kinetic properties and a crystal structure that suggests it evolved from a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Christoffersen, Stig; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Mølgaard, Anne; Kadziola, Anders

    2015-04-14

    The adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRTase) encoded by the open reading frame SSO2342 of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was subjected to crystallographic, kinetic, and ligand binding analyses. The enzyme forms dimers in solution and in the crystals, and binds one molecule of the reactants 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and adenine or the product adenosine monophosphate (AMP) or the inhibitor adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in each active site. The individual subunit adopts an overall structure that resembles a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase) more than known APRTases implying that APRT functionality in Crenarchaeotae has its evolutionary origin in this family of PRTases. Only the N-terminal two-thirds of the polypeptide chain folds as a traditional type I PRTase with a five-stranded β-sheet surrounded by helices. The C-terminal third adopts an unusual three-helix bundle structure that together with the nucleobase-binding loop undergoes a conformational change upon binding of adenine and phosphate resulting in a slight contraction of the active site. The inhibitor ADP binds like the product AMP with both the α- and β-phosphates occupying the 5'-phosphoribosyl binding site. The enzyme shows activity over a wide pH range, and the kinetic and ligand binding properties depend on both pH and the presence/absence of phosphate in the buffers. A slow hydrolysis of PRPP to ribose 5-phosphate and pyrophosphate, catalyzed by the enzyme, may be facilitated by elements in the C-terminal three-helix bundle part of the protein.

  2. Prediction of interindividual variation in drug plasma levels in vivo from individual enzyme kinetic data and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaards, J.J.P.; Hissink, E.M.; Briggs, M.; Weaver, R.; Jochemsen, R.; Jackson, P.; Bertrand, M.; Bladeren, P. van

    2000-01-01

    A strategy is presented to predict interindividual variation in drug plasma levels in vivo by the use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and human in vitro metabolic parameters, obtained through the combined use of microsomes containing single cytochrome P450 enzymes and a human liver

  3. Red Seaweed Enzyme-Catalyzed Bromination of Bromophenol Red: An Inquiry-Based Kinetics Laboratory Experiment for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jittam, Piyachat; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Promptmas, Chamras; Sriwattanarothai, Namkang; Archavarungson, Nattinee; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    Haloperoxidase enzymes are of interest for basic and applied bioscientists because of their increasing importance in pharmaceutical industry and environmental cleanups. In a guided inquiry-based laboratory experiment for life-science, agricultural science, and health science undergraduates, the bromoperoxidase from a red seaweed was used to…

  4. Kinetics of corneal epithelium turnover in vivo. Studies of lovastatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cenedella, R.J.; Fleschner, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    The authors developed a direct chemical approach for estimating the rate of turnover of the corneal epithelium in vivo. The method was used to examine the effects of lovastatin, a potent inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis, on proliferation and turnover of the epithelium. Corneal DNA was labeled by pulse injection (IP) of the rat with 3H-thymidine, and 3H-labeled DNA was recovered from peripheral and central corneas over the next 15 days. Only the epithelium became labeled, and the loss of label by cell desquamation began 3 days after injection. The loss of 3H-DNA from the cornea (peripheral plus central region) followed first-order kinetics. The half-life of the disappearance was about 3 days. The peripheral cornea became more highly labeled than the central cornea and began to lose 3H-DNA before the central cornea. These observations support the possibility of a higher mitotic rate in the peripheral region and the centripetal movement of a population of peripheral epithelial cells in the normal cornea. The half-lives of the disappearance of 3H-DNA from peripheral and central corneas measured between days 5 and 15 postinjection were identical, both at 3 days. Complete turnover of the corneal epithelium would, therefore, require about 2 weeks (4-5 half-lives). Treatment of the rat with lovastatin had no obvious effects upon the proliferation or turnover of the corneal epithelium. Although lovastatin inhibited corneal 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the key regulatory enzyme of cholesterol synthesis, the cornea compensated by induction of this enzyme so that there was no net inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in the cornea

  5. Kinetic study of the alkaline metals oxidation by dry oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touzain, Ph.

    1967-06-01

    The oxidation of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium and sodium-potassium alloys by dry oxygen is studied at several temperatures and in the oxygen pressure range 40 to 400 mmHg. One distinguishes three different oxidation behaviours (inflammation, ignition and slow combustion) whose zones are precised in function of the temperature. The slow oxidation kinetic laws, the composition of oxides and the motive of oxides colorations are determined. At least, the experimental data are construed theoretically. (author) [fr

  6. Kinetic study of lithium-cadmium ternary amalgam decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordova, M.H.; Andrade, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of metals, which form stable lithium phase in binary alloys, on the formation of intermetallic species in ternary amalgams and their effect on thermal decomposition in contact with water is analyzed. Cd is selected as ternary metal, based on general experimental selection criteria. Cd (Hg) binary amalgams are prepared by direct contact Cd-Hg, whereas Li is formed by electrolysis of Li OH aq using a liquid Cd (Hg) cathodic well. The decomposition kinetic of Li C(Hg) in contact with 0.6 M Li OH is studied in function of ageing and temperature, and these results are compared with the binary amalgam Li (Hg) decomposition. The decomposition rate is constant during one hour for binary and ternary systems. Ageing does not affect the binary systems but increases the decomposition activation energy of ternary systems. A reaction mechanism that considers an intermetallic specie participating in the activated complex is proposed and a kinetic law is suggested. (author)

  7. Kinetic Study on Channelling of Protons in Metallic Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, Zhao; Yuan-Hong, Song; You-Nian, Wang

    2008-01-01

    Based on the kinetic model and the dielectric response theory, a theoretical model is put forward to describe the transport of protons along nanotube axes. With the introduction of electron band structure for different nanotubes like zigzag and armchair nanotubes of metallic properties, the collective excitation of electrons on the cylinders induced by the incident ions is studied, showing several distinct peaks in the curves of the energy loss function. Furthermore, the stopping power and the self-energy are calculated as functions of ion velocities, especially taking into account the influence of damping coefficients. It is conceivable from the results that, in the kinetic formulation, plasmon excitation plays a major role in the stopping. And as the damping increases, the peaks of the stopping power shift to the lower velocities, with the broadening of the plasmon resonance. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  8. DEFLUORIDATION OF DRINKING WATER BY ELECTROCOAGULATION/ELECTROFLOTATION - KINETIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennajah Mounir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A variable order kinetic (VOK model derived from the langmuir-freundlish equation was applied to determine the kinetics of fluoride removal reaction by electrocoagulation (EC. Synthetic solutions were employed to elucidate the effects of the initial fluoride concentration, the applied current and the initial acidity on the simulation results of the model. The proposed model successfully describes the fluoride removal in Airlift reactor in comparison with the experimental results. In this study two EC cells with the same capacity (V = 20 L were used to carry out fluoride removal with aluminum electrodes, the first is a stirred tank reactor (STR the second is an airlift reactor (ALR. The comparison of energy consumption demonstrates that the (ALR is advantageous for carrying out the defluoridation removal process.

  9. Evaluation of dilatometric techniques for studies of sintering kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed Ali, M.; Toft Soerensen, O.

    1985-04-01

    The kinetics of the initial sintering stage of CeO 2 is evaluated by three different techniques: constant heating rate dilatometry, constant shrinkage rate dilatometry and a new technique recently introduced by the authors called Stepwise Isothermal Dilatometry (SID). Comparative measurements with these techniques showed that too high activation energies were obtained with the two first techniques, both of which can be termed as nonisothermal, whereas activation energies comparable to those reported for cation diffusion in other fluorite oxides were obtained with the latter technique. Of the three techniques SID is thus considered to be the most accurate for studies of the sintering kinetics. In contrast to the two nonisothermal techniques SID has the further advantage that both the controlling mechanism and its activation energy can be determined in a single experiment. From the SID-measurement it was concluded that the initial sintering stage of CeO 2 is controlled by grain-boundary diffusion. (author)

  10. Kinetic study of ozonation of molasses fermentation wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coca, M.; Pena, M.; Gonzalez, G.

    2007-01-01

    A kinetic study of molasses wastewater ozonation was carried out in a stirred tank reactor to obtain the rate constants for the decolorization reaction and the regime through which ozone is absorbed. First, fundamental mass transfer parameters such as ozone solubility, volumetric mass transfer coefficients and ozone decomposition kinetics were determined from semi-batch experiments in organic-free solutions with an ionic composition similar that of industrial wastewater. The influence of operating variables such as the stirring rate and gas flow rate on the kinetic and mass transfer parameters was also studied. The application of film theory allows to establish that the reactions between ozone and colored compounds in wastewater take place in the fast and pseudo-first-order regime, within the liquid film. The decolorization rate constants were evaluated at pH 8.7 and 25 deg. C, varying from 0.6 x 10 7 to 3.8 x 10 7 L mol -1 s -1 , depending on the stirring rate and the inlet gas flow

  11. Enzyme study of the separate stages in alcohol fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mar Monux, D

    1968-01-01

    The precise roles of ATP, DNA, and NADP in interaction with enzymes in certain of the 11 phases of fermentation are outlined. Individual enzymes which take part in the 11 phases are: (1) hexose transferase; (2) phosphohexoseisomerase; (3) fructosinase; (4) aldolase; (5) an SH-enzyme; (6) 3-phosphoglycero-1-phosphotransferase; (7) ghosphoglyceromutosase; (8) 2-phosphoglycerohydrolase; (9) pyruvic transferase; (10) pyruvic decarboxylase; (11) alcohol dehydrogenase.

  12. Studies on Ganoderma lucidum III. production of pectolytic enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, L.S.; Tseng, T.C.

    1986-07-01

    Pectolytic enzymes produced by Ganoderma lucidum B in culture and polypropylene bags were investigated. Two pectolytic enzymes, i.e., endo-polygalacturonase (endo-PG) and endo-pectic methyl trans-eliminase (endo-PMTE) were obtained from crude enzymes of G. lucidum B extract from mycelia polypropylene bags. The endo-PMTE has to optimal pH at 4.5 and 8.0. The enzyme stimulated by Ca/sup + +/ ion and preferred only pectin; the enzyme activity decreased at temperature above 50/sup 0/C. The endo-PMTE a and endo-PMTE b, obtained from polypropylene bag with mycelia of G. lucidum B, were purified by 60-80% ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-100 gel filtration, DEAE-cellulose ion exchange column chromatography and isoelectric focusing, showing pI at 8.2 and 5.5. Disc gel electrophoresis confirmed two peaks corresponding to endo-PMTE a and b as isoenzymes. Pectolytic enzymes purified by 60-80% ammonium sulfate fraction macerated potato disc and it was more active than the crude enzyme. At pH 4.5, maceration of potato disc by pectolytic enzymes more effective than those at pH 8.0 or 7.0. At pH 8.0, Ca/sup + +/ ion stimulate pectolytic enzyme activities and accelerated maceration.

  13. Kinetic study on coagulase formation and growth of 'Staphylococcus aureus': comparative and combined action of antibiotics and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiortsis, M.

    1980-01-01

    Coagulase production is preserved in Staphylococcus aureus cultures although growth was strongly reduced after irradiation with 90,000 rads by a 60 Co source. Kinetic studies on the growth and coagulase formation by non-irradiated and irradiated bacteria are reported, using various antibiotics such as chloramphenicol, actinomycin D and mitomycin. Both chloramphenicol (1-50 μg/ml) and actinomycin D (0.05-0.8 μg/ml) added to S. aureus cultures reduce and finally inhibit growth rate and coagulase synthesis proportionally to their concentration in the medium; irradiated and non-irradiated cultures behave similarly to the inhibitory action of those antibiotics. Mitomycin between 0.2-9.6 μg/ml reduces growth, but enzyme production is slightly affected; high levels of coagulase are observed in non-growing cultures. Mitomycin and gamma radiation affecting DNA give similar results: inhibition of growth but not of enzyme formation. Kinetic studies show that coagulase is synthesized during the first five minutes either in irradiated or in non-irradiated cultures. Indication of a de novo synthesis, instead of a mere release of ready-formed enzyme, is given by using chloramphenicol or actinomycin which strongly inhibit coagulase production in irradiated S. aureus. Cultures treated by those antibiotics have their coagulase levels reduced to the same degree, were they irradiated or not; it is assumed that both types of cultures behave similarly, as far as enzyme production is concerned. A massive irradiation dose alone -or mitomycin in high concentrations alone- may suspend bacterial growth although enzyme synthesis continues. A similar result is obtained by combining lower irradiation doses with an appropriate antibiotic. The combined and/or synergistic actions of gamma radiation and antibiotics could successfully differentiate between the two cellular functions: growth and enzyme synthesis [fr

  14. Studies on a photoreactivating enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A photoreactivating enzyme was purified from Schneider's Line No. 2 Drosophila melanogaster cultured cells. DEAE cellulose chromatography with high potassium phosphate buffer conditions was used to separate nucleic acids from the protein component of the crude cell extract. The protein pass-through fraction from DEAE cellulose was chromatographed on phosphocellulose followed by hydroxylapatite, using linear potassium phosphate gradients to elute the enzyme. Gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-200 resulted in a 4500-fold purification of the enzyme with a final recovery of 4%. The enzyme has an apparent gel filtration molecular weight of 32,900 (+/- 1350 daltons) and an isoelectric pH of 4.9. Optimum ionic strength for activity is 0.17 at pH 6.5 in potassium phosphate buffer. The action spectrum for photoreactivation in Drosophila has an optimum at 365 nm with a response to wavelengths in the range of 313 to 465 nm. Drosophila photoreactivating enzyme contains an essential RNA that is necessary for activity in vitro. The ability of the enzyme to photoreactivate dimers in vitro is abolished by treatment of the enzyme with ribonucleases, or by disruption of the enzyme-RNA complex by electrophoresis or adsorption to DEAE cellulose. The essential RNA is heterogeneous in size but contains a 10-12 base region that may interact with the active site of the enzyme, and thus is protected from degradation by contaminating RNase activities during purification. The RNA is thought to stabilize the photoreactivating enzyme by maintaining the enzyme in the proper configuration for binding to dimer-containing DNA. It is not known whether this RNA is essential for in vivo photoreactivation

  15. Biochemical toxicology studies of methomyl and its kinetic reaction with cholinesterase in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, S.M.; Abdel-Hamid, F.M.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the pesticide methomyl on acetylcholinesterase activities in brain and blood of male rats in vivo and the kinetics involved in their reaction in vitro were studied. Also, its effect on peroxidase action of catalase in vivo was studied using 14C - formate. The results showed that methomyl is a competitive inhibitor for acetylcholinesterase and the concentration levels that caused 50% inhibition of the enzyme activity were 2.1 x 10-2 M and 1.9 x 10-4 for brain and blood- Ache, respectively. The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity decreased to 67.5 % at the time of appearance of toxicity symptoms. The radioactivity eliminated in both the expired air and in urine was reduced

  16. Kinetics study of ethanol steam reforming on Pt/CeO{sub 2} based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, A. [Queen' s-RMC Fuel Cell Research Centre, Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Thurgood, C.; Amphlett, J. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Peppley, B. [Queens Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Interest in fuel cell systems operating on fuels derived from renewable energy sources is increasing because they have the potential to produce electricity with high efficiency and minimal emissions of carbon dioxide and other pollutants. Bioethanol is currently produced by the fermentation of non-edible biomass, through conventional means and also through advances in enzyme technology. The authors previously reported on the steam reforming of bioethanol with a stable ceria supported precious metal catalyst, developed in-house. The catalyst had good thermal stability and resisted carbon formation. This paper reported on a more recent kinetic study in which the influence of operating conditions were quantified. The operating conditions included temperature, steam/carbon ratios, and gas hourly velocities. The results of standard catalyst characterization techniques such as BET, TGA, SEM and TPR were also provided. The data was used to drive an empirical rate expression. The study also investigated a potential rate mechanism.

  17. Physicochemical Properties and Enzymes Activity Studies in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil Physicochemical properties and enzyme concentration were evaluated in soil from a refined-oil contaminated community in Isiukwuato, Abia State three years after the spill. The soil enzymes examined were urease, lipase, oxidase, alkaline and acid phosphatases. Results show a significant (P< 0.05) decrease in the ...

  18. Experimental kinetic study and modeling of calcium oxide carbonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouchon, L.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, major contributors to the greenhouse effect, are considered as the main cause of global warming. So, decrease of CO 2 emitted by large industrial combustion sources or power plants, is an important scientific goal. One of the approaches is based on CO 2 separation and capture from flue gas, followed by sequestration in a wide range of geological formations. In this aim, CO 2 is captured by sorbents like calcium oxide (CaO) in multi-cycle process of carbonation/de-carbonation. However, it was shown that the most important limitations of such process are related to the reversibility of reaction. CaO rapidly loses activity towards CO 2 , so the maximum extent of carbonation decreases as long as the number of cycles increases. In order to well understand the processes and parameters influencing the capture capacity of CaO-based sorbents, it appears important to get details on the kinetic law governing the reaction, which have not been really studied up to now. To investigate this reaction, CaO carbonation kinetics was followed by means of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) on divided materials. Special care was given to the validation of the usual kinetic assumptions such as steady state and rate-determining step assumptions. The aim was to obtain a model describing the reaction in order to explain the influence of intensive variables such as carbonation temperature and CO 2 partial pressure. TGA curves obtained under isothermal and isobaric conditions showed an induction period linked to the nucleation process and a strong slowing down of the reaction rate once a given fractional conversion was reached. Both phenomena were observed to depend on carbonation temperature and CO 2 partial pressure. To explain these results, the evolution of texture and microstructure of the solid during the reaction was regarded as essential. Reaction at the grain scale induces a volume increase from CaO to CaCO 3 which causes a change in the

  19. Dose-Dependent Change in Elimination Kinetics of Ethanol due to Shift of Dominant Metabolizing Enzyme from ADH 1 (Class I to ADH 3 (Class III in Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Haseba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ADH 1 and ADH 3 are major two ADH isozymes in the liver, which participate in systemic alcohol metabolism, mainly distributing in parenchymal and in sinusoidal endothelial cells of the liver, respectively. We investigated how these two ADHs contribute to the elimination kinetics of blood ethanol by administering ethanol to mice at various doses, and by measuring liver ADH activity and liver contents of both ADHs. The normalized AUC (AUC/dose showed a concave increase with an increase in ethanol dose, inversely correlating with β. CLT (dose/AUC linearly correlated with liver ADH activity and also with both the ADH-1 and -3 contents (mg/kg B.W.. When ADH-1 activity was calculated by multiplying ADH-1 content by its Vmax⁡/mg (4.0 and normalized by the ratio of liver ADH activity of each ethanol dose to that of the control, the theoretical ADH-1 activity decreased dose-dependently, correlating with β. On the other hand, the theoretical ADH-3 activity, which was calculated by subtracting ADH-1 activity from liver ADH activity and normalized, increased dose-dependently, correlating with the normalized AUC. These results suggested that the elimination kinetics of blood ethanol in mice was dose-dependently changed, accompanied by a shift of the dominant metabolizing enzyme from ADH 1 to ADH 3.

  20. Misconceptions regarding basic thermodynamics and enzyme kinetics have led to erroneous conclusions regarding the metabolic importance of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne

    2017-11-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate involving the coenzyme NAD + . Part of the foundation for the proposed shuttling of lactate from astrocytes to neurons during brain activation is the differential distribution of LDH isoenzymes between the two cell types. In this short review, we outline the basic kinetic properties of the LDH isoenzymes expressed in neurons and astrocytes, and argue that the distribution of LDH isoenzymes does not in any way govern directional flow of lactate between the two cellular compartments. The two main points are as follows. First, in line with the general concept of chemical catalysis, enzymes do not influence the thermodynamic equilibrium of a chemical reaction but merely the speed at which equilibrium is obtained. Thus, differential distribution of LDH isoenzymes with different kinetic parameters does not predict which cells are producing and which are consuming lactate. Second, the thermodynamic equilibrium of the reaction is toward the reduced substrate (i.e., lactate), which is reflected in the concentrations measured in brain tissue, suggesting that the reaction is at near-equilibrium at steady state. To conclude, the cellular distribution of LDH isoenzymes is of little if any consequence in determining any directional flow of lactate between neurons and astrocytes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Enzyme Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  2. A Kinetic Model Explains Why Shorter and Less Affine Enzyme-recruiting Oligonucleotides Can Be More Potent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lykke Pedersen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides complementary to RNA targets promise generality and ease of drug design. The first systemically administered antisense drug was recently approved for treatment and others are in clinical development. Chemical modifications that increase the hybridization affinity of oligonucleotides are reasoned to confer higher potency, i.e., modified oligonucleotides can be dosed at lower concentrations to achieve the same effect. Surprisingly, shorter and less affine oligonucleotides sometimes display increased potency. To explain this apparent contradiction, increased uptake or decreased propensity to form structures have been suggested as possible mechanisms. Here, we provide an alternative explanation that invokes only the kinetics behind oligonucleotide-mediated cleavage of RNA targets. A model based on the law of mass action predicts, and experiments support, the existence of an optimal binding affinity. Exaggerated affinity, and not length per se, is detrimental to potency. This finding clarifies how to optimally apply high-affinity modifications in the discovery of potent antisense oligonucleotide drugs.

  3. Study of kinetics of extraction of actinides in processes of reprocessing of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamotte, Claude

    1978-01-01

    This research thesis reports a bibliographical study on extraction kinetics. After some generalities on solvent-based extraction, and on the chemistry of actinides in solution, on the methods of kinetics study which are generally used and their mathematical treatments, the author compares the published results for the extraction kinetics of nitric acid, uranium VI, uranium IV, neptunium IV and plutonium IV [fr

  4. Kinetic study of an alcoholic fermentation, using honey like substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Jose Angel; Castano, Hader Ivan; Arias Mario

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes a kinetic study of an alcoholic fermentation using honey like substrate; for this effect they were carried out nine fermentations in discontinuous process with a volume, of 10 L, following the behavior of the substrate concentrations, biomass and product in the time. It was evaluated the convenience of factors like the agitation and the addition of nutritious, also, it was observed the effect of the initial concentrations of substrate and inoculate and the type of honey looking for the best conditions of the process for the obtaining of an alcoholic drink

  5. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Emil L.; Jørgensen, Line A.; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R.

    2015-05-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using

  6. Study on immobilization enzyme using radiation grafting and condensation covalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jin; Su Zongxian; Gao Jianfeng

    1989-01-01

    The immobilization of gluecose oxidase (GOD) on polyethylene and F 46 is described by radiation grafting and condensation covalent. The GOD on polyethylene film is characterized with IR-spectrum. The results show that the enzyme activity on F 46 film is high when dose rate and covalent yield are low. When covalent yield is 4.3% the enzyme relative activity achieves the greatest value for F 46 film. The experiment also demonstrates that acrylic acid affects the relative activity of enzyme and the method of IR-pectrum character is convenient and efficient for GOD on polyethylene film

  7. A kinetic study of soluble glucose oxidase using a rotating-disc electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroe-Biezen, van S.A.M.; Janssen, A.P.M.; Janssen, L.J.J.

    1994-01-01

    In order to determine the kinetic parameters of glucose oxidation catalysed by the enzyme glucose oxidase (GO) the initial velocity of hydrogen peroxide formation was measured using a rotating disc electrode (RDE). The major advantage of this method is the possibility of continuous measurement of

  8. Effect of neohesperidin dihydrochalcone on the activity and stability of alpha-amylase: a comparative study on bacterial, fungal, and mammalian enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani-Amin, Elaheh; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Larijani, Bagher; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2015-10-01

    Neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC) was recently introduced as an activator of mammalian alpha-amylase. In the current study, the effect of NHDC has been investigated on bacterial and fungal alpha-amylases. Enzyme assays and kinetic analysis demonstrated the capability of NHDC to significantly activate both tested alpha-amylases. The ligand activation pattern was found to be more similar between the fungal and mammalian enzyme in comparison with the bacterial one. Further, thermostability experiments indicated a stability increase in the presence of NHDC for the bacterial enzyme. In silico (docking) test locates a putative binding site for NHDC on alpha-amylase surface in domain B. This domain shows differences in various alpha-amylase types, and the different behavior of the ligand toward the studied enzymes may be attributed to this fact. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Emil L; Jørgensen, Line A; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R

    2015-06-07

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.

  10. Isotherm, kinetic, and thermodynamic study of ciprofloxacin sorption on sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutavdžić Pavlović, Dragana; Ćurković, Lidija; Grčić, Ivana; Šimić, Iva; Župan, Josip

    2017-04-01

    In this study, equilibrium isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamics of ciprofloxacin on seven sediments in a batch sorption process were examined. The effects of contact time, initial ciprofloxacin concentration, temperature and ionic strength on the sorption process were studied. The K d parameter from linear sorption model was determined by linear regression analysis, while the Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) sorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms by linear and nonlinear methods. The estimated K d values varied from 171 to 37,347 mL/g. The obtained values of E (free energy estimated from D-R isotherm model) were between 3.51 and 8.64 kJ/mol, which indicated a physical nature of ciprofloxacin sorption on studied sediments. According to obtained n values as measure of intensity of sorption estimate from Freundlich isotherm model (from 0.69 to 1.442), ciprofloxacin sorption on sediments can be categorized from poor to moderately difficult sorption characteristics. Kinetics data were best fitted by the pseudo-second-order model (R 2  > 0.999). Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (ΔG°), enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) were calculated to estimate the nature of ciprofloxacin sorption. Results suggested that sorption on sediments was a spontaneous exothermic process.

  11. Study of water vapour adsorption kinetics on aluminium oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livanova, Alesya; Meshcheryakov, Evgeniy; Reshetnikov, Sergey; Kurzina, Irina

    2017-11-01

    Adsorbents on the basis of active aluminum oxide are still of demand on the adsorbent-driers market. Despite comprehensive research of alumina adsorbents, and currently is an urgent task to improve their various characteristics, and especially the task of increasing the sorption capacity. In the present work kinetics of the processes of water vapours' adsorption at room temperature on the surface of desiccant samples has been studied. It was obtained on the basis of bayerite and pseudoboehmite experimentally. The samples of pseudoboehmite modified with sodium and potassium ions were taken as study objects. The influence of an adsorbent's grain size on the kinetics of water vapours' adsorption was studied. The 0.125-0.25 mm and 0.5-1.0 mm fractions of this sample were used. It has been revealed that the saturation water vapor fine powder (0.125-0.25 mm) is almost twofold faster in comparison with the sample of fraction 0.5-1.0 mm due to the decrease in diffusion resistance in the pores of the samples when moving from the sample of larger fraction to the fine-dispersed sample. It has been established that the adsorption capacity of the pseudoboehmite samples, modified by alkaline ions, is higher by ˜40 %, than for the original samples on the basis of bayerite and pseudoboehmite.

  12. A kinetic study on the Novozyme 435-catalyzed esterification of free fatty acids with octanol to produce octyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Avisha; Mitra, Debarati

    2015-01-01

    Octyl esters can serve as an important class of biolubricant components replacing their mineral oil counterparts. The purpose of the current work was to investigate the enzymatic esterification reaction of free fatty acids (FFA, from waste cooking oil) with octanol in a solvent-free system using a commercial lipase Novozyme 435. It was found that the esterificaton reaction followed the Ping-pong bi-bi kinetics with no inhibition by substrates or products within the studied concentration range. The maximum reaction rate was estimated to be 0.041 mol L(-1) g(-1) h(-1) . Additionally, the stability of Novozyme 435 in the current reaction system was studied by determining its activity and final conversion of FFA to esters after 12 successive utilizations. Novozyme 435 exhibited almost 100% enzyme activity up to 7 cycles of reaction and gradually decreased (by 5%) thereafter. The kinetic parameters evaluated from the study shall assist in the design of reactors for large-scale production of octyl esters from a cheap biomass source. The enzyme reusability data can further facilitate mass production by curtailing the cost of expensive enzyme consumption. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  13. Studies of the immobilization of enzymes and microorganism pt.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.K.

    1979-01-01

    A new method of immobilization of glucose oxidase by the aerobic gamma radiation of synthetic monomers was developed. The radiocopolymerization was conducted aerobically at -70 to-80 degC with the mixture of several polyfunctional esters, acrylates and native enzyme. The retained activity of immobilized glucoseoxidase was about 50 to 55% when a NK 23G ester, acrylamide-bis and water mixture (1:1:2) in cold toluene treated with 450 Krad of gamma radiation. The radiation dose did not influence significantly to the enzyme activity. The solvents used to prepare the beads of glucose oxidase and monomers were toluene, n-hexane, petoleum ether and chloroform. 0.05M tris-gycerol(pH 7.0) was a more suitable buffer solution for immobilizing the enzyme than was 0.02M phosphate. Immobilization of glucose oxidase shifted the optimum pH for its reaction from 6.0 to 6.5. The pH profile for the immobilized enzyme showed a broad range of optimum activity while the native enzyme gave a sharp pick for its optimum pH value. The immobilized enzyme reaction temperature was at the range of 30-40 degreesC. (Author)

  14. Determination of glutamate dehydrogenase activity and its kinetics in mouse tissues using metabolic mapping (quantitative enzyme histochemistry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botman, Dennis; Tigchelaar, Wikky; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2014-11-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyses the reversible conversion of glutamate into α-ketoglutarate with the concomitant reduction of NAD(P)(+) to NAD(P)H or vice versa. GDH activity is subject to complex allosteric regulation including substrate inhibition. To determine GDH kinetics in situ, we assessed the effects of various glutamate concentrations in combination with either the coenzyme NAD(+) or NADP(+) on GDH activity in mouse liver cryostat sections using metabolic mapping. NAD(+)-dependent GDH V(max) was 2.5-fold higher than NADP(+)-dependent V(max), whereas the K(m) was similar, 1.92 mM versus 1.66 mM, when NAD(+) or NADP(+) was used, respectively. With either coenzyme, V(max) was determined at 10 mM glutamate and substrate inhibition was observed at higher glutamate concentrations with a K(i) of 12.2 and 3.95 for NAD(+) and NADP(+) used as coenzyme, respectively. NAD(+)- and NADP(+)-dependent GDH activities were examined in various mouse tissues. GDH activity was highest in liver and much lower in other tissues. In all tissues, the highest activity was found when NAD(+) was used as a coenzyme. In conclusion, GDH activity in mice is highest in the liver with NAD(+) as a coenzyme and highest GDH activity was determined at a glutamate concentration of 10 mM. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Kinetics Study of Extracellular Detergent Stable Alkaline Protease from Rhizopus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zareena Mushtaq

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, extracellular alkaline protease was produced from Rhizopus oryzae in submerged fermentation using dairy waste (whey as a substrate. Fermentation kinetics was studied and various parameters were optimized. The strain produced maximum protease at initial medium pH of 6.0 medium depth of 26 mm, inoculum size of 2% at incubation temperature of 35ºC for 168 h of fermentation. Alkaline protease was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulphate fractionation followed by sephadex G-100 chromatography. The molecular mass of alkaline protease was 69 kDa determined by 10% SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH and temperature of alkaline protease was 9.0 and 40ºC, respectively. Metal profile of the enzyme showed that the enzyme was non-metallic in nature. The Km , Kcat , Vmax and Kcat/Km values of purified protease were 7.0 mg/mL, 3.8 x102S-1, 54.30 µmol/min and 54.28 s-1mg -1.mL respectively, using casein as substrate. The purified alkaline protease had stability with commercial detergents.

  16. Enzyme Inhibitory and Molecular Docking Studies on Some Organic Molecules of Natural Occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, M. A.; Hussain, G.; Rehman, A. U.; Shahwar, D.; Mohyuddin, A.; Ashraf, M.; Rahman, J.; Lodhi, M. A.; Khan, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, in vitro enzyme inhibitory studies on cinchonidine (1), cinchonine (2), quinine (3), noscapine (narcotine, 4) and santonine (5) were carried out. The various enzymes included in the study were lipoxygenase, xanthine oxidase, acetyl cholinesterase, butyryl cholinesterase and protease. The results revealed that 2, 3, and 4 were moderate active against lipoxygenase and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The molecule 3 possessed weak activity against butyryl cholinesterase enzyme while remaining molecules were inactive against this enzyme. However, all these compounds were inactive against acetyl cholinestrase and protease enzymes. The synthesized compounds were computationally docked into the active site of lipoxygenase enzyme. The compounds 3 and 4 showed decent interactions, hence strengthening the observed results. (author)

  17. The kinetic study of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrel, L.; Chopin, J.

    1996-01-01

    Iodine chemistry is one of the most important subjects of research in the field of reactor safety because this element can form volatile species which represent a biological hazard for environment. As the iodine and the peroxide are both present in the sump of the containment in the event of a severe accident on a light water nuclear reactor, it can be important to improve the knowledge on the reaction of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of iodine by hydrogen peroxide has been studied in acid solution using two different analytical methods. The first is a UV/Vis spectrophotometer which records the transmitted intensity at 460 nm as a function of time to follow the decrease of iodine concentration, the second is an amperometric method which permits to record the increase of iodine+1 with time thanks to the current of reduction of iodine+1 to molecular iodine. The iodine was generated by Dushman reaction and the series of investigations were made at 40 o C in a continuous stirring tank reactor. The influence of the initial concentrations of iodine, iodate, hydrogen peroxide, H + ions has been determined. The kinetics curves comprise two distinct chemical phases both for molecular iodine and for iodine+1. The relative importance of the two processes is connected to the initial concentrations of [I 2 ], [IO 3 - ], [H 2 O 2 ] and [H + ]. A rate law has been determined for the two steps for molecular iodine. (author) figs., tabs., 22 refs

  18. Kinetic studies of ICF target dynamics with ePLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. J.

    2016-10-01

    The ePLAS code was recently used1 to show that a modeling change from artificial to real viscosity can result in a decrease of the predicted performance of ICF targets. This code typically follows either fluid or PIC electrons with fluid ions in self-consistent E - and B - fields computed by the Implicit Moment Method2. For the present study the ions have instead been run as PIC particles undergoing Krook-like self-collisions. The ePLAS collision model continually redistributes the ion particle properties toward a local Maxwellian, while conserving the mean density, momentum and energy. Whereas the use of real viscosity captures large Knudsen Number effects as the active target dimensions shrink below the ion mean-free-path, the new kinetic modeling can manifest additional effects such as collisional shock precursors3 from the escape and streaming of the fastest particle ions. In 2D cylindrical geometry we will explore how such kinetic shock extensions might affect shell and core compression dynamics in ICF target implosions.

  19. Kinetics study of antimony adsorption on Si(1 1 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapena, L.; Mueller, P.; Quentel, G.; Guesmi, H.; Treglia, G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we use mass spectrometry (MS) and reflection high-energy electron (RHEED) to study the kinetics of adsorption of Sb on Si(1 1 1) surface and its relation to the corresponding surface structure. At high temperature (T>800 deg. C) all the impinging Sb 4 molecules completely dissociate at the silicon surface and a 2D gas of Sb monomers reversibly adsorbs on the (1x1) surface. At low temperature (T 4 molecules act as precursors and can be partially reflected or desorbed while a 2D stable layer of Sb monomers irreversibly adsorbs. The surface continuously shifts from a blurred (7x7) surface to a (1x1) structure near completion of the 2D layer. In the intermediate range (600 deg. C< T<800 deg. C) provided that the coverage is large enough (θ ∼ 2/3) the condensation of the 2D gas leads to a 2D (5√3 x 5√3) reconstruction. We show that introducing the formation of a condensed phase in a kinetics model allows us to reproduce our experimental data. Finally, we determine the adsorption geometry from ab initio calculations: Sb is adsorbed on top positions, somewhat passivating the Si surface dangling bonds

  20. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is an enzyme with unusual kinetic properties and a crystal structure that suggests it evolved from a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen

    2015-01-01

    The adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRTase) encoded by the open reading frame SSO2342 of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2, was subjected to crystallographic, kinetic and ligand binding analyses. The enzyme forms dimers in solution and in the crystals, and binds one molecule of the reactants 5...

  1. Study of vitamin D serum level in patients with epilepsy treated with enzyme-inducing and non enzyme-inducing medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sima Hashemipour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Changes of serum minerals and vitamin D have been reported in anticonvulsant drugs user patients. The present study aimed at comparing the changes of serum minerals and vitamin D among two groups of enzyme-inducing and non enzyme-inducing anticonvulsant drug users. Methods: In this study 22 patients treated with enzyme-inducing drugs (carbamazepin, phenytoin, phenobarbital were compared to 25 patients of matched sex, age, and BMI treated with non enzyme-inducing drugs (sodium evaporate, lamotrigine. Serum calcium, phosphate, parathormone, and 25-hydroxy vitamin D were calculated in both groups. Calcium was measured by Calorimetery method. Parathormone and vitamin D were measured using ELISA method. Results: The mean serum vitamin D level was lower in enzyme-inducing than non enzyme-inducing drugs users (15.9±8.3 and 24.2±14.8, P=0.02. Frequency of vitamin D deficiency was higher in enzyme-inducing compared to non enzyme-inducing drugs users, 84% and 48% , respectively (P=0.016. The mean serum calcium level was significantly lower in enzyme-inducing drugs users. (8.7±0.2 vs. 9.0± 0.7, p= 0.05. Four percent in enzyme-inducing group compared to twenty four percent of non enzyme-inducing group had secondary hyperparathyroidism (P=0.016. Conclusion: While vitamin D deficiency is more frequent in enzyme-inducing drug users, secondary hyperparathyroidism is less frequent.

  2. Kinetic study of hydrolysis of coconut fiber into glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhaimin, Sudiono, Sri

    2017-03-01

    Kinetic study of hydrolysis of coconut fiber into glucose has been done. The aim of this research was to study of the effect of time and temperature to the glucose as the result of the conversion of coconut fiber. The various temperature of the hydrolysis process were 30 °C, 48 °C, 72 °C and 95 °C and the various time of the hydrolysis process were 0, 15, 30, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300 minutes. A quantitative analysis was done by measured the concentration of the glucose as the result of the conversion of coconut fiber. The result showed that the rate constant from the various temperature were 3.10-4 minute-1; 8.10-4 minutees-1; 84.10-4 minute-1, and 205.10-4 minute-1, and the energy activation was 7,69. 103 kJ/mol.

  3. Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases - Studies of Fungal Secretomes and Enzyme Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nekiunaite, Laura

    degradation, were also identified upstream the LPMO genes, providing evidence for a co-regulatory mechanism of LPMOs and amylolytic hydrolases. The second part of the PhD thesis is focused on understanding the binding properties of LPMOs to starch and starch mimic substrate. It was shown that LPMOs possessing...... to different substrates at the protein level. It could help to design better enzyme cocktails that increase efficiency of biomass degradation. The secretomes of A. nidulans revealed differences in growth and secretion of enzymes, depending on the type and properties of starches. A common characteristic...... conversion as they produce a wide diversity of degrading enzymes. In the first part of this PhD thesis, the secretomes of the well-known fungus Aspergillus nidulans grown on cereal and legume starches were analyzed. Secretomics is a powerful tool to unravel secretion patterns of fungi and their response...

  4. Kinetic Study of Denatonium Sorption to Smectite Clay Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosson, Garry S; Sandmann, Emily

    2013-06-01

    The denatonium cation, as a benzoate salt, is the most bitter cation known to modern society and is frequently added to consumer products to reduce accidental and intentional consumption by humans and animals. Denatonium can enter the environment by accidental discharges, potentially rendering water supplies undrinkable. Interactions of denatonium with soil components ( i.e. , smectite minerals) ultimately control the environmental fate of denatonium, but the current literature is devoid of studies that evaluate denatonium sorption to smectite minerals. This study investigated the mechanism and kinetics of denatonium sorption to smectite clay minerals as a function of smectite type, temperature, pH and ionic strength. Uptake by synthetic mica montmorillonite (Syn-1), Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2), and Texas montmorillonite (STx-1b) at 305K was rapid, with equilibrium being reached within 2 min for all clays. Complete removal of denatonium was observed for STx-1b at pH 6.9, while partial removal was observed for Syn-1 and SWy-2. Kinetic behavior of SWy-2 and Syn-1 is consistent with a pseudo-second-order model at 305K. An activation energy of +25.9 kJ/mol was obtained for sorption to Syn-1 and was independent of temperature between 286K and 338K. Activation-free energy (Δ G *), activation enthalpy (Δ H *), and activation entropy (Δ S *) for Syn-1 were found to be +62.91 kJ/mol, +23.36 kJ/mol, and -0.130 kJ/(K·mol), respectively. Sorption capacities at pH 3.6, 6.9, and 8.2 were constant at 1.3×10 -2 g denatonium/g clay; however, the kinetic rate constant increased by 56%, going from acidic to basic solution conditions. Distribution coefficients were negatively correlated with ionic strength, suggesting cation exchange. Collectively, results suggested that smectite minerals can serve as efficient sinks for denatonium cations. This is much-needed information for agencies developing regulations regarding denatonium usage and for water treatment professionals

  5. Thermogravimetric kinetic study of agricultural residue biomass pyrolysis based on combined kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xun; Hu, Mian; Hu, Wanyong; Chen, Zhihua; Liu, Shiming; Hu, Zhiquan; Xiao, Bo

    2016-11-01

    Pyrolytic kinetic of an agricultural residue (AR) feedstock, a mixture of plants (cotton, wheat, rich, corn) stems, was investigated based on combined kinetics. The most suitable mechanism for AR one-step pyrolysis was f(α)=(1-α)(1.1816)α(-1.8428) with kinetic parameters of: apparent activation energy 221.7kJ/mol, pre-exponential factor 4.17E16s(-1). Pyrolysis of AR feedstock could not be described by one-step reaction attributes to heterogeneous features of pyrolysis processes. Combined kinetics three-parallel-reaction (CK-TPR) model fitted the pyrolysis experimental data very well. Reaction mechanisms for pseudo hemicelluloses, cellulose, lignin in CK-TPR model was f(α)=(1-α)(1.6244)α(-0.3371)[-ln(1-α)](-0.0515), f(α)=(1-α)(1.0597)α(-0.6909)[-ln(1-α)](0.9026) and f(α)=(1-α)(2.9577)α(-4.7719), respectively. Apparent activation energy of three pseudo components followed the order of Elignin(197.3kJ/mol)>Ecellulose(176.3kJ/mol)>Ehemicelluloses (151.1kJ/mol). Mechanism of hemicelluloses pyrolysis could be further expressed as f(α)=(1-α)(1.4). The pyrolytic mechanism of cellulose met the Nucleation well. However, mechanism of lignin pyrolysis was complex, which possibly was the combined effects of Nucleation, Diffusion, Geometrical contraction, and Power law. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Kinetics studies of solvent extraction of rare earths into DEHPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, T.M.; Tran, T.

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics of rare earth solvent extraction into di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid have been studied using radiotracers ( 141 Ce, 152 Eu, 153 Gd, 160 Tb and 88 Y) in a modified Lewis cell. The experimental procedure involved continuous monitoring of both aqueous and organic phases using an automated γ- counting system. Using this method, highly reproducible results were obtained without chemical analysis or disturbance of the system. The initial rate extraction was first order with respect to individual rare earth concentration. At low acidities ([H+] < 0.01 M), the extraction rates of rare earths were equal and independent of pH. However, at high acidities, the extraction rate was strongly dependent on pH and varied between the rare earths. Similarly, differences in the extraction rate of individual rare earths were apparent at low DEHPA concentration. (authors)

  7. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) in alcoholic cirrhosis: a kinetic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Grønbaek, M; Møller, Søren

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Carbohydrate deficient transferrin has been introduced as a marker of excessive alcohol intake. The present study was undertaken in order to measure the circulating level of carbohydrate deficient transferrin in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and to assess arteriovenous kinetics...... of carbohydrate deficient transferrin in liver and kidney. METHODS/RESULTS: The median value of serum carbohydrate deficient transferrin was 16.0 U/l in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 41), and this value was not significantly different from that of a normal control group (median 17.4 U/l, n = 55, ns......). Carbohydrate deficient transferrin was significantly higher in patients with cirrhosis and high current alcohol intake than in abstaining patients (20 vs. 14 U/l, p 50 g/day) had a significantly higher carbohydrate deficient transferrin...

  8. Prospects in the Study of Stem-Cell Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, J. E. [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto (Canada); Ontario Cancer Instute, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1968-08-15

    The recent rapid progress in the field of stem-cell kinetics has been due in large part to the development of reliable in-vivo assays for the functions of haemopoietic stem cells. As a direct result of the availability of these assays, several novel and interesting phenomena have been described. What is now needed is not so much further search for new phenomena as an understanding of the phenomena that have already been uncovered. It is postulated that new approaches will be required for the analysis of these phenomena, and that future progress in the field will be strongly dependent on the development of methods suitable for the detailed study of the growth and differentiation of populations of haemopoietic cells in culture systems. (author)

  9. Study of kinetics of the tetroxane thermolysis by UV spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, N.L.; Leiva, L.C.; Castellanos, M.G.; Cafferata, L.F.R.; Gomez V, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    The 3,3,6,6-tetramethyl-1,2,4,5-tetroxane (ACDP) in methanol solution shows an absorbance peak at low wave length in UV spectrum and follows the Lambert Beer law until 10-2 M concentration at 209 nm. The ACDP thermal decomposition have been studied by the UV spectroscopy like an alternative method to find out the kinetic parameters from the thermolysis of these compounds. The rate constants at the temperatures and initial concentration ranges of 130-166 and 0,003-0,013 mol / L, respectively, and the activation parameters were similar to the corresponding values found by other methodology, verifying this analytic technique. Acetone produced during reaction no interference in ACDP quantification by UV analysis. (Author)

  10. A study of butyl acetate synthesis. 4-reaction kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Orjuela Londoño

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at studying liquid-phase acetic acid and butyl alcohol esterification reaction (P atm =0.76 Bar,using an ion exchange resin (Lewatit K-2431 as catalyst. The effect of the absence of internal and external mass transport on catalyst particles was established in the research conditions used here. A set of assays to determine the effect of catalyst load (0.5%, 1%, 2% w/w temperature (73°C, 80°C, 87°C and molar ratio (1:2, 1:1, 2:1 acid/alcohol on reaction rate was carried out and both LHHW and pseudo-homogeneous kinetic expressions were obtained, these being in good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Magnetic enzyme reactors for isolation and study of heterogeneous glycoproteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korecká, L.; Ježová, J.; Bílková, Z.; Beneš, Milan J.; Horák, Daniel; Hradcová, O.; Slováková, M.; Viovy, J.-L.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 293, č. 1 (2005), s. 349-357 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/0023 Grant - others:EU project(XE) QLG-CT-2001-01903 Keywords : magnetic enzyme reactor * trypsin * chymotrypsin Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.985, year: 2005

  12. In vitro studies of ante-mortem proliferation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, W.H.; Withers, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    Using K562 human erythroblastoid cells, it was concluded that dose fractionation has no discrepant effect on the ante-mortem proliferation kinetics of doomed cells as opposed to clonogenic cell survival and that effects on ante-mortem proliferation kinetics cannot be solely responsible for the differences in fractionation response between early and late responding tissues. (UK)

  13. In vitro kinetic studies on the mechanism of oxygen-dependent cellular uptake of copper radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Jason P; Bell, Stephen G; Wong, Luet-Lok; Dilworth, Jonathan R [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Chemistry Research Laboratory, 12 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TA (United Kingdom); Giansiracusa, Jeffrey H [Department of Mathematics, Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, 24-29 St Giles' , Oxford, OX1 3LB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: hollanj3@mskcc.org, E-mail: jasonpholland@gmail.com

    2009-04-07

    The development of hypoxia-selective radiopharmaceuticals for use as therapeutic and/or imaging agents is of vital importance for both early identification and treatment of cancer and in the design of new drugs. Radiotracers based on copper for use in positron emission tomography have received great attention due to the successful application of copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes, such as [{sup 60/62/64}Cu(II)ATSM] and [{sup 60/62/64}Cu(II)PTSM], as markers for tumour hypoxia and blood perfusion, respectively. Recent work has led to the proposal of a revised mechanism of hypoxia-selective cellular uptake and retention of [Cu(II)ATSM]. The work presented here describes non-steady-state kinetic simulations in which the reported pO{sub 2}-dependent in vitro cellular uptake and retention of [{sup 64}Cu(II)ATSM] in EMT6 murine carcinoma cells has been modelled by using the revised mechanistic scheme. Non-steady-state (NSS) kinetic analysis reveals that the model is in very good agreement with the reported experimental data with a root-mean-squared error of less than 6% between the simulated and experimental cellular uptake profiles. Estimated rate constants are derived for the cellular uptake and washout (k{sub 1} = 9.8 {+-} 0.59 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1} and k{sub 2} = 2.9 {+-} 0.17 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}), intracellular reduction (k{sub 3} = 5.2 {+-} 0.31 x 10{sup -2} s{sup -1}), reoxidation (k{sub 4} = 2.2 {+-} 0.13 mol{sup -1} dm{sup 3} s{sup -1}) and proton-mediated ligand dissociation (k{sub 5} = 9.0 {+-} 0.54 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}). Previous mechanisms focused on the reduction and reoxidation steps. However, the data suggest that the origins of hypoxia-selective retention may reside with the stability of the copper(I) anion with respect to protonation and ligand dissociation. In vitro kinetic studies using the nicotimamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent ferredoxin reductase enzyme PuR isolated from the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris have

  14. Kinetic study and syngas production from pyrolysis of forestry waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Mian; Wang, Xun; Chen, Jian; Yang, Ping; Liu, Cuixia; Xiao, Bo; Guo, Dabin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis process can be divided into three stages using differential DTG method. • A modified discrete DAEM model fitted experimental data well. • Fe/biochar catalyst showed a good performance on catalytic reforming process. - Abstract: Kinetic study and syngas production from pyrolysis of forestry waste (pine sawdust (PS)) were investigated using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a fixed-bed reactor, respectively. In TGA, it was found that the pyrolysis of PS could be divided into three stages and stage II was the major mass reduction stage with mass loss of 73–74%. The discrete distributed activation energy model (DAEM) with discrete 200 first-order reactions was introduced to study the pyrolysis kinetic. The results indicated that the DAEM with 200 first-order reactions could approximate the pyrolysis process with an excellent fit between experimental and calculated data. The apparent activation energies of PS ranged from 147.86 kJ·mol −1 to 395.76 kJ·mol −1 , with corresponding pre-exponential factors of 8.30 × 10 13 s −1 to 3.11 × 10 25 s −1 . In the fixed-bed reactor, char supported iron catalyst was prepared for tar cracking. Compared with no catalyst which the gas yield and tar yield were 0.58 N m 3 /kg biomass and 201.23 g/kg biomass, the gas yield was markedly increased to 1.02 N m 3 /kg biomass and the tar yield was decreased to only 26.37 g/kg biomass in the presence of char supported iron catalyst. These results indicated that char supported iron catalyst could potentially be used to catalytically decompose tar molecules in syngas generated via biomass pyrolysis.

  15. Kinetic studies on batch cultivation of Trichoderma reesei and application to enhance cellulase production by fed-batch fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijuan; Li, Chen; Yang, Zhenhua; Jia, Wendi; Zhang, Dongyuan; Chen, Shulin

    2013-07-20

    Reducing the production cost of cellulase as the key enzyme for cellulose hydrolysis to fermentable sugars remains a major challenge for biofuel production. Because of the complexity of cellulase production, kinetic modeling and mass balance calculation can be used as effective tools for process design and optimization. In this study, kinetic models for cell growth, substrate consumption and cellulase production in batch fermentation were developed, and then applied in fed-batch fermentation to enhance cellulase production. Inhibition effect of substrate was considered and a modified Luedeking-Piret model was developed for cellulase production and substrate consumption according to the growth characteristics of Trichoderma reesei. The model predictions fit well with the experimental data. Simulation results showed that higher initial substrate concentration led to decrease of cellulase production rate. Mass balance and kinetic simulation results were applied to determine the feeding strategy. Cellulase production and its corresponding productivity increased by 82.13% after employing the proper feeding strategy in fed-batch fermentation. This method combining mathematics and chemometrics by kinetic modeling and mass balance can not only improve cellulase fermentation process, but also help to better understand the cellulase fermentation process. The model development can also provide insight to other similar fermentation processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The kinetic study of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrel, L [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, IPNS, CEN Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Chopin, J [Laboratoire d` Electrochimie Inorganique, ENSSPICAM, Marseille (France)

    1996-12-01

    Iodine chemistry is one of the most important subjects of research in the field of reactor safety because this element can form volatile species which represent a biological hazard for environment. As the iodine and the peroxide are both present in the sump of the containment in the event of a severe accident on a light water nuclear reactor, it can be important to improve the knowledge on the reaction of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of iodine by hydrogen peroxide has been studied in acid solution using two different analytical methods. The first is a UV/Vis spectrophotometer which records the transmitted intensity at 460 nm as a function of time to follow the decrease of iodine concentration, the second is an amperometric method which permits to record the increase of iodine+1 with time thanks to the current of reduction of iodine+1 to molecular iodine. The iodine was generated by Dushman reaction and the series of investigations were made at 40{sup o}C in a continuous stirring tank reactor. The influence of the initial concentrations of iodine, iodate, hydrogen peroxide, H{sup +} ions has been determined. The kinetics curves comprise two distinct chemical phases both for molecular iodine and for iodine+1. The relative importance of the two processes is connected to the initial concentrations of [I{sub 2}], [IO{sub 3}{sup -}], [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] and [H{sup +}]. A rate law has been determined for the two steps for molecular iodine. (author) figs., tabs., 22 refs.

  17. Fibrin related antigens: assay development, clinical and kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruskal, J B

    1987-08-01

    This thesis describes an assay which is able to measure and to determine the proportions of fibrin- and fibrinogen-related antigens (FRA) present in clinical samples. No assay exists at present which is capable of distinguishing between fibrin and fibrinogen degradation products concurrently and in a clinical setting. The assay may be used as a tool with which to gain further insight to pathophysiology of disorders characterized by activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways. This study provides and analysis of the FRA profiles in patients with disorders characterised by possible enhanced fibrinolytic activity. Studies have been undertaken on patients with acute and chronic liver diseases, on patients with the various syndromes of coronary artery disease and on patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with and without evidence of microvascular disease. Certain observations made it evident that further studies were required in order to explain previously undocumented fibrinolytic abnormalities in certain patient groups. Data obtained from patients with liver disease provided information compatible with the activation of their fibrinolytic pathways. The initial scope of this study was then extended to further investigate the deranged haemostatic mechanisms in patients with severe liver diseases. Kinetic studies were performed which required the development of specific technology to be able to measure certain previously undertermined parameters. Mathematical models describing the rates of fibrin formation and lysis were developed for human studies. Fibrin-derived D-dimer was radiolabelled and its validity as and intravenous tracer and maker of fibrin degradation established.

  18. Crystallographic Study of Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis Enzyme MurD: Domain Movement Revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Šink

    Full Text Available The biosynthetic pathway of peptidoglycan, an essential component of bacterial cell wall, is a well-recognized target for antibiotic development. Peptidoglycan precursors are synthesized in the bacterial cytosol by various enzymes including the ATP-hydrolyzing Mur ligases, which catalyze the stepwise addition of amino acids to a UDP-MurNAc precursor to yield UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. MurD catalyzes the addition of D-glutamic acid to UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala in the presence of ATP; structural and biochemical studies have suggested the binding of the substrates with an ordered kinetic mechanism in which ligand binding inevitably closes the active site. In this work, we challenge this assumption by reporting the crystal structures of intermediate forms of MurD either in the absence of ligands or in the presence of small molecules. A detailed analysis provides insight into the events that lead to the closure of MurD and reveals that minor structural modifications contribute to major overall conformation alterations. These novel insights will be instrumental in the development of new potential antibiotics designed to target the peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway.

  19. In-Situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    DATES COVERED (From - To) 1/29/10-9/30/10 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE In situ optical studies of oxidation/reduction kinetics on SOFC cermet anodes 5a...0572 In-situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Montana State University...of Research In-situ Optical Studies of Oxidation/Reduction Kinetics on SOFC Cermet Anodes Principal Investigator Robert Walker Organization

  20. Measurement of enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T K; Keshwani, M M

    2009-01-01

    To study and understand the nature of living cells, scientists have continually employed traditional biochemical techniques aimed to fractionate and characterize a designated network of macromolecular components required to carry out a particular cellular function. At the most rudimentary level, cellular functions ultimately entail rapid chemical transformations that otherwise would not occur in the physiological environment of the cell. The term enzyme is used to singularly designate a macromolecular gene product that specifically and greatly enhances the rate of a chemical transformation. Purification and characterization of individual and collective groups of enzymes has been and will remain essential toward advancement of the molecular biological sciences; and developing and utilizing enzyme reaction assays is central to this mission. First, basic kinetic principles are described for understanding chemical reaction rates and the catalytic effects of enzymes on such rates. Then, a number of methods are described for measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rates, which mainly differ with regard to techniques used to detect and quantify concentration changes of given reactants or products. Finally, short commentary is given toward formulation of reaction mixtures used to measure enzyme activity. Whereas a comprehensive treatment of enzymatic reaction assays is not within the scope of this chapter, the very core principles that are presented should enable new researchers to better understand the logic and utility of any given enzymatic assay that becomes of interest.

  1. Kinetic Studies of Alkaline Phosphatase from the Liver of Agama ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    group of catalytic proteins (enzymes) that have the ability to ... was determined by the method of Biuret (Gornall et al.,. 1949) using ... The result indicate that the enzyme has an optimum. pH of 9.9. ... Total protein (mg) Total activity. (x10-4).

  2. Substrate-Dependent Kinetics in Tyrosinase-based Biosensing: Amperometry vs. Spectrophotometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rassaei, Liza; Cui, Jin; Goluch, E.D.; Lemay, Serge Joseph Guy

    2012-01-01

    Despite the broad use of enzymes in electroanalytical biosensors, the influence of enzyme kinetics on the function of prototype sensors is often overlooked or neglected. In the present study, we employ amperometry as an alternative or complementary method to study the kinetics of tyrosinase, whose

  3. A computational study on kinetics, mechanism and thermochemistry ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    level procedure employing the optimization at .... for a better understanding of mechanistic pathways, kinetics and thermochemistry we must rely on quantum chemical methods. The aim of this paper is to have .... The search was made along.

  4. Kinetic Study of Calcination of Jakura Limestone Using Power Rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    National Research Institute for Chemical Technology, P.M. B 1052, Zaria, ... calcination of Jakura limestone was also found to be first order reaction with respect to CaCO3 ... Keywords: Jakura, limestone, calcination, kinetics, power law model.

  5. Study of growth kinetic and modeling of ethanol production by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... coefficient (0.96299). Based on Leudking-Piret model, it could be concluded that ethanol batch fermentation is a non-growth associated process. Key words: Kinetic parameters, simulation, cell growth, ethanol, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  6. Kinetic characterization of glucose aerodehydrogenase from Aspergillus niger EMS-150-F after optimizing the dose of mutagen for enhanced production of enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Umbreen, Huma; Zia, Muhammad Anjum; Rasul, Samreen

    2013-01-01

    In the present study enhanced production of glucose aerodehydrogenase from Aspergillus niger has been achieved after optimizing the dose of chemical mutagen ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) that has not been reported earlier. Different doses of mutagen were applied and a strain was developed basing upon the best production. The selected strain Aspergillus niger EMS-150-F was optimized for nutrient requirements in order to produce enzyme through fermentation and the results showed the best yield ...

  7. Synthesis, kinetic mechanism and docking studies of vanillin derivatives as inhibitors of mushroom tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Zaman; Rafiq, Muhammad; Seo, Sung-Yum; Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to discover the extent of contribution to antityrosinase activity by adding hydroxy substituted benzoic acid, cinnamic acid and piperazine residues to vanillin. The study showed the transformation of vanillin into esters as shown in (4a-4d), (6a-6b), and (8a-8b). In addition, the relationship between structures of these esters and their mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity was explored. The kinetics of inhibition on mushroom tyrosinase by these esters was also investigated. It was found that hydroxyl substituted benzoic acid derivatives were weak inhibitors; however hydroxy or chloro substituted cinnamic acid and piperazine substituted derivatives were able to induce significant tyrosinase inhibition. The mushroom tyrosinase (PDBID 2ZWE) was docked with synthesized vanillin derivatives and their calculated binding energies were compared with experimental IC50 values which provided positive correlation. The most potent derivative 2-(4-formyl-2-methoxyphenoxy)-2-oxoethyl (2E)-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-enoate (6a) possesses hydroxy substituted cinnamic acid scaffold having IC50 value 16.13 μM with binding energy of -7.2 kcal/mol. The tyrosinase inhibitory activity of (6a) is comparable with standard kojic acid. Kinetic analysis indicated that compound 6a was mixed-type tyrosinase inhibitor with inhibition constant values Ki (13 μM) and Ki' (53 μM) and formed reversible enzyme inhibitor complex. The active vanillin analog (6a) was devoid of toxic effects as shown in cytotoxic studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. New Insights about Enzyme Evolution from Large Scale Studies of Sequence and Structure Relationships*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shoshana D.; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies, each representing a large set of sequences that evolved from a common ancestor and that retain conserved features of their structures and active sites. Using several examples, we describe the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve new reaction and substrate specificities in each unique superfamily. The results provide insight about enzyme evolution that is not easily obtained from studies of one or only a few enzymes. PMID:25210038

  9. New insights about enzyme evolution from large scale studies of sequence and structure relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shoshana D; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2014-10-31

    Understanding how enzymes have evolved offers clues about their structure-function relationships and mechanisms. Here, we describe evolution of functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies, each representing a large set of sequences that evolved from a common ancestor and that retain conserved features of their structures and active sites. Using several examples, we describe the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve new reaction and substrate specificities in each unique superfamily. The results provide insight about enzyme evolution that is not easily obtained from studies of one or only a few enzymes. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. 3D studies of coarserning kinetics of individual grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Stefan Othmar

    Techniques for fast, non-destructive characterization of the microstructure of materials using synchrotron X-ray radiation have in recent years become an important tool in materials science. The non-destructive nature of the techniques allows for time-resolved characterization of three-dimensiona......Techniques for fast, non-destructive characterization of the microstructure of materials using synchrotron X-ray radiation have in recent years become an important tool in materials science. The non-destructive nature of the techniques allows for time-resolved characterization of three......-dimensional microstructures, i.e. direct probing of the evolution of specific microstructural features. Synchrotron X-ray radiation techniques have in the present work been employed for experimental characterization of microstructural evolution in individual grains during isothermal annealing: For a study of individual...... grains during recrystallization, where the recrystallization kinetics of individual grains and the temperature dependence of the recrystallization rate is examined, and for a study of grain structure and grain growth, where growth predictions are put forth in terms of the grain size and topology...

  11. Chlorine dioxide oxidation of Escherichia coli in water - A study of the disinfection kinetics and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Isaac; Maddila, Suresh; Lin, Johnson; Jonnalagadda, Sreekantha B

    2017-06-07

    This study investigated the kinetics and mechanism of chlorine dioxide (ClO 2 ) inactivation of a Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (ATCC 35218) in oxidant demand free (ODF) water in detail as a function of disinfectant concentration (0.5-5.0 mg/L), water pH (6.5-8.5), temperature variations (4-37°C) and bacterial density (10 5 -10 7 cfu/mL). The effects of ClO 2 on bacterial cell morphology, outer membrane permeability, cytoplasmic membrane disruption and intracellular enzymatic activity were also studied to elucidate the mechanism of action on the cells. Increasing temperature and disinfectant concentration were proportional to the rate of cell killing, but efficacy was found to be significantly subdued at 0.5 mg/L and less dependent on the bacterial density. The bactericidal efficiency was higher at alkaline pH of 8 or above as compared to neutral and slightly acidic pH of 7 and 6.5 respectively. The disinfection kinetic curves followed a biphasic pattern of rapid inactivation within the initial 2 min which were followed by a tailing even in the presence of residual biocide. The curves were adequately described by the C avg Hom model. Transmission Electron Microscopy images of the bacteria cells exposed to lethal concentrations of ClO 2 indicated very little observable morphological damage to the outer membranes of the cells. ClO 2 however was found to increase the permeability of the outer and cytoplasmic membranes leading to the leakage of membrane components such as 260 nm absorbing materials and inhibiting the activity of the intracellular enzyme β-D-galactosidase. It is suggested that the disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane and subsequent efflux of intracellular components result in the inactivation of the Gram-negative bacteria.

  12. Hydrodenitrogenation mechanism of aromatic amines. Kinetic study and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Araujo, P.A.P.

    1994-06-01

    The decomposition of model molecules reacting alone or in competition was studied in a fixed bed reactor at 623 K and 7 MPa over a sulfided NiMo/Al 2 O 3 catalyst. The inhibiting effect of H 2 S and some nitrogen molecules, namely quinoline type compounds plays a major role in the transformation of anilines intermediates. On the other hand H 2 S acts as a cocatalyst and promote carbon-nitrogen bond cleavage, specially at low H 2 S partial pressure. When the H 2 S partial pressure is greater than the nitrogen compound partial pressure an inhibiting effect of H 2 S occurs and its promoting effect on carbon-nitrogen bond cleavage is cancelled. Hydrogen has a positive but moderate effect in hydrogenation steps. The mechanism of carbon-nitrogen bond scission depends on the structure of the nitrogen molecule namely on the hybridization of the carbon atom bearing the nitrogen atom. If the carbon a with respect to the nitrogen is monosubstituted the mechanism is essentially a nucleophilic substitution. When the degree of substitution increases the elimination mechanism becomes more important and the two mechanisms are in competition. With a sulfided catalyst, H 2 S from the gas phase doesn't change the importance of each mechanism, it just increases the rate of the reaction. In the presence of an oxide catalyst the contribution of the two mechanisms change. This result shows the importance of the sulphur species from the surface. Using isotopic exchange we could demonstrate that the sites able to dissociate H 2 S and H 2 are the same, and that the dissociation is of heterolytic nature. The kinetic modeling of hydrotreatment reactions using the CHEMKIN/SURFACE CHEMKIN package seems to be a convenient method in order to understand the kinetic and mechanistic phenomena in hydrodenitrogenation. The preliminary simulations in the case of 2.6 diethylaniline showed that only one type of site is not sufficient in order to account for the experimental results. Further simulations

  13. DNA Damage: Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Study on the Oxygen Binding and Substrate Hydroxylation Step in AlkB Repair Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesne, Matthew G; Latifi, Reza; Gonzalez-Ovalle, Luis E; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P

    2014-01-01

    AlkB repair enzymes are important nonheme iron enzymes that catalyse the demethylation of alkylated DNA bases in humans, which is a vital reaction in the body that heals externally damaged DNA bases. Its mechanism is currently controversial and in order to resolve the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes, a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study was performed on the demethylation of the N1-methyladenine fragment by AlkB repair enzymes. Firstly, the initial modelling identified the oxygen binding site of the enzyme. Secondly, the oxygen activation mechanism was investigated and a novel pathway was found, whereby the catalytically active iron(IV)–oxo intermediate in the catalytic cycle undergoes an initial isomerisation assisted by an Arg residue in the substrate binding pocket, which then brings the oxo group in close contact with the methyl group of the alkylated DNA base. This enables a subsequent rate-determining hydrogen-atom abstraction on competitive σ-and π-pathways on a quintet spin-state surface. These findings give evidence of different locations of the oxygen and substrate binding channels in the enzyme and the origin of the separation of the oxygen-bound intermediates in the catalytic cycle from substrate. Our studies are compared with small model complexes and the effect of protein and environment on the kinetics and mechanism is explained. PMID:24339041

  14. Detailed kinetic modeling study of n-pentanol oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Heufer, Karl Alexander; Sarathy, Mani; Curran, Henry J.; Davis, Alexander C.; Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.

    2012-01-01

    To help overcome the world's dependence upon fossil fuels, suitable biofuels are promising alternatives that can be used in the transportation sector. Recent research on internal combustion engines shows that short alcoholic fuels (e.g., ethanol or n-butanol) have reduced pollutant emissions and increased knock resistance compared to fossil fuels. Although higher molecular weight alcohols (e.g., n-pentanol and n-hexanol) exhibit higher reactivity that lowers their knock resistance, they are suitable for diesel engines or advanced engine concepts, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), where higher reactivity at lower temperatures is necessary for engine operation. The present study presents a detailed kinetic model for n-pentanol based on modeling rules previously presented for n-butanol. This approach was initially validated using quantum chemistry calculations to verify the most stable n-pentanol conformation and to obtain C-H and C-C bond dissociation energies. The proposed model has been validated against ignition delay time data, speciation data from a jet-stirred reactor, and laminar flame velocity measurements. Overall, the model shows good agreement with the experiments and permits a detailed discussion of the differences between alcohols and alkanes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  15. Kinetic study of uranium carburization by different carbonated gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feron, Guy

    1963-01-01

    The kinetic study of the reaction U + CO 2 and U + CO has been performed by a thermogravimetric method on a spherical uranium powder, in temperature ranges respectively from 460 to 690 deg. C and from 570 to 850 deg. C. The reaction with carbon dioxide leads to uranium dioxide. A carbon deposition takes place at the same time. The global reactions is the result of two reactions: U + 2 CO 2 → UO 2 + 2 CO U + CO 2 → UO 2 + C The reaction with carbon monoxide leads to a mixture of dioxide UO 2 , dicarbide UC 2 and free carbon. The main reaction can be written. U + CO → 1/2 UO 2 + 1/2 UC 2 The free carbon results of the disproportionation of the carbon monoxide. A remarkable separation of the two phases UO 2 and UC 2 can be observed. A mechanism accounting for the phenomenon has been proposed. The two reactions U + CO 2 and U + CO begin with a long germination period, after which, the reaction velocity seems to be limited in both cases by the ionic diffusion of oxygen through the uranium dioxide. (author) [fr

  16. Kinetic Study of Nonequilibrium Plasma-Assisted Methane Steam Reforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop a detailed reaction mechanism for plasma-assisted methane steam reforming, a comprehensive numerical and experimental study of effect laws on methane conversion and products yield is performed at different steam to methane molar ratio (S/C, residence time s, and reaction temperatures. A CHEMKIN-PRO software with sensitivity analysis module and path flux analysis module was used for simulations. A set of comparisons show that the developed reaction mechanism can accurately predict methane conversion and the trend of products yield in different operating conditions. Using the developed reaction mechanism in plasma-assisted kinetic model, the reaction path flux analysis was carried out. The result shows that CH3 recombination is the limiting reaction for CO production and O is the critical species for CO production. Adding 40 wt.% Ni/SiO2 in discharge region has significantly promoted the yield of H2, CO, or CO2 in dielectric packed bed (DPB reactor. Plasma catalytic hybrid reforming experiment verifies the reaction path flux analysis tentatively.

  17. Kinetic studies on a repetitively pulsed fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.

    1982-01-01

    Neutronic analysis of an earlier proposed periodically pulsed fast reactor at Kalpakkam (KPFR) has been carried out numerically under equilibrium and transient conditions using the one-point model of reactor kinetics and the experimentally measured total worth of reactivity modulator, the parabolic coefficient of reactivity of the movable reflector and the mean prompt neutron lifetime. Results of steady-state calculations - treated on the basis of delayed neutron precursor and energy balances during a period of operation - have been compared with the analytical formulae of Larrimore for a parabolic reactivity input. Empirical relations for half-width of the fast neutron pulse, the peak pulse power and the power at first crossing of prompt criticality have been obtained and shown to be accurate enough for predicting steady-state power pulse characteristics of a periodically pulsed fast reactor. The concept of a subprompt-critical reactor has been used to calculate the fictitious delayed neutron fraction, β of the KPFR through a numerical experiment. Relative pulse height stability and pulse shape sensitivity to changes of maximum reactivity is discussed. With the aid of new safety concepts, the Power Amplification Factor (PAF) and the Pulse Growth Factor (Rsub(p)), the dynamics KPFR under accidental conditions has been studied for step and ramp reactivity perturbations. All the analysis has been done without taking account of reactivity feedback. (orig.)

  18. Aqueous photodegradation of antibiotic florfenicol: kinetics and degradation pathway studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Li, Jianhua; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Guoqing; Feng, Yanhong; Wang, Zunyao; Yang, Xi

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of antibacterial agents in natural environment was of scientific concern in recent years. As endocrine disrupting chemicals, they had potential risk on ecology system and human beings. In the present study, the photodegradation kinetics and pathways of florfenicol were investigated under solar and xenon lamp irradiation in aquatic systems. Direct photolysis half-lives of florfenicol were determined as 187.29 h under solar irradiation and 22.43 h under xenon lamp irradiation, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydroxyl radical (·OH) and singlet oxygen ((1)O2) were found to play an important role in indirect photolysis process. The presence of nitrate and dissolved organic matters (DOMs) could affect photolysis of florfenicol in solutions through light screening effect, quenching effect, and photoinduced oxidization process. Photoproducts of florfenicol in DOMs solutions were identified by solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS) analysis techniques, and degradation pathways were proposed, including photoinduced hydrolysis, oxidation by (1)O2 and ·OH, dechlorination, and cleavage of the side chain.

  19. KINETIC MODELS STUDY OF HYDRODESULPHURIZATION VACUUM DISTILLATE REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdulMunem A. Karim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available    This study deals with  kinetics of hydrodesulphurization (HDS reaction of vacuum gas oil (611-833 K which was distillated from Kirkuk crude oil and which was obtained by blending the fractions, light vacuum gas oil (611 - 650 K, medium vacuum gas oil (650-690 K, heavy vacuum gas oil (690-727 K and very heavy vacuum gas oil (727-833 K.   The vacuum gas oil was hydrotreated on a commercial cobalt-molybdenum alumina catalyst presulfied at specified conditions in a laboratory trickle bed reactor. The reaction temperature range (583-643 K,liquid hourly space velocity range (1.5-3.75 h-1 and hydrogen pressure was kept constant at 3.5 MPa with hydrogen to oil ratio about 250 lt/lt.           The conversion results for desulphurization reaction appeared to obey the second order reaction. According to this model, the rate constants for desulphurization reaction were determined. Finally, the apparent activation energy (Ea, enthalpy of activation ( H* and entropy ( S* were calculated based on the values of rate constant (k2 and were equal 80.3792 KJ/mole, 75.2974 KJ/mole and 197.493 J/mole, respectively.

  20. Contributions to the study of positive ion kinetics in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, A.

    1978-01-01

    Extensive studies on cesium ion kinetics in cesium and cesium-noble gas mixtures were performed. The obtained data are correlated with the measured parameters of the thermionic diodes. The mobility of atomic and molecular cesium ions at low electric fields, including zero electric field, in cesium and cesium krypton mixtures were measured using the time of flight method and a special thermionic ion detector. The atomic ion conversion into molecular ions is theoretically considered in the diffusion equation of the charged particles and the obtained analytical relation is in good agreement with the experimental cesium measured data. The reaction rate of the ion conversion in cesium is considered from these measurements. Measurements on the diffused plasma through the anode (provided with holes) of the cesium thermionic diode supply data on the anode sheath, the ratio of electronic and ionic current, electron temperature and the nature of the cesium ions (atomic or molecular) for various modes of the low voltage arc discharge. The obtained data have been used for the optimization of the thermionic diode parameters, as well as for the development of a new type of device for the detection of impurities in the air. (author)

  1. Kinetic study of ultrasonic antisolvent crystallization of sirolimus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, P.J. [Chemical Engineering Department, S. V. National Institute of Technology, Surat 395007, Gujarat (India); Concept Medical Research Pvt. Ltd., Ground Floor, Narayan Darshan, Nr. Rupam Cinema, Salabatpura, Surat 395003, Gujarat (India); Murthy, Z.V.P.

    2010-03-15

    Sirolimus, generally used in organ transplantation, is derived from bacterium Streptomyces hygroscopicus. Mass transfer controlled ultrasonic antisolvent method was used for determining the precipitation kinetics of sirolimus. The effect of temperature was determined on the particles size, percentage recovery, critical radius of nucleus, mass transfer coefficient, etc. for sirolimus dissolved in methanol and antisolvent water using ultrasonic treatment. The study was done using classical nucleation theory, which can also be applied to precipitation processes. Experiments were carried out at various temperatures; viz: 45, 50, 60 and 70 C and the percentage recoveries of sirolimus were found to be 90.74, 91.5, 92.64 and 93.61%, respectively, for initial amount of 8 mg dissolved in 1 mL of solvent and further introduced into 12 mL of HPLC water. The final average diameters of crystals observed for the temperatures were 1371, 1287, 1063 and 863 nm, respectively. The systems were found to be mass transfer controlling and that the mass diffusivities were found to be about 3.97 x 10{sup -9}, 4.00 x 10{sup -9}, 3.01 x 10{sup -9} and 1.92 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Studies on drying kinetics of olive foot cake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamlat, M. S.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The olive foot cake is a very important by-product of olive oil industry since it can contain until 12 % of oil which can be extracted using solvent. The used solvent is often immiscible with water. This is the reason why its effect is limited by the moisture of olive foot cake making its drying imperative. In this paper, we present the behaviour of olive foot cake subjected to convective drying. The experimental results show that the drying rate versus moisture presents only one period of decreasing rate. The influence of the main parameters on drying kinetics is studied.El orujo es un importante subproducto de la industria del aceite de oliva ya que puede contener hasta el 12 % del aceite, el cual puede ser extraído usando un disolvente apropiado. El uso del disolvente es a menudo inmiscible con el agua. Esta es la razón por la que su efecto está limitado por la humedad del orujo, haciendo su secado imperativo. En este artículo se presenta el comportamiento del orujo sometido a un secado por convección. Los resultados experimentales mostraron que la velocidad de secado frente a la humedad, presenta un solo período de disminución de dicha velocidad. Se ha estudiado la influencia de los principales parámetros sobre la cinética de secado.

  3. Kinetic study of seawater reverse osmosis membrane fouling

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Muhammad

    2013-10-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane fouling is not a static state but a dynamic phenomenon. The investigation of fouling kinetics and dynamics of change in the composition of the foulant mass is essential to elucidate the mechanism of fouling and foulant-foulant interactions. The aim of this work was to study at a lab scale the fouling process with an emphasis on the changes in the relative composition of foulant material as a function of operating time. Fouled membrane samples were collected at 8 h, and 1, 2, and 4 weeks on a lab-scale RO unit operated in recirculation mode. Foulant characterization was performed by CLSM, AFM, ATR-FTIR, pyrolysis GC-MS, and ICP-MS techniques. Moreover, measurement of active biomass and analysis of microbial diversity were performed by ATP analysis and DNA extraction, followed by pyro-sequencing, respectively. A progressive increase in the abundance of almost all the foulant species was observed, but their relative proportion changed over the age of the fouling layer. Microbial population in all the membrane samples was dominated by specific groups/species belonging to Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria phyla; however, similar to abiotic foulant, their relative abundance also changed with the biofilm age. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  4. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    We have made measurements of state-to-state deactivation cross sections and radiative lifetimes for Xe*(6p,6p',7p) and Kr*(5p) states in xenon and krypton buffer gases. These results are relevant to kinetic models and both excimer lasers and the infrared xenon laser; and they are a significant improvement in the precision of the known radiative lifetimes. This type of experiment can now be compared with recent calculations of state-to-state collisional relaxation in rare-gases by Hickman, Huestis, and Saxon. We have also made significant progress in the study of the electronic spectra of small molecules of the rare gases. Spectra have been obtained for Xe 2 , Xe 3 , Xe 4 , and larger clusters. As guidance for the larger clusters of the rare gases we have obtained the first multiphoton spectra for excitons in condensed xenon. In collaboration with research on the multiphoton spectra of the rare gases, we have continued experiments using synchrotron radiation in collaboration with the University of Hamburg. In experiments there we have observed excitation and fluorescence spectra for single xenon atoms at the surface, within the second layer, and within the bulk of large argon clusters

  5. Detailed kinetic modeling study of n-pentanol oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Heufer, Karl Alexander

    2012-10-18

    To help overcome the world\\'s dependence upon fossil fuels, suitable biofuels are promising alternatives that can be used in the transportation sector. Recent research on internal combustion engines shows that short alcoholic fuels (e.g., ethanol or n-butanol) have reduced pollutant emissions and increased knock resistance compared to fossil fuels. Although higher molecular weight alcohols (e.g., n-pentanol and n-hexanol) exhibit higher reactivity that lowers their knock resistance, they are suitable for diesel engines or advanced engine concepts, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), where higher reactivity at lower temperatures is necessary for engine operation. The present study presents a detailed kinetic model for n-pentanol based on modeling rules previously presented for n-butanol. This approach was initially validated using quantum chemistry calculations to verify the most stable n-pentanol conformation and to obtain C-H and C-C bond dissociation energies. The proposed model has been validated against ignition delay time data, speciation data from a jet-stirred reactor, and laminar flame velocity measurements. Overall, the model shows good agreement with the experiments and permits a detailed discussion of the differences between alcohols and alkanes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Kinetic and thermodynamic study of the reaction catalyzed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin del Campo, Julia S.; Patino, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The reaction catalyzed by one enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway was studied. → A spectrophotometric method is proposed for kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. → The pH and the temperature influences are reported on physical chemical properties. → Relative concentrations of substrates are also important in the catalytic process. - Abstract: The enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC 1.1.1.49) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides has a dual coenzyme specificity with oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD ox ) and oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate as electron acceptors. The G6PD coenzyme selection is determined by the metabolic cellular prevailing conditions. In this study a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis is presented for the reaction catalyzed by G6PD from L. mesenteroides with NAD ox as coenzyme in phosphate buffer. For this work, an in situ spectrophotometric technique was employed based on the detection of one product of the reaction. Substrate and coenzyme concentrations as well as temperature and pH effects were evaluated. The apparent equilibrium constant, the Michaelis constant, and the turnover number were determined as a function of each experimental condition. The standard transformed Gibbs energy of reaction was determined from equilibrium constants at different initial conditions. For the product 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone, a value of the standard Gibbs energy of formation is proposed, Δ f G o = -1784 ± 5 kJ mol -1 .

  7. Kinetic and thermodynamic study of the reaction catalyzed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin del Campo, Julia S. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados - Unidad Merida, Carretera antigua a Progreso Km. 6, A.P. 73 Cordemex, 97310, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Patino, Rodrigo, E-mail: rtarkus@mda.cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados - Unidad Merida, Carretera antigua a Progreso Km. 6, A.P. 73 Cordemex, 97310, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2011-04-20

    Research highlights: {yields} The reaction catalyzed by one enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway was studied. {yields} A spectrophotometric method is proposed for kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. {yields} The pH and the temperature influences are reported on physical chemical properties. {yields} Relative concentrations of substrates are also important in the catalytic process. - Abstract: The enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC 1.1.1.49) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides has a dual coenzyme specificity with oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sub ox}) and oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate as electron acceptors. The G6PD coenzyme selection is determined by the metabolic cellular prevailing conditions. In this study a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis is presented for the reaction catalyzed by G6PD from L. mesenteroides with NAD{sub ox} as coenzyme in phosphate buffer. For this work, an in situ spectrophotometric technique was employed based on the detection of one product of the reaction. Substrate and coenzyme concentrations as well as temperature and pH effects were evaluated. The apparent equilibrium constant, the Michaelis constant, and the turnover number were determined as a function of each experimental condition. The standard transformed Gibbs energy of reaction was determined from equilibrium constants at different initial conditions. For the product 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone, a value of the standard Gibbs energy of formation is proposed, {Delta}{sub f}G{sup o} = -1784 {+-} 5 kJ mol{sup -1}.

  8. A study of redox kinetic in silicate melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnien, V.

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand better iron redox reactions and mechanisms in silicate glasses and melts. Particular interest has been paid to the influence of temperature and chemical composition. For this purpose, the influence of alkali element content, iron content and network formers on the kinetics of redox reactions has been determined through XANES and Raman spectroscopy experiments performed either near the glass transition or above the liquidus temperature. As a complement, electrical conductivity and RBS spectroscopy experiments have been made to characterize the diffusivity of the species that transport electrical charges and the reaction morphology, respectively. Temperature and composition variations can induce changes in the dominating redox mechanism. At a given temperature, the parameters that exert the strongest influence on redox mechanisms are the presence or lack of divalent cations and the existing decoupling between the mobility of network former and modifier elements. Near Tg, the diffusion of divalent cations, when present in the melt, controls the kinetics of iron redox reactions along with a flux of electron holes. Composition, through the degree of polymerization and the silicate network structure, influences the kinetics and the nature of the involved cations, but not the mechanisms of the reaction. Without alkaline earth elements, the kinetics of redox reactions are controlled by the diffusion of oxygen species. With increasing temperatures, the diffusivities of all ionic species tend to become similar. The decoupling between ionic fluxes then is reduced so that several mechanisms become kinetically equivalent and can thus coexist. (author)

  9. Adsorptive removal of Auramine-O: Kinetic and equilibrium study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mall, Indra Deo; Srivastava, Vimal Chandra; Agarwal, Nitin Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Present study deals with the adsorption of Auramine-O (AO) dye by bagasse fly ash (BFA) and activated carbon-commercial grade (ACC) and laboratory grade (ACL). BFA is a solid waste obtained from the particulate collection equipment attached to the flue gas line of the bagasse fired boilers of cane sugar mills. Batch studies were performed to evaluate the influences of various experimental parameters like initial pH (pH 0 ), contact time, adsorbent dose and initial concentration (C 0 ) for the removal of AO. Optimum conditions for AO removal were found to be pH 0 ∼ 7.0 and equilibrium time ∼30 min for BFA and ∼120 min for activated carbons. Optimum BFA, ACC and ACL dosages were found to be 1, 20 and 2 g/l, respectively. Adsorption of AO followed pseudo-second order kinetics with the initial sorption rate for adsorption on BFA being the highest followed by those on ACL and ACC. The sorption process was found to be controlled by both film and pore diffusion with film diffusion at the earlier stages followed by pore diffusion at the later stages. Equilibrium isotherms for the adsorption of AO on BFA, ACC and ACL were analyzed by Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubinin-Radushkevich, and Temkin isotherm equations using linear correlation coefficient. Langmuir isotherm gave the best correlation of adsorption for all the adsorbents studied. Thermodynamic study showed that adsorption of AO on ACC (with a more negative Gibbs free energy value) is more favoured. BFA which was used without any pretreatment showed high surface area, pore volume and pore size exhibiting its potential to be used as an adsorbent for the removal of AO

  10. Enzymatic Synthesis of Furfuryl Alcohol Ester with Oleic Acid by Candida antarctica Lipase B and Its Kinetic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Avery; Dey, Tanmoy; Ghosh, Mahua; Ghosh, Jaydip; Ghosh, Santinath

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the successful enzymatic production of furfuryl oleate and its detailed kinetic study by Michaelis-Menten model. Esterification of oleic acid and furfuryl alcohol by Candida antarctica lipase B (Novozym 435 preparation) in a solvent free system was studied in the present work at 1:1 molar ratio of furfuryl alcohol and oleic acid. About 99 % conversion (on the basis of oleic acid) has been achieved within 6 h at 5 % enzyme concentration. Ping-pong bi-bi mechanism (inhibition phenomenon taken into account) was applied to describe the ratios as a complex kinetic model. The kinetic parameters were determined using MATLAB language programme. The two initial rate constants KA and KB respectively were found out by different progress curves plotted with the help of MATLAB language programme. It was concluded from the results that furfuryl alcohol considerably inhibited the enzymatic reaction while oleic acid had negligible inhibitory effect. It was clearly seen that the initial rate was increased with the increase in the furfuryl alcohol concentration until 2 M/L after which there was a drop in the initial rate depicting the inhibitory effect of furfuryl alcohol. Surprisingly, it has been observed that addition of 0.1 mol of product activated the esterification reaction. Finally, the model was found to be statistically fitting well with the experimental data.

  11. Kinetic Studies on Ni-YSZ Composite Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-01-01

    AC and DC techniques were applied to investigate the electrochemical reaction kinetics of porous composite Ni/8-mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (Ni/8YSZ) solid oxide cell (SOC) electrodes using a novel pseudo-3-electrode cell geometry. From OCV impedance spectra an activation energy Ea of 1.13 e......V, prefactor yan of 3.7·105·T, hydrogen and steam partial pressure dependencies a and b respectively of -0.07 and 0.22 were determined. DC current density vs. overpotential curves compared with those predicted using the determined kinetic parameters. Apparent Butler-Volmer charge transfer coefficients α were...... branch and the need for different α values for each branch suggests that a simple BV model of the measured electrode kinetics is insufficient and/or different reaction mechanisms might be occurring in anodic vs cathodic polarization....

  12. The Study of a Simple Redox Reaction as an Experimental Approach to Chemical Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Horst; Zipp, Arden P.

    1988-01-01

    Recommends using iodide ions and peroxodisulfate ions for studying rate laws instead of the standard iodine clock for kinetic study. Presents the methodology and a discussion of the kinetics involved for a laboratory experiment for a high school or introductory college course. (ML)

  13. Kinetic and equilibrium study for the sorption of Pb(II) ions from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kinetic and equilibrium study for the sorption of Pb(II) ions from aqueous phase by water hyacinth ( Eichhornia crassipes ) ... Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia ... Abstract. This paper reports the kinetic and equilibrium studies of Eichhornia crassipes root biomass as a biosorbent for Pb(II) ions from aqueous system.

  14. Study of the oxidation kinetics of the MA 956 superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Alonso, M.C.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J.L.; Escudero, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    This work deals with the oxidation kinetics of the MA 956 superalloy in the temperature range of 800-1,200 degree centigree for up to 200 h exposure. During oxidation the alloy develops a fine, compact and very well adhered α-alumina layer, the thickness of which increases with increasing time and temperature. The oxidation kinetics obeys a sub parabolic type behaviour. The scale growth seems to occur by two different oxidation mechanisms; above 1,050 degree centigree, the oxidation process would be controlled by α-alumina, and below 900 degree centigree by γ-alumina. (Author) 17 refs

  15. Highly efficient enzyme encapsulation in a protein nanocage: towards enzyme catalysis in a cellular nanocompartment mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonen, Lise; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; van Hest, Jan C. M.

    2016-07-01

    The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions.The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures for the cloning, expression, and purification of all proteins, as well as supplementary figures and calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04181g

  16. Study of cellulase enzymes self-assembly in aqueous-acetonitrile solvent: Viscosity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaouar, N., E-mail: naoufel-ghaouar@lycos.co [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Molle, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 (Tunisia); Institut National des Sciences Appliquees et de Technologie, INSAT, Centre Urbain Nord, BP. 676, Tunis (Tunisia); Aschi, A. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Molle, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 (Tunisia); Belbahri, L. [School of Engineering of Lullier, University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, 150, Route de Presinge, 1254 Jussy (Switzerland); Trabelsi, S.; Gharbi, A. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Molle, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 (Tunisia)

    2009-11-15

    The present study extends the viscosity measurements performed by Ghaouar et al. [Physica B, submitted for publication.] to study the conformational change of the cellulase enzymes in aqueous-acetonitrile mixture. We aim to investigate: (i) the denaturation process by measuring the specific viscosity for temperatures varying between 25 and 65 deg. C and acetonitrile concentrations between 0% and 50%, (ii) the enzyme-enzyme interaction by calculating the Huggins coefficient and (iii) the enzyme sizes by following the hydrodynamic radius for various temperatures. The precipitation of cellulases versus acetonitrile concentration is also considered. We show from all physical quantities measured in this work that the precipitation and the denaturation processes of cellulase enzymes exist together.

  17. Study of cellulase enzymes self-assembly in aqueous-acetonitrile solvent: Viscosity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaouar, N.; Aschi, A.; Belbahri, L.; Trabelsi, S.; Gharbi, A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study extends the viscosity measurements performed by Ghaouar et al. [Physica B, submitted for publication.] to study the conformational change of the cellulase enzymes in aqueous-acetonitrile mixture. We aim to investigate: (i) the denaturation process by measuring the specific viscosity for temperatures varying between 25 and 65 deg. C and acetonitrile concentrations between 0% and 50%, (ii) the enzyme-enzyme interaction by calculating the Huggins coefficient and (iii) the enzyme sizes by following the hydrodynamic radius for various temperatures. The precipitation of cellulases versus acetonitrile concentration is also considered. We show from all physical quantities measured in this work that the precipitation and the denaturation processes of cellulase enzymes exist together.

  18. Influencing factors and kinetic studies of imidacloprid degradation by ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi; Deng, Jing; Deng, Yang; Gao, Naiyun

    2018-03-02

    Batch kinetic tests in ozonation of imidacloprid from water were performed in this study. The pseudo-first-order rate constant of imidacloprid degradation was increased from 0.079 to 0.326 min -1 with the increasing pH from 6.02 to 8.64 at an average ozone dose of 1.149 mg L -1 . When the alkalinity was increased from 0 to 250 mg L -1 NaHCO 3 , the pseudo-first-order rate constants decreased from 0.121 to 0.034 min -1 . These results suggested that the predominant oxidant gradually switched from ozone to hydroxyl radicals ([Formula: see text]) with the increase in solution pH. The secondary rate constant [Formula: see text] (10.92 ± 0.12 M -1 s -1 ) for the reaction of imidacloprid and molecular ozone was determined at pH 2.0 and in the presence of 50 mM ter-butyl alcohol (p-chlorobenzoic acid, pCBA), respectively. An indirect competition method was used to determine the secondary rate constant for [Formula: see text] oxidation of imidacloprid in the presence of pCBA as the reference compound. The rate constants [Formula: see text] were estimated to range 2.65-3.79 M -1 s -1 at pH 6.02-8.64. Results obtained from this study demonstrate that ozonation appears to be an effective method to remove imidacloprid from water.

  19. Simulation studies in biochemical signaling and enzyme reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelatury, Sudarshan R.; Vagula, Mary C.

    2014-06-01

    Biochemical pathways characterize various biochemical reaction schemes that involve a set of species and the manner in which they are connected. Determination of schematics that represent these pathways is an important task in understanding metabolism and signal transduction. Examples of these Pathways are: DNA and protein synthesis, and production of several macro-molecules essential for cell survival. A sustained feedback mechanism arises in gene expression and production of mRNA that lead to protein synthesis if the protein so synthesized serves as a transcription factor and becomes a repressor of the gene expression. The cellular regulations are carried out through biochemical networks consisting of reactions and regulatory proteins. Systems biology is a relatively new area that attempts to describe the biochemical pathways analytically and develop reliable mathematical models for the pathways. A complete understanding of chemical reaction kinetics is prohibitively hard thanks to the nonlinear and highly complex mechanisms that regulate protein formation, but attempting to numerically solve some of the governing differential equations seems to offer significant insight about their biochemical picture. To validate these models, one can perform simple experiments in the lab. This paper introduces fundamental ideas in biochemical signaling and attempts to take first steps into the understanding of biochemical oscillations. Initially, the two-pool model of calcium is used to describe the dynamics behind the oscillations. Later we present some elementary results showing biochemical oscillations arising from solving differential equations of Elowitz and Leibler using MATLAB software.

  20. Studies on the kinetics and intraparticle diffusivities of BOD, colour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    The kinetics and intraparticle diffusivities of BOD, TSS and colour reduction from palm oil mill effluent (POME) using ... discharged (Asia et al., 2006). The oil palm ... biological treatment methods, anaerobic digestion is often the most ... and lower capital cost. ... was then rinsed with distilled water and air dried, ready for the.

  1. Kinetic modelling and thermodynamic studies on purification of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adsorbent capacities have been determined by mathematical fitting of equilibrium data using the most common isotherms: Freundlich isotherm and Langmuir isotherm. Several kinetic models have been applied to the process. Thermodynamic parameters: △So, △Ho, △Go and Ea (kJ/mol) have been determined.

  2. Kinetic, Equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on the biosorption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of the biosorption of Cd (II) from aqueous solution by the leaf biomass of Calotropis procera popularly known in western Nigeria as 'bom bom'and genrally known as Sodom apple were investigated at different experimental conditions. Optimum conditions of pH, contact time, ...

  3. Ab initio and kinetic modeling studies of formic acid oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, Paul; Glarborg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for oxidation of formic acid (HOCHO) in flames has been developed, based on theoretical work and data from literature. Ab initio calculations were used to obtain rate coefficients for reactions of HOCHO with H, O, and HO2. Modeling predictions with the mechanism...

  4. Penicillin Hydrolysis: A Kinetic Study of a Multistep, Multiproduct Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarrick, Thomas A.; McLafferty, Fred W.

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures used, and typical results are provided for an experiment in which students carry out the necessary measurements on the acid-catalysis of penicillin in two hours. By applying kinetic theory to the data obtained, the reaction pathways for the hydrolysis of potassium benzyl penicillin are elucidated. (JN)

  5. Kinetic study on anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hou; Kashima, Hiroyuki; Regan, John M; Hussain, Abid; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2017-09-01

    Monod kinetic parameters provide information required for kinetic analysis of anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to denitrification (AOM-D). This information is critical for engineering AOM-D processes in wastewater treatment facilities. We first experimentally determined Monod kinetic parameters for an AOM-D enriched culture and obtained the following values: maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) 0.121/d, maximum substrate-utilization rate (q max ) 28.8mmol CH 4 /g cells-d, half maximum-rate substrate concentration (K s ) 83μΜ CH 4 , growth yield (Y) 4.76gcells/mol CH 4 , decay coefficient (b) 0.031/d, and threshold substrate concentration (S min ) 28.8μM CH 4 . Clone library analysis of 16S rRNA and mcrA gene fragments suggested that AOM-D reactions might have occurred via the syntrophic interaction between denitrifying bacteria (e.g., Ignavibacterium, Acidovorax, and Pseudomonas spp.) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanobacterium spp.), supporting reverse methanogenesis-dependent AOM-D in our culture. High μ max and q max , and low K s for the AOM-D enrichment imply that AOM-D could play a significant role in mitigating atmospheric methane efflux. In addition, these high kinetic features suggest that engineered AOM-D systems may provide a sustainable alternative to nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Kinetic study of sphingomyelin hydrolysis for ceramide production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Long; Hellgren, Lars; Xu, Xuebing

    2008-01-01

    in cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries such as in hair and skin care products. The enzymatic hydrolysis of sphingomyelin has been proved to be a feasible method to produce ceramide. The kinetic performance of sphingomyelin hydrolysis in the optimal two-phase (water:organic solvent) reaction system...

  7. Crystallographic and kinetic study of riboflavin synthase from Brucella abortus, a chemotherapeutic target with an enhanced intrinsic flexibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serer, María I.; Bonomi, Hernán R. [IIBBA–CONICET, Avenida Patricias Argentinas 435, C1405BWE Buenos Aires (Argentina); Guimarães, Beatriz G. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX (France); Rossi, Rolando C. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 956, C1113AAD Buenos Aires (Argentina); Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Klinke, Sebastián, E-mail: sklinke@leloir.org.ar [IIBBA–CONICET, Avenida Patricias Argentinas 435, C1405BWE Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-05-01

    This work reports crystal structures of trimeric riboflavin synthase from the pathogen B. abortus both as the apo protein and in complex with several ligands of interest. It is shown that ligand binding drives the assembly of the unique active site of the trimer, and these findings are complemented by a detailed kinetic study on this enzyme, in which marked inhibition by substrate and product was observed. Riboflavin synthase (RS) catalyzes the last step of riboflavin biosynthesis in microorganisms and plants, which corresponds to the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine to yield one molecule of riboflavin and one molecule of 5-amino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione. Owing to the absence of this enzyme in animals and the fact that most pathogenic bacteria show a strict dependence on riboflavin biosynthesis, RS has been proposed as a potential target for antimicrobial drug development. Eubacterial, fungal and plant RSs assemble as homotrimers lacking C{sub 3} symmetry. Each monomer can bind two substrate molecules, yet there is only one active site for the whole enzyme, which is located at the interface between two neighbouring chains. This work reports the crystallographic structure of RS from the pathogenic bacterium Brucella abortus (the aetiological agent of the disease brucellosis) in its apo form, in complex with riboflavin and in complex with two different product analogues, being the first time that the structure of an intact RS trimer with bound ligands has been solved. These crystal models support the hypothesis of enhanced flexibility in the particle and also highlight the role of the ligands in assembling the unique active site. Kinetic and binding studies were also performed to complement these findings. The structural and biochemical information generated may be useful for the rational design of novel RS inhibitors with antimicrobial activity.

  8. Crystallographic and kinetic study of riboflavin synthase from Brucella abortus, a chemotherapeutic target with an enhanced intrinsic flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serer, María I.; Bonomi, Hernán R.; Guimarães, Beatriz G.; Rossi, Rolando C.; Goldbaum, Fernando A.; Klinke, Sebastián

    2014-01-01

    This work reports crystal structures of trimeric riboflavin synthase from the pathogen B. abortus both as the apo protein and in complex with several ligands of interest. It is shown that ligand binding drives the assembly of the unique active site of the trimer, and these findings are complemented by a detailed kinetic study on this enzyme, in which marked inhibition by substrate and product was observed. Riboflavin synthase (RS) catalyzes the last step of riboflavin biosynthesis in microorganisms and plants, which corresponds to the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine to yield one molecule of riboflavin and one molecule of 5-amino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione. Owing to the absence of this enzyme in animals and the fact that most pathogenic bacteria show a strict dependence on riboflavin biosynthesis, RS has been proposed as a potential target for antimicrobial drug development. Eubacterial, fungal and plant RSs assemble as homotrimers lacking C 3 symmetry. Each monomer can bind two substrate molecules, yet there is only one active site for the whole enzyme, which is located at the interface between two neighbouring chains. This work reports the crystallographic structure of RS from the pathogenic bacterium Brucella abortus (the aetiological agent of the disease brucellosis) in its apo form, in complex with riboflavin and in complex with two different product analogues, being the first time that the structure of an intact RS trimer with bound ligands has been solved. These crystal models support the hypothesis of enhanced flexibility in the particle and also highlight the role of the ligands in assembling the unique active site. Kinetic and binding studies were also performed to complement these findings. The structural and biochemical information generated may be useful for the rational design of novel RS inhibitors with antimicrobial activity

  9. Novel swirl-flow reactor for kinetic studies of semiconductor photocatalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ray, A.K; Beenackers, A.A C M

    1997-01-01

    A new two-phase swirl-flow monolithic-type reactor was designed to study the kinetics of heterogeneous photocatalytic processes on immobilized semiconductor catalysts. True kinetic rate constants for destruction of a textile dye were measured as a function of wavelength of light intensity and angle

  10. Oxidation of L-cystine by chromium(VI) - a kinetic study | Kumar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetics of the title reaction was studied spectrophotometrically in HClO4 medium at 380 nm. The data suggested that the order with respect to cystine is fractional, whereas chromium(VI) follows first order kinetics. The reaction was second order in [H+]. Cysteic acid was found to be the main product of oxidation.

  11. Biomarker kinetics in the prediction of VAP diagnosis: results from the BioVAP study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Póvoa, Pedro; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Ramirez, Paula; Bos, Lieuwe D.; Esperatti, Mariano; Silvestre, Joana; Gili, Gisela; Goma, Gema; Berlanga, Eugenio; Espasa, Mateu; Gonçalves, Elsa; Torres, Antoni; Artigas, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) remains difficult. Our aim was to assess the value of biomarker kinetics in VAP prediction. We performed a prospective, multicenter, observational study to evaluate predictive accuracy of biomarker kinetics, namely C-reactive protein

  12. Synthesis, structural investigation and kinetic studies of uranyl(VI) unsymmetrical Schiff base complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asadi, Z.; Asadi, M.; Zeinali, A.; Ranjkeshshorkaei, M.; Fejfarová, Karla; Eigner, Václav; Dušek, Michal; Dehnokhalaji, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 6 (2014), s. 1673-1683 ISSN 0974-3626 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0809 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : uranyl schiff base complexes * kinetic study * kinetics of thermal decomposition * X-ray crystallography * cyclic voltammetry Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.191, year: 2014

  13. Positional isotope exchange studies on enzyme using NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, T.O.

    1987-01-01

    The isotopically enriched compounds, 18 O-β,γ-ATP and 18 O bridge-labeled pyrophosphate, synthesized previously in this laboratory, were used to investigate and measure the exchange vs. turnover of substrates and products from their central complexes in four selected enzyme systems. Using hi-field 31 P NMR, we were able to differentiate between 18 O labeled in the bridge vs. the non-bridge positions by virtue of the isotope shift upon the phosphorus nuclei. The bridge to non-bridge scrambling of the label was quantitated and the exchange vs. turnover ratios under a variety of conditions was determined. Using the substrate inhibitor carboxycreatinine, PIX experiments with 18 O-β,γ-ATP and creatine kinase were conducted. It was shown that carboxycreatinine and creatine kinase promoted exchange of the 18 O label as determined by NMR. We have concluded that carboxycreatinine is either a substrate that catalyzes very slow turnover or it catalyzes exchange by a dissociative (SN 1 /sub P/) type of mechanism

  14. Study on the Correlation between Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Seven Key Enzymes and Ginsenoside Content in Ginseng in Over Time in Ji'an, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Juxin; Zhang, Daihui; Zhuang, Jianjian; Huang, Yi; Mu, Ying; Lv, Shaowu

    2017-12-11

    Panax ginseng is a traditional medicine. Fresh ginseng is one of the most important industries related to ginseng development, and fresh ginseng of varying ages has different medicinal properties. Previous research has not systematically reported the correlation between changes in key enzyme activity with changes in ginsenoside content in fresh ginseng over time. In this study, for the first time, we use ginseng samples of varying ages in Ji'an and systematically reported the changes in the activity of seven key enzymes (HMGR, FPS, SS, SE, DS, CYP450, and GT). We investigated the content of ginsenoside and gene expression of these key enzymes. Ginsenoside content was measured using HPLC. HPLC, GC-MS, and LC-MS were combined to measure the enzyme activity of the key enzymes. Quantitative PCR was used in the investigation of gene expression. By analyzing the correlation between the enzyme activity and the transcription level of the key enzymes with ginsenoside content, we found that DS and GT enzyme activities are significantly correlated with the ginsenoside content in different ages of ginseng. Our findings might provide a new strategy to discriminate between ginseng of different years. Meanwhile, this research provides important information for the in-depth study of ginsenoside biosynthesis.

  15. A new, sensitive method for enzyme kinetic studies of scarce glucosides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazura, Pavel; Fohlerová, Radka; Brzobohatý, Břetislav; Kiran, N.S.; Janda, L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 1 (2006), s. 55-63 ISSN 0165-022X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/0865 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : Amplex Ultra Red reagent * beta-glucosidase * zeatin-O-glukozid Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.403, year: 2006

  16. Aqueous solutions that model the cytosol : studies on polarity, chemical reactivity and enzyme kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asaad, N.; den Otter, M.J.; Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    2004-01-01

    Concentrated solutions of a series of organic compounds have been prepared and the effects of these solutes on the properties of the solvent system assessed as a function of their concentration and nature. Polarity, as measured by Reichardt's E-T(30) probe, exhibits a linear variation with both

  17. Inhibition and Kinetic Studies of Tortoise (Kinixys erosa) Liver arginase

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of amino acid on tortoise liver arginase showed that L-lysine, L-valine, L-serine, L-aspartic acid and L aspartic acid had significant inhibitory effect on the enzyme but proline and glutamic acid showed slight inhibition. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citrate, ascorbic acid, boric acid and sodium borate ...

  18. Atmospheric degradation of 3-methylfuran: kinetic and products study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tapia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A study of the kinetics and products obtained from the reactions of 3-methylfuran with the main atmospheric oxidants has been performed. The rate coefficients for the gas-phase reaction of 3-methylfuran with OH and NO3 radicals have been determined at room temperature and atmospheric pressure (air and N2 as bath gases, using a relative method with different experimental techniques. The rate coefficients obtained for these reactions were (in units cm3 molecule−1 s−1 kOH = (1.13 ± 0.22 × 10−10 and kNO3 = (1.26 ± 0.18 × 10−11. Products from the reaction of 3-methylfuran with OH, NO3 and Cl atoms in the absence and in the presence of NO have also been determined. The main reaction products obtained were chlorinated methylfuranones and hydroxy-methylfuranones in the reaction of 3-methylfuran with Cl atoms, 2-methylbutenedial, 3-methyl-2,5-furanodione and hydroxy-methylfuranones in the reaction of 3-methylfuran with OH and NO3 radicals and also nitrated compounds in the reaction with NO3 radicals. The results indicate that, in all cases, the main reaction path is the addition to the double bond of the aromatic ring followed by ring opening in the case of OH and NO3 radicals. The formation of 3-furaldehyde and hydroxy-methylfuranones (in the reactions of 3-methylfuran with Cl atoms and NO3 radicals confirmed the H-atom abstraction from the methyl group and from the aromatic ring, respectively. This study represents the first product determination for Cl atoms and NO3 radicals in reactions with 3-methylfuran. The reaction mechanisms and atmospheric implications of the reactions under consideration are also discussed.

  19. A study of kinetic friction: The Timoshenko oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henaff, Robin; Le Doudic, Gabriel; Pilette, Bertrand; Even, Catherine; Fischbach, Jean-Marie; Bouquet, Frédéric; Bobroff, Julien; Monteverde, Miguel; Marrache-Kikuchi, Claire A.

    2018-03-01

    Friction is a complex phenomenon that is of paramount importance in everyday life. We present an easy-to-build and inexpensive experiment illustrating Coulomb's law of kinetic friction. The so-called friction, or Timoshenko, oscillator consists of a plate set into periodic motion through the competition between gravity and friction on its rotating supports. The period of such an oscillator gives a measurement of the coefficient of kinetic friction μk between the plate and the supports. Our prototype is mainly composed of a motor, LEGO blocks, and a low-cost microcontroller, but despite its simplicity, the results obtained are in good agreement with values of μk found in the literature (enhanced online).

  20. Hydroxylamine nitrate self-catalytic kinetics study with adiabatic calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lijun [Mary Kay O' Connor Process Safety Center, Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University System, College Station, TX 77843-3122 (United States); Wei Chunyang [BASF Corporation, Wyandotte, MI 48192 (United States); Guo Yuyan; Rogers, William J. [Mary Kay O' Connor Process Safety Center, Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University System, College Station, TX 77843-3122 (United States); Sam Mannan, M. [Mary Kay O' Connor Process Safety Center, Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A and M University System, College Station, TX 77843-3122 (United States)], E-mail: mannan@tamu.edu

    2009-03-15

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) is an important member of the hydroxylamine compound family with applications that include equipment decontamination in the nuclear industry and aqueous or solid propellants. Due to its instability and autocatalytic behavior, HAN has been involved in several incidents at the Hanford and Savannah River Site (SRS) [Technical Report on Hydroxylamine Nitrate, US Department of Energy, 1998]. Much research has been conducted on HAN in different areas, such as combustion mechanism, decomposition mechanism, and runaway behavior. However, the autocatalytic decomposition behavior of HAN at runaway stage has not been fully addressed due to its highly exothermic and rapid decomposition behavior. This work is focused on extracting HAN autocatalytic kinetics and analyzing HAN critical behavior from adiabatic calorimetry measurements. A lumped autocatalytic kinetic model for HAN and associated model parameters are determined. Also the storage and handling critical conditions of diluted HAN solution without metal presence are quantified.

  1. Hydroxylamine nitrate self-catalytic kinetics study with adiabatic calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lijun; Wei Chunyang; Guo Yuyan; Rogers, William J.; Sam Mannan, M.

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) is an important member of the hydroxylamine compound family with applications that include equipment decontamination in the nuclear industry and aqueous or solid propellants. Due to its instability and autocatalytic behavior, HAN has been involved in several incidents at the Hanford and Savannah River Site (SRS) [Technical Report on Hydroxylamine Nitrate, US Department of Energy, 1998]. Much research has been conducted on HAN in different areas, such as combustion mechanism, decomposition mechanism, and runaway behavior. However, the autocatalytic decomposition behavior of HAN at runaway stage has not been fully addressed due to its highly exothermic and rapid decomposition behavior. This work is focused on extracting HAN autocatalytic kinetics and analyzing HAN critical behavior from adiabatic calorimetry measurements. A lumped autocatalytic kinetic model for HAN and associated model parameters are determined. Also the storage and handling critical conditions of diluted HAN solution without metal presence are quantified

  2. Kinetic isotope effect studies on milk xanthine oxidase and on chicken liver xanthine dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ardenne, S.C.; Edmondson, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of isotopic substitution of the 8-H of xanthine (with 2 H and 3 H) on the rate of oxidation by bovine xanthine oxidase and by chicken xanthine dehydrogenase has been measured. V/K isotope effects were determined from competition experiments. No difference in H/T (V/K) values was observed between xanthine oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase. Xanthine dehydrogenase exhibited a larger T/D (V/K) value than that observed for xanthine oxidase. Observed H/T (V/K) values for either enzyme are less than those H/T (V/K) values calculated with D/T (V/K) data. These discrepancies are suggested to arise from the presence of a rate-limiting step(s) prior to the irreversible C-H bond cleavage step in the mechanistic pathways of both enzymes. These kinetic complexities preclude examination of whether tunneling contributes to the reaction coordinate for the H-transfer step in each enzyme. No observable exchange of tritium with solvent is observed during the anaerobic incubation of [8- 3 H]xanthine with either enzyme, which suggests the reverse commitment to catalysis (C r ) is essentially zero. With the assumption of adherence to reduced mass relationships, the intrinsic deuterium isotope effect ( D k) for xanthine oxidation is calculated. By the use of these values and steady-state kinetic data, the minimal rate for the hydrogen-transfer step is calculated to be ∼75-fold faster than k cat for xanthine oxidase and ∼10-fold faster than k cat for xanthine dehydrogenase. Values calculated for each enzyme were found to be identical within experimental uncertainty

  3. Chemical kinetics studies at high temperatures using shock tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Rajakumar, B; Anandraj, D; Reddy, KPJ; Arunan, E

    2002-01-01

    Shock tube is an unique facility to create temperature gradients exceeding million degrees Kelvin per second. We have established two shock tubes for measuring the kinetic reaction rates at high temperatures with two different but complementary detection techniques. The first one is a single pulse shock tube, in which the reflected shock is used to heat the molecules. The equilibrated products are analyzed by gas chromatograph and infrared spectrometer. The second one uses laser-schlieren sys...

  4. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    During the past year, we have made measurements of state-to-state energy transfer cross sections and radiative lifetimes for Xe*(6p,6p',7p) and Kr*(5p) states in xenon and krypton buffer gases. These results are relevant to kinetic models of both excimer lasers and the infrared xenon laser; and they are a significant improvement in the precision of the known radiative lifetimes. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  5. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of glycerol pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantozzi, F.; Frassoldati, A.; Bartocci, P.; Cinti, G.; Quagliarini, F.; Bidini, G.; Ranzi, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Glycerol pyrolysis can produce about 44–48%v hydrogen at 750–800 °C. • A simplified 452 reactions kinetic model of glycerol pyrolysis has been developed. • The model has good agreement with experimental data. • Non condensable gas yields can reach 70%. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of glycerol, a by-product of the biodiesel industry, is an important potential source of hydrogen. The obtained high calorific value gas can be used either as a fuel for combined heat and power (CHP) generation or as a transportation fuel (for example hydrogen to be used in fuel cells). Optimal process conditions can improve glycerol pyrolysis by increasing gas yield and hydrogen concentration. A detailed kinetic mechanism of glycerol pyrolysis, which involves 137 species and more than 4500 reactions, was drastically simplified and reduced to a new skeletal kinetic scheme of 44 species, involved in 452 reactions. An experimental campaign with a batch pyrolysis reactor was properly designed to further validate the original and the skeletal mechanisms. The comparisons between model predictions and experimental data strongly suggest the presence of a catalytic process promoting steam reforming of methane. High pyrolysis temperatures (750–800 °C) improve process performances and non-condensable gas yields of 70%w can be achieved. Hydrogen mole fraction in pyrolysis gas is about 44–48%v. The skeletal mechanism developed can be easily used in Computational Fluid Dynamic software, reducing the simulation time.

  6. Differences in kinetic variables between injured and noninjured novice runners : A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredeweg, Steef W.; Kluitenberg, Bas; Bessem, Bram; Buist, Ida

    Objectives: This prospective study examined differences in kinetic variables between injured and noninjured novice female and male runners and their potential contribution to RRIs. Design: A prospective cohort study. Methods: At baseline vertical ground reaction forces were assessed with an

  7. Combining Microbial Enzyme Kinetics Models with Light Use Efficiency Models to Predict CO2 and CH4 Ecosystem Exchange from Flooded and Drained Peatland Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Jenerette, D.; Knox, S. H.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    Under California's Cap-and-Trade program, companies are looking to invest in land-use practices that will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta is a drained cultivated peatland system and a large source of CO2. To slow soil subsidence and reduce CO2 emissions, there is growing interest in converting drained peatlands to wetlands. However, wetlands are large sources of CH4 that could offset CO2-based GHG reductions. The goal of our research is to provide accurate measurements and model predictions of the changes in GHG budgets that occur when drained peatlands are restored to wetland conditions. We have installed a network of eddy covariance towers across multiple land use types in the Delta and have been measuring CO2 and CH4 ecosystem exchange for multiple years. In order to upscale these measurements through space and time we are using these data to parameterize and validate a process-based biogeochemical model. To predict gross primary productivity (GPP), we are using a simple light use efficiency (LUE) model which requires estimates of light, leaf area index and air temperature and can explain 90% of the observed variation in GPP in a mature wetland. To predict ecosystem respiration we have adapted the Dual Arrhenius Michaelis-Menten (DAMM) model. The LUE-DAMM model allows accurate simulation of half-hourly net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in a mature wetland (r2=0.85). We are working to expand the model to pasture, rice and alfalfa systems in the Delta. To predict methanogenesis, we again apply a modified DAMM model, using simple enzyme kinetics. However CH4 exchange is complex and we have thus expanded the model to predict not only microbial CH4 production, but also CH4 oxidation, CH4 storage and the physical processes regulating the release of CH4 to the atmosphere. The CH4-DAMM model allows accurate simulation of daily CH4 ecosystem exchange in a mature wetland (r2=0.55) and robust estimates of annual CH4 budgets. The LUE

  8. Study of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase levels in tobacco chewers and smokers: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chundru Venkata Naga Sirisha

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The present study gave us an insight about the relationship between antioxidant enzyme activity, oxidative stress and tobacco. The altered antioxidant enzyme levels observed in this study will act as a predictor for pre potentially malignant lesions. Therefore an early intervention of tobacco habit and its related oxidative stress would prevent the development of tobacco induced lesions.

  9. Peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 2 from the fruitfly: dehydrogenase and hydratase act as separate entities, as revealed by structure and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haataja, Tatu J K; Koski, M Kristian; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Glumoff, Tuomo

    2011-05-01

    All of the peroxisomal β-oxidation pathways characterized thus far house at least one MFE (multifunctional enzyme) catalysing two out of four reactions of the spiral. MFE type 2 proteins from various species display great variation in domain composition and predicted substrate preference. The gene CG3415 encodes for Drosophila melanogaster MFE-2 (DmMFE-2), complements the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MFE-2 deletion strain, and the recombinant protein displays both MFE-2 enzymatic activities in vitro. The resolved crystal structure is the first one for a full-length MFE-2 revealing the assembly of domains, and the data can also be transferred to structure-function studies for other MFE-2 proteins. The structure explains the necessity of dimerization. The lack of substrate channelling is proposed based on both the structural features, as well as by the fact that hydration and dehydrogenation activities of MFE-2, if produced as separate enzymes, are equally efficient in catalysis as the full-length MFE-2.

  10. An in vitro assay to study the recruitment and substrate specificity of chromatin modifying enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Michiel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications of core histones play an important role in regulating fundamental biological processes such as DNA repair, transcription and replication. In this paper, we describe a novel assay that allows sequential targeting of distinct histone modifying enzymes to immobilized nucleosomal templates using recombinant chimeric targeting molecules. The assay can be used to study the histone substrate specificity of chromatin modifying enzymes as well as whether and how certain enzymes affect each other's histone modifying activities. As such the assay can help to understand how a certain histone code is established and interpreted.

  11. Integrative computational approach for genome-based study of microbial lipid-degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorapreeda, Tayvich; Thammarongtham, Chinae; Laoteng, Kobkul

    2016-07-01

    Lipid-degrading or lipolytic enzymes have gained enormous attention in academic and industrial sectors. Several efforts are underway to discover new lipase enzymes from a variety of microorganisms with particular catalytic properties to be used for extensive applications. In addition, various tools and strategies have been implemented to unravel the functional relevance of the versatile lipid-degrading enzymes for special purposes. This review highlights the study of microbial lipid-degrading enzymes through an integrative computational approach. The identification of putative lipase genes from microbial genomes and metagenomic libraries using homology-based mining is discussed, with an emphasis on sequence analysis of conserved motifs and enzyme topology. Molecular modelling of three-dimensional structure on the basis of sequence similarity is shown to be a potential approach for exploring the structural and functional relationships of candidate lipase enzymes. The perspectives on a discriminative framework of cutting-edge tools and technologies, including bioinformatics, computational biology, functional genomics and functional proteomics, intended to facilitate rapid progress in understanding lipolysis mechanism and to discover novel lipid-degrading enzymes of microorganisms are discussed.

  12. Kinetic study of UV-irradiated amorphous sulfur by EPR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Mkami, H.; Smith, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is used to investigate UV-irradiation damage in amorphous sulfur by examining post-irradiation kinetics as a function of UV-exposure time. The kinetic study is described by first-order concurrent reactions where the sulfur, as reactant, undergoes two parallel processes leading to the formation of two distinct defects called S 1 * and S 2 *. The temperature dependence of the EPR intensities of the signals, related to these defects, is used in the kinetic study

  13. Study of the stochastic point reactor kinetic equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Yorio

    1980-01-01

    Diagrammatic technique is used to solve the stochastic point reactor kinetic equation. The method gives exact results which are derived from Fokker-Plank theory. A Green's function dressed with the clouds of noise is defined, which is a transfer function of point reactor with fluctuating reactivity. An integral equation for the correlation function of neutron power is derived using the following assumptions: 1) Green's funntion should be dressed with noise, 2) The ladder type diagrams only contributes to the correlation function. For a white noise and the one delayed neutron group approximation, the norm of the integral equation and the variance to mean-squared ratio are analytically obtained. (author)

  14. Derivation of kinetic coefficients by atomistic methods for studying defect behavior in Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insepov, Z.; Rest, J.; Yacout, A.M.; Kuksin, A.Yu.; Norman, G.E.; Stegailov, V.V.; Starikov, S.V.; Yanilkin, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A multiscale concept couples molecular dynamics (MD) with ab initio and kinetic rate theory. ► Evolution of a system of self-interstitial atoms and vacancies in Mo is studied by MD. ► Formation of di-SIA clusters and SIA–vacancy recombination is analyzed. ► 1D diffusion of self-interstitials at various temperature and defect concentrations were studied. ► This paper provides a powerful predictive tool for simulating irradiation of nuclear materials. - Abstract: A multiscale concept for irradiated materials simulation is formulated based on coupling molecular dynamics simulations (MD) where the potential was obtained from ab initio data of energies of the basic defect structures, with kinetic mesoscale models. The evolution of a system containing self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and vacancies in crystalline molybdenum is investigated by means of MD. The kinetics of formation of di-SIA clusters and SIA–vacancy recombination is analyzed via approaches used in the kinetic theory of radiation ageing. The effects of 1D diffusion of SIAs, temperature, and defect concentrations on the reaction rates are also studied. This approach can validate both the kinetic mechanisms and the appropriate kinetic coefficients, offering the potential to significantly reduce the uncertainty of the kinetic methodology and providing a powerful predictive tool for simulating irradiation behavior of nuclear materials.

  15. Kinetic and mass transfer studies on the isomerization of cellulose hydrolyzate using immobilized Streptomyces cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, T K; Chand, S

    1978-01-01

    Streptomyces cells possessing glucose isomerase activity, heat-treated and confined within polyester sacs have been used in batch/continuous isomerization of enzymatically hydrolyzed microcrystalline cellulose. Conversion data at different concentrations of substrate closely follow the reactor performance equation based on the reaction kinetics. The effect of external film and pore diffusional resistances were experimentally found to be negligible. The dispersion effects in the packed bed column have been evaluated by pulse input tracer analysis. Continuous operation of the column to isomerize cellulose hydrolyzate (2.0 M glucose) showed an exponential deactivation of enzyme activity with a half-life of 447 h.

  16. Kinetics of Enzymatic High-Solid Hydrolysis of Lignocellulosic Biomass Studied by Calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Søren Nymand; Rasmussen, Erik Lumby; McFarland, K.C.

    2011-01-01

    analysis of the interrelationships of enzyme load and the rate, time, and extent of the reaction. The results suggest that the hydrolysis rate of pretreated corn stover is limited initially by available attack points on the substrate surface (conversion) but becomes proportional to enzyme dosage......Enzymatic hydrolysis of high-solid biomass (>10% w/w dry mass) has become increasingly important as a key step in the production of second-generation bioethanol. To this end, development of quantitative real-time assays is desirable both for empirical optimization and for detailed kinetic analysis...... rate with a detection limit of about 500 pmol glucose s−1. Hence, calorimetry is shown to be a highly sensitive real-time method, applicable for high solids, and independent on the complexity of the substrate. Dose–response experiments with a typical cellulase cocktail enabled a multidimensional...

  17. A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Zhu

    2006-08-31

    Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. One strategy that potentially enhances CO{sub 2} solubility and reduces the risk of CO{sub 2} leak back to the surface is dissolution of indigenous minerals in the geological formation and precipitation of secondary carbonate phases, which increases the brine pH and immobilizes CO{sub 2}. Clearly, the rates at which these dissolution and precipitation reactions occur directly determine the efficiency of this strategy. However, one of the fundamental problems in modern geochemistry is the persistent two to five orders of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory measured and field derived feldspar dissolution rates. To date, there is no real guidance as to how to predict silicate reaction rates for use in quantitative models. Current models for assessment of geological carbon sequestration have generally opted to use laboratory rates, in spite of the dearth of such data for compositionally complex systems, and the persistent disconnect between laboratory and field applications. Therefore, a firm scientific basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO2 injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation to measure silicate dissolution rates and iron carbonate precipitation rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In the second year of the project, we completed CO{sub 2}-Navajo sandstone interaction batch and flow-through experiments and a Navajo sandstone dissolution experiment without the presence of CO{sub 2} at 200 C and 250-300 bars, and initiated dawsonite dissolution and solubility experiments. We also performed additional 5-day experiments at the

  18. Experimental and Chemical Kinetic Modeling Study of Dimethylcyclohexane Oxidation and Pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Eldeeb, Mazen A.; Jouzdani, Shirin; Wang, Zhandong; Sarathy, Mani; Akih-Kumgeh, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    A combined experimental and chemical kinetic modeling study of the high-temperature ignition and pyrolysis of 1,3-dimethylcyclohexane (13DMCH) is presented. Ignition delay times are measured behind reflected shock waves over a temperature range

  19. Stable isotope studies of nicotine kinetics and bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benowitz, N.L.; Jacob, P. III; Denaro, C.; Jenkins, R.

    1991-01-01

    The stable isotope-labeled compound 3',3'-dideuteronicotine was used to investigate the disposition kinetics of nicotine in smokers, the systemic absorption of nicotine from cigarette smoke, and the bioavailability of nicotine ingested as oral capsules. Blood levels of labeled nicotine could be measured for 9 hours after a 30-minute intravenous infusion. Analysis of disposition kinetics in 10 healthy men revealed a multiexponential decline after the end of an infusion, with an elimination half-life averaging 203 minutes. This half-life was longer than that previously reported, indicating the presence of a shallow elimination phase. Plasma clearance averaged 14.6 ml/min/kg. The average intake of nicotine per cigarette was 2.29 mg. A cigarette smoke-monitoring system that directly measured particulate matter in smoke was evaluated in these subjects. Total particulate matter, number of puffs on the cigarette, total puff volume, and time of puffing correlated with the intake of nicotine from smoking. The oral bioavailability of nicotine averaged 44%. This bioavailability is higher than expected based on the systemic clearance of nicotine and suggests that there may be significant extrahepatic metabolism of nicotine

  20. Kinetic study of oil extraction from olive foot cake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamrous, O.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oil extraction from olive foot cake can be explained by a model based on two stages. The first step corresponds to a simple washing of the oil from the particle surface. In the second step, the extraction is controlled by two mechanisms: slow diffusion from broken cells and very slow diffusion from intact cells.The kinetic coefficients of this mathematical model are calculated using the experimental results obtained from hexane and commercial ethyl alcohol for different particle sizes.La cinética de extracción de aceite de orujo puede ser explicada por un modelo basado en dos etapas. La primera etapa corresponde a un simple lavado del aceite de la superficie de las partículas. En la segunda etapa, la extracción esta controlada por dos mecanismos: difusión lenta desde las células rotas y difusión muy lenta desde las células intactas.Los coeficientes cinéticas de este modelo matemático se calculan usando los resultados experimentales obtenidos con hexano y alcohol etílico comercial para diferentes tamaños de partícula.

  1. Computational studies of radiation and oxidative damage to DNA and its recognition by repair enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, M. [Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is used to study the time evolution of the recognition processes and to construct a model of the specific DNA-repair enzyme' complexes. MD simulations of the following molecules were performed: DNA dodecamer with thymine dimer (TD), DNA 30-mer with thymine glycol (TG), and respective specific repair enzymes T4 Endonuclease V and Endonuclease III. Both DNA lesions are experimentally suggested to be mutagenic and carcinogenic unless properly recognized and repaired by repair enzymes. In the case of TD, there is detected a strong kink around the TD site, that is not observed in native DNA. In addition there is observed a different value of electrostatic energy at the TD site - negative '-9 kcal/mol', in contrast to the nearly neutral value of the native thymine site. These two factors - structural changes and specific electrostatic energy - seem to be important for proper recognition of a TD damaged site and for formation of DNA-enzyme complex. Formation of this complex is the onset of the repair of DNA. In the case of TG damaged DNA the structural characteristics of the TG were calculated (charges, bond lengths, bond angles, etc.). The formed TG was used to replace the native thymine and then submitted to the simulation in the system with a repair enzyme with Endonuclease III for the purpose of the study of the formation of the DNA-enzyme complex. (author)

  2. Advances in enzyme bioelectrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRESSA R. PEREIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bioelectrochemistry can be defined as a branch of Chemical Science concerned with electron-proton transfer and transport involving biomolecules, as well as electrode reactions of redox enzymes. The bioelectrochemical reactions and system have direct impact in biotechnological development, in medical devices designing, in the behavior of DNA-protein complexes, in green-energy and bioenergy concepts, and make it possible an understanding of metabolism of all living organisms (e.g. humans where biomolecules are integral to health and proper functioning. In the last years, many researchers have dedicated itself to study different redox enzymes by using electrochemistry, aiming to understand their mechanisms and to develop promising bioanodes and biocathodes for biofuel cells as well as to develop biosensors and implantable bioelectronics devices. Inside this scope, this review try to introduce and contemplate some relevant topics for enzyme bioelectrochemistry, such as the immobilization of the enzymes at electrode surfaces, the electron transfer, the bioelectrocatalysis, and new techniques conjugated with electrochemistry vising understand the kinetics and thermodynamics of redox proteins. Furthermore, examples of recent approaches in designing biosensors and biofuel developed are presented.

  3. Kinetic analysis and chemical modification studies of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase from yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NaPRTase) from Baker's yeast catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate from phosphoribosyl α-1-pyrophosphate and nicotinate, concomitant with ATP hydrolysis. Using purified NaPRTase, initial velocity measurements were performed varying one substrate concentration at different fixed levels of the second substrate and maintaining the third substrate constant. Subsequently, an exchange of label was observed between ATP and [ 14 C]-ADP. This rate of exchange was inhibited by PRibPP and pyrophosphate. Incubations of NaPRTase with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate followed by sodium borohydride reduction led to inactivation of the enzyme. Pyridoxal was a less effective inhibitor than pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The inactivation of the enzyme by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was reversible upon flow dialysis, whereas reduction of the enzyme-pyridoxal complex with sodium borohydride rendered the inhibition irreversible. The presence of ATP or PRibPP, with or with Mg 2+ , provided protection against this inactivation, while a kinetic analysis revealed the inhibition to be competitive, and noncompetitive, respectively. One mole of [ 3 H]-pyridoxal phosphate was required to completely inactivate the enzyme, which was reduced in the presence of MgATP and MgPRibPP to 0.2 and 0.6, respectively. No incorporation of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was observed in the combination of both of the two substrates

  4. Study on the inactivation of intracellular enzyme molecules by X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.B.

    1977-01-01

    Inactivation of the glutamic acid dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme molecules in the Ehrlich ascites tumor cells of the mouse were studied. The above mentioned intracellular enzyme molecules were irradiated by the X-ray radiation under the condition of 65 kV, 1 Amp under the atmosphere of nitrogen gases and by 4 0 C. Thereby, irradiation doses were 580 KR/min(error: +-3%). After irradiation, the cell homogentes were prepared through liquid air techniques. There after, the activities of the enzymes were measured with photometric method given by O. Warburg and W. Christian. The dose effect curves of the activities of the two enzymes by the X-ray irradiation showed both exponential and the inactivation doses were 6.5x10 6 and 5.0x10 6 R respectively. These results showed one side that the inactivation process of the intracellular enzyme molecules was one hit reaction after target theory, and the other side that this inactivation process could not be the primary causes of the death through X-ray irradiation of the vertebrate animals, because of the high resistance of the intracellular protein molecules against X-ray irradiation. The one hit reaction by the inactivation process of the irradiated intracellular enzyme molecules was discussed. (author)

  5. Evaluating correlation between serum liver enzymes and toxocariasis: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Miladi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of toxocariasis in individuals with the normal and abnormal level of liver enzymes. Methods: In this case-control study, the serum samples were collected in the individuals referred to diagnostic laboratories of Arak in Iran. A total of 144 sera with abnormal level of liver enzymes were selected as cases and the same numbers of sera with the normal level of liver enzymes also were selected as controls. The sera were examined for anti-Toxocara IgG. Results: Twelve (4.2% sera contained anti-Toxocara antibody and all of them were in the case group. Although the mean of all liver enzymes was significantly different in the two groups (P < 0.05, statistical test showed no relationship between the level of liver enzymes and toxocariasis. Conclusions: It was concluded that the liver enzyme alteration is not the valid indicator for predicting toxocariasis. Because the kind of liver dysfunction, that is caused by the larvae of Toxocara, is unspecified, and it seems factors such as the number of larvae can play a basic role for the emergence of alterations.

  6. Ignition characteristics of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran: An experimental and kinetic study

    KAUST Repository

    Tripathi, Rupali

    2016-10-15

    The present paper elucidates oxidation behavior of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF), a novel second-generation biofuel. New experimental data sets for 2-MTHF including ignition delay time measurements in two different combustion reactors, i.e. rapid compression machine and high-pressure shock tube, are presented. Measurements for 2-MTHF/oxidizer/diluent mixtures were performed in the temperature range of . 639-1413 K, at pressures of 10, 20, and 40 bar, and at three different equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. A detailed chemical kinetic model describing both low-and high-temperature chemistry of 2-MTHF was developed and validated against new ignition delay measurements and already existing flame species profiles and ignition delay measurements. The mechanism provides satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. For identifying key reactions at various combustion conditions and to attain a better understanding of the combustion behavior, reaction path and sensitivity analyses were performed.

  7. Determination of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase (GAD65 in Pancreatic Islets and Its In Vitro and In Vivo Degradation Kinetics in Serum Using a Highly Sensitive Enzyme Immunoassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schlosser

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamic acid decarboxylase GAD65 autoantibodies (GADA are an established marker for autoimmune diabetes. Recently, the autoantigen GAD65 itself was proposed as biomarker of beta-cell loss for prediction of autoimmune diabetes and graft rejection after islet transplantation. Therefore, the GAD65 content in pancreatic islets of different species and its serum degradation kinetics were examined in this study using a sensitive immunoassay. GAD65 was found in quantities of 78 (human, 43.7 (LEW.1A rat and 37.4 (BB/OK rat ng per 1,000 islets, respectively, but not in mouse islets. The in vitro half-life of porcine GAD65 and human recombinant GAD65 ranged from 1.27 to 2.35 hours at 37°C in human serum, plasma and blood, and was unaffected by presence of GAD65 autoantibodies. After injecting 2,000 ng recombinant human GAD65 into LEW.1A rats, the in vivo half-life was 2.77 hours. GAD65 was undetectable after 24 hours in these animals, and for up to 48 hours following diabetes induction by streptozotocin in LEW.1A rats. Estimated from these data, at least 13 islets in rat and 1,875 in human must be simultaneously destroyed to detect GAD65 in circulation. These results should be taken into consideration in further studies aimed at examining the diagnostic relevance of GAD65.

  8. Kinetic study of formation of sodalite from a kaolin waste of Jari river - PA, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, L.N. da; Paz, S.P.A. da; Angelica, R.S.; Neves, R.F.

    2011-01-01

    Zeolites are materials with a wide industrial application, which has motivated the development of a large number of scientific papers on this topic. This work presents a kinetic study of the formation process of sodalite produced from the reaction of the kaolin waste in the presence of sodium hydroxide solution (5M) performed at temperatures of 80, 100, 120 and 150 ° C. The process was conducted in batch, static, and autoclaves lined with Teflon, and monitoring the kinetics was performed by ex situ XRD analysis of the materials obtained in the time interval from 2 to 24 hours. The kinetic model that best describes this transformation is zero-order homogeneous reaction. Finally, we conclude that the technique of X-ray diffraction is a powerful tool to study the kinetics of phase transformation ex situ. (author)

  9. Structure–kinetic relationship study of CDK8/CycC specific compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Elisabeth V.; Böttcher, Jark; Huber, Robert; Maskos, Klaus; Neumann, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In contrast with the very well explored concept of structure–activity relationship, similar studies are missing for the dependency between binding kinetics and compound structure of a protein ligand complex, the structure–kinetic relationship. Here, we present a structure–kinetic relationship study of the cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8)/cyclin C (CycC) complex. The scaffold moiety of the compounds is anchored in the kinase deep pocket and extended with diverse functional groups toward the hinge region and the front pocket. These variations can cause the compounds to change from fast to slow binding kinetics, resulting in an improved residence time. The flip of the DFG motif (“DMG” in CDK8) to the inactive DFG-out conformation appears to have relatively little influence on the velocity of binding. Hydrogen bonding with the kinase hinge region contributes to the residence time but has less impact than hydrophobic complementarities within the kinase front pocket. PMID:23630251

  10. Study on Protease Enzyme Produced by Pathogenic Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Elhakim, E.E.

    2014-01-01

    A total of 110 surface swabs were taken from skin of burned and post burn wounded patients. Infected swabs from burned patients were found to be 62.8% and 63.6%,while post burn wounded patients were 66.7% and 69.2% in male and female patients, respectively. The burned and post burn wounded patients were infected with bacteria in the order of gram negative bacilli >gram positive cocci>gram positive bacilli .Pseudomonas aeruginosa,Proteus mirabilis,Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus showed the highest proteolytic activity. The effect of cultivation condition,different media, incubation time, incubation temperature, ph, metal ions, inhibitors and different doses of gamma radiation on the proteolytic activity of the tested bacterial isolates showing the highest proteolytic activity were studied. The tested bacterial isolates showed susceptibility to some antibiotics and showed resistance to the others. The effects of gamma radiation on the tested bacteria and on the susceptibility of the tested bacteria isolates to antibiotics under test were studied.

  11. Structural and Kinetic Studies of Novel Cytochrome P450 Small-Alkane Hydroxylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-02-27

    The goals of this project are to investigate (1) the kinetics and stabilities of engineered cytochrome P450 (P450) small alkane hydroxylases and their evolutionary intermediates, (2) the structural basis for catalytic proficiency on small alkanes of these engineered P450s, and (3) the changes in redox control resulting from protein engineering. To reach these goals, we have established new methods for determining the kinetics and stabilities of multicomponent P450s such as CYP153A6. Using these, we were able to determine that CYP153A6 is proficient for hydroxylation of alkanes as small as ethane, an activity that has never been observed previously in any natural P450. To elucidate the structures of the engineered P450s, we obtained x-ray diffraction data for two variants in the P450PMO (propane monooxygenase) lineage and a preliminary structure for the most evolved variant. This structure shows changes in the substrate binding regions of the enzyme and a reduction in active site volume that are consistent with the observed changes in substrate specificity from fatty acids in the native enzyme to small alkanes in P450PMO. We also constructed semi-rational designed libraries mutating only residues in the enzyme active site that in one round of mutagenesis and screening produced variants that achieved nearly half of the activity of the most evolved enzymes of the P450PMO lineage. Finally, we found that changes in redox properties of the laboratory-evolved P450 alkane hydroxylases did not reflect the improvement in their electron transfer efficiency. The heme redox potential remained constant throughout evolution, while activity increased and coupling efficiency improved from 10% to 90%. The lack of correlation between heme redox potential and enzyme activity and coupling efficiency led us to search for other enzyme properties that could be better predictors for activity towards small alkanes, specifically methane. We investigated the oxidation potential of the radical

  12. Study of kinetics and mechanism of diazo compound reactions using nuclear chemical polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gragerov, I.P.; Levit, A.F.; Kiprianova, L.A.; Buchachenko, A.L.; Sterleva, T.G.

    1975-01-01

    It has been established that at the rate-determining steps of the radical reactions in which aniline interacts with isoamyl nitrite and substituted diazo salts interact with sodium methylate, tertiary fatty amines, or phosphinic acid, no transfer of a single electron occurs. The processes of single electron transfer do not seem to play a decisive role in the kinetics of most transformations of diazo compounds. Chemical nuclear polarization is shown to be suitable for kinetic studies of fast radical processes

  13. Gravimetric and conductometric studies of the sedimentation kinetics in aqueous dispersions of kaoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulavyin, L.A.; Khrapatij, S.V.; Koval'chuk, V.Yi.; Klepko, V.V.; Lebovka, M.Yi.

    2006-01-01

    Using gravimetric and conductometric methods, the sedimentation kinetics in aqueous suspensions of Alekseev kaoline has been studied for pH value range from 4 to 10. It has been found that pH increasing leads to the decreasing of mean radii of flocks linearly. We found that sedimentation kinetics for intermediate pH values can be described by scaling equations that crossover time defined transition from a gravitational mechanism of deposition to the diffusion one

  14. A study of sodium oxide crystallization mechanisms and kinetics in cold traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latge, C.

    1984-04-01

    After showing up the present lack of data on crystallization mechanisms and kinetics, a number of tests were conducted on a sodium test loop equipped with two experimental cold traps. The effects of several geometric and thermohydraulic parameters on purification efficiency were also studied. The test results were used to develop a simulation model. An optimization code based on the model can be used to determine the nucleation and growth kinetics

  15. Ceramic membrane microfilter as an immobilized enzyme reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, T J; Gainer, J L; Kirwan, D J

    1992-10-01

    This study investigated the use of a ceramic microfilter as an immobilized enzyme reactor. In this type of reactor, the substrate solution permeates the ceramic membrane and reacts with an enzyme that has been immobilized within its porous interior. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of permeation rate on the observed kinetic parameters for the immobilized enzyme in order to assess possible mass transfer influences or shear effects. Kinetic parameters were found to be independent of flow rate for immobilized penicillinase and lactate dehydrogenase. Therefore, neither mass transfer nor shear effects were observed for enzymes immobilized within the ceramic membrane. Both the residence time and the conversion in the microfilter reactor could be controlled simply by regulating the transmembrane pressure drop. This study suggests that a ceramic microfilter reactor can be a desirable alternative to a packed bed of porous particles, especially when an immobilized enzyme has high activity and a low Michaelis constant.

  16. Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetic study of formation of lithium titanate by solid state route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonak, Sagar; Jain, Uttam; Sahu, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Krishnamurthy, Nagaiyar

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of formation of lithium titanate from the solid state reaction of lithium carbonate and titanium oxide was studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetric technique. Thermogravimetric data for the reaction of lithium carbonate and titanium oxide was obtained at various heating rates. The methods such as Flynn–Wall–Ozawa and Kissinger–Akahira–Sunose were used to estimate the kinetic parameters from the obtained thermogravimetric data. The average activation energy for the formation of lithium titanate by solid state route was found to be 243 kJ/mol K. The reaction mechanism was determined by the method given by Malek. It was found that the three dimensional diffusion model best describes the reaction kinetics. A kinetic equation describing the reaction is proposed and reaction mechanism is discussed

  17. Kinetic Study on the Esterification of Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD) Using Heterogeneous Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofiqah, U.; Djalal, R. A.; Sutrisno, B.; Hidayat, A.

    2018-05-01

    Esterification with heterogeneous catalysts is believed to have advantages compared to homogeneous catalysts. Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD) was esterified by ZrO2 -SO4 2-/natural zeolite at temperature variation of 55°C, 60°C, and 65°C to produce biodiesel. Determination of reaction kinetics was done by experiment and modeling. Kinetic study was approached using pseudo-homogeneous model of first order. For experiment, reaction kinetics were 0.0031 s-1, 0.0054 s-1, and 0.00937 s-1 for a temperature of 55 °C, 60 °C and 65 °C, respectively. For modelling, reaction kinetics were 0.0030 s-1, 0.0055 s-1, and 0.0090 s-1 for a temperature of 55°C, 60°C and 65°C, respectively. Rate and conversion of reaction are getting increased by increasing temperature.

  18. Heparin kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swart, C.A.M. de.

    1983-01-01

    The author has studied the kinetics of heparin and heparin fractions after intravenous administration in humans and in this thesis the results of this study are reported. Basic knowledge about the physico-chemical properties of heparin and its interactions with proteins resulting in anticoagulant and lipolytic effects are discussed in a review (chapter II), which also comprises some clinical aspects of heparin therapy. In chapter III the kinetics of the anticoagulant effect are described after intravenous administration of five commercial heparin preparations. A mathematical model is presented that fits best to these kinetics. The kinetics of the anticoagulant and lipolytic effects after intravenous injection of various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions and their relationship with the disappearance of the radiolabel are described in chapter IV. Chapter V gives a description of the kinetics of two radiolabels after injection of in vitro formed complexes consisting of purified, 125 I-radiolabelled antithrombin III and various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions. (Auth.)

  19. The Effect of D-(−-arabinose on Tyrosinase: An Integrated Study Using Computational Simulation and Inhibition Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Jian Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase is a ubiquitous enzyme with diverse physiologic roles related to pigment production. Tyrosinase inhibition has been well studied for cosmetic, medicinal, and agricultural purposes. We simulated the docking of tyrosinase and D-(−-arabinose and found a binding energy of −4.5 kcal/mol for theup-formof D-(−-arabinose and −4.4 kcal/mol for thedown-form of D-(−-arabinose. The results of molecular dynamics simulation suggested that D-(−-arabinose interacts mostly with HIS85, HIS259, and HIS263, which are believed to be in the active site. Our kinetic study showed that D-(−-arabinose is a reversible, mixed-type inhibitor of tyrosinase (α-value =6.11±0.98, Ki=0.21±0.19 M. Measurements of intrinsic fluorescence showed that D-(−-arabinose induced obvious tertiary changes to tyrosinase (binding constant K=1.58±0.02 M−1, binding number n=1.49±0.06. This strategy of predicting tyrosinase inhibition based on specific interactions of aldehyde and hydroxyl groups with the enzyme may prove useful for screening potential tyrosinase inhibitors.

  20. Studies of the kinetics of radiation induced spurs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.J.B.

    1982-12-01

    This thesis addresses two major unresolved problems of diffusion-controlled reaction kinetics: diffusion and reaction in a system containing a small number of particles and the geminate recombination of ions. The few particle system is approached from the assumption that all pair distances evolve independently. From this assumption a Master equation is set up with which the discrete nature of the reaction process in removing particles in pairs is described. The independent pairs assumption gives an expression for the time-dependent rate of transition between states of the process. The model is compared with direct Monte Carlo simulations of the diffusion-reaction process for systems where the initial distribution of particles is Gaussian. Several gross effects are accounted for quantitatively. Minor discrepancies are resolved by further comparison with a Monte Carlo formulation of the independent pairs model which accounts for all initial correlations. Several extensions of the model are discussed, in particular the extensions to systems of charged particles and scavenging reactions. In order to make the extension to account for Coulomb forces, the recombination of a geminate charged pair must be analysed. The analysis is made in terms of the mathematical theory of diffusion. (author)

  1. Study on the numerical analysis of nuclear reactor kinetics equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    A two-step alternating direction explict method is proposed for the solution of the space-and time-dependent diffusion theory reactor kinetics equations in two space dimensions as a special case of the general class of alternating direction implicit method and the truncation error of this method is estimated. To test the validity of this method it is applied to the Pressurized Water Reactor and CANDU-PHW reactor which have been operating and underconstructing in Korea. The time dependent neutron flux of the PWR reactor during control rod insertion and time dependent neutronic power of CANDU-PHW reactor in the case of postulated loss of coolant accident are obtained from the numerical calculation results. The results of the PWR reactor problem are shown the close agreement between implicit-difference method used in the TWIGL program and this method, and the results of the CANDU-PHW reactor are compared with the results of improved quasistic method and modal method. (Author)

  2. Palmito de pupunha (Bactris gasipaes Kunth. composição mineral e cinética de enzimas oxidativas Heart of palm (Bactris gasipaes Kunth.: mineral composition and kinetics of oxidative enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Ottoboni Galdino

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A análise da presença de enzimas oxidativas como a peroxidase (POD e a polifenoloxidase (PPO e o controle da atividade destas enzimas são importantes na preservação e no processamento de alimentos. Este trabalho teve por objetivo determinar a atividade enzimática da polifenoloxidase (PPO e da peroxidase (POD do palmito de pupunha, bem como avaliar o comportamento destas enzimas frente ao tratamento térmico e assim calcular a cinética de inativação térmica das mesmas para suas porções termorresistente e termolábil. Para a extração de peroxidase (POD e polifenoloxidase (PPO de palmito, utilizou-se solução tampão fosfato de sódio 100 mM com diferentes pHs (5,5; 6,0; 6,5 e 7,0. O melhor pH de extração da POD foi 5,5 e da PPO, 6,5. Estes extratos foram tratados em diferentes temperaturas (65, 70, 75 e 80 °C por períodos de 1 a 10 minutos. A POD e a PPO sofreram um decréscimo de 70 e 80%, respectivamente, em relação às suas atividades iniciais. As energias de ativação, nas temperaturas estudadas, para a porção termolábil e termorresistente da peroxidase foram 154,0 e 153,0 kJ.mol-1, respectivamente, enquanto que para a polifenoloxidase foram 26,3 e 27,0 kJ.mol-1, respectivamente. Resultados apresentaram valores que estão dentro da faixa de energia de ativação reportada para o processo de inativação térmica de enzimas.Analysis of oxidative enzymes such as peroxidase (POD and polyphenoloxidase (PPO and the control of the activity of these enzymes are important in food preservation and also in food processing. The aim of this work was to determine polyphenoloxidase (PPO and peroxidase (POD enzymatic activity in heart of palm, as well as to evaluate enzyme behavior during thermal treatment, determining the kinetics of thermal inactivation of the heat resistant and heat labile portions. For the extraction of peroxidase (POD and polyphenoloxidase (PPO from the heart of palm solution, 100 mM sodium phosphate buffer with

  3. Preliminary study on isolation and quality analysis of enzymes from fermented oil palm empty fruit bunch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mat Rasol Awang; Tamikazu Kume; Shinpei Matsuhashi

    1998-01-01

    Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) is a cellulosic waste, consisting of 40 - 60 % cellulose with the remaining components comprised of hemicellulose, lignin and other materials. Cellulase is a complex of enzymes containing chiefly endo and exo glucanase, as well as cellobiase plus others (Mandel et al, 1976). Studies on cellulase production from Trichodermaa viride have been reported. The enzyme system from this fungi is considered to be a complete composition of cellulase; and it was reported to be able to hydrolyse slowly a more resistant or crystalline portion of cellulose. Previous work showed Pleorotus sajor-caju and Coprinus cinereus can be easily grown on EFB. The quality of this enzyme system was characterized based on its degradation activity on filter paper, salicin and xylan into simple sugars. These activity tests would revealed the ability of cellulase enzyme system to break down insoluble cellulose, and hydrolysing salicin such as cellobiose and xylanase for breaking down hemicellulose. In this study, the enzyme system derived from liquid state fermentation by these fungi utilizing EFB as carbon source was investigated

  4. Study of thermal and chemical effects on cellulase enzymes: Viscosity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaouar, N.; Aschi, A.; Belbahri, L.; Trabelsi, S.; Gharbi, A.

    2009-01-01

    The behaviour of cellulase enzymes in phosphate saline buffer has been studied over a wide range of temperatures and enzyme concentrations by using viscosity measurements. To characterize the conformation change of cellulase versus temperature and chemical denaturants, such as guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) and urea, the information about the intrinsic viscosity and the hydrodynamic radius are necessary. The dependence of the intrinsic viscosity and the hydrodynamic radius in its random coil conformation on temperature and denaturant concentration were studied. Our results and discussions are limited to the dilute regime of concentration because of abnormalities in conformation observed in the very dilute regime due to the presence of capillary absorption effects.

  5. Study of thermal and chemical effects on cellulase enzymes: Viscosity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaouar, N., E-mail: naoufel-ghaouar@lycos.co [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Molle, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 (Tunisia); Institut National des Sciences Appliquees et de Technologie, INSAT, Centre Urbain Nord, BP. 676, Tunis (Tunisia); Aschi, A. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Molle, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 (Tunisia); Belbahri, L. [Agronomy Department, School of Engineering of Lullier, University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, 150, Route de Presinge, 1254 Jussy (Switzerland); Trabelsi, S.; Gharbi, A. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Molle, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 (Tunisia)

    2009-11-15

    The behaviour of cellulase enzymes in phosphate saline buffer has been studied over a wide range of temperatures and enzyme concentrations by using viscosity measurements. To characterize the conformation change of cellulase versus temperature and chemical denaturants, such as guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) and urea, the information about the intrinsic viscosity and the hydrodynamic radius are necessary. The dependence of the intrinsic viscosity and the hydrodynamic radius in its random coil conformation on temperature and denaturant concentration were studied. Our results and discussions are limited to the dilute regime of concentration because of abnormalities in conformation observed in the very dilute regime due to the presence of capillary absorption effects.

  6. Kinetic study of the interaction of glutathione with four antitumor disulfides: possible mechanism for cellular glutathione depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, D L

    1989-01-01

    The reactions between the cellular tripeptide, glutathione (GSH) and four disulfide derivatives of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and 6-thioguanine (6-TG) (compounds 1-4) were studied kinetically. The decyl and phenyl derivatives of 6-MP and 6-TG were reacted with GSH in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4 or 6.0) at 25.0 degrees C and were monitored spectrophotometrically by observing the release of 6-MP and 6-TG. Second order kinetics were observed, with rate constants of 142, 564, 4174 and 429 M-1 s-1 being measured for compounds 1-4, respectively. When the reactions were carried out in the presence of GSH-S-transferase the rates were enhanced 1.3-5.4 times those observed in the absence of enzyme. Products of the reactions were isolated by chromatography and tentatively identified by TLC or fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. It was observed that GSH reacted with each disulfide in a 1:1 manner, forming a mixed disulfide between GSH and decanethiol or thiophenol while releasing 6-MP or 6-TG. It was concluded that the reported depletion of GSH from EMT6 cells after exposure to these disulfides could be due to their reaction with GSH, and the formation of the mixed disulfides.

  7. An operando FTIR spectroscopic and kinetic study of carbon monoxide pressure influence on rhodium-catalyzed olefin hydroformylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Christoph; Sawall, Mathias; Block, Axel; Neymeyr, Klaus; Ludwig, Ralf; Börner, Armin; Selent, Detlef

    2014-09-08

    The influence of carbon monoxide concentration on the kinetics of the hydroformylation of 3,3-dimethyl-1-butene with a phosphite-modified rhodium catalyst has been studied for the pressure range p(CO)=0.20-3.83 MPa. Highly resolved time-dependent concentration profiles of the organometallic intermediates were derived from IR spectroscopic data collected in situ for the entire olefin-conversion range. The dynamics of the catalyst and organic components are described by enzyme-type kinetics with competitive and uncompetitive inhibition reactions involving carbon monoxide taken into account. Saturation of the alkyl-rhodium intermediates with carbon monoxide as a cosubstrate occurs between 1.5 and 2 MPa of carbon monoxide pressure, which brings about a convergence of aldehyde regioselectivity. Hydrogenolysis of the acyl intermediate is fast at 30 °C and low pressure of p(CO)=0.2 MPa, but is of minus first order with respect to the solution concentration of carbon monoxide. Resting 18-electron hydrido and acyl complexes that correspond to early and late rate-determining states, respectively, coexist as long as the conversion of the substrate is not complete. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of a novel acid protease from Aspergillus foetidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Paula Monteiro; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes Ferreira; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira; Junior, Adalberto Pessoa; Converti, Attilio; Perego, Patrizia

    2015-11-01

    The kinetics of a thermostable extracellular acid protease produced by an Aspergillus foetidus strain was investigated at different pH, temperatures and substrate concentrations. The enzyme exhibited maximal activity at pH 5.0 and 55°C, and its irreversible deactivation was well described by first-order kinetics. When temperature was raised from 55 to 70°C, the deactivation rate constant increased from 0.018 to 5.06h(-1), while the half-life decreased from 37.6 to 0.13h. The results of activity collected at different temperatures were then used to estimate, the activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction (E*=19.03kJ/mol) and the standard enthalpy variation of reversible enzyme unfolding (ΔH°U=19.03kJ/mol). The results of residual activity tests carried out in the temperature range 55-70°C allowed estimating the activation energy (E(*)d=314.12kJ/mol), enthalpy (311.27≤(ΔH°d≤311.39kJ/mol), entropy (599.59≤ΔS(*)d≤610.49kJ/mol K) and Gibbs free energy (103.18≤ΔG(*)d≤113.87kJ/mol) of the enzyme irreversible denaturation. These thermodynamic parameters suggest that this new protease is highly thermostable and could be important for industrial applications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on thermodynamic parameters of an acid protease produced by A. foetidus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pyrolysis of Waste Castor Seed Cake: A Thermo-Kinetics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi Muhammad Sokoto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomass pyrolysis is a thermo-chemical conversion process that is of both industrial and ecological importance. The efficient chemical transformation of waste biomass to numerous products via pyrolysis reactions depends on process kinetic rates; hence the need for kinetic models to best design and operate the pyrolysis. Also, for an efficient design of an environmentally sustainable pyrolysis process of a specific lignocellulosic waste, a proper understanding of its thermo-kinetic behavior is imperative. Thus, pyrolysis kinetics of castor seed de-oiled cake (Ricinus communis using thermogravimetric technique was studied. The decomposition of the cake was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere with a flow rate of 100mL min-1 from ambient temperature to 900 °C. The results of the thermal profile showed moisture removal and devolatilization stages, and maximum decomposition of the cake occurred at a temperature of 200-400 °C. The kinetic parameters such as apparent activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and order of reaction were determined using Friedman (FD, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS, and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO kinetic models. The average apparent activation energy values of 124.61, 126.95 and 129.80 kJmol-1 were calculated from the slopes of the respective models. The apparent activation energy values obtained depends on conversion, which is an evidence of multi-step kinetic process during the pyrolytic decomposition of the cake. The kinetic data would be of immense benefit to model, design and develop a suitable thermo-chemical system for the conversion of waste de-oil cake to energy carrier.

  10. Kinetic studies on the reaction between dicyanocobinamide and hypochlorous acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiman Maitra

    Full Text Available Hypochlorous acid (HOCl is a potent oxidant generated by myeloperoxidase (MPO, which is an abundant enzyme used for defense against microbes. We examined the potential role of HOCl in corrin ring destruction and subsequent formation of cyanogen chloride (CNCl from dicyanocobinamide ((CN2-Cbi. Stopped-flow analysis revealed that the reaction consists of at least three observable steps, including at least two sequential transient intermediates prior to corrin ring destruction. The first two steps were attributed to sequential replacement of the two cyanide ligands with hypochlorite, while the third step was the destruction of the corrin ring. The formation of (OCl(CN-Cbi and its conversion to (OCl2-Cbi was fitted to a first order rate equation with second order rate constants of 0.002 and 0.0002 µM(-1 s(-1, respectively. The significantly lower rate of the second step compared to the first suggests that the replacement of the first cyanide molecule by hypochlorite causes an alteration in the ligand trans effects changing the affinity and/or accessibility of Co toward hypochlorite. Plots of the apparent rate constants as a function of HOCl concentration for all the three steps were linear with Y-intercepts close to zero, indicating that HOCl binds in an irreversible one-step mechanism. Collectively, these results illustrate functional differences in the corrin ring environments toward binding of diatomic ligands.

  11. Experimental and Chemical Kinetic Modeling Study of Dimethylcyclohexane Oxidation and Pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Eldeeb, Mazen A.

    2016-08-30

    A combined experimental and chemical kinetic modeling study of the high-temperature ignition and pyrolysis of 1,3-dimethylcyclohexane (13DMCH) is presented. Ignition delay times are measured behind reflected shock waves over a temperature range of 1049–1544 K and pressures of 3.0–12 atm. Pyrolysis is investigated at average pressures of 4.0 atm at temperatures of 1238, 1302, and 1406 K. By means of mid-infrared direct laser absorption at 3.39 μm, fuel concentration time histories are measured under ignition and pyrolytic conditions. A detailed chemical kinetic model for 13DMCH combustion is developed. Ignition measurements show that the ignition delay times of 13DMCH are longer than those of its isomer, ethylcyclohexane. The proposed chemical kinetic model predicts reasonably well the effects of equivalence ratio and pressure, with overall good agreement between predicted and measured ignition delay times, except at low dilution levels and high pressures. Simulated fuel concentration profiles agree reasonably well with the measured profiles, and both highlight the influence of pyrolysis on the overall ignition kinetics at high temperatures. Sensitivity and reaction pathway analyses provide further insight into the kinetic processes controlling ignition and pyrolysis. The work contributes toward improved understanding and modeling of the oxidation and pyrolysis kinetics of cycloalkanes.

  12. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of uranium biosorption by calcium alginate beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Jing; Fan, Fangli; Wu, Xiaolei; Tian, Wei; Zhao, Liang; Yin, Xiaojie; Fan, Fuyou; Li, Zhan; Tian, Longlong; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Guo, Junsheng

    2013-01-01

    Calcium alginate beads are potential biosorbent for radionuclides removal as they contain carboxyl groups. However, until now limited information is available concerning the uptake behavior of uranium by this polymer gel, especially when sorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics are concerned. In present work, batch experiments were carried out to study the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of uranium sorption by calcium alginate beads. The effects of initial solution pH, sorbent amount, initial uranium concentration and temperature on uranium sorption were also investigated. The determined optimal conditions were: initial solution pH of 3.0, added sorbent amount of 40 mg, and uranium sorption capacity increased with increasing initial uranium concentration and temperature. Equilibrium data obtained under different temperatures were fitted better with Langmuir model than Freundlich model, uranium sorption was dominated by a monolayer way. The kinetic data can be well depicted by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The activation energy derived from Arrhenius equation was 30.0 kJ/mol and the sorption process had a chemical nature. Thermodynamic constants such as ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 and ΔG 0 were also evaluated, results of thermodynamic study showed that the sorption process was endothermic and spontaneous. -- Highlights: • Equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of uranium sorption by CaAlg were studied. • Equilibrium studies show that Langmuir isotherm better fit with experimental data. • Pseudo-second-order kinetics model is found to be well depicting the kinetic data. • Thermodynamic study shows that the sorption process is endothermic and spontaneous

  13. Insights on Cytochrome P450 Enzymes and Inhibitors Obtained Through QSAR Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Foroozesh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The cytochrome P450 (CYP superfamily of heme enzymes play an important role in the metabolism of a large number of endogenous and exogenous compounds, including most of the drugs currently on the market. Inhibitors of CYP enzymes have important roles in the treatment of several disease conditions such as numerous cancers and fungal infections in addition to their critical role in drug-drug interactions. Structure activity relationships (SAR, and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationships (3D-QSAR represent important tools in understanding the interactions of the inhibitors with the active sites of the CYP enzymes. A comprehensive account of the QSAR studies on the major human CYPs 1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2A6, 2B6, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 3A4 and a few other CYPs are detailed in this review which will provide us with an insight into the individual/common characteristics of the active sites of these enzymes and the enzyme-inhibitor interactions.

  14. Kinetic and structural studies reveal a unique binding mode of sulfite to the nickel center in urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Luca; Cianci, Michele; Benini, Stefano; Bertini, Leonardo; Musiani, Francesco; Ciurli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Urease is the most efficient enzyme known to date, and catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea using two Ni(II) ions in the active site. Urease is a virulence factor in several human pathogens, while causing severe environmental and agronomic problems. Sporosarcina pasteurii urease has been used extensively in the structural characterization of the enzyme. Sodium sulfite has been widely used as a preservative in urease solutions to prevent oxygen-induced oxidation, but its role as an inhibitor has also been suggested. In the present study, isothermal titration microcalorimetry was used to establish sulfite as a competitive inhibitor for S. pasteurii urease, with an inhibition constant of 0.19mM at pH7. The structure of the urease-sulfite complex, determined at 1.65Å resolution, shows the inhibitor bound to the dinuclear Ni(II) center of urease in a tridentate mode involving bonds between the two Ni(II) ions in the active site and all three oxygen atoms of the inhibitor, supporting the observed competitive inhibition kinetics. This coordination mode of sulfite has never been observed, either in proteins or in small molecule complexes, and could inspire synthetic coordination chemists as well as biochemists to develop urease inhibitors based on this chemical moiety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative proteomic study of Aspergillus Fumigatus secretome revealed deamidation of secretory enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adav, Sunil S; Ravindran, Anita; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2015-04-24

    Aspergillus sp. plays an essential role in lignocellulosic biomass recycling and is also exploited as cell factories for the production of industrial enzymes. This study profiled the secretome of Aspergillus fumigatus when grown with cellulose, xylan and starch by high throughput quantitative proteomics using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). Post translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins play a critical role in protein functions. However, our understanding of the PTMs in secretory proteins is limited. Here, we present the identification of PTMs such as deamidation of secreted proteins of A. fumigatus. This study quantified diverse groups of extracellular secreted enzymes and their functional classification revealed cellulases and glycoside hydrolases (32.9%), amylases (0.9%), hemicellulases (16.2%), lignin degrading enzymes (8.1%), peptidases and proteases (11.7%), chitinases, lipases and phosphatases (7.6%), and proteins with unknown function (22.5%). The comparison of quantitative iTRAQ results revealed that cellulose and xylan stimulates expression of specific cellulases and hemicellulases, and their abundance level as a function of substrate. In-depth data analysis revealed deamidation as a major PTM of key cellulose hydrolyzing enzymes like endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases and glucosidases. Hemicellulose degrading endo-1,4-beta-xylanase, monosidases, xylosidases, lignin degrading laccase, isoamyl alcohol oxidase and oxidoreductases were also found to be deamidated. The filamentous fungi play an essential role in lignocellulosic biomass recycling and fungal strains belonging to Aspergillus were also exploited as cell factories for the production of organic acids, pharmaceuticals, and industrially important enzymes. In this study, extracellular proteins secreted by thermophilic A. fumigatus when grown with cellulose, xylan and starch were profiled using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) by

  16. Characterization of the cloned full-length and a truncated human target of rapamycin: Activity, specificity, and enzyme inhibition as studied by a high capacity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang Weiguo; Lamison, Craig; LaRocque, James; Gibbons, James; Yu, Ker

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR/TOR) is implicated in cancer and other human disorders and thus an important target for therapeutic intervention. To study human TOR in vitro, we have produced in large scale both the full-length TOR (289 kDa) and a truncated TOR (132 kDa) from HEK293 cells. Both enzymes demonstrated a robust and specific catalytic activity towards the physiological substrate proteins, p70 S6 ribosomal protein kinase 1 (p70S6K1) and eIF4E binding protein 1 (4EBP1), as measured by phosphor-specific antibodies in Western blotting. We developed a high capacity dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) for analysis of kinetic parameters. The Michaelis constant (K m ) values of TOR for ATP and the His6-S6K substrate were shown to be 50 and 0.8 μM, respectively. Dose-response and inhibition mechanisms of several known inhibitors, the rapamycin-FKBP12 complex, wortmannin and LY294002, were also studied in DELFIA. Our data indicate that TOR exhibits kinetic features of those shared by traditional serine/threonine kinases and demonstrate the feasibility for TOR enzyme screen in searching for new inhibitors

  17. A study of the fine structure, enzyme activities and pattern of 14CO2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A detailed study of selected grasses has been made with respect to fine structures characteristics, enzyme activities associated with C-4 and C-3 pathway photosynthesis, and short term carbon dioxide-14 incorporation experiments. A good correlation was obtained between the fine structure, the carbon pathway and the ...

  18. Laboratory studies on the adsorption kinetics of 137Cs in sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaison, T.J.; Patra, A.K.; Ravi, P.M.; Sarkar, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    During the operation of a nuclear reactor, extreme care is taken to minimize the release of radionuclides to the environment. Low level radioactive liquid waste generated is treated and released to the nearest water body after monitoring to ensure that the activity levels are well within the regulatory limits. Environmental Survey Laboratories (ESL) attached to power plants carry out a systematic environmental monitoring and impact assessment to ensure that the dose to the member of public is well within the limits. This paper presents the results of a systematic laboratory study carried out at ESL, Kakrapar Atomic Power Station (KAPS) on the adsorption kinetics of 137 Cs in sediment. The study is to evaluate the sorption kinetics of 137 Cs + onto site specific sediment. Sets of adsorption experiments were conducted at specific time intervals for two different 137 Cs + concentrations, keeping other experimental conditions same. The kinetics of 137 Cs + adsorption on sediment is analyzed using pseudo first order, pseudo second order, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models. The pseudo-second order kinetic model is better correlated with the kinetics data compared with the pseudo first-order model. This indicates 137 Cs + ions can be involved in chemical bonding during the adsorption process to the analysed sediment. This chemi-sorption processes show a good compliance with the pseudo-second order kinetic model. It is also evident that lower concentration exhibits greater adsorption rate (k 2 value is 1.85 x 10 -5 Bq g -1 min -1 for 1245 Bq sets and 1.05 x 10 -5 Bq g -1 min -1 for 2456 Bq sets) from the pseudo second order model. Intra-particle diffusion rate constants (K id ) were also obtained by two different models for both the concentrations and found to be higher for higher concentration. (author)

  19. Kinetic study of the dehydration reaction of lithium sulfate monohydrate crystals using microscopy and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Shuiquan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Zondag, Herbert [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Energy research Center of the Netherlands – ECN, P.O. Box 1, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Steenhoven, Anton van [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Rindt, Camilo, E-mail: c.c.m.rindt@tue.nl [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-12-10

    Highlights: • Kinetics of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O single crystals were modeled based on elementary processes. • Kinetics of nucleation and nuclei growth were studied by using optical microscopy. • A novel experiment was designed to visualize the reaction front into crystal bulk. • Fractional conversion was calculated and compared with TGA-experiments. - Abstract: Simulation of gas–solid reactions occurring in industrial processes requires a robust kinetic model to be applicable in a wide range of complicated reaction conditions. However, in literature it is often seen that even the same reaction under specific controlled conditions is interpreted with different kinetic models. In the present work, a phenomenological model based on nucleation and nuclei growth processes is presented to study the kinetics of the dehydration reaction of lithium sulfate monohydrate single crystals. The two elementary processes of the reaction, nucleation and nuclei growth, are characterized and quantified as a function of temperature by using optical microscopy experiments. The in-situ measured characteristics of the dehydration reaction provided confirmatory evidence that the rate of nucleation obeys an exponential law and the rate of nuclei growth is approximately constant. With knowledge acquired from the optical observations as inputs of the kinetic model, the fractional conversion of the dehydration reaction was calculated and compared with experimental results from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). A satisfactory comparison was found both in isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. It is demonstrated that this knowledge-based model has a great potential to represent the gas–solid reaction kinetics in a wide range of process conditions regarding temperature, pressure and particle geometry.

  20. Kinetic studies of the inhibition of a human liver 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid/dihydrodiol dehydrogenase isozyme by bile acids and anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyabe, Y; Amano, T; Deyashiki, Y; Hara, A; Tsukada, F

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the steady-state kinetics for a cytosolic 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid/dihydrodiol dehydrogenase isozyme of human liver and its inhibition by several bile acids and anti-inflammatory drugs such as indomethacin, flufemanic acid and naproxen. Initial velocity and product inhibition studies performed in the NADP(+)-linked (S)-1-indanol oxidation at pH 7.4 were consistent with a sequential ordered mechanism in which NADP+ binds first and leaves last. The bile acids and drugs, competitive inhibitors with respect to the alcohol substrate, exhibited uncompetitive inhibition with respect to the coenzyme, with Ki values less than 1 microM, whereas indomethacin exhibited noncompetitive inhibition (Ki < 24 microM). The kinetics of the inhibition by a mixture of the two inhibitors suggests that bile acids and drugs, except indomethacin, bind to overlapping sites at the active center of the enzyme-coenzyme binary complex.

  1. Shock wave, fluid instability and implosion studies with a kinetic particle approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagert, Irina; Even, Wesley P.; Strother, Terrance T.

    2016-10-01

    Many problems in laboratory plasma physics are subject to flows that move between the continuum and the kinetic regime. The correct description of these flows is crucial in order to capture their impact on the system's dynamical evolution. Examples are capsule implosions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Although their dynamics is predominantly shaped by shock waves and fluid instabilities, non-equilibrium flows in form of deuterium/tritium ions have been shown to play a significant role. We present recent studies with our Monte Carlo kinetic particle code that is designed to capture continuum and kinetic flows in large physical systems with possible applications in ICF studies. Discussed results will include standard shock wave and fluid instability tests and simulations that are adapted towards future ICF studies with comparisons to hydrodynamic simulations. This work used the Wolf TriLAB Capacity Cluster at LANL. I.S. acknowledges support through a Director's fellowship (20150741PRD3) from Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  2. Kinetics of the H 2O 2-dependent ligninase-catalyzed oxidation of veratryl alcohol in the presence of cationic surfactant studied by spectrophotometric technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Airong; Huang, Xirong; Song, Shaofang; Wang, Dan; Lu, Xuemei; Qu, Yinbo; Gao, Peiji

    2003-09-01

    The kinetics of ligninase-catalyzed oxidation of veratryl alcohol (VA) by H 2O 2 in the aqueous medium containing cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) has been investigated using spectrophotometric technique. Steady-state kinetic studies at different concentrations of CTAB indicate that the reaction follows a ping pong mechanism and the mechanism always holds but the kinetic parameters vary with CTAB concentrations. CTAB is a weak inhibitor for ligninase; it lowers the maximum initial velocity. CTAB also causes the Michaelis constant of H 2O 2 to decrease dramatically and that of VA to increase markedly. Based on the changes in kinetic parameters of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction at different CTAB concentrations (lower than, near to and larger than its critical micelle concentration) and the effects of the CTAB monomer and the micelles on the spectra of VA and its corresponding aldehyde, a conclusion could be made that modification of the enzymatic protein by the surfactant monomer should be responsible for the above-mentioned results.

  3. Adsorption of saturated fatty acid in urea complexation: Kinetics and equilibrium studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawardhani, Dwi Ardiana; Sulistyo, Hary; Sediawan, Wahyudi Budi; Fahrurrozi, Mohammad

    2018-02-01

    Urea complexation is fractionation process for concentrating poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from vegetable oil or animal fats. For process design and optimization in commercial industries, it is necessary to provide kinetics and equilibrium data. Urea inclusion compounds (UICs) as the product is a unique complex form which one molecule (guest) is enclosed within another molecule (host). In urea complexation, the guest-host bonding exists between saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and crystalline urea. This research studied the complexation is analogous to an adsorption process. The Batch adsorption process was developed to obtain the experimental data. The ethanolic urea solution was mixed with SFA in certain compositions and adsorption times. The mixture was heated until it formed homogenous and clear solution, then it cooled very slowly until the first numerous crystal appeared. Adsorption times for the kinetic data were determined since the crystal formed. The temperature was maintained constant at room temperature. Experimental sets of data were observed with adsorption kinetics and equilibrium models. High concentration of saturated fatty acid (SFA) was used to represent adsorption kinetics and equilibrium parameters. Kinetic data were examined with pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order and intra particle diffusion models. Linier, Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm were used to study the equilibrium model of this adsorption. The experimental data showed that SFA adsorption in urea crystal followed pseudo second-order model. The compatibility of the data with Langmuir isotherm showed that urea complexation was a monolayer adsorption.

  4. Thermal inactivation kinetics of β-galactosidase during bread baking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xiao Dong; Boom, Remko M; Schutyser, Maarten A I

    2017-06-15

    In this study, β-galactosidase was utilized as a model enzyme to investigate the mechanism of enzyme inactivation during bread baking. Thermal inactivation of β-galactosidase was investigated in a wheat flour/water system at varying temperature-moisture content combinations, and in bread during baking at 175 or 205°C. In the wheat flour/water system, the thermostability of β-galactosidase increased with decreased moisture content, and a kinetic model was accurately fitted to the corresponding inactivation data (R 2 =0.99). Interestingly, the residual enzyme activity in the bread crust (about 30%) was hundredfold higher than that in the crumb (about 0.3%) after baking, despite the higher temperature in the crust throughout baking. This result suggested that the reduced moisture content in the crust increased the thermostability of the enzyme. Subsequently, the kinetic model reasonably predicted the enzyme inactivation in the crumb using the same parameters derived from the wheat flour/water system. However, the model predicted a lower residual enzyme activity in the crust compared with the experimental result, which indicated that the structure of the crust may influence the enzyme inactivation mechanism during baking. The results reported can provide a quantitative understanding of the thermal inactivation kinetics of enzyme during baking, which is essential to better retain enzymatic activity in bakery products supplemented with heat-sensitive enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A framework and case studies for evaluation of enzyme ontogeny in children's health risk evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Gary; Vulimiri, Suryanarayana V; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Kancherla, Jayaram; Foos, Brenda; Sonawane, Babasaheb

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the ontogeny of Phase I and Phase II metabolizing enzymes may be used to inform children's vulnerability based upon likely differences in internal dose from xenobiotic exposure. This might provide a qualitative assessment of toxicokinetic (TK) variability and uncertainty pertinent to early lifestages and help scope a more quantitative physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) assessment. Although much is known regarding the ontogeny of metabolizing systems, this is not commonly utilized in scoping and problem formulation stage of human health risk evaluation. A framework is proposed for introducing this information into problem formulation which combines data on enzyme ontogeny and chemical-specific TK to explore potential child/adult differences in internal dose and whether such metabolic differences may be important factors in risk evaluation. The framework is illustrated with five case study chemicals, including some which are data rich and provide proof of concept, while others are data poor. Case studies for toluene and chlorpyrifos indicate potentially important child/adult TK differences while scoping for acetaminophen suggests enzyme ontogeny is unlikely to increase early-life risks. Scoping for trichloroethylene and aromatic amines indicates numerous ways that enzyme ontogeny may affect internal dose which necessitates further evaluation. PBTK modeling is a critical and feasible next step to further evaluate child-adult differences in internal dose for a number of these chemicals.

  6. Determination of the enzyme reaction rate in a differential fixed-bed reactor: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruque Filho E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction rate of starch hydrolysis catalyzed by a glucoamylase covalently bound to chitin particles was measured in a Differential Fixed-Bed Reactor (DFBR. Under selected test conditions the initial reaction rate may represent biocatalyst activity. Some aspects which influence measurement of the initial reaction rate of an immobilized enzyme were studied: the amount of desorbed enzyme and its hydrolytic activity, the extent of pore blockage of the biocatalyst caused by substrate solution impurities and the internal and external diffusional mass transfer effects. The results showed that the enzyme glucoamylase was firmly bound to the support, as indicated by the very low amount of desorbed protein found in the recirculating liquid. Although this protein was very active, its contribution to the overall reaction rate was negligible. It was observed that the biocatalyst pores were susceptible to being blocked by the impurities of the starch solution. This latter effect was accumulative, increasing with the number of sequential experiments carried out. When the substrate solution was filtered before use, very reliable determinations of immobilized enzyme reaction rates could be performed in the DFBR. External and internal diffusional resistences usually play a significant role in fixed-bed reactors. However, for the experimental system studied, internal mass transfer effects were not significant, and it was possible to select an operational condition (recirculation flow rate value that minimized the external diffusional limitations.

  7. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of premixed nitroethane flames at low pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Kuiwen; Zhang, Lidong; Xie, Mingfeng

    2013-01-01

    An experimental and kinetic modeling study is reported on three premixed nitroethane/oxygen/argon flames at low pressure (4.655kPa) with the equivalence ratios (Φ) of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0. Over 30 flame species were identified with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrome......An experimental and kinetic modeling study is reported on three premixed nitroethane/oxygen/argon flames at low pressure (4.655kPa) with the equivalence ratios (Φ) of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0. Over 30 flame species were identified with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass...

  8. The kinetics of multi-compartmentalized systems, studied by radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouveia, A.S. de.

    1978-01-01

    The use of compartmental models to investigate kinetic problems is presented. This use is restricted, however, to linear models. As an application of different methods, the kinetic behaviour of haemaccel labelled with iodine 131 is studied, the interval of the physically viable solutions being established. The existence of a class of solutions is explained as a result of lack of knowledge of a complete data set. The possibility of obtaining a single solution is also discussed. The formalism of the program SAAM (Simulation, Analysis and modelling) now judged very important for the study of multi-compartimental analysis is presented. (I.C.R) [pt

  9. Inactivation disinfection property of Moringa Oleifera seed extract: optimization and kinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, M. A.; Jami, M. S.; Hammed, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the statistical optimization study of disinfection inactivation parameters of defatted Moringa oleifera seed extract on Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial cells. Three level factorial design was used to estimate the optimum range and the kinetics of the inactivation process was also carried. The inactivation process involved comparing different disinfection models of Chicks-Watson, Collins-Selleck and Homs models. The results from analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the statistical optimization process revealed that only contact time was significant. The optimum disinfection range of the seed extract was 125 mg/L, 30 minutes and 120rpm agitation. At the optimum dose, the inactivation kinetics followed the Collin-Selleck model with coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.6320. This study is the first of its kind in determining the inactivation kinetics of pseudomonas aeruginosa using the defatted seed extract.

  10. Kinetics Studies on citric acid production by gamma ray induced mutant of Aspergillus niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, A.A.; Choudhury, N.; Islam, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Effect of cultural pH and incubation temperature on citric acid yield and kinetic patterns of citric acid fermentation by a natural isolate of aspergillus niger as CA16 and one of its gamma ray induced mutants were studied using cane molasses as growth and fermentation substrate. Mutant strain, 277/30 gave maximum citric acid yield of 85 g/l at pH 3.5 and 28 degree centigrade in molasses medium adjusted to 16% sugar and 25% prescott salt in the medium. Parent strain, CA16 gave a maximum yield of 34 g/l at pH 4.0 and 26 degree centigrade in molasses medium adjusted to 16% sugar and 100% prescott salt in the medium. In kinetic studies, strains showed combination kinetics of citric acid fermentation where product formation is directly related to growth and cell mass and indirectly related to carbohydrate uptake

  11. Removal Rate of Organic Matter Using Natural Cellulose via Adsorption Isotherm and Kinetic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Mohd Fadhil Md; Ponraj, Mohanadoss; Low, Wen-Pei; Fulazzaky, Mohamad Ali; Iwao, Kenzo; Songip, Ahmad Rahman; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Ismail, Zulhilmi; Jamal, Mohamad Hidayat

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) using coconut fiber (CF) and palm oil fiber (POF) was investigated. Preliminary analysis was performed using a jar test for the selection of optimal medium before the fabricated column model experiment. The equilibrium studies on isotherms and kinetic models for NOM adsorption were analyzed using linearized correlation coefficient. Results showed that the equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir isotherm model for both CF and POF. The most suitable adsorption model was the pseudo-first-order kinetic model for POF and pseudo-second-order kinetic model for CF. The adsorption capacities achieved by the CF and POF were 15.67 and 30.8 mg/g respectively. Based on this investigation, it can be concluded that the POF is the most suitable material for the removal of NOM in semi polluted river water.

  12. Copper adsorption on magnetite-loaded chitosan microspheres: A kinetic and equilibrium study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podzus, P.E., E-mail: ppodzus@gmail.com [Grupo de Aplicaciones de Materiales Biocompatibles, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina); Debandi, M.V. [Grupo de Aplicaciones de Materiales Biocompatibles, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina); Daraio, M.E., E-mail: medit@fi.uba.ar [Grupo de Aplicaciones de Materiales Biocompatibles, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    A composite of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and the biopolymer chitosan, chemically crosslinked, was prepared as microspheres and used to adsorb copper ions, which were chosen as a model of contaminant metal in water. The adsorption of copper on the magnetic microspheres was studied in a batch process, with different aqueous solutions of Cu (II) at concentrations ranging from 40 to 1100 ppm. Kinetic and equilibrium aspects of the adsorption process were studied. The time-dependent Cu (II) adsorption data were well described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. It was found that the equilibrium data follow the Langmuir isotherm, with a maximum adsorption capacity of around 500 mg Cu/g chitosan. The used microspheres were removed and after desorption the material was able to be reused as an adsorbent. The prepared microspheres proved efficient in the removal of copper ions through an adsorption process whose kinetic and equilibrium characteristics were analyzed.

  13. Mechanism, kinetics and application studies on enhanced activated sludge by interior microelectrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoyi; Xue, Yu; Wang, Wenna

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced activated sludge by interior microelectrolysis (EAIM) was studied to treat textile wastewater, kinetics, mechanism and application of which were also discussed in comparison with traditional activated sludge and interior microelectrolysis, respectively. The results of kinetics study indicated three different processes all followed first-order kinetics well. In EAIM, three impact factors take effects on COD removal, which are flocculation, activated sludge and electrophoresis and redox. In terms of assumption of no interaction among three COD removal mechanisms, 49.6% of the total COD removal is ascribed to flocculation, 30.1% to activated sludge and 20.3% to electrophoresis and redox. EAIM showed its advantages in COD removal efficiency, extensive adaptability to complex composition and wide range of pH. EAIM-aerobic process provided an efficient and economic performance for dealing with textile wastewater.

  14. Kinetic studies of the yeast His-Asp phosphorelay signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaserer, Alla O.; Andi, Babak; Cook, Paul F.; West, Ann H.

    2010-01-01

    For both prokaryotic and eukaryotic His-Asp phosphorelay signaling pathways, the rates of protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation determine the stimulus-to-response time frame. Thus, kinetic studies of phosphoryl group transfer between signaling partners are important for gaining a full understanding of how the system is regulated. In many cases, the phosphotransfer reactions are too fast for rates to be determined by manual experimentation. Rapid quench flow techniques thus provide a powerful method for studying rapid reactions that occur in the millisecond time frame. In this chapter, we describe experimental design and procedures for kinetic characterization of the yeast SLN1-YPD1-SSK1 osmoregulatory phosphorelay system using a rapid quench flow kinetic instrument. PMID:20946842

  15. Copper adsorption on magnetite-loaded chitosan microspheres: A kinetic and equilibrium study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podzus, P.E.; Debandi, M.V.; Daraio, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    A composite of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and the biopolymer chitosan, chemically crosslinked, was prepared as microspheres and used to adsorb copper ions, which were chosen as a model of contaminant metal in water. The adsorption of copper on the magnetic microspheres was studied in a batch process, with different aqueous solutions of Cu (II) at concentrations ranging from 40 to 1100 ppm. Kinetic and equilibrium aspects of the adsorption process were studied. The time-dependent Cu (II) adsorption data were well described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. It was found that the equilibrium data follow the Langmuir isotherm, with a maximum adsorption capacity of around 500 mg Cu/g chitosan. The used microspheres were removed and after desorption the material was able to be reused as an adsorbent. The prepared microspheres proved efficient in the removal of copper ions through an adsorption process whose kinetic and equilibrium characteristics were analyzed.

  16. Batch study, equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption of naphthalene using waste tyre rubber granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix A. Aisien

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of waste tyre rubber granules (WTRG for the batch adsorption of naphthalene from aqueous solutions was investigated. The effect of various operational variables such as contact time, initial naphthalene concentration, adsorbent dose, size of adsorbent particles, and temperature of solution on the adsorption capacity of WTRG was evaluated. The adsorption of naphthalene by WTRG was a fast kinetic process with an equilibrium contact time of 60 min. A low temperature (5°C, small adsorbent particle size (0.212 mm and higher adsorbent dosage favored the adsorption process. Results of isotherm studies revealed that adsorption of naphthalene was best described by the Langmuir isotherm equation (R2=0.997 while the kinetics of the process was best described by the Lagergren pseudofirst order kinetic equation (R2=0.998. This study has demonstrated the suitability of WTRG for the removal of naphthalene from aqueous solution.

  17. Numerical Simulations of Kinetic Alfvén Waves to Study Spectral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Numerical Simulations of Kinetic Alfvén Waves to Study Spectral. Index in Solar Wind Turbulence and Particle Heating. R. P. Sharma. ∗. & H. D. Singh. Center for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi 110 016, India. ∗ e-mail: rpsharma@ces.iitd.ernet.in. Abstract. We present numerical simulations of the ...

  18. A calorimetric study of solute effects on the kinetic stability of a-amylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Søren Nymand; Andersen, Kim Bruno; Øgendal, Lars Holm

    2009-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the applications of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to Study solute effects on the kinetics of irreversible protein denaturation. More specifically, denaturation of Bacillus Halmapalus alpha-amylase (BHA) was initiated by addition of EDTA to the calorimetric cell...

  19. Study of strength kinetics of sand concrete system of accelerated hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharanova, A. V.; Lenkova, D. A.; Panfilova, A. D.

    2018-04-01

    Methods of calorimetric analysis are used to study the dynamics of the hydration processes of concretes with different accelerator contents. The efficiency of the isothermal calorimetry method is shown for study of strength kinetics of concrete mixtures of accelerated hardening, promising for additive technologies in civil engineering.

  20. Mixtures of rubber tyre and plastic wastes pyrolysis: A kinetic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Miguel; Cabrita, I.; Pinto, Filomena; Gulyurtlu, I.

    2013-01-01

    The study performed aimed at analysing possible routes for pyrolysis reaction mechanisms of polymeric materials namely RT (rubber tyre) and plastic wastes (PE (polyethylene), PP (polypropylene) and PS (polystyrene)). Consequently, and seeking sustainable transformation of waste streams into valuable chemicals and renewable liquid fuels, mixture of 30% RT, 20% PE, 30% PP and 20% PS was subjected to pyrolysis. Different kinetic models were studied using experimental data. None of the mechanisms found in literature led to a numerical adjustment and different pathways were investigated. Kinetic studies were performed aiming to evaluate direct conversions into new solid, liquid and gaseous products and if parallel reactions and/or reversible elementary steps should be included. Experiments were performed in batch system at different temperatures and reaction times. Kinetic models were evaluated and reaction pathways were proposed. Models reasonably fit experimental data, allow explaining wastes thermal degradation. Kinetic parameters were estimated for all temperatures and dependence of Ea and pre-exponential factor on temperature was evaluated. The rate constant of some reactions exhibited nonlinear temperature dependence on the logarithmic form of Arrhenius law. This fact strongly suggests that temperature has a significant effect on reaction mechanism of pyrolysis of mixtures of rubber tyre and plastic wastes. - Highlights: • Kinetic study of rubber tyre (RT) and different plastic wastes (PE, PP and PS) was performed in batch reactor. • Definition of possible pathways taken into account for the formation of final products. • Kinetic parameters were estimated. • The effect of reaction temperature and reaction time on liquid composition was performed

  1. Kinetic studies and evaluation of potential compounds for the chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis using LdNH-MBP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renno, M.N.; Figueroa-Villar, J.D. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Silva, N.B. da; Tinoco, L.W. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisas de Produtos Naturais; Borja-Cabrera, G.P.; Palatnik-de-Sousa, C.B.P. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Microbiologia

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Protozoan parasites rely exclusively on purine salvage from the host for DNA and RNA synthesis and nucleoside hydrolases (N Hs) are the enzymes that catalyze the N-rib osyl hydrolysis of all commonly occurring purine and pi rimidine nucleosides, thus being excellent targets for the design of antiparasitic compounds. The general aim of our work with Leishmania donovani NH (LdNH) is to find new inhibitors for this enzyme as potential agents for the chemotherapy of visceral leishmaniasis. In this part of the work we expressed LdNH bound to maltose-binding protein (MBP) in E. coli using the pMAL-C2x vector. After purification by affinity chromatography the enzyme activity was monitored by UV (280 nm) and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy using inosine as substrate. All the assays were carried out at 25 deg C in phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) in water (UV) and D{sub 2}O (NMR). Our results show that LdNH-MBP behaves kinetically in the same way as it have been reported for free LdNH, thus confirming that LdNH-MBP maintains the appropriate folding and activity of the enzyme active site, thus being a good model to develop and evaluate new inhibitors of LdNH. As an example, the kinetics tests with AZT have shown that this compound is not an effective inhibitor of this enzyme.

  2. Kinetic studies and evaluation of potential compounds for the chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis using LdNH-MBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renno, M.N.; Figueroa-Villar, J.D.; Silva, N.B. da; Tinoco, L.W.; Borja-Cabrera, G.P.; Palatnik-de-Sousa, C.B.P.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Protozoan parasites rely exclusively on purine salvage from the host for DNA and RNA synthesis and nucleoside hydrolases (N Hs) are the enzymes that catalyze the N-rib osyl hydrolysis of all commonly occurring purine and pi rimidine nucleosides, thus being excellent targets for the design of antiparasitic compounds. The general aim of our work with Leishmania donovani NH (LdNH) is to find new inhibitors for this enzyme as potential agents for the chemotherapy of visceral leishmaniasis. In this part of the work we expressed LdNH bound to maltose-binding protein (MBP) in E. coli using the pMAL-C2x vector. After purification by affinity chromatography the enzyme activity was monitored by UV (280 nm) and 1 H NMR spectroscopy using inosine as substrate. All the assays were carried out at 25 deg C in phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) in water (UV) and D 2 O (NMR). Our results show that LdNH-MBP behaves kinetically in the same way as it have been reported for free LdNH, thus confirming that LdNH-MBP maintains the appropriate folding and activity of the enzyme active site, thus being a good model to develop and evaluate new inhibitors of LdNH. As an example, the kinetics tests with AZT have shown that this compound is not an effective inhibitor of this enzyme

  3. Kinetic study on ferulic acid production from banana stem waste via mechanical extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainol, Norazwina; Masngut, Nasratun; Khairi Jusup, Muhamad

    2018-04-01

    Banana is the tropical plants associated with lots of medicinal properties. It has been reported to be a potential source of phenolic compounds such as ferulic acid (FA). FA has excellent antioxidant properties higher than vitamin C and E. FA also have a wide range of biological activities, such as antioxidant activities and anti-microbial activities. This paper presents an experimental and kinetic study on ferulic acid (FA) production from banana stem waste (BSW) via mechanical extraction. The objective of this research is to determine the kinetic parameters in the ferulic acid production. The banana stem waste was randomly collected from the local banana plantation in Felda Lepar Hilir, Pahang. The banana stem juice was mechanically extracted by using sugarcane press machine (KR3176) and further analyzed in high performance liquid chromatography. The differential and integral method was applied to determine the kinetic parameter of the extraction process and the data obtained were fitted into the 0th, 1st and 2nd order of extraction process. Based on the results, the kinetic parameter and R2 value from were 0.05 and 0.93, respectively. It was determined that the 0th kinetic order fitted the reaction processes to best represent the mechanical extraction.

  4. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in rat lung alveolar epithelial cells. An ultrastructural enzyme-cytochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Matsubara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD is the key enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway in carbohydrate metabolism, and it plays an important role in cell proliferation and antioxidant regulation within cells in various organs. Although marked cell proliferation and oxidant/antioxidant metabolism occur in lung alveolar epithelial cells, definite data has been lacking as to whether cytochemically detectable G6PD is present in alveolar epithelial cells. The distribution pattern of G6PD within these cells, if it is present, is also unknown. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the subcellular localization of G6PD in alveolar cells in the rat lung using a newly- developed enzyme-cytochemistry (copper-ferrocyanide method. Type I cells and stromal endothelia and fibroblasts showed no activities. Electron-dense precipitates indicating G6PD activity were clearly visible in the cytoplasm and on the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum of type II alveolar epithelial cells. The cytochemical controls ensured specific detection of enzyme activity. This enzyme may play a role in airway defense by delivering substances for cell proliferation and antioxidant forces, thus maintaining the airway architecture.

  5. A study on some enzymes in rice field fish as biomarkers for pesticide exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juzu Hayati Arshad; Mazlina Muhammad; Salmijah Surif; Abdul Manan Mat Jais

    2002-01-01

    A study was carried out on three enzymes in rice field fish which can be used as possible biomarkers for pesticide exposure. The results obtained showed that the activity of the enzyme EROD (ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase) increased between 1.5-2.2 fold in snakehead or haruan (Channa striata) sampled from the pesticide polluted areas, particularly the recycled areas and only a slight increase in EROD activity in climbing perch or puyu (Anabas testudineus). Increase in the activity of carboxylesterase was also noted. The percentage inhibition of acety1cholinesterase ranges from 18.4%-57.4% and 2.5%-34.2% for Channa striata and Anabas testudineus, respectively. Generally, a higher percentage of acety1cholinesterase inhibition was noted for those fish sampled from the recycled areas. The noted changes in the activity of these enzymes suggest exposure of rice field fish to foreign compounds, possibly pesticides, which are known to induce EROD activity and inhibit acety1cholinesterase activity. Therefore it may be possible to use these enzymes as biomarkers for pesticide exposure. (Author)

  6. Enzymatic synthesis of farnesyl laurate in organic solvent: initial water activity, kinetics mechanism, optimization of continuous operation using packed bed reactor and mass transfer studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, N K; Kamaruddin, A H; Uzir, M H

    2011-08-01

    The influence of water activity and water content was investigated with farnesyl laurate synthesis catalyzed by Lipozyme RM IM. Lipozyme RM IM activity depended strongly on initial water activity value. The best results were achieved for a reaction medium with an initial water activity of 0.11 since it gives the best conversion value of 96.80%. The rate constants obtained in the kinetics study using Ping-Pong-Bi-Bi and Ordered-Bi-Bi mechanisms with dead-end complex inhibition of lauric acid were compared. The corresponding parameters were found to obey the Ordered-Bi-Bi mechanism with dead-end complex inhibition of lauric acid. Kinetic parameters were calculated based on this model as follows: V (max) = 5.80 mmol l(-1) min(-1) g enzyme(-1), K (m,A) = 0.70 mmol l(-1) g enzyme(-1), K (m,B) = 115.48 mmol l(-1) g enzyme(-1), K (i) = 11.25 mmol l(-1) g enzyme(-1). The optimum conditions for the esterification of farnesol with lauric acid in a continuous packed bed reactor were found as the following: 18.18 cm packed bed height and 0.9 ml/min substrate flow rate. The optimum molar conversion of lauric acid to farnesyl laurate was 98.07 ± 0.82%. The effect of mass transfer in the packed bed reactor has also been studied using two models for cases of reaction limited and mass transfer limited. A very good agreement between the mass transfer limited model and the experimental data obtained indicating that the esterification in a packed bed reactor was mass transfer limited.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of radiation damaged DNA. Molecules and repair enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2004-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) studies on several radiation damages to DNA and their recognition by repair enzymes are introduced in order to describe the stepwise description of molecular process observed at radiation lesion sites. MD studies were performed on pyrimidine (thymine dimer, thymine glycol) and purine (8-oxoguanine) lesions using an MD simulation code AMBER 5.0. The force field was modified for each lesion. In all cases the significant structural changes in the DNA double helical structure were observed; a) the breaking of hydrogen bond network between complementary bases and resulting opening of the double helix (8-oxoguanine); b) the sharp bending of the DNA helix centered at the lesion site (thymine dimer, thymine glycol); and c) the flipping-out base on the strand complementary to the lesion (8-oxoguanine). These changes were related to the overall collapsing double helical structure around the lesion and might facilitate the docking of the repair enzyme into the DNA and formation of DNA-enzyme complex. In addition to the structural changes, at lesion sites there were found electrostatic interaction energy values different from those at native sites (thymine dimer -10 kcal/mol, thymine glycol -26 kcal/mol, 8-oxoguanine -48 kcal/mol). These values of electrostatic energy may discriminate lesion from values at native sites (thymine 0 kcal/mol, guanine -37 kcal/mol) and enable a repair enzyme to recognize a lesion during scanning DNA surface. The observed specific structural conformation and energetic properties at the lesions sites are factors that guide a repair enzyme to discriminate lesions from non-damaged native DNA segments. (author)

  8. A kinetic study of textile dyeing wastewater degradation by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durruty, Ignacio; Fasce, Diana; González, Jorge Froilán; Wolski, Erika Alejandra

    2015-06-01

    The potential of Penicillium chrysogenum to decolorize azo dyes and a real industrial textile wastewater was studied. P. chrysogenum was able to decolorize and degrade three azo dyes (200 mg L(-1)), either independently or in a mixture of them, using glucose as a carbon source. A kinetic model for degradation was developed and it allowed predicting the degradation kinetics of the mixture of the three azo dyes. In addition, P. chrysogenum was able to decolorize real industrial wastewater. The kinetic model proposed was also able to predict the decolorization of the real wastewater. The calibration of the proposed model makes it a useful tool for future wastewater facilities' design and for practical applications.

  9. Kinetic studies on the degradation of crystal violet by the Fenton oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Fan, M M; Li, C F; Peng, M; Sheng, L J; Pan, Q; Song, G W

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of dye crystal violet (CV) by Fenton oxidation process was investigated. The UV-Vis spectrogram has shown that CV can be degraded effectively by Fenton oxidation process. Different system variables namely initial H(2)O(2) concentration, initial Fe(2 + ) concentration and reaction temperature, which have effect on the degradation of CV by Fenton oxidation process, have been studied systematically. The degradation kinetics of CV was also elucidated based on the experimental data. The degradation of CV obeys the first-order reaction kinetics. The kinetic model can be described as k=1.5 exp(-(7.5)/(RT))[H(2)O(2)](0)(0.8718)[Fe(2+)](0)(0.5062). According to the IR spectrogram, it is concluded that the benzene ring of crystal violet has been destroyed by Fenton oxidation. The result will be useful in treating dyeing wastewater containing CV by Fenton oxidation process.

  10. Study of kinetics, equilibrium and isotope exchange in ion exchange systems Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plicka, J.; Stamberg, K.; Cabicar, J.; Gosman, A.

    1986-01-01

    The description of kinetics of ion exchange in ternary system was based upon three Nernst-Planck equations, each of them describing the particle diffusion flux of a given counterion as an independent process. For experimental verification, the strongly acidic cation exchanger OSTION KS 08 the shallow-bed technique, and 0.2 mol x dm -3 aqueous nitrate solutions were chosen. The kinetics of ion exchange in the system of cations Na + - Mg 2+ - UO 2 2+ was studied. The values of diffusion coefficients obtained by evaluating of kinetics of isotope exchange and binary ion exchange were used for calculation. The comparison of calculated exchange rate curves with the experimental ones was made. It was found that the exchanging counterions were affected by each other. (author)

  11. Kinetic study of corn straw pyrolysis: comparison of two different three-pseudocomponent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqi; Zhao, Wei; Meng, Baihong; Liu, Chunlong; Zhu, Qunyi; Zhao, Guangbo

    2008-11-01

    With heating rates of 20, 50 and 100 K min(-1), the thermal decomposition of corn straw samples (corn stalks skins, corn stalks cores, corn bracts and corn leaves) were studied using thermogravimetric analysis. The maximum pyrolysis rates increased with the heating rate increasing and the temperature at the peak pyrolysis rate also increased. Assuming the addition of three independent parallel reactions, corresponding to three pseudocomponents linked to the hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin, two different three-pseudocomponent models were used to simulate the corn straw pyrolysis. Model parameters of pyrolysis were given. It was found that the three-pseudocomponent model with n-order kinetics was more accurate than the model with first-order kinetics at most cases. It showed that the model with n-order kinetics was more accurate to describe the pyrolysis of the hemicellulose.

  12. Characteristics and kinetic studies of Hydrilla verticillata pyrolysis via thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiquan; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Genbao; Chen, Xiaojuan; Hu, Mian; Laghari, Mahmood; Wang, Xun; Guo, Dabin

    2015-10-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics and kinetic of Hydrilla verticillata (HV) have been investigated using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed that the pyrolysis behavior of HV can be divided into two independent stages. The kinetics of Stage I was investigated using a distributed activation energy model (DAEM) with discrete 99 first-order reactions. Stage II was an independent stage which corresponds to the decomposition of calcium oxalate, whose kinetics was studied using iso-conversional method together with compensation effect and master-plots method. The activation energies ranged from 92.39 to 506.17 and 190.42 to 222.48 kJ/mol for the first and second stages respectively. Calculated data gave very good fit to the experimental data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [18F]-2-FDG as a tool for studying hexokinase kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, J.; Gysemans, M.

    1990-01-01

    In the basic research related to the development of radiolabelled glucose analogues or to sugar metabolism, the measurement of hexokinase kinetics is very important. The article of S. J. Gatley et al about the quality control of [ 18 F]-2-FDG preparations using the hexokinase reaction in vitro was the basic idea of the method proposed in this paper dealing with the direct measurement of hexokinase kinetics by the measurement of the activity related to [ 18 F]-2-FDG-6-phosphate. Experimental results indicate that the method is appropriate for hexokinase studies

  14. Kinetics of Iodine 131 labelled fibrinogen in cancerous patients. Pharmacological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boneu-Valmalette, Andree; Bugat, Roland; David, J.-F.; Combes, P.-F.

    1977-01-01

    The results obtained in a previous study using 131 I fibrinogen in cancerous patients suggested a local intravascular clotting process. In order to elucidate the mechanism of fibrinogen kinetic abnormalities different drugs including heparin, prednisone, ticlopidin, aspirin and indomethacin were administred in 68 patients and their effects evaluated by change in the 131 I fibrinogen disappearance rate. The results suggest that these drugs may counteract with the early stages of coagulation (kinin-forming system, factor XII) and that abnormal 131 I fibrinogen kinetic in cancer would be a non specific phenomenon [fr

  15. Contribution to the study of the kinetics of maraging steel aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Victor, O.B. dos.

    1990-01-01

    Maraging steels are materials with very low contents of C and with Ni, Co, Mo and T1 additions, that can reach very high mechanical strength values by combinations of heat treatment operations. Three 18% Ni Maraging steels have had some aspects of their aging kinetics investigated by experimental procedures using electrical resistivity, internal friction and hardness measurement techniques, in samples aged from 30 seconds to several hours. Finally, it was verified that the techniques employed were very adequate to the purposes of the present kinetics studies. (author)

  16. Kinetic Study on Ultrasound Assisted Biodiesel Production from Waste Cooking Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widayat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study a kinetic model of biodiesel production from waste cooking oil assisted by ultrasound power. The model considered the biodiesel production process as a 2nd order reversible reaction, while its kinetic parameters were estimated using MATLAB, based on data extracted from Hingu, et al. [1]. The data represented experiments under low-frequency ultrasonic wave (20 kHz and variations of temperature, power, catalyst concentration, and alcohol-oil molar ratio. Statistical analysis showed that the proposed model fits well to the experimental data with a determination coefficient (R2 higher than 0.9.

  17. STUDY ON THE KINETICS OF POLYMERIZATION OF MMA BY COPPER(Ⅱ) CHELATING RESINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangHongzuo; JiangYuanzhang; 等

    1993-01-01

    The polymerization of MMA initiated by copper(Ⅱ) chelating resins/CCl4 system was studied.From the kinetic data,the kinetic equation of polymerization can be expressed as Rp=Ke-56400/RT[MMA]1.57[CCl4]m[RESIN-Cu]0.18 where m:3-4.5,when[CCl4] 0.1-6.93M.The free radical polymerization mechanism is proposed.The primary radicals are formed by the process of complexation-chlorine transformation among the copper(Ⅱ) chelating resin,CCl4 and methacrylate.

  18. Kinetic study of the annealing reactions in Cu-Ni-Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donoso, E.

    2014-01-01

    The thermal aging of a Cu-45Ni-4Fe, Cu-34Ni-11Fe and Cu-33Ni-22Fe alloys tempered from 1173 K have been studied from Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and microhardness measurements. The analysis of DSC curves, from room temperature to 950 K, shows the presence of one exothermic reaction associated to the formation of FeNi 3 phase nucleating from a modulate structure, and one endothermic peak attributed to dissolution of this phase. Kinetic parameters were obtained using the usual Avrami-Erofeev equation, modified Kissinger method and integrated kinetic functions. Microhardness measurements confirmed the formation and dissolution of the FeNi 3 phase. (Author)

  19. Ergonomics, anthropometrics, and kinetic evaluation of gait: A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Rosa; Fontes, Liliana Magalhães Campos; Arezes, P.; Carvalho, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop appropriate changes in a pair of shoes in order to improve the gait of an individual selected for this case study. This analysis took into account ergonomic aspects, namely those relating to the individual’s anthropometrics. Gait analysis was done with the adapted footwear both before and after intervention.A conventional X-ray was performed, which revealed a 29-mm left lower limb shortening and possible foot adduction. The anthropometric assessment confir...

  20. A Kinetic Study of the Diels-Alder Reaction. An Experiment Illustrating Simple Second-Order Reaction Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Michael G.; Dills, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Describes an organic chemistry experiment for teaching the basic concepts of chemical kinetics. Provides background information about first- and second-order reactions, experimental procedures of the Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene and dimethyl fumarate, and the experimental results. (YP)

  1. Kinetic Monte Carlo studies of the reaction kinetics of crystal defects that diffuse one-dimensionally with occasional transverse migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Trinkaus, H.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    2007-01-01

    The reaction kinetics of the various species of mobile defects in irradiated materials are crucially dependent on the dimensionality of their migration. Sink strengths for one-dimensionally (1D) gliding interstitial loops undergoing occasional direction changes have been described analytically...

  2. Enzymatic production of sterculic acid from the novel Phoenix tree seed oil: Optimization and kinetic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, X.; Sun, S.

    2017-01-01

    Phoenix tree (Firmiana simplex) seed oil is a novel oil which is rich in sterculic acid. Sterculic acid, a cyclopropene fatty acid, can be used as the inhibitor of the stearoyl-CoA desaturase system and mammary carcinomas growth. In this work, Lipozyme TLIM-catalyzed hydrolysis of the novel Phoenix tree seed oil was used to prepare sterculic acid. High temperature GC-FID and the degree of hydrolysis (DH) were used to monitor the reaction progress. Effects of reaction variables on the hydrolysis were evaluated and optimized using response surface methodology. Results showed that sterculic acid can be successfully prepared from the novel seed oil, and the effect of reaction variables on the hydrolysis decreased in the order of reaction time > enzyme load > temperature. A high yield of fatty acids (DH, 98.2±0.8%) can be obtained under optimized conditions (45 ºC, mass ratio of water to oil 10:1, enzyme load 10%, and 18 h). The Arrhenius equation for the hydrolysis was LnV0 = 9.12 − 4721/T. The activation energy was 39.25KJ/mol. The kinetic values for Vmax, K/m were 0.232mol/(L∙min) and 0.084 mol/L, respectively. [es

  3. A kinetic study on the decomposition of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural into levulinic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girisuta, B.; Janssen, L. P. B. M.; Heeres, H. J.

    2006-01-01

    Levulinic acid (LA), accessible by the acid catalyzed degradation of biomass, is potentially a very versatile green intermediate chemical for the synthesis of various (bulk) chemicals for applications like fuel additives, polymers, and resin precursors. We report here a kinetic study on one of the

  4. A kinetic study of 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions in micellar media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rispens, T; Engberts, JBFN

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of the 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions (DC) of benzonitrile oxide with a series of N-substituted maleimides in micellar media have been investigated. Surfactants studied include anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate, cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, and a series of nonionic alkyl

  5. Stability and kinetic studies of supported ionic liquid phase catalysts for hydroformylation of propene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Haumann, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts have been studied with regard to their long-term stability in the continuous gas-phase hydroformylation of propene. Kinetic data have been acquired by variation of temperature, pressure, syngas composition, substrate concentration, and residence time...

  6. A calculational study on neutron kinetics and thermodynamics of a gaseous core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.

    1992-06-01

    A numerical and analytical study of the static and dynamic properties of a GCFR with oscillating fuel gas (uranium and carbon fluorides) is presented. Neutron kinetics parts of combined GCFR models are introduced. Thermodynamic properties of the GCFR and of the fuel gas are treated. (HP)

  7. Dissolution kinetics of volatile organic compound vapors in water : An integrated experimental and computational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba; Pontedeiro, Elizabeth M.; Pérez Guerrero, Jesús S.; Raoof, Amir; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid; van Genuchten, Martinus Th

    In this study we performed batch experiments to investigate the dissolution kinetics of trichloroethylene (TCE) and toluene vapors in water at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The batch systems consisted of a water reservoir and a connected headspace, the latter containing a small glass

  8. A Kinetic Degradation Study of Curcumin in Its Free Form and Loaded in Polymeric Micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naksuriya, Ornchuma; van Steenbergen, Mies J.; Sastre Torano, Javier; Okonogi, Siriporn; Hennink, Wim E.

    Curcumin, a phenolic compound, possesses many pharmacological activities and is under clinical evaluation to treat different diseases. However, conflicting data about its stability have been reported. In this study, the kinetic degradation of curcumin from a natural curcuminoid mixture under various

  9. Flow chemistry kinetic studies reveal reaction conditions for ready access to unsymmetrical trehalose analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mitul K; Davis, Benjamin G

    2010-10-07

    Monofunctionalization of trehalose, a widely-found symmetric plant disaccharide, was studied in a microreactor to give valuable kinetic insights that have allowed improvements in desymmetrization yields and the development of a reaction sequence for large scale monofunctionalizations that allow access to probes of trehalose's biological function.

  10. Application of point kinetic model in the study of fluidized bed reactor dynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco Tullio de; Streck, Elaine E.

    1995-01-01

    In this work the dynamical behavior of the fluidized bed nuclear reactor is analysed. The main goal consist to study the effect of the acceleration term in the point kinetic equations. Numerical simulations are reported considering constant acceleration. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs

  11. A kinetic study on the conversion of glucose to levulinic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girisuta, B; Janssen, LPBM; Heeres, HJ

    Levulinic acid has been identified as a promising green. biomass derived platform chemical. A kinetic study oil one of the key steps in the conversion of biomass to levulinic acid, i.e., the acid catalysed decomposition of glucose to levulinic acid has been performed. The experiments were Performed

  12. Green chemicals : A Kinetic Study on the Conversion of Glucose to Levulinic Acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girisuta, B.; Janssen, L.P.B.M.; Heeres, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Levulinic acid has been identified as a promising green, biomass derived platform chemical. A kinetic study on one of the key steps in the conversion of biomass to levulinic acid, i.e., the acid catalysed decomposition of glucose to levulinic acid has been performed. The experiments were performed

  13. The Nature of the Micellar Stern Region As Studied by Reaction Kinetics. 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, Niklaas J.; Serena, Paola; Blandamer, Michael J.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    2004-01-01

    The nature of rate-retarding effects of cationic micelles on the water-catalyzed hydrolyses of a series of para-substituted 1-benzoyl-1,2,4-triazoles (1a-f) and 1-benzoyl-3-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole (2) has been studied using kinetic methods. A comparison is drawn between medium effects in the micellar

  14. Kinetic study on the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to levulinic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girisuta, B.; Janssen, L. P. B. M.; Heeres, H. J.

    2007-01-01

    A variety of interesting bulk chemicals is accessible by the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose. An interesting example is levulinic acid, a versatile precursor for fuel additives, polymers, and resins. A detailed kinetic study on the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose to levulinic acid is

  15. The kinetics of the methanol synthesis on a copper catalyst: An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.N.R.; Borman, P.C.; Kuczynski, M.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1989-01-01

    The kinetics of the low pressure of methanol from feed gases containing solely CO and H2 were studied in an internally recycled gradientless reactor. As experimental accuracy impeded the application of high CO contents, the experimental range of mole fraction of CO was limited to 0.04 to 0.22. The

  16. A note on the use of ellipsometry for studying the kinetics of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    encountered in organic monolayer films, as would occur for example in ... dology advanced is applied to the kinetics of formation of a self-assembled monolayer of a well-studied ... Colvin et al 1992), this aspect of research assumes greater.

  17. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies of Charge-Transfer Complex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICOLAAS

    aFaculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan, 65174, Iran. bFaculty of ... tially ionic structure D+A–, and pointed out that a low ionization potential for the ... fering to the re-uptake of norepinephrine or serotonin.17 The study of CT ...

  18. Theoretical Studies in Chemical Kinetics - Annual Report, 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karplus, Martin

    1970-10-01

    The research performed includes (a) Alkali-Halide, Alkali-Halide (MX, M?X?) Exchange Reactions; (b) Inversion Problem; (c) Quantum Mechanics of Scattering Processes, (d) Transition State Analysis of Classical Trajectories, (e) Differential Cross Sections from Classical Trajectories; and (f) Other Studies.

  19. Equilibrium and kinetics studies of metal ion adsorption on dyed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Batch equilibration studies were conducted to determine the nature of adsorption of Zn (II) and Cu (II) onto dyed coconut pollens. The nature of adsorption of metal ions was explained using the Langmuir equation. The calculated values of equilibrium parameter indicated favourable adsorption by the adsorbents. Also the ...

  20. Kinetics studies of fungal biogas production from certain agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaerobic degradation of sugar cane and rice husk by cellulolytic fungus was studied respectively at optimum operational condition of concentration, 1:5 w/v of the lignocelluloses: water and temperature of 33oC. The average rates of biogas production determined for sugar cane and rice husk were 57cm3per day and ...

  1. Inventory Control: A Small Electronic Device for Studying Chemical Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rodriguez, A. L.; Calvo-Aguilar, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Shows how the rate of reaction can be studied using a simple electronic device that overcomes the difficulty students encounter in solving the differential equations describing chemical equilibrium. The device, used in conjunction with an oscilloscope, supplies the voltages that represent the chemical variables that take part in the equilibrium.…

  2. Study on kinetic of strain-aging in zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    The strain-aging in zircaloy-4 has been investigated in this work and a study of the general problems involving this phenomenon has been realized in Zirconium and its alloys. It has been verified that a yield point appears in the Zircaloy-4, when it is submitted to strain-aging treatment between the temperatures 200 0 C and 400 0 C. (author)

  3. Radical-induced oxidation of RAFT agents : a kinetic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Changxi; He, Junpo; Zhou, Yanwu; Gu, Yuankai; Yang, Yuliang

    2011-01-01

    Radical-induced oxidn. of reversible addn.-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agents is studied with respect to the effect of mol. structure on oxidn. rate. The radicals are generated by homolysis of either azobisisobutyronitrile or alkoxyamine and transformed in situ immediately into peroxy

  4. KINETIC STUDY OF LIQUID-PHASE ADSORPTIVE REMOVAL OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results from this study have revealed that the ATL waste, which is hitherto an environmental nuisance, has the ability to adsorb metal ions from solution and the data are relevant for optimal design of wastewater treatment plants. The low cost and easy availability of ATL waste make potential industrial application a ...

  5. Chemical kinetics on thermal decompositions of cumene hydroperoxide in cumene studied by calorimetry: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duh, Yih-Shing, E-mail: yihshingduh@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Occupation Safety and Health, Jen-Teh Junior College of Medicine, Nursing and Management, Miaoli, 35664, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, National United University, No. 1 Lien-Da, Miaoli, 36052, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-08-10

    Highlights: • Chemical kinetics on thermal decompositions of CHP are conducted and summarized. • Kinetics agrees well between data from DSC and adiabatic calorimetry. • Ea is determined to be about 120 kJ mol{sup −1} by various calorimetry. • LogA (A in s{sup −1}) is determined to be about 11.8 by various calorimetry. - Abstract: Study on chemical kinetics related to the thermal decomposition of cumene hydoperoxide (CHP) in cumene is summarized in this work. It is of great importance to gather and compare the differences between these kinetic parameters for further substantial applications in the chemical industry and process safety. CHP has been verified to possess an autocatalytic behavior by using microcalorimetry (such as TAM and C-80) operated at isothermal mode in the temperature range from 70 °C to 120 °C. However, it exhibits a reaction of n-th order detected by non-isothermal DSC scanning and adiabatic calorimeter. By the isothermal aging tests, activation energy and frequency factor in logA(s{sup −1}) were averaged to be (117.3 ± 5.9) kJ mol{sup −1}and (11.4 ± 0.3), respectively. Kinetic parameters acquired from data of interlaboratories by using heat-flow calorimetry, the averaged activation energy and frequency factor in logA(s{sup −1}) were (119.3 ± 11.3) kJ mol{sup −1}and (12.0 ± 0.2), respectively. On the analogy of results from adiabatic calorimetry, the activation energy and frequency factor in logA(s{sup −1}) were respectively averaged to be (122.4 ± 9.2) kJ mol{sup −1}and (11.8 ± 0.8). Five sets of kinetic models in relation to autocatalytic reactions are collected and discussed as well.

  6. Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

    2008-03-31

    This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling

  7. Kinetic study of ion exchange in phosphoric acid chelating resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brikci-Nigassa, Mounir; Hamouche, Hafida

    1995-11-01

    Uranium may be recovered as a by product of wet phosphoric acid using a method based on specific ion exchange resins. These resins called chelates contain amino-phosphonic functional groups. The resin studied in this work is a purolite S-940; uranium may be loaded on this resin from 30% P2O5 phosphoric acid in its reduced state. The influence of different parameters on the successive steps of the process have been studied in batch experiments: uranium reduction, loading and oxydation. Uranium may be eluted with ammonium carbonate and the resin regeneration may be done with hydrochloric acid.Ferric ions reduce the effective resin capacity considerably and inert fixation conditions are proposed to enhance uranium loading

  8. PIXE study of the kinetics of biomaterials ossification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, G.; Robaye, G.; Braye, F.; Oudadesse, H.; Irigaray, J. L.

    1994-05-01

    Biomaterials are frequently implanted in bones. This implantation is followed by a phenomenon of ossification. The purpose of this work was to study the time evolution of the gradient of characteristic atomic element's concentrations in the bone, the implant and the bone-implant interface. We have studied two types of neutral biomaterials: pure synthetic hydroxyapatite and porite's asteroid coral. The animal implantations have been made on sheep of the same age and sex having received the same basic diet. The implantations have been made in the cortical femur. On both sides of the implant, at the same distance, two screws were placed to allow further determination of the position of the implant. The PIXE method is particularly suitable here because of the possibility to analyze directly the samples without any preparation and to choose easily the dimensions of beam used for the gradient study. The X-rays have been detected with an ultra LEGe instead of the usual Si(Li) device to avoid the Si escape peak associated with the K α X-ray of calcium, the major constituent of bone. This peak is particularly disturbing here because its energy corresponds to the K α line of phosphorus, an important constituent of bone. The results of these determinations are presented and discussed.

  9. Muscular sufficiency, serum protein, enzymes and bioenergetic studies in chronic malnutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Mittal, R.D.; Agarwal, K.N.; Agarwal, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Muscle sufficiency was significantly lower in 1336 children with chronic malnutrition of moderate to severe degree. 18 children with a chronic moderate degree of malnutrition and 8 well-nourished age-matched controls were selected for biochemical and 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31-P MRS) studies. The results shows that: a) serum total protein, albumin, iron, calcium and inorganic phosphate were similar in both groups; b) serum enzyme levels were significantly increased in the malnuourished group; c) 31-P MRS showed significantly higher means for total ATP, β-ATP, α-ATP and inorganic phosphate for the malnourished compared to the control group. In chronic malnutrition, proteins are maintained by degradation in muscle resulting in release of amino acids and enzymes. 31-P MRS studies showing increases in total ATP, β-ATP and inorganic phosphate and a decrease in phosphocreatine suggest that ATP is maintained at the cost of phosphocreatine. 22 refs., 4 tabs. 1 fig

  10. Muscular sufficiency, serum protein, enzymes and bioenergetic studies in chronic malnutrition. [31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R K; Mittal, R D; Agarwal, K N; Agarwal, D K [Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India)

    1994-03-01

    Muscle sufficiency was significantly lower in 1336 children with chronic malnutrition of moderate to severe degree. 18 children with a chronic moderate degree of malnutrition and 8 well-nourished age-matched controls were selected for biochemical and 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31-P MRS) studies. The results shows that: (a) serum total protein, albumin, iron, calcium and inorganic phosphate were similar in both groups; (b) serum enzyme levels were significantly increased in the malnuourished group; (c) 31-P MRS showed significantly higher means for total ATP, [beta]-ATP, [alpha]-ATP and inorganic phosphate for the malnourished compared to the control group. In chronic malnutrition, proteins are maintained by degradation in muscle resulting in release of amino acids and enzymes. 31-P MRS studies showing increases in total ATP, [beta]-ATP and inorganic phosphate and a decrease in phosphocreatine suggest that ATP is maintained at the cost of phosphocreatine. 22 refs., 4 tabs. 1 fig.

  11. Enzyme mechanisms for pyruvate-to-lactate flux attenuation: a study of Sherpas, Quechuas, and hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochachka, P W; Stanley, C; McKenzie, D C; Villena, A; Monge, C

    1992-10-01

    During incremental exercise to fatigue under hypobaric hypoxia, Andean Quechua natives form and accumulate less plasma lactate than do lowlanders under similar conditions. This phenomenon of low lactate accumulation despite hypobaric hypoxia, first discovered some half century ago, is known in Quechuas to be largely unaffected by acute exposure to hypoxia or by acclimatization to sea level conditions. Earlier Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and metabolic biochemistry studies suggest that closer coupling of energy demand and energy supply in Quechuas allows given changes in work rate with relatively modest changes in muscle adenylate and phosphagen concentrations, thus tempering the activation of glycolytic flux to pyruvate--a coarse control mechanism operating at the level of overall pathway flux. Later studies of enzyme activities in skeletal muscles of Quechuas and of Sherpas have identified a finely-tuned control mechanism which by adaptive modifications of a few key enzymes apparently serves to specifically attenuate pyruvate flux to lactate.

  12. Application of liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for study of steroid-converting enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksík, Ivan; Mikulíková, Katerina; Pácha, Jirí; Kucka, Marek; Deyl, Zdenek

    2004-02-05

    A high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure ionization-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-API-ESI-MS) method was developed for the analysis of steroids in a study of steroid-converting enzymes. Separations ware done on a Zorbax Eclipse XDB-C18 column (eluted with a linear methanol-water-acetic acid gradient) and identification of the steroids involved was done by API-ESI-MS using positive ion mode and extracted ion analysis. The applicability of the present method for studying steroid metabolism was proven in assaying two steroid-converting enzymes (20beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) in various biological samples (rat and chicken intestine, chicken oviduct).

  13. Kinetic studies of sulfide mineral oxidation and xanthate adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiratta, Neeraj K.

    2000-10-01

    Sulfide minerals are a major source of metals; however, certain sulfide minerals, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are less desirable. Froth flotation is a commonly used separation technique, which requires the use of several reagents to float and depress different sulfide minerals. Xanthate, a thiol collector, has gained immense usage in sulfide minerals flotation. However, some sulfides are naturally hydrophobic and may float without a collector. Iron sulfides, such as pyrite and pyrrhotite, are few of the most abundant minerals, yet economically insignificant. Their existence with other sulfide minerals leads to an inefficient separation process as well as environmental problems, such as acid mine drainage during mining and processing and SO 2 emissions during smelting process. A part of the present study is focused on understanding their behavior, which leads to undesired flotation and difficulties in separation. The major reasons for the undesired flotation are attributed to the collectorless hydrophobicity and the activation with heavy metal ions. To better understand the collectorless hydrophobicity of pyrite, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) of freshly fractured pyrite electrodes was used to study the oxidation and reduction of the mineral. The EIS results showed that the rate of reaction increases with oxidation and reduction. At moderate oxidizing potentials, the rate of reaction is too slow to replenish hydrophilic iron species leaving hydrophobic sulfur species on the surface. However, at higher potentials, iron species are replaced fast enough to depress its flotation. Effects of pH and polishing were also explored using EIS. Besides collectorless hydrophobicity, the activation of pyrrhotite with nickel ions and interaction with xanthate ions makes the separation more difficult. DETA and SO2 are commonly used as pyrrhotite depressants; however, the mechanism is not very well understood. Contact angle measurements, cyclic voltammetry and Tafel

  14. Kinetics studies following state-selective laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this contract was the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions relevant to the excited state chemistry observed in discharges. We studied deactivation reactions and excitation transfer in collisions of excited states of xenon and krypton atoms with Ar, Kr, Xe and chlorine. The reactant states were excited selectively in two-photon transitions using tunable u.v. and v.u.v. lasers. Excited states produced by the collision were observed by their fluorescence. Reaction rates were measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measured interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra were obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. Our research then required several categories of experiments in order to fully understand a reaction process: 1. High resolution laser spectroscopy of bound molecules or lineshapes of colliding pairs is used to determine potential curves for reactants. 2. Direct measurements of state-to-state reaction rates were measured by studying the time dependent loss of excited reactants and the time dependent formation of products. 3. The energy selectivity of a laser can be used to excite reactants on an excited surface with controlled internuclear configurations. For free states of reactants (as exist in a gas cell) this has been termed laser assisted reactions, while for initially bound states (as chemically bound reactants or dimers formed in supersonic beams) the experiments have been termed photo-fragmentation spectroscopy

  15. A Kinetic Study of the Emulsion Polymerization of Vinyl Acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, N.; Nyhagen, L.

    1973-01-01

    The emulsion polymerization of vinyl acetate was studied at 50°C. It was found that the rate of polymerization was proportional to the 0.5 power of the initiator concentration and the 0.25 power of the number of particles. The number of particles was proportional to the power 0.5 ± 0.......05 of the emulsifier concentration, but independent of the initiator concentration. The limiting viscosity number of the polymers produced was independent of the initiator concentration and number of polymer particles. It is suggested that the mechanism of vinyl acetate emulsion polymerization is similar...

  16. A study of butyl acetate synthesis. 4-reaction kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro Orjuela Londoño; Fernando Leiva Lenis; Luis Alejandro Boyacá Mendivelso; Gerardo Rodríguez Niño; Luis María Carballo Suárez

    2006-01-01

    This work was aimed at studying liquid-phase acetic acid and butyl alcohol esterification reaction (P atm =0.76 Bar),using an ion exchange resin (Lewatit K-2431) as catalyst. The effect of the absence of internal and external mass transport on catalyst particles was established in the research conditions used here. A set of assays to determine the effect of catalyst load (0.5%, 1%, 2% w/w) temperature (73°C, 80°C, 87°C) and molar ratio (1:2, 1:1, 2:1 acid/alcohol) on reaction rate was carrie...

  17. Removal of mercury(II) from aqueous media using eucalyptus bark: Kinetic and equilibrium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodbane, Ilhem; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2008-01-01

    In this study, eucalyptus camaldulensis bark, a forest solid waste, is proposed as a novel material for the removal of mercury(II) from aqueous phase. The operating variables studied were sorbent dosage, ionic strength, stirring speed, temperature, solution pH, contact time, and initial metal concentration. Sorption experiments indicated that the sorption capacity was dependent on operating variables and the process was strongly pH-dependent. Kinetic measurements showed that the process was uniform and rapid. In order to investigate the mechanism of sorption, kinetic data were modeled using the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic equations, and intraparticle diffusion model. Among the kinetic models studied, the pseudo-second-order equation was the best applicable model to describe the sorption process. Equilibrium isotherm data were analyzed using the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherms. The Langmuir model yields a much better fit than the Freundlich model. Isotherms have also been used to obtain the thermodynamic parameters such as free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of sorption. The maximum sorption capacity was 33.11 mg g -1 at 20 deg. C and the negative value of free energy change indicated the spontaneous nature of sorption. These results demonstrate that eucalyptus bark is very effective in the removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions

  18. In vivo doses of butadiene epoxides as estimated from in vitro enzyme kinetics by using cob(I)alamin and measured hemoglobin adducts: An inter-species extrapolation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motwani, Hitesh V.; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is a rodent and human carcinogen. In the cancer tests, mice have been much more susceptible than rats with regard to BD-induced carcinogenicity. The species-differences are dependent on metabolic formation/disappearance of the genotoxic BD epoxy-metabolites that lead to variations in the respective in vivo doses, i.e. “area under the concentration-time curve” (AUC). Differences in AUC of the most gentoxic BD epoxy-metabolite, diepoxybutane (DEB), are considered important with regard to cancer susceptibility. The present work describes: the application of cob(I)alamin for accurate measurements of in vitro enzyme kinetic parameters associated with BD epoxy-metabolites in human, mouse and rat; the use of published data on hemoglobin (Hb) adduct levels of BD epoxides from BD exposure studies on the three species to calculate the corresponding AUCs in blood; and a parallelogram approach for extrapolation of AUC of DEB based on the in vitro metabolism studies and adduct data from in vivo measurements. The predicted value of AUC of DEB for humans from the parallelogram approach was 0.078 nM · h for 1 ppm · h of BD exposure compared to 0.023 nM · h/ppm · h as calculated from Hb adduct levels observed in occupational exposure. The corresponding values in nM · h/ppm · h were for mice 41 vs. 38 and for rats 1.26 vs. 1.37 from the parallelogram approach vs. experimental exposures, respectively, showing a good agreement. This quantitative inter-species extrapolation approach will be further explored for the clarification of metabolic rates/pharmacokinetics and the AUC of other genotoxic electrophilic compounds/metabolites, and has a potential to reduce and refine animal experiments. - Highlights: • In vitro metabolism to in vivo dose extrapolation of butadiene metabolites was proposed. • A parallelogram approach was introduced to estimate dose (AUC) in humans and rodents. • AUC of diepoxybutane predicted in humans was 0.078 nM h/ppm h

  19. In vivo doses of butadiene epoxides as estimated from in vitro enzyme kinetics by using cob(I)alamin and measured hemoglobin adducts: An inter-species extrapolation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motwani, Hitesh V., E-mail: hitesh.motwani@mmk.su.se; Törnqvist, Margareta

    2014-12-15

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) is a rodent and human carcinogen. In the cancer tests, mice have been much more susceptible than rats with regard to BD-induced carcinogenicity. The species-differences are dependent on metabolic formation/disappearance of the genotoxic BD epoxy-metabolites that lead to variations in the respective in vivo doses, i.e. “area under the concentration-time curve” (AUC). Differences in AUC of the most gentoxic BD epoxy-metabolite, diepoxybutane (DEB), are considered important with regard to cancer susceptibility. The present work describes: the application of cob(I)alamin for accurate measurements of in vitro enzyme kinetic parameters associated with BD epoxy-metabolites in human, mouse and rat; the use of published data on hemoglobin (Hb) adduct levels of BD epoxides from BD exposure studies on the three species to calculate the corresponding AUCs in blood; and a parallelogram approach for extrapolation of AUC of DEB based on the in vitro metabolism studies and adduct data from in vivo measurements. The predicted value of AUC of DEB for humans from the parallelogram approach was 0.078 nM · h for 1 ppm · h of BD exposure compared to 0.023 nM · h/ppm · h as calculated from Hb adduct levels observed in occupational exposure. The corresponding values in nM · h/ppm · h were for mice 41 vs. 38 and for rats 1.26 vs. 1.37 from the parallelogram approach vs. experimental exposures, respectively, showing a good agreement. This quantitative inter-species extrapolation approach will be further explored for the clarification of metabolic rates/pharmacokinetics and the AUC of other genotoxic electrophilic compounds/metabolites, and has a potential to reduce and refine animal experiments. - Highlights: • In vitro metabolism to in vivo dose extrapolation of butadiene metabolites was proposed. • A parallelogram approach was introduced to estimate dose (AUC) in humans and rodents. • AUC of diepoxybutane predicted in humans was 0.078 nM h/ppm h

  20. Experimental studies on plutonium kinetics in marine biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.; Heyraud, M.; Beasley, T.M.

    1975-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were undertaken to measure plutonium flux through marine organisms and to clarify the pathways by which this important element is cycled in the marine environment. The use of a specially prepared isotope, plutonium-237, allowed measurements to be made with standard NaI(Tl) scintillation techniques. Mussels, shrimp and worms were allowed to accumulate plutonium-237 from seawater for up to 25 days. Accumulation by shrimp was relatively slow and the degree of uptake was strongly influenced by moulting. Cast moults contained large fractions of the shrimps' plutonium content, indicating the high affinity of plutonium for surface areas. Only small amounts of the isotope in the moult are lost to water; hence, moulting is considered to be an important biological parameter in the biogeochemical cycling of plutonium. Mussels attained higher concentration factors than shrimp with most of the accumulated isotope (>80%) located in the shell. Byssus threads often contained large fractions of the mussels' plutonium-237 content and reached concentration factors as high as 4100. Worms readily accumulated plutonium-237 in either the +4 or +6 state, reaching concentration factors of approximately 200. Retention studies indicated a relatively slow loss of plutonium-237 from all animals studied. In the case of mussels, a computed half-time for a large fraction of the animals' plutonium content was of the order of 2 years. The more rapid loss from shrimp (Tbsub(1/2)=1.5 months) was due principally to the large fraction of plutonium lost at moult. Food chain studies with shrimp indicated that tissue build-up via plutonium ingestion would be a slow process. Total excretion was not entirely a result of passing contaminated food through the gut; approximately 15% of the ingested plutonium was removed from the contaminated food and subsequently excreted by processes other than defaecation of labelled food. Ratios of four different plutonium isotopes used in the