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Sample records for enzyme ece implications

  1. Cardiac expression patterns of endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE): Implications for conduction system development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedmera, David; Harris, B. S.; Grant, E.; Zhang, N.; Jourdan, J.; Kurková, D.; Gourdie, R. G.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 237, - (2008), s. 1746-1753 ISSN 1058-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/08/0615 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Purkyně Fellowship Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : chick embryo * heart development * immunohistochemistry Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.018, year: 2008

  2. Lactoferricin B-derived peptides with inhibitory effects on ECE-dependent vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Musoles, Ricardo; López-Díez, José Javier; Torregrosa, Germán; Vallés, Salvador; Alborch, Enrique; Manzanares, Paloma; Salom, Juan B

    2010-10-01

    Endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), a key peptidase in the endothelin (ET) system, cleaves inactive big ET-1 to produce active ET-1, which binds to ET(A) receptors to exert its vasoconstrictor and pressor effects. ECE inhibition could be beneficial in the treatment of hypertension. In this study, a set of eight lactoferricin B (LfcinB)-derived peptides, previously characterized in our laboratory as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides, was examined for their inhibitory effects on ECE. In vitro inhibitory effects on ECE activity were assessed using both the synthetic fluorogenic peptide substrate V (FPS V) and the natural substrate big ET-1. To study vasoactive effects, an ex vivo functional assay was developed using isolated rabbit carotid artery segments. With FPS V, only four LfcinB-derived peptides induced inhibition of ECE activity, whereas the eight peptides showed ECE inhibitory effects with big ET-1 as substrate. Regarding the ex vivo assays, six LfcinB-derived peptides showed inhibition of big ET-1-induced, ECE-dependent vasoconstriction. A positive correlation between the inhibitory effects of LfcinB-derived peptides on ECE activity when using big ET-1 and the inhibitory effects on ECE-dependent vasoconstriction was shown. ECE-independent vasoconstriction induced by ET-1 was not affected, thus discarding effects of LfcinB-derived peptides on ET(A) receptors or intracellular signal transduction mechanisms. In conclusion, a combined in vitro and ex vivo method to assess the effects of potentially antihypertensive peptides on the ET system has been developed and applied to show the inhibitory effects on ECE-dependent vasoconstriction of six LfcinB-derived peptides, five of which were dual vasopeptidase (ACE/ECE) inhibitors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. ECE diagnostics for RTO/RC ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vayakis, G.; Bartlett, D.V.; Costley, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the current status of the Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostic on the Reduced Technical Objectives/Reduced Cost International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (RTO/RC ITER). It discusses the implications of the new machine design on the measurement requirements, the ability of the diagnostic technique to meet these, and the changes in the implementation imposed by the new layout. Finally, it outlines the physics studies, design and R and D work required prior to the detailed design and construction of the diagnostic. Key results are: (i) that the localisation of the measurement is similar to that in ITER-FDR (40-100 mm in X-mode, 60-200 mm in O-mode for the reference scenario), so that the relative spatial resolution degrades in this, smaller, machine, and (ii) the expected effect of transport barriers on the temperature profile in the high temperature region will be poorly resolved, because the effect of the temperature gradient on the outboard side is to degrade the resolution to (∼250 mm in X-mode, ∼350 mm in O-mode). Nevertheless ECE will be able to make a unique and useful contribution to the RTO/RC ITER measurement set

  4. Recent developments of ECE diagnostics at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, E. de la; Sanchez, J. [Association Euratom-Ciemat para Fusion, Ciemant (Spain); Cientoli, C.; Blanchard, P.; Joffrin, E.; Mazon, D. [Association Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, IFP-CNR, Milano (Italy); Riva, M.; Zerbini, M. [Association Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione Centro Ricerche Energia Frascati (Italy); Conway, G. [IPP-Euratom Association, Garching (Germany); Felton, R.; Fessey, J.; Gowers, C. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX, Association Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Padova (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    In JET, two types of ECE (electron cyclotron emission) instruments are routinely operated to provide electron temperature measurements: a Michelson interferometer and a heterodyne radiometer. ECE diagnostics are able to provide time-resolved electron temperature profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution, and have proven to play a fundamental role in the investigation and development of internal transport barriers (ITBs) in JET. In this paper we report on the major upgrade of the ECE diagnostics systems currently in progress at JET. Diagnostic developments include an upgrade of the multi-channel heterodyne radiometer, aimed at extending the radial region over which T{sub e} measurement can be performed, and the installation of a new Michelson interferometer with fast scanning capability, to improve the frequency and temporal resolution of the multi-harmonic ECE measurements at JET. Moreover, a future extension of the ECE system, an oblique ECE diagnostic to measure the ECE spectra at different angles with respect to the normal to the magnetic field, is being developed. This diagnostic is expected to give valuable insight into the interpretation of ECE measurements in high T{sub e}-plasmas and should be available for measurements once JET resumes operation in 2005.In this paper, the recent developments in the JET ECE diagnostic system will be described and illustrated with some recent results, with an emphasis on issues related with calibration stability, high-Te plasmas and ITB studies. Some of these issues will be discussed in the context of ITER.

  5. ECE Measurements using Doppler-shifted observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, L.; Auge, N.; Giruzzi, G.; Javon, C.; Laurent, L.; Talvard, M.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental evidence is reported for asymmetries in Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) spectra measured along oblique lines of sight during Ohmic discharges. These could be attributed to small deviations from the Maxwellian distribution, due either to anomalous transport or to an energetic electron population. A clear interpretation of such asymmetries requires further experimental investigation. During Lower Hybrid Current Drive experiments, intense peaks appear in the optically thin low-frequency region of the ECE spectrum in windows between cut-off layers. The effects of the inductive electric field and RF power on ECE spectra have been investigated using a Fokker-Planck code. The interpretation is consistent with observations at different power levels

  6. Investigating Teacher Leadership in ECE Centres in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Heikka, Johanna; Halttunen, Leena; Waniganayake, Manjula

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the enactment of teacher leadership in early childhood education (ECE) centres in Finland. Theoretically, the study was informed by the emerging scholarship of early childhood distributed pedagogical leadership and school based research on teacher leadership as well as classical theorizing of ECE leadership. Staff from three ECE centres participated as a purposive sample of informants in this study. The study involved participative observations of ECE sta...

  7. Assessment Of An Oblique ECE Diagnostic For ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.; Harvey, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    A systematic disagreement between the electron temperature measured by electron cyclotron emission (TECE) and laser Thomson scattering (TTS), that increases with TECE, is observed in JET and TFTR plasmas, such that TECE ∼1.2 TTS when TECE ∼10 keV. The disagreement is consistent with a non-Maxwellian distortion in the bulk electron momentum distribution. ITER is projected to operate with Te(0) ∼ 20-40 keV so the disagreement between TECE and TTS could be > 50%, with significant physics implications. The GENRAY ray tracing code predicts that a two-view ECE system, with perpendicular and moderately oblique viewing antennas, would be sufficient to reconstruct a two-temperature bulk distribution. If the electron momentum distribution remains Maxwellian the moderately oblique view could still be used to measure Te(R). A viewing dump will not be required for the oblique view and plasma refraction will be minimal. The oblique view has a similar radial resolution to the perpendicular view, but with some reduction in radial coverage. Oblique viewing angles of up to 20 o can be implemented without a major revision to the front end of the existing ITER ECE diagnostic design.

  8. Dual NEP/ECE inhibition improves endothelial function in mesenteric resistance arteries of 32-week-old SHR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemkens, Pieter; Spijkers, Leon Ja; Meens, Merlijn J

    2017-01-01

    Endothelin 1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor, pro-mitogenic and pro-inflammatory peptide, may promote development of endothelial dysfunction and arterial remodeling. ET-1 can be formed through cleavage of big-ET-1 by endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) or neutral endopeptidase (NEP). We investiga...

  9. Gender and professionalisation in the Danish ECE workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen Baagøe

    Despite one of the highest proportions of men in ECEs, the percentage of men in Danish ECEs has not risen over the last 15 years. Main policy focus has been on possible strategies of professionalization. The presentation explores the practical difficulties of the two different strategies and the ...

  10. First results and future projects for Petula ECE measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How, J.; Melin, G.; Girard, A.

    1985-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics are being installed on the Petula-B tokamak. First results include extensive measurements of the total ECE radiation, integrated over 50-1000 GHz, during ohmic and current drive operation, and preliminary interferograms from the polarizing interferometer. Future plans are discussed

  11. Fast polarizers installation for ECRH and ECE in TCV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, M.; Goodman, T.P.; Felici, F.; Porte, L.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the installation of fast polarizers for ECRH injection and ECE diagnostics, in the TCV tokamak. The main goal is to change the polarization during a plasma shot and react to changing conditions such as: plasma current and position, ECRH injection angles as well as ECE oblique

  12. Dynamic changes in the secondary structure of ECE-1 and XCE account for their different substrate specificities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ul-Haq Zaheer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-converting enzyme (XCE involved in nervous control of respiration, is a member of the M13 family of zinc peptidases, for which no natural substrate has been identified yet. In contrast, it’s well characterized homologue endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1 showed broad substrate specificity and acts as endopeptidase as well as dipeptidase. To explore the structural differences between XCE and ECE-1, homology model of XCE was built using the complex structure of ECE-1 with phosphoramidon (pdb-id: 3DWB as template. Phosphoramidon was docked into the binding site of XCE whereas phosphate oxygen of the inhibitor was used as water molecule to design the apo forms of both enzymes. Molecular dynamics simulation of both enzymes was performed to analyze the dynamic nature of their active site residues in the absence and presence of the inhibitor. Results Homology model of XCE explained the role of non-conserved residues of its S2’ subsite. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations identified the flexible transitions of F149/I150, N566/N571, W714/W719, and R145/R723 residues of ECE-1/XCE for the strong binding of the inhibitor. Secondary structure calculations using DSSP method reveals the folding of R145/R723 residue of ECE-1/XCE into β-sheet structure while unfolding of the S2’ subsite residues in aECE-1 and sustained compact folding of that of aXCE. The results evaluated are in good agreement with available experimental data, thus providing detailed molecular models which can explain the structural and specificities differences between both zinc peptidases. Conclusions Secondary structure changes of both enzymes during the simulation time revealed the importance of β-sheet structure of R145/R723 for its binding with the terminal carboxylate group of the inhibitor. Unfolding of the α-helix comprising the S2’ subsite residues in aECE-1 correlate well with its endopeptidase activity while their compact folding in aXCE may

  13. Update on the status of the ITER ECE diagnostic design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerable progress has been made on the design of the ITER electron cyclotron emission (ECE diagnostic over the past two years. Radial and oblique views are still included in the design in order to measure distortions in the electron momentum distribution, but the oblique view has been redirected to reduce stray millimeter radiation from the electron cyclotron heating system. A major challenge has been designing the 1000 K calibration sources and remotely activated mirrors located in the ECE diagnostic shield module (DSM in the equatorial port plug #09. These critical systems are being modeled and prototypes are being developed. Providing adequate neutron shielding in the DSM while allowing sufficient space for optical components is also a significant challenge. Four 45-meter long low-loss transmission lines transport the 70–1000 GHz ECE from the DSM to the ECE instrumentation room. Prototype transmission lines are being tested, as are the polarization splitter modules that separate O-mode and X-mode polarized ECE. A highly integrated prototype 200–300 GHz radiometer is being tested on the DIII-D tokamak in the USA. Design activities also include integration of ECE signals into the ITER plasma control system and determining the hardware and software architecture needed to control and calibrate the ECE instruments.

  14. Internal Magnetic Configuration Measured by ECE Imaging on EAST Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ming; Wen Yizhi; Xie Jinlin; Yu Changxuan; Gao Bingxi; Xu Xiaoyuan; Liu Wandong; Hu Liqun; Sun Youwen; Qian Jinping; Wan Baonian

    2013-01-01

    ECE imaging (electron cyclotron emission imaging) is an important diagnostic which can give 2D imaging of temperature fluctuation in the core of tokamak. A method based on ECE imaging is introduced which can give the information of the position of magnetic axis and the structure of internal magnetic surface for EAST tokamak. The EFIT equilibrium reconstruction is not reliable due to the absence of important core diagnostic at the initial phase for EAST, so the information given by ECE imaging could help to improve the accuracy of EFIT equilibrium reconstruction. (magnetically confined plasma)

  15. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  16. Fast polarizers installation for ECRH and ECE in TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Miguel, E-mail: miguel.silva@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Goodman, Timothy; Felici, Federico; Porte, Laurie [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    We report on the installation of fast polarizers for ECRH injection and ECE diagnostics, in the TCV tokamak. The main goal is to change the polarization during a plasma shot and react to changing conditions such as: plasma current and position, ECRH injection angles as well as ECE oblique observation angle and correlation ECE frequency. This will allow tracking of plasma variations, find optimum parameters to maximize ECRH absorption and improve the quality and consistency of ECE measurements. The polarization is varied using two fast polarizers, from General Atomics, positioned either in the evacuated transmission line for ECRH, or in a similar non-evacuated line near a real-time moveable directional antenna for ECE. A programmable driver is used to control a servo-motor and allows three operation modes during a plasma shot: fixed angle position, pre-programmed reference waveform and following of a real-time reference waveform. Preliminary tests of the motor controller achieved an 8 Hz bandwidth for a {+-}4{sup o} amplitude motion and a 2.2 Hz bandwidth for a {+-}4{sup o} amplitude motion. The fast polarizers are presently in the ECE system and the control hardware is being installed.

  17. Carbonic Anhydrase: An Efficient Enzyme with Possible Global Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Boone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As the global atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 and other greenhouse gases continue to grow to record-setting levels, so do the demands for an efficient and inexpensive carbon sequestration system. Concurrently, the first-world dependence on crude oil and natural gas provokes concerns for long-term availability and emphasizes the need for alternative fuel sources. At the forefront of both of these research areas are a family of enzymes known as the carbonic anhydrases (CAs, which reversibly catalyze the hydration of CO2 into bicarbonate. CAs are among the fastest enzymes known, which have a maximum catalytic efficiency approaching the diffusion limit of 108 M−1s−1. As such, CAs are being utilized in various industrial and research settings to help lower CO2 atmospheric emissions and promote biofuel production. This review will highlight some of the recent accomplishments in these areas along with a discussion on their current limitations.

  18. Status of the design of the ITER ECE diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.; Austin, M. E.; Beno, J. H.; Danani, S.; Ellis, R. F.; Feder, R.; Hesler, J. L.; Hubbard, A. E.; Johnson, D. W.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, V.; Ouroua, A.; Pandya, H. K. B.; Phillips, P. E.; Roman, C.; Rowan, W. L.; Udintsev, V.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.; Kubo, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the baseline design for the ITER electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic has entered the detailed preliminary design phase. Two plasma views are planned, a radial view and an oblique view that is sensitive to distortions in the electron momentum distribution near the average thermal momentum. Both views provide high spatial resolution electron temperature profiles when the momentum distribution remains Maxwellian. The ECE diagnostic system consists of the front-end optics, including two 1000 K calibration sources, in equatorial port plug EP9, the 70-1000 GHz transmission system from the front-end to the diagnostics hall, and the ECE instrumentation in the diagnostics hall. The baseline ECE instrumentation will include two Michelson interferometers that can simultaneously measure ordinary and extraordinary mode ECE from 70 to 1000 GHz, and two heterodyne radiometer systems, covering 122-230 GHz and 244-355 GHz. Significant design challenges include 1) developing highly-reliable 1000 K calibration sources and the associated shutters/mirrors, 2) providing compliant couplings between the front-end optics and the polarization splitter box that accommodate displacements of the vacuum vessel during plasma operations and bake out, 3) protecting components from damage due to stray ECH radiation and other intense millimeter wave emission and 4) providing the low-loss broadband transmission system

  19. Cadence Feedback With ECE PEDO to Monitor Physical Activity Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardic, Fusun; Göcer, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the monitoring capabilities of the equipment for clever exercise pedometer (ECE PEDO) that provides audible feedback when the person exceeds the upper and lower limits of the target step numbers per minute and to compare step counts with Yamax SW-200 (YX200) as the criterion pedometer. A total of 30 adult volunteers (15 males and 15 females) were classified as normal weight (n = 10), overweight (n = 10), and obese (n = 10). After the submaximal exercise test on a treadmill, the moderate intensity for walking was determined by using YX200 pedometer and then the number of steps taken in a minute was measured. Lower and upper limits of steps per minute (cadence) were recorded in ECE PEDO providing audible feedback when the person's walking speed gets out of the limits. Volunteers walked for 30 minutes in the individual step count range by attaching the ECE PEDO and YX200 pedometer on both sides of the waist belt in the same session. Step counts of the volunteers were recorded. Wilcoxon, Spearman correlation, and Bland–Altman analyses were performed to show the relationship and agreement between the results of 2 devices. Subjects took an average of 3511 ± 426 and 3493 ± 399 steps during 30 minutes with ECE PEDO and criterion pedometer, respectively. About 3500 steps taken by ECE PEDO reflected that this pedometer has capability of identifying steps per minute to meet moderate intensity of physical activity. There was a strong correlation between step counts of both devices (P PEDO and YX200 pedometer in the Bland–Altman analysis. Although both devices showed a strong similarity in counting steps, the ECE PEDO provides monitoring of intensity such that a person can walk in a specified time with a desired speed. PMID:26962822

  20. Spatial Resolution of the ECE for JET Typical Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribaldos, V.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to obtain estimations of the spatial resolution of the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) phenomena for the typical plasmas found in JET tokamak. The analysis of the spatial resolution of the ECE is based on the underlying physical process of emission and a working definition is presented and discussed. In making these estimations a typical JET pulse is being analysed taking into account the magnetic configuration, the density and temperature profiles, obtained with the EFIT code and from the LIDAR diagnostic. Ray tracing simulations are performed for a Maxwellian plasma taking into account the antenna pattern. (Author) 5 refs

  1. Measurement of periodically varying ECE spectra using a Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, L.; Rodriguez, L.; Talvard, M.

    1987-01-01

    In some tokamak experiments the ECE spectrum is periodically varying. If the modulation frequency is small enough (less than 10 Hz) the plasma can be considered as quasi-stationary during the typical scan time of most of the Michelson interferometers. It is possible to measure simply ECE spectra at different times of the oscillation. We present here a technique which allows to measure smaller fluctuations at larger frequencies. However the analysis requires a large number of periods of oscillation at constant frequency and a scanning mirror moving at constant velocity

  2. Radiation transport modelling for the interpretation of oblique ECE measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denk Severin S.

    2017-01-01

    Since radiation transport modelling is required for the interpretation of oblique ECE diagnostics we present in this paper an extended forward model that supports oblique lines of sight. To account for the refraction of the line of sight, ray tracing in the cold plasma approximation was added to the model. Furthermore, an absorption coefficient valid for arbitrary propagation was implemented. Using the revised model it is shown that for the oblique ECE Imaging diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade there can be a significant difference between the cold resonance position and the point from which most of the observed radiation originates.

  3. First results of the ECE measurements on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcin, M.; Javon, C.; Laurent, L.; Masset, R.; Rodriguez, L.; Talvard, M.

    1989-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Tore Supra experiments in april 1988, the ECE diagnostic has been partially operated. The main elements of the diagnostic have been tested and first results have been obtained with a Michelson interferometer and a vertical array of antennae. According to the latter arrangement, the first inverted emissivity profiles are presented

  4. IEA SHC Task 42/ECES Annex 29 WG A1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ristić, Alenka; Furbo, Simon; Moser, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    An overview on the recent results on the engineering and characterization of sorption materials, PCMs and TCMs investigated in the working group WG A1 “Engineering and processing of TES materials” of IEA SHC Task 42 / ECES Annex 29 (Task 4229) entitled “Compact Thermal Energy Storage” is presented....

  5. Absolute intensity calibration for ECE measurements on EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong; Liu Xiang; Zhao Hailin

    2014-01-01

    In this proceeding, the results of the in-situ absolute intensity calibration for ECE measurements on EAST are presented. A 32-channel heterodyne radiometer system and a Michelson interferometer on EAST have been calibrated independently, and preliminary results from plasma operation indicate a good agreement between the electron temperature profiles obtained with different systems. (author)

  6. mRNA levels of enzymes and receptors implicated in arachidonic acid metabolism in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Armas, Rafael; Durand, Karine; Guillaudeau, Angélique; Weinbreck, Nicolas; Robert, Sandrine; Moreau, Jean-Jacques; Caire, François; Acosta, Gisela; Pebet, Matias; Chaunavel, Alain; Marin, Benoît; Labrousse, François; Denizot, Yves

    2010-07-01

    Gliomas are tumors of the central nervous system derived from glial cells. They show cellular heterogeneity and lack specific diagnostic markers. Although a possible role for the eicosanoid cascade has been suggested in glioma tumorigenesis, the relationship between enzymes and receptors implicated in arachidonic acid metabolism, with histological tumor type has not yet been determined. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to measure and compare transcript levels of enzymes and receptors implicated in both lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways between oligodendrogliomas, astrocytomas, glioblastomas and mixed oligoastrocytomas. Arachidonic acid metabolism-related enzymes and receptor transcripts (i) were underexpressed in classical oligodendrogliomas compared to astrocytomas and/or glioblastomas, (ii) differed between astrocytomas and glioblastomas and (iii) had an intermediate expression in mixed oligoastrocytomas. mRNA levels of enzymes and receptors implicated both in lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways differed significantly in gliomas according to the histological type. Copyright 2010 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Catalysis by a de novo zinc-mediated protein interface: implications for natural enzyme evolution and rational enzyme engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der, Bryan S; Edwards, David R; Kuhlman, Brian

    2012-05-08

    Here we show that a recent computationally designed zinc-mediated protein interface is serendipitously capable of catalyzing carboxyester and phosphoester hydrolysis. Although the original motivation was to design a de novo zinc-mediated protein-protein interaction (called MID1-zinc), we observed in the homodimer crystal structure a small cleft and open zinc coordination site. We investigated if the cleft and zinc site at the designed interface were sufficient for formation of a primitive active site that can perform hydrolysis. MID1-zinc hydrolyzes 4-nitrophenyl acetate with a rate acceleration of 10(5) and a k(cat)/K(M) of 630 M(-1) s(-1) and 4-nitrophenyl phosphate with a rate acceleration of 10(4) and a k(cat)/K(M) of 14 M(-1) s(-1). These rate accelerations by an unoptimized active site highlight the catalytic power of zinc and suggest that the clefts formed by protein-protein interactions are well-suited for creating enzyme active sites. This discovery has implications for protein evolution and engineering: from an evolutionary perspective, three-coordinated zinc at a homodimer interface cleft represents a simple evolutionary path to nascent enzymatic activity; from a protein engineering perspective, future efforts in de novo design of enzyme active sites may benefit from exploring clefts at protein interfaces for active site placement.

  8. Morning Receptions in a Danish ECE Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Ida; Gravgaard, Mette Lykke

    This paper focus on a special pedagogical context; morning receptions as a learning environment. The studies of mornings are part of a 3 year long research project in which different types of learning environments were investigated. Few studies have researched morning receptions in this perspecti...... even though pedagogues often emphasize that this particular pedagogical context have implications on the children’s wellbeing and learning possibilities throughout the day....

  9. Calibration methods for ECE systems with microwave sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubbing, B.J.D.; Kissel, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors investigated the feasibility of two methods for calibration of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) systems, both based on the use of a microwave source. In the first method -called the Antenna Pattern Integration (API) method - the microwave source is scanned in space, so as to simulate a large - area - blackbody -source. In the second method -called the Untuned Cavity (UC) method -an untuned cavity, fed by the microwave source, is used to simulate a blackbody. For both methods, the hardware required to perform partly automated calibrations was developed. The microwave based methods were compared with a large area blackbody calibration on two different ECE systems, a Michelson interferometer and a grating polychromator. The API method was found to be more successful than the UC method. (author)

  10. Infusing Technical Communication and Teamwork within the ECE Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    KEDROWICZ, By April; WATANABE, Sundy

    2006-01-01

    This paper highlights a unique approach to infusing formal training and practice in oral and written communication and teamwork development in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of Utah. Faculty and graduate (Ph.D.) students from the College of Humanities have teamed up with faculty from engineering to develop communication and teamwork instruction that is integrated into the existing engineering curriculum. These skills are used as a vehicle ...

  11. Detailed Performance Assessment for the ITER ECE Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, W.; Austin, M.; Houshmandyar, S.; Phillips, P.; Beno, J.; Bryant, A.; Ouroua, A.; Weeks, D.; Hubbard, A.; Taylor, G.

    2017-10-01

    One of the primary diagnostics for electron temperature (Te) measurement on ITER is based on the detection of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) Here we describe the predicted performance of the newly completed ECE diagnostic design by quantitatively following the emission from the plasma to the instruments and including the calibration method to assess accuracy. Operation of the diagnostic at 5.3 T is the main interest here but critical features of the emission spectra for 2.65 T and 1.8 T will be described. ECE will be collected by two very similar optical systems: one a radial view, the other an oblique view. Both measurements are used for Te while the oblique view also allows detection of non-thermal distortion in the electron distribution. An in-vacuum calibration source is included in the front end of each view to calibrate out the effect of any degradation of in-vessel optics. Following collection, the emission is split into orthogonal polarizations and transmitted to the detection instruments via waveguides filled with dry nitrogen, a choice that simplifies construction and analysis. Near the instruments, a switchyard is used to select which polarization and view is detected by each instrument. The design for the radiometer used for 5.3 T will be described in detail. Supported by PPPL/US-DA via subcontract S013464-H to UT Austin.

  12. Effects of peripheral physical phenomena on ECE spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airoldi, A.; Ramponi, G.

    1993-01-01

    In large fusion Tokamaks the measurement of the Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) from the low field side, perpendicularly viewing chord, is by now a standard way of obtaining the radial electron temperature profile. In high temperature plasmas the condition of large optical thickness for the second harmonic X-mode may be easily satisfied even for frequencies corresponding to the edge plasma region, allowing the temperature profile to be inferred. Recent experimental observations of enhanced emission at frequencies associated with the extreme edge of the profile in H-mode JET plasmas have been interpreted as the effect of a small fraction of suprathermal electrons. It is well known that the ECE spectra are very sensitive to the presence of non-thermal electron components, thus it is important to interpret the ECE signals as an indication of the possible deviation of the electron distribution function from a 'pure' Maxwellian and to discern under which conditions they are a good measure of the plasma thermal energy. (author) 3 refs., 6 figs

  13. Hyphae-specific genes HGC1, ALS3, HWP1, and ECE1 and relevant signaling pathways in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yan; He, Hong; Dong, Yan; Pan, Hengbiao

    2013-12-01

    Fungal virulence mechanisms include adhesion to epithelia, morphogenesis, production of secretory hydrolytic enzymes, and phenotype switching, all of which contribute to the process of pathogenesis. A striking feature of the biology of Candida albicans is its ability to grow in yeast, pseudohyphal, and hyphal forms. The hyphal form plays an important role in causing disease, by invading epithelial cells and causing tissue damage. In this review, we illustrate some of the main hyphae-specific genes, namely HGC1, UME6, ALS3, HWP1, and ECE1, and their relevant and reversed signal transduction pathways in reactions stimulated by environmental factors, including pH, CO2, and serum.

  14. Proteinaceous inhibitors of carbohydrate-active enzymes in cereals – Implication in agriculture, cereal-processing and nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juge, N.; Svensson, Birte

    2006-01-01

    Enzymes that degrade, modify, or create glycosidic bonds are involved in carbohydrate biosynthesis and remodelling. Microbial carbohydrate-active enzymes form the basis of current green technology in the food, feed, starch, paper and pulp industries and the revolution in genomics may offer long...... knowledge on their structure, function, and implication in cereal processing, agriculture and nutrition. (c) 2006 Society of Chemical Industry...

  15. Inhibition of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes by lapatinib, pazopanib, regorafenib and sorafenib: Implications for hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, John O; Chau, Nuy; Rowland, Andrew; Burns, Kushari; McKinnon, Ross A; Mackenzie, Peter I; Tucker, Geoffrey T; Knights, Kathleen M; Kichenadasse, Ganessan

    2017-04-01

    Kinase inhibitors (KIs) are a rapidly expanding class of drugs used primarily for the treatment of cancer. Data relating to the inhibition of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes by KIs is sparse. However, lapatinib (LAP), pazopanib (PAZ), regorafenib (REG) and sorafenib (SOR) have been implicated in the development of hyperbilirubinemia in patients. This study aimed to characterise the role of UGT1A1 inhibition in hyperbilirubinemia and assess the broader potential of these drugs to perpetrate drug-drug interactions arising from UGT enzyme inhibition. Twelve recombinant human UGTs from subfamilies 1A and 2B were screened for inhibition by LAP, PAZ, REG and SOR. IC 50 values for the inhibition of all UGT1A enzymes, except UGT1A3 and UGT1A4, by the four KIs were enzyme identified to date. In vitro-in vivo extrapolation indicates that inhibition of UGT1A1 contributes significantly to the hyperbilirubinemia observed in patients treated with REG and SOR, but not with LAP and PAZ. Inhibition of other UGT1A1 substrates in vivo is likely. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Extensive Lysine Methylation in Hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea: Potential Implications for Protein Stability and Recombinant Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine H. Botting

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In eukarya and bacteria, lysine methylation is relatively rare and is catalysed by sequence-specific lysine methyltransferases that typically have only a single-protein target. Using RNA polymerase purified from the thermophilic crenarchaeum Sulfolobus solfataricus, we identified 21 methyllysines distributed across 9 subunits of the enzyme. The modified lysines were predominantly in α-helices and showed no conserved sequence context. A limited survey of the Thermoproteus tenax proteome revealed widespread modification with 52 methyllysines in 30 different proteins. These observations suggest the presence of an unusual lysine methyltransferase with relaxed specificity in the crenarchaea. Since lysine methylation is known to enhance protein thermostability, this may be an adaptation to a thermophilic lifestyle. The implications of this modification for studies and applications of recombinant crenarchaeal enzymes are discussed.

  17. Cadence Feedback With ECE PEDO to Monitor Physical Activity Intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Ardic, Fusun; G?cer, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the monitoring capabilities of the equipment for clever exercise pedometer (ECE PEDO) that provides audible feedback when the person exceeds the upper and lower limits of the target step numbers per minute and to compare step counts with Yamax SW-200 (YX200) as the criterion pedometer. A total of 30 adult volunteers (15 males and 15 females) were classified as normal weight (n?=?10), overweight (n?=?10), and obese (n?=?10). After the submaxima...

  18. Upgraded ECE radiometer on the Tore Supra Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segui, J.L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M.; Maget, P.; Udintsev, V.S.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.

    2004-01-01

    An upgraded 32-channel heterodyne radiometer, 1 GHz spaced, is used on the Tore-Supra tokamak to measure the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the ordinary mode (O1) and 94-126.5 GHz for the extraordinary mode (X2). From now radial resolution is essentially limited by ECE relativistic effects related to electron temperature and density, not by the channels frequency spacing. For example, this leads to precise electron temperature mapping during magneto hydrodynamic activities (MHD). In the equatorial plane, we use a dual polarisation Gaussian optics lens antenna. It has low spreading and a perpendicular line-of-sight that gives ECE measurements very low refraction and Doppler effects. Assuming that the plasma is a black body and there is no overlap between ECE harmonics, one can deduce the electron temperature profile by using the first harmonic ordinary mode (O1) or the second harmonic extraordinary mode (X2). The principle radio frequency emitter (RF) has its frequencies down shifted into intermediary frequencies (IF) that span from 2 to 18 GHz in the single side band mode (SSB). It is amplified by low noise IF amplifiers before forming channels. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94-110 GHz. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 GHz) in order to perform electron temperature measurements during electron cyclotron resonance heated plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the tokamak vacuum vessel by using a 600 deg C black body hot source, a double coherent digital signal averaging (trigger, turn and clock) on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper, and a simulated tokamak window. The use of differential electronics and strong electromagnetic shielding improves also the calibration precision. The fast and slow data acquisition systems are free of aliasing

  19. Upgraded ECE radiometer on the Tore Supra Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segui, J.L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M.; Maget, P.; Udintsev, V.S. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Antar, G.Y. [Center for Energy Research, UCSD, La Jolla CA (United States); Kraemer-Flecken, A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik

    2004-07-01

    An upgraded 32-channel heterodyne radiometer, 1 GHz spaced, is used on the Tore-Supra tokamak to measure the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the ordinary mode (O1) and 94-126.5 GHz for the extraordinary mode (X2). From now radial resolution is essentially limited by ECE relativistic effects related to electron temperature and density, not by the channels frequency spacing. For example, this leads to precise electron temperature mapping during magneto hydrodynamic activities (MHD). In the equatorial plane, we use a dual polarisation Gaussian optics lens antenna. It has low spreading and a perpendicular line-of-sight that gives ECE measurements very low refraction and Doppler effects. Assuming that the plasma is a black body and there is no overlap between ECE harmonics, one can deduce the electron temperature profile by using the first harmonic ordinary mode (O1) or the second harmonic extraordinary mode (X2). The principle radio frequency emitter (RF) has its frequencies down shifted into intermediary frequencies (IF) that span from 2 to 18 GHz in the single side band mode (SSB). It is amplified by low noise IF amplifiers before forming channels. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94-110 GHz. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 GHz) in order to perform electron temperature measurements during electron cyclotron resonance heated plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the tokamak vacuum vessel by using a 600 deg C black body hot source, a double coherent digital signal averaging (trigger, turn and clock) on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper, and a simulated tokamak window. The use of differential electronics and strong electromagnetic shielding improves also the calibration precision. The fast and slow data acquisition systems are free of aliasing

  20. Quantitative comparison of catalytic mechanisms and overall reactions in convergently evolved enzymes: implications for classification of enzyme function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonacid, Daniel E; Yera, Emmanuel R; Mitchell, John B O; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2010-03-12

    Functionally analogous enzymes are those that catalyze similar reactions on similar substrates but do not share common ancestry, providing a window on the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve required catalysts. Identification and use of this information to improve reaction classification and computational annotation of enzymes newly discovered in the genome projects would benefit from systematic determination of reaction similarities. Here, we quantified similarity in bond changes for overall reactions and catalytic mechanisms for 95 pairs of functionally analogous enzymes (non-homologous enzymes with identical first three numbers of their EC codes) from the MACiE database. Similarity of overall reactions was computed by comparing the sets of bond changes in the transformations from substrates to products. For similarity of mechanisms, sets of bond changes occurring in each mechanistic step were compared; these similarities were then used to guide global and local alignments of mechanistic steps. Using this metric, only 44% of pairs of functionally analogous enzymes in the dataset had significantly similar overall reactions. For these enzymes, convergence to the same mechanism occurred in 33% of cases, with most pairs having at least one identical mechanistic step. Using our metric, overall reaction similarity serves as an upper bound for mechanistic similarity in functional analogs. For example, the four carbon-oxygen lyases acting on phosphates (EC 4.2.3) show neither significant overall reaction similarity nor significant mechanistic similarity. By contrast, the three carboxylic-ester hydrolases (EC 3.1.1) catalyze overall reactions with identical bond changes and have converged to almost identical mechanisms. The large proportion of enzyme pairs that do not show significant overall reaction similarity (56%) suggests that at least for the functionally analogous enzymes studied here, more stringent criteria could be used to refine

  1. Quantitative comparison of catalytic mechanisms and overall reactions in convergently evolved enzymes: implications for classification of enzyme function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Almonacid

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Functionally analogous enzymes are those that catalyze similar reactions on similar substrates but do not share common ancestry, providing a window on the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve required catalysts. Identification and use of this information to improve reaction classification and computational annotation of enzymes newly discovered in the genome projects would benefit from systematic determination of reaction similarities. Here, we quantified similarity in bond changes for overall reactions and catalytic mechanisms for 95 pairs of functionally analogous enzymes (non-homologous enzymes with identical first three numbers of their EC codes from the MACiE database. Similarity of overall reactions was computed by comparing the sets of bond changes in the transformations from substrates to products. For similarity of mechanisms, sets of bond changes occurring in each mechanistic step were compared; these similarities were then used to guide global and local alignments of mechanistic steps. Using this metric, only 44% of pairs of functionally analogous enzymes in the dataset had significantly similar overall reactions. For these enzymes, convergence to the same mechanism occurred in 33% of cases, with most pairs having at least one identical mechanistic step. Using our metric, overall reaction similarity serves as an upper bound for mechanistic similarity in functional analogs. For example, the four carbon-oxygen lyases acting on phosphates (EC 4.2.3 show neither significant overall reaction similarity nor significant mechanistic similarity. By contrast, the three carboxylic-ester hydrolases (EC 3.1.1 catalyze overall reactions with identical bond changes and have converged to almost identical mechanisms. The large proportion of enzyme pairs that do not show significant overall reaction similarity (56% suggests that at least for the functionally analogous enzymes studied here, more stringent criteria could be used to

  2. Conceptual Design of the ITER ECE Diagnostic – An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouroua A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ITER ECE diagnostic has recently been through a conceptual design review for the entire system including front end optics, transmission line, and back-end instruments. The basic design of two viewing lines, each with a single ellipsoidal mirror focussing into the plasma near the midplane of the typical operating scenarios is agreed upon. The location and design of the hot calibration source and the design of the shutter that directs its radiation to the transmission line are issues that need further investigation. In light of recent measurements and discussion, the design of the broadband transmission line is being revisited and new options contemplated. For the instruments, current systems for millimeter wave radiometers and broad-band spectrometers will be adequate for ITER, but the option for employing new state-of-the-art techniques will be left open.

  3. Waste energy recovery in the industry in the ECE region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    In the ECE region industry accounts for about 44 per cent of total final energy consumption, 50-55 per cent of which is ''lost''. Since the early 1970s the efficiency of energy use has improved by 5 or 6 percentage points. The potential for further cost-effective savings is estimated at 10 to 20 percentage points, depending on the type of industrial activity, kind of waste energy, availability of outlets, investment strategies, awareness of the significantly improved technical possibilities and degree of co-operation between energy specialists and production engineers, equipment manufacturers, and industrial sectors at the national and international levels. The present publication argues the case for secondary energy recovery (SER) by end-users and international co-operation in technical, economic, environmental and methodological fields. It is based on data compiled by the secretariat of the Economic Commission for Europe on 1 June 1984 and given general distribution. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Overview of recent results from the Tore Supra ECE diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talvard, M.; Liu, W.D.; Giruzzi, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Tore Supra ECE diagnostic system consists of a set of 3 Michelson and 12 Fabry-Perot interferometers, which is now fully operational. We present results obtained with the 3 Michelson during LHCD experiments first. It is shown how the sensitivity of the diagnostic to rather high v (perpendicular) prevents detection of v (parallel) anisotropies. On the other hand, measurements during the Ohmic phase reveal some unexpected anisotropy which can be attributed to superthermal electrons related to the bootstrap current. The 12 Fabry-Perot have been operated using high acquisition sampling rates during pellet injection experiments. A shudder preceding the pellet itself is clearly evidenced just before an internal disruption occurs. During sawtooth activity, such measurements are also used to study the dynamics of the m=1, n=1 instability on the q=1 surface itself

  5. Conceptual Design of the ITER ECE Diagnostic - An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, M. E.; Pandya, H. K. B.; Beno, J.; Bryant, A. D.; Danani, S.; Ellis, R. F.; Feder, R.; Hubbard, A. E.; Kumar, S.; Ouroua, A.; Phillips, P. E.; Rowan, W. L.

    2012-09-01

    The ITER ECE diagnostic has recently been through a conceptual design review for the entire system including front end optics, transmission line, and back-end instruments. The basic design of two viewing lines, each with a single ellipsoidal mirror focussing into the plasma near the midplane of the typical operating scenarios is agreed upon. The location and design of the hot calibration source and the design of the shutter that directs its radiation to the transmission line are issues that need further investigation. In light of recent measurements and discussion, the design of the broadband transmission line is being revisited and new options contemplated. For the instruments, current systems for millimeter wave radiometers and broad-band spectrometers will be adequate for ITER, but the option for employing new state-of-the-art techniques will be left open.

  6. Upgrades and Real Time Ntm Control Application of the Ece Radiometer on Asdex Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, N. K.; Suttrop, W.; Behler, K.; Giannone, L.; Manini, A.; Maraschek, M.; Raupp, G.; Reich, M.; Sips, A. C. C.; Stober, J.; Treutterer, W.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Cirant, S.

    2009-04-01

    The 60-channel electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer diagnostic on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak is presently being upgraded to include a 1 MHz sampling rate data acquisition system. This expanded capability allows electron temperature measurements up to 500 kHz (anti-aliasing filter cut-off) with spatial resolution ~1 cm, and will thus provide measurement of plasma phenomena on the MHD timescale, such as neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). The upgraded and existing systems may be run in parallel for comparison, and some of the first plasma measurements using the two systems together are presented. A particular planned application of the upgraded radiometer is integration into a real-time NTM stabilization loop using targeted deposition of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). For this loop, it is necessary to determine the locations of the NTM and ECRH deposition using ECE measurements. As the magnetic island of the NTM repeatedly rotates through the ECE line of sight, electron temperature fluctuations at the NTM frequency are observed. The magnetic perturbation caused by the NTM is independently measured using Mirnov coils, and a correlation profile between these magnetic measurements and the ECE data is constructed. The phase difference between ECE oscillations on opposite sides of the island manifests as a zero-crossing of the correlation profile, which determines the NTM location in ECE channel space. To determine the location of ECRH power deposition, the power from a given gyrotron may be modulated at a particular frequency. Correlation analysis of this modulated signal and the ECE data identifies a particular ECE channel associated with the deposition of that gyrotron. Real time equilibrium reconstruction allows the ECE channels to be translated into flux surface and spatial coordinates for use in the feedback loop.

  7. Guava leaves polyphenolics-rich extract inhibits vital enzymes implicated in gout and hypertension in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irondi, Emmanuel Anyachukwu; Agboola, Samson Olalekan; Oboh, Ganiyu; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Shode, Francis O.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Elevated uric acid level, an index of gout resulting from the over-activity of xanthine oxidase (XO), increases the risk of developing hypertension. However, research has shown that plant-derived inhibitors of XO and angiotensin 1-converting enzyme (ACE), two enzymes implicated in gout and hypertension, respectively, can prevent or ameliorate both diseases, without noticeable side effects. Hence, this study characterized the polyphenolics composition of guava leaves extract and evaluated its inhibitory effect on XO and ACE in vitro. Materials and Methods: The polyphenolics (flavonoids and phenolic acids) were characterized using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with diode array detection (DAD). The XO, ACE, and Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation inhibitory activities, and free radicals (2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl [DPPH]* and 2,2´-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic [ABTS]*+) scavenging activities of the extract were determined using spectrophotometric methods. Results: Flavonoids were present in the extract in the order of quercetin > kaempferol > catechin > quercitrin > rutin > luteolin > epicatechin; while phenolic acids were in the order of caffeic acid > chlorogenic acid > gallic acids. The extract effectively inhibited XO, ACE and Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner; having half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 38.24 ± 2.32 μg/mL, 21.06 ± 2.04 μg/mL and 27.52 ± 1.72 μg/mL against XO, ACE and Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation, respectively. The extract also strongly scavenged DPPH* and ABTS*+. Conclusion: Guava leaves extract could serve as functional food for managing gout and hypertension and attenuating the oxidative stress associated with both diseases. PMID:27104032

  8. Guava leaves polyphenolics-rich extract inhibits vital enzymes implicated in gout and hypertension in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irondi, Emmanuel Anyachukwu; Agboola, Samson Olalekan; Oboh, Ganiyu; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Shode, Francis O

    2016-01-01

    Elevated uric acid level, an index of gout resulting from the over-activity of xanthine oxidase (XO), increases the risk of developing hypertension. However, research has shown that plant-derived inhibitors of XO and angiotensin 1-converting enzyme (ACE), two enzymes implicated in gout and hypertension, respectively, can prevent or ameliorate both diseases, without noticeable side effects. Hence, this study characterized the polyphenolics composition of guava leaves extract and evaluated its inhibitory effect on XO and ACE in vitro. The polyphenolics (flavonoids and phenolic acids) were characterized using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with diode array detection (DAD). The XO, ACE, and Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation inhibitory activities, and free radicals (2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl [DPPH]* and 2,2´-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic [ABTS]*(+)) scavenging activities of the extract were determined using spectrophotometric methods. Flavonoids were present in the extract in the order of quercetin > kaempferol > catechin > quercitrin > rutin > luteolin > epicatechin; while phenolic acids were in the order of caffeic acid > chlorogenic acid > gallic acids. The extract effectively inhibited XO, ACE and Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner; having half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 38.24 ± 2.32 μg/mL, 21.06 ± 2.04 μg/mL and 27.52 ± 1.72 μg/mL against XO, ACE and Fe(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation, respectively. The extract also strongly scavenged DPPH* and ABTS*(+). Guava leaves extract could serve as functional food for managing gout and hypertension and attenuating the oxidative stress associated with both diseases.

  9. Combining phylogenetic and syntenic analyses for understanding the evolution of TCP ECE genes in eudicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène L Citerne

    Full Text Available TCP ECE genes encode transcription factors which have received much attention for their repeated recruitment in the control of floral symmetry in core eudicots, and more recently in monocots. Major duplications of TCP ECE genes have been described in core eudicots, but the evolutionary history of this gene family is unknown in basal eudicots. Reconstructing the phylogeny of ECE genes in basal eudicots will help set a framework for understanding the functional evolution of these genes. TCP ECE genes were sequenced in all major lineages of basal eudicots and Gunnera which belongs to the sister clade to all other core eudicots. We show that in these lineages they have a complex evolutionary history with repeated duplications. We estimate the timing of the two major duplications already identified in the core eudicots within a timeframe before the divergence of Gunnera and after the divergence of Proteales. We also use a synteny-based approach to examine the extent to which the expansion of TCP ECE genes in diverse eudicot lineages may be due to genome-wide duplications. The three major core-eudicot specific clades share a number of collinear genes, and their common evolutionary history may have originated at the γ event. Genomic comparisons in Arabidopsis thaliana and Solanumlycopersicum highlight their separate polyploid origin, with syntenic fragments with and without TCP ECE genes showing differential gene loss and genomic rearrangements. Comparison between recently available genomes from two basal eudicots Aquilegiacoerulea and Nelumbonucifera suggests that the two TCP ECE paralogs in these species are also derived from large-scale duplications. TCP ECE loci from basal eudicots share many features with the three main core eudicot loci, and allow us to infer the makeup of the ancestral eudicot locus.

  10. Correlation ECE diagnostic in Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, C.; Irby, J.; Leccacorvi, R.; Vieira, R.; Oi, C.; Rice, J.; Reinke, M.; Gao, C.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Churchill, R.; Theiler, C.; Walk, J.; Hughes, J.; Hubbard, A.; Greenwald, M.

    2015-01-01

    Correlation ECE (CECE) is a diagnostic technique that allows measurement of small amplitude electron temperature, Te, fluctuations through standard cross-correlation analysis methods. In Alcator C-Mod, a new CECE diagnostic has been installed[Sung RSI 2012], and interesting phenomena have been observed in various plasma conditions. We find that local Te fluctuations near the edge (ρ ~ 0:8) decrease across the linearto- saturated ohmic confinement transition, with fluctuations decreasing with increasing plasma density [Sung NF 2013], which occurs simultaneously with rotation reversals [Rice NF 2011]. Te fluctuations are also reduced across core rotation reversals with an increase of plasma density in RF heated L-mode plasmas, which implies that the same physics related to the reduction of Te fluctuations may be applied to both ohmic and RF heated L-mode plasmas. In I-mode plasmas, we observe the reduction of core Te fluctuations, which indicates changes of turbulence occur not only in the pedestal region but also in the core across the L/I transition [White NF 2014]. The present CECE diagnostic system in C-Mod and these experimental results are described in this paper

  11. Short communication: expression of transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the female lower genital tract: implications for microbicide research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Hu, Minlu; Cost, Marilyn; Poloyac, Samuel; Rohan, Lisa

    2013-11-01

    Topical vaginal microbicides have been considered a promising option for preventing the male-to-female sexual transmission of HIV; however, clinical trials to date have not clearly demonstrated robust and reproducible effectiveness results. While multiple approaches may help enhance product effectiveness observed in clinical trials, increasing the drug exposure in lower genital tract tissues is a compelling option, given the difficulty in achieving sufficient drug exposure and positive correlation between tissue exposure and microbicide efficacy. Since many microbicide drug candidates are substrates of transporters and/or metabolizing enzymes, there is emerging interest in improving microbicide exposure and efficacy through local modulation of transporters and enzymes in the female lower genital tract. However, no systematic information on transporter/enzyme expression is available for ectocervical and vaginal tissues of premenopausal women, the genital sites most relevant to microbicide drug delivery. The current study utilized reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to examine the mRNA expression profile of 22 transporters and 19 metabolizing enzymes in premenopausal normal human ectocervix and vagina. Efflux and uptake transporters important for antiretroviral drugs, such as P-gp, BCRP, OCT2, and ENT1, were found to be moderately or highly expressed in the lower genital tract as compared to liver. Among the metabolizing enzymes examined, most CYP isoforms were not detected while a number of UGTs such as UGT1A1 were highly expressed. Moderate to high expression of select transporters and enzymes was also observed in mouse cervix and vagina. The implications of this information on microbicide research is also discussed, including microbicide pharmacokinetics, the utilization of the mouse model in microbicide screening, as well as the in vivo functional studies of cervicovaginal transporters and enzymes.

  12. The lysosomal enzyme receptor protein (LERP is not essential, but is implicated in lysosomal function in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina Hasanagic

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The lysosomal enzyme receptor protein (LERP of Drosophila melanogaster is the ortholog of the mammalian cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate (Man 6-P receptor, which mediates trafficking of newly synthesized lysosomal acid hydrolases to lysosomes. However, flies lack the enzymes necessary to make the Man 6-P mark, and the amino acids implicated in Man 6-P binding by the mammalian receptor are not conserved in LERP. Thus, the function of LERP in sorting of lysosomal enzymes to lysosomes in Drosophila is unclear. Here, we analyze the consequence of LERP depletion in S2 cells and intact flies. RNAi-mediated knockdown of LERP in S2 cells had little or no effect on the cellular content or secretion of several lysosomal hydrolases. We generated a novel Lerp null mutation, LerpF6, which abolishes LERP protein expression. Lerp mutants have normal viability and fertility and display no overt phenotypes other than reduced body weight. Lerp mutant flies exhibit a 30–40% decrease in the level of several lysosomal hydrolases, and are hypersensitive to dietary chloroquine and starvation, consistent with impaired lysosome function. Loss of LERP also enhances an eye phenotype associated with defective autophagy. Our findings implicate Lerp in lysosome function and autophagy.

  13. A ''quick DYECET'' method for ECE particle tracks in polymer detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Mahdi, S.

    1993-01-01

    The new dyed electrochemically etched track (DEYCET) method recently developed at the National Radiation Protection Department (NRPD) of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) using sensitization and dyeing steps is a useful and powerful method for dyeing charged particle and neutron-induced-recoil tracks in polymer detectors. This original DYECET method is effective but time consuming due to the steps for sensitization and dyeing which usually takes several hours. A ''Quick DYECET'' method, also recently developed in our laboratory, is introduced in this paper which dyes ECE tracks effectively in different colours within a few minutes. This new method can dye ECE tracks, cracks, fractures and fractals with different water and/or alcohol soluble dyes using cold or hot dyebaths. The method provides a high contrast and a high resolution of ECE tracks for visual track counting especially at high track densities. Some preliminary results are reported and discussed. (author)

  14. Pitfalls in Using Limitation Clauses in the International General Conditions ECE 188 and Orgalime S 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henschel, Rene Franz

    2008-01-01

    various individual provisions contained in the general conditions - for example limitation of the right to require repair and further limitation of liability. If this is not motivated by the circumstances surrounding the particular contract, the parties risk creating imbalances in the otherwise well-balanced......The article centers on the rules on the limitation of liability in the general conditions ECE 188 and Orgalime S 2000. ECE 188 differ considerably from S 2000, as the provisions in ECE 188 do not give the necessary consideration to the development in industry practices and legal rules, including...... the approximation and harmonization of legal systems that have taken place during the last 50 years. S 2000 reflects an international trend that increasingly recognizes the importance of striking a balance between the interests of the parties. However, in practice the parties often derogate considerably from...

  15. Discovery of a new ECE parameter affecting the response of polymer track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Katouzi, M.

    1993-01-01

    The pressure applied to the electrochemical etching (ECE) chamber system and in turn to the rubber washers holding a detector tight in place was discovered to be a new parameter in ECE having a direct effect on internal heating and thus on the detector's response. The type, material, shape and size of the washers showed significant effects on the detector's response. Special pressure ECE (PECE) chambers with measurable and reproducible pressure were designed, constructed and used in this study. The effects observed seem to be due to forced vibrations of the detector in an electric field the degree of which depends on the pressure applied and stretching the detectors, like winding the strings of a musical instrument. The results of the above studies are presented and discussed. (author)

  16. Design and first plasma measurements of the ITER-ECE prototype radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, M. E.; Brookman, M. W.; Rowan, W. L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Danani, S. [ITER-India/Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Bryerton, E. W.; Dougherty, P. [Virginia Diodes, Inc., Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    On ITER, second harmonic optically thick electron cyclotron emission (ECE) in the range of 220-340 GHz will supply the electron temperature (T{sub e}). To investigate the requirements and capabilities prescribed for the ITER system, a prototype radiometer covering this frequency range has been developed by Virginia Diodes, Inc. The first plasma measurements with this instrument have been carried out on the DIII-D tokamak, with lab bench tests and measurements of third through fifth harmonic ECE from high T{sub e} plasmas. At DIII-D the instrument shares the transmission line of the Michelson interferometer and can simultaneously acquire data. Comparison of the ECE radiation temperature from the absolutely calibrated Michelson and the prototype receiver shows that the ITER radiometer provides accurate measurements of the millimeter radiation across the instrument band.

  17. Processing of Candida albicans Ece1p Is Critical for Candidalysin Maturation and Fungal Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P. Richardson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen responsible for superficial and life-threatening infections in humans. During mucosal infection, C. albicans undergoes a morphological transition from yeast to invasive filamentous hyphae that secrete candidalysin, a 31-amino-acid peptide toxin required for virulence. Candidalysin damages epithelial cell plasma membranes and stimulates the activating protein 1 (AP-1 transcription factor c-Fos (via p38–mitogen-activated protein kinase [MAPK], and the MAPK phosphatase MKP1 (via extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 [ERK1/2]–MAPK, which trigger and regulate proinflammatory cytokine responses, respectively. The candidalysin toxin resides as a discrete cryptic sequence within a larger 271-amino-acid parental preproprotein, Ece1p. Here, we demonstrate that kexin-like proteinases, but not secreted aspartyl proteinases, initiate a two-step posttranslational processing of Ece1p to produce candidalysin. Kex2p-mediated proteolysis of Ece1p after Arg61 and Arg93, but not after other processing sites within Ece1p, is required to generate immature candidalysin from Ece1p, followed by Kex1p-mediated removal of a carboxyl arginine residue to generate mature candidalysin. C. albicans strains harboring mutations of Arg61 and/or Arg93 did not secrete candidalysin, were unable to induce epithelial damage and inflammatory responses in vitro, and showed attenuated virulence in vivo in a murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. These observations identify enzymatic processing of C. albicans Ece1p by kexin-like proteinases as crucial steps required for candidalysin production and fungal pathogenicity.

  18. Cadence Feedback With ECE PEDO to Monitor Physical Activity Intensity: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardic, Fusun; Göcer, Esra

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the monitoring capabilities of the equipment for clever exercise pedometer (ECE PEDO) that provides audible feedback when the person exceeds the upper and lower limits of the target step numbers per minute and to compare step counts with Yamax SW-200 (YX200) as the criterion pedometer.A total of 30 adult volunteers (15 males and 15 females) were classified as normal weight (n = 10), overweight (n = 10), and obese (n = 10). After the submaximal exercise test on a treadmill, the moderate intensity for walking was determined by using YX200 pedometer and then the number of steps taken in a minute was measured. Lower and upper limits of steps per minute (cadence) were recorded in ECE PEDO providing audible feedback when the person's walking speed gets out of the limits. Volunteers walked for 30 minutes in the individual step count range by attaching the ECE PEDO and YX200 pedometer on both sides of the waist belt in the same session. Step counts of the volunteers were recorded. Wilcoxon, Spearman correlation, and Bland-Altman analyses were performed to show the relationship and agreement between the results of 2 devices.Subjects took an average of 3511 ± 426 and 3493 ± 399 steps during 30 minutes with ECE PEDO and criterion pedometer, respectively. About 3500 steps taken by ECE PEDO reflected that this pedometer has capability of identifying steps per minute to meet moderate intensity of physical activity. There was a strong correlation between step counts of both devices (P PEDO and YX200 pedometer in the Bland-Altman analysis.Although both devices showed a strong similarity in counting steps, the ECE PEDO provides monitoring of intensity such that a person can walk in a specified time with a desired speed.

  19. Commissioning of inline ECE system within waveguide based ECRH transmission systems on ASDEX upgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donné A.J.H.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A CW capable inline electron cyclotron emission (ECE separation system for feedback control, featuring oversized corrugated waveguides, is commissioned on ASDEX upgrade (AUG. The system is based on a combination of a polarization independent, non-resonant, Mach-Zehnder diplexer equipped with dielectric plate beam splitters [2, 3] employed as corrugated oversized waveguide filter, and a resonant Fast Directional Switch, FADIS [4, 5, 6, 7] as ECE/ECCD separation system. This paper presents an overview of the system, the low power characterisation tests and first high power commissioning on AUG.

  20. Development of neural network techniques for the analysis of JET ECE data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, D.V.; Bishop, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on a project currently in progress to develop neutral network techniques for the conversion of JET ECE spectra to electron temperature profiles. The aim is to obtain profiles with reduced measurement uncertainties by incorporating data from the LIDAR Thomson scattering diagnostic in the analysis, while retaining the faster time resolution of the ECE measurements. The properties of neural networks are briefly reviewed, and the reasons for using them in this application are explained. Some preliminary results are presented and the direction of future work is outlined. (orig.)

  1. Commissioning of inline ECE system within waveguide based ECRH transmission systems on ASDEX upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, W. A.; Kasparek, W.; Doelman, N.; van den Braber, R.; van den Brand, H.; Meo, F.; de Baar, M. R.; Amerongen, F. J.; Donné, A. J. H.; Elzendoorn, B. S. Q.; Erckmann, V.; Goede, A. P. H.; Giannone, L.; Grünwald, G.; Hollman, F.; Kaas, G.; Krijger, B.; Michel, G.; Lubyako, L.; Monaco, F.; Noke, F.; Petelin, M.; Plaum, B.; Purps, F.; ten Pierik, J. G. W.; Schüller, C.; Slob, J. W.; Stober, J. K.; Schütz, H.; Wagner, D.; Westerhof, E.; Ronden, D. M. S.

    2012-09-01

    A CW capable inline electron cyclotron emission (ECE) separation system for feedback control, featuring oversized corrugated waveguides, is commissioned on ASDEX upgrade (AUG). The system is based on a combination of a polarization independent, non-resonant, Mach-Zehnder diplexer equipped with dielectric plate beam splitters [2, 3] employed as corrugated oversized waveguide filter, and a resonant Fast Directional Switch, FADIS [4, 5, 6, 7] as ECE/ECCD separation system. This paper presents an overview of the system, the low power characterisation tests and first high power commissioning on AUG.

  2. Why there is no cookbook approach to palliative care: implications of the P450 enzyme system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuebler, Kim K; Varga, James; Mihelic, Ronald A

    2003-01-01

    A plethora of literature describes the impact of the P450 enzyme system, but this information is limited regarding its relevancy to nursing practice. However, oncology nurses providing palliative symptom management must have a working knowledge of the P450 enzyme system to recognize the variability that exists among individual medication reactions or why a "cookbook approach" to symptom management is not always effective and appropriate. This article describes the variations associated with medication metabolism with reference to ethnic differences. Having a basic understanding of the P450 enzyme system and, more specifically, the CYP2D6 influence on the metabolism of common medications used in palliative symptom management can help to prevent medication toxicity or underdosing, which interferes with patients' quality of life.

  3. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma cruzi UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase Implicate Flexibility of the Histidine Loop in Enzyme Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J. (Virginia Tech); (UMC)

    2012-11-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report crystal structures of the galactofuranose biosynthetic enzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) from T. cruzi, which are the first structures of this enzyme from a protozoan parasite. UGM is an attractive target for drug design because galactofuranose is absent in humans but is an essential component of key glycoproteins and glycolipids in trypanosomatids. Analysis of the enzyme-UDP noncovalent interactions and sequence alignments suggests that substrate recognition is exquisitely conserved among eukaryotic UGMs and distinct from that of bacterial UGMs. This observation has implications for inhibitor design. Activation of the enzyme via reduction of the FAD induces profound conformational changes, including a 2.3 {angstrom} movement of the histidine loop (Gly60-Gly61-His62), rotation and protonation of the imidazole of His62, and cooperative movement of residues located on the si face of the FAD. Interestingly, these changes are substantially different from those described for Aspergillus fumigatus UGM, which is 45% identical to T. cruzi UGM. The importance of Gly61 and His62 for enzymatic activity was studied with the site-directed mutant enzymes G61A, G61P, and H62A. These mutations lower the catalytic efficiency by factors of 10-50, primarily by decreasing k{sub cat}. Considered together, the structural, kinetic, and sequence data suggest that the middle Gly of the histidine loop imparts flexibility that is essential for activation of eukaryotic UGMs. Our results provide new information about UGM biochemistry and suggest a unified strategy for designing inhibitors of UGMs from the eukaryotic pathogens.

  4. Crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi UDP-galactopyranose mutase implicate flexibility of the histidine loop in enzyme activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhatwalia, Richa; Singh, Harkewal; Oppenheimer, Michelle; Sobrado, Pablo; Tanner, John J

    2012-06-19

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we report crystal structures of the galactofuranose biosynthetic enzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) from T. cruzi, which are the first structures of this enzyme from a protozoan parasite. UGM is an attractive target for drug design because galactofuranose is absent in humans but is an essential component of key glycoproteins and glycolipids in trypanosomatids. Analysis of the enzyme-UDP noncovalent interactions and sequence alignments suggests that substrate recognition is exquisitely conserved among eukaryotic UGMs and distinct from that of bacterial UGMs. This observation has implications for inhibitor design. Activation of the enzyme via reduction of the FAD induces profound conformational changes, including a 2.3 Å movement of the histidine loop (Gly60-Gly61-His62), rotation and protonation of the imidazole of His62, and cooperative movement of residues located on the si face of the FAD. Interestingly, these changes are substantially different from those described for Aspergillus fumigatus UGM, which is 45% identical to T. cruzi UGM. The importance of Gly61 and His62 for enzymatic activity was studied with the site-directed mutant enzymes G61A, G61P, and H62A. These mutations lower the catalytic efficiency by factors of 10-50, primarily by decreasing k(cat). Considered together, the structural, kinetic, and sequence data suggest that the middle Gly of the histidine loop imparts flexibility that is essential for activation of eukaryotic UGMs. Our results provide new information about UGM biochemistry and suggest a unified strategy for designing inhibitors of UGMs from the eukaryotic pathogens.

  5. N-Glycosylation of Carnosinase Influences Protein Secretion and Enzyme Activity Implications for Hyperglycemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riedl, Eva; Koeppel, Hannes; Pfister, Frederick; Peters, Verena; Sauerhoefer, Sibylle; Sternik, Paula; Brinkkoetter, Paul; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Navis, Gerjan; Henning, Robert H.; Van Den Born, Jacob; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Janssen, Bart; van der Woude, Fokko J.; Yard, Benito A.

    OBJECTIVE-The (CTG)(n) polymorphism in the serum carnosinase (CN-1) gene affects CN-1 secretion Since CN-1 is heavily glycosylated and glycosylation might influence protein secretion as well, we tested the role of N-glycosylation for CN-1 secretion and enzyme activity. We also tested whether CN-1

  6. Observation of MHD fluctuation by ECE on W7-X first experimental campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Hayato; Hirsch, Matthias; Weir, Gavin; Hofel, Udo; Beurskens, Marc; Masuzaki, Suguru; W7-X Team

    2016-10-01

    Wendelstein 7-X is an optimized stellarator for ECRH high density steady-state discharges at reactor relevant collisionality regimes. The first experiment (OP1.1) was successfully conducted from Dec.2015. ECE (Electron Cyclotron Emission diagnostic) is one of the main diagnostic during the first experimental campaign. The 2nd harmonic x-mode emission is obtained by outside-antenna and detected by 32-channel heterodyne radiometer. The frequency band is from 126GHz to 162GHz. Radiometers are calibrated by LN2 temperature and room temperature. The absolute calibration error was estimated to be 10%. The electron temperature radial profile obtained by ECE agrees the Thomson scattering and imaging X-ray spectroscopy result. The asymmetric profile is still indicated due to mix of O2-mode. Fluctuations derived from MHD instability are often observed by electron temperature and magnetic fluctuations. The radial mode structure is clearly identified by ECE. It indicates the existence of magnetic island and from its appearance on both sides of the X2 emission spectrum the knowledge on the localization of the ECE channels can be improved by symmetrization.

  7. Disarming Contankerous People: Coping with Difficult Personalities in ECE Work Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Luis; Smith, Connie Jo

    2009-01-01

    Difficult personalities come in a variety of roles in just about every setting. While types have been identified in the typical corporate and business culture, difficult work personalities also inhabit the world of early childhood education (ECE) workplaces. Because difficult people have an impact on workplace morale and productivity, the topic…

  8. Four Good Reasons Why ECE Is Not Just Important, but Essential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Anne W.

    2009-01-01

    As an advocate for young children and families and an advocate for early childhood education, the author has long argued for improving quality and for investing more public dollars in ECE. To make her case, the author used several different arguments, including: moral; workforce productivity; brain research; and return on investment. The author…

  9. Commissioning of inline ECE system within waveguide based ECRH transmission systems on ASDEX upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bongers, W. A.; Kasparek, W.; Doelman, N.

    2012-01-01

    A CW capable inline electron cyclotron emission (ECE) separation system for feedback control, featuring oversized corrugated waveguides, is commissioned on ASDEX upgrade (AUG). The system is based on a combination of a polarization independent, non-resonant, Mach-Zehnder diplexer equipped with di...

  10. Commissioning of inline ECE system within waveguide based ECRH transmission systems on ASDEX upgrade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, W.A.; Kasparek, W.; Doelman, N. J.; Braber, R. van den; Brand, H. van den; Meo, F.; Baar, M.R. de; Amerongen, F.J.; Donné, A.J.H.; Elzendoorn, B.S.Q.; Erckmann, V.; Goede, A.P.H.; Giannone, L.; Grünwald, G.; Hollman, F.; Kaas, G.; Krijger, B.; Michel, G.; Lubyako, L.; Monaco, F.; Noke, F.; Petelin, M.; Plaum, B.; Purps, F.; Pierik, J.G.W. ten; Schüller, C.; Slob, J.W.; Stober, J.K.; Schütz, H.; Wagner, D.; Westerhof, E.; Ronden, D.M.S.

    2012-01-01

    A CW capable inline electron cyclotron emission (ECE) separation system for feedback control, featuring oversized corrugated waveguides, is commissioned on ASDEX upgrade (AUG). The system is based on a combination of a polarization independent, non-resonant, Mach-Zehnder diplexer equipped with

  11. The pathogenomics of McArdle disease-genes, enzymes, models, and therapeutic implication

    OpenAIRE

    Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Santalla Hernández, Alfredo; Brull, Astrid; Luna, Noemí de; Lucía Mulas, Alejandro; Pinós, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    Numerous biomedical advances have been made since Carl and Gerty Cori discovered the enzyme phosphorylase in the 1940s and the Scottish physician Brian McArdle reported in 1951 a previously 'undescribed disorder characterized by a gross failure of the breakdown in muscle of glycogen'. Today we know that this disorder, commonly known as 'McArdle disease', is caused by inherited deficiency of the muscle isoform of glycogen phosphorylase (GP). Here we review the main aspects of the 'pathogenomic...

  12. Polyphenols as enzyme inhibitors in different degraded peat soils: Implication for microbial metabolism in rewetted peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Dominik; Roth, Cyril; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Fenner, Nathalie; Reuter, Hendrik

    2015-04-01

    Recently, more than 30,000 ha of drained minerotrophic peatlands (= fens) in NE Germany were rewetted to restore their ecological functions. Due to an extended drainage history, a re-establishment of their original state is not expected in the short-term. Elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, ammonium and phosphate have been measured in the soil porewater of the upper degraded peat layers of rewetted fens at levels of one to three orders higher than the values in pristine systems; an indicator of increased microbial activity in the upper degraded soil layers. On the other hand there is evidence that the substrate availability within the degraded peat layer is lowered since the organic matter has formerly been subject to intense decomposition over the decades of drainage and intense agricultural use of the areas. Previously however, it was suggested that inhibition of hydrolytic enzymes by polyphenolic substances is suspended during aeration of peat soils mainly due to the decomposition of the inhibiting polyphenols by oxidising enzymes such as phenol oxidase. Accordingly we hypothesised a lack of enzyme inhibiting polyphenols in degraded peat soils of rewetted fens compared to less decomposed peat of more natural fens. We collected both peat samples at the soil surface (0-20 cm) and fresh roots of dominating vascular plants and mosses (as peat parent material) from five formerly drained rewetted sites and five more natural sites of NE Germany and NW Poland. Less decomposed peat and living roots were used to obtain an internal standard for polyphenol analysis and to run enzyme inhibition tests. For all samples we determined the total phenolic contents and in addition we distinguished between the contents of hydrolysable and condensed tannic substances. From a methodical perspective the advantage of internal standards compared to the commercially available standards cyanidin chloride and tannic acid became apparent. Quantification with cyanidin or

  13. Role of Protein Kinase C in Endothelin Converting Enzyme-1 trafficking and shedding from endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuruppu, Sanjaya, E-mail: Sanjaya.Kuruppu@med.monash.edu.au [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Vic. 3800 (Australia); Tochon-Danguy, Natalie; Ian Smith, A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Vic. 3800 (Australia)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} PKC activation increases the trafficking of ECE-1 to the cell surface. {yields} This in turn leads to an increase in the amount of ECE-1 shed. {yields} Only the catalytically active C-terminal region is shed from the cell surface. -- Abstract: This study aimed to determine the consequences of Protein Kinase C (PKC) mediated Endothelin Converting Enzyme-1 (ECE-1) phosphorylation and its relationship to ECE-1 expression and shedding. The proteins on the surface of EA.hy926 cells were labelled with EZ-Link NHS-SS-Biotin both prior to (control) and following stimulation by 2 {mu}M phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) which activates PKC. The biotinylated proteins were isolated using neutravidin beads, resolved by gel electrophoresis and analysed by western blotting using anti-ECE-1 antibodies. Significant increase in ECE-1 expression at the cell surface was observed following stimulation by PMA, compared to unstimulated control cells (170 {+-} 32.3% of control, n = 5). The ECE-1 activity (expressed as {mu}M substrate cleaved/min) was determined by monitoring the cleavage of a quenched fluorescent substrate. The specificity of cleavage was confirmed using the ECE-1 inhibitor (CGS35066). The stimulation of cells by PMA (1 {mu}M, 6 h) significantly increased the ECE-1 activity (0.28 {+-} 0.02; n = 3) compared to the control (0.07 {+-} 0.02; n = 3). This increase was prevented by prior incubation with the PKC inhibitor bisindolymaleimide (BIM; 2 {mu}M for 1 h; 0.10 {+-} 0.01; n = 3). Treatment with PMA also increased the activity of ECE-1 in the media (0.18 {+-} 0.01; n = 3) compared to control (0.08 {+-} 0.01; n = 3). In addition, this study confirmed by western immunoblotting that only the extracellular region of ECE-1 is released from the cell surface. These data indicate for the first time that PKC activation induces the trafficking and shedding of ECE to and from the cell surface, respectively.

  14. Acrolein inhibits NADH-linked mitochondrial enzyme activity: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocernich, Chava B; Butterfield, D Allan

    2003-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain increased lipid peroxidation and decreased energy utilization are found. Mitochondria membranes contain a significant amount of arachidonic and linoleic acids, precursors of lipid peroxidation products, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and 2-propen-1-al (acrolein), that are extremely reactive. Both alkenals are increased in AD brain. In this study, we examined the effects of nanomolar levels of acrolein on the activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH), both reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-linked mitochondrial enzymes. Acrolein decreased PDH and KGDH activities significantly in a dose-dependent manner. Using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), acrolein was found to bind lipoic acid, a component in both the PDH and KGDH complexes, most likely explaining the loss of enzyme activity. Acrolein also interacted with oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) in such a way as to decrease the production of NADH. Acrolein, which is increased in AD brain, may be partially responsible for the dysfunction of mitochondria and loss of energy found in AD brain by inhibition of PDH and KGDH activities, potentially contributing to the neurodegeneration in this disorder.

  15. Inhibition of enzyme activity by nanomaterials: potential mechanisms and implications for nanotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccormack, Tyson J; Clark, Rhett J; Dang, Michael K M; Ma, Guibin; Kelly, Joel A; Veinot, Jonathan G C; Goss, Greg G

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether nanoparticle-exposure affects enzyme function and to determine the mechanisms responsible. Silicon, Au, and CdSe nanoparticles were synthesized in house and their physicochemical properties were characterized. The activity of purified lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was inhibited or abolished by all nanoparticles tested. Inhibition was dependent upon particle core and surface-functional group composition. Inhibition of LDH was absent in crude tissue homogenates, in the presence of albumin, and at the isoelectric point of the protein, indicating that nanoparticles bind non-specifically to abundant proteins via a charge interaction. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the structure of LDH may be altered by nanoparticles in a manner different from that of bulk controls. We present new data on the specific physicochemical properties of nanoparticles that may lead to bioactivity and highlight a number of potentially serious problems with common nanotoxicity testing methods.

  16. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radulescu, Razvan T., E-mail: ratura@gmx.net [Molecular Concepts Research (MCR), Muenster (Germany); Duckworth, William C. [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Levy, Jennifer L. [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Fawcett, Janet, E-mail: janet.fawcett@va.gov [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2010-04-30

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  17. The pathogenomics of McArdle disease--genes, enzymes, models, and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; Santalla, Alfredo; Brull, Astrid; de Luna, Noemi; Lucia, Alejandro; Pinós, Tomàs

    2015-03-01

    Numerous biomedical advances have been made since Carl and Gerty Cori discovered the enzyme phosphorylase in the 1940s and the Scottish physician Brian McArdle reported in 1951 a previously 'undescribed disorder characterized by a gross failure of the breakdown in muscle of glycogen'. Today we know that this disorder, commonly known as 'McArdle disease', is caused by inherited deficiency of the muscle isoform of glycogen phosphorylase (GP). Here we review the main aspects of the 'pathogenomics' of this disease including, among others: the spectrum of mutations in the gene (PYGM) encoding muscle GP; the interplay between the different tissue GP isoforms in cellular cultures and in patients; what can we learn from naturally occurring and recently laboratory-generated animal models of the disease; and potential therapies.

  18. Serglycin proteoglycan is not implicated in localizing exocrine pancreas enzymes to zymogen granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Carsten U; Cowland, Jack B; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Storage and release of proteins from granules forms the basis of cellular functions as diverse as cell mediated cytotoxicity, neuronal communication, activation of muscle fibres, and release of hormones or digestive enzymes from endocrine and exocrine glands, such as the pancreas. Serglycin...... is the major intracellular proteoglycan of haematopoietic cells. Serglycin is important for localization of proteins in granules of different haematopoietic cell types. Previous reports have indicated a role for serglycin in granule formation and localization of zymogens in granules of the exocrine pancreas...... in rat. We here present data showing that serglycin is not present at the protein level in human or murine pancreas. Furthermore, the amount and localization of three exocrine pancreas zymogens (amylase, trypsinogen, and carboxypeptidase A) is not affected by the absence of serglycin in a serglycin knock...

  19. County-Scale Spatial Distribution of Soil Enzyme Activities and Enzyme Activity Indices in Agricultural Land: Implications for Soil Quality Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangping Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here the spatial distribution of soil enzymatic properties in agricultural land was evaluated on a county-wide (567 km2 scale in Changwu, Shaanxi Province, China. The spatial variations in activities of five hydrolytic enzymes were examined using geostatistical methods. The relationships between soil enzyme activities and other soil properties were evaluated using both an integrated total enzyme activity index (TEI and the geometric mean of enzyme activities (GME. At the county scale, soil invertase, phosphatase, and catalase activities were moderately spatially correlated, whereas urease and dehydrogenase activities were weakly spatially correlated. Correlation analysis showed that both TEI and GME were better correlated with selected soil physicochemical properties than single enzyme activities. Multivariate regression analysis showed that soil OM content had the strongest positive effect while soil pH had a negative effect on the two enzyme activity indices. In addition, total phosphorous content had a positive effect on TEI and GME in orchard soils, whereas alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen and available potassium contents, respectively, had negative and positive effects on these two enzyme indices in cropland soils. The results indicate that land use changes strongly affect soil enzyme activities in agricultural land, where TEI provides a sensitive biological indicator for soil quality.

  20. Effects of ionizing radiation on the activity of the major hepatic enzymes implicated in bile acid biosynthesis in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souidi, M.; Scanff, P.; Grison, St.; Gourmelon, P.; Aigueperse, J.

    2007-01-01

    In the days following high-dose radiation exposure, damage to small intestinal mucosa is aggravated by changes in the bile acid pool reaching the gut. Intestinal bile acid malabsorption, as described classically, may be associated with altered hepatic bile acid biosynthesis, which was the objective of this work. The activity of the main rate-limiting enzymes implicated in the bile acid biosynthesis were evaluated in the days following an 8-Gy γ Co 60 total body irradiation of rats, with concomitant determination of biliary bile acid profiles and intestinal bile acid content. Modifications of biliary bile acid profiles, observed as early as the first post-irradiation day, were most marked at the third and fourth day, and resulted in an increased hydrophobicity index. In parallel, the intestinal bile acids' content was enhanced and hepatic enzymatic activities leading to bile acids were changed. A marked increase of sterol 12-hydroxylase and decrease of oxy-sterol 7-hydroxylase activity was observed at day 3, whereas both cholesterol 7-hydroxylase and oxy-sterol 7-hydroxylase activities were decreased at day 4 after irradiation. These results show, for the first time, radiation-induced modifications of hepatic enzymatic activities implicated in bile acid biosynthesis and suggest that they are mainly a consequence of radiation-altered intestinal absorption, which induces a physiological response of the entero-hepatic bile acid recirculation. (authors)

  1. The effect of pulse current on energy saving during Electrochemical Chloride Extraction (ECE) in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tian R.; Geiker, Mette R.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Energy consumption is a factor influencing the cost of Electrochemical Chloride Extraction (ECE) in concrete. The aims of this work were to investigate the possibility for energy saving when using a pulsed electric field during ECE and the effect of the pulsed current on removal of chloride. Four...... experiments with artificially polluted concrete under same charge transfer were conducted. Results showed that the energy consumption was decreased 15% by pulse current in experiments with 0.2 mA/cm2 current density, which was higher than that of 0.1 mA/cm2 experiments with a decrease of 9.6%. When comparing...... the voltage drop at different parts of the experimental cells, it was found that the voltage drop of the area across the concrete was the major contributor to energy consumption, and results indicated that the pulse current could decrease the voltage drop of this part by re-distribution of ions in pore fluid...

  2. Neutron dosimetry by UV and IR spectrophotometry of the newly developed dyed ECE tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Sadeghi Bajd, S.

    1990-01-01

    New, large and high-contrasted dyed ECE recoil tracks have been successfully developed. The chief reason for this development has been the provision of large photon-absorbing sites on a non-absorbing unaffected polymer surface for UV and IR spectrophotometry. In this approach, ECE recoil tracks in polycarbonate were dyed using our optimised conditions; sensitisation in 20% by weight acrylic acid at 75 0 C for 3.5 h and dyeing in 3% by weight eosin at 95 0 C for 4 h. Spectrophotometry by UV and IR, track counting and optical densitometry were applied to the samples. These preliminary studies showed some promise for UV absorbance measurements for routine large-scale applications. the results of which are presented and discussed. (author)

  3. Application of the model of the relativistic anti-loss-cone distribution to ECE spectrum in discharge applying LH wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Masayasu; Yokomizo, Hideaki

    1987-11-01

    The electron cyclotron emission (ECE) is dominated from supra-thermal electron in discharge applying LH wave. We obtain informations of supra-thermal electron by applying the model of the relativistic anti-loss-cone distribution to ECE spectrum in the discharge. In this model, the emission perpendicular to the magnetic field are considered. The frequency range is considered to be well above the plasma and electron cyclotron frequencies, thus collective effects can be neglected. The electron distribution is assumed to be anisotropic in the velocity space and strongly extended in the direction parallel to the magnetic field, namely the relativistic anti-loss-cone distribution. The informations of supra-thermal electron are obtained by the following way. The temperature and density of the supra-thermal electron and the anti-loss-cone angle are obtained from the power spectrum of LH wave launched, the measured slope of the spectrum of ECE and the spectral radiance of ECE. (author)

  4. Precision and resolution on Tore-Supra ECE electron temperature profile measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segui, J.L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M.

    2003-01-01

    A 16-channel heterodyne radiometer, 2 GHz spaced, is used on Tore-Supra to measure the electron cyclotron emission in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the O mode and 94 -126 GHz for the X mode. In the equatorial plane, a dual polarisation Gaussian optics lens antenna, with a perpendicular line of sight (with respect to the magnetic field), gives ECE measurements with very low refraction and Doppler effects. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This improves time stability calibration and gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94 -110 GHz RF band for polarisation studies. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 GHz) in order to perform temperature measurements during ECRH plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the vacuum vessel by using a 600 deg. C black body, a digital signal averaging on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper placed directly in front of it, and a simulation window without Fabry-Perot effects. The calibration precision leads to ECE temperature profiles which are very consistent with Thomson scattering measurements and guarantees a good stability of the ECE profiles for small changes on the magnetic field (absolute precision ± 6%, relative precision between channels ± 3%). Post-pulse data processing takes routinely into account the total magnetic field (B vacuum with ripple, B para , B dia , B pol , all with analytical formulations), the radial relativistic shift (analytical formulation is used), the refraction, not described in this paper, (cut-off detection with safety margin to avoid strong refraction), the nonthermal ECE spectra, not described in this paper, during LHCD (using an electron density threshold criterion). These previous analytical formulations are compatible with real time processing. Relativistic radial broadening simulations show that it is useful to fulfill 32 channels (1 GHz spaced). (authors)

  5. Precision and resolution on Tore-Supra ECE electron temperature profile measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segui, J.L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M. [Association EURATOM -CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2003-07-01

    A 16-channel heterodyne radiometer, 2 GHz spaced, is used on Tore-Supra to measure the electron cyclotron emission in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the O mode and 94 -126 GHz for the X mode. In the equatorial plane, a dual polarisation Gaussian optics lens antenna, with a perpendicular line of sight (with respect to the magnetic field), gives ECE measurements with very low refraction and Doppler effects. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This improves time stability calibration and gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94 -110 GHz RF band for polarisation studies. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 GHz) in order to perform temperature measurements during ECRH plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the vacuum vessel by using a 600 deg. C black body, a digital signal averaging on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper placed directly in front of it, and a simulation window without Fabry-Perot effects. The calibration precision leads to ECE temperature profiles which are very consistent with Thomson scattering measurements and guarantees a good stability of the ECE profiles for small changes on the magnetic field (absolute precision {+-} 6%, relative precision between channels {+-} 3%). Post-pulse data processing takes routinely into account the total magnetic field (B{sub vacuum} with ripple, B{sub para}, B{sub dia}, B{sub pol}, all with analytical formulations), the radial relativistic shift (analytical formulation is used), the refraction, not described in this paper, (cut-off detection with safety margin to avoid strong refraction), the nonthermal ECE spectra, not described in this paper, during LHCD (using an electron density threshold criterion). These previous analytical formulations are compatible with real time processing. Relativistic radial broadening simulations show that it is useful to fulfill 32 channels (1 GHz

  6. Preliminary study of ECE imaging concept for W7-X, using the Talbot effect in rectangular waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, Daniel; Plaum, Burkhard; Kasparek, Walter; Hirth, Thomas [IGVP, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Hirsch, Matthias [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    For spatially resolved measurements of Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) in W7-X, an imaging antenna based on a corrugated rectangular waveguide can be used. The imaging characteristics of the antenna allow a simultaneous operation at multiple angles and frequencies. As a result it is possible to localize a set of points inside the plasma, where the ECE can be measured without the need of mobile components facing the plasma.

  7. Ideal kink and neoclassical tearing mode identification in DIII-D with ECE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hailin; Austin, Max; Brookman, Michale; Rowan, William; La Haye, R. J.

    2017-10-01

    Detection of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs), which can degrade plasma confinement or cause disruptions, is important in tokamaks. We have developed a code to cross-correlate ECE/magnetics data to get the amplitude and phase profiles of the electron temperature (Te) oscillation caused by the rotating magnetic island and/or a kink. It has been observed that the ΔTe amplitude on the two sides of the island center can be very different in some discharges. Also, a discrepancy often exists between the location of the rational q surface according to MSE-constrained EFIT and the location of island center according to ECE; this can be an issue for ECCD suppression of NTMs. We explore the possible causes of these two phenomena in terms of ECE location and calibration accuracy. By analyzing the Te fluctuation phase evolution after a large sawtooth crash which triggers an NTM, the presence of a kink-like mode before the onset of NTM can be discerned. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-97ER54415 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  8. Preliminary optical design of polarization splitter box for ITER ECE diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ravinder; Danani, Suman; Pandya, Hitesh Kumar; Kumar, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    In tokamak, electron cyclotron emission (ECE) leaves the magnetically confined plasma with two polarizing modes, one with electric field parallel to magnetic field known as ordinary mode or O-Mode polarization, and other with the electric field perpendicular to magnetic field, extraordinary Mode or X-Mode. These radiation modes will be collected simultaneously in the ITER ECE measurement line. Therefore, it is necessary to split the radiation into O and X-mode polarizations before transmission otherwise there might be polarization mixing during transmission of the ECE radiation from tokamak to the measurement instruments. Proposed design of the polarization splitter box consists of two Gaussian beam telescopes built from three ellipsoidal mirrors and one flat mirror. A wire grid beam splitter separates the O and X-Mode polarization emission. The box is covered with microwave absorber to minimize scattering of the radiation. The design is being optimized by simulation using the Gaussian beam Mode software to achieve the desired performance, details will be discussed

  9. Multichannel heterodyne radiometers with fast-scanning backward-wave oscillators for ECE measurement on HT-7 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.Y.; Poznyak, V.I.; Ploskirev, G.; Kalupin, D.; Wan, Y.X.; Xie, J.K.; Luo, J.R.; Li, J.G.; Gao, X.; Wan, B.N.; Zhang, X.D.; Wang, K.J.; Kuang, G.L.

    2001-01-01

    Two sets of fast-scanning heterodyne radiometer receiver systems employing backward-wave oscillators (BWOs) in 78-118 and 118-178 GHz were developed and installed for electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements on HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The double sideband (DSB) radiometer in 78-118 GHz measures 16 ECE frequency points with a scanning time period of 0.65 ms. The other radiometer in 118-178 GHz consists of one independent channel of DSB heterodyne receiver with intermediate frequency (IF) of 100-500 MHz and two channels of single sideband (SSB) heterodyne receiver that are sensitive to upper sideband and lower sideband individually; the IF frequency of the SSB channels are 1.5 GHz around the local oscillator frequencies with 1 GHz bandwidth. By employing a novel design, this unique radiometer measures 3 ECE frequency points at each of the 16 local oscillator frequency points in 118-178 GHz, and the full band can be swept in 0.65 ms period, thus the radiometer measures 48 ECE frequency points in 0.65 ms in principle. Each of the local oscillators' frequency points can be preset by program to meet specific physics interests. Horizontal view of ECE was installed to measure electron temperature profiles; vertically viewing optics along a perpendicular chord was also installed to study nonthermal ECE spectra. Preliminary measurement results were presented during ohmic and pellet injection plasmas

  10. Improvement of the T{sub e} profile on JET measured by Ece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, P. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Luna, E. de la [Association Euratom-Ciemat, Lab. Nacional de Fusion, Madrid (Spain); Gowers, Ch. [Association Euratom-UKAEA Fusion, Culham Science Centre, Abingdom (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    On JET, a key source of calibrated electron temperature T{sub e} profiles is from the measurements of the full ECE (electron cyclotron emission) spectrum made by a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS). It is absolutely calibrated by using a calibration source inside the vacuum vessel. High spatial and temporal resolution ECE T{sub e} profiles are obtained using a 96 channel heterodyne instrument which is cross calibrated on each JET pulse against the data from the FTS system. Residual systematic frequency dependant errors at the 5-10% level can then be evaluated and corrected for, using specific discharges in which the toroidal field is varied while keeping the shape of the T8e profile constant. This improvement in the calibration method has been systematically applied at JET for the first time improving both the smoothness and the symmetry of the T{sub e} profiles. The consequences of this improvement are discussed. In addition, it is shown that no deviation occurs in the FTS calibration for more than 8 years, which is relevant for ITER. (author)

  11. The ECE Pre-Service Teachers' Perception on Factors Affecting the Integration of Educational Computer Games in Two Conditions: Selecting versus Redesigning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancar Tokmak, Hatice; Ozgelen, Sinan

    2013-01-01

    This case study aimed to examine early childhood education (ECE) pre-service teachers' perception on the factors affecting integration of educational computer games to their instruction in two areas: selecting and redesigning. Twenty-six ECE pre-service teachers participated in the study. The data was collected through open-ended questionnaires,…

  12. A Nordic approach to ECE system and social differences - a Danish trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente

    . Preliminary results from the Danish trial: Action Competencies in Social Pedagogical Work with Socially Endangered Children (The ASP-project) based on a Bourdiean perspective - indicate that there is reason to focus more on teachers' professional skills and qualifications concerning new challenges....... It is demanding for teachers working with the entire ECE/ASPimplementation process because they have to reflect upon their own practice and role in relation to create and implement new knowledge of socially endangered children. Based on an analysis of the Nordic situation, the paper discusses preliminary results......The aim of this study is to develop an intervention and test its effects based on a theoretical concept of learning and social innovation. International research shows that early interventions can make a positive difference, and, as shown in American RCT studies, there are long-term effects...

  13. Practical experience with measurement of diesel engine smoke pursuant to ECE-R 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, W

    1975-01-01

    Since the ECE regulation 24 demands that diesel smoke of automobiles be measured with opacimeters or units yielding equivalent results, the smoke density of diesel engines was measured with opacimeters and filter units for comparison. Conversion tables, comparative curves, and calculations are provided permitting the conversion of grey tones into opacity units with an accuracy sufficient for practical use. The correlation of measurements obtained with the filters and opacimeters was studied during operation at constant full load and at free acceleration. A relationship could be found in most cases; however, it provided no basis for setting up correlations. Finally, smoke characteristics of induction diesel engines were compared with supercharged engines at different geographical altitudes, based upon practical road tests in the Grossglockner mountains. A linear smoke increase with increasing altitude or decreasing air density was observed.

  14. 8th Annual report 1999. UN ECE convention on long-range transboundary air pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleemola, S.; Forsius, M. [eds.

    1999-07-01

    The Integrated Monitoring Programme (ICP IM) is part of the Effects Monitoring Strategy under the UN ECE Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. The main aim of ICP IM is to provide a framework to observe and understand the complex changes occurring in the external environment. This report summarizes the work carried out by the ICP IM Programme Centre and several collaborating institutes. The emphasis of the report is in the work done during the programme year 1998/99 including: - a short summary of previous data assessments - a short status report of the ICP IM activities, content of the IM database, and the present geographical coverage of the monitoring network - a documentation of the scientific strategies to carry out data assessment on two priority topics: - assessment of heavy metal pools and fluxes - assessment of cause-effect relationships for understorey vegetation - a description of the WATBAL-model for estimating monthly water balance components, including soil water fluxes. (orig.)

  15. A Nordic approach to Early Childhood Education (ECE) and socially endangered children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente

    2009-01-01

    system fails to provide equal social and intellectual opportunities to all children, further development in this area is required. Based on an analysis of the Nordic situation, a recent Danish intervention involving some 60 centres and 2.700 pre-school children and some preliminary results are presented...... opportunities for all by starting with early intervention. This is particularly especially relevant in Denmark, where >95% of all children attend in day-care. International research shows that early interventions can make a positive difference, and as shown in American Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) studies......, the effects are lasting. On the other hand, international research does not address the two different main approaches to the ECE systems (holistic/academic) nor to the questions of how pedagogic initiatives and framework conditions work as prerequisites for success (best practice). An analysis of research...

  16. ECE diagnostic for the TARA tandem mirror machine using a fast-scanning Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guharay, S.K.; Boyd, D.A.; Ellis, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    This ECE (electron cyclotron emission) diagnostic utilizes a fast-scanning Michelson interferometer to determine two parameters, the temperature and the loss cone angle, of the distribution function of the hot electrons (Tapprox. >100 keV) generated in the axisymmetric plug plasma of the TARA tandem mirror device. The radiation transport system employs a lens relay and a low-pass grating filter in order to transmit the synchrotron radiation over a spectral range of 2.9--18.6 cm -1 . This enables us to study the emitted radiation spectrum up to the 40th harmonic of the electron--cyclotron frequency in the plug plasma (B = 5 kG). Details of the design principles and the development of the diagnostic at TARA will be presented

  17. Inequality, Economic Growth and Trade Openness: a Study Case for Central and Eastern Countries (ECE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Neagu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the phenomenon of income inequality in ten countries from Eastern and Central Europe (ECE, by highlighting two aspects: (1 the link between growth and income inequality; (2 the effects of trade openess and other key factors on income inequality, such as: foreign direct investment (FDI, market capitalization and educational level of labour force. The method used was the Panel Data Analysis with statistical data from the period of 2000-2014. An increasing effect in income inequality was identified due to the trade openess, the inward stock of ISD and the market capitalization and an equalizing effect in the income distribution generated by the educational level of labour force. A positive association was also found between the growth of PIB per capita level and the increase of income inequality in the examined countries.

  18. Pharmacological hypothesis: Nitric oxide-induced inhibition of ADAM-17 activity as well as vesicle release can in turn prevent the production of soluble endothelin-converting enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W; Parkington, Helena C; Smith, Ian

    2017-10-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) are two highly potent vasoactive molecules with opposing effects on the vasculature. Endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) catalyse the production of ET-1 and NO, respectively. It is well established that these molecules play a crucial role in the initiation and progression of cardiovascular diseases and have therefore become targets of therapy. Many studies have examined the mechanism(s) by which NO regulates ET-1 production. Expression and localization of ECE-1 is a key factor that determines the rate of ET-1 production. ECE-1 can either be membrane bound or be released from the cell surface to produce a soluble form. NO has been shown to reduce the expression of both membrane-bound and soluble ECE-1. Several studies have examined the mechanism(s) behind NO-mediated inhibition of ECE expression on the cell membrane. However, the precise mechanism(s) behind NO-mediated inhibition of soluble ECE production are unknown. We hypothesize that both exogenous and endogenous NO, inhibits the production of soluble ECE-1 by preventing its release via extracellular vesicles (e.g., exosomes), and/or by inhibiting the activity of A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease-17 (ADAM17). If this hypothesis is proven correct in future studies, these pathways represent targets for the therapeutic manipulation of soluble ECE-1 production. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. Aβ degradation or cerebral perfusion? Divergent effects of multifunctional enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, J Scott; Palmer, Jennifer C; Tayler, Hannah; Palmer, Laura E; Ashby, Emma; Kehoe, Patrick G; Love, Seth

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that deficient clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) contributes to its accumulation in late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD). Several Aβ-degrading enzymes, including neprilysin (NEP), endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) reduce Aβ levels and protect against cognitive impairment in mouse models of AD. In post-mortem human brain tissue we have found that the activity of these Aβ-degrading enzymes rise with age and increases still further in AD, perhaps as a physiological response that helps to minimize the build-up of Aβ. ECE-1/-2 and ACE are also rate-limiting enzymes in the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and angiotensin II (Ang II), two potent vasoconstrictors, increases in the levels of which are likely to contribute to reduced blood flow in AD. This review considers the possible interdependence between Aβ-degrading enzymes, ischemia and Aβ in AD: ischemia has been shown to increase Aβ production both in vitro and in vivo, whereas increased Aβ probably enhances ischemia by vasoconstriction, mediated at least in part by increased ECE and ACE activity. In contrast, NEP activity may help to maintain cerebral perfusion, by reducing the accumulation of Aβ in cerebral blood vessels and lessening its toxicity to vascular smooth muscle cells. In assessing the role of Aβ-degrading proteases in the pathogenesis of AD and, particularly, their potential as therapeutic agents, it is important to bear in mind the multifunctional nature of these enzymes and to consider their effects on other substrates and pathways.

  20. High activity and low temperature optima of extracellular enzymes in Arctic sediments: implications for carbon cycling by heterotrophic microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    2003-01-01

    (chondroitin sulfate, fucoidan, xylan and pullulan) to determine the temperature-activity responses of hydrolysis of a related class of compounds. All 4 enzyme activities showed similarly low temperature optima in the range of 15 to 18degreesC. These temperature optima are considerably lower than most previous......The rate of the initial step in microbial remineralization of organic carbon, extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis, was investigated as a function of temperature in permanently cold sediments from 2 fjords on the west coast of Svalbard (Arctic Ocean). We used 4 structurally distinct polysaccharides...... reports of temperature optima for enzyme activities in marine sediments. At 0degreesC, close to the in situ temperature, these enzyme activities achieved 13 to 38% of their rates at optimum temperatures. In one experiment, sulfate reduction rates were measured in parallel with extracellular enzymatic...

  1. The chaperone role of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and its implications for rare diseases involving B6-dependent enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, Barbara; Montioli, Riccardo; Oppici, Elisa; Astegno, Alessandra; Voltattorni, Carla Borri

    2014-02-01

    The biologically active form of the B6 vitamers is pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), which plays a coenzymatic role in several distinct enzymatic activities ranging from the synthesis, interconversion and degradation of amino acids to the replenishment of one-carbon units, synthesis and degradation of biogenic amines, synthesis of tetrapyrrolic compounds and metabolism of amino-sugars. In the catalytic process of PLP-dependent enzymes, the substrate amino acid forms a Schiff base with PLP and the electrophilicity of the PLP pyridine ring plays important roles in the subsequent catalytic steps. While the essential role of PLP in the acquisition of biological activity of many proteins is long recognized, the finding that some PLP-enzymes require the coenzyme for refolding in vitro points to an additional role of PLP as a chaperone in the folding process. Mutations in the genes encoding PLP-enzymes are causative of several rare inherited diseases. Patients affected by some of these diseases (AADC deficiency, cystathionuria, homocystinuria, gyrate atrophy, primary hyperoxaluria type 1, xanthurenic aciduria, X-linked sideroblastic anaemia) can benefit, although at different degrees, from the administration of pyridoxine, a PLP precursor. The effect of the coenzyme is not limited to mutations that affect the enzyme-coenzyme interaction, but also to those that cause folding defects, reinforcing the idea that PLP could play a chaperone role and improve the folding efficiency of misfolded variants. In this review, recent biochemical and cell biology studies highlighting the chaperoning activity of the coenzyme on folding-defective variants of PLP-enzymes associated with rare diseases are presented and discussed. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Contribution to the ministerial conference ''environment for Europe'', Lucerne, Switzerland, 28-30 April 1993. As adopted by the Senior Advisers to ECE Governments on Environmental and Water Problems on 19 March 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Ministerial Conference ''Environmental for Europe'', held in Dobris Castle in June 1991, underlined the need to develop an environmental programme for Europe which would serve as the framework for improved coordination of national and international efforts in Europe. The Expert Group for the second Ministerial Conference ''Environment for Europe'', to be hosted by the Government of Switzerland in Lucerne from 28 to 30 April 1993, invited the Senior Advisers to propose initial elements for such a programme. The Senior Advisers were also invited to assess progress in the implementation of the conclusions and recommendations of the Bergen, Dublin and Dobris Conferences, to consider the relevant implications of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED), and to prepare draft elements for a Ministerial Declaration for the Lucerne Conference. The present document, prepared in the light of the discussions held and the various documents considered, was adopted by the Senior Advisers to ECE Governments on Environmental and Water Problems at their sixth session in Geneva, 16-19 March 1993 (ECE/ENVWA/29, para. 18)

  3. FOM-Rijnhuizen contributions to IAEA technical committee meeting on ECE and ECRH, seventh joint workshop on ECE and ECRH (EC-7), Hefei, P.R. China, 8-11 May 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This report contains five contributions all being in INIS-scope, entitled respectivel: Measurements on Waveguide Components for ECRH on RTP; Electron Cyclotron Resonance heating on RTP; Electron Cyclotron Heating of High Density JET H-Mode Discharges; Electron Cyclotron Current Drive and m=2 Mode Stabilization in NET; A Double-heterodyne ECE Radiometer for the measurement of Small Temperature Fluctuations on RTP. (author). 37 refs.; 30 figs.; 5 tabs

  4. A Study on Control Strategy of Regenerative Braking in the Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicle Based on ECE Regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tao; Zheng, Jincheng; Su, Yongmao; Zhao, Jinghui

    2013-01-01

    This paper establishes a mathematic model of composite braking in the hydraulic hybrid vehicle and analyzes the constraint condition of parallel regenerative braking control algorithm. Based on regenerative braking system character and ECE (Economic Commission of Europe) regulations, it introduces the control strategy of regenerative braking in parallel hydraulic hybrid vehicle (PHHV). Finally, the paper establishes the backward simulation model of the hydraulic hybrid vehicle in Matlab/simul...

  5. A functional screen implicates microRNA-138-dependent regulation of the depalmitoylation enzyme APT1 in dendritic spine morphogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegel, Gabriele; Obernosterer, Gregor; Fiore, Roberto; Oehmen, Martin; Bicker, Silvia; Christensen, Mette; Khudayberdiev, Sharof; Leuschner, Philipp F; Busch, Clara J L; Kane, Christina; Hübel, Katja; Dekker, Frank; Hedberg, Christian; Rengarajan, Balamurugan; Drepper, Carsten; Waldmann, Herbert; Kauppinen, Sakari; Greenberg, Michael E; Draguhn, Andreas; Rehmsmeier, Marc; Martinez, Javier; Schratt, Gerhard M; Dekker, Frank

    The microRNA pathway has been implicated in the regulation of synaptic protein synthesis and ultimately in dendritic spine morphogenesis, a phenomenon associated with long-lasting forms of memory. However, the particular microRNAs (miRNAs) involved are largely unknown. Here we identify specific

  6. A Survey of Soil Enzyme Activities along Major Roads in Beijing: The Implications for Traffic Corridor Green Space Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxin Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil quality is critical to the management of urban green space, in particular, along traffic corridors where traffic-related air pollution is significant. Soil quality can be evaluated by soil enzyme activities, which show quick responses to both natural and anthropogenic disturbances. In this study, we investigated three soil enzyme activities (i.e., dehydrogenase, catalase and urease along the major roads in urban areas of Beijing. Results show the activities of dehydrogenase, catalase and urease in urban samples were 58.8%, 68.2% and 48.5% less than the rural sample, respectively. The content of fluorescent amino acids as indicators of microbial activities was also consistently lower in urban samples than the rural. We observed two times greater exposure of particulate material along the roadsides in urban areas than rural areas. Although traffic air pollutants provide some nutrient sources to stimulate the URE activity, the exposure to traffic-related air pollution leads to the substantial decrease in enzyme activities. There were significant negative correlations for exposure to PM10 with DHA (r = −0.8267, p = 0.0017 and CAT (r = −0.89, p = 0.0002 activities. For the urban soils URE activity increased with the increasing of PM. We conclude that the degraded soil quality can negatively affect the target of developing plants and green spaces along the traffic corridors to mitigate the traffic impact. This study suggests the investigation of integrated strategies to restore the soil quality, reinforce the ecological service functions of green spaces along the traffic corridors and reduce the traffic pollutants.

  7. A functional screen implicates microRNA-138-dependent regulation of the depalmitoylation enzyme APT1 in dendritic spine morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siegel, Gabriele; Obernosterer, Gregor; Fiore, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    of acyl protein thioesterase 1 (APT1), an enzyme regulating the palmitoylation status of proteins that are known to function at the synapse, including the alpha(13) subunits of G proteins (Galpha(13)). RNA-interference-mediated knockdown of APT1 and the expression of membrane-localized Galpha(13) both...... suppress spine enlargement caused by inhibition of miR-138, suggesting that APT1-regulated depalmitoylation of Galpha(13) might be an important downstream event of miR-138 function. Our results uncover a previously unknown miRNA-dependent mechanism in neurons and demonstrate a previously unrecognized...

  8. High activity and low temperature optima of extracellular enzymes in Arctic sediments: implications for carbon cycling by heterotrophic microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    2003-01-01

    The rate of the initial step in microbial remineralization of organic carbon, extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis, was investigated as a function of temperature in permanently cold sediments from 2 fjords on the west coast of Svalbard (Arctic Ocean). We used 4 structurally distinct polysaccharides...... hydrolysis in order to determine the relative temperature responses of the initial and terminal steps in microbial remineralization of carbon. The temperature optimum of sulfate reduction, 21degreesC, was considerably lower than previous reports of sulfate reduction in marine sediments, but is consistent...... with recent studies of psychrophilic sulfate reducers isolated from Svalbard sediments. A calculation of potential carbon flow into the microbial food chain demonstrated that the activity of just one type of polysaccharide-hydrolyzing enzyme could in theory supply 21 to 100% of the carbon consumed via sulfate...

  9. Curcumin inhibits development and cell adhesion in Dictyostelium discoideum: Implications for YakA signaling and GST enzyme function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garige, Mamatha; Walters, Eric, E-mail: ewalters@howard.edu

    2015-11-13

    The molecular basis for nutraceutical properties of the polyphenol curcumin (Curcuma longa, Turmeric) is complex, affecting multiple factors that regulate cell signaling and homeostasis. Here, we report the effect of curcumin on cellular and developmental mechanisms in the eukaryotic model, Dictyostelium discoideum. Dictyostelium proliferation was inhibited in the presence of curcumin, which also suppressed the prestarvation marker, discoidin I, members of the yakA-mediated developmental signaling pathway, and expression of the extracellular matrix/cell adhesion proteins (DdCAD and csA). This resulted in delayed chemotaxis, adhesion, and development of the organism. In contrast to the inhibitory effects on developmental genes, curcumin induced gstA gene expression, overall GST activity, and generated production of reactive oxygen species. These studies expand our knowledge of developmental and biochemical signaling influenced by curcumin, and lends greater consideration of GST enzyme function in eukaryotic cell signaling, development, and differentiation.

  10. Curcumin inhibits development and cell adhesion in Dictyostelium discoideum: Implications for YakA signaling and GST enzyme function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garige, Mamatha; Walters, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis for nutraceutical properties of the polyphenol curcumin (Curcuma longa, Turmeric) is complex, affecting multiple factors that regulate cell signaling and homeostasis. Here, we report the effect of curcumin on cellular and developmental mechanisms in the eukaryotic model, Dictyostelium discoideum. Dictyostelium proliferation was inhibited in the presence of curcumin, which also suppressed the prestarvation marker, discoidin I, members of the yakA-mediated developmental signaling pathway, and expression of the extracellular matrix/cell adhesion proteins (DdCAD and csA). This resulted in delayed chemotaxis, adhesion, and development of the organism. In contrast to the inhibitory effects on developmental genes, curcumin induced gstA gene expression, overall GST activity, and generated production of reactive oxygen species. These studies expand our knowledge of developmental and biochemical signaling influenced by curcumin, and lends greater consideration of GST enzyme function in eukaryotic cell signaling, development, and differentiation.

  11. Euroguidelines in Central and Eastern Europe (ECEE) conference and the Warsaw Declaration - a comprehensive meeting report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, J D; Oprea, C; de Witt, S; Pozniak, A; Gökengin, D; Youle, M; Lundgren, J D; Horban, A

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to summarize the outcomes of the Euroguidelines in Central and Eastern Europe (ECEE) conference held in Warsaw in February 2016. The main aim of this conference was to facilitate a discussion on European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines implementation across the region and neighbouring countries and to present the current obstacles in benchmarking HIV care in Europe. During a 2-day meeting, there were country-based presentations using a predefined template so as to make the data comparable and focus the discussion. Areas covered were country epidemiology, surveillance, national strategy for treatment and prevention, standards of care, access to care and treatment availability. Each participant filled in a questionnaire investigating HIV guidelines usage per country. In total, 16 Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and neighbouring countries were represented at the conference: Albania, Armenia, Belarus, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Georgia, Hungary, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia and Turkey. EACS guidelines version 7.1 were used in 14 (87%) countries. In 11 (69%) countries, national guidelines were available, of which eight had been recently updated. Half of the countries declared that they use World Health Organization (WHO) and Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) guidelines, over one-third the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) HIV testing guidelines and one in five the International Antiviral Society-USA (IAS-USA) Panel guidelines from 2012. Participants declared their will to promote the widespread use of EACS guidelines for HIV infection in the CEE region and neighbouring countries by signing the Warsaw Declaration. They also emphasized the need to increase publishing of data from national cohorts in that region. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  12. Isotope Effects Associated with N2O Production by Fungal and Bacterial Nitric Oxide Reductases: Implications for Enzyme Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegg, E. L.; Yang, H.; Gandhi, H.; McQuarters, A.; Lehnert, N.; Ostrom, N. E.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is both a powerful greenhouse gas and a key participant in ozone destruction. Microbial activity accounts for over 70% of the N2O produced annually, and the atmospheric concentration of N2O continues to rise. Because the fungal and bacterial denitrification pathways are major contributors to microbial N2O production, understanding the mechanism by which NO is reduced to N2O will contribute to both N2O source tracing and quantification. Our strategy utilizes stable isotopes to probe the enzymatic mechanism of microbial N2O production. Although the use of stable isotopes to study enzyme mechanisms is not new, our approach is distinct in that we employ both measurements of isotopic preferences of purified enzyme and DFT calculations, thereby providing a synergistic combination of experimental and computational approaches. We analyzed δ18O, δ15Nα (central N atom in N2O), and δ15Nβ (terminal N atom) of N2O produced by purified fungal cytochrome P450 nitric oxide reductase (P450nor) from Histoplasma capsulatum as well as bacterial cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR) from Paracoccus denitrificans. P450nor exhibits an inverse kinetic isotope effect for Nβ (KIE = 0.9651) but a normal isotope effect for both Nα (KIE = 1.0127) and the oxygen atom (KIE = 1.0264). These results suggest a mechanism where NO binds to the ferric heme in the P450nor active site and becomes Nβ. Analysis of the NO-binding step indicated a greater difference in zero point energy in the transition state than the ground state, resulting in the inverse KIE observed for Nβ. Following protonation and rearrangement, it is speculated that this complex forms a FeIV-NHOH- species as a key intermediate. Our data are consistent with the second NO (which becomes Nα and O in the N2O product) attacking the FeIV-NHOH- species to generate a FeIII-N2O2H2 complex that enzymatically (as opposed to abiotically) breaks down to release N2O. Conversely, our preliminary data

  13. Regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes in infectious and inflammatory disease: implications for biologics-small molecule drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Pankajini; Taneja, Guncha; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Ghose, Romi

    2017-06-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) are primarily down-regulated during infectious and inflammatory diseases, leading to disruption in the metabolism of small molecule drugs (smds), which are increasingly being prescribed therapeutically in combination with biologics for a number of chronic diseases. The biologics may exert pro- or anti-inflammatory effect, which may in turn affect the expression/activity of DMEs. Thus, patients with infectious/inflammatory diseases undergoing biologic/smd treatment can have complex changes in DMEs due to combined effects of the disease and treatment. Areas covered: We will discuss clinical biologics-SMD interaction and regulation of DMEs during infection and inflammatory diseases. Mechanistic studies will be discussed and consequences on biologic-small molecule combination therapy on disease outcome due to changes in drug metabolism will be highlighted. Expert opinion: The involvement of immunomodulatory mediators in biologic-SMDs is well known. Regulatory guidelines recommend appropriate in vitro or in vivo assessments for possible interactions. The role of cytokines in biologic-SMDs has been documented. However, the mechanisms of drug-drug interactions is much more complex, and is probably multi-factorial. Studies aimed at understanding the mechanism by which biologics effect the DMEs during inflammation/infection are clinically important.

  14. Allostery Is an Intrinsic Property of the Protease Domain of DegS Implications for Enzyme Function and Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T. (MIT)

    2010-12-02

    DegS is a periplasmic Escherichia coli protease, which functions as a trimer to catalyze the initial rate-limiting step in a proteolytic cascade that ultimately activates transcription of stress response genes in the cytoplasm. Each DegS subunit consists of a protease domain and a PDZ domain. During protein folding stress, DegS is allosterically activated by peptides exposed in misfolded outer membrane porins, which bind to the PDZ domain and stabilize the active protease. It is not known whether allostery is conferred by the PDZ domains or is an intrinsic feature of the trimeric protease domain. Here, we demonstrate that free DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} equilibrates between active and inactive trimers with the latter species predominating. Substrate binding stabilizes active DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} in a positively cooperative fashion. Mutations can also stabilize active DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} and produce an enzyme that displays hyperbolic kinetics and degrades substrate with a maximal velocity within error of that for fully activated, intact DegS. Crystal structures of multiple DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} variants, in functional and non-functional conformations, support a two-state model in which allosteric switching is mediated by changes in specific elements of tertiary structure in the context of an invariant trimeric base. Overall, our results indicate that protein substrates must bind sufficiently tightly and specifically to the functional conformation of DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} to assist their own degradation. Thus, substrate binding alone may have regulated the activities of ancestral DegS trimers with subsequent fusion of the protease domain to a PDZ domain, resulting in ligand-mediated regulation.

  15. On Eddy current examination (ECE) of Incoloy 800 SG tube using OD encircling and ID bobbin coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, K.; Sunder Krishna, K.; Bakshu, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present and compare the results of ECE carried out on steam generator tubes from OD side and ID side. During the manufacturing of the tubes Eddy current testing is being carried out using OD encircling probe as per ASTM E 571. Here the purpose of the test is to capture the manufacturing defects. The parameters of the test are optimized to achieve best sensitivity to this requirement. These tubes are then installed in the steam generator and once again ECE is carried out during installation (pre-service inspection-PSI) and during in-service inspection (ISI) by using ID bobbin coil. These tests are carried out as per ASME section V article 8 appendix 1. Here the purpose of the test is to detect wall thinning, dent, pits etc due to operation and to locate these defects (OD side or ID side). Here the operating parameters are optimized for phase separation of defects from OD and ID. These parameters are quite different from those used during the manufacturing ECE. Interpretation of the signals detected in PSI/ISI in must be done with care to correlate with defect indications detected during manufacturing. In the present study, tubes with certain manufacturing defects, detected with OD encircling test were subjected to ID bobbin coil examination. Also certain tubes with signal picked up during test from ID were examined by using the OD encircling probe. This comparison of the results provides a clear picture about the sensitivity and deficiency of the either type of test. (author)

  16. The study on the neoclassical transport analysis using ECE measured temperature profiles in the LHD long pulse plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasao, Hajime; Watanabe, Kiyomasa; Inagaki, Shigeru

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the change of the neoclassical transport and the radial electric field in the long pulse LHD plasmas by using the experimental ECE data. The neoclassical heat flux, which the neo-classical theory predicts, changes due to the change of the radial electric field. The increase of H ions injected by Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) in He discharge produce effect on the electric field. There is the threshold of H quantity on the change of the electric field polarity. (author)

  17. IEA SHC Task 42/ECES Annex 29 – A Simple Tool for the Economic Evaluation of Thermal Energy Storages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathgeber, Christoph; Hiebler, Stefan; Lävemann, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of IEA SHC Task 42 / ECES Annex 29, a simple tool for the economic evaluation of thermal energy storages has been developed and tested on various existing storages. On that account, the storage capacity costs (costs per installed storage capacity) of thermal energy storages...... have been evaluated via a Top-down and a Bottom-up approach. The Top-down approach follows the assumption that the costs of energy supplied by the storage should not exceed the costs of energy from the market. The maximum acceptable storage capacity costs depend on the interest rate assigned...

  18. A Study on Control Strategy of Regenerative Braking in the Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicle Based on ECE Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes a mathematic model of composite braking in the hydraulic hybrid vehicle and analyzes the constraint condition of parallel regenerative braking control algorithm. Based on regenerative braking system character and ECE (Economic Commission of Europe regulations, it introduces the control strategy of regenerative braking in parallel hydraulic hybrid vehicle (PHHV. Finally, the paper establishes the backward simulation model of the hydraulic hybrid vehicle in Matlab/simulink and makes a simulation analysis of the control strategy of regenerative braking. The results show that this strategy can equip the hydraulic hybrid vehicle with strong brake energy recovery power in typical urban drive state.

  19. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  20. Heterodyne ECE diagnostic in the mode detection and disruption avoidance at TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Finken, K.H.; Larue, H.; Udintsev, V.S.; TEXTOR - team

    2003-01-01

    Disruptions cause major concerns for the operation of tokamaks. During disruption large forces act on the tokamak vessel and its interior parts. The huge amount of plasma energy deposited on the first wall components within one millisecond causes serious damage. Therefore disruptions should be avoided. One way to avoid disruptions is the operation of a tokamak in a regime which is easy to handle from the control point of view. However, the operation in the advanced scenarios or improved confinement modes is very complicated and even small deviation in one of the control parameters can cause a disruption. In this cases a method should be available to detect the disruption in advance and mitigate or even better avoid the energy quench by appropriate means. At TEXTOR we developed a method to detect the disruption precursor. The module is integrated in the plasma control system. The detection method was tested at TEXTOR for (i) combination with tangential neutral beam injection to increase the toroidal rotation profile and to tear apart the m = 2 disruption precursor by a steep rotation gradient across the island (ii) gas puff experiments with He used to mitigate the disruption effects specially to suppress the generation of the runaway electrons. The paper demonstrates the possibility to detect disruptions precursors and to avoid disruptions using two ECE-channels out of the standard electron temperature diagnostic. The system demonstrated its reliability during the last month of TEXTOR operation. The injection of co- as well as counter neutral beam to avoid the disruption was successful tested and a detailed analysis of the mode development is presented. The measured rotation profiles show the development of a step in the toroidal velocity in the vicinity of the q = 2 surface which prevents the plasma from a disruption. Furthermore detailed analysis of the frequency development of the m = 2 mode could explain the observed sudden increase in the mode frequency

  1. UN-ECE task force: 'by-product utilization from stationary installations'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackl, A. E.; Zehetner, G.

    1996-09-01

    The task force has concluded as followed: Major sources of by-products considered in this report from stationary installations are large scale firing installations, waste incineration, upgrading processes and utilization in iron and steel, aluminium and copper industry, and the pulp and paper industry. The share of each sector source to the total amount of by-products generated differs significantly in the participating countries. State of the art processes as described in the report take account of the need for integrated pollution prevention and control. In particular the requirements set out in the Convention on Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution can still be satisfied when applying these state of the art processes. The report shows that a number of techniques for avoidance, reduction and/or utilization of by-products are in commercial operation in the branches discussed. They can therefore be considered to be best available. For some special by-products technical processes for the treatment are still in development and are not yet state-of-the-art. The implementation of the already proven techniques varies considerably in the different ECE-countries. This is mainly due to the following circumstances: differences in the design and stringency of legal regulations, availability of landfilling sites, costs of disposal, differences in industrial structure. Problems with by-product utilization originate mainly from: a) from a loss of international competitiveness of the respective industrial sector, if the reduction of the amount of by-products or their utilization leads to higher costs than conventional processes; b) from quality standards for materials which are inadequate for secondary raw materials thus creating acceptance problems of these materials. C) In some cases incineration and/or thermal recycling processes generate PCDD/F. quantities produces may be capable of reduction by means of process modification. If, however PCDD/F is released to the

  2. Implication of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme gene (CYP2E1, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, mEH and NAT2 Polymorphisms in Breast Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabbouj Sallouha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzymes (XMEs contribute to the detoxification of numerous cancer therapy-induced products. This study investigated the susceptibility and prognostic implications of the CYP2E1, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, mEH and NAT2 gene polymorphisms in breast carcinoma patients. Methods The authors used polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme digestion to characterize the variation of the CYP2E1, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, mEH and NAT2 gene in a total of 560 unrelated subjects (246 controls and 314 patients. Results The mEH (C/C mutant and the NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes were significantly associated with breast carcinoma risk (p = 0.02; p = 0.01, respectively. For NAT2 the association was more pronounced among postmenopausal patients (p = 0.006. A significant association was found between CYP2D6 (G/G wild type and breast carcinoma risk only in postmenopausal patients (p = 0.04. Association studies of genetic markers with the rates of breast carcinoma specific overall survival (OVS and the disease-free survival (DFS revealed among all breast carcinoma patients no association to DFS but significant differences in OVS only with the mEH gene polymorphisms (p = 0.02. In addition, the mEH wild genotype showed a significant association with decreased OVS in patients with axillary lymph node-negative patients (p = 0.03 and with decreasesd DFS in patients with axillary lymph node-positive patients (p = 0.001. However, the NAT2 intermediate acetylator genotype was associated with decreased DFS in axillary lymph node-negative patients. Conclusion The present study may prove that polymorphisms of some XME genes may predict the onset of breast carcinoma as well as survival after treatment.

  3. Enzyme 15-lipoxygenase 1 promotes hypoxia-inducible factor 1α turnover and reduces vascular endothelial growth factor expression: implications for angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Hua; Wang, Ruoxiang; Kelavkar, Uddhav; Wang, Christopher Y; Simons, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is the regulatory subunit of the heterodimeric HIF-1 that plays a critical role in transcriptional regulation of genes in angiogenesis and hypoxic adaptation, while fatty acid metabolism mediated by lipoxygenases has been implicated in a variety of pathogeneses, including cancers. In this study, we report that 15-lipoxygenase 1 (15-LO1), a key member of the lipoxygenase family, promotes HIF-1α ubiquitination and degradation. Altering the level of 15-LO1 yields inverse changes in HIF-1α and HIF-1 transcriptional activity, under both normoxia and hypoxia, and even in CoCl 2 -treated cells where HIF-1α has been artificially elevated. The antagonistic effect of 15-LO1 is mediated by the Pro 564 /hydroxylation/26S proteasome system, while both the enzymatic activity and the intracellular membrane-binding function of 15-LO1 appear to contribute to HIF-1α suppression. Our findings provide a novel mechanism for HIF-1α regulation, in which oxygen-dependent HIF-1 activity is modulated by an oxygen-insensitive lipid metabolic enzyme

  4. Capacidad discriminante de la Escala de Componentes Emocionales (ECE-I en un diseño con grupos pareados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Quirós-Morales

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluaron las características discriminantes y predictivas de la Escala de Componentes Emocionales (ECE-I en personas diagnosticadas con fibromialgia. La escala está conformada por 24 ítems distribuidos en 4 factores: problemas fisiológicos (F-PF, autoevaluación negativa (F-AN, desesperanza (F-D, estrés (F-E. Se utilizó una muestra de 124 mujeres (62 diagnosticadas con fibromialgia y 62 sin fibromialgia. Los niveles de predicción y clasificación expresan que la escala puede ser un instrumento útil en psicología de la salud para discriminar la presencia de indicadores emocionales para personas con diagnóstico de fibromialgia.

  5. Enzyme Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  6. Measuring the Enzyme Activity of Arabidopsis Deubiquitylating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowska, Kamila; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Isono, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitylating enzymes, or DUBs, are important regulators of ubiquitin homeostasis and substrate stability, though the molecular mechanisms of most of the DUBs in plants are not yet understood. As different ubiquitin chain types are implicated in different biological pathways, it is important to analyze the enzyme characteristic for studying a DUB. Quantitative analysis of DUB activity is also important to determine enzyme kinetics and the influence of DUB binding proteins on the enzyme activity. Here, we show methods to analyze DUB activity using immunodetection, Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining, and fluorescence measurement that can be useful for understanding the basic characteristic of DUBs.

  7. Molecular docking studies of 3-bromopyruvate and its derivatives to metabolic regulatory enzymes: Implication in designing of novel anticancer therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Saveg; Pandey, Shrish Kumar; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Goel, Yugal; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2017-01-01

    Altered metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer, as malignant cells display a mammoth up-regulation of enzymes responsible for steering their bioenergetic and biosynthetic machinery. Thus, the recent anticancer therapeutic strategies focus on the targeting of metabolic enzymes, which has led to the identification of specific metabolic inhibitors. One of such inhibitors is 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP), with broad spectrum of anticancer activity due to its ability to inhibit multiple metabolic enzymes. However, the molecular characterization of its binding to the wide spectrum of target enzymes remains largely elusive. Therefore, in the present study we undertook in silico investigations to decipher the molecular nature of the docking of 3-BP with key target enzymes of glycolysis and TCA cycle by PatchDock and YASARA docking tools. Additionally, derivatives of 3-BP, dibromopyruvate (DBPA) and propionic acid (PA), with reported biological activity, were also investigated for docking to important target metabolic enzymes of 3-BP, in order to predict their therapeutic efficacy versus that of 3-BP. A comparison of the docking scores with respect to 3-BP indicated that both of these derivatives display a better binding strength to metabolic enzymes. Further, analysis of the drug likeness of 3-BP, DBPA and PA by Lipinski filter, admetSAR and FAF Drug3 indicated that all of these agents showed desirable drug-like criteria. The outcome of this investigation sheds light on the molecular characteristics of the binding of 3-BP and its derivatives with metabolic enzymes and thus may significantly contribute in designing and optimizing therapeutic strategies against cancer by using these agents.

  8. Molecular docking studies of 3-bromopyruvate and its derivatives to metabolic regulatory enzymes: Implication in designing of novel anticancer therapeutic strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveg Yadav

    Full Text Available Altered metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer, as malignant cells display a mammoth up-regulation of enzymes responsible for steering their bioenergetic and biosynthetic machinery. Thus, the recent anticancer therapeutic strategies focus on the targeting of metabolic enzymes, which has led to the identification of specific metabolic inhibitors. One of such inhibitors is 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP, with broad spectrum of anticancer activity due to its ability to inhibit multiple metabolic enzymes. However, the molecular characterization of its binding to the wide spectrum of target enzymes remains largely elusive. Therefore, in the present study we undertook in silico investigations to decipher the molecular nature of the docking of 3-BP with key target enzymes of glycolysis and TCA cycle by PatchDock and YASARA docking tools. Additionally, derivatives of 3-BP, dibromopyruvate (DBPA and propionic acid (PA, with reported biological activity, were also investigated for docking to important target metabolic enzymes of 3-BP, in order to predict their therapeutic efficacy versus that of 3-BP. A comparison of the docking scores with respect to 3-BP indicated that both of these derivatives display a better binding strength to metabolic enzymes. Further, analysis of the drug likeness of 3-BP, DBPA and PA by Lipinski filter, admetSAR and FAF Drug3 indicated that all of these agents showed desirable drug-like criteria. The outcome of this investigation sheds light on the molecular characteristics of the binding of 3-BP and its derivatives with metabolic enzymes and thus may significantly contribute in designing and optimizing therapeutic strategies against cancer by using these agents.

  9. Comparative studies of vertebrate endothelin-converting enzyme-like 1 genes and proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes RS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Roger S Holmes,1,2 Laura A Cox11Department of Genetics and Southwest National Primate Research Center, Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX, USA; 2Eskitis Institute for Cell and Molecular Therapies and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, AustraliaAbstract: Endothelin-converting enzyme-like 1 (ECEL1 is a member of the M13 family of neutral endopeptidases which play an essential role in the neural regulation of vertebrate respiration. Genetic deficiency of this protein results in respiratory failure soon after birth. Comparative ECEL1 amino acid sequences and structures and ECEL1 gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Vertebrate ECEL1 sequences shared 66%–99% identity as compared with 30%–63% sequence identities with other M13-like family members, ECE1, ECE2, and NEP (neprilysin or MME. Three N-glycosylation sites were conserved among most vertebrate ECEL1 proteins examined. Sequence alignments, conserved key amino acid residues, and predicted secondary and tertiary structures were also studied, including cytoplasmic, transmembrane, and luminal sequences and active site residues. Vertebrate ECEL1 genes usually contained 18 exons and 17 coding exons on the negative strand. Exons 1 and 2 of the human ECEL1 gene contained 5'-untranslated (5'-UTR regions, a large CpG island (CpG256, and several transcription factor binding sites which may contribute to the high levels of gene expression previously reported in neural tissues. Phylogenetic analyses examined the relationships and potential evolutionary origins of the vertebrate ECEL1 gene with six other vertebrate neutral endopeptidase M13 family genes. These suggested that ECEL1 originated in an ancestral vertebrate genome from a duplication event in an ancestral neutral endopeptidase M13-like gene.Keywords: vertebrates, amino acid sequence, ECEL1, ECE1, ECE2, KELL, NEP, NEPL1, PHEX

  10. Impact of heavy metal on activity of some microbial enzymes in the riverbed sediments: Ecotoxicological implications in the Ganga River (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Deepa; Pandey, Jitendra

    2018-04-15

    We studied the extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) in the riverbed sediment along a 518km gradient of the Ganga River receiving carbon and nutrient load from varied human sources. Also, we tested, together with substrate-driven stimulation, if the heavy metal accumulated in the sediment inhibits enzyme activities. Because pristine values are not available, we considered Dev Prayag, a least polluted site located 624km upstream to main study stretch, as a reference site. There were distinct increases in enzyme activities in the sediment along the study gradient from Dev Prayag, however, between-site differences were in concordance with sediment carbon(C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDAase), β-glucosidase (Glu) and protease activities showed positive correlation with C, N and P while alkaline phosphatase was found negatively correlated with P. Enzyme activities were found negatively correlated with heavy metal, although ecological risk index (E R i ) varied with site and metal species. Dynamic fit curves showed significant positive correlation between heavy metal and microbial metabolic quotient (qCO 2 ) indicating a decrease in microbial activity in response to increasing heavy metal concentrations. This study forms the first report linking microbial enzyme activities to regional scale sediment heavy metal accumulation in the Ganga River, suggests that the microbial enzyme activities in the riverbed sediment were well associated with the proportion of C, N and P and appeared to be a sensitive indicator of C, N and P accumulation in the river. Heavy metal accumulated in the sediment inhibits enzyme activities, although C rich sediment showed relatively low toxicity due probably to reduced bioavailability of the metal. The study has relevance from ecotoxicological as well as from biomonitoring perspectives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Development and validity of a preliminary version of the Emotional Competence Scale in sports (ECE-D Desarrollo y validación de una versión preliminar de la Escala de Competencia emocional en el deporte (ECE-D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Ruiz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The relevant role of emotions in competitive contexts has been widely supported in the sport psychology literature. The aim of this study was to create a valid measure of emotional development in sports. The sample is composed by 367 sportsmen/women belonging to different sporting disciplines. Analyses were performed about the antecedents and the psychometric properties of the Emotional Development Scale (Schutte, Malouff, Hall, Haggerty, Cooper, Golden & Dornhein, 1998. Results showed that, in general terms, the initially proposed four factor model was supported. Implications for considering the improvement of the applicability questionnaire are advanced.
    KEY WORDS: Emotions, empathy, self-control, physical activity, sports, emotional competence

     

    El importante papel que juegan las emociones en los contextos deportivos ha sido ampliamente defendido en la literatura sobre psicología del deporte. El objetivo de este estudio es desarrollar y validar un instrumento para evaluar la competencia emocional de los deportistas. La muestra la componen 367 deportistas de ambos géneros pertenecientes a diferentes disciplinas deportivas. Se analizaron los antecedentes y las características psicométricas de la Escala de Desarrollo Emocional (Schutte, Malouff, Hall, Haggerty, Cooper, Golden y Dornhein, 1998. Los resultados obtenidos confirmaron en términos generales el modelo de cuatro factores propuesto por los autores originales y además, plantea la posibilidad de incluir mejoras sustanciales del cuestionario para futuras versiones relacionadas con su aplicabilidad.
    PALABRAS CLAVE: Emociones, empatía, autocontrol, actividad física, deporte, competencia emocional.

  12. Strain differences in angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin II type I receptor expression. Possible implications for experimental chronic renal transplant failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit-van Oosten, A; Henning, RH; van Goor, H

    Background The Fisher to Lewis (F-L) model of renal transplantation (Rtx) is widely used. Rtx from F to L without immunosuppressive treatment results in 50% survival, whereas L to F results in survival rates similar to syngrafts. When treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or

  13. Marine ecosystem community carbon and nutrient uptake stoichiometry under varying ocean acidification during the PeECE III experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. J. Bellerby

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes to seawater inorganic carbon and nutrient concentrations in response to the deliberate CO2 perturbation of natural plankton assemblages were studied during the 2005 Pelagic Ecosystem CO2 Enrichment (PeECE III experiment. Inverse analysis of the temporal inorganic carbon dioxide system and nutrient variations was used to determine the net community stoichiometric uptake characteristics of a natural pelagic ecosystem perturbed over a range of pCO2 scenarios (350, 700 and 1050 μatm. Nutrient uptake showed no sensitivity to CO2 treatment. There was enhanced carbon production relative to nutrient consumption in the higher CO2 treatments which was positively correlated with the initial CO2 concentration. There was no significant calcification response to changing CO2 in Emiliania huxleyi by the peak of the bloom and all treatments exhibited low particulate inorganic carbon production (~15 μmol kg−1. With insignificant air-sea CO2 exchange across the treatments, the enhanced carbon uptake was due to increase organic carbon production. The inferred cumulative C:N:P stoichiometry of organic production increased with CO2 treatment from 1:6.3:121 to 1:7.1:144 to 1:8.25:168 at the height of the bloom. This study discusses how ocean acidification may incur modification to the stoichiometry of pelagic production and have consequences for ocean biogeochemical cycling.

  14. Interaction between Red Yeast Rice and CYP450 Enzymes/P-Glycoprotein and Its Implication for the Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Lovastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hao Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Red yeast rice (RYR can reduce cholesterol through its active component, lovastatin. This study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of lovastatin in RYR products and potential RYR-drug interactions. Extracts of three registered RYR products (LipoCol Forte, Cholestin, and Xuezhikang were more effective than pure lovastatin in inhibiting the activities of cytochrome P450 enzymes and P-glycoprotein. Among CYP450 enzymes, RYR showed the highest inhibition on CYP1A2 and CYP2C19, with comparable inhibitory potencies to the corresponding typical inhibitors. In healthy volunteers taking the RYR product LipoCol Forte, the pharmacokinetic properties of lovastatin and lovastatin acid were linear in the dose range of 1 to 4 capsules taken as a single dose and no significant accumulation was observed after multiple dosing. Concomitant use of one LipoCol Forte capsule with nifedipine did not change the pharmacokinetics of nifedipine. Yet, concomitant use of gemfibrozil with LipoCol Forte resulted in a significant increase in the plasma concentration of lovastatin acid. These findings suggest that the use of RYR products may not have effects on the pharmacokinetics of concomitant comedications despite their effects to inhibit the activities of CYP450 enzymes and P-gp, whereas gemfibrozil affects the pharmacokinetics of lovastatin acid when used concomitantly with RYR products.

  15. The orbital ground state of the azide-substrate complex of human heme oxygenase is an indicator of distal H-bonding: Implications for the enzyme mechanism‡

    OpenAIRE

    Ogura, Hiroshi; Evans, John P.; Peng, Dungeng; Satterlee, James D.; de Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz; Mar, Gerd N. La

    2009-01-01

    The active site electronic structure of the azide complex of substrate-bound human heme oxygenase-1, (hHO) has been investigated by 1H NMR spectroscopy to shed light on the orbital/spin ground state as an indicator of the unique distal pocket environment of the enzyme. 2D 1H NMR assignments of the substrate and substrate-contact residue signals reveal a pattern of substrate methyl contact shifts, that places the lone iron π-spin in the dxz orbital, rather than the dyz orbital found in the cya...

  16. Cold-Adapted Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georlette, D.; Bentahir, M.; Claverie, P.; Collins, T.; D'amico, S.; Delille, D.; Feller, G.; Gratia, E.; Hoyoux, A.; Lonhienne, T.; Meuwis, M.-a.; Zecchinon, L.; Gerday, Ch.

    In the last few years, increased attention has been focused on enzymes produced by cold-adapted micro-organisms. It has emerged that psychrophilic enzymes represent an extremely powerful tool in both protein folding investigations and for biotechnological purposes. Such enzymes are characterised by an increased thermosensitivity and, most of them, by a higher catalytic efficiency at low and moderate temperatures, when compared to their mesophilic counterparts. The high thermosensitivity probably originates from an increased flexibility of either a selected area of the molecular edifice or the overall protein structure, providing enhanced abilities to undergo conformational changes during catalysis at low temperatures. Structure modelling and recent crystallographic data have allowed to elucidate the structural parameters that could be involved in this higher resilience. It was demonstrated that each psychrophilic enzyme adopts its own adaptive strategy. It appears, moreover, that there is a continuum in the strategy of protein adaptation to temperature, as the previously mentioned structural parameters are implicated in the stability of thermophilic proteins. Additional 3D crystal structures, site-directed and random mutagenesis experiments should now be undertaken to further investigate the stability-flexibility-activity relationship.

  17. Recommendations to ECE governments on the prevention of water pollution from hazardous substances as adopted by the Committee on Environmental Policy at its first session (1994)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    With a view to preventing, controlling and reducing the release of pollutants into the aquatic environment, thus promoting the implementation of the Convention on the Protection and Use of Transboundary Watercourses and International Lakes, pending its entry into force, it is recommended that ECE Governments, taking into account, inter alia, current water quality, water-quality requirements of present and future water users in the relevant catchments, requirements of aquatic and riparian flora and fauna, assessments of the risks involved, the urgency of control measures, and the economic feasibility

  18. Methamphetamine-induced neuronal protein NAT8L is the NAA biosynthetic enzyme: implications for specialized acetyl coenzyme A metabolism in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyannur, Prasanth S; Moffett, John R; Manickam, Pachiappan; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Arun, Peethambaran; Nitta, Atsumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Madhavarao, Chikkathur N; Namboodiri, Aryan M A

    2010-06-04

    N-acetylaspartate (NAA) is a concentrated, neuron-specific brain metabolite routinely used as a magnetic resonance spectroscopy marker for brain injury and disease. Despite decades of research, the functional roles of NAA remain unclear. Biochemical investigations over several decades have associated NAA with myelin lipid synthesis and energy metabolism. However, studies have been hampered by an inability to identify the gene for the NAA biosynthetic enzyme aspartate N-acetyltransferase (Asp-NAT). A very recent report has identified Nat8l as the gene encoding Asp-NAT and confirmed that the only child diagnosed with a lack of NAA on brain magnetic resonance spectrograms has a 19-bp deletion in this gene. Based on in vitro Nat8l expression studies the researchers concluded that many previous biochemical investigations have been technically flawed and that NAA may not be associated with brain energy or lipid metabolism. In studies done concurrently in our laboratory we have demonstrated via cloning, expression, specificity for acetylation of aspartate, responsiveness to methamphetamine treatment, molecular modeling and comparative immunolocalization that NAT8L is the NAA biosynthetic enzyme Asp-NAT. We conclude that NAA is a major storage and transport form of acetyl coenzyme A specific to the nervous system, thus linking it to both lipid synthesis and energy metabolism. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Effects of CO2 on particle size distribution and phytoplankton abundance during a mesocosm bloom experiment (PeECE II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schartau

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of seawater carbon dioxide (CO2 concentration on the size distribution of suspended particles (2–60 μm and on phytoplankton abundance was investigated during a mesocosm experiment at the large scale facility (LFS in Bergen, Norway, in the frame of the Pelagic Ecosystem CO2 Enrichment study (PeECE II. In nine outdoor enclosures the partial pressure of CO2 in seawater was modified by an aeration system to simulate past (~190 μatm CO2, present (~370 μatm CO2 and future (~700 μatm CO2 CO2 conditions in triplicates. Due to the initial addition of inorganic nutrients, phytoplankton blooms developed in all mesocosms and were monitored over a period of 19 days. Seawater samples were collected daily for analysing the abundance of suspended particles and phytoplankton with the Coulter Counter and with Flow Cytometry, respectively. During the bloom period, the abundance of small particles (2 levels. At that time, a direct relationship between the total-surface-to-total-volume ratio of suspended particles and DIC concentration was determined for all mesocosms. Significant changes with respect to the CO2 treatment were also observed in the phytoplankton community structure. While some populations such as diatoms seemed to be insensitive to the CO2 treatment, others like Micromonas spp. increased with CO2, or showed maximum abundance at present day CO2 (i.e. Emiliania huxleyi. The strongest response to CO2 was observed in the abundance of small autotrophic nano-plankton that strongly increased during the bloom in the past CO2 mesocosms. Together, changes in particle size distribution and phytoplankton community indicate a complex interplay between the ability of the cells to physiologically respond to changes in CO2 and size selection. Size of cells is of general importance for a variety of processes in marine systems such as diffusion-limited uptake of substrates, resource allocation, predator-prey interaction, and gravitational settling

  20. Imbalance between pulmonary angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activity in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Bos, Albert P.; Bem, Reinout A.; Dierdorp, Barbara S.; Dekker, Tamara; van Goor, Harry; Kamilic, Jelena; van der Loos, Chris M.; van den Berg, Elske; Bruijn, Martijn; van Woensel, Job B.; Lutter, René

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme and its effector peptide angiotensin II have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Recently, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 was identified as the counter-regulatory enzyme of angiotensin-converting enzyme that converts angiotensin

  1. Imbalance between pulmonary angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activity in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wosten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Bos, Albert; Bem, Reinout A.; Dierdorp, Barbara S.; Dekker, Tamara; van Goor, Harry; Kamilic, Jelena; van der Loos, Chris M.; van den Berg, Elske; Bruijn, Martijn; van Woensel, Job B.; Lutter, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Angiotensin-converting enzyme and its effector peptide angiotensin II have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Recently, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 was identified as the counter-regulatory enzyme of angiotensin-converting enzyme that converts

  2. Temporal variations in the gene expression levels of cyanobacterial anti-oxidant enzymes through geological history: implications for biological evolution during the Great Oxidation Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, M.; Furukawa, R.; Yokobori, S. I.; Tajika, E.; Yamagishi, A.

    2016-12-01

    A significant rise in atmospheric O2 levels during the GOE (Great Oxidation Event), ca. 2.45-2.0 Ga, must have caused a great stress to biosphere, enforcing life to adapt to oxic conditions. Cyanobacteria, oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria that had been responsible for the GOE, are at the same time one of the organisms that would have been greatly affected by the rise of O2 level in the surface environments. Knowledge on the evolution of cyanobacteria is not only important to elucidate the cause of the GOE, but also helps us to better understand the adaptive evolution of life in response to the GOE. Here we performed phylogenetic analysis of an anti-oxidant enzyme Fe-SOD (iron superoxide dismutase) of cyanobacteria, to assess the adaptive evolution of life under the GOE. The rise of O2 level must have increased the level of toxic reactive oxygen species in cyanobacterial cells, thus forced them to change activities or the gene expression levels of Fe-SOD. In the present study, we focus on the change in the gene expression levels of the enzyme, which can be estimated from the promoter sequences of the gene. Promoters are DNA sequences found upstream of protein encoding regions, where RNA polymerase binds and initiates transcription. "Strong" promoters that efficiently interact with RNA polymerase induce high rates of transcription, leading to high levels of gene expression. Thus, from the temporal changes in the promoter sequences, we can estimate the variations in the gene expression levels during the geological time. Promoter sequences of Fe-SOD at each ancestral node of cyanobacteria were predicted from phylogenetic analysis, and the ancestral promoter sequences were compared to the promoters of known highly expressed genes. The similarity was low at the time of the emergence of cyanobacteria; however, increased at the branching nodes diverged 2.4 billon years ago. This roughly coincided with the onset of the GOE, implying that the transition from low to high gene

  3. Enhanced electrochemical sensitivity of enzyme precipitate coating (EPC)-based glucose oxidase biosensors with increased free CNT loadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Jun, Sun-Ae; Kwon, Yongchai; Ha, Su; Sang, Byong-In; Kim, Jungbae

    2015-02-01

    Enzymatic electrodes were fabricated by using three different immobilizations of glucose oxidase (GOx): covalent enzyme attachment (CA), enzyme coating (EC), and enzyme precipitate coating (EPC), here referred to as CA-E, EC-E, and EPC-E, respectively. When additional carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were introduced from 0 to 75wt% for the EPC-E design, its initial biosensor sensitivity was improved from 2.40×10(-3) to 16.26×10(-3) A∙M(-1)∙cm(-2), while its electron charge transfer rate constant was increased from 0.33 to 1.47s(-1). When a fixed ratio of CNTs was added for three different electrode systems, EPC-E showed the best glucose sensitivity and long-term thermal stability. For example, when 75wt% of additional CNTs was added, the initial sensitivity of EPC-E was 16.26×10(-3) A∙M(-1)∙cm(-2), while those of EC-E and CA-E were only 6.42×10(-3) and 1.18×10(-3) A∙M(-1)∙cm(-2), respectively. Furthermore, EPC-E retained 63% of its initial sensitivity after thermal treatment at 40°C over 41days, while EC-E and CA-E showed only 12% and 1% of initial sensitivities, respectively. Consequently, the EPC approach with additional CNTs achieved both high sensitivity and long-term stability, which are required for continuous and accurate glucose monitoring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Biological effects of CCS in the absence of SOD1 enzyme activation: implications for disease in a mouse model for ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proescher, Jody B; Son, Marjatta; Elliott, Jeffrey L; Culotta, Valeria C

    2008-06-15

    The CCS copper chaperone is critical for maturation of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) through insertion of the copper co-factor and oxidization of an intra-subunit disulfide. The disulfide helps stabilize the SOD1 polypeptide, which can be particularly important in cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) linked to misfolding of mutant SOD1. Surprisingly, however, over-expressed CCS was recently shown to greatly accelerate disease in a G93A SOD1 mouse model for ALS. Herein we show that disease in these G93A/CCS mice correlates with incomplete oxidation of the SOD1 disulfide. In the brain and spinal cord, CCS over-expression failed to enhance oxidation of the G93A SOD1 disulfide and if anything, effected some accumulation of disulfide-reduced SOD1. This effect was mirrored in culture with a C244,246S mutant of CCS that has the capacity to interact with SOD1 but can neither insert copper nor oxidize the disulfide. In spite of disulfide effects, there was no evidence for increased SOD1 aggregation. If anything, CCS over-expression prevented SOD1 misfolding in culture as monitored by detergent insolubility. This protection against SOD1 misfolding does not require SOD1 enzyme activation as the same effect was obtained with the C244,246S allele of CCS. In the G93A SOD1 mouse, CCS over-expression was likewise associated with a lack of obvious SOD1 misfolding marked by detergent insolubility. CCS over-expression accelerates SOD1-linked disease without the hallmarks of misfolding and aggregation seen in other mutant SOD1 models. These studies are the first to indicate biological effects of CCS in the absence of SOD1 enzymatic activation.

  5. Prolonged Expression of Secreted Enzymes in Dogs After Liver-Directed Delivery of Sleeping Beauty Transposons: Implications for Non-Viral Gene Therapy of Systemic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronovich, Elena L; Hyland, Kendra A; Hall, Bryan C; Bell, Jason B; Olson, Erik R; Rusten, Myra Urness; Hunter, David W; Ellinwood, N Matthew; McIvor, R Scott; Hackett, Perry B

    2017-07-01

    The non-viral, integrating Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system is efficient in treating systemic monogenic disease in mice, including hemophilia A and B caused by deficiency of blood clotting factors and mucopolysaccharidosis types I and VII caused by α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) and β-glucuronidase (GUSB) deficiency, respectively. Modified approaches of the hydrodynamics-based procedure to deliver transposons to the liver in dogs were recently reported. Using the transgenic canine reporter secreted alkaline phosphatase (cSEAP), transgenic protein in the plasma was demonstrated for up to 6 weeks post infusion. This study reports that immunosuppression of dogs with gadolinium chloride (GdCl 3 ) prolonged the presence of cSEAP in the circulation up to 5.5 months after a single vector infusion. Transgene expression declined gradually but appeared to stabilize after about 2 months at approximately fourfold baseline level. Durability of transgenic protein expression in the plasma was inversely associated with transient increase of liver enzymes alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase in response to the plasmid delivery procedure, which suggests a deleterious effect of hepatocellular toxicity on transgene expression. GdCl 3 treatment was ineffective for repeat vector infusions. In parallel studies, dogs were infused with potentially therapeutic transposons. Activities of transgenic IDUA and GUSB in plasma peaked at 50-350% of wildtype, but in the absence of immunosuppression lasted only a few days. Transposition was detectable by excision assay only when the most efficient transposase, SB100X, was used. Dogs infused with transposons encoding canine clotting factor IX (cFIX) were treated with GdCl 3 and showed expression profiles similar to those in cSEAP-infused dogs, with expression peaking at 40% wt (2 μg/mL). It is concluded that GdCl 3 can support extended transgene expression after hydrodynamic introduction of SB transposons in dogs, but that alternative

  6. The orbital ground state of the azide-substrate complex of human heme oxygenase is an indicator of distal H-bonding: Implications for the enzyme mechanism‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Hiroshi; Evans, John P.; Peng, Dungeng; Satterlee, James D.; de Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz; Mar, Gerd N. La

    2009-01-01

    The active site electronic structure of the azide complex of substrate-bound human heme oxygenase-1, (hHO) has been investigated by 1H NMR spectroscopy to shed light on the orbital/spin ground state as an indicator of the unique distal pocket environment of the enzyme. 2D 1H NMR assignments of the substrate and substrate-contact residue signals reveal a pattern of substrate methyl contact shifts, that places the lone iron π-spin in the dxz orbital, rather than the dyz orbital found in the cyanide complex. Comparison of iron spin relaxivity, magnetic anisotropy and magnetic susceptibilities argues for a low-spin, (dxy)2(dyz,dxz)3, ground state in both azide and cyanide complexes. The switch from singly-occupied dyz for the cyanide to dxz for the azide complex of hHO is shown to be consistent with the orbital hole determined by the azide π-plane in the latter complex, which is ∼90° in-plane rotated from that of the imidazole π-plane. The induction of the altered orbital ground state in the azide relative to the cyanide hHO complex, as well as the mean low-field bias of methyl hyperfine shifts and their paramagnetic relaxivity relative to those in globins, indicate that azide exerts a stronger ligand field in hHO than in the globins, or that the distal H-bonding to azide is weaker in hHO than in globins. The Asp140 → Ala hHO mutant that abolishes activity retains the unusual WT azide complex spin/orbital ground state. The relevance of our findings for other HO complexes and the HO mechanism is discussed. PMID:19243105

  7. The orbital ground state of the azide-substrate complex of human heme oxygenase is an indicator of distal H-bonding: implications for the enzyme mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Hiroshi; Evans, John P; Peng, Dungeng; Satterlee, James D; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R; La Mar, Gerd N

    2009-04-14

    The active site electronic structure of the azide complex of substrate-bound human heme oxygenase 1 (hHO) has been investigated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy to shed light on the orbital/spin ground state as an indicator of the unique distal pocket environment of the enzyme. Two-dimensional (1)H NMR assignments of the substrate and substrate-contact residue signals reveal a pattern of substrate methyl contact shifts that places the lone iron pi-spin in the d(xz) orbital, rather than the d(yz) orbital found in the cyanide complex. Comparison of iron spin relaxivity, magnetic anisotropy, and magnetic susceptibilities argues for a low-spin, (d(xy))(2)(d(yz),d(xz))(3), ground state in both azide and cyanide complexes. The switch from singly occupied d(yz) for the cyanide to d(xz) for the azide complex of hHO is shown to be consistent with the orbital hole determined by the azide pi-plane in the latter complex, which is approximately 90 degrees in-plane rotated from that of the imidazole pi-plane. The induction of the altered orbital ground state in the azide relative to the cyanide hHO complex, as well as the mean low-field bias of methyl hyperfine shifts and their paramagnetic relaxivity relative to those in globins, indicates that azide exerts a stronger ligand field in hHO than in the globins, or that the distal H-bonding to azide is weaker in hHO than in globins. The Asp140 --> Ala hHO mutant that abolishes activity retains the unusual WT azide complex spin/orbital ground state. The relevance of our findings for other HO complexes and the HO mechanism is discussed.

  8. Performance of an all-electric vehicle under UN ECE R101 test conditions: A feasibility study for the city of Kaunas, Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raslavičius, Laurencas; Starevičius, Martynas; Keršys, Artūras; Pilkauskas, Kęstutis; Vilkauskas, Andrius

    2013-01-01

    Transport activity has been a key facilitator and driver of economic prosperity in Lithuanian (hereinafter LIT) and it is likely to continue to grow. It can produce both positive and negative effects on the quality of life and the environment depending on country-specific circumstances. This research paper sets the stage for a look at the LIT passenger vehicle fleet and its transition towards sustainable mobility through the use of all-electric vehicles. The large multi purpose vehicle from French car-maker Renault, model Renault Espace, was used for test drives, according ECE R101 (urban cycle) requirements. The conventional spark ignited internal combustion engine of the vehicle was replaced by the electric one and equipped with the new generation LiFePO 4 Lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. Three streets of Kaunas city (LIT) with different categories B1, B2 and C2 were selected for the test procedure. Estimation of the power demand (depending on displacement and daytime) and evaluation of battery performance characteristics were discussed in detail. Calculation of the driving distance of the one charge of the traction battery estimates several driving conditions and variation of the mass of the investigated vehicle. Comparison of consumption of different fuel grades for 1 km showed that costs of electric power driven vehicle is 4 times as low as with A95 grade petrol and 2.4 times as low as with diesel fuel. - Highlights: • This paper examines the perspectives for electric vehicles use in Lithuania. • We used standardized test procedure UN ECE R101 (urban cycle). • The study found that the BEVs (battery-only electric vehicles) can cover approximately 75% of all daily driving. • Inspection of the results highlights the importance of BEVs introduction. • We have shown that battery-only electric vehicles are economically rational

  9. The inhibitory effect of an extract of Sanguisorba officinalis L. on ultraviolet B-induced pigmentation via the suppression of endothelin-converting enzyme-1{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachiya, Akira; Kobayashi, Akemi; Ohuchi, Atsushi; Kitahara, Takashi; Takema, Yoshinori [Kao Biological Science Lab., Ichikai, Tochigi (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been reported to be expressed in human epidermis at both the gene and protein levels. ET-1 plays a pivotal role in ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced pigmentation due to its accentuated secretion after UVB irradiation and its function as a mitogen and as a melanogen for human melanocytes. We have recently found that endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE)-1{alpha} plays a constitutive role in the secretion of ET-1 by human keratinocytes and that an extract of Sanguisorba officinalis L. inhibits ECE activity in human endothelial cells, which predominantly express ECE-1{alpha}. In this report, to clarify the potential use of this botanical extract as a whitening agent, we examined whether this extract inhibits UVB-induced pigmentation in vivo. When this extract was applied to human keratinocytes after UVB irradiation, secretion of ET-1 by those cells was reduced, and this was accompanied by a concomitant increase in the secretion of inactive precursor Big endothelin-1. When hairless mice were exposed to UVB light and were treated with the extract, it suppressed the induction of ET-1 in the UVB-irradiated epidermis. In the course of UVB-induced pigmentation of brownish guinea pig skin, this extract significantly diminished pigmentation in UVB-exposed areas. These findings indicate that ECE-1{alpha} in keratinocytes plays a pivotal role in the induction of pigmentation following UVB irradiation and that an extract of S. officinalis, which inhibits ET-1 production in human keratinocytes, is a good ingredient for a whitening agent. (author)

  10. The inhibitory effect of an extract of Sanguisorba officinalis L. on ultraviolet B-induced pigmentation via the suppression of endothelin-converting enzyme-1α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachiya, Akira; Kobayashi, Akemi; Ohuchi, Atsushi; Kitahara, Takashi; Takema, Yoshinori

    2001-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been reported to be expressed in human epidermis at both the gene and protein levels. ET-1 plays a pivotal role in ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced pigmentation due to its accentuated secretion after UVB irradiation and its function as a mitogen and as a melanogen for human melanocytes. We have recently found that endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE)-1α plays a constitutive role in the secretion of ET-1 by human keratinocytes and that an extract of Sanguisorba officinalis L. inhibits ECE activity in human endothelial cells, which predominantly express ECE-1α. In this report, to clarify the potential use of this botanical extract as a whitening agent, we examined whether this extract inhibits UVB-induced pigmentation in vivo. When this extract was applied to human keratinocytes after UVB irradiation, secretion of ET-1 by those cells was reduced, and this was accompanied by a concomitant increase in the secretion of inactive precursor Big endothelin-1. When hairless mice were exposed to UVB light and were treated with the extract, it suppressed the induction of ET-1 in the UVB-irradiated epidermis. In the course of UVB-induced pigmentation of brownish guinea pig skin, this extract significantly diminished pigmentation in UVB-exposed areas. These findings indicate that ECE-1α in keratinocytes plays a pivotal role in the induction of pigmentation following UVB irradiation and that an extract of S. officinalis, which inhibits ET-1 production in human keratinocytes, is a good ingredient for a whitening agent. (author)

  11. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted...... by that enzyme...

  12. Silica-Immobilized Enzyme Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Silica-IMERs 14 implicated in neurological disorders such as Schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease.[86] Drug discovery for targets that can alter the...primarily the activation of prodrugs and proantibiotics for cancer treatments or antibiotic therapy , respectively.[87] Nitrobenzene nitroreductase was...BuChE) Monolith disks* Packed Silica Biosilica Epoxide- Silica Silica-gel Enzyme Human AChE Human AChE Human AChE Equine BuChE Human

  13. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  14. ARTHUR RIMBAUD’NUN ILLUMINATIONS’UNDA VE ECE AYHAN’IN BAKIŞSIZ BİR KEDİ KARA’SINDA ATEŞ DİYALEKTİĞİ

    OpenAIRE

    KIZILÇİM, Yavuz; Kızılçim, Yavuz

    2010-01-01

    Biz, bu çalışmada, seçili iki şairde ateş üzerine kurulmuş söylemleri çözümlemeyi denedik. İnce ayrıntılar üzerinde yoğunlaşarak Ece Ayhan üzerindeki, Arthur Rimbaud etkisini göstermeye çalıştık. Bir yandan çarpıcı benzerlikleri, diğer yandan farklılıkları çözümledik. Her iki şairde, belirli ölçülerde dili bozmayı; yani, dilin iç yapısıyla oynamayı göze alarak daha baştan şiirdeki değişimci yanın temsilcileri olmuşlardır. Her iki şair de, ateş’ten yola çıkarak, tutarlı bir mantığa göre sırası...

  15. Role of endothelin-converting enzyme, chymase and neutral endopeptidase in the processing of big ET-1, ET-1(1-21) and ET-1(1-31) in the trachea of allergic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Campo, Benjamin A; Goldie, Roy G; Jeng, Arco Y; Henry, Peter J

    2002-08-01

    The present study examined the roles of endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and mast cell chymase as processors of the endothelin (ET) analogues ET-1(1-21), ET-1(1-31) and big ET-1 in the trachea of allergic mice. Male CBA/CaH mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (10 microg) delivered intraperitoneal on days 1 and 14, and exposed to aerosolized ovalbumin on days 14, 25, 26 and 27 (OVA mice). Mice were killed and the trachea excised for histological analysis and contraction studies on day 28. Tracheae from OVA mice had 40% more mast cells than vehicle-sensitized mice (sham mice). Ovalbumin (10 microg/ml) induced transient contractions (15+/-3% of the C(max)) in tracheae from OVA mice. The ECE inhibitor CGS35066 (10 microM) inhibited contractions induced by big ET-1 (4.8-fold rightward shift of dose-response curve; Peffect on contractions induced by any of the ET analogues used. The NEP inhibitor CGS24592 (10 microM) inhibited contractions induced by ET-1(1-31) (6.2-fold rightward shift; Pbig ET-1. These data suggest that big ET-1 is processed predominantly by a CGS35066-sensitive ECE within allergic airways rather than by mast cell-derived proteases such as chymase. If endogenous ET-1(1-31) is formed within allergic airways, it is likely to undergo further conversion by NEP to more active products.

  16. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes...

  17. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  18. Immobilized enzymes and cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucke, C; Wiseman, A

    1981-04-04

    This article reviews the current state of the art of enzyme and cell immobilization and suggests advances which might be made during the 1980's. Current uses of immobilized enzymes include the use of glucoamylase in the production of glucose syrups from starch and glucose isomerase in the production of high fructose corn syrup. Possibilities for future uses of immobilized enzymes and cells include the utilization of whey and the production of ethanol.

  19. Profiling the orphan enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Next Generation Sequencing generates an incredible amount of sequence and great potential for new enzyme discovery. Despite this huge amount of data and the profusion of bioinformatic methods for function prediction, a large part of known enzyme activities is still lacking an associated protein sequence. These particular activities are called “orphan enzymes”. The present review proposes an update of previous surveys on orphan enzymes by mining the current content of public databases. While the percentage of orphan enzyme activities has decreased from 38% to 22% in ten years, there are still more than 1,000 orphans among the 5,000 entries of the Enzyme Commission (EC) classification. Taking into account all the reactions present in metabolic databases, this proportion dramatically increases to reach nearly 50% of orphans and many of them are not associated to a known pathway. We extended our survey to “local orphan enzymes” that are activities which have no representative sequence in a given clade, but have at least one in organisms belonging to other clades. We observe an important bias in Archaea and find that in general more than 30% of the EC activities have incomplete sequence information in at least one superkingdom. To estimate if candidate proteins for local orphans could be retrieved by homology search, we applied a simple strategy based on the PRIAM software and noticed that candidates may be proposed for an important fraction of local orphan enzymes. Finally, by studying relation between protein domains and catalyzed activities, it appears that newly discovered enzymes are mostly associated with already known enzyme domains. Thus, the exploration of the promiscuity and the multifunctional aspect of known enzyme families may solve part of the orphan enzyme issue. We conclude this review with a presentation of recent initiatives in finding proteins for orphan enzymes and in extending the enzyme world by the discovery of new

  20. 7th annual report 1998. UN ECE convention on long-range transboundary air pollution. International cooperative programme on integrated monitoring of air pollution effects on ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleemola, S.; Forsius, M. [eds.

    1998-11-01

    The Integrated Monitoring Programme (ICP IM) is part of the Effects Monitoring Strategy under the UN ECE Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution Convention. The main aim of ICP IM is to provide a framework to observe and understand the complex changes occurring in the external environment. The monitoring and prediction of complex ecosystem effects on undisturbed reference areas require a continuous effort to improve the collection and assessment of data on the international scale. At the 1997 Task Force meeting it was decided that future annual reports from ICP IM would have a more technical character. The report could include some scientific material but also short technical descriptions of recent national activities and publications. Scientific articles should preferably be published in recognised scientific journals. The responsibility for producing annual reports would still lie on the Programme Centre, but more contributions from National Focal Points were welcomed. The content of the present Annual Report reflects the decisions of the Task Force meeting. The report gives a general overview of the ICP IM activities, the present content of the ICP IM database, and presents results from assessment activities carried out by several collaborating institutes and the ICP IM Programme Centre during the programme year 1997/98. The resources of the Programme Centre have been targeted to the revision of the Programme Manual and the EU/LIFE-project `Development of Assessment and Monitoring Techniques at Integrated Monitoring Sites in Europe`, which has limited the possibilities to carry out additional evaluations of ICP IM data. Section 1 is a short status report of the ICP IM activities, content of the IM database, including the contents of the GIS database, and the present geographical coverage of the monitoring network. Section 2 contains a report on multivariate gradient analysis applied to relate chemical and biological observations (prepared by D. de Zwart, RIVM

  1. Artificial Enzymes, "Chemzymes"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Rousseau, Cyril Andre Raphaël; Pedersen, Lavinia Georgeta M

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models that successf......Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models...... that successfully perform Michaelis-Menten catalysis under enzymatic conditions (i.e., aqueous medium, neutral pH, ambient temperature) and for those that do, very high rate accelerations are seldomly seen. This review will provide a brief summary of the recent developments in artificial enzymes, so called...... "Chemzymes", based on cyclodextrins and other molecules. Only the chemzymes that have shown enzyme-like activity that has been quantified by different methods will be mentioned. This review will summarize the work done in the field of artificial glycosidases, oxidases, epoxidases, and esterases, as well...

  2. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna, E-mail: kristyna.pospiskova@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Safarik, Ivo, E-mail: ivosaf@yahoo.com [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Nanobiotechnology, Institute of Nanobiology and Structural Biology of GCRC, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (−20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Cross-linked enzyme powders were prepared in various liquid media. • Insoluble enzymes were magnetized using iron oxides particles. • Magnetic iron oxides particles were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • Magnetic modification was performed under low (freezing) temperature. • Cross-linked powdered trypsin and lipase can be used repeatedly for reaction.

  3. Targeted enzyme prodrug therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellmann, N; Deckert, P M; Bachran, D; Fuchs, H; Bachran, C

    2010-09-01

    The cure of cancer is still a formidable challenge in medical science. Long-known modalities including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are successful in a number of cases; however, invasive, metastasized and inaccessible tumors still pose an unresolved and ongoing problem. Targeted therapies designed to locate, detect and specifically kill tumor cells have been developed in the past three decades as an alternative to treat troublesome cancers. Most of these therapies are either based on antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs or tumor site-specific activation of prodrugs. The latter is a two-step procedure. In the first step, a selected enzyme is accumulated in the tumor by guiding the enzyme or its gene to the neoplastic cells. In the second step, a harmless prodrug is applied and specifically converted by this enzyme into a cytotoxic drug only at the tumor site. A number of targeting systems, enzymes and prodrugs were investigated and improved since the concept was first envisioned in 1974. This review presents a concise overview on the history and latest developments in targeted therapies for cancer treatment. We cover the relevant technologies such as antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT), gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) as well as related therapies such as clostridial- (CDEPT) and polymer-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (PDEPT) with emphasis on prodrug-converting enzymes, prodrugs and drugs.

  4. Enzymes in Fermented Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giyatmi; Irianto, H E

    Fermented fish products are very popular particularly in Southeast Asian countries. These products have unique characteristics, especially in terms of aroma, flavor, and texture developing during fermentation process. Proteolytic enzymes have a main role in hydrolyzing protein into simpler compounds. Fermentation process of fish relies both on naturally occurring enzymes (in the muscle or the intestinal tract) as well as bacteria. Fermented fish products processed using the whole fish show a different characteristic compared to those prepared from headed and gutted fish. Endogenous enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and aminopeptidase are the most involved in the fermentation process. Muscle tissue enzymes like cathepsins, peptidases, transaminases, amidases, amino acid decarboxylases, glutamic dehydrogenases, and related enzymes may also play a role in fish fermentation. Due to the decreased bacterial number during fermentation, contribution of microbial enzymes to proteolysis may be expected prior to salting of fish. Commercial enzymes are supplemented during processing for specific purposes, such as quality improvement and process acceleration. In the case of fish sauce, efforts to accelerate fermentation process and to improve product quality have been studied by addition of enzymes such as papain, bromelain, trypsin, pepsin, and chymotrypsin. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Residual glycosaminoglycan accumulation in mitral and aortic valves of a patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome after 6 years of enzyme replacement therapy: Implications for early diagnosis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Sato

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS is an inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of the enzymes needed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG degradation. MPS type I is caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-l-iduronidase and is classified into Hurler syndrome, Scheie syndrome, and Hurler–Scheie syndrome based on disease severity and onset. Cardiac complications such as left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiac valve disease, and coronary artery disease are often observed in MPS type I. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT has been available for MPS type I, but the efficacy of this treatment for cardiac valve disease is unknown. We report on a 56-year-old female patient with attenuated MPS I (Scheie syndrome who developed aortic and mitral stenosis and coronary artery narrowing. The cardiac valve disease progressed despite ERT and she finally underwent double valve replacement and coronary artery bypass grafting. The pathology of the cardiac valves revealed GAG accumulation and lysosomal enlargement in both the mitral and aortic valves. Zebra body formation was also confirmed using electron microscopy. Our results suggest that ERT had limited efficacy in previously established cardiac valve disease. Early diagnosis and initiation of ERT is crucial to avoid further cardiac complications in MPS type I.

  6. Algal polysaccharides as matrices for the immobilization of urease in lipid ultrathin films studied with tensiometry and vibrational spectroscopy: Physical-chemical properties and implications in the enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito, Audrey Kalinouski; Nordi, Cristina S F; Caseli, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    Currently, many biological substances extracted from algae have received special attention because of their intrinsic characteristics, which can be applied to different areas of biotechnology. Therefore, in the current study, exopolysaccharides (EPS) from the microalgae Cryptomonas tetrapirenoidosa were employed as an aqueous subphase of a monolayer formed by the lipid dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB). The primary objective of this approach was to evaluate whether EPS could serve as a matrix for the immobilization of the enzyme urease to produce biosensors for urea. After DODAB was spread on the EPS solutions, urease was injected into the aqueous subphase, and the surface was submitted to compression using lateral barriers. The monolayers were subsequently characterized by surface pressure-area isotherms and polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). The results indicated that EPS enhanced the adsorption of the enzyme on the lipid monolayer. The mixed films were later transferred to solid supports using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique and were characterized by transfer ratio, PM-IRRAS, quartz crystal microbalance, and atomic force microscopy. The immobilization of the enzyme on solid supports was fundamental for providing an ideal geometrical accommodation of urease because the interaction of EPS with urease in solution causes a decrease of the relative activity of urease. Therefore, these LB films are promising for the fabrication of future urea biosensors, the architecture of which can be manipulated and enhanced at the molecular level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. CELLULOSE DEGRADATION BY OXIDATIVE ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  8. Enzymic lactose hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J J; Brand, J C

    1980-01-01

    Acid or enzymic hydrolysis can be used to hydrolyze lactose. Advantages of both are compared and details of enzymic hydrolysis using yeast or fungal enzymes given. The new scheme outlined involves recycling lactase. Because lactose and lactase react to ultrafiltration (UF) membranes differently separation is possible. Milk or milk products are ultrafiltered to separate a concentrate from a lactose-rich permeate which is treated with lactase in a reactor until hydrolysis reaches a required level. The lactase can be removed by UF as it does not permeate the membrane, and it is recycled back to the reactor. Permeate from the second UF stage may or may not be recombined with the concentrate from the first stage to produce a low lactose product (analysis of a typical low-lactose dried whole milk is given). Batch or continuous processes are explained and a batch process without enzyme recovery is discussed. (Refs. 4).

  9. Indicators: Sediment Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment enzymes are proteins that are produced by microorganisms living in the sediment or soil. They are indicators of key ecosystem processes and can help determine which nutrients are affecting the biological community of a waterbody.

  10. Enzyme Vs. Extremozyme -32 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Enzymes are biocatalytic protein molecules that enhance the rates of ... to physical forces (hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic 1, electrostatic and Van der ... conformation. In 1995 ... surface against 14.7% in Klenow poll (some of the hydrophobic.

  11. Overproduction of ligninolytic enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Torok, Tamas

    2014-06-17

    Methods, compositions, and systems for overproducing ligninolytic enzymes from the basidiomycetous fungus are described herein. As described, the method can include incubating a fungal strain of Cerrena unicolor IBB 303 in a fermentation system having growth medium which includes lignocellulosic material and then cultivating the fungal strain in the fermentation system under conditions wherein the fungus expresses the ligninolytic enzymes. In some cases, the lignocellulosic material is mandarin peel, ethanol production residue, walnut pericarp, wheat bran, wheat straw, or banana peel.

  12. Targeted quantification of functional enzyme dynamics in environmental samples for microbially mediated biogeochemical processes: Targeted quantification of functional enzyme dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minjing [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 People' s Republic of China; Gao, Yuqian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Qian, Wei-Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Liu, Yuanyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Nelson, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Nicora, Carrie D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Resch, Charles T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Thompson, Christopher [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Yan, Sen [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 People' s Republic of China; Fredrickson, James K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Zachara, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen 518055 People' s Republic of China

    2017-07-13

    Microbially mediated biogeochemical processes are catalyzed by enzymes that control the transformation of carbon, nitrogen, and other elements in environment. The dynamic linkage between enzymes and biogeochemical species transformation has, however, rarely been investigated because of the lack of analytical approaches to efficiently and reliably quantify enzymes and their dynamics in soils and sediments. Herein, we developed a signature peptide-based technique for sensitively quantifying dissimilatory and assimilatory enzymes using nitrate-reducing enzymes in a hyporheic zone sediment as an example. Moreover, the measured changes in enzyme concentration were found to correlate with the nitrate reduction rate in a way different from that inferred from biogeochemical models based on biomass or functional genes as surrogates for functional enzymes. This phenomenon has important implications for understanding and modeling the dynamics of microbial community functions and biogeochemical processes in environments. Our results also demonstrate the importance of enzyme quantification for the identification and interrogation of those biogeochemical processes with low metabolite concentrations as a result of faster enzyme-catalyzed consumption of metabolites than their production. The dynamic enzyme behaviors provide a basis for the development of enzyme-based models to describe the relationship between the microbial community and biogeochemical processes.

  13. Measurement of enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, T K; Keshwani, M M

    2009-01-01

    To study and understand the nature of living cells, scientists have continually employed traditional biochemical techniques aimed to fractionate and characterize a designated network of macromolecular components required to carry out a particular cellular function. At the most rudimentary level, cellular functions ultimately entail rapid chemical transformations that otherwise would not occur in the physiological environment of the cell. The term enzyme is used to singularly designate a macromolecular gene product that specifically and greatly enhances the rate of a chemical transformation. Purification and characterization of individual and collective groups of enzymes has been and will remain essential toward advancement of the molecular biological sciences; and developing and utilizing enzyme reaction assays is central to this mission. First, basic kinetic principles are described for understanding chemical reaction rates and the catalytic effects of enzymes on such rates. Then, a number of methods are described for measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rates, which mainly differ with regard to techniques used to detect and quantify concentration changes of given reactants or products. Finally, short commentary is given toward formulation of reaction mixtures used to measure enzyme activity. Whereas a comprehensive treatment of enzymatic reaction assays is not within the scope of this chapter, the very core principles that are presented should enable new researchers to better understand the logic and utility of any given enzymatic assay that becomes of interest.

  14. Bioinformatic analysis of an unusual gene-enzyme relationship in the arginine biosynthetic pathway among marine gamma proteobacteria: implications concerning the formation of N-acetylated intermediates in prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labedan Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The N-acetylation of L-glutamate is regarded as a universal metabolic strategy to commit glutamate towards arginine biosynthesis. Until recently, this reaction was thought to be catalyzed by either of two enzymes: (i the classical N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS, gene argA first characterized in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa several decades ago and also present in vertebrates, or (ii the bifunctional version of ornithine acetyltransferase (OAT, gene argJ present in Bacteria, Archaea and many Eukaryotes. This paper focuses on a new and surprising aspect of glutamate acetylation. We recently showed that in Moritella abyssi and M. profunda, two marine gamma proteobacteria, the gene for the last enzyme in arginine biosynthesis (argH is fused to a short sequence that corresponds to the C-terminal, N-acetyltransferase-encoding domain of NAGS and is able to complement an argA mutant of E. coli. Very recently, other authors identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis an independent gene corresponding to this short C-terminal domain and coding for a new type of NAGS. We have investigated the two prokaryotic Domains for patterns of gene-enzyme relationships in the first committed step of arginine biosynthesis. Results The argH-A fusion, designated argH(A, and discovered in Moritella was found to be present in (and confined to marine gamma proteobacteria of the Alteromonas- and Vibrio-like group. Most of them have a classical NAGS with the exception of Idiomarina loihiensis and Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis which nevertheless can grow in the absence of arginine and therefore appear to rely on the arg(A sequence for arginine biosynthesis. Screening prokaryotic genomes for virtual argH-X 'fusions' where X stands for a homologue of arg(A, we retrieved a large number of Bacteria and several Archaea, all of them devoid of a classical NAGS. In the case of Thermus thermophilus and Deinococcus radiodurans, the arg(A-like sequence

  15. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  16. Matrix Metalloproteinase Enzyme Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases play an important role in many biological processes such as embriogenesis, tissue remodeling, wound healing, and angiogenesis, and in some pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, arthritis and cancer. Currently, 24 genes have been identified in humans that encode different groups of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes. This review discuss the members of the matrix metalloproteinase family and their substrate specificity, structure, function and the regulation of their enzyme activity by tissue inhibitors. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 209-220

  17. The surface science of enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2002-01-01

    One of the largest challenges to science in the coming years is to find the relation between enzyme structure and function. Can we predict which reactions an enzyme catalyzes from knowledge of its structure-or from its amino acid sequence? Can we use that knowledge to modify enzyme function......? To solve these problems we must understand in some detail how enzymes interact with reactants from its surroundings. These interactions take place at the surface of the enzyme and the question of enzyme function can be viewed as the surface science of enzymes. In this article we discuss how to describe...... catalysis by enzymes, and in particular the analogies between enzyme catalyzed reactions and surface catalyzed reactions. We do this by discussing two concrete examples of reactions catalyzed both in nature (by enzymes) and in industrial reactors (by inorganic materials), and show that although analogies...

  18. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems.

  19. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospišková, K.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 380, APR 2015 (2015), s. 197-200 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : enzyme powders * cross-linking * magnetic modification * magnetic separation * magnetic iron oxides particles * microwave-assisted synthesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.357, year: 2015

  20. Enzyme with rhamnogalacturonase activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kofod, L.V.; Andersen, L.N.; Dalboge, H.; Kauppinen, M.S.; Christgau, S.; Heldt-Hansen, H.P.; Christophersen, C.; Nielsen, P.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Schols, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    An enzyme exhibiting rhamnogalacturonase activity, capable of cleaving a rhamnogalacturonan backbone in such a manner that galacturonic acids are left as the non-reducing ends, and which exhibits activity on hairy regions from a soy bean material and/or on saponified hairy regions from a sugar beet

  1. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Advances in enzyme bioelectrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRESSA R. PEREIRA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bioelectrochemistry can be defined as a branch of Chemical Science concerned with electron-proton transfer and transport involving biomolecules, as well as electrode reactions of redox enzymes. The bioelectrochemical reactions and system have direct impact in biotechnological development, in medical devices designing, in the behavior of DNA-protein complexes, in green-energy and bioenergy concepts, and make it possible an understanding of metabolism of all living organisms (e.g. humans where biomolecules are integral to health and proper functioning. In the last years, many researchers have dedicated itself to study different redox enzymes by using electrochemistry, aiming to understand their mechanisms and to develop promising bioanodes and biocathodes for biofuel cells as well as to develop biosensors and implantable bioelectronics devices. Inside this scope, this review try to introduce and contemplate some relevant topics for enzyme bioelectrochemistry, such as the immobilization of the enzymes at electrode surfaces, the electron transfer, the bioelectrocatalysis, and new techniques conjugated with electrochemistry vising understand the kinetics and thermodynamics of redox proteins. Furthermore, examples of recent approaches in designing biosensors and biofuel developed are presented.

  3. Embedded enzymes catalyse capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentish, Sandra

    2018-05-01

    Membrane technologies for carbon capture can offer economic and environmental advantages over conventional amine-based absorption, but can suffer from limited gas flux and selectivity to CO2. Now, a membrane based on enzymes embedded in hydrophilic pores is shown to exhibit combined flux and selectivity that challenges the state of the art.

  4. Photoperiodism and Enzyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Orlando; Morel, Claudine

    1974-01-01

    Metabolic readjustments after a change from long days to short days appear, in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, to be achieved through the operation of two main mechanisms: variation in enzyme capacity, and circadian rhythmicity. After a lag time, capacity in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and capacity in aspartate aminotransferase increase exponentially and appear to be allometrically linked during 50 to 60 short days; then a sudden fall takes place in the activity of the former. Malic enzyme and alanine aminotransferase behave differently. Thus, the operation of the two sections of the pathway (before and after the malate step) give rise to a continuously changing functional compartmentation in the pathway. Circadian rhythmicity, on the other hand, produces time compartmentation through phase shifts and variation in amplitude, independently for each enzyme. These characteristics suggest that the operation of a so-called biological clock would be involved. We propose the hypothesis that feedback regulation would be more accurate and efficient when applied to an already oscillating, clock-controlled enzyme system. PMID:16658749

  5. ISFET based enzyme sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoot, Bart H.; Bergveld, Piet

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the results that have been reported on ISFET based enzyme sensors. The most important improvement that results from the application of ISFETs instead of glass membrane electrodes is in the method of fabrication. Problems with regard to the pH dependence of the response and the

  6. The Enzyme Function Initiative†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlt, John A.; Allen, Karen N.; Almo, Steven C.; Armstrong, Richard N.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Cronan, John E.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C. Dale; Raushel, Frank M.; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily-specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include: 1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation); 2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia; 3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy; 4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization; and 5) dissemination of data via the EFI’s website, enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal and pharmaceutical efforts. PMID

  7. The Enzyme Function Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlt, John A; Allen, Karen N; Almo, Steven C; Armstrong, Richard N; Babbitt, Patricia C; Cronan, John E; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J; Jacobson, Matthew P; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C Dale; Raushel, Frank M; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2011-11-22

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic, we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include (1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation), (2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia, (3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy, (4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization, and (5) dissemination of data via the EFI's Website, http://enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal, and pharmaceutical efforts.

  8. Assessment of the Human Kynurenine Pathway: Comparisons and Clinical Implications of Ethnic and Gender Differences in Plasma Tryptophan, Kynurenine Metabolites, and Enzyme Expressions at Baseline and after Acute Tryptophan Loading and Depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla A.-B. Badawy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tryptophan (Trp metabolism via the kynurenine pathway (KP was assessed in normal healthy US volunteers at baseline and after acute Trp depletion (ATD and acute Trp loading (ATL using amino acid formulations. The hepatic KP accounts for ~90% of overall Trp degradation. Liver Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO contributes ~70% toward Trp oxidation, with the remainder achieved by subsequent rate-limiting enzymes in the KP. TDO is not influenced by a 1.15 g Trp load, but is maximally activated by a 5.15 g dose. We recommend a 30 mg/kg dose for future ATL studies. ATD activates TDO and enhances the Trp flux down the KP via its leucine component. Higher plasma free [Trp] and lower total [Trp] are observed in women, with no gender differences in kynurenines. Kynurenic acid is lower in female Caucasians, which may explain their lower incidence of schizophrenia. African-American and Hispanic women have a lower TDO and Trp oxidation relative to free Trp than the corresponding men. African-American women have a potentially higher 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid/anthranilic acid ratio, which may protect them against osteoporosis. Future studies of the KP in relation to health and disease should focus on gender and ethnic differences.

  9. Enzyme hydration, activity and flexibility : A neutron scattering approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurkal-Siebert, V.; Finney, J.L.; Daniel, R.M.; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2006-01-01

    Recent measurements have demonstrated enzyme activity at hydrations as low as 3%. The question of whether the hydration-induced enzyme flexibility is important for activity is addressed by performing picosecond dynamic neutron scattering experiments on pig liver esterase powders at various temperatures as well as solutions. At all temperatures and hydrations investigated here, significant quasielastic scattering intensity is found in the protein, indicating the presence of anharmonic, diffusive motion. As the hydration increases a temperature-dependent dynamical transition appears and strengthens involving additional diffusive motion. At low temperature, increasing hydration resulted in lower flexibility of the enzyme. At higher temperatures, systems containing sufficient number of water molecules interacting with the protein exhibit increased flexibility. The implication of these results is that, although the additional hydration-induced diffusive motion and flexibility at high temperatures in the enzyme detected here may be related to increased activity, they are not required for the enzyme to function

  10. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril, prevents the hyperactivity and impulsivity of neurokinin-1 receptor gene 'knockout' mice: sex differences and implications for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Ashley J; Pillidge, Katharine; Grabowska, Ewelina M; Stanford, S Clare

    2015-04-01

    Mice lacking functional neurokinin-1 receptors (NK1R-/-) display behavioural abnormalities resembling attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): locomotor hyperactivity, impulsivity and inattentiveness. The preferred ligand for NK1R, substance P, is metabolised by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), which forms part of the brain renin angiotensin system (BRAS). In view of evidence that the BRAS modulates locomotor activity and cognitive performance, we tested the effects of drugs that target the BRAS on these behaviours in NK1R-/- and wildtype mice. We first tested the effects of the ACE inhibitor, captopril, on locomotor activity. Because there are well-established sex differences in both ADHD and ACE activity, we compared the effects of captopril in both male and female mice. Locomotor hyperactivity was evident in male NK1R-/- mice, only, and this was abolished by treatment with captopril. By contrast, male wildtypes and females of both genotypes were unaffected by ACE inhibition. We then investigated the effects of angiotensin AT1 (losartan) and AT2 (PD 123319) receptor antagonists on the locomotor activity of male NK1R-/- and wildtype mice. Both antagonists increased the locomotor activity of NK1R-/- mice, but neither affected the wildtypes. Finally, we tested the effects of captopril on the performance of male NK1R-/- and wildtype mice in the 5-choice serial reaction-time task (5-CSRTT) and found that ACE inhibition prevented the impulsivity of NK1R-/- mice. These results indicate that certain behaviours, disrupted in ADHD, are influenced by an interaction between the BRAS and NK1R, and suggest that ACE inhibitors could provide a novel treatment for this disorder. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. NRSA enzyme decomposition model data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme activities measured at more than 2000 US streams and rivers. These enzyme data were then used to predict organic matter decomposition and microbial...

  13. Cellulase enzyme and biomass utilization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... human population grows and economic development. However, the current .... conditions and the production cost of the related enzyme system. Therefore ... Given the importance of this enzyme to these so many industries,.

  14. Liver enzymes and psychological well-being response to aerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... Background: Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a medical condition that has broad implications for a person's physical and ... Objective: The aim of this study was to detect changes in liver enzymes and psychological well-being in response to aerobic .... of mood that can be used to calculate a Total Mood.

  15. Enzyme recycling in lignocellulosic biorefineries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henning; Pinelo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    platform. Cellulases are the most important enzymes required in this process, but the complex nature of lignocellulose requires several other enzymes (hemicellulases and auxiliary enzymes) for efficient hydrolysis. Enzyme recycling increases the catalytic productivity of the enzymes by reusing them...... for several batches of hydrolysis, and thereby reduces the overall cost associated with the hydrolysis. Research on this subject has been ongoing for many years and several promising technologies and methods have been developed and demonstrated. But only in a very few cases have these technologies been...... upscaled and tested in industrial settings, mainly because of many difficulties with recycling of enzymes from the complex lignocellulose hydrolyzate at industrially relevant conditions, i.e., high solids loadings. The challenges are associated with the large number of different enzymes required...

  16. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Melike Dönertaş

    Full Text Available The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG. Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution.

  17. Impact of angiotensin and endothelin converting enzymes and related bradykinin on renal functions in L-NAME hypertensive rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ali Zainal; Maulood, Ismail M.

    2017-09-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS), one of the most important hormonal systems, controls the kidney functions by regulating fluid volume, and electrolyte balance. The current study included the effects of kinin-kallikrein system (KKS) and its interaction with both angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and endothelin converting enzyme (ECE) on some of kidney function test parameters. In the present experiment, rats were divided into six groups, the first group was infused with normal saline, the second group was L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treated rats, third group was bradykinin (BK), forth group was captopril (ACEi), fifth group was phosphoramidon (ECEi), sixth group was a combination of BK with phosphoramidon. L-NAME was intravenously infused for one hour to develop systematic hypertension in male rats. After one hour of infusion, the results showed that L-NAME significantly increased serum creatinine. While, it decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and K+ excretion rate. Moreover, BK increased packed cell volume PCV%, serum creatinine and K+ ion concentration. While, it reduced GFR, serum Ca+2 ion concentration, K+ and Na+ excretion rates. On the other hand, captopril infusion showed its effect by reduction in GFR, serum Ca+2 ion and electrolyte excretion rates. Phosphoramidon an ECEi dramatically reduced serum Ca+2 ion, but it increased pH, GFR and Ca+2 excretion rate. The results suggested that BK and Captopril each alone severely reduces GFR value. Interestingly, inhibition of ET-1 production via phosphoramidon could markedly elevate GFR values.

  18. Implicative Algebras

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tadesse

    In this paper we introduce the concept of implicative algebras which is an equivalent definition of lattice implication algebra of Xu (1993) and further we prove that it is a regular Autometrized. Algebra. Further we remark that the binary operation → on lattice implicative algebra can never be associative. Key words: Implicative ...

  19. Enzyme Molecules in Solitary Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela B. Liebherr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  20. DGAT enzymes and triacylglycerol biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Stone, Scot J.; Koliwad, Suneil; Harris, Charles; Farese, Robert V.

    2008-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (triglycerides) (TGs) are the major storage molecules of metabolic energy and FAs in most living organisms. Excessive accumulation of TGs, however, is associated with human diseases, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and steatohepatitis. The final and the only committed step in the biosynthesis of TGs is catalyzed by acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzymes. The genes encoding two DGAT enzymes, DGAT1 and DGAT2, were identified in the past decade, and the use of molecular tools, including mice deficient in either enzyme, has shed light on their functions. Although DGAT enzymes are involved in TG synthesis, they have distinct protein sequences and differ in their biochemical, cellular, and physiological functions. Both enzymes may be useful as therapeutic targets for diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of DGAT enzymes, focusing on new advances since the cloning of their genes, including possible roles in human health and diseases. PMID:18757836

  1. Enzyme stabilization for pesticide degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivers, D.B.; Frazer, F.R. III; Mason, D.W.; Tice, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Enzymes offer inherent advantages and limitations as active components of formulations used to decontaminate soil and equipment contaminated with toxic materials such as pesticides. Because of the catalytic nature of enzymes, each molecule of enzyme has the potential to destroy countless molecules of a contaminating toxic compound. This degradation takes place under mild environmental conditions of pH, temperature, pressure, and solvent. The basic limitation of enzymes is their degree of stability during storage and application conditions. Stabilizing methods such as the use of additives, covalent crosslinking, covalent attachment, gel entrapment, and microencapsulation have been directed developing an enzyme preparation that is stable under extremes of pH, temperature, and exposure to organic solvents. Initial studies were conducted using the model enzymes subtilisin and horseradish peroxidase.

  2. Direct comparison of enzyme histochemical and immunohistochemical methods to localize an enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2002-01-01

    Immunohistochemical localization of enzymes is compared directly with localization of enzyme activity with (catalytic) enzyme histochemical methods. The two approaches demonstrate principally different aspects of an enzyme. The immunohistochemical method localizes the enzyme protein whether it is

  3. Enzyme Mimics: Advances and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuah, Evelyn; Toh, Seraphina; Yee, Jessica; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-13

    Enzyme mimics or artificial enzymes are a class of catalysts that have been actively pursued for decades and have heralded much interest as potentially viable alternatives to natural enzymes. Aside from having catalytic activities similar to their natural counterparts, enzyme mimics have the desired advantages of tunable structures and catalytic efficiencies, excellent tolerance to experimental conditions, lower cost, and purely synthetic routes to their preparation. Although still in the midst of development, impressive advances have already been made. Enzyme mimics have shown immense potential in the catalysis of a wide range of chemical and biological reactions, the development of chemical and biological sensing and anti-biofouling systems, and the production of pharmaceuticals and clean fuels. This Review concerns the development of various types of enzyme mimics, namely polymeric and dendrimeric, supramolecular, nanoparticulate and proteinic enzyme mimics, with an emphasis on their synthesis, catalytic properties and technical applications. It provides an introduction to enzyme mimics and a comprehensive summary of the advances and current standings of their applications, and seeks to inspire researchers to perfect the design and synthesis of enzyme mimics and to tailor their functionality for a much wider range of applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Phage lytic enzymes: a history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudil, David

    2015-02-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of 'bacteria-eaters' or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well (Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specific disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay (Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes-from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  5. [The rise of enzyme engineering in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaoxiang

    2015-06-01

    Enzyme engineering is an important part of the modern biotechnology. Industrial biocatalysis is considered the third wave of biotechnology following pharmaceutical and agricultural waves. In 25 years, China has made a mighty advances in enzyme engineering research. This review focuses on enzyme genomics, enzyme proteomics, biosynthesis, microbial conversion and biosensors in the Chinese enzyme engineering symposiums and advances in enzyme preparation industry in China.

  6. Enzyme structure, enzyme function and allozyme diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In estimates of population genetic diversity based on allozyme heterozygosity, some enzymes are regularly more variable than others. Evolutionary theory suggests that functionally less important molecules, or parts of molecules, evolve more rapidly than more important ones; the latter enzymes should then theoretically be ...

  7. Computational enzyme design: transitioning from catalytic proteins to enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Wai Shun; Siegel, Justin B

    2014-08-01

    The widespread interest in enzymes stem from their ability to catalyze chemical reactions under mild and ecologically friendly conditions with unparalleled catalytic proficiencies. While thousands of naturally occurring enzymes have been identified and characterized, there are still numerous important applications for which there are no biological catalysts capable of performing the desired chemical transformation. In order to engineer enzymes for which there is no natural starting point, efforts using a combination of quantum chemistry and force-field based protein molecular modeling have led to the design of novel proteins capable of catalyzing chemical reactions not catalyzed by naturally occurring enzymes. Here we discuss the current status and potential avenues to pursue as the field of computational enzyme design moves forward. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Immobilized enzymes: understanding enzyme - surface interactions at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoarau, Marie; Badieyan, Somayesadat; Marsh, E Neil G

    2017-11-22

    Enzymes immobilized on solid supports have important and industrial and medical applications. However, their uses are limited by the significant reductions in activity and stability that often accompany the immobilization process. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular level interactions between proteins and supporting surfaces that contribute to changes in stability and activity. This understanding has been facilitated by the application of various surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques that allow the structure and orientation of enzymes at the solid/liquid interface to be probed, often with monolayer sensitivity. An appreciation of the molecular interactions between enzyme and surface support has allowed the surface chemistry and method of enzyme attachement to be fine-tuned such that activity and stability can be greatly enhanced. These advances suggest that a much wider variety of enzymes may eventually be amenable to immobilization as green catalysts.

  9. Stability of Enzymes in Granular Enzyme Products for Laundry Detergents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biran, Suzan; Bach, Poul; Simonsen, Ole

    Enzymes have long been of interest to the detergent industry due to their ability to improve the cleaning efficiency of synthetic detergents, contribute to shortening washing times, and reduce energy and water consumption, provision of environmentally friendlier wash water effluents and fabric care....... However, incorporating enzymes in detergent formulations gives rise to numerous practical problems due to their incompatibility with and stability against various detergent components. In powdered detergent formulations, these issues can be partly overcome by physically isolating the enzymes in separate...... particles. However, enzymes may loose a significant part of their activity over a time period of several weeks. Possible causes of inactivation of enzymes in a granule may be related to the release of hydrogen peroxide from the bleaching chemicals in a moisture-containing atmosphere, humidity, autolysis...

  10. Enzymes in Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, David C; German, J Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Milk proteins are a complex and diverse source of biological activities. Beyond their function, intact milk proteins also act as carriers of encrypted functional sequences that, when released as peptides, exert biological functions, including antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity, which could contribute to the infant's competitive success. Research has now revealed that the release of these functional peptides begins within the mammary gland itself. A complex array of proteases produced in mother's milk has been shown to be active in the milk, releasing these peptides. Moreover, our recent research demonstrates that these milk proteases continue to digest milk proteins within the infant's stomach, possibly even to a larger extent than the infant's own proteases. As the neonate has relatively low digestive capacity, the activity of milk proteases in the infant may provide important assistance to digesting milk proteins. The coordinated release of these encrypted sequences is accomplished by selective proteolytic action provided by an array of native milk proteases and infant-produced enzymes. The task for scientists is now to discover the selective advantages of this protein-protease-based peptide release system. © 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Digestive enzymes of some earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, P C; Dash, M C

    1980-10-15

    4 species of tropical earthworms differed with regard to enzyme activity. The maximum activity of protease and of cellulase occurred in the posterior region of the gut of the earthworms. On the average Octochaetona surensis shows maximum activity and Drawida calebi shows minimum activity for all the enzymes studied.

  12. Photoreactivating enzyme from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snapka, R.M.; Fuselier, C.O.

    1977-01-01

    Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) has been purified in large amounts from an E.coli strain lysogenic for a defective lambda bacteriophage carrying the phr gene. The resulting enzyme had a pH optimum of 7.2 and an ionic strength optimum of 0.18. It consisted of an apoprotein and cofactor, both of which were necessary for catalytic activity. The apoprotein had a monomer molecular weight of 35,200 and showed stable aggregates under denaturing conditions. The amino acid analysis of the E.coli enzyme was very similar to that of the photoreactivating enzyme from orchid seedlings (Cattelya aurantiaca). Both had arginine at the amino terminus. The cofactor, like the holoenzyme, showed absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and emission properties indicative of an adenine moiety. Although the isolated enzyme had an action spectrum which peaked at about 360 nm, neither the cofactor, apoenzyme nor holoenzyme showed any detectable absorption between 300 and 400 nm. (author)

  13. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imagining and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography

  14. Photoreactivating enzyme from Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snapka, R M; Fuselier, C O [California Univ., Irvine (USA)

    1977-05-01

    Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme (PRE) has been purified in large amounts from an E.coli strain lysogenic for a defective lambda bacteriophage carrying the phr gene. The resulting enzyme had a pH optimum of 7.2 and an ionic strength optimum of 0.18. It consisted of an apoprotein and cofactor, both of which were necessary for catalytic activity. The apoprotein had a monomer molecular weight of 35,200 and showed stable aggregates under denaturing conditions. The amino acid analysis of the E.coli enzyme was very similar to that of the photoreactivating enzyme from orchid seedlings (Cattelya aurantiaca). Both had arginine at the amino terminus. The cofactor, like the holoenzyme, showed absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and emission properties indicative of an adenine moiety. Although the isolated enzyme had an action spectrum which peaked at about 360 nm, neither the cofactor, apoenzyme nor holoenzyme showed any detectable absorption between 300 and 400 nm.

  15. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based multiplex enzyme assay for six enzymes associated with hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul Min; Lee, Kyunghoon; Jun, Sun-Hee; Song, Sang Hoon; Song, Junghan

    2017-08-15

    Deficiencies in erythrocyte metabolic enzymes are associated with hereditary hemolytic anemia. Here, we report the development of a novel multiplex enzyme assay for six major enzymes, namely glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase, hexokinase, triosephosphate isomerase, and adenosine deaminase, deficiencies in which are implicated in erythrocyte enzymopathies. To overcome the drawbacks of traditional spectrophotometric enzyme assays, the present assay was based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The products of the six enzymes were directly measured by using ion pairing UPLC-MS/MS, and the precision, linearity, ion suppression, optimal sample amounts, and incubation times were evaluated. Eighty-three normal individuals and 13 patients with suspected enzymopathy were analyzed. The UPLC running time was within 5min. No ion suppression was observed at the retention time for the products or internal standards. We selected an optimal dilution factor and incubation time for each enzyme system. The intra- and inter-assay imprecision values (CVs) were 2.5-12.1% and 2.9-14.3%, respectively. The linearity of each system was good, with R 2 values >0.97. Patient samples showed consistently lower enzyme activities than those from normal individuals. The present ion paring UPLC-MS/MS assay enables facile and reproducible multiplex evaluation of the activity of enzymes implicated in enzymopathy-associated hemolytic anemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigaciones sobre la Entrevista Conductual Estructurada (ECE en la Selección de Personal en la Administración General del País Vasco: Meta-análisis de la Fiabilidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JESUS F. SALGADO

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo tiene por objetivos: (1 presentar las entrevistas conductuales estructuradas (ECE como una técnica apropiada para la selección de personal en las organizaciones tanto privadas como públicas; (2 describir el proceso de implementación de las entrevistas conductuales estructuradas en la Administración General del País Vasco (AGPV y mostrar cómo instrumentos desarrollados inicialmente en el ámbito de las organizaciones privadas pueden utilizarse sin merma de calidad ni de garantías procesales en las organizaciones públicas, tales como la administración general del estado; y (3 presentar los resultados de la evidencia empírica disponible en la actualidad, después de un año de utilización, sobre la fiabilidad de los entrevistadores y de los procesos de entrevista llevados a cabo en la Administración General del País Vasco. Dos meta-análisis fueron llevados a cabo con los resultados de la investigación realizada sobre 20 diseños de entrevista diferentes. La evidencia disponible indica que la fiabilidad de los entrevistadores usando la entrevista conductual estructurada en la AGPV es de .83 y que la fiabilidad de las decisiones del panel de entrevistadores (3 ó 4 entrevistadores es de .93. Estos hallazgos superan ampliamente los resultados obtenidos en investigaciones previas y sus implicaciones para la práctica de la selección de personal en la Administración Pública son comentadas.

  17. BAKERY ENZYMES IN CEREAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Koman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE Bread is the most common and traditional food in the world. For years, enzymes such as malt and fungal alpha-amylase have been used in bread making. Due to the changes in the baking industry and the ever-increasing demand for more natural products, enzymes have gained real importance in bread-making. If an enzyme is added, it is often destroyed by the heat during the baking process. For generations, enzymes have been used for the improvement of texture and appearance, enhancement of nutritional values and generation of appealing flavours and aromas. Enzymes used in bakery industry constitute nearly one third of the market. The bakery products have undergone radical improvements in quality over the past years in terms of flavour, texture and shelf-life. The the biggest contributor for these improvementsis the usage of enzymes. Present work seeks to systematically describe bakery enzymes, their classification, benefits, usage and chemical reactions in the bread making process.doi:10.5219/193

  18. [Automated analyzer of enzyme immunoassay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, S

    1995-09-01

    Automated analyzers for enzyme immunoassay can be classified by several points of view: the kind of labeled antibodies or enzymes, detection methods, the number of tests per unit time, analytical time and speed per run. In practice, it is important for us consider the several points such as detection limits, the number of tests per unit time, analytical range, and precision. Most of the automated analyzers on the market can randomly access and measure samples. I will describe the recent advance of automated analyzers reviewing their labeling antibodies and enzymes, the detection methods, the number of test per unit time and analytical time and speed per test.

  19. Multi-enzyme Process Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade Santacoloma, Paloma de Gracia

    are affected (in a positive or negative way) by the presence of the other enzymes and compounds in the media. In this thesis the concept of multi-enzyme in-pot term is adopted for processes that are carried out by the combination of enzymes in a single reactor and implemented at pilot or industrial scale...... features of the process and provides the information required to structure the process model by using a step-by-step procedure with the required tools and methods. In this way, this framework increases efficiency of the model development process with respect to time and resources needed (fast and effective....... In this way the model parameters that drives the main dynamic behavior can be identified and thus a better understanding of this type of processes. In order to develop, test and verify the methodology, three case studies were selected, specifically the bi-enzyme process for the production of lactobionic acid...

  20. PIXE analysis of Zn enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, C.; Oliver, A.; Andrade, E.; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J.L.; Romero, I.; Celis, H.

    1999-01-01

    Zinc is a necessary component in the action and structural stability of many enzymes. Some of them are well characterized, but in others, Zn stoichiometry and its association is not known. PIXE has been proven to be a suitable technique for analyzing metallic proteins embedded in electrophoresis gels. In this study, PIXE has been used to investigate the Zn content of enzymes that are known to carry Zn atoms. These include the carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme well characterized by other methods and the cytoplasmic pyrophosphatase of Rhodospirillum rubrum that is known to require Zn to be stable but not how many metal ions are involved or how they are bound to the enzyme. Native proteins have been purified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and direct identification and quantification of Zn in the gel bands was performed with an external proton beam of 3.7 MeV energy

  1. GRE Enzymes for Vector Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme data that were collected during the 2004-2006 EMAP-GRE program. These data were then used by Moorhead et al (2016) in their ecoenzyme vector...

  2. Watching Individual Enzymes at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Kerstin; Rocha, Susana; De Cremer, Gert; Roeffaers, Maarten B. J.; Uji-i, Hiroshi; Hofkens, Johan

    Single-molecule fluorescence experiments are a powerful tool to analyze reaction mechanisms of enzymes. Because of their unique potential to detect heterogeneities in space and time, they have provided unprecedented insights into the nature and mechanisms of conformational changes related to the catalytic reaction. The most important finding from experiments with single enzymes is the generally observed phenomenon that the catalytic rate constants fluctuate over time (dynamic disorder). These fluctuations originate from conformational changes occurring on time scales, which are similar to or slower than that of the catalytic reaction. Here, we summarize experiments with enzymes that show dynamic disorder and introduce new experimental strategies showing how single-molecule fluorescence experiments can be applied to address other open questions in medical and industrial enzymology, such as enzyme inactivation processes, reactant transfer in cascade reactions, and the mechanisms of interfacial catalysis.

  3. Photosynthetic fuel for heterologous enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo

    2017-01-01

    of reducing power. Recent work on the metabolic engineering of photosynthetic organisms has shown that the electron carriers such as ferredoxin and flavodoxin can be used to couple heterologous enzymes to photosynthetic reducing power. Because these proteins have a plethora of interaction partners and rely...... on electrostatically steered complex formation, they form productive electron transfer complexes with non-native enzymes. A handful of examples demonstrate channeling of photosynthetic electrons to drive the activity of heterologous enzymes, and these focus mainly on hydrogenases and cytochrome P450s. However......, competition from native pathways and inefficient electron transfer rates present major obstacles, which limit the productivity of heterologous reactions coupled to photosynthesis. We discuss specific approaches to address these bottlenecks and ensure high productivity of such enzymes in a photosynthetic...

  4. DGAT enzymes and triacylglycerol biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Stone, Scot J.; Koliwad, Suneil; Harris, Charles; Farese, Robert V.

    2008-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (triglycerides) (TGs) are the major storage molecules of metabolic energy and FAs in most living organisms. Excessive accumulation of TGs, however, is associated with human diseases, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and steatohepatitis. The final and the only committed step in the biosynthesis of TGs is catalyzed by acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzymes. The genes encoding two DGAT enzymes, DGAT1 and DGAT2, were identified in the past decade, ...

  5. Enzymes: principles and biotechnological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes are biological catalysts (also known as biocatalysts) that speed up biochemical reactions in living organisms, and which can be extracted from cells and then used to catalyse a wide range of commercially important processes. This chapter covers the basic principles of enzymology, such as classification, structure, kinetics and inhibition, and also provides an overview of industrial applications. In addition, techniques for the purification of enzymes are discussed. PMID:26504249

  6. de novo computational enzyme design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanghellini, Alexandre

    2014-10-01

    Recent advances in systems and synthetic biology as well as metabolic engineering are poised to transform industrial biotechnology by allowing us to design cell factories for the sustainable production of valuable fuels and chemicals. To deliver on their promises, such cell factories, as much as their brick-and-mortar counterparts, will require appropriate catalysts, especially for classes of reactions that are not known to be catalyzed by enzymes in natural organisms. A recently developed methodology, de novo computational enzyme design can be used to create enzymes catalyzing novel reactions. Here we review the different classes of chemical reactions for which active protein catalysts have been designed as well as the results of detailed biochemical and structural characterization studies. We also discuss how combining de novo computational enzyme design with more traditional protein engineering techniques can alleviate the shortcomings of state-of-the-art computational design techniques and create novel enzymes with catalytic proficiencies on par with natural enzymes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Engineering Cellulase Enzymes for Bioenergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Meera Elizabeth

    Sustainable energy sources, such as biofuels, offer increasingly important alternatives to fossil fuels that contribute less to global climate change. The energy contained within cellulosic biofuels derives from sunlight energy stored in the form of carbon-carbon bonds comprising sugars such as glucose. Second-generation biofuels are produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks, including agricultural waste products and non-food crops like Miscanthus, that contain lignin and the polysaccharides hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulose is the most abundant biological material on Earth; it is a polymer of glucose and a structural component of plant cell walls. Accessing the sugar is challenging, as the crystalline structure of cellulose resists degradation; biochemical and thermochemical means can be used to depolymerize cellulose. Cellulase enzymes catalyze the biochemical depolymerization of cellulose into glucose. Glucose can be used as a carbon source for growth of a biofuel-producing microorganism. When it converts glucose to a hydrocarbon fuel, this microbe completes the biofuels process of transforming sunlight energy into accessible, chemical energy capable of replacing non-renewable transportation fuels. Due to strong intermolecular interactions between polymer chains, cellulose is significantly more challenging to depolymerize than starch, a more accessible polymer of glucose utilized in first-generation biofuels processes (often derived from corn). While most mammals cannot digest cellulose (dietary fiber), certain fungi and bacteria produce cellulase enzymes capable of hydrolyzing it. These organisms secrete a wide variety of glycoside hydrolase and other classes of enzymes that work in concert. Because cellulase enzymes are slow-acting and expensive to produce, my aim has been to improve the properties of these enzymes as a means to make a cellulosic biofuels process possible that is more efficient and, consequently, more economical than current

  8. Enzymes and Enzyme Activity Encoded by Nonenveloped Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Kimi; Banerjee, Manidipa; Johnson, John E

    2017-09-29

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that rely on host cell machineries for their replication and survival. Although viruses tend to make optimal use of the host cell protein repertoire, they need to encode essential enzymatic or effector functions that may not be available or accessible in the host cellular milieu. The enzymes encoded by nonenveloped viruses-a group of viruses that lack any lipid coating or envelope-play vital roles in all the stages of the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the structural, biochemical, and mechanistic information available for several classes of enzymes and autocatalytic activity encoded by nonenveloped viruses. Advances in research and development of antiviral inhibitors targeting specific viral enzymes are also highlighted.

  9. The phosphoric acid leak from the wreck of the MV Ece in the English Channel in 2006: Assessment with a ship of opportunity, an operational ecosystem model and historical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly-Gerreyn, Boris A. [National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, Waterfront Campus, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: bag@noc.soton.ac.uk; Hydes, David J. [National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, Waterfront Campus, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom); Hartman, Mark C. [National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, Waterfront Campus, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom); Siddorn, John [Ocean Forecasting Research and Development, Met Office, FitzRoy Road, Exeter EX1 3PB (United Kingdom); Hyder, Patrick [Ocean Forecasting Research and Development, Met Office, FitzRoy Road, Exeter EX1 3PB (United Kingdom); Holt, Martin W. [Ocean Forecasting Research and Development, Met Office, FitzRoy Road, Exeter EX1 3PB (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    This study evaluates the ship of opportunity (Ferrybox) concept for both sustained monitoring of UK shelf sea waters and numerical model validation. Release of phosphate from the wreck of a chemical tanker (MV Ece) in the western English Channel (49.73{sup o}N, 3.25{sup o}W) in March 2006 is used to demonstrate the importance of sustained observations in decision support systems and policy development. The Ferrybox system continuously collects sea surface (5 m) data from a suite of autonomous electronic sensors installed on a passenger ferry operating year-round between Portsmouth (UK) and Bilbao (Spain). The detection of anomalously high concentrations of phosphate (1.54 mmol m{sup -3}, four times the usual level) and onset of phytoplankton growth close to the wreck site in March 2006 was placed in the context of multiple years of measurements (phosphate, nitrate, silicate and chlorophyll) collected from the Ferrybox system (2003-2006) and the long-term time series station E1 (50.03{sup o}N, 4.65{sup o}W, 1930-1987) in the English Channel. With regard to decision support, release of phosphate from the tanker is unlikely to pose a threat as phytoplankton growth at the end of winter is not unusual in this region and dissolved inorganic nitrogen rather than phosphate (DIN:DIP = 10-18) is likely to ultimately limit algal growth in spring 2006. With regard to policy development, the Oslo and Paris (OSPAR) commissions recommendation of sampling every three years in 'non-problem areas' is likely to provide statistically inadequate data, given the interannual and decadal variability identified in the Ferrybox and E1 data: the Ferrybox data show that oceanic winter nutrient concentrations varied by 35-50% between 2003/2004 and 2005/2006 due to deeper mixing of water off-shelf in early 2005/2006 and comparisons between the Ferrybox and E1 years show that the western English Channel is currently experiencing a low in phosphate concentrations similar to those in the

  10. The phosphoric acid leak from the wreck of the MV Ece in the English Channel in 2006: Assessment with a ship of opportunity, an operational ecosystem model and historical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly-Gerreyn, Boris A.; Hydes, David J.; Hartman, Mark C.; Siddorn, John; Hyder, Patrick; Holt, Martin W.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates the ship of opportunity (Ferrybox) concept for both sustained monitoring of UK shelf sea waters and numerical model validation. Release of phosphate from the wreck of a chemical tanker (MV Ece) in the western English Channel (49.73 o N, 3.25 o W) in March 2006 is used to demonstrate the importance of sustained observations in decision support systems and policy development. The Ferrybox system continuously collects sea surface (5 m) data from a suite of autonomous electronic sensors installed on a passenger ferry operating year-round between Portsmouth (UK) and Bilbao (Spain). The detection of anomalously high concentrations of phosphate (1.54 mmol m -3 , four times the usual level) and onset of phytoplankton growth close to the wreck site in March 2006 was placed in the context of multiple years of measurements (phosphate, nitrate, silicate and chlorophyll) collected from the Ferrybox system (2003-2006) and the long-term time series station E1 (50.03 o N, 4.65 o W, 1930-1987) in the English Channel. With regard to decision support, release of phosphate from the tanker is unlikely to pose a threat as phytoplankton growth at the end of winter is not unusual in this region and dissolved inorganic nitrogen rather than phosphate (DIN:DIP = 10-18) is likely to ultimately limit algal growth in spring 2006. With regard to policy development, the Oslo and Paris (OSPAR) commissions recommendation of sampling every three years in 'non-problem areas' is likely to provide statistically inadequate data, given the interannual and decadal variability identified in the Ferrybox and E1 data: the Ferrybox data show that oceanic winter nutrient concentrations varied by 35-50% between 2003/2004 and 2005/2006 due to deeper mixing of water off-shelf in early 2005/2006 and comparisons between the Ferrybox and E1 years show that the western English Channel is currently experiencing a low in phosphate concentrations similar to those in the 1960s. The importance of

  11. The phosphoric acid leak from the wreck of the MV Ece in the English Channel in 2006: Assessment with a ship of opportunity, an operational ecosystem model and historical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Gerreyn, Boris A; Hydes, David J; Hartman, Mark C; Siddorn, John; Hyder, Patrick; Holt, Martin W

    2007-07-01

    This study evaluates the ship of opportunity (Ferrybox) concept for both sustained monitoring of UK shelf sea waters and numerical model validation. Release of phosphate from the wreck of a chemical tanker (MV Ece) in the western English Channel (49.73 degrees N, 3.25 degrees W) in March 2006 is used to demonstrate the importance of sustained observations in decision support systems and policy development. The Ferrybox system continuously collects sea surface (5m) data from a suite of autonomous electronic sensors installed on a passenger ferry operating year-round between Portsmouth (UK) and Bilbao (Spain). The detection of anomalously high concentrations of phosphate (1.54mmolm(-3), four times the usual level) and onset of phytoplankton growth close to the wreck site in March 2006 was placed in the context of multiple years of measurements (phosphate, nitrate, silicate and chlorophyll) collected from the Ferrybox system (2003-2006) and the long-term time series station E1 (50.03 degrees N, 4.65 degrees W, 1930-1987) in the English Channel. With regard to decision support, release of phosphate from the tanker is unlikely to pose a threat as phytoplankton growth at the end of winter is not unusual in this region and dissolved inorganic nitrogen rather than phosphate (DIN:DIP=10-18) is likely to ultimately limit algal growth in spring 2006. With regard to policy development, the Oslo and Paris (OSPAR) commissions recommendation of sampling every three years in "non-problem areas" is likely to provide statistically inadequate data, given the interannual and decadal variability identified in the Ferrybox and E1 data: the Ferrybox data show that oceanic winter nutrient concentrations varied by 35-50% between 2003/2004 and 2005/2006 due to deeper mixing of water off-shelf in early 2005/2006 and comparisons between the Ferrybox and E1 years show that the western English Channel is currently experiencing a low in phosphate concentrations similar to those in the 1960s. The

  12. Rethinking fundamentals of enzyme action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrop, D B

    1999-01-01

    Despite certain limitations, investigators continue to gainfully employ concepts rooted in steady-state kinetics in efforts to draw mechanistically relevant inferences about enzyme catalysis. By reconsidering steady-state enzyme kinetic behavior, this review develops ideas that allow one to arrive at the following new definitions: (a) V/K, the ratio of the maximal initial velocity divided by the Michaelis-Menten constant, is the apparent rate constant for the capture of substrate into enzyme complexes that are destined to yield product(s) at some later point in time; (b) the maximal velocity V is the apparent rate constant for the release of substrate from captured complexes in the form of free product(s); and (c) the Michaelis-Menten constant K is the ratio of the apparent rate constants for release and capture. The physiologic significance of V/K is also explored to illuminate aspects of antibiotic resistance, the concept of "perfection" in enzyme catalysis, and catalytic proficiency. The conceptual basis of congruent thermodynamic cycles is also considered in an attempt to achieve an unambiguous way for comparing an enzyme-catalyzed reaction with its uncatalyzed reference reaction. Such efforts promise a deeper understanding of the origins of catalytic power, as it relates to stabilization of the reactant ground state, stabilization of the transition state, and reciprocal stabilizations of ground and transition states.

  13. First measurement of ECE from JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costley, A.E.; Bartlett, D.V.; Campbell, D.J.; Baker, E.A.M.; Kiff, M.G.; Neill, G.F.

    1985-01-01

    A multichannel system for measuring the electron cyclotron emission from JET has been designed and constructed. The design criteria are briefly outlined and the system is described. Some typical results obtained with the first operational channel during the november-december 1983 operating period of JET are presented

  14. Subcellular localization of pituitary enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    A cytochemical procedure is reported for identifying subcellular sites of enzymes hydrolyzing beta-naphthylamine substrates, and to study the sites of reaction product localization in cells of various tissues. Investigations using the substrate Leu 4-methoxy-8-naphthylamine, a capture with hexonium pararosaniline, and the final chelation of osmium have identified the hydrolyzing enzyme of rat liver cells; this enzyme localized on cell membranes with intense deposition in the areas of the parcanaliculi. The study of cells in the anterior pituitary of the rat showed the deposition of reaction product on cell membrane; and on the membranes of secretion granules contained within the cell. The deposition of reaction product on the cell membrane however showed no increase or decrease with changes in the physiological state of the gland and release of secretion granules from specific cells.

  15. Enzymes in CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Gladis, Arne; Thomsen, Kaj

    The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) can accelerate the absorption rate of CO2 into aqueous solutions by several-fold. It exist in almost all living organisms and catalyses different important processes like CO2 transport, respiration and the acid-base balances. A new technology in the field...... of carbon capture is the application of enzymes for acceleration of typically slow ternary amines or inorganic carbonates. There is a hidden potential to revive currently infeasible amines which have an interesting low energy consumption for regeneration but too slow kinetics for viable CO2 capture. The aim...... of this work is to discuss the measurements of kinetic properties for CA promoted CO2 capture solvent systems. The development of a rate-based model for enzymes will be discussed showing the principles of implementation and the results on using a well-known ternary amine for CO2 capture. Conclusions...

  16. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejerskov, Betina; Jarlstad Olesen, Morten T; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2017-01-01

    Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug administra......Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy (SMEPT) is a biomedical platform developed to perform a localized synthesis of drugs mediated by implantable biomaterials. This approach combines the benefits and at the same time offers to overcome the drawbacks for traditional pill-based drug...

  17. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  18. Curious Cases of the Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusu, Nuriye Nuray

    2015-07-01

    Life as we know it heavily relies on biological catalysis, in fact, in a very nonromantic version of it, life could be considered as a series of chemical reactions, regulated by the guarding principles of thermodynamics. In ancient times, a beating heart was a good sign of vitality, however, to me, it is actually the presence of active enzymes that counts… Though we do not usually pay attention, the history of enzymology is as old as humanity itself, and dates back to the ancient times. This paper is dedicated to these early moments of this remarkable science that touched our lives in the past and will make life a lot more efficient for humanity in the future. There was almost always a delicate, fundamentally essential relationship between mankind and the enzymes. Challenged by a very alien and hostile Nature full of predators, prehistoric men soon discovered the medicinal properties of the plants, through trial and error. In fact, they accidently discovered the enzyme inhibitors and thus, in crude terms, kindled a sparkling area of research. These plant-derivatives that acted as enzyme inhibitors helped prehistoric men in their pursuit of survival and protection from predators; in hunting and fishing… Later in history, while the underlying purposes of survival and increasing the quality of life stayed intact, the ways and means of enzymology experienced a massive transformation, as the 'trial and error' methodology of the ancients is now replaced with rational scientific theories.

  19. Enzymes with activity toward Xyloglucan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vincken, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    Xyloglucans are plant cell wall polysaccharides, which belong to the hemicellulose class. Here the structural variations of xyloglucans will be reviewed. Subsequently, the anchoring of xyloglucan in the plant cell wall will be discussed. Enzymes involved in degradation or modification of xyloglucan

  20. Application of Enzyme Coupling Reactions to Shift Thermodynamically Limited Biocatalytic Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu, Rohana; Woodley, John M.

    2015-01-01

    , it can be challenging to combine several engineered enzymes in vitro for the conversion of non-natural substrates. In this mini-review we focus on enzyme coupling reactions as a tool to alleviate thermodynamic constraints in synthetically useful biocatalytic reactions. The implications of thermodynamic...... shift the equilibrium of otherwise thermodynamically unfavourable reactions to give a higher conversion of the target product. By coupling an energetically unfavourable reaction with a more favourable one, the multi-enzyme cascade mimics the approach taken in nature in metabolic pathways. Nevertheless...

  1. Sensor potency of the moonlighting enzyme-decorated cytoskeleton: the cytoskeleton as a metabolic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There is extensive evidence for the interaction of metabolic enzymes with the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. The significance of these interactions is far from clear. Presentation of the hypothesis In the cytoskeletal integrative sensor hypothesis presented here, the cytoskeleton senses and integrates the general metabolic activity of the cell. This activity depends on the binding to the cytoskeleton of enzymes and, depending on the nature of the enzyme, this binding may occur if the enzyme is either active or inactive but not both. This enzyme-binding is further proposed to stabilize microtubules and microfilaments and to alter rates of GTP and ATP hydrolysis and their levels. Testing the hypothesis Evidence consistent with the cytoskeletal integrative sensor hypothesis is presented in the case of glycolysis. Several testable predictions are made. There should be a relationship between post-translational modifications of tubulin and of actin and their interaction with metabolic enzymes. Different conditions of cytoskeletal dynamics and enzyme-cytoskeleton binding should reveal significant differences in local and perhaps global levels and ratios of ATP and GTP. The different functions of moonlighting enzymes should depend on cytoskeletal binding. Implications of the hypothesis The physical and chemical effects arising from metabolic sensing by the cytoskeleton would have major consequences on cell shape, dynamics and cell cycle progression. The hypothesis provides a framework that helps the significance of the enzyme-decorated cytoskeleton be determined. PMID:23398642

  2. A model of extracellular enzymes in free-living microbes: which strategy pays off?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traving, Sachia J; Thygesen, Uffe H; Riemann, Lasse; Stedmon, Colin A

    2015-11-01

    An initial modeling approach was applied to analyze how a single, nonmotile, free-living, heterotrophic bacterial cell may optimize the deployment of its extracellular enzymes. Free-living cells live in a dilute and complex substrate field, and to gain enough substrate, their extracellular enzymes must be utilized efficiently. The model revealed that surface-attached and free enzymes generate unique enzyme and substrate fields, and each deployment strategy has distinctive advantages. For a solitary cell, surface-attached enzymes are suggested to be the most cost-efficient strategy. This strategy entails potential substrates being reduced to very low concentrations. Free enzymes, on the other hand, generate a radically different substrate field, which suggests significant benefits for the strategy if free cells engage in social foraging or experience high substrate concentrations. Swimming has a slight positive effect for the attached-enzyme strategy, while the effect is negative for the free-enzyme strategy. The results of this study suggest that specific dissolved organic compounds in the ocean likely persist below a threshold concentration impervious to biological utilization. This could help explain the persistence and apparent refractory state of oceanic dissolved organic matter (DOM). Microbial extracellular enzyme strategies, therefore, have important implications for larger-scale processes, such as shaping the role of DOM in ocean carbon sequestration. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be safe...

  4. Heavy enzymes--experimental and computational insights in enzyme dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderek, Katarzyna; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2014-08-01

    The role of protein motions in the chemical step of enzyme-catalyzed reactions is the subject of an open debate in the scientific literature. The systematic use of isotopically substituted enzymes has been revealed as a useful tool to quantify the role of these motions. According to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, changing the mass of the protein does not change the forces acting on the system but alters the frequencies of the protein motions, which in turn can affect the rate constant. Experimental and theoretical studies carried out in this field are presented in this article and discussed in the framework of Transition State Theory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enzyme technology: Key to selective biorefining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    to the reaction is a unique trait of enzyme catalysis. Since enzyme selectivity means that a specific reaction is catalysed between particular species to produce definite products, enzymes are particularly fit for converting specific compounds in mixed biomass streams. Since enzymes are protein molecules...... their rational use in biorefinery processes requires an understanding of the basic features of enzymes and reaction traits with respect to specificity, kinetics, reaction optima, stability and structure-function relations – we are now at a stage where it is possible to use nature’s enzyme structures as starting...... point and then improve the functional traits by targeted mutation of the protein. The talk will display some of our recent hypotheses related to enzyme action, recently obtained results within knowledge-based enzyme improvements as well as cast light on research methods used in optimizing enzyme...

  6. Bystander or No Bystander for Gene Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam V. Patterson

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT of cancer aims to improve the selectivity of chemotherapy by gene transfer, thus enabling target cells to convert nontoxic prodrugs to cytotoxic drugs. A zone of cell kill around gene-modified cells due to transfer of toxic metabolites, known as the bystander effect, leads to tumour regression. Here we discuss the implications of either striving for a strong bystander effect to overcome poor gene transfer, or avoiding the bystander effect to reduce potential systemic effects, with the aid of three successful GDEPT systems. This review concentrates on bystander effects and drug development with regard to these enzyme prodrug combinations, namely herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK with ganciclovir (GCV, cytosine deaminase (CD from bacteria or yeast with 5-fluorocytodine (5-FC, and bacterial nitroreductase (NfsB with 5-(azaridin-1-yl-2,4-dinitrobenzamide (CB1954, and their respective derivatives.

  7. Thermal Stabilization of Enzymes Immobilized within Carbon Paste Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Liu, J; Cepra, G

    1997-08-01

    In this note we report on the remarkable thermal stabilization of enzymes immobilized in carbon paste electrodes. Amperometric biosensors are shown for the first time to withstand a prolonged high-temperature (>50 °C) stress. Nearly full activity of glucose oxidase is retained over periods of up to 4 months of thermal stress at 60-80 °C. Dramatic improvements in the thermostability are observed for polyphenol oxidase, lactate oxidase, alcohol oxidase, horseradish peroxidase, and amino acid oxidase. Such resistance to heat-induced denaturation is attributed to the conformational rigidity of these biocatalysts within the highly hydrophobic (mineral oil or silicone grease) pasting liquid. While no chemical stabilizer is needed for attaining such protective action, it appears that low humidity (i.e., low water content) is essential for minimizing the protein mobility. Besides their implications for electrochemical biosensors, such observations should lead to a new generation of thermoresistant enzyme reactors based on nonpolar semisolid supports.

  8. Study of DNA reconstruction enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiguchi, M [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1976-12-01

    Description was made of the characteristics and mechanism of 3 reconstructive enzymes which received from M. luteus or E. coli or T4, and of which natures were clarified as reconstructive enzymes of DNA irradiated with ultraviolet rays. As characteristics, the site of breaking, reaction, molecular weight, electric charge in the neutrality and a specific adhesion to DNA irradiated with ultraviolet rays were mentioned. As to mutant of ultraviolet ray sensitivity, hereditary control mechanism of removal and reconstruction by endo-nuclease activation was described, and suggestion was referred to removal and reconstruction of cells of xedoderma pigmentosum which is a hereditary disease of human. Description was also made as to the mechanism of exonuclease activation which separates dimer selectively from irradiated DNA.

  9. Metrological aspects of enzyme production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerber, T M; Pereira-Meirelles, F V; Dellamora-Ortiz, G M

    2010-01-01

    Enzymes are frequently used in biotechnology to carry out specific biological reactions, either in industrial processes or for the production of bioproducts and drugs. Microbial lipases are an important group of biotechnologically valuable enzymes that present widely diversified applications. Lipase production by microorganisms is described in several published papers; however, none of them refer to metrological evaluation and the estimation of the uncertainty in measurement. Moreover, few of them refer to process optimization through experimental design. The objectives of this work were to enhance lipase production in shaken-flasks with Yarrowia lipolytica cells employing experimental design and to evaluate the uncertainty in measurement of lipase activity. The highest lipolytic activity obtained was about three- and fivefold higher than the reported activities of CRMs BCR-693 and BCR-694, respectively. Lipase production by Y. lipolytica cells aiming the classification as certified reference material is recommended after further purification and stability studies

  10. Consumer attitudes to enzymes in food production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Helle Alsted; Grunert, Klaus G.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    The use of enzymes in food production has potential benefits for both food manufacturers and consumers. A central question is how consumers react to new ways of producing foods with enzymes. This study investigates the formation of consumer attitudes to different enzyme production methods in three...... European countries. Results show that consumers are most positive towards non-GM enzyme production methods. The enzyme production method is by far the most important factor for the formation of buying intentions compared to price and benefits. Results also show that environmental concern and attitudes...... to technological progress are the socio-political attitudes that have the highest predictive value regarding attitudes to enzyme production methods....

  11. Research progress of nanoparticles as enzyme mimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, XiaoNa; Liu, JianBo; Hou, Shuai; Wen, Tao; Liu, WenQi; Zhang, Ke; He, WeiWei; Ji, YingLu; Ren, HongXuan; Wang, Qi; Wu, XiaoChun

    2011-10-01

    Natural enzymes as biological catalysts possess remarkable advantages, especially their highly efficient and selective catalysis under mild conditions. However, most natural enzymes are proteins, thus exhibiting an inherent low durability to harsh reaction conditions. Artificial enzyme mimetics have been pursued extensively to avoid this drawback. Quite recently, some inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) have been found to exhibit unique enzyme mimetics. In addition, their much higher stability overcomes the inherent disadvantage of natural enzymes. Furthermore, easy mass-production and low cost endow them more benefits. As a new member of artificial enzyme mimetics, they have received intense attention. In this review article, major progress in this field is summarized and future perspectives are highlighted.

  12. Allosteric regulation of epigenetic modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucconi, Beth E; Cole, Philip A

    2017-08-01

    Epigenetic enzymes including histone modifying enzymes are key regulators of gene expression in normal and disease processes. Many drug development strategies to target histone modifying enzymes have focused on ligands that bind to enzyme active sites, but allosteric pockets offer potentially attractive opportunities for therapeutic development. Recent biochemical studies have revealed roles for small molecule and peptide ligands binding outside of the active sites in modulating the catalytic activities of histone modifying enzymes. Here we highlight several examples of allosteric regulation of epigenetic enzymes and discuss the biological significance of these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Immobilised enzymes in biorenewable production

    OpenAIRE

    Franssen, M.C.R.; Steunenberg, P.; Scott, E.L.; Zuilhof, H.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Oils, fats, carbohydrates, lignin, and amino acids are all important raw materials for the production of biorenewables. These compounds already play an important role in everyday life in the form of wood, fabrics, starch, paper and rubber. Enzymatic reactions do, in principle, allow the transformation of these raw materials into biorenewables under mild and sustainable conditions. There are a few examples of processes using immobilised enzymes that are already applied on an industrial scale, ...

  14. Immobilization of enzymes by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaetsu, I.; Kumakura, M.; Yoshida, M.; Asano, M.; Himei, M.; Tamura, M.; Hayashi, K.

    1979-01-01

    Immobilization of various enzymes was performed by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomers at low temperatures. Alpha-amylase and glucoamylase were effectively immobilized in hydrophilic polymer carrier such as poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and also in rather hydrophobic carrier such as poly(tetraethylene-glycol diacrylate). Immobilized human hemoglobin underwent the reversible oxygenation concomitantly with change of oxygen concentration outside of the matrices. (author)

  15. Lignin-degrading enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-ru; Sarkanen, Simo; Wang, Yun-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the activities of four kinds of enzyme have been purported to furnish the mechanistic foundations for macromolecular lignin depolymerization in decaying plant cell walls. The pertinent fungal enzymes comprise lignin peroxidase (with a relatively high redox potential), manganese peroxidase, an alkyl aryl etherase, and laccase. The peroxidases and laccase, but not the etherase, are expressed extracellularly by white-rot fungi. A number of these microorganisms exhibit a marked preference toward lignin in their degradation of lignocellulose. Interestingly, some white-rot fungi secrete both kinds of peroxidase but no laccase, while others that are equally effective express extracellular laccase activity but no peroxidases. Actually, none of these enzymes has been reported to possess significant depolymerase activity toward macromolecular lignin substrates that are derived with little chemical modification from the native biopolymer. Here, the assays commonly employed for monitoring the traditional fungal peroxidases, alkyl aryl etherase, and laccase are described in their respective contexts. A soluble native polymeric substrate that can be isolated directly from a conventional milled-wood lignin preparation is characterized in relation to its utility in next-generation lignin-depolymerase assays.

  16. Immobilised enzymes in biorenewables production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Maurice C R; Steunenberg, Peter; Scott, Elinor L; Zuilhof, Han; Sanders, Johan P M

    2013-08-07

    Oils, fats, carbohydrates, lignin, and amino acids are all important raw materials for the production of biorenewables. These compounds already play an important role in everyday life in the form of wood, fabrics, starch, paper and rubber. Enzymatic reactions do, in principle, allow the transformation of these raw materials into biorenewables under mild and sustainable conditions. There are a few examples of processes using immobilised enzymes that are already applied on an industrial scale, such as the production of High-Fructose Corn Syrup, but these are still rather rare. Fortunately, there is a rapid expansion in the research efforts that try to improve this, driven by a combination of economic and ecological reasons. This review focusses on those efforts, by looking at attempts to use fatty acids, carbohydrates, proteins and lignin (and their building blocks), as substrates in the synthesis of biorenewables using immobilised enzymes. Therefore, many examples (390 references) from the recent literature are discussed, in which we look both at the specific reactions as well as to the methods of immobilisation of the enzymes, as the latter are shown to be a crucial factor with respect to stability and reuse. The applications of the renewables produced in this way range from building blocks for the pharmaceutical and polymer industry, transport fuels, to additives for the food industry. A critical evaluation of the relevant factors that need to be improved for large-scale use of these examples is presented in the outlook of this review.

  17. Self-powered enzyme micropumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Samudra; Patra, Debabrata; Ortiz-Rivera, Isamar; Agrawal, Arjun; Shklyaev, Sergey; Dey, Krishna K.; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo; Mallouk, Thomas E.; Sen, Ayusman

    2014-05-01

    Non-mechanical nano- and microscale pumps that function without the aid of an external power source and provide precise control over the flow rate in response to specific signals are needed for the development of new autonomous nano- and microscale systems. Here we show that surface-immobilized enzymes that are independent of adenosine triphosphate function as self-powered micropumps in the presence of their respective substrates. In the four cases studied (catalase, lipase, urease and glucose oxidase), the flow is driven by a gradient in fluid density generated by the enzymatic reaction. The pumping velocity increases with increasing substrate concentration and reaction rate. These rechargeable pumps can be triggered by the presence of specific analytes, which enables the design of enzyme-based devices that act both as sensor and pump. Finally, we show proof-of-concept enzyme-powered devices that autonomously deliver small molecules and proteins in response to specific chemical stimuli, including the release of insulin in response to glucose.

  18. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Fejerskov

    Full Text Available In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol, β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose - dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  19. Electro-ultrafiltration of industrial enzyme solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Ann Dorrit; Hansen, Erik Børresen; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2007-01-01

    To reduce the problems with fouling and concentration polarization during crossflow ultrafiltration of industrial enzyme solutions an electric field is applied across the membrane. The filtration performance during electro-ultrafiltration (EUF) has been tested with several enzymes. Results show...

  20. Biochemical characterization of thermostable cellulase enzyme from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... tested for their ability to produce cellulase complex enzyme by growing on a defined substrates as well ... In the current industrial processes, cellulolytic enzymes ... energy sources such as glucose, ethanol, hydrogen and.

  1. Epigenetics of dominance for enzyme activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    dimer over a wide range of H+ concentrations accounts for the epigenetics of dominance for enzyme activity. [Trehan K S ... The present study has been carried on acid phosphatase .... enzyme activity over mid parent value (table 3, col. 13),.

  2. Castor Oil Transesterification Catalysed by Liquid Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade, Thalles; Errico, Massimiliano; Christensen, Knud Villy

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, biodiesel production by reaction of non-edible castor oil with methanol under enzymatic catalysis is investigated. Two liquid enzymes were tested: Eversa Transform and Resinase HT. Reactions were performed at 35 °C and with a molar ratio of methanol to oil of 6:1. The reaction...... time was 8 hours. Stepwise addition of methanol was necessary to avoid enzyme inhibition by methanol. In order to minimize the enzyme costs, the influence of enzyme activity loss during reuse of both enzymes was evaluated under two distinct conditions. In the former, the enzymes were recovered...... and fully reused; in the latter, a mixture of 50 % reused and 50 % fresh enzymes was tested. In the case of total reuse after three cycles, both enzymes achieved only low conversions. The biodiesel content in the oil-phase using Eversa Transform was 94.21 % for the first cycle, 68.39 % in the second, and 33...

  3. Zymography methods for visualizing hydrolytic enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Vandooren, Jennifer; Geurts, Nathalie; Martens, Erik; Van den Steen, Philippe E.; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2013-01-01

    Zymography is a technique for studying hydrolytic enzymes on the basis of substrate degradation. It is a powerful., but often misinterpreted, tool. yielding information on potential. hydrolytic activities, enzyme forms and the locations of active enzymes. In this Review, zymography techniques are compared in terms of advantages, limitations and interpretations. With in gel zymography, enzyme forms are visualized according to their molecular weights. Proteolytic activities are localized in tis...

  4. Biomedical Applications of Enzymes From Marine Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamala, K; Sivaperumal, P

    Marine microbial enzyme technologies have progressed significantly in the last few decades for different applications. Among the various microorganisms, marine actinobacterial enzymes have significant active properties, which could allow them to be biocatalysts with tremendous bioactive metabolites. Moreover, marine actinobacteria have been considered as biofactories, since their enzymes fulfill biomedical and industrial needs. In this chapter, the marine actinobacteria and their enzymes' uses in biological activities and biomedical applications are described. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Substrate-Wrapped, Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Probes for Hydrolytic Enzyme Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallmyer, Nathaniel E; Musielewicz, Joseph; Sutter, Joel; Reuel, Nigel F

    2018-04-17

    Hydrolytic enzymes are a topic of continual study and improvement due to their industrial impact and biological implications; however, the ability to measure the activity of these enzymes, especially in high-throughput assays, is limited to an established, few enzymes and often involves the measurement of secondary byproducts or the design of a complex degradation probe. Herein, a versatile single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based biosensor that is straightforward to produce and measure is described. The hydrolytic enzyme substrate is rendered as an amphiphilic polymer, which is then used to solubilize the hydrophobic nanotubes. When the target enzyme degrades the wrapping, the SWNT fluorescent signal is quenched due to increased solvent accessibility and aggregation, allowing quantitative measurement of hydrolytic enzyme activity. Using (6,5) chiral SWNT suspended with polypeptides and polysaccharides, turnover frequencies are estimated for cellulase, pectinase, and bacterial protease. Responses are recorded for concentrations as low as 5 fM using a well-characterized protease, Proteinase K. An established trypsin-based plate reader assay is used to compare this nanotube probe assay with standard techniques. Furthermore, the effect of freeze-thaw cycles and elevated temperature on enzyme activity is measured, suggesting freezing to have minimal impact even after 10 cycles and heating to be detrimental above 60 °C. Finally, rapid optimization of enzyme operating conditions is demonstrated by generating a response surface of cellulase activity with respect to temperature and pH to determine optimal conditions within 2 h of serial scans.

  6. Mathematical modelling of enzyme synthesis during fermentations: the Q-functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, H K; Martiny, S C

    1981-01-01

    In modeling enzyme synthesis, the Q-function has been generalized to describe ordinary induction and repression as well as mixed induction-repression. The practical use of the Q-function as found in the literature was considered, especially the implications of applying fractional exponents.

  7. Cellulolytic enzyme compositions and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Prashant; Gaspar, Armindo Ribiero; Croonenberghs, James; Binder, Thomas P.

    2017-07-25

    The present invention relates enzyme composition comprising a cellulolytic preparation and an acetylxylan esterase (AXE); and the used of cellulolytic enzyme compositions for hydrolyzing acetylated cellulosic material. Finally the invention also relates to processes of producing fermentation products from acetylated cellulosic materials using a cellulolytic enzyme composition of the invention.

  8. Immobilization of Enzymes in Polymer Supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Hugh D.; Walt, David R.

    1986-01-01

    Two experiments in which an enzyme is immobilized onto a polymeric support are described. The experiments (which also demonstrate two different polymer preparations) involve: (1) entrapping an enzyme in an acrylamide polymer; and (2) reacting the amino groups on the enzyme's (esterase) lysine residues with an activated polymer. (JN)

  9. Purification and characterization of extracellular amylolytic enzyme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study, the amylase enzyme producing potential of four different Aspergillus species was analyzed. The extracted amylase enzyme was purified by diethyl amino ethyl (DEAE) cellulose and Sephadex G-50 column chromatography and the enzyme activity was measured by using synthetic substrate starch.

  10. Activation of interfacial enzymes at membrane surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Halperin, Avi

    2006-01-01

    A host of water-soluble enzymes are active at membrane surfaces and in association with membranes. Some of these enzymes are involved in signalling and in modification and remodelling of the membranes. A special class of enzymes, the phospholipases, and in particular secretory phospholipase A2 (s...

  11. PROCESS FOR DUST-FREE ENZYME MANUFACTURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andela, C.; Feijen, Jan; Dillissen, Marc

    1994-01-01

    New enzyme granules are provided with improved properties. The granules are based on core particles having a good pore size and pore size distribution to allow an enzyme solution to enter into the particle. Accordingly, the core material comprises the enzyme in liquid form, thus eliminating the

  12. Enzyme structure and interaction with inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    This article reviews some of the results of studies on the 13 C-labeled enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are used in combination with isotopic labeling to learn about the structure and dynamics of this enzyme. 13 C-labeling is used for the purpose of studying enzyme/substrate and enzyme/inhibitor interactions. A second set of studies with DHFR was designed to investigate the basis for the high affinity between the inhibitor methotrexate and DHFR. The label was placed on the inhibitor, rather than the enzyme

  13. Applications of Microbial Enzymes in Food Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Parameswaran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of enzymes or microorganisms in food preparations is an age-old process. With the advancement of technology, novel enzymes with wide range of applications and specificity have been developed and new application areas are still being explored. Microorganisms such as bacteria, yeast and fungi and their enzymes are widely used in several food preparations for improving the taste and texture and they offer huge economic benefits to industries. Microbial enzymes are the preferred source to plants or animals due to several advantages such as easy, cost-effective and consistent production. The present review discusses the recent advancement in enzyme technology for food industries. A comprehensive list of enzymes used in food processing, the microbial source of these enzymes and the wide range of their application are discussed.

  14. DNA-Based Enzyme Reactors and Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veikko Linko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, the possibility to create custom biocompatible nanoshapes using DNA as a building material has rapidly emerged. Further, these rationally designed DNA structures could be exploited in positioning pivotal molecules, such as enzymes, with nanometer-level precision. This feature could be used in the fabrication of artificial biochemical machinery that is able to mimic the complex reactions found in living cells. Currently, DNA-enzyme hybrids can be used to control (multi-enzyme cascade reactions and to regulate the enzyme functions and the reaction pathways. Moreover, sophisticated DNA structures can be utilized in encapsulating active enzymes and delivering the molecular cargo into cells. In this review, we focus on the latest enzyme systems based on novel DNA nanostructures: enzyme reactors, regulatory devices and carriers that can find uses in various biotechnological and nanomedical applications.

  15. Perspectives on electrostatics and conformational motions in enzyme catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanoian, Philip; Liu, C Tony; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Benkovic, Stephen

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Enzymes are essential for all living organisms, and their effectiveness as chemical catalysts has driven more than a half century of research seeking to understand the enormous rate enhancements they provide. Nevertheless, a complete understanding of the factors that govern the rate enhancements and selectivities of enzymes remains elusive, due to the extraordinary complexity and cooperativity that are the hallmarks of these biomolecules. We have used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, pre-steady-state kinetics, X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), vibrational and fluorescence spectroscopies, resonance energy transfer, and computer simulations to study the implications of conformational motions and electrostatic interactions on enzyme catalysis in the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). We have demonstrated that modest equilibrium conformational changes are functionally related to the hydride transfer reaction. Results obtained for mutant DHFRs illustrated that reductions in hydride transfer rates are correlated with altered conformational motions, and analysis of the evolutionary history of DHFR indicated that mutations appear to have occurred to preserve both the hydride transfer rate and the associated conformational changes. More recent results suggested that differences in local electrostatic environments contribute to finely tuning the substrate pKa in the initial protonation step. Using a combination of primary and solvent kinetic isotope effects, we demonstrated that the reaction mechanism is consistent across a broad pH range, and computer simulations suggested that deprotonation of the active site Tyr100 may play a crucial role in substrate protonation at high pH. Site-specific incorporation of vibrational thiocyanate probes into the ecDHFR active site provided an experimental tool for interrogating these microenvironments and for investigating changes in electrostatics along the DHFR catalytic cycle

  16. Contribution of attendant anions on cadmium toxicity to soil enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Haixia; Kong, Long; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; He, Wenxiang

    2017-11-01

    Sorption and desorption are critical processes to control the mobility and biotoxicity of cadmium (Cd) in soils. It is known that attendant anion species of heavy metals could affect metal adsorption on soils and might further alter their biotoxicity. However, for Cd, the influence of attendant anions on its sorption in soils and subsequent toxicity on soil enzymes are still unknown. In this work, four Cd compounds with different salt anions (SO 4 2- , NO 3 - , Cl - , and Ac - ) were selected to investigate their impact of on the sorption, soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP). Thus, a series of simulated Cd pollution batch experiments including measuring adsorption-desorption behavior of Cd on soils and soil enzyme activities were carried out. Results showed that CdSO 4 exhibited highest sorption capacity among the tested soils except in Hunan soil. The Cd sorption with NO 3 - displayed a similar behavior with Cl - on all tested soils. Compared with soil properties, all four kinds of anions on Cd sorption played a more significant role affecting Cd ecological toxicity to soil DHA and ALP. Cd in acetate or nitrate form appears more sensitive towards DHA than sulphate and chloride, while the later pair is more toxic towards ALP than the former. These results have important implications for evaluation of Cd contamination using soil enzyme as bioindicator. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ethanologenic Enzymes of Zymomonas mobilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, Lonnie O' Neal

    1999-03-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a unique microorganism in being both obligately fermentative and utilizing a Entner-Doudoroff pathway for glycolysis. Glycolytic flux in this organism is readily measured as evolved carbon dioxide, ethanol, or glucose consumed and exceeds 1 {micro}mole glucose/min per mg cell protein. To support this rapid glycolysis, approximately 50% of cytoplasmic protein is devoted to the 13 glycolytic and fermentative enzymes which constitute this central catabolic pathway. Only 1 ATP (net) is produced from each glucose metabolized. During the past grant period, we have completed the characterization of 11 of the 13 glycolytic genes from Z. mobilis together with complementary but separate DOE-fimded research by a former post-dot and collaborator, Dr. Tyrrell Conway. Research funded in my lab by DOE, Division of Energy Biosciences can be divided into three sections: A. Fundamental studies; B. Applied studies and utility; and C. Miscellaneous investigations.

  18. Prediction of Wild-type Enzyme Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz-Hansen, Henrik Marcus

    of biotechnology, including enzyme discovery and characterization. This work presents two articles on sequence-based discovery and functional annotation of enzymes in environmental samples, and two articles on analysis and prediction of enzyme thermostability and cofactor requirements. The first article presents...... a sequence-based approach to discovery of proteolytic enzymes in metagenomes obtained from the Polar oceans. We show that microorganisms living in these extreme environments of constant low temperature harbour genes encoding novel proteolytic enzymes with potential industrial relevance. The second article...... presents a web server for the processing and annotation of functional metagenomics sequencing data, tailored to meet the requirements of non-bioinformaticians. The third article presents analyses of the molecular determinants of enzyme thermostability, and a feature-based prediction method of the melting...

  19. Toward mechanistic classification of enzyme functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonacid, Daniel E; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2011-06-01

    Classification of enzyme function should be quantitative, computationally accessible, and informed by sequences and structures to enable use of genomic information for functional inference and other applications. Large-scale studies have established that divergently evolved enzymes share conserved elements of structure and common mechanistic steps and that convergently evolved enzymes often converge to similar mechanisms too, suggesting that reaction mechanisms could be used to develop finer-grained functional descriptions than provided by the Enzyme Commission (EC) system currently in use. Here we describe how evolution informs these structure-function mappings and review the databases that store mechanisms of enzyme reactions along with recent developments to measure ligand and mechanistic similarities. Together, these provide a foundation for new classifications of enzyme function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. How Do Enzymes 'Meet' Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Zeng, Guangming; Xu, Piao; Lai, Cui; Tang, Lin

    2017-11-01

    Enzymes are fundamental biological catalysts responsible for biological regulation and metabolism. The opportunity for enzymes to 'meet' nanoparticles and nanomaterials is rapidly increasing due to growing demands for applications in nanomaterial design, environmental monitoring, biochemical engineering, and biomedicine. Therefore, understanding the nature of nanomaterial-enzyme interactions is becoming important. Since 2014, enzymes have been used to modify, degrade, or make nanoparticles/nanomaterials, while numerous nanoparticles/nanomaterials have been used as materials for enzymatic immobilization and biosensors and as enzyme mimicry. Among the various nanoparticles and nanomaterials, metal nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials have received extensive attention due to their fascinating properties. This review provides an overview about how enzymes meet nanoparticles and nanomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Production of Enzymes from Marine Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X Q; Xu, X N; Chen, L Y

    Marine actinobacteria are well recognized for their capabilities to produce valuable natural products, which have great potential for applications in medical, agricultural, and fine chemical industries. In addition to producing unique enzymes responsible for biosynthesis of natural products, many marine actinobacteria also produce hydrolytic enzymes which are able to degrade various biopolymers, such as cellulose, xylan, and chitin. These enzymes are important to produce biofuels and biochemicals of interest from renewable biomass. In this chapter, the recent reports of novel enzymes produced by marine actinobacteria are reviewed, and advanced technologies that can be applied to search for novel marine enzymes as well as for improved enzyme production by marine actinobacteria are summarized, which include ribosome engineering, genome mining, as well as synthetic biology studies. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of pressure tuning of enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naghshineh, Mahsa

    and high energy consumption. Therefore, searching for an environmentally friendly method of pectin extraction is a task for science and industry. Employment of hydrolytic enzymes may represent a green approach to obtain intact pectin polymer. However, the low stability/activity of enzymes, and low polymer...... yield of enzymatic extraction limits the application of enzyme in pectin production. There is evidence that emerging technology of high hydrostatic pressure processing can result in stabilization and activation of some enzymes. Therefore, the use of high hydrostatic pressure in combination with enzyme...... (cellulase/xylanase: 50/0, 50/25, 50/50, 25/50, and 0/50 U/g lime peel) at ambient pressure, 100 and 200 MPa were used to extract pectin from dried lime peel waste. It was found that pressure level, type and concentration of enzyme significantly influenced pectin yield and degree of esterification (DE...

  3. Enzyme Enzyme activities in relation to sugar accumulation in tomato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, M.J.; Rahman, M.H.; Mamun, M.A.; Islam, K.

    2006-01-01

    Enzyme activities in tomato juice of five different varieties viz. Ratan, Marglove, BARI-1, BARI-5 and BARI-6, in relation to sugar accumulation were investigated at different maturity stages. The highest amount of invertase and beta-galactosidase was found in Marglove and the lowest in BARI- 6 at all maturity stages. Total soluble sugar and sucrose contents were highest in BARI-1 and lowest in BARI-6. The activity of amylase was maximum in Ratan and minimum in Marglove. Protease activity was highest in Ratan and lowest in BARI-6. BARI-1 contained the highest cellulase activity and the lowest in BARI-5. The amount of total soluble sugar and sucrose increased moderately from premature to ripe stage. The activities of amylase and cellulase increased up to the mature stage and then decreased drastically in the ripe stage. The activities of invertase and protease increased sharply from the premature to the ripe stage while the beta-galactosidase activity decreased remarkably. No detectable amount of reducing sugar was present in the premature stage in all cultivars of tomato but increased thereafter upto the ripe stage. The highest reducing sugar was present in BARI-5 in all of the maturity stages. (author)

  4. ENZYME RESISTANCE OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED STARCH POTATOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sh. Mannapova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here in this article the justification of expediency of enzyme resistant starch use in therapeutic food products is presented . Enzyme resistant starch is capable to resist to enzymatic hydrolysis in a small intestine of a person, has a low glycemic index, leads to decrease of postprandial concentration of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides in blood and insulin reaction, to improvement of sensitivity of all organism to insulin, to increase in sense of fulness and to reduction of adjournment of fats. Resistant starch makes bifidogenшс impact on microflora of a intestine of the person, leads to increase of a quantity of lactobacillus and bifidobacterium and to increased production of butyric acid in a large intestine. In this regard the enzyme resistant starch is an important component in food for prevention and curing of human diseases such as diabetes, obesity, colitis, a cancer of large and direct intestine. One method is specified by authors for imitation of starch digestion in a human body. This method is based on the definition of an enzyme resistance of starch in vitro by its hydrolysis to glucose with application of a glucoamylase and digestive enzyme preparation Pancreatin. This method is used in researches of an enzyme resistance of starch, of genetically modified potato, high amylose corn starch Hi-Maize 1043 and HYLON VII (National Starch Food Innovation, USA, amylopectin and amylose. It is shown that the enzyme resistance of the starch emitted from genetically modified potatoes conforms to the enzyme resistance of the high amylose corn starch “Hi-Maize 1043 and HYLON VII starch”, (National Starch Food Innovation, the USA relating to the II type of enzyme resistant starch. It is established that amylopectin doesn't have the enzyme resistant properties. The results of researches are presented. They allow us to make the following conclusion: amylose in comparison with amylopectin possesses higher enzyme resistance and gives to

  5. Functional characterization of genetic enzyme variations in human lipoxygenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Horn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian lipoxygenases play a role in normal cell development and differentiation but they have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular, hyperproliferative and neurodegenerative diseases. As lipid peroxidizing enzymes they are involved in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis since they produce lipid hydroperoxides, which serve as an efficient source for free radicals. There are various epidemiological correlation studies relating naturally occurring variations in the six human lipoxygenase genes (SNPs or rare mutations to the frequency for various diseases in these individuals, but for most of the described variations no functional data are available. Employing a combined bioinformatical and enzymological strategy, which included structural modeling and experimental site-directed mutagenesis, we systematically explored the structural and functional consequences of non-synonymous genetic variations in four different human lipoxygenase genes (ALOX5, ALOX12, ALOX15, and ALOX15B that have been identified in the human 1000 genome project. Due to a lack of a functional expression system we resigned to analyze the functionality of genetic variations in the hALOX12B and hALOXE3 gene. We found that most of the frequent non-synonymous coding SNPs are located at the enzyme surface and hardly alter the enzyme functionality. In contrast, genetic variations which affect functional important amino acid residues or lead to truncated enzyme variations (nonsense mutations are usually rare with a global allele frequency<0.1%. This data suggest that there appears to be an evolutionary pressure on the coding regions of the lipoxygenase genes preventing the accumulation of loss-of-function variations in the human population.

  6. [Advances on enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Feng-Hua; Ye, Jian-Qing; Chen, Zuan-Guang; Cheng, Zhi-Yi

    2010-06-01

    With the continuous development in microfluidic fabrication technology, microfluidic analysis has evolved from a concept to one of research frontiers in last twenty years. The research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors based on microfluidic devices has also made great progress. Microfluidic technology improved greatly the analytical performance of the research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors by reducing the consumption of reagents, decreasing the analysis time, and developing automation. This review focuses on the development and classification of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices.

  7. Zymography methods for visualizing hydrolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandooren, Jennifer; Geurts, Nathalie; Martens, Erik; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2013-03-01

    Zymography is a technique for studying hydrolytic enzymes on the basis of substrate degradation. It is a powerful, but often misinterpreted, tool yielding information on potential hydrolytic activities, enzyme forms and the locations of active enzymes. In this Review, zymography techniques are compared in terms of advantages, limitations and interpretations. With in gel zymography, enzyme forms are visualized according to their molecular weights. Proteolytic activities are localized in tissue sections with in situ zymography. In vivo zymography can pinpoint proteolytic activity to sites in an intact organism. Future development of novel substrate probes and improvement in detection and imaging methods will increase the applicability of zymography for (reverse) degradomics studies.

  8. Detoxification enzymes activities in deltamethrin and bendiocarb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detoxification enzymes activities in deltamethrin and bendiocarb resistant and susceptible malarial vectors ( Anopheles gambiae ) breeding in Bichi agricultural and residential sites, Kano state, Nigeria.

  9. Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme: purification and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snapka, R.M.; Sutherland, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    Researchers have purified large quantities of Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme to apparent homogeneity and have studied its physical and chemical properties. The enzyme has a molecular weight of 36,800 and a S/sub 20,w/ 0 of 3.72 S. Amino acid analysis revealed an apparent absence of tryptophan, a low content of aromatic residues, and the presence of no unusual amino acids. The N terminus is arginine. The purified enzyme contained up to 13% carbohydrate by weight. The carbohydrate was composed of mannose, galactose, glucose, and N-acetylglucosamine. The enzyme is also associated with RNA containing uracil, adenine, guanine, and cytosine with no unusual bases detected

  10. Thermometric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay: TELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiasson, B; Borrebaeck, C; Sanfridson, B; Mosbach, K

    1977-08-11

    A new method, thermometric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (TELISA), for the assay of endogenous and exogenous compounds in biological fluids is described. It is based on the previously described enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technique, ELISA, but utilizes enzymic heat formation which is measured in an enzyme thermistor unit. In the model system studied determination of human serum albumin down to a concentration of 10(-10) M (5 ng/ml) was achieved, with both normal and catalase labelled human serum albumin competing for the binding sites on the immunosorbent, which was rabbit antihuman serum albumin immobilized onto Sepharose CL-4B.

  11. The mechanisms of Excited states in enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Frederic Nicolas Rønne; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Enzyme catalysis is studied on the basis of excited state processes, which are of electronic, vibrational and thermal nature. The ways of achieving the excited state, such as photo-absorption and ligand binding, are discussed and exemplified by various cases of enzymes.......Enzyme catalysis is studied on the basis of excited state processes, which are of electronic, vibrational and thermal nature. The ways of achieving the excited state, such as photo-absorption and ligand binding, are discussed and exemplified by various cases of enzymes....

  12. Spectroscopic studies of copper enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, D.M.; Moog, R.; Zumft, W.; Koenig, S.H.; Scott, R.A.; Cote, C.E.; McGuirl, M.

    1986-01-01

    Several spectroscopic methods, including absorption, circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), X-ray absorption, resonance Raman, EPR, NMR, and quasi-elastic light-scattering spectroscopy, have been used to probe the structures of copper-containing amine oxidases, nitrite reductase, and nitrous oxide reductase. The basic goals are to determine the copper site structure, electronic properties, and to generate structure-reactivity correlations. Collectively, the results on the amine oxidases permit a detailed model for the Cu(II) sites in these enzymes to be constructed that, in turn, rationalizes the ligand-binding chemistry. Resonance Raman spectra of the phenylhydrazine and 2,4-dinitrophenyl-hydrazine derivatives of bovine plasma amine oxidase and models for its organic cofactor, e.g. pyridoxal, methoxatin, are most consistent with methoxatin being the intrinsic cofactor. The structure of the Cu(I) forms of the amine oxidases have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS); the copper coordination geometry is significantly different in the oxidized and reduced forms. Some anomalous properties of the amine oxidases in solution are explicable in terms of their reversible aggregation, which the authors have characterized via light scattering. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases display several novel spectral properties. The data suggest that new types of copper sites are present

  13. Variation in pH optima of hydrolytic enzyme activities in tropical rain forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Benjamin L

    2010-10-01

    Extracellular enzymes synthesized by soil microbes play a central role in the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in the environment. The pH optima of eight hydrolytic enzymes involved in the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur, were assessed in a series of tropical forest soils of contrasting pH values from the Republic of Panama. Assays were conducted using 4-methylumbelliferone-linked fluorogenic substrates in modified universal buffer. Optimum pH values differed markedly among enzymes and soils. Enzymes were grouped into three classes based on their pH optima: (i) enzymes with acidic pH optima that were consistent among soils (cellobiohydrolase, β-xylanase, and arylsulfatase), (ii) enzymes with acidic pH optima that varied systematically with soil pH, with the most acidic pH optima in the most acidic soils (α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase, and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase), and (iii) enzymes with an optimum pH in either the acid range or the alkaline range depending on soil pH (phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase). The optimum pH values of phosphomonoesterase were consistent among soils, being 4 to 5 for acid phosphomonoesterase and 10 to 11 for alkaline phosphomonoesterase. In contrast, the optimum pH for phosphodiesterase activity varied systematically with soil pH, with the most acidic pH optima (3.0) in the most acidic soils and the most alkaline pH optima (pH 10) in near-neutral soils. Arylsulfatase activity had a very acidic optimum pH in all soils (pH ≤3.0) irrespective of soil pH. The differences in pH optima may be linked to the origins of the enzymes and/or the degree of stabilization on solid surfaces. The results have important implications for the interpretation of hydrolytic enzyme assays using fluorogenic substrates.

  14. Direct Electron Transfer of Enzymes in a Biologically Assembled Conductive Nanomesh Enzyme Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Ki-Young; Song, Yong-Won; Choi, Won Kook; Chang, Joonyeon; Yi, Hyunjung

    2016-02-24

    Nondestructive assembly of a nanostructured enzyme platform is developed in combination of the specific biomolecular attraction and electrostatic coupling for highly efficient direct electron transfer (DET) of enzymes with unprecedented applicability and versatility. The biologically assembled conductive nanomesh enzyme platform enables DET-based flexible integrated biosensors and DET of eight different enzyme with various catalytic activities. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Enzyme Activity Experiments Using a Simple Spectrophotometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbut, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Experimental procedures for studying enzyme activity using a Spectronic 20 spectrophotometer are described. The experiments demonstrate the effect of pH, temperature, and inhibitors on enzyme activity and allow the determination of Km, Vmax, and Kcat. These procedures are designed for teaching large lower-level biochemistry classes. (MR)

  16. The use of enzymes for beer brewing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van Laura H.G.; Mostert, Joost; Zisopoulos, Filippos K.; Boom, Remko M.; Goot, van der Atze Jan

    2016-01-01

    The exergetic performance of beer produced by the conventional malting and brewing process is compared with that of beer produced using an enzyme-assisted process. The aim is to estimate if the use of an exogenous enzyme formulation reduces the environmental impact of the overall brewing process.

  17. Lignocellulose biotechnology: issues of bioconversion and enzyme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lignocellulose biotechnology: issues of bioconversion and enzyme production. ... and secondly to highlight some of the modern approaches which potentially could be used to tackle one of the major impediments, namely high enzyme cost, to speed-up the extensive commercialisation of the lignocellulose bioprocessing.

  18. Illustrating Enzyme Inhibition Using Gibbs Energy Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearne, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Gibbs energy profiles have great utility as teaching and learning tools because they present students with a visual representation of the energy changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. Unfortunately, most textbooks divorce discussions of traditional kinetic topics, such as enzyme inhibition, from discussions of these same topics in terms of…

  19. Enzyme Catalysis and the Gibbs Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Addison

    2009-01-01

    Gibbs-energy profiles are often introduced during the first semester of organic chemistry, but are less often presented in connection with enzyme-catalyzed reactions. In this article I show how the Gibbs-energy profile corresponds to the characteristic kinetics of a simple enzyme-catalyzed reaction. (Contains 1 figure and 1 note.)

  20. Enzyme Engineering for In Situ Immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Fabian B H; Chen, Shuxiong; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2016-10-14

    Enzymes are used as biocatalysts in a vast range of industrial applications. Immobilization of enzymes to solid supports or their self-assembly into insoluble particles enhances their applicability by strongly improving properties such as stability in changing environments, re-usability and applicability in continuous biocatalytic processes. The possibility of co-immobilizing various functionally related enzymes involved in multistep synthesis, conversion or degradation reactions enables the design of multifunctional biocatalyst with enhanced performance compared to their soluble counterparts. This review provides a brief overview of up-to-date in vitro immobilization strategies while focusing on recent advances in enzyme engineering towards in situ self-assembly into insoluble particles. In situ self-assembly approaches include the bioengineering of bacteria to abundantly form enzymatically active inclusion bodies such as enzyme inclusions or enzyme-coated polyhydroxyalkanoate granules. These one-step production strategies for immobilized enzymes avoid prefabrication of the carrier as well as chemical cross-linking or attachment to a support material while the controlled oriented display strongly enhances the fraction of accessible catalytic sites and hence functional enzymes.

  1. Utilization of enzyme supplemented Telfairia occidentalis stalk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An eight (8) week feeding trial was carried out to assess the use of enzyme natuzyme supplemented Telfairia occidentalis stalk extract as growth inducer in the practical diet for Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings. Five isonitrogenous (35% crude protein) diets at 0 ml of stalk extract and enzyme (TRT 1), 15 ml (TRT 2) and 30 ...

  2. Bacterial Enzymes and Antibiotic Resistance- Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Lauren [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β-lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes.

  3. Application of radiopolymerization for immobilization of enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higa, O.Z.; Mastro, N.L. del; Castagnet, A.C.G.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrophilic glass-forming monomers were used in an application of irradiation technology for the immobilization of cellulase and cellobiase. Experiments to observe the effect of additives such as silicates and polyethylene glycol in the enzyme entrapment are reported on. In all cases, enzymatic activity was maintained for more than fifteen batch enzyme reactions. (Author) [pt

  4. Enzyme-Catalyzed Transetherification of Alkoxysilanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter G. Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first evidence of an enzyme-catalyzed transetherification of model alkoxysilanes. During an extensive enzymatic screening in the search for new biocatalysts for silicon-oxygen bond formation, we found that certain enzymes promoted the transetherification of alkoxysilanes when tert-butanol or 1-octanol were used as the reaction solvents.

  5. Enzymes from Higher Eukaryotes for Industrial Biocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The industrial production of fine chemicals, feed and food ingredients, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and their respective intermediates relies on an increasing application of biocatalysis, i.e. on enzyme or whole-cell catalyzed conversions of molecules. Simple procedures for discovery, cloning and over-expression as well as fast growth favour fungi, yeasts and especially bacteria as sources of biocatalysts. Higher eukaryotes also harbour an almost unlimited number of potential biocatalysts, although to date the limited supply of enzymes, the high heterogeneity of enzyme preparations and the hazard of infectious contaminants keep some interesting candidates out of reach for industrial bioprocesses. In the past only a few animal and plant enzymes from agricultural waste materials were employed in food processing. The use of bacterial expression strains or non-conventional yeasts for the heterologous production of efficient eukaryotic enzymes can overcome the bottleneck in enzyme supply and provide sufficient amounts of homogenous enzyme preparations for reliable and economically feasible applications at large scale. Ideal enzymatic processes represent an environmentally friendly, »near-to-completion« conversion of (mostly non-natural substrates to pure products. Recent developments demonstrate the commercial feasibility of large-scale biocatalytic processes employing enzymes from higher eukaryotes (e.g. plants, animals and also their usefulness in some small-scale industrial applications.

  6. Biocatalytic material comprising multilayer enzyme coated fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

    2009-11-03

    The present invention relates generally to high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials and processes for using the same. The materials comprise enzyme aggregate coatings having high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environment. These new materials provide a new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

  7. 21 CFR 864.4400 - Enzyme preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enzyme preparations. 864.4400 Section 864.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Specimen Preparation Reagents § 864.4400 Enzyme...

  8. Loop 7 of E2 enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papaleo, Elena; Casiraghi, Nicola; Arrigoni, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin (Ub) system controls almost every aspect of eukaryotic cell biology. Protein ubiquitination depends on the sequential action of three classes of enzymes (E1, E2 and E3). E2 Ub-conjugating enzymes have a central role in the ubiquitination pathway, interacting with both E1 and E3...

  9. Enzyme adsorption at solid-liquid interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duinhoven, S.

    1992-01-01

    Enzymes are proteins with the capacity of catalysing various reactions. Nowadays two types of enzymes, proteases and lipases, are available for use in detergent formulations for household and industrial laundry washing. Proteases are capable of catalysing the hydrolysis of proteins while

  10. [Potentialization of antibiotics by lytic enzymes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisou, J; Babin, P; Babin, R

    1975-01-01

    Few lytic enzymes, specially papaine and lysozyme, acting on the membrane and cell wall structures facilitate effects of bacitracine, streptomycine and other antibiotics. Streptomycino resistant strains became sensibles to this antibiotic after contact with papaine and lysozyme. The results of tests in physiological suspensions concern only the lytic activity of enzymes. The results on nutrient medium concern together lytic, and antibiotic activities.

  11. Enzyme activity assay of glycoprotein enzymes based on a boronate affinity molecularly imprinted 96-well microplate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhen

    2014-12-16

    Enzyme activity assay is an important method in clinical diagnostics. However, conventional enzyme activity assay suffers from apparent interference from the sample matrix. Herein, we present a new format of enzyme activity assay that can effectively eliminate the effects of the sample matrix. The key is a 96-well microplate modified with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared according to a newly proposed method called boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a glycoprotein enzyme that has been routinely used as an indicator for several diseases in clinical tests, was taken as a representative target enzyme. The prepared MIP exhibited strong affinity toward the template enzyme (with a dissociation constant of 10(-10) M) as well as superb tolerance for interference. Thus, the enzyme molecules in a complicated sample matrix could be specifically captured and cleaned up for enzyme activity assay, which eliminated the interference from the sample matrix. On the other hand, because the boronate affinity MIP could well retain the enzymatic activity of glycoprotein enzymes, the enzyme captured by the MIP was directly used for activity assay. Thus, additional assay time and possible enzyme or activity loss due to an enzyme release step required by other methods were avoided. Assay of ALP in human serum was successfully demonstrated, suggesting a promising prospect of the proposed method in real-world applications.

  12. Characterisation of recombinant human fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase: implications for Sjögren-Larsson syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lloyd, Matthew D.; Boardman, Kieren D. E.; Smith, Andrew; van den Brink, Daan M.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Threadgill, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH) is an NAD+-dependent oxidoreductase involved in the metabolism of fatty alcohols. Enzyme activity has been implicated in the pathology of diabetes and cancer. Mutations in the human gene inactivate the enzyme and cause accumulation of fatty alcohols in

  13. Enzymic oxidation of carbon monoxide. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, T

    1959-01-01

    An enzyme which catalyzes the oxidation of carbon monoxide into carbon dioxide was obtained in a cell free state from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. The enzyme activity was assayed manometrically by measuring the rate of gas uptake under the atmosphere of carbon monoxide in the presence of benzyl-viologen as an oxidant. The optimum pH range was 7 to 8. The activity was slightly suppressed by illumination. The enzyme was more stable than hydrogenase or formate dehydrogenase against the heat treatment, suggesting that it is a different entity from these enzymes. In the absence of an added oxidant, the enzyme preparation produced hydrogen gas under the atmosphere of carbon monoxide. The phenomenon can be explained assuming the reductive decomposition of water. 17 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Enzymes - important players in green chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Tarczykowska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry has become a worldwide approach that leads to sustainable growth through application and development of its principles. A lot of work has to be put into designing new processes comprising of materials which do not emit pollutants to the atmosphere. Inventing new safer methods and finding less harmful products can be challenging. Enzymes are a great hope of scientists in the field of green chemistry. Enzymes as catalysts require mild conditions therefore it is a great way of saving resources such as energy or water. Processes with the use of enzymes have become more feasible by being more cost effective and eco friendly. Taking into account the benefits of green chemistry, enzyme biocatalysis has quickly replaced traditional chemical processes in several fields, and this substitution is going to reach even more areas because of new emerging technologies in enzyme engineering.

  15. Practical steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are key components of most biological processes. Characterization of enzymes is therefore frequently required during the study of biological systems. Steady-state kinetics provides a simple and rapid means of assessing the substrate specificity of an enzyme. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis (see Site-Directed Mutagenesis), it can be used to probe the roles of particular amino acids in the enzyme in substrate recognition and catalysis. Effects of interaction partners and posttranslational modifications can also be assessed using steady-state kinetics. This overview explains the general principles of steady-state enzyme kinetics experiments in a practical, rather than theoretical, way. Any biochemistry textbook will have a section on the theory of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, including derivations of the relevant equations. No specific enzymatic assay is described here, although a method for monitoring product formation or substrate consumption over time (an assay) is required to perform the experiments described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of thermostable enzymes for bioethanol processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Pernille Anastasia

    of fermentable sugars (glucose) as cellulose is tightly linked to hemicellulose and lignin. Lignocellulose is disrupted during pretreatment, but to degrade cellulose to single sugars, lignocellulolytic enzymes such as cellulases and hemicellulases are needed. Lignocellulolytic enzymes are costly...... for the ioethanol production, but the expenses can be reduced by using thermostable enzymes, which are known for their increased stability and inhibitor olerance. However, the advantage of using thermostable enzymes has not been studied thoroughly and more knowledge is needed for development of bioethanol processes....... Enzymes are added to the bioethanol process after pretreatment. For an efficient sugar and ethanol yield, the solids content of biomass is normally increased, which results in highly viscous slurries that are difficult to mix. Therefore, the first enzymatic challenge is to ensure rapid reduction...

  17. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Application of Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khusainova, Alsu

    Enzymes have recently been reported as effective enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agents. Both laboratory and field tests demonstrated significant increase in the ultimate oil production. Up to16% of additional oil was produced in the laboratory conditions and up to 269 barrels of additional oil per day...... were recovered in the field applications. The following mechanisms were claimed to be responsible for the enhancement of the oil production due to enzymes: wettability improvement of the rock surface; formation of the emulsions; reduction of oil viscosity; and removal of high molecular weight paraffins....... However, the positive effect of enzymes on oil recovery is not that obvious. In most of the studies commercial enzyme products composed of enzymes, surfactants and stabilisers were used. Application of such samples makes it difficult to assign a positive EOR effect to a certain compound, as several...

  18. Fungal enzymes in the attine ant symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Schiøtt, Morten; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    the more basal attine genera use substrates such as flowers, plant debris, small twigs, insect feces and insect carcasses. This diverse array of fungal substrates across the attine lineage implies that the symbiotic fungus needs different enzymes to break down the plant material that the ants provide...... or different efficiencies of enzyme function. Fungal enzymes that degrade plant cell walls may have functionally co-evolved with the ants in this scenario. We explore this hypothesis with direct measurements of enzyme activity in fungus gardens in 12 species across 8 genera spanning the entire phylogeny...... and diversity of life-styles within the attine clade. We find significant differences in enzyme activity between different genera and life-styles of the ants. How these findings relate to attine ant coevolution and crop optimization are discussed....

  19. Production of cellulolytic enzymes from ascomycetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gustav Hammerich; Lübeck, Mette; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing production of cellulose degrading enzymes is of great interest in order to increase the feasibility of constructing biorefinery facilities for a sustainable supply of energy and chemical products. The ascomycete phylum has a large potential for the production of cellulolytic enzymes....... Although numerous enzymatic profiles have already been unraveled, the research has been covering only a limited number of species and genera, thus leaving many ascomycetes to be analyzed. Such analysis requires choosing appropriate media and cultivation methods that ensure enzyme profiles with high...... specificities and activities. However, the choice of media, cultivation methods and enzyme assays highly affect the enzyme activity profile observed. This review provides an overview of enzymatic profiles for several ascomycetes covering phylogenetically distinct genera and species. The profiles of cellulose...

  20. Enzymes of industrial purpose - review of the market of enzyme preparations and prospects for its development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Tolkacheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial enzyme preparations are increasingly replacing conventional chemical catalysts in a number of industrial processes. Such drugs, in addition to environmental friendliness and high activity, have a number of advantages over enzyme preparations of vegetable and animal origin, namely: the production of microbial enzymes in bioreactors is easily controlled and predictable; excreted microbiological enzymes are more stable than intracellular animals and plant enzymes; the genetic diversity of microorganisms makes it possible to produce enzyme preparations with a wide range of specificity; microbiological enzymes can be synthesized year-round, in contrast to the production of plant enzymes, which is often seasonal. The leaders of the world market of enzymes are proteases and amylases, which account for 25% and 15%, respectively. Over the past five years, the world market for carbohydrases, including mainly amylases, cellulases and xylanases, has been the fastest growing segment of the enzyme market with an aggregate annual growth rate of more than 7.0%. Another major product of the industrial enzyme market, which has a great potential for growth, is lipases. From the point of view of designation, the main part is represented by food and food enzymes. The Russian market continues to be unsaturated - the current supply is not able to meet the needs of the Russian feed and food industry in enzyme preparations. Enzyme preparations of domestic producers are in demand in forage production, while food industrial enterprises prefer imported products. The most significant enterprises in the enzymatic industry in Russia at the moment are Sibbiofarm, AgroSistema, Agroferment. In the light of the Russian policy of increasing food security, the development of the domestic enzyme industry is an extremely topical task.

  1. Expanding the Halohydrin Dehalogenase Enzyme Family: Identification of Novel Enzymes by Database Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallmey, Marcus; Koopmeiners, Julia; Wells, Elizabeth; Wardenga, Rainer; Schallmey, Anett

    2014-12-01

    Halohydrin dehalogenases are very rare enzymes that are naturally involved in the mineralization of halogenated xenobiotics. Due to their catalytic potential and promiscuity, many biocatalytic reactions have been described that have led to several interesting and industrially important applications. Nevertheless, only a few of these enzymes have been made available through recombinant techniques; hence, it is of general interest to expand the repertoire of these enzymes so as to enable novel biocatalytic applications. After the identification of specific sequence motifs, 37 novel enzyme sequences were readily identified in public sequence databases. All enzymes that could be heterologously expressed also catalyzed typical halohydrin dehalogenase reactions. Phylogenetic inference for enzymes of the halohydrin dehalogenase enzyme family confirmed that all enzymes form a distinct monophyletic clade within the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. In addition, the majority of novel enzymes are substantially different from previously known phylogenetic subtypes. Consequently, four additional phylogenetic subtypes were defined, greatly expanding the halohydrin dehalogenase enzyme family. We show that the enormous wealth of environmental and genome sequences present in public databases can be tapped for in silico identification of very rare but biotechnologically important biocatalysts. Our findings help to readily identify halohydrin dehalogenases in ever-growing sequence databases and, as a consequence, make even more members of this interesting enzyme family available to the scientific and industrial community. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. An overview of technologies for immobilization of enzymes and surface analysis techniques for immobilized enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Nur Royhaila; Marzuki, Nur Haziqah Che; Buang, Nor Aziah; Huyop, Fahrul; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The current demands of sustainable green methodologies have increased the use of enzymatic technology in industrial processes. Employment of enzyme as biocatalysts offers the benefits of mild reaction conditions, biodegradability and catalytic efficiency. The harsh conditions of industrial processes, however, increase propensity of enzyme destabilization, shortening their industrial lifespan. Consequently, the technology of enzyme immobilization provides an effective means to circumvent these concerns by enhancing enzyme catalytic properties and also simplify downstream processing and improve operational stability. There are several techniques used to immobilize the enzymes onto supports which range from reversible physical adsorption and ionic linkages, to the irreversible stable covalent bonds. Such techniques produce immobilized enzymes of varying stability due to changes in the surface microenvironment and degree of multipoint attachment. Hence, it is mandatory to obtain information about the structure of the enzyme protein following interaction with the support surface as well as interactions of the enzymes with other proteins. Characterization technologies at the nanoscale level to study enzymes immobilized on surfaces are crucial to obtain valuable qualitative and quantitative information, including morphological visualization of the immobilized enzymes. These technologies are pertinent to assess efficacy of an immobilization technique and development of future enzyme immobilization strategies. PMID:26019635

  3. Metagenomics as a Tool for Enzyme Discovery: Hydrolytic Enzymes from Marine-Related Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Ana; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Tran, Hai; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Yakimov, Michail M; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses metagenomics and its application for enzyme discovery, with a focus on hydrolytic enzymes from marine metagenomic libraries. With less than one percent of culturable microorganisms in the environment, metagenomics, or the collective study of community genetics, has opened up a rich pool of uncharacterized metabolic pathways, enzymes, and adaptations. This great untapped pool of genes provides the particularly exciting potential to mine for new biochemical activities or novel enzymes with activities tailored to peculiar sets of environmental conditions. Metagenomes also represent a huge reservoir of novel enzymes for applications in biocatalysis, biofuels, and bioremediation. Here we present the results of enzyme discovery for four enzyme activities, of particular industrial or environmental interest, including esterase/lipase, glycosyl hydrolase, protease and dehalogenase.

  4. Expression of lignocellulolytic enzymes in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellitzer Andrea

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sustainable utilization of plant biomass as renewable source for fuels and chemical building blocks requires a complex mixture of diverse enzymes, including hydrolases which comprise the largest class of lignocellulolytic enzymes. These enzymes need to be available in large amounts at a low price to allow sustainable and economic biotechnological processes. Over the past years Pichia pastoris has become an attractive host for the cost-efficient production and engineering of heterologous (eukaryotic proteins due to several advantages. Results In this paper codon optimized genes and synthetic alcohol oxidase 1 promoter variants were used to generate Pichia pastoris strains which individually expressed cellobiohydrolase 1, cellobiohydrolase 2 and beta-mannanase from Trichoderma reesei and xylanase A from Thermomyces lanuginosus. For three of these enzymes we could develop strains capable of secreting gram quantities of enzyme per liter in fed-batch cultivations. Additionally, we compared our achieved yields of secreted enzymes and the corresponding activities to literature data. Conclusion In our experiments we could clearly show the importance of gene optimization and strain characterization for successfully improving secretion levels. We also present a basic guideline how to correctly interpret the interplay of promoter strength and gene dosage for a successful improvement of the secretory production of lignocellulolytic enzymes in Pichia pastoris.

  5. Immobilized enzyme studies in a microscale bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Francis; Forrest, Scott; Palmer, Jim; Lu, Zonghuan; Elmore, John; Elmore, Bill B

    2004-01-01

    Novel microreactors with immobilized enzymes were fabricated using both silicon and polymer-based microfabrication techniques. The effectiveness of these reactors was examined along with their behavior over time. Urease enzyme was successfully incorporated into microchannels of a polymeric matrix of polydimethylsiloxane and through layer-bylayer self-assembly techniques onto silicon. The fabricated microchannels had cross-sectional dimensions ranging from tens to hundreds of micrometers in width and height. The experimental results for continuous-flow microreactors are reported for the conversion of urea to ammonia by urease enzyme. Urea conversions of >90% were observed.

  6. Enzyme-based antifouling coatings: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stefan Møller; Pedersen, Leif Toudal; Laursen, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    A systematic overview is presented of the literature that reports the antifouling (AF) protection of underwater structures via the action of enzymes. The overall aim of this review is to assess the state of the art of enzymatic AF technology, and to highlight the obstacles that have to be overcome...... for successful development of enzymatic AF coatings. The approaches described in the literature are divided into direct and indirect enzymatic AF, depending on the intended action of the enzymes. Direct antifouling is used when the enzymes themselves are active antifoulants. Indirect antifouling refers...

  7. Enzymic hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes to glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spano, L A; Medeiros, J; Mandels, M

    1976-01-01

    An enzymic process for the conversion of cellulose to glucose is based on the use of a specific enzyme derived from mutant strains of the fungus trichoderma viride which is capable of reacting with the crystalline fraction of the cellulose molecule. The production and mode of action of the cellulase complex produced during the growth of trichoderma viride is discussed as well as the application of such enzymes for the conversion of cellulosic wastes to crude glucose syrup for use in production of chemical feedstocks, single-cell proteins, fuels, solvents, etc.

  8. Dibromine radical anion reactions with heme enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicka, L.; Gebicki, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Reactions of Br 2 radical anion with heme enzymes, catalase horseradish peroxidase, have been studied by pulse radiolysis. It has been found that Br 2 - does not react with the heme centre of investigated enzymes. Dibromine radical anion reacts with tryptophan residues of catalase without any influence on the activity of catalase. It is suggested that in pulse radiolysis studies, where horseradish peroxidase is at about tenfold excess toward Br 2 - , the enzyme is modified rather by Br 2 , than by Br 2 - . (author). 26 refs., 3 figs

  9. Dimeric assembly of enterocyte brush border enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M

    1994-01-01

    The noncovalent, dimeric assembly of small intestinal brush border enzymes was studied by sedimentation analysis in density gradients of extracts of pulse-labeled pig jejunal mucosal explants. Like aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2), sucrase-isomaltase (EC 3.2.1.48-10), aminopeptidase A (EC 3...... appearance of the liposome-reconstituted enzyme [Norén et al. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 12306-12309], showing only the inner, membrane-anchored domains of the monomers to be in close contact with one another while the outer domains are far apart. In contrast to the other brush border enzymes studied...

  10. Process for preparing multilayer enzyme coating on a fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

    2009-11-03

    A process for preparing high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials is disclosed and processes for using the same. The process involves coating of a material or fiber with enzymes and enzyme aggregate providing a material or fiber with high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environments. In one illustrative approach, enzyme "seeds" are covalently attached to polymer nanofibers followed by treatment with a reagent that crosslinks additional enzyme molecules to the seed enzymes forming enzyme aggregates thereby improving biocatalytic activity due to increased enzyme loading and enzyme stability. This approach creates a useful new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with potential applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

  11. Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-07-01

    NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key industrial enzyme, the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 cellulase (Cel6A), predict that aromatic residues near the enzyme's active site and at the entrance and exit tunnel perform different functions in substrate binding and catalysis, depending on their location in the enzyme. These results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide variety of binding affinities for diverse functions. Outcomes also suggest that protein engineering strategies in which mutations are made around the binding sites may require tailoring specific to the enzyme family. Cellulase enzymes ubiquitously exhibit tunnels or clefts lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrate polymers to monomers, but the molecular-level role of these aromatic residues remains unknown. In silico mutation of the aromatic residues near the catalytic site of Cel6A has little impact on the binding affinity, but simulation suggests that these residues play a major role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for cleaving glycosidic bonds to produce fermentable sugars. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the cellulase tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity. This suggests that these residues play a role in acquiring cellulose chains from the cellulose crystal and stabilizing the reaction product, respectively. These results illustrate that the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions varies dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, the results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering

  12. The effect of angiotensin converting enzyme genotype on aerobic capacity following high intensity interval training

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, N; Baker, M.D; Higgins, T; Cobbold, C

    2014-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Physical activity can reduce T2DM and CVD risk, and increase aerobic capacity, a significant predictor of all-cause mortality and morbidity. High intensity interval training (HIIT) produces similar improvements in aerobic capacity to continuous moderate exercise (CME). Different genotypes of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) have been implicated in improving aerobic capacity and theref...

  13. Dietary modulation of thymic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susana, Feliu María; Paula, Perris; Slobodianik, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is a complex syndrome caused by an inadequate intake of energy, protein, minerals and vitamins which affects the immune system. Nutritional imbalances, present in children with energy-protein malnutrition and infections, make defining the specific effects of each of them on the thymus difficult. For this reason, it is necessary to design an experimental model in animals that could define a single variable. As the thymus atrophy described in humans is similar to that observed in murines, a rat experimental model makes the extrapolation to man possible. Some authors suggest that the activity of Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) and Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP)--involved in purine metabolism--have an influence on T lymphocyte development and the immune system, due to intracellular accumulation of toxic levels of deoxynucleotides. Studies in our group, performed in an experimental model on Wistar growing rats, have demonstrated that protein deficiency or imbalance in the profile of essential amino acids in the diet, produce loss of thymus weight, reduction in the number of thymocytes, a diminished proportion of T cells presenting the W3/13 antigenic determinant and DNA content with concomitant increase in cell size, and the proportion of immature T cells and activity of ADA and PNP, without modifying the activity of 5´Nucleotidase in the thymus. It is important to point out that there were neither differences in energy intake between experimental groups and their controls, nor clinical symptoms of deficiency of other nutrients. The increase in these thymic enzyme activities was an alternative mechanism to avoid the accumulation of high levels of deoxynucleotides, which would be toxic for T lymphocytes. On the other hand, the administration of a recovery diet, with a high amount of high quality protein, was able to reverse the mentioned effects. The quick reply of Adenosine Deaminase to nutritional disorders and the following nutritional recovery, points

  14. Highly efficient enzyme encapsulation in a protein nanocage: towards enzyme catalysis in a cellular nanocompartment mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonen, Lise; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; van Hest, Jan C. M.

    2016-07-01

    The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions.The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures for the cloning, expression, and purification of all proteins, as well as supplementary figures and calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04181g

  15. Impact of enzyme loading on the efficacy and recovery of cellulolytic enzymes immobilized on enzymogel nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaratunga, Ashani; Kudina, Olena; Nahar, Nurun; Zakharchenko, Andrey; Minko, Sergiy; Voronov, Andriy; Pryor, Scott W

    2015-03-01

    Cellulase and β-glucosidase were adsorbed on a polyacrylic acid polymer brush grafted on silica nanoparticles to produce enzymogels as a form of enzyme immobilization. Enzyme loading on the enzymogels was increased to a saturation level of approximately 110 μg (protein) mg(-1) (particle) for each enzyme. Enzymogels with varied enzyme loadings were then used to determine the impact on hydrolysis rate and enzyme recovery. Soluble sugar concentrations during the hydrolysis of filter paper and Solka-Floc with the enzymogels were 45 and 53%, respectively, of concentrations when using free cellulase. β-Glucosidase enzymogels showed lower performance; hydrolyzate glucose concentrations were just 38% of those using free enzymes. Increasing enzyme loading on the enzymogels did not reduce net efficacy for cellulase and improved efficacy for β-glucosidase. The use of free cellulases and cellulase enzymogels resulted in hydrolyzates with different proportions of cellobiose and glucose, suggesting differential attachment or efficacy of endoglucanases, exoglucanases, and β-glucosidases present in cellulase mixtures. When loading β-glucosidase individually, higher enzyme loadings on the enzymogels produced higher hydrolyzate glucose concentrations. Approximately 96% of cellulase and 66 % of β-glucosidase were recovered on the enzymogels, while enzyme loading level did not impact recovery for either enzyme.

  16. Role of antioxidant scavenging enzymes and extracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ChithrashreeGS

    2012-08-23

    Aug 23, 2012 ... peroxidase are two important antioxidant scavenging enzymes involved in ... Catalase was assayed using the method of Beers and Sizer. (1951) with .... yeast dextrose calcium carbonate agar (YDC) medium. Catalase and ...

  17. Involvement of methyltransferases enzymes during the energy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    INVOLVEMENT OF METHYLTRANSFERASES ENZYMES DURING THE. ENERGY METABOLISM OF ..... cell extract still exhibited relatively high methanogenesis with methanol (Fig ... product CH3-CoM into methane (see Fig. 1). The HS-CoM ...

  18. Enzymes: The possibility of production and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petronijević Živomir B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes are biological catalysts with increasing application in the food pharmaceutical, cosmetic, textile and chemical industry. They are also important as reagents in chemical analysis, leather fabrications and as targets for the design of new drugs. Keeping in mind the growing need to replace classical chemical processes by alternative ones, because of ever growing environmental pollution, it is important that enzyme and other biotechnological processes are economical. Therefore, price decrease and stability and enzyme preparation efficiency increase are required more and more. This paper presents a short review of methods for yield increase and the improvement of the quality of enzyme products as commercial products, as well as a review of the possibilities of their application.

  19. Optimizing culture medium for debittering constitutive enzyme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... enzyme naringinase production by Aspergillus oryzae. JMU316. Dong-xiao .... even though industrial applications of naringinase are becoming more and ... guidance for industry. MATERIALS AND ..... For economic reasons,.

  20. distribution, abundance and properties of restriction enzymes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA of granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) I and II with a view to ... properties for manipulation of the genes for production of modified starch. .... procurement, storage and handling of the ..... been made on restriction enzymes of potato,.

  1. Novel enzymes for the degradation of cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn Svein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The bulk terrestrial biomass resource in a future bio-economy will be lignocellulosic biomass, which is recalcitrant and challenging to process. Enzymatic conversion of polysaccharides in the lignocellulosic biomass will be a key technology in future biorefineries and this technology is currently the subject of intensive research. We describe recent developments in enzyme technology for conversion of cellulose, the most abundant, homogeneous and recalcitrant polysaccharide in lignocellulosic biomass. In particular, we focus on a recently discovered new type of enzymes currently classified as CBM33 and GH61 that catalyze oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides. These enzymes promote the efficiency of classical hydrolytic enzymes (cellulases by acting on the surfaces of the insoluble substrate, where they introduce chain breaks in the polysaccharide chains, without the need of first “extracting” these chains from their crystalline matrix.

  2. Enzymes in Poultry and Swine Nutrition

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Poultry production in China and the potential for using enzyme preparations .... The feed manufacturers produce about 310 × 106t of high-quality feed, saving about 30%, ...... Chickens and experimental designs used in the three experiments.

  3. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in "extreme" conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches.

  4. Polyphenol Oxidase Enzyme and Inactivation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leman Yılmaz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidase enzyme is found in vegetables and fruits, as well as in some animal organs and microorganisms. Polyphenol oxidase enzyme responsible for enzymatic browning is a group of copper proteins that catalyses the oxidation of phenolic compounds to quinones, which produce brown pigments, commonly found in fruits and vegetables. During the industrial preparation of fruits and vegetables, results of catalytic effect of polyphenol oxidase causes enzymatic browning. Enzymatic browning impairs the appearance of products containing phenolic compounds along with undesirable colour, odor and taste formation and significant loss of nutritional value of the products. This affects the acceptability of the products by the consumers and causes economic losses. In this review, some characteristics of polyphenol oxidase enzyme in different fruits and vegetables have been reviewed and information about chemical antibrowning agents, thermal applications, irradiation applications and alternative methods such as high pressure processing, pulse electric field, supercritical carbon dioxide and ultrasound applications to inactivate this enzyme has been presented.

  5. Radioimmunoassay of polypeptide hormones and enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felber, J.P.

    1974-01-01

    General principles of radioimmunoassay are reviewed. Detailed procedures are reviewed for the following hormones: insulin, pituitary hormones, gonadotropins, parathyroid hormone, ACTH, glucagon, gastrin, and peptide hormones. Radioimmunoassay of enzymes is also discussed. (U.S.)

  6. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Findlay, Stuart G.; Follstad Shah, Jennifer J.; Hill, Brian H.; Kuehn, Kevin A.; Kuske, Cheryl; Litvak, Marcy E.; Martinez, Noelle G.; Moorhead, Daryl L.; Warnock, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimilation of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus by diverse aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities (1160 cases). Regression analyses were conducted by habitat (aquatic and terrestrial), enzyme class (hydrolases and oxidoreductases) and assay methodology (low affinity and high affinity substrates) to relate potential reaction rates to substrate availability. Across enzyme classes and habitats, the scaling relationships between apparent Vmax and apparent Km followed similar power laws with exponents of 0.44 to 0.67. These exponents, called elasticities, were not statistically distinct from a central value of 0.50, which occurs when the Km of an enzyme equals substrate concentration, a condition optimal for maintenance of steady state. We also conducted an ecosystem scale analysis of ten extracellular hydrolase activities in relation to soil and sediment organic carbon (2,000–5,000 cases/enzyme) that yielded elasticities near 1.0 (0.9 ± 0.2, n = 36). At the metabolomic scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions is the proportionality constant that connects the C:N:P stoichiometries of organic matter and ecoenzymatic activities. At the ecosystem scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions shows that organic matter ultimately limits effective enzyme binding sites. Our findings suggest that one mechanism by which microbial communities maintain homeostasis is regulating extracellular enzyme expression to optimize the short-term responsiveness of substrate acquisition. The analyses also show that, like elemental stoichiometry, the fundamental attributes of enzymatic reactions can be extrapolated from biochemical to community and ecosystem scales.

  7. Purification and characterization of protease enzyme from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The enzyme was active in pH range 5 to11 and temperature of 30 to 80°C. The optimum pH and the temperature for protease activity were recorded to be pH 8 and 50°C, respectively. The enzyme was stable up to 40°C and pH 9. The protease activity was inhibited by Zn2+, Ni2+ and Sn2+ and increased by Ca2+, Mg2+ ...

  8. Enzyme-driven mechanisms in biocorrosion

    OpenAIRE

    Basséguy, Régine

    2007-01-01

    Objectives (abstract of presentation): Recent works carried out in our team concerning enzymes and biocorrosion are presented at the meeting. For aerobic conditions, the direct catalysis of the reduction of oxygen on steel by enzymes or porphyrin was proved and a local electrochemical analysis technique (SVET) was developed to visualize the localization of the catalysis. On anaerobic conditions, the influence of phosphate species and other weak acids on the water reduction on steel was shown....

  9. A stochastic model of enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanini, Marianne; Newman, Timothy; McKane, Alan

    2003-10-01

    Enzyme kinetics is generally modeled by deterministic rate equations, and in the simplest case leads to the well-known Michaelis-Menten equation. It is plausible that stochastic effects will play an important role at low enzyme concentrations. We have addressed this by constructing a simple stochastic model which can be exactly solved in the steady-state. Throughout a wide range of parameter values Michaelis-Menten dynamics is replaced by a new and simple theoretical result.

  10. Enzyme Technology for Shipboard Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    sucrose to the sweeter invert sugar by the enzyme invertase is a well established process, as is the conversion of starch to glucose by the enzyme...aspects of our health and daily lives. Recent advances in fundamental and applied enzymology indicate that we have already started in that direction. At a...Chemtech, p. 677 (Nov 1973) 11 - Bungay, H. P., "Applied Enzymology ," Worthington, Biochemical Corp., Notes for an AIChE Lecture, Washington, D. C. (Dec

  11. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  12. The ultrasound technology for modifying enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meliza Lindsay Rojas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes are protein complexes compounds widely studied and used due to their ability to catalyze reactions. The food processing mainly a ims the inactivation of enzymes due to various undesirable effects. However, there are many processes that can be optimized by its catalytic activity. In this context, different technologies have been applied both to inactivate or to improve the enzymes ef ficiency. The Ultrasound technology emerges as an alternative mainly applied to achieve the enzyme inactivation. On the contrary, very few investigations show the ability of this technology under certain conditions to achieve the opposite effect (i.e. increase the catalytic activity of enzymes. The objective of this study was to correlate the ultrasonic energy delivered to the sample (J/mL with the residual enzymatic activity and explain the possible mechanisms which results in the enzymatic activation/in activation complex behavior. The activity of POD in coconut water was evaluated as a model. The enzymatic activity initially increased, followed by reduction with a trend to enzyme inactivation. This complex behavior is directly related to the applied ultr asonic energy and their direct mechanical effects on the product, as well as the effect in the enzymatic infinite intermediate states and its structural conformation changes. The obtained results are useful for both academic and industrial perspectives.

  13. The ultrasound technology for modifying enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meliza Lindsay

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes are protein complexes compounds widely studied and used due to their ability to catalyze reactions. The food processing mainly aims the inactivation of enzymes due to various undesirable effects. However, there are many processes that can be optimized by its catalytic activity. In this context, different technologies have been applied both to inactivate or to improve the enzymes efficiency. The Ultrasound technology emerges as an alternative mainly applied to achieve the enzyme inactivation. On the contrary, very few investigations show the ability of this technology under certain conditions to achieve the opposite effect (i.e. increase the catalytic activity of enzymes. The objective of this study was to correlate the ultrasonic energy delivered to the sample (J/mL with the residual enzymatic activity and explain the possible mechanisms which results in the enzymatic activation/inactivation complex behavior. The activity of POD in coconut water was evaluated as a model. The enzymatic activity initially increased, followed by reduction with a trend to enzyme inactivation. This complex behavior is directly related to the applied ultrasonic energy and their direct mechanical effects on the product, as well as the effect in the enzymatic infinite intermediate states and its structural conformation changes. The obtained results are useful for both academic and industrial perspectives.

  14. Directed evolution of enzymes using microfluidic chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilát, Zdeněk.; Ježek, Jan; Šmatlo, Filip; Kaůka, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-12-01

    Enzymes are highly versatile and ubiquitous biological catalysts. They can greatly accelerate large variety of reactions, while ensuring appropriate catalytic activity and high selectivity. These properties make enzymes attractive biocatalysts for a wide range of industrial and biomedical applications. Over the last two decades, directed evolution of enzymes has transformed the field of protein engineering. We have devised microfluidic systems for directed evolution of haloalkane dehalogenases in emulsion droplets. In such a device, individual bacterial cells producing mutated variants of the same enzyme are encapsulated in microdroplets and supplied with a substrate. The conversion of a substrate by the enzyme produced by a single bacterium changes the pH in the droplet which is signalized by pH dependent fluorescence probe. The droplets with the highest enzymatic activity can be separated directly on the chip by dielectrophoresis and the resultant cell lineage can be used for enzyme production or for further rounds of directed evolution. This platform is applicable for fast screening of large libraries in directed evolution experiments requiring mutagenesis at multiple sites of a protein structure.

  15. Lysosomal enzyme activation in irradiated mammary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, C.; Wills, E.D.

    1976-01-01

    Lysosomal enzyme activity of C3H mouse mammary tumors was measured quantitatively by a histochemical method. Following whole-body doses of 3600 rad or less no changes were observed in the lysosomal enzyme activity for 12 hr after the irradiation, but very large increases in acid phosphatase and β-naphthylamidase activity were, however, observed 24 hr after irradiation. Significant increases in enzyme activity were detected 72 hr after a dose of 300 rad and the increases of enzyme activity were dose dependent over the range 300 to 900 rad. Testosterone (80 mg/kg) injected into mice 2 hr before irradiation (850 rad) caused a significant increase of lysosomal enzyme activity over and above that of the same dose of irradiation alone. If the tumor-bearing mice were given 95 percent oxygen/5 percent carbon dioxide to breathe for 8 min before irradiation the effect of 850 rad on lysosomal acid phosphatase was increased to 160 percent/that of the irradiation given alone. Activitation of lysosomal enzymes in mammary tumors is an important primary or secondary consequence of radiation

  16. Enzymes for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasiri, Hamidreza

    2011-04-15

    Primary oil recovery by reservoir pressure depletion and secondary oil recovery by waterflooding usually result in poor displacement efficiency. As a consequence there is always some trapped oil remaining in oil reservoirs. Oil entrapment is a result of complex interactions between viscous, gravity and capillary forces. Improving recovery from hydrocarbon fields typically involves altering the relative importance of the viscous and capillary forces. The potential of many EOR methods depends on their influence on fluid/rock interactions related to wettability and fluid/fluid interactions reflected in IFT. If the method has the potential to change the interactions favorably, it may be considered for further investigation, i.e. core flooding experiment, pilot and reservoir implementation. Enzyme-proteins can be introduced as an enhanced oil recovery method to improve waterflood performance by affecting interactions at the oil-water-rock interfaces. An important part of this thesis was to investigate how selected enzymes may influence wettability and capillary forces in a crude oil-brine-rock system, and thus possibly contribute to enhanced oil recovery. To investigate further by which mechanisms selected enzyme-proteins may contribute to enhance oil recovery, groups of enzymes with different properties and catalytic functions, known to be interfacially active, were chosen to cover a wide range of possible effects. These groups include (1) Greenzyme (GZ) which is a commercial EOR enzyme and consists of enzymes and stabilizers (surfactants), (2) The Zonase group consists of two types of pure enzyme, Zonase1 and Zonase2 which are protease enzymes and whose catalytic functions are to hydrolyze (breakdown) peptide bonds, (3) The Novozyme (NZ) group consists of three types of pure enzyme, NZ2, NZ3 and NZ6 which are esterase enzymes and whose catalytic functions are to hydrolyze ester bonds, and (4) Alpha-Lactalbumin ( -La) which is an important whey protein. The effect of

  17. Computational Biochemistry-Enzyme Mechanisms Explored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culka, Martin; Gisdon, Florian J; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Understanding enzyme mechanisms is a major task to achieve in order to comprehend how living cells work. Recent advances in biomolecular research provide huge amount of data on enzyme kinetics and structure. The analysis of diverse experimental results and their combination into an overall picture is, however, often challenging. Microscopic details of the enzymatic processes are often anticipated based on several hints from macroscopic experimental data. Computational biochemistry aims at creation of a computational model of an enzyme in order to explain microscopic details of the catalytic process and reproduce or predict macroscopic experimental findings. Results of such computations are in part complementary to experimental data and provide an explanation of a biochemical process at the microscopic level. In order to evaluate the mechanism of an enzyme, a structural model is constructed which can be analyzed by several theoretical approaches. Several simulation methods can and should be combined to get a reliable picture of the process of interest. Furthermore, abstract models of biological systems can be constructed combining computational and experimental data. In this review, we discuss structural computational models of enzymatic systems. We first discuss various models to simulate enzyme catalysis. Furthermore, we review various approaches how to characterize the enzyme mechanism both qualitatively and quantitatively using different modeling approaches. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Activity assessment of microbial fibrinolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Essam

    2013-08-01

    Conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin inside blood vessels results in thrombosis, leading to myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. In general, there are four therapy options: surgical operation, intake of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, or fibrinolytic enzymes. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes have attracted much more attention than typical thrombolytic agents because of the expensive prices and the side effects of the latter. The fibrinolytic enzymes were successively discovered from different microorganisms, the most important among which is the genus Bacillus. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes, especially those from food-grade microorganisms, have the potential to be developed as functional food additives and drugs to prevent or cure thrombosis and other related diseases. There are several assay methods for these enzymes; this may due to the insolubility of substrate, fibrin. Existing assay methods can be divided into three major groups. The first group consists of assay of fibrinolytic activity with natural proteins as substrates, e.g., fibrin plate methods. The second and third groups of assays are suitable for kinetic studies and are based on the determination of hydrolysis of synthetic peptide esters. This review will deal primarily with the microorganisms that have been reported in literature to produce fibrinolytic enzymes and the first review discussing the methods used to assay the fibrinolytic activity.

  19. Patterns of failure after postoperative radiotherapy for incompletely resected (R1) non-small cell lung cancer: implications for radiation target volume design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszyna-Serementa, Marta; Socha, Joanna; Wierzchowski, Marek; Kępka, Lucyna

    2013-05-01

    Overall survival (OS) and pattern of failure in R1-resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with 3D-planned postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) was retrospectively evaluated. The outcomes and patterns of failure in patients with (+) and without (-) extracapsular nodal extension (ECE) were compared and analyzed with respect to the radiation target volume design. Eighty R1-resected (37 ECE+ and 43 ECE-) patients received PORT (60Gy, 2Gy daily) between 2002 and 2011. Patients with N2 disease received limited elective nodal irradiation (ENI); for pN0-1 disease the use of ENI was optional. Among ECE- (extranodal-R1) patients there were 35 pN0-1 and eight pN2 cases; in pN0-1 patients, patterns of failure and outcomes were analyzed with respect to the use of ENI. Loco-regional failure (LRF) was defined as in-field relapse; isolated nodal failure (INF) was defined as out-of-field regional nodal recurrence occurring without LRF, irrespective of distant metastases. The actuarial 3-year OS rate was 36.3% (median: 30 months). Three-year OS rates in the ECE- and ECE+ group were 40.4% and 31.4%, with median OS of 31 and 24 months, respectively (p=0.43). In multivariate analysis, the presence of ECE was correlated with OS (HR=3.02; 95% CI: 1.00-9.16; p=0.05). Three-year cumulative incidence of LRF (CILRF) was 14.5% and 15.5% in the ECE- and ECE+ groups, respectively (p=0.98). Three-year cumulative incidence of INF (CIINF) was 14.1% in the ECE- group and 11.1% in the ECE+ group (p=0.76). For pN0-1 patients treated with and without ENI (13 and 22 patients) 3-year CILRF rates were 7.7% and 20.8%, respectively (p=0.20); 3-year CIINF rates were 9.1% and 16.3%, respectively (p=0.65). PORT resulted in a relatively good survival of R1-resected NSCLC patients. Relatively high incidence of INF was found in both ECE+ and ECE- patients. For ECE+ patients, treated with limited ENI, distant failure remains a major concern, so the design of ENI fields seems of lesser

  20. Enzyme-MOF (metal-organic framework) composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xizhen; Fang, Yu; Joseph, Elizabeth; Wang, Qi; Li, Jialuo; Banerjee, Sayan; Lollar, Christina; Wang, Xuan; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2017-06-06

    The ex vivo application of enzymes in various processes, especially via enzyme immobilization techniques, has been extensively studied in recent years in order to enhance the recyclability of enzymes, to minimize enzyme contamination in the product, and to explore novel horizons for enzymes in biomedical applications. Possessing remarkable amenability in structural design of the frameworks as well as almost unparalelled surface tunability, Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have been gaining popularity as candidates for enzyme immobilization platforms. Many MOF-enzyme composites have achieved unprecedented results, far outperforming free enzymes in many aspects. This review summarizes recent developments of MOF-enzyme composites with special emphasis on preparative techniques and the synergistic effects of enzymes and MOFs. The applications of MOF-enzyme composites, primarily in transferation, catalysis and sensing, are presented as well. The enhancement of enzymatic activity of the composites over free enzymes in biologically incompatible conditions is emphasized in many cases.

  1. Kinetics of enzyme action: essential principles for drug hunters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stein, Ross L

    2011-01-01

    ... field. Beginning with the most basic principles pertaining to simple, one-substrate enzyme reactions and their inhibitors, and progressing to a thorough treatment of two-substrate enzymes, Kinetics of Enzyme Action...

  2. Continuous enzyme reactions with immobilized enzyme tubes prepared by radiation cast-polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru; Kaetsu, Isao

    1986-01-01

    Immobilized glucose oxidase tubes were prepared by radiation cast-polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and tetraethyleneglycol diacrylate monomer at low temperatures. The immobilized enzyme tubes which were spirally set in a water bath were used as reactor, in which the enzyme activity varied with tube size and flow rate of the substrate. The conversion yield of the substrate in continuous enzyme reaction was about 80%. (author)

  3. Support for Implications of Compressive Sensing Concepts to Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-02

    Justin Romberg Georgia Tech jrom@ece.gatech.edu Emil Sidky University of Chicago sidky@uchicago.edu Michael Stenner MITRE mstenner@mitre.org Lei Tian...assessment of image quality. Michael Stenner Michael has broad interests in optical imaging, sensing, and communications, and is published in such

  4. Stabilization of enzymes in ionic liquids via modification of enzyme charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordwald, Erik M; Kaar, Joel L

    2013-09-01

    Due to the propensity of ionic liquids (ILs) to inactivate enzymes, the development of strategies to improve enzyme utility in these solvents is critical to fully exploit ILs for biocatalysis. We have developed a strategy to broadly improve enzyme utility in ILs based on elucidating the effect of charge modifications on the function of enzymes in IL environments. Results of stability studies in aqueous-IL mixtures indicated a clear connection between the ratio of enzyme-containing positive-to-negative sites and enzyme stability in ILs. Stability studies of the effect of [BMIM][Cl] and [EMIM][EtSO4 ] on chymotrypsin specifically found an optimum ratio of positively-charged amine-to-negatively-charged acid groups (0.39). At this ratio, the half-life of chymotrypsin was increased 1.6- and 4.3-fold relative to wild-type chymotrypsin in [BMIM][Cl] and [EMIM][EtSO4 ], respectively. The half-lives of lipase and papain were similarly increased as much as 4.0 and 2.4-fold, respectively, in [BMIM][Cl] by modifying the ratio of positive-to-negative sites of each enzyme. More generally, the results of stability studies found that modifications that reduce the ratio of enzyme-containing positive-to-negative sites improve enzyme stability in ILs. Understanding the impact of charge modification on enzyme stability in ILs may ultimately be exploited to rationally engineer enzymes for improved function in IL environments. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Comparison of Enzymes / Non-Enzymes Proteins Classification Models Based on 3D, Composition, Sequences and Topological Indices

    OpenAIRE

    Munteanu, Cristian Robert

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of Enzymes / Non-Enzymes Proteins Classification Models Based on 3D, Composition, Sequences and Topological Indices, German Conference on Bioinformatics (GCB), Potsdam, Germany (September, 2007)

  6. Enzymic conversion of starch to glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-08-19

    Corn is steeped in a SO/sub 2/ solution for 30 to 40 hours, coarsely ground, separated from the germ, and filtered. A 35% suspension of the germ-free corn, still containing fibers, hull, and gluten, is treated with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to raise the pH to 6.5 to 7.0. A starch-liquifying enzyme is added and after a 2 hours treatment at 85/sup 0/ the liquefied starch is cooled to 60/sup 0/ and the pH is adjusted to 4.5 to 5.0 with H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. A saccharifying enzyme is now added. After 40 to 81 hours, a raw glucose solution is obtained and is freed from fibers and gluten by filtration. The commercial starch-liquifying enzymes are designated HT-1000 and Neozyme 3 LC (liquid). The saccharifying enzymes are Diazyme or Diazyme L 30 (liquid). The solid enzymes are used at a level up to 0.1% by weight of the starch. Up to 100% conversion of starch into glucose is achieved.

  7. Thermophilic archaeal enzymes and applications in biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2011-01-01

    Thermophilic enzymes have advantages for their use in commercial applications and particularly for the production of chiral compounds to produce optically pure pharmaceuticals. They can be used as biocatalysts in the application of 'green chemistry'. The thermophilic archaea contain enzymes that have already been used in commercial applications such as the L-aminoacylase from Thermococcus litoralis for the resolution of amino acids and amino acid analogues. This enzyme differs from bacterial L-aminoacylases and has similarities to carboxypeptidases from other archaeal species. An amidase/γ-lactamase from Sulfolobus solfataricus has been used for the production of optically pure γ-lactam, the building block for antiviral carbocyclic nucleotides. This enzyme has similarities to the bacterial signature amidase family. An alcohol dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix has been used for the production of optically pure alcohols and is related to the zinc-containing eukaryotic alcohol dehydrogenases. A transaminase and a dehalogenase from Sulfolobus species have also been studied. The archaeal transaminase is found in a pathway for serine synthesis which is found only in eukaryotes and not in bacteria. It can be used for the asymmetric synthesis of homochiral amines of high enantioselective purity. The L-2-haloacid dehalogenase has applications both in biocatalysis and in bioremediation. All of these enzymes have increased thermostability over their mesophilic counterparts.

  8. Concentration profiles near an activated enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soohyung; Agmon, Noam

    2008-09-25

    When a resting enzyme is activated, substrate concentration profile evolves in its vicinity, ultimately tending to steady state. We use modern theories for many-body effects on diffusion-influenced reactions to derive approximate analytical expressions for the steady-state profile and the Laplace transform of the transient concentration profiles. These show excellent agreement with accurate many-particle Brownian-dynamics simulations for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The steady-state profile has a hyperbolic dependence on the distance of the substrate from the enzyme, albeit with a prefactor containing the complexity of the many-body effects. These are most conspicuous for the substrate concentration at the surface of the enzyme. It shows an interesting transition as a function of the enzyme turnover rate. When it is high, the contact concentration decays monotonically to steady state. However, for slow turnover it is nonmonotonic, showing a minimum due to reversible substrate binding, then a maximum due to diffusion of new substrate toward the enzyme, and finally decay to steady state. Under certain conditions one can obtain a good estimate for the critical value of the turnover rate constant at the transition.

  9. Development of enzymes and enzyme systems by genetic engineering to convert biomass to sugars

    Science.gov (United States)

    TITLE Development of Enzymes and Enzyme Systems by Genetic Engineering to Convert Biomass to Sugars ABSTRACT Plant cellulosic material is one of the most viable renewable resources for the world’s fuel and chemical feedstock needs. Currently ethanol derived from corn starch is the most common li...

  10. Nanomaterials with enzyme-like characteristics (nanozymes): next-generation artificial enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Wang, Erkang

    2013-07-21

    Over the past few decades, researchers have established artificial enzymes as highly stable and low-cost alternatives to natural enzymes in a wide range of applications. A variety of materials including cyclodextrins, metal complexes, porphyrins, polymers, dendrimers and biomolecules have been extensively explored to mimic the structures and functions of naturally occurring enzymes. Recently, some nanomaterials have been found to exhibit unexpected enzyme-like activities, and great advances have been made in this area due to the tremendous progress in nano-research and the unique characteristics of nanomaterials. To highlight the progress in the field of nanomaterial-based artificial enzymes (nanozymes), this review discusses various nanomaterials that have been explored to mimic different kinds of enzymes. We cover their kinetics, mechanisms and applications in numerous fields, from biosensing and immunoassays, to stem cell growth and pollutant removal. We also summarize several approaches to tune the activities of nanozymes. Finally, we make comparisons between nanozymes and other catalytic materials (other artificial enzymes, natural enzymes, organic catalysts and nanomaterial-based catalysts) and address the current challenges and future directions (302 references).

  11. Microbial genetic engineering and enzyme technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollenberg, C.P.; Sahm, H.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of up-to-date contributions BIOTEC 1 has experts discussing the current topics in microbial gene technology and enzyme technology and speculating on future developments. Bacterial and yeast systems for the production of interferons, growth hormone or viral antigenes are described as well as the impact of gene technology on plants. Exciting is the prospect of degrading toxic compounds in our environment by microorganisms tuned in the laboratory. Enzymes are the most effective catalysts we know. They exhibit a very high substrate- and stereospecificity. These properties make enzymes extremely attractive as industrial catalysts, leading to new production processes that are non-polluting and save both energy and raw materials. (orig.) With 135 figs., 36 tabs.

  12. Ultrasound in Enzyme Activation and Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Raymond; Gamage, Mala; Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Knoerzer, Kai

    As discussed in previous chapters, most effects due to ultrasound arise from cavitation events, in particular, collapsing cavitation bubbles. These collapsing bubbles generate very high localized temperatures and pressure shockwaves along with micro-streaming that is associated with high shear forces. These effects can be used to accelerate the transport of substrates and reaction products to and from enzymes, and to enhance mass transfer in enzyme reactor systems, and thus improve efficiency. However, the high velocity streaming, together with the formation of hydroxy radicals and heat generation during collapsing of bubbles, may also potentially affect the biocatalyst stability, and this can be a limiting factor in combined ultrasound/enzymatic applications. Typically, enzymes can be readily denatured by slight changes in environmental conditions, including temperature, pressure, shear stress, pH and ionic strength.

  13. Enzyme Histochemistry for Functional Histology in Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cima, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    In invertebrates, enzyme histochemistry has recently found a renaissance regarding its applications in morphology and ecology. Many enzyme activities are useful for the morphofunctional characterization of cells, as biomarkers of biological and pathologic processes, and as markers of the response to environmental stressors. Here, the adjustments to classic techniques, including the most common enzymes used for digestion, absorption, transport, and oxidation, as well as techniques for azo-coupling, metal salt substitution and oxidative coupling polymerization, are presented in detail for various terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates. This chapter also provides strategies to solve the problems regarding anesthesia, small body size, the presence of an exo- or endoskeleton and the search for the best fixative in relation to the internal fluid osmolarity. These techniques have the aim of obtaining good results for both the pre- and post-embedding labeling of specimens, tissue blocks, sections, and hemolymph smears using both light and transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Intestinal enzyme distribution after supralethal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becciolini, A; Gerber, G B; Buracchi, A; Deroo, J [Florence Univ. (Italy). Istituto di Radiologia; Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium). Dept. de Radiobiologie)

    1977-07-01

    The activity of some intestinal enzymes has been studied after 2 kR irradiation. Brush border enzymes, maltase and leucineaminopeptidase (LAP) show an increase 20 hours after irradiation, while after 72 hours their activities are reduced to very low levels. Lysosomal enzymes show a completely different behaviour: acid phosphatase activity increases only 72 hours after irradiation, whereas ..beta.. glucuronidase increases significantly after 20 hours and reaches values two or three times higher than controls after 72 hours. The histologic picture at the first interval after irradiation shows gross alterations in the crypt region, but the villi appear nearly normal. Seventy-two hours after irradiation the whole epithelium is affected and very numerous leukocytes are present in the stroma.

  15. Arabinogalactan proteins: focus on carbohydrate active enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eKnoch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs are a highly diverse class of cell surface proteoglycans that are commonly found in most plant species. AGPs play important roles in many cellular processes during plant development, such as reproduction, cell proliferation, pattern formation and growth, and in plant-microbe interaction. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their function. Numerous studies using monoclonal antibodies that recognize different AGP glycan epitopes have shown the appearance of a slightly altered AGP glycan in a specific stage of development in plant cells. Therefore, it is anticipated that the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycan is tightly regulated during development. Until recently, however, little was known about the enzymes involved in the metabolism of AGP glycans. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy; http://www.cazy.org/ involved in the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycans, and we discuss the biological role of these enzymes in plant development.

  16. Radiation and enzyme degradation of cellulose materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchacek, V.

    1983-01-01

    The results are summed up of a study of the effect of gamma radiation on pure cellulose and on wheat straw. The irradiation of cellulose yields acid substances - formic acid and polyhydroxy acids, toxic malondialdehyde and the most substantial fraction - the saccharides xylose, arabinose, glucose and certain oligosaccharides. A ten-fold reduction of the level of cellulose polymerization can be caused by relatively small doses - (up to 250 kGy). A qualitative analysis was made of the straw before and after irradiation and it was shown that irradiation had no significant effect on the qualitative composition of the straw. A 48 hour enzyme hydrolysis of the cellulose and straw were made after irradiation and an economic evaluation of the process was made. Radiation pretreatment is technically and economically advantageous; the production of fodder using enzyme hydrolysis of irradiated straw is not economically feasible due to the high cost of the enzyme. (M.D.)

  17. Engineering of pectinolytic enzymes for enhanced thermostability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorte Møller

    Conversion of waste materials into valuable compounds is promising concerning transformation of byproduct streams such as sugar beet and potato pulp. In order to obtain those compounds with reduced energy consumption, carbohydrate active enzymes can be used as catalysts. Sugar beet and potato pulp...... consist of pectin that can be converted into beneficial polymeric and oligomeric carbohydrates requiring enzymes such as pectin lyases, rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) lyases, polygalacturonases and galactanases. Enzymatic conversion of such pectinaceous biomasses at high temperatures is advantageous...... as it gives rise to lower substrate viscosity, easier mixing, higher substrate solubility and lowers the risk of contamination. The overall objective of this thesis was to discover enzymes for degradation of RGI structures in pectin and further engineer for enhanced thermostability. The hypotheses were...

  18. Enzyme Sorption onto Soil and Biocarbon Amendments Alters Catalytic Capacity and Depends on the Specific Protein and pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, E.; Fogle, E. J.; Cotrufo, M. F.

    2017-12-01

    Enzymes catalyze biogeochemical reactions in soils and play a key role in nutrient cycling in agricultural systems. Often, to increase soil nutrients, agricultural managers add organic amendments and have recently experimented with charcoal-like biocarbon products. These amendments can enhance soil water and nutrient holding capacity through increasing porosity. However, the large surface area of the biocarbon has the potential to sorb nutrients and other organic molecules. Does the biocarbon decrease nutrient cycling through sorption of enzymes? In a laboratory setting, we compared the interaction of two purified enzymes β-glucosidase and acid phosphatase with a sandy clay loam and two biocarbons. We quantified the sorbed enzymes at three different pHs using a Bradford protein assay and then measured the activity of the sorbed enzyme via high-throughput fluorometric analysis. Both sorption and activity depended upon the solid phase, pH, and specific enzyme. Overall the high surface area biocarbon impacted the catalytic capacity of the enzymes more than the loam soil, which may have implications for soil nutrient management with these organic amendments.

  19. Translational control of an intestinal microvillar enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Cowell, G M; Sjöström, H

    1986-01-01

    The rates of biosynthesis of adult and foetal pig small-intestinal aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) were compared to determine at which level the expression of the microvillar enzyme is developmentally controlled. In organ-cultured explants, the rate of biosynthesis of foetal aminopeptidase N is only...... about 3% of the adult rate. The small amount synthesized occurs in a high-mannose-glycosylated, membrane-bound, form that is processed to the mature, complex-glycosylated, form at a markedly slower rate than that of the adult enzyme. Extracts of total RNA from adult and foetal intestine contained...

  20. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Application of Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Khusainova, Alsu; Shapiro, Alexander; Woodley, John

    2016-01-01

    Enzymer er for nylig blevet rapporteret, som effektive stoffer for forbedret olieindvinding(EOR). Både laboratorie undersøgelser og felttest viste en markant stigning af olieproduktion. Op til ekstra 16 % af olien blev produceret i laboratorie eksperimenter og op til ekstra 269 tønder olie per dag blev fremstillet under feltforsøg. Det var foreslået, at følgende mekanismer har medvirket tiløget olieproduktionen på grund af enzymer: forbedringer af bjergartsoverfladens befugtningsevne;dannelse...

  1. Immobilized enzyme reactor chromatography: Optimization of protein retention and enzyme activity in monolithic silica stationary phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besanger, Travis R.; Hodgson, Richard J.; Green, James R.A.; Brennan, John D.

    2006-01-01

    Our group recently reported on the application of protein-doped monolithic silica columns for immobilized enzyme reactor chromatography, which allowed screening of enzyme inhibitors present in mixtures using mass spectrometry for detection. The enzyme was immobilized by entrapment within a bimodal meso/macroporous silica material prepared by a biocompatible sol-gel processing route. While such columns proved to be useful for applications such as screening of protein-ligand interactions, significant amounts of entrapped proteins leached from the columns owing to the high proportion of macropores within the materials. Herein, we describe a detailed study of factors affecting the morphology of protein-doped bioaffinity columns and demonstrate that specific pH values and concentrations of poly(ethylene glycol) can be used to prepare essentially mesoporous columns that retain over 80% of initially loaded enzyme in an active and accessible form and yet still retain sufficient porosity to allow pressure-driven flow in the low μL/min range. Using the enzyme γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT), we further evaluated the catalytic constants of the enzyme entrapped in capillary columns with different silica morphologies as a function of flowrate and backpressure using the enzyme reactor assay mode. It was found that the apparent activity of the enzyme was highest in mesoporous columns that retained high levels of enzyme. In such columns, enzyme activity increased by ∼2-fold with increases in both flowrate (from 250 to 1000 nL/min) and backpressure generated (from 500 to 2100 psi) during the chromatographic activity assay owing to increases in k cat and decreases in K M , switching from diffusion controlled to reaction controlled conditions at ca. 2000 psi. These results suggest that columns with minimal macropore volumes (<5%) are advantageous for the entrapment of soluble proteins for bioaffinity and bioreactor chromatography

  2. 21 CFR 862.2500 - Enzyme analyzer for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enzyme analyzer for clinical use. 862.2500 Section... Instruments § 862.2500 Enzyme analyzer for clinical use. (a) Identification. An enzyme analyzer for clinical use is a device intended to measure enzymes in plasma or serum by nonkinetic or kinetic measurement of...

  3. 21 CFR 864.9400 - Stabilized enzyme solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stabilized enzyme solution. 864.9400 Section 864... and Blood Products § 864.9400 Stabilized enzyme solution. (a) Identification. A stabilized enzyme... enzyme solutions include papain, bromelin, ficin, and trypsin. (b) Classification. Class II (performance...

  4. Review of the biochemical basis of enzyme immunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingler, W.

    1982-01-01

    The ever increasing number of radioimmunological determination poses problems allied with the handling of radioactive substances. In recent years various non-radioactive methods have been developed, among which the enzyme immunoassay is already in routine use. Homogeneous and heterogeneous enzyme immunoassays are described. Criteria for enzymes, substrates and enzyme-substrate reactions are listed. (orig.) [de

  5. Seeing & Feeling How Enzymes Work Using Tangible Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kwok-chi

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a tangible model used to help students tackle some misconceptions about enzyme actions, particularly the induced-fit model, enzyme-substrate complementarity, and enzyme inhibition. The model can simulate how substrates induce a change in the shape of the active site and the role of attraction force during enzyme-substrate…

  6. Towards structural studies of the old yellow enzyme homologue SYE4 from Shewanella oneidensis and its complexes at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elegheert, Jonathan; Hemel, Debbie van den; Dix, Ina; Stout, Jan; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Brigé, Ann; Savvides, Savvas N.

    2009-01-01

    Of the four old yellow enzyme homologues found in S. oneidensis, SYE4 is the homologue most implicated in resistance to oxidative stress. SYE4 was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Shewanella oneidensis is an environmentally versatile Gram-negative γ-proteobacterium that is endowed with an unusually large proteome of redox proteins. Of the four old yellow enzyme (OYE) homologues found in S. oneidensis, SYE4 is the homologue most implicated in resistance to oxidative stress. SYE4 was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 and were moderately pseudo-merohedrally twinned, emulating a P422 metric symmetry. The native crystals of SYE4 were of exceptional diffraction quality and provided complete data to 1.10 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation, while crystals of the reduced enzyme and of the enzyme in complex with a wide range of ligands typically led to high-quality complete data sets to 1.30–1.60 Å resolution, thus providing a rare opportunity to dissect the structure–function relationships of a good-sized enzyme (40 kDa) at true atomic resolution. Here, the attainment of a number of experimental milestones in the crystallographic studies of SYE4 and its complexes are reported, including isolation of the elusive hydride–Meisenheimer complex

  7. Purification, characterization of phytase enzyme from Lactobacillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purification, characterization of phytase enzyme from Lactobacillus plantarum bacteria and determination of its kinetic properties. ... Many of the cereal grains, legumes and oilseeds store phosphorus in phytate form. Phytases can be produced by plants, animals and microorganisms. However, the ones with microbial origin ...

  8. Enzyme Replacement Therapy for Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dolores Sanchez-Niño PhD

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is a rare X-linked disease caused by the deficiency of α-galactosidase that leads to the accumulation of abnormal glycolipid. Untreated patients develop potentially lethal complications by age 30 to 50 years. Enzyme replacement therapy is the current standard of therapy for Fabry disease. Two formulations of recombinant human α-galactosidase A (agalsidase are available in most markets: agalsidase-α and agalsidase-β, allowing a choice of therapy. However, the US Food and Drug Administration rejected the application for commercialization of agalsidase-α. The main difference between the 2 enzymes is the dose. The label dose for agalsidase-α is 0.2 mg/kg/2 weeks, while the dose for agalsidase-β is 1.0 mg/kg/2 weeks. Recent evidence suggests a dose-dependent effect of enzyme replacement therapy and agalsidase-β is 1.0 mg/kg/2 weeks, which has been shown to reduce the occurrence of hard end points (severe renal and cardiac events, stroke, and death. In addition, patients with Fabry disease who have developed tissue injury should receive coadjuvant tissue protective therapy, together with enzyme replacement therapy, to limit nonspecific progression of the tissue injury. It is likely that in the near future, additional oral drugs become available to treat Fabry disease, such as chaperones or substrate reduction therapy.

  9. Enzyme catalysis by entropy without Circe effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Masoud; Himo, Fahmi; Åqvist, Johan

    2016-03-01

    Entropic effects have often been invoked to explain the extraordinary catalytic power of enzymes. In particular, the hypothesis that enzymes can use part of the substrate-binding free energy to reduce the entropic penalty associated with the subsequent chemical transformation has been very influential. The enzymatic reaction of cytidine deaminase appears to be a distinct example. Here, substrate binding is associated with a significant entropy loss that closely matches the activation entropy penalty for the uncatalyzed reaction in water, whereas the activation entropy for the rate-limiting catalytic step in the enzyme is close to zero. Herein, we report extensive computer simulations of the cytidine deaminase reaction and its temperature dependence. The energetics of the catalytic reaction is first evaluated by density functional theory calculations. These results are then used to parametrize an empirical valence bond description of the reaction, which allows efficient sampling by molecular dynamics simulations and computation of Arrhenius plots. The thermodynamic activation parameters calculated by this approach are in excellent agreement with experimental data and indeed show an activation entropy close to zero for the rate-limiting transition state. However, the origin of this effect is a change of reaction mechanism compared the uncatalyzed reaction. The enzyme operates by hydroxide ion attack, which is intrinsically associated with a favorable activation entropy. Hence, this has little to do with utilization of binding free energy to pay the entropic penalty but rather reflects how a preorganized active site can stabilize a reaction path that is not operational in solution.

  10. Biochemical assessement of liver enzymes in immunocompromised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: This study aims at the estimation of serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and glutmyltransferase GGT (Liver enzymes) in Human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) and/or Acquired immune deficiency syndrome(AIDS) patients in parts of Edo State, Nigeria.

  11. Enzyme specific activity in functionalized nanoporous supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Chenghong; Soares, Thereza A; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu Jun; Ackerman, Eric J

    2008-01-01

    Here we reveal that enzyme specific activity can be increased substantially by changing the protein loading density (P LD ) in functionalized nanoporous supports so that the enzyme immobilization efficiency (I e , defined as the ratio of the specific activity of the immobilized enzyme to the specific activity of the free enzyme in solution) can be much higher than 100%. A net negatively charged glucose oxidase (GOX) and a net positively charged organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) were entrapped spontaneously in NH 2 - and HOOC-functionalized mesoporous silica (300 A, FMS) respectively. The specific activity of GOX entrapped in FMS increased with decreasing P LD . With decreasing P LD , I e of GOX in FMS increased from 150%. Unlike GOX, OPH in HOOC-FMS showed increased specific activity with increasing P LD . With increasing P LD , the corresponding I e of OPH in FMS increased from 100% to>200%. A protein structure-based analysis of the protein surface charges directing the electrostatic interaction-based orientation of the protein molecules in FMS demonstrates that substrate access to GOX molecules in FMS is limited at high P LD , consequently lowering the GOX specific activity. In contrast, substrate access to OPH molecules in FMS remains open at high P LD and may promote a more favorable confinement environment that enhances the OPH activity

  12. Exogenous fibrolytic enzymes to unlock nutrients: Histological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a need for a better understanding of the mode-of-action of exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE) used as additives in ruminant feeds. Four forages, treated with EFE, were evaluated in vitro and histologically, in an attempt to determine the effect of EFE on tissue degradation. Weeping love grass, kikuyu leaf material, ...

  13. Microbial nitrilases: versatile, spiral forming, industrial enzymes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thuku, RN

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available such case is the NAD+ synthetase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Bellinzoni et al., 2005). This enzyme relies on an associated amino-terminal amidase domain in order to utilize glutamine as a source of nitrogen and liberate ammonia which is required...

  14. A Comprehensive Enzyme Kinetic Exercise for Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Janice S.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a comprehensive treatment of experimental enzyme kinetics strongly coupled to electronic data acquisition and use of spreadsheets to organize data and perform linear and nonlinear least-squares analyses, all in a manner that promotes development of important reasoning skills. Kinetic parameters are obtained for the stable…

  15. A Qualitative Approach to Enzyme Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Grover L.

    2009-01-01

    Most general biochemistry textbooks present enzyme inhibition by showing how the basic Michaelis-Menten parameters K[subscript m] and V[subscript max] are affected mathematically by a particular type of inhibitor. This approach, while mathematically rigorous, does not lend itself to understanding how inhibition patterns are used to determine the…

  16. Enzyme Kinetics? Elementary, my dear 3 -8 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    research interests are in the areas of protein- ... rate constant for the formation of products, k3 is significantly of some enzymes. ... tissue at different stages of development. .... represent the only values of Km and V max that satisfy all of the sets.

  17. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Gene Polymorphism: An Observational Study among Diabetic Hypertensive Subjects in Malaysia. ... Methods: The pharmacological effect of ACE inhibition on mean arterial pressure (MAP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were observed among a total of 62 subjects for ...

  18. Protein engineering of enzymes for process applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodley, John M

    2013-01-01

    opportunities will be targeted on modification to enable process application. This article discusses the challenges involved in enzyme modification focused on process requirements, such as the need to fulfill reaction thermodynamics, specific activity under the required conditions, kinetics at required...... concentrations, and stability. Finally, future research directions are discussed, including the integration of biocatalysis with neighboring chemical steps....

  19. Enzyme activity of a Phanerochaete chrysosporium cellobiohydrolase

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to produce a secreted, heterologously expressed Phanerochaete chrysosporium cellobiohydrolase (CBHI.1) protein that required no in vitro chemical refolding and to investigate the cellulolytic activity of the clone expressing the glutathione S-transferase (GST) fused CBHI.1 protein. Plate enzyme ...

  20. Detergents - Zeolites and Enzymes Excel Cleaning Power

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Presently used detergent formulations generally consist of surfactants, builder and cobuilder, bleaching agents, addi- tives for secondary benefits and enzymes. Zeolites are basically hydrated crystalline aluminium silicates which function as ion exchangers and make the water soft by removing calcium, magnesium and ...

  1. Furin is a chemokine-modifying enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hensbergen, Paul J; Verzijl, Dennis; Balog, Crina I A

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines comprise a class of structurally related proteins that are involved in many aspects of leukocyte migration under basal and inflammatory conditions. In addition to the large number of genes, limited processing of these proteins by a variety of enzymes enhances the complexity of the tota...

  2. Ligninolytic enzyme complex of Armillaria spp

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stoychev, I.; Nerud, František

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2000), s. 248-250 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : lignin olytic enzyme * lignin peroxidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2000

  3. Involvement of methyltransferases enzymes during the energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The methyl group transfer from dimethylsulfide (DMS), trimethylamine and methanol to 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (coenzyme M) were investigated from cell extracts of Methanosarcina semesiae sp. nov. to evaluate whether the enzyme systems involved were constitutive or inductive. The extracts from cells grown on ...

  4. Computationally designed libraries for rapid enzyme stabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijma, Hein J.; Floor, Robert J.; Jekel, Peter A.; Baker, David; Marrink, Siewert J.; Janssen, Dick B.

    The ability to engineer enzymes and other proteins to any desired stability would have wide-ranging applications. Here, we demonstrate that computational design of a library with chemically diverse stabilizing mutations allows the engineering of drastically stabilized and fully functional variants

  5. Role of antioxidant scavenging enzymes and extracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present work, we studied the role of antioxidant scavenging enzymes of plant pathogenic bacteria: catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and a virulence factor; extracelluar polysaccharide production in determining the virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) isolates and its differential reaction to rice cultivars.

  6. Novel Industrial Enzymes from Uncultured Arctic Microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede

    , and reduce the risk of contaminations. Cold- and alkaline-active enzymes can be found in microorganisms adapted to living in natural environments with these conditions, which are extremely rare but found in the unique ikaite columns from SW Greenland (4-6 °C, pH >10). It is estimated that less than 1...

  7. Microbial nitrilases: versatile, spiral forming, industrial enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuku, R N; Brady, D; Benedik, M J; Sewell, B T

    2009-03-01

    The nitrilases are enzymes that convert nitriles to the corresponding acid and ammonia. They are members of a superfamily, which includes amidases and occur in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The superfamily is characterized by having a homodimeric building block with a alpha beta beta alpha-alpha beta beta alpha sandwich fold and an active site containing four positionally conserved residues: cys, glu, glu and lys. Their high chemical specificity and frequent enantioselectivity makes them attractive biocatalysts for the production of fine chemicals and pharmaceutical intermediates. Nitrilases are also used in the treatment of toxic industrial effluent and cyanide remediation. The superfamily enzymes have been visualized as dimers, tetramers, hexamers, octamers, tetradecamers, octadecamers and variable length helices, but all nitrilase oligomers have the same basic dimer interface. Moreover, in the case of the octamers, tetradecamers, octadecamers and the helices, common principles of subunit association apply. While the range of industrially interesting reactions catalysed by this enzyme class continues to increase, research efforts are still hampered by the lack of a high resolution microbial nitrilase structure which can provide insights into their specificity, enantioselectivity and the mechanism of catalysis. This review provides an overview of the current progress in elucidation of structure and function in this enzyme class and emphasizes insights that may lead to further biotechnological applications.

  8. Enzymes and Ecosystems -- Where Do They Overlap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard E. Dickson

    1996-01-01

    The whole plant is not the sum of its enzyme systems. This book demonstrates the importance of whole-plant physiology by examining carbon-nitrogen interactions and how these interactions are influenced by demands of the whole plant. In some aspects it is a timely response to the current, strong reductionist trends in plant physiology associated with advances in...

  9. Transition state theory for enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an essay that discusses the concepts underlying the application of modern transition state theory to reactions in enzymes. Issues covered include the potential of mean force, the quantization of vibrations, the free energy of activation, and transmission coefficients to account for nonequilibrium effect, recrossing, and tunneling. PMID:26008760

  10. Synthetic Applications of Nitrile-Converting Enzymes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martínková, Ludmila; Mylerová, Veronika

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 7, - (2003), s. 1279-1295 ISSN 1385-2728 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4020213 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : nitrile * converting * enzymes Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.521, year: 2003

  11. Enzyme kinetic characterization of protein tyrosine phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Branner, S.; Møller, K. B.

    2003-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play a central role in cellular signaling processes, resulting in an increased interest in modulating the activities of PTPs. We therefore decided to undertake a detailed enzyme kinetic evaluation of various transmembrane and cytosolic PTPs (PTPalpha, PTPbeta...

  12. Chitinolytic enzymes produces by ovine rumen bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopečný, Jan; Hodrová, Blanka

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 5 (2000), s. 465-468 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/97/1221 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : chitinolytic enzymes Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2000

  13. growth and extracellular enzyme production by microorganisms

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okorie

    2013-06-26

    Jun 26, 2013 ... 1Federal Institute of Industrial Research Oshodi, Lagos, Nigeria. 2Department of ... of Bacillus subtilis (Bs2) were able to produce lipase enzyme. The study ... However, most commercial starter cultures originated from those ... The traditional method of preparing Ugba was employed in the laboratory to ...

  14. Laccase Enzymes in Inocula Pleurotus spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora García-Oduardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of edible and medicinal mushrooms Pleurotus has been aimed at promoting alternative management for agricultural products. This basidiomicete has been the subject of numerous studies because of its fruiting body constitutes a food, being a producer of enzymes with industrial interest and for its ability of biotransformation of lignocellulosic substrates. Pleurotus inocula in the established technology for growing edible and medicinal mushrooms in the CEBI Research- Production Plant were performed using sorghum or wheat. However, it is possible to expand the possibilities with other substrates. In this paper, the results of laccase enzymes production in inocula prepared with sorghum, corn and coffee pulp with two strains Pleurotus ostreatus CCEBI 3021 and Pleurotus ostreatus CCEBI 3024 are presented. The period of preparation of seed reaches 15-21 days, the measurements of laccase activity were performed in periods of seven days. Extraction of crude enzyme was performed in aqueous phase, the determination of the laccase enzyme activity, using guaiacol as substrate. The results obtained in this work with studies in previous work using sorghum as inocula are compared. It is found that higher yields are obtained laccase in coffee pulp. This study contributes to the theoretical knowledge and to provide alternatives for securing the production process of the plant.

  15. Lignocellulose degradation, enzyme production and protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial conversion of corn stover by white rot fungi has the potential to increase its ligninolysis and nutritional value, thereby transforming it into protein-enriched animal feed. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize conditions for the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes by Trametes versicolor during ...

  16. Thermodynamic activity-based intrinsic enzyme kinetic sheds light on enzyme-solvent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosch, Jan-Hendrik; Wagner, David; Nistelkas, Vasilios; Spieß, Antje C

    2017-01-01

    The reaction medium has major impact on biocatalytic reaction systems and on their economic significance. To allow for tailored medium engineering, thermodynamic phenomena, intrinsic enzyme kinetics, and enzyme-solvent interactions have to be discriminated. To this end, enzyme reaction kinetic modeling was coupled with thermodynamic calculations based on investigations of the alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis (LbADH) in monophasic water/methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) mixtures as a model solvent. Substrate concentrations and substrate thermodynamic activities were varied separately to identify the individual thermodynamic and kinetic effects on the enzyme activity. Microkinetic parameters based on concentration and thermodynamic activity were derived to successfully identify a positive effect of MTBE on the availability of the substrate to the enzyme, but a negative effect on the enzyme performance. In conclusion, thermodynamic activity-based kinetic modeling might be a suitable tool to initially curtail the type of enzyme-solvent interactions and thus, a powerful first step to potentially understand the phenomena that occur in nonconventional media in more detail. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:96-103, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Adsorption of monocomponent enzymes in enzyme mixture analyzed quantitatively during hydrolysis of lignocellulose substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Várnai, Anikó; Viikari, Liisa; Marjamaa, Kaisa; Siika-aho, Matti

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of purified Trichoderma reesei cellulases (TrCel7A, TrCel6A and TrCel5A) and xylanase TrXyn11 and Aspergillus niger β-glucosidase AnCel3A was studied in enzyme mixture during hydrolysis of two pretreated lignocellulosic materials, steam pretreated and catalytically delignified spruce, along with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). The enzyme mixture was compiled to resemble the composition of commercial cellulase preparations. The hydrolysis was carried out at 35 °C to mimic the temperature of the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Enzyme adsorption was followed by analyzing the activity and the protein amount of the individual free enzymes in the hydrolysis supernatant. Most enzymes adsorbed quickly at early stages of the hydrolysis and remained bound throughout the hydrolysis, although the conversion reached was fairly high. Only with the catalytically oxidized spruce samples, the bound enzymes started to be released as the hydrolysis degree reached 80%. The results based on enzyme activities and protein assay were in good accordance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of irradiation on immobilized enzymes compared with that on enzymes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schachinger, L.; Schippel, C.; Altmann, E.; Diepold, B.; Yang, C.; Jaenike, M.; Hochhaeuser, E.

    1985-01-01

    Glucose oxidase and catalase were immobilized by attaching them to nylon fibers that had been treated with triethyloxonium-tetrafluoroborate, diaminohexane and glutaraldialdehyde according to Morris, Campell and Hornby (1975). This method assures that the enzymes are bound to a side chain of the polyamide structure. Enzyme activity (as measured by the O 2 -uptake and by microcalorimetry) was found to be unchanged after 2 years. The apparent Ksub(m)-constants of the immobilized enzymes with glucose were the same as those for enzymes in solution. GOD and catalase immobilized in poly(acrylamide) gel had the same Ksub(m)-value. Despite the high stability during storage, the radiation induced inactivation of enzymes immobilized on gel or chromosorb, an inorganic carrier, was of the same order of magnitude as that of the dissolved enzymes. The enzymes bound to nylon fibers showed a higher radiation sensitivity. This might have been caused by an additional attack on the binding site of the carrier. (orig.)

  19. Nanoarmored Enzymes for Organic Enzymology: Synthesis and Characterization of Poly(2-Alkyloxazoline)-Enzyme Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leurs, Melanie; Tiller, Joerg C

    2017-01-01

    The properties of enzymes can be altered significantly by modification with polymers. Numerous different methods are known to obtain such polymer-enzyme conjugates (PECs). However, there is no universal method to render enzymes into PECs that are fully soluble in organic solvents. Here, we present a method, which achieves such high degree of modification of proteins that the majority of modified enzymes will be soluble in organic solvents. This is achieved by preparing poly(2-alkyloxazoline)s (POx) with an NH 2 end group and coupling this functional polymer via pyromellitic acid dianhydride onto the amino groups of the respective protein. The resulting PECs are capable of serving as surfactants for unmodified proteins, rendering the whole mixture organosoluble. Depending on the nature of the POx and the molecular weight and the nature of the enzyme, the PECs are soluble in chloroform or even toluene. Another advantage of this method is that the poly(2-alkyloxazoline) can be activated with the coupling agent and used for the enzyme conjugation without further purification. The POx-enzyme conjugates generated by this modification strategy show modulated catalytic activity in both, aqueous and organic, systems. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative gene expression of intestinal metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ho-Chul; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Cho, Hee-Jung; Yi, Hee; Cho, Soo-Min; Lee, Dong-Goo; Abd El-Aty, A M; Kim, Jin-Suk; Sun, Duxin; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the expression profiles of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the intestine of mouse, rat and human. Total RNA was isolated from the duodenum and the mRNA expression was measured using Affymetrix GeneChip oligonucleotide arrays. Detected genes from the intestine of mouse, rat and human were ca. 60% of 22690 sequences, 40% of 8739 and 47% of 12559, respectively. Total genes of metabolizing enzymes subjected in this study were 95, 33 and 68 genes in mouse, rat and human, respectively. Of phase I enzymes, the mouse exhibited abundant gene expressions for Cyp3a25, Cyp4v3, Cyp2d26, followed by Cyp2b20, Cyp2c65 and Cyp4f14, whereas, the rat showed higher expression profiles of Cyp3a9, Cyp2b19, Cyp4f1, Cyp17a1, Cyp2d18, Cyp27a1 and Cyp4f6. However, the highly expressed P450 enzymes were CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP4F3, CYP2C18, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A7, CYP11B1 and CYP2B6 in the human. For phase II enzymes, glucuronosyltransferase Ugt1a6, glutathione S-transferases Gstp1, Gstm3 and Gsta2, sulfotransferase Sult1b1 and acyltransferase Dgat1 were highly expressed in the mouse. The rat revealed predominant expression of glucuronosyltransferases Ugt1a1 and Ugt1a7, sulfotransferase Sult1b1, acetyltransferase Dlat and acyltransferase Dgat1. On the other hand, in human, glucuronosyltransferases UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, glutathione S-transferases MGST3, GSTP1, GSTA2 and GSTM4, sulfotransferases ST1A3 and SULT1A2, acetyltransferases SAT1 and CRAT, and acyltransferase AGPAT2 were dominantly detected. Therefore, current data indicated substantial interspecies differences in the pattern of intestinal gene expression both for P450 enzymes and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. This genomic database is expected to improve our understanding of interspecies variations in estimating intestinal prehepatic clearance of oral drugs.

  1. Non-homologous isofunctional enzymes: a systematic analysis of alternative solutions in enzyme evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelchenko, Marina V; Galperin, Michael Y; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2010-04-30

    Evolutionarily unrelated proteins that catalyze the same biochemical reactions are often referred to as analogous - as opposed to homologous - enzymes. The existence of numerous alternative, non-homologous enzyme isoforms presents an interesting evolutionary problem; it also complicates genome-based reconstruction of the metabolic pathways in a variety of organisms. In 1998, a systematic search for analogous enzymes resulted in the identification of 105 Enzyme Commission (EC) numbers that included two or more proteins without detectable sequence similarity to each other, including 34 EC nodes where proteins were known (or predicted) to have distinct structural folds, indicating independent evolutionary origins. In the past 12 years, many putative non-homologous isofunctional enzymes were identified in newly sequenced genomes. In addition, efforts in structural genomics resulted in a vastly improved structural coverage of proteomes, providing for definitive assessment of (non)homologous relationships between proteins. We report the results of a comprehensive search for non-homologous isofunctional enzymes (NISE) that yielded 185 EC nodes with two or more experimentally characterized - or predicted - structurally unrelated proteins. Of these NISE sets, only 74 were from the original 1998 list. Structural assignments of the NISE show over-representation of proteins with the TIM barrel fold and the nucleotide-binding Rossmann fold. From the functional perspective, the set of NISE is enriched in hydrolases, particularly carbohydrate hydrolases, and in enzymes involved in defense against oxidative stress. These results indicate that at least some of the non-homologous isofunctional enzymes were recruited relatively recently from enzyme families that are active against related substrates and are sufficiently flexible to accommodate changes in substrate specificity.

  2. Therapeutic Enzymes: Applications and Approaches to Pharmacological Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Maryam; Ghoshoon, Mohammad B; Vakili, Bahareh; Ghasemi, Younes

    2017-01-01

    Among therapeutic proteins, enzymes represent small and of course profitable market. They can be used to treat important, rare, and deadly diseases. Enzyme therapy is the only available treatment for certain disorders. Here, pharmaceutical enzymes are reviewed. They are categorized in four main groups, enzymes in replacement therapy, enzymes in cancer treatment, enzymes for fibrinolysis, and finally enzymes that are used topically for various treatments. Furthermore, enzyme gene therapy and future perspective of therapeutic enzymes are mentioned in brief. There are many important approved enzymes in pharmaceutical market. Several approaches such as point mutation, fusion protein designing, glycoengineering, and PEGylation were used to achieve improved enzymes. Although sometimes enzymes were engineered to facilitate production and purification process, appropriate delivery to target sites, extending half-life, and reducing immunogenicity are among the main goals of engineering approaches. Overall, enzymes play a critical role in treatment of common and rare diseases. Evaluation of new enzymes as well as improvement of approved enzymes are of the most important challenges in biotechnology. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. DUB3 Deubiquitylating Enzymes Regulate Hippo Pathway Activity by Regulating the Stability of ITCH, LATS and AMOT Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thanh Hung; Kugler, Jan-Michael; Cohen, Stephen Michael

    2017-01-01

    /TAZ, is regulated by ubiquitin mediated protein turnover and several ubiquitin ligase complexes have been implicated in human cancer. However, little is known about the deubiquitylating enzymes that counteract these ubiquitin ligases in regulation of the Hippo pathway. Here we identify the DUB3 family...... deubiquitylating enzymes as regulators of Hippo pathway activity. We provide evidence that DUB3 proteins regulate YAP/TAZ activity by controlling the stability of the E3 ligase ITCH, the LATS kinases and the AMOT family proteins. As a novel Hippo pathway regulator, DUB3 has the potential to act a tumor suppressor...

  4. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng

    2008-01-01

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 (angstrom) resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes.

  5. Fine-tuning the ubiquitin code at DNA double-strand breaks: deubiquitinating enzymes at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta eCitterio

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitination is a reversible protein modification broadly implicated in cellular functions. Signaling processes mediated by ubiquitin are crucial for the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, one of the most dangerous types of DNA lesions. In particular, the DSB response critically relies on active ubiquitination by the RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitin ligases at the chromatin, which is essential for proper DSB signaling and repair. How this pathway is fine-tuned and what the functional consequences are of its deregulation for genome integrity and tissue homeostasis are subject of intense investigation. One important regulatory mechanism is by reversal of substrate ubiquitination through the activity of specific deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs, as supported by the implication of a growing number of DUBs in DNA damage response (DDR processes. Here, we discuss the current knowledge of how ubiquitin-mediated signaling at DSBs is controlled by deubiquitinating enzymes, with main focus on DUBs targeting histone H2A and on their recent implication in stem cell biology and cancer.

  6. Chaperone-like activities of α-synuclein: α-Synuclein assists enzyme activities of esterases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Misun; Kim, SeungBum; Kang, Mira; Ryu, Yeonwoo; Doohun Kim, T.

    2006-01-01

    α-Synuclein, a major constituent of Lewy bodies (LBs), has been implicated to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), although the physiological function of α-synuclein has not yet been known. Here we have shown that α-synuclein, which has no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure, can protect the enzyme activity of microbial esterases against stress conditions such as heat, pH, and organic solvents. In particular, the flexibility of α-synuclein and its C-terminal region seems to be important for complex formation, but the structural integrity of the C-terminal region may not be required for stabilization of enzyme activity. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in vivo enzyme assays showed highly specific interactions of esterases with α-synuclein. Our results indicate that α-synuclein not only protects the enzyme activity of microbial esterases in vitro, but also can stabilize the active conformation of microbial esterases in vivo

  7. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  8. Enhancing the functional properties of thermophilic enzymes by chemical modification and immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Don A; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2011-09-10

    The immobilization of proteins (mostly typically enzymes) onto solid supports is mature technology and has been used successfully to enhance biocatalytic processes in a wide range of industrial applications. However, continued developments in immobilization technology have led to more sophisticated and specialized applications of the process. A combination of targeted chemistries, for both the support and the protein, sometimes in combination with additional chemical and/or genetic engineering, has led to the development of methods for the modification of protein functional properties, for enhancing protein stability and for the recovery of specific proteins from complex mixtures. In particular, the development of effective methods for immobilizing large multi-subunit proteins with multiple covalent linkages (multi-point immobilization) has been effective in stabilizing proteins where subunit dissociation is the initial step in enzyme inactivation. In some instances, multiple benefits are achievable in a single process. Here we comprehensively review the literature pertaining to immobilization and chemical modification of different enzyme classes from thermophiles, with emphasis on the chemistries involved and their implications for modification of the enzyme functional properties. We also highlight the potential for synergies in the combined use of immobilization and other chemical modifications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Immobilization of enzymes using non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs): Surface and enzyme effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Keeran; Xi, Jingshu; Stuckey, David C

    2015-12-01

    The use of non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs) as a support for enzyme immobilisation was investigated. Formulation required the mixing of an aqueous-surfactant solution with a relatively non-polar solvent-surfactant solution, forming a solvent droplet surrounded by a thin stabilised aqueous film (soapy shell). Studies utilising anionic surfactants have showed increased retention, however, very little have been understood about the forces governing immobilisation. This study seeks to determine the effects of enzyme properties on CLA immobilisation by examining a non-ionic/non-polar solvent system comprised of two non-ionic surfactants, Tween 20 and 80, mineral oil and the enzymes lipase, aprotinin and α-chymotrypsin. From these results it was deduced that hydrophobic interactions strongly governed immobilisation. Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CSLM) revealed that immobilisation was predominantly achieved by surface adsorption attributed to hydrophobic interactions between the enzyme and the CLA surface. Enzyme surface affinity was found to increase when added directly to the formulation (pre-manufacture addition), as opposed to the bulk continuous phase (post-manufacture addition), with α-chymotrypsin and aprotinin being the most perturbed, while lipase was relatively unaffected. The effect of zeta potential on immobilisation showed that enzymes adsorbed better closer to their pI, indicating that charge minimisation was necessary for immobilisation. Finally, the effect of increasing enzyme concentration in the aqueous phase resulted in an increase in adsorption for all enzymes due to cooperativity between protein molecules, with saturation occurring faster at higher adsorption rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Enzyme Immobilization: An Overview on Methods, Support Material, and Applications of Immobilized Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisha, V L; Jain, Ankita; Jain, Amita

    Immobilized enzymes can be used in a wide range of processes. In recent years, a variety of new approaches have emerged for the immobilization of enzymes that have greater efficiency and wider usage. During the course of the last two decades, this area has rapidly expanded into a multidisciplinary field. This current study is a comprehensive review of a variety of literature produced on the different enzymes that have been immobilized on various supporting materials. These immobilized enzymes have a wide range of applications. These include applications in the sugar, fish, and wine industries, where they are used for removing organic compounds from waste water. This study also reviews their use in sophisticated biosensors for metabolite control and in situ measurements of environmental pollutants. Immobilized enzymes also find significant application in drug metabolism, biodiesel and antibiotic production, bioremediation, and the food industry. The widespread usage of immobilized enzymes is largely due to the fact that they are cheaper, environment friendly, and much easier to use when compared to equivalent technologies. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Targeting of ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors for the treatment of CNS diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Walmod, Peter Schledermann; Filippov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, their receptors at the cell surface, and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) involved in cell-cell or cell-ECM interactions are implicated in processes related to major diseases of the central nervous system including Alzheimer's disease (AD), epilepsy......, schizophrenia, addiction, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cancer. There are multiple strategies for targeting the ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors with antibodies, peptides, glycosaminoglycans, and other natural and synthetic compounds. ECM-targeting treatments include...... chondroitinase ABC, heparin/heparan sulfate-mimicking oligosaccharides, ECM cross-linking antibodies, and drugs stimulating expression of ECM molecules. The amount or activity of ECM-degrading enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases can be modulated indirectly via the regulation of endogenous inhibitors like...

  12. Coccolithophores: Functional Biodiversity, Enzymes and Bioprospecting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Allen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Emiliania huxleyi is a single celled, marine phytoplankton with global distribution. As a key species for global biogeochemical cycling, a variety of strains have been amassed in various culture collections. Using a library consisting of 52 strains of E. huxleyi and an ‘in house‘ enzyme screening program, we have assessed the functional biodiversity within this species of fundamental importance to global biogeochemical cycling, whilst at the same time determining their potential for exploitation in biocatalytic applications. Here, we describe the screening of E. huxleyi strains, as well as a coccolithovirus infected strain, for commercially relevant biocatalytic enzymes such as acid/alkali phosphodiesterase, acid/alkali phosphomonoesterase, EC1.1.1-type dehydrogenase, EC1.3.1-type dehydrogenase and carboxylesterase.

  13. Enzymic saccharification of some pretreated agricultural wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gammal, S.M.A.; Sadek, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Cellulosie wastes, artichoke leaves and stalks, sugar-cane bagasse and fennel seeds after extraction of essential oils were treated with various concentrations of peracetic acid at 100/sup 0/C, 60/sup 0/C and room temperature several times, washed with water and ethanol and air dried. The degree of enzymatic solubilization of each treated cellulosic waste was measured with Aspergillus niger cellulase (Endo-1,4-B-Glucanase; 1,4-(1,3; 1,4)-..beta..-D-glucan 4-glucanohydrolase; EC 3. 2.1.4). Artichoke waste and sugar-cane bagasse were solubilized more efectively by the enzymethan fennel waste. Data are presented describing the effect of time, enzyme and substrate concentration on the rate of enzymic hydrolysis. Infrared spectra of the treated and untreated cellulosic materials were recorded.

  14. Hydrolytic enzyme activity enhanced by Barium supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Muñoz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis of polymers is a first and often limiting step during the degradation of plant residues. Plant biomass is generally a major component of waste residues and a major renewable resource to obtain a variety of secondary products including biofuels. Improving the performance of enzymatic hydrolysis of plant material with minimum costs and limiting the use of additional microbial biomass or hydrolytic enzymes directly influences competitiveness of these green biotechnological processes. In this study, we cloned and expressed a cellulase and two esterases recovered from environmental thermophilic soil bacterial communities and characterize their optimum activity conditions including the effect of several metal ions. Results showed that supplementing these hydrolytic reactions with Barium increases the activity of these extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. This observation represents a simple but major improvement to enhance the efficiency and competitiveness of this process within an increasingly important biotechnological sector.

  15. (Hyper)thermophilic enzymes: production and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcicchio, Pierpaolo; Levisson, Mark; Kengen, Servé W M; Koutsopoulos, Sotirios

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms, thriving at environmental temperatures near or above 100 °C, has revolutionized our ideas about the upper temperature limit at which life can exist. The characterization of (hyper)thermostable proteins has broadened our understanding and presented new opportunities for solving one of the most challenging problems in biophysics: how is structural stability and biological function maintained at high temperatures where "normal" proteins undergo dramatic structural changes? In our laboratory we have purified and studied many thermostable and hyperthermostable proteins in an attempt to determine the molecular basis of heat stability. Here, we present methods to express such proteins and enzymes in E. coli and provide a general protocol for overproduction and purification. The ability to produce enzymes that retain their stability and activity at elevated temperatures creates exciting opportunities for a wide range of biocatalytic applications.

  16. Marvels of enzyme catalysis at true atomic resolution: distortions, bond elongations, hidden flips, protonation states and atom identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Piotr; Tittmann, Kai

    2014-12-01

    Although general principles of enzyme catalysis are fairly well understood nowadays, many important details of how exactly the substrate is bound and processed in an enzyme remain often invisible and as such elusive. In fortunate cases, structural analysis of enzymes can be accomplished at true atomic resolution thus making possible to shed light on otherwise concealed fine-structural traits of bound substrates, intermediates, cofactors and protein groups. We highlight recent structural studies of enzymes using ultrahigh-resolution X-ray protein crystallography showcasing its enormous potential as a tool in the elucidation of enzymatic mechanisms and in unveiling fundamental principles of enzyme catalysis. We discuss the observation of seemingly hyper-reactive, physically distorted cofactors and intermediates with elongated scissile substrate bonds, the detection of 'hidden' conformational and chemical equilibria and the analysis of protonation states with surprising findings. In delicate cases, atomic resolution is required to unambiguously disclose the identity of atoms as demonstrated for the metal cluster in nitrogenase. In addition to the pivotal structural findings and the implications for our understanding of enzyme catalysis, we further provide a practical framework for resolution enhancement through optimized data acquisition and processing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) on oxidative stress response enzymes of the macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterhuizen-Londt, M; Pflugmacher, S; Downing, T G

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria are known to produce bioactive secondary metabolites such as hepatotoxins, cytotoxins and neurotoxins. The newly recognized neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a naturally occurring non-protein amino acid found in the majority of cyanobacterial genera tested. Evidence that exists for implication of BMAA in neurodegenerative disorders relies on bioaccumulation and biomagnification from symbiotic cyanobacteria. Uptake and accumulation of free BMAA by various non-symbiotic organisms, including aquatic macrophytes, has been documented but to date limited evidence of ecotoxicology exists. We therefore investigated the effect of BMAA on the oxidative stress responses of the macrophyte, Ceratophyllum demersum. Markers for oxidative stress in this study are the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. We found that BMAA had an inhibitory effect on all the oxidative stress response enzymes tested in plants exposed to BMAA. However enzymes not related to oxidative stress response were not affected by BMAA in in vitro experiments. Binding studies in the presence of BMAA showed reduced enzyme specific activity over time compared to the control. This study shows that BMAA causes oxidative stress indirectly as it inhibits antioxidant enzymes required to combat reactive oxygen species that cause damage to cells. Further investigations are required to fully understand the inhibitory effect of BMAA on these enzymes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A thermodynamic and theoretical view for enzyme regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinyi

    2015-01-01

    Precise regulation is fundamental to the proper functioning of enzymes in a cell. Current opinions about this, such as allosteric regulation and dynamic contribution to enzyme regulation, are experimental models and substantially empirical. Here we proposed a theoretical and thermodynamic model of enzyme regulation. The main idea is that enzyme regulation is processed via the regulation of abundance of active conformation in the reaction buffer. The theoretical foundation, experimental evidence, and experimental criteria to test our model are discussed and reviewed. We conclude that basic principles of enzyme regulation are laws of protein thermodynamics and it can be analyzed using the concept of distribution curve of active conformations of enzymes.

  19. Ethanol from wood. Cellulase enzyme production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szengyel, Zsolt

    2000-03-01

    Conversion of biomass to liquid fuels, such as ethanol, has been investigated during the past decades. First due to the oil crisis of the 1970s and lately because of concerns about greenhouse effect, ethanol has been found to be a suitable substitute for gasoline in transportation. Although ethanol is produced in large quantities from corn starch, the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol is rather problematic. However, cellulosic raw materials are important as they are available in large quantities from agriculture and forestry. One of the most extensively investigated processes is the enzymatic process, in which fungal cellulolytic enzymes are used to convert the cellulose content of the biomass to glucose, which is then fermented to ethanol. In order to make the raw material accessible to biological attack, it has to be pretreated first. The most successful method, which has been evaluated for various lignocellulosic materials, is the steam pretreatment. In this thesis the utilization of steam pretreated willow (hardwood) and spruce (softwood) was examined for enzyme production using a filamentous fungus T. reesei RUT C30. Various carbon sources originating from the steam pretreated materials have been investigated. The replacement of the solid carbon source with a liquid carbon source, as well as the effect of pH, was studied. The effect of toxic compounds generated during pretreatment was also examined. Comparative study of softwood and hardwood showed that steam pretreated hardwood is a better carbon source than softwood. The hydrolytic potential of enzyme solutions produced on wood derived carbon sources was better compared to commercial cellulases. Also enzyme solutions produced on steam pretreated spruce showed less sensitivity towards toxic compounds formed during steam pretreatment.

  20. Substrates and method for determining enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.E.; Bissell, E.R.

    1981-10-13

    A method is disclosed for determining the presence of an enzyme in a biological fluid, which includes the steps of contacting the fluid with a synthetic chromogenic substrate, which is an amino acid derivative of 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin; incubating the substrate-containing fluid to effect enzymatic hydrolysis; and fluorometrically determining the presence of the free 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin chromophore in the hydrolyzate. No Drawings

  1. Nedd8 processing enzymes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donoghue, Jean; Bech-Otschir, Dawadschargal; Larsen, Ida

    2013-01-01

    Conjugation of the ubiquitin-like modifier Nedd8 to cullins is critical for the function of SCF-type ubiquitin ligases and thus facilitates ubiquitin conjugation and ultimately degradation of SCF substrates, including several cell cycle regulators. Like ubiquitin, Nedd8 is produced as a precursor...... that must first be processed before it becomes active. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae this is carried out exclusively by the enzyme Yuh1....

  2. Radioisotope-enzymes and cancer study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luyen, T. van

    2008-01-01

    Cancer is a pathological sign, when the abnormal cells appear in certain human tissues or organs. These cells can reproduce beyond the control of normal biological protection mechanism. Because they reproduce very fast, the metabolic process is accelerated, which causes the extreme need for more energy, substrate and catalyzing enzymes. Based on these needs, we can control the metabolic process by: Stopping supplying the energy. Stopping supplying the substrate and the materials to build up the cell's structure. Stopping operating catalysis by breaking out the enzyme's structure. Destroying the tumor cell by extra agents such as radiations and chemicals. All of these methods have been studied for a long time, which costs too much money, time and labor. Although we succeeded in some ways, the results are still not satisfactory. There are many reasons for this situation but the main one is the lack of information to understand all the processes taking place in the cell and our body. However, as far as we studied, we would like to propose the method to break the structure of the enzyme by nuclear decay process. (author)

  3. Effect of turmeric on xenobiotic metabolising enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goud, V K; Polasa, K; Krishnaswamy, K

    1993-07-01

    Diet contains several substances capable of inhibiting chemical carcinogenesis. It is known that such inhibitors may either act directly by scavenging the reactive substances or indirectly by promoting mechanisms which enhance detoxification. Turmeric which contains curcumin both in vitro and in vivo is an active antimutagen. Studies were therefore conducted to evaluate the effects of turmeric on xenobiotic metabolising enzymes in hepatic tissue of rats fed turmeric ranging from 0.5-10% in the diet. Enzymes such as aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase, UDP glucuronyl transferase and glutathione-S-transferase were assayed after four weeks of turmeric fed diets. No significant differences were seen in the activating enzyme AHH. However, UDPGT was significantly elevated in rats fed 10% turmeric while GSHT registered a significant increase in 5 and 10% turmeric fed diet as compared to controls and 0.5-1.0% turmeric fed animals. The results suggest that turmeric may increase detoxification systems in addition to its anti-oxidant properties. Curcumin perhaps is the active principle in turmeric. Turmeric used widely as a spice would probably mitigate the effects of several dietary carcinogens.

  4. Enzyme-Gelatin Electrochemical Biosensors: Scaling Down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik A. Heering

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we investigate the possibility of scaling down enzyme-gelatin modified electrodes by spin coating the enzyme-gelatin layer. Special attention is given to the electrochemical behavior of the selected enzymes inside the gelatin matrix. A glassy carbon electrode was used as a substrate to immobilize, in the first instance, horse heart cytochrome c (HHC in a gelatin matrix. Both a drop dried and a spin coated layer was prepared. On scaling down, a transition from diffusion controlled reactions towards adsorption controlled reactions is observed. Compared to a drop dried electrode, a spin coated electrode showed a more stable electrochemical behavior. Next to HHC, we also incorporated catalase in a spin coated gelatin matrix immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode. By spincoating, highly uniform sub micrometer layers of biocompatible matrices can be constructed. A full electrochemical study and characterization of the modified surfaces has been carried out. It was clear that in the case of catalase, gluteraldehyde addition was needed to prevent leaking of the catalase from the gelatin matrix.

  5. Ionizing radiation effect on enzymes. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libicky, A.; Chottova, O.; Fidlerova, J.; Urban, J.; Kubankova, V.

    1980-01-01

    A decrease in the efficacy of trypsin (determination according to PhBs 3 with the use of L-lysine ethyl ester chloride) was investigated in pancreatin obtained by enzyme precipitation from a pancreas extraction after autolysis, in the identical sample with an additionally increased content of lipids, in pancreatin containing parts of the pancreatic tissue, in crystalline trypsin, and in crystalline salt-free and lyophilized trypsine after irradiation with gamma rays from 60 Co, doses ranging from 1x10 4 Gy to 12x10 4 Gy. The results were statistically evaluated and after the conversion to dried or lipid-free substance expressed in graphs. The dependence of the efficacy on the radiation dose has a linear course in semi-logarithmic arrangement, similarly as it occurred in chymotrypsin and in the total proteolytic efficacy. The decrease in the efficacy of trypsin in the samples of pancreatin in percentage maintains the same sequence in the samples under study as it was in the decrease in the efficacy of chymotrypsin and the total proteolytic efficacy, but it is smaller. The decrease in the efficacy of pure enzyme is, similarly to chymotrypsin, greater than the decrease in the efficacy of the enzyme in pancreatin. The present ballast substances thus significantly influence stability. (author)

  6. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Guoxin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  7. Enzymes in biogenesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Enzyme characterization using tracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, D.B.

    1975-01-01

    Enzymes and metabolic pathways, by which starch and cell wall polysaccharides are formed, were investigated in order to learn how these processes are regulated and to identify the enzymatic regulatory mechanisms involved. Germinating lily pollen was used for studies of cell wall formation, and pollen and maize endosperm for studies of starch biosynthesis. Hexokinase being the first step in conversion of hexoses to starch, wall polysaccharides and respiratory substrates, maize endosperm enzyme was assayed by its conversion of 14 C-hexose to 14 C-hexose-6-P, and rapid separation of the two labelled compounds on anion-exchange paper. This enzyme did not appear to be under tight regulation by feed-back inhibition or activation, nor to be severely inhibited by glucose-6-P or activated by citrate. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and other pyrophosphorylases were assayed radiochemically with 14 C-glucose-1-P (forward direction) or 32-PPsub(i) (reverse direction). They showed that the maize endosperm enzyme was activated by the glycolytic intermediates fructose-6-P and 3-phosphoglycerate, and that low levels of the enzyme were present in the high sucrose-low starch mutant named shrunken-2. Under optimal in-vitro assay conditions, the pollen enzyme reacted four times faster than the observed in-vivo rate of starch accumulation. Biogenesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides requires the conversion of hexose phosphates to various sugar nucleotides and utilization of the latter by the appropriate polysaccharide synthetases. Lily pollen possesses a β-1,3-glucan synthetase which is activated up to six-fold by β-linked oligosaccharides. Hence, the in-vivo activity of this enzyme may be modulated by such effector molecules

  8. Understanding Biological Rates and their Temperature Dependence, from Enzymes to Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, E.; Arcus, V. L.

    2017-12-01

    individual steps, indicating all enzymes have an influence on organism temperature dependence. This has implications for our understanding of how organisms respond to fluctuations in environmental temperature.

  9. Multi-enzyme catalyzed processes: Next generation biocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade Santacoloma, Paloma de Gracia; Sin, Gürkan; Gernaey, Krist

    2011-01-01

    Biocatalysis has been attracting increasing interest in recent years. Nevertheless, most studies concerning biocatalysis have been carried out using single enzymes (soluble or immobilized). Currently, multiple enzyme mixtures are attractive for the production of many compounds at an industrial...

  10. Catabolite repression of enzyme synthesis does not prevent sporulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, J M; Uratani-Wong, B; Freese, E

    1980-01-01

    In the presence of excess glucose, a decrease of guanine nucleotides in Bacillus subtilis initiated sporulation but did not prevent catabolite repression of three enzymes. Therefore, the ultimate mechanism(s) repressing enzyme synthesis differs from that suppressing sporulation.

  11. Pathogenicity and cell wall-degrading enzyme activities of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. J. T. Ekanem

    2005-12-17

    Dec 17, 2005 ... be attributed to the activities of these cell wall degrading enzymes. Keywords: Cowpea ... bacteria have long been known to produce enzymes capable of ... Inoculated seeds were sown in small plastic pots filled with steam- ...

  12. Directing filtration to optimize enzyme immobilization in reactive membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jianquan; Marpani, Fauziah; Brites, Rita

    2014-01-01

    enzymatic reaction efficiency were evaluated in terms of enzyme loading, conversion rate and biocatalytic stability. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was selected as a model enzyme. Lower pressure, higher enzyme concentration and lower pH resulted in higher irreversible fouling resistance and lower permeate flux....... High pH during immobilization produced increased permeate flux but declines in conversion rates, likely because of the weak immobilization resulting from strong electrostatic repulsion between enzymes and membrane. The results showed that pore blocking as a fouling mechanism permitted a higher enzyme...... loading but generated more permeability loss, while cake layer formation increased enzyme stability but resulted in low loading rate. Low pH (near isoelectric point) favored hydrophobic and electrostatic adsorption of enzymes on the membrane, which reduced the enzyme stability. Neutral pH, however...

  13. Transcriptional regulation of the xylanolytic enzyme system of Aspergillus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peij, van N.N.M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger , produce high levels of polysaccharide degrading enzymes and are frequently used as production organisms for industrial enzyme preparations. The application of these polysaccharidases as xylanases and cellulases comprises

  14. Production and optimization of ligninolytic enzymes by white rot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production and optimization of ligninolytic enzymes by white rot fungus Schizophyllum ... size and nutritional factors (carbon and nitrogen ratio, mediators and metal ions). ... scale production of these enzymes for diverse industrial applications.

  15. Selected soil enzymes: Examples of their potential roles in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-05

    Feb 5, 2008 ... Soil enzymes regulate ecosystem functioning and in particular play a key role in nutrient cycling. In ... A better understanding of the role of these soil enzyme- es activity ..... measure of any disruption caused by pesticides, trace.

  16. ligninolytic enzymes of the fungus isolated from soil contaminated

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FUTE

    aimed at isolating lignin degrading fungi from soil contaminated with cow dung ... strain was screened for production of ligninolytic enzymes using Rhemazol Brilliant blue R ... put in airtight plastic bag and carried out to ..... Enzyme Microbial.

  17. Structure and function of α-glucan debranching enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Sofie; Henriksen, Anette; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    α-Glucan debranching enzymes hydrolyse α-1,6-linkages in starch/glycogen, thereby, playing a central role in energy metabolism in all living organisms. They belong to glycoside hydrolase families GH13 and GH57 and several of these enzymes are industrially important. Nine GH13 subfamilies include α......-glucan debranching enzymes; isoamylase and glycogen debranching enzymes (GH13_11); pullulanase type I/limit dextrinase (GH13_12–14); pullulan hydrolase (GH13_20); bifunctional glycogen debranching enzyme (GH13_25); oligo-1 and glucan-1,6-α-glucosidases (GH13_31); pullulanase type II (GH13_39); and α-amylase domains......_39 enzymes could represent a “missing link” between the strictly α-1,6-specific debranching enzymes and the enzymes with dual specificity and α-1,4-linkage preference....

  18. Discovery of enzymes for toluene synthesis from anoxic microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beller, Harry R.; Rodrigues, Andria V.; Zargar, Kamrun

    2018-01-01

    Microbial toluene biosynthesis was reported in anoxic lake sediments more than three decades ago, but the enzyme catalyzing this biochemically challenging reaction has never been identified. Here we report the toluene-producing enzyme PhdB, a glycyl radical enzyme of bacterial origin that catalyzes...... phenylacetate decarboxylation, and its cognate activating enzyme PhdA, a radical S-adenosylmethionine enzyme, discovered in two distinct anoxic microbial communities that produce toluene. The unconventional process of enzyme discovery from a complex microbial community (>300,000 genes), rather than from...... a microbial isolate, involved metagenomics- and metaproteomics-enabled biochemistry, as well as in vitro confirmation of activity with recombinant enzymes. This work expands the known catalytic range of glycyl radical enzymes (only seven reaction types had been characterized previously) and aromatic...

  19. Preparation of immobilized enzyme membrane by radiation-cast-polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1989-01-01

    The preparation of immobilized enzyme membranes was studied by radiation cast-polymerization at low temperatures using cellulase enzyme, hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers. The enzyme activity of the membranes was affected by monomer concentration, membrane thickness, and hydrophilicity of monomer, in which the membranes with 100 μm thickness from high monomer concentration (80%) had high enzyme activity, which was similar to that of the membranes with 1.0 mm thickness from low monomer concentration (20%). (author)

  20. Compounds from silicones alter enzyme activity in curing barnacle glue and model enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittschof, Daniel; Orihuela, Beatriz; Harder, Tilmann; Stafslien, Shane; Chisholm, Bret; Dickinson, Gary H

    2011-02-17

    Attachment strength of fouling organisms on silicone coatings is low. We hypothesized that low attachment strength on silicones is, in part, due to the interaction of surface available components with natural glues. Components could alter curing of glues through bulk changes or specifically through altered enzyme activity. GC-MS analysis of silicone coatings showed surface-available siloxanes when the coatings were gently rubbed with a cotton swab for 15 seconds or given a 30 second rinse with methanol. Mixtures of compounds were found on 2 commercial and 8 model silicone coatings. The hypothesis that silicone components alter glue curing enzymes was tested with curing barnacle glue and with commercial enzymes. In our model, barnacle glue curing involves trypsin-like serine protease(s), which activate enzymes and structural proteins, and a transglutaminase which cross-links glue proteins. Transglutaminase activity was significantly altered upon exposure of curing glue from individual barnacles to silicone eluates. Activity of purified trypsin and, to a greater extent, transglutaminase was significantly altered by relevant concentrations of silicone polymer constituents. Surface-associated silicone compounds can disrupt glue curing and alter enzyme properties. Altered curing of natural glues has potential in fouling management.

  1. Studies on the enzymes produced by Basidiomycetes. Part 1. The production of crude enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, J. S.; Kim, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Cellulase, protease, and xylanase, formation by the basidiomycetes, Pleurotus ostreatus 301 and Lentinus edodes 3-1 in growth on rice straw medium were studied. Cultural conditions adequate for enzyme production and effects of various materials and inorganic salts added to the rice straw media were investigated. Lentinus edodes 3-1 was an excellent producer of cellulase and xylanase, and Pleurotus ostreatus 301 of protease. The optimum conditions for enzyme production were 30 degrees for cellulase production and at 25 degrees for xylanase and protease production, with 75% moisture content and initial pH of 5.0-6.0. The appropriate incubation times for enzyme production were 30 days and 35 days for Pleurotus ostreatus 301 and Lentinus edodes 3-1, respectively. Among the various materials added, defatted soybean, defatted rape seed, or defatted sesame were all effective in enzyme production but reduced mycelial growth. Rice bran was also effective, particularly at a 30% concentration. The addition of inorganic salts enhanced enzyme production. Among inorganic salts, the optimum concentration of CaCO3 was 5%, and that of CaSO4 was 2%.

  2. Inactivation of the HR6B ubiquitin-conjugating DNA repair enzyme in mice causes male sterility associated with chromatin modification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Klaveren; J. de Wit (Jan); C.G. van Gurp; M.H.M. Koken (Marcel); M. Vermey; J.H. van Roijen (Jan Herman); J.T.M. Vreeburg (Jan); W.M. Baarends (Willy); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); H.P. Roest (Henk)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe ubiquitin-conjugating yeast enzyme RAD6 and its human homologs hHR6A and hHR6B are implicated in postreplication repair and damage-induced mutagenesis. The yeast protein is also required for sporulation and may modulate chromatin structure via histone ubiquitination. We report the

  3. Mycelial growth interactions and mannan-degrading enzyme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... enzymes (Frost and Moss, 1987). However, microbial enzymes are more in use due to cheaper substrates and ease of process modification. In microbial enzyme and biomass production, defined mixed culture method in which more than one organism grows simultaneously can result in increased biomass ...

  4. Microbial production of raw starch digesting enzymes | Sun | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Raw starch digesting enzymes refer to enzymes that can act directly on raw starch granules below the gelatinization temperature of starch. With the view of energy-saving, a worldwide interest has been focused on raw starch digesting enzymes in recent years, especially since the oil crisis of 1973. Raw starch digesting ...

  5. Development of the Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Linenberger, Kimberly J.

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme function is central to student understanding of multiple topics within the biochemistry curriculum. In particular, students must understand how enzymes and substrates interact with one another. This manuscript describes the development of a 15-item Enzyme-Substrate Interactions Concept Inventory (ESICI) that measures student understanding…

  6. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA...

  7. Production of cell wall enzymes in pepper seedlings, inoculated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pepper seedlings inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal AM fungus, Glomus etunicatum, produced cellulase, polygal-acturonase and pectin methylestrase enzymes. The activities of the enzymes increased as the pepper seedlings matured in age, showing that the activity of the enzymes in the seedlings was age mediated.

  8. Screening genus Penicillium for producers of cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Kristian Bertel Rømer; Mørkeberg, Astrid; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2004-01-01

    For enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic material, cellulolytic enzymes from Trichoderma reesei are most commenly used, but, there is a need for more efficient enzyme cocktails. In this study, the production of cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes was investigated in 12 filamentous fungi from ...

  9. A virus-based single-enzyme nanoreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comellas Aragones, M.; Engelkamp, H.; Claessen, V.I.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Rowan, A.E.; Christianen, P.C.M.; Maan, J.C.; Verduin, B.J.M.; Cornelissen, J.J.L.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Most enzyme studies are carried out in bulk aqueous solution, at the so-called ensemble level, but more recently studies have appeared in which enzyme activity is measured at the level of a single molecule, revealing previously unseen properties. To this end, enzymes have been chemically or

  10. Magnetic enzyme reactors for isolation and study of heterogeneous glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korecka, Lucie; Jezova, Jana; Bilkova, Zuzana; Benes, Milan; Horak, Daniel; Hradcova, Olga; Slovakova, Marcela; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2005-01-01

    The newly developed magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with defined hydrophobicity and porosity were used for the preparation of magnetic enzyme reactors. Magnetic particles with immobilized proteolytic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin and papain and with enzyme neuraminidase were used to study the structure of heterogeneous glycoproteins. Factors such as the type of carrier, immobilization procedure, operational and storage stability, and experimental conditions were optimized

  11. Regulation of SIRT 1 mediated NAD dependent deacetylation: A novel role for the multifunctional enzyme CD38

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksoy, Pinar; Escande, Carlos; White, Thomas A.; Thompson, Michael; Soares, Sandra; Benech, Juan Claudio; Chini, Eduardo N.

    2006-01-01

    The SIRT 1 enzyme is a NAD dependent deacetylase implicated in ageing, cell protection, and energy metabolism in mammalian cells. How the endogenous activity of SIRT 1 is modulated is not known. The enzyme CD38 is a multifunctional enzyme capable of synthesis of the second messenger, cADPR, NAADP, and ADPR. However, the major enzymatic activity of CD38 is the hydrolysis of NAD. Of particular interest is the fact that CD38 is present on the inner nuclear membrane. Here, we investigate the modulation of the SIRT 1 activity by CD38. We propose that by modulating availability of NAD to the SIRT1 enzyme, CD38 may regulate SIRT1 enzymatic activity. We observed that in CD38 knockout mice, tissue levels of NAD are significantly increased. We also observed that incubation of purified recombinant SIRT1 enzyme with CD38 or nuclear extracts of wild-type mice led to a significant inhibition of its activity. In contrast, incubation of SIRT1 with cellular extract from CD38 knockout mice was without effect. Furthermore, the endogenous activity of SIRT1 was several time higher in nuclear extracts from CD38 knockout mice when compared to wild-type nuclear extracts. Finally, the in vivo deacetylation of the SIRT1 substrate P53 is increased in CD38 knockout mice tissue. Our data support the novel concept that nuclear CD38 is a major regulator of cellular/nuclear NAD level, and SIRT1 activity. These findings have strong implications for understanding the basic mechanisms that modulate intracellular NAD levels, energy homeostasis, as well as ageing and cellular protection modulated by the SIRT enzymes

  12. Kininase enzymes of cat eye tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, J.W.; Anderson, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Eye tissues contain kininase activities, including an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-like activity. The authors have begun further to characterize the ACE-like activity and to examine for another reputed kininase, carboxypeptidase N (CPN). Homogenates of tissues of 6 cat eyes and paired plasmas were assayed for ACE using 3 acyl-tripeptide substrates, 3 H-benzoylated F-A-P, F-G-P and A-G-P (respectively, BFAP, BFGP and BAGP). CPN was assayed using 3 H-benzoyl-A-R. All eye tissues and fluids contained ACE- and CPN-like activities. The ACE activity was clearly owing to ACE: relative values of Kc/Km for BFAP, BFGP and BAGP were those for pure ACE (2.213, 1.751 and 1.0); reactivities with inhibitors were as expected (Ki for captopril, MK 422 and RAC-X-65: 2.7, 0.62 and 0.31 nM). EDTA inhibited both ACE and CPN (I 50 's: 43 and 47 μM). CPN activity was inhibited by 2-mercaptomethyl-3-guanidinoethylthiopropionate (Ki 2.4 nM). However, distributions of the two enzymes differed markedly. Virtually all tissues contained ACE at specific activities higher than that of plasma. Specific activities appeared to be a function of tissue vascularity (for choroid, ciliary body, iris, retina and plasma: 7.31, 2.57, 1.98, 1.53 and 0.21 pmol/mg protein). Only iris contained more CPN that did plasma (23.0 v. 7.21 pmol/mg protein). The tissue distribution of ACE is that expected for an endothelial-associated enzyme. Plasma may be the major source of CPN in eye tissues other than iris

  13. Student Opinion Survey On Delivery Of ECE431: Computer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-10

    , tidak: no). Reasons for interest/non-interest in computer programming. Reason. Number of Com. Reasons for Interest in Computer Programming essfully solving a problem/creating something new potential applications.

  14. EBW-X-O and ECE in MAST

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Preinhaelter, Josef; Shevchenko, V.; Valovic, M.; Pavlo, Pavol; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 9 (2002), s. 211 ISSN 0003-0503. [Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society /44./. Orlando , Florida, 11.11.2001-15.11.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/00/1215 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  15. Eastern and Central Europe Decommissioning, ECED 2015 - Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Scientific conference deals with problems of reactor decommissioning and radioactive waste management in the Central Europe. The Conference included the following sessions: (1): Characterisation and Radioactive Waste Management; (2) Managerial Aspects of Decommissioning; (3) JAVYS Experience with Back-End of Nuclear Power Engineering - Progress in Last 2 Years; (4) Decommissioning Planning and Costing and Education; (5) Technical Aspects of Decommissioning; (6) Radioactive Waste Management; (4) Poster Session. The Book of Abstracts contains two invitation speeches and 30 abstracts.

  16. The JET ECE heterodyne radiometer and investigations of fast phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, D.V.; Porte, L.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the design and performance characteristics of the JET heterodyne radiometer are reviewed, and some novel aspects of the instrument are described. Areas where the radiometer could benefit from further improvement are highlighted, and those improvements currently in progress are discussed. Some measurements which demonstrate the radiometer's power as a diagnostic of fast phenomena are presented. (orig.)

  17. Recent progress of the ECE diagnostics on EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Ling, B.L.; Han, X.

    2013-01-01

    On EAST, a 32-channel radiometer system with wider frequency range and better spatial resolution has been commissioned in 2012, and a Michelson interferometer system from JET was relocated very recently. These systems together with the systems we already have, satisfy the requirement of the electron cyclotron emission measurements on EAST for a wide range of toroidal magnetic field. (author)

  18. ECE from MAST - Gaussian beams and antenna aiming problem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Preinhaelter, Josef; Urban, Jakub; Pavlo, Pavol; Shevchenko, V.; Valovic, M.; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, suppl.C (2004), C116-C122 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology /21./. Praha, 14.06.2004-17.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : ECEemission, Gaussian beams Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  19. Need for Specialist Teachers in Early Childhood Education (ECE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    Early childhood is one of the major stages in ones development in life. It is a period .... through the exploration of nature, the environment, art, music and playing with toys etc. .... systems have all increased the visibility of the movement. Various.

  20. Enzyme-potentiated desensitization in otolaryngic allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulec, Jack L

    2002-03-01

    This is a preliminary report of a new method of treating otolaryngic allergy with enzyme-potentiated desensitization (EPD). The nature of EPD and its use in otolaryngology are described. Thirty-six patients have been treated and followed in a private medical practice since February 1997. This article reviews the clinical features of EPD and provides six cases as examples; the clinical features described include allergic rhinitis, serous otitis media, asthma, dermatitis, fixed food allergy, and Ménière's disease. EPD is an effective technique for the treatment of otolaryngic allergy and offers advantages over conventional techniques.

  1. NADPH oxidase: an enzyme for multicellularity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalucque, Hervé; Silar, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Multicellularity has evolved several times during the evolution of eukaryotes. One evolutionary pressure that permits multicellularity relates to the division of work, where one group of cells functions as nutrient providers and the other in specialized roles such as defence or reproduction. This requires signalling systems to ensure harmonious development of multicellular structures. Here, we show that NADPH oxidases are specifically present in organisms that differentiate multicellular structures during their life cycle and are absent from unicellular life forms. The biochemical properties of these enzymes make them ideal candidates for a role in intercellular signalling.

  2. Expression of Enzymes that Metabolize Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Peters, C. P.

    2012-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. Clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result if the liver is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver.

  3. The enzymes of bacterial census and censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Walter; Tipton, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    N-Acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are a major class of quorum-sensing signals used by Gram-negative bacteria to regulate gene expression in a population-dependent manner, thereby enabling group behavior. Enzymes capable of generating and catabolizing AHL signals are of significant interest for the study of microbial ecology and quorum-sensing pathways, for understanding the systems that bacteria have evolved to interact with small-molecule signals, and for their possible use in therapeutic and industrial applications. The recent structural and functional studies reviewed here provide a detailed insight into the chemistry and enzymology of bacterial communication. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, B R

    2002-09-01

    Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (SACE) levels are influenced by genetic polymorphism. Interpretation of serum levels with the appropriate genotypic reference range improves the diagnostic sensitivity of the assay for sarcoidosis. SACE assays are performed by a large number of routine clinical laboratories. However, there is no external quality assessment (EQA) for SACE other than an informal regional scheme. This showed analytical performance of SACE assays to be poor, with a diversity of reference ranges, leading to widely disparate clinical classification of EQA samples. Genetic polymorphism combined with poor analytical performance suggest that perhaps SACE assays should revert to being the province of specialized laboratories.

  5. Guava leaves polyphenolics-rich extract inhibits vital enzymes implicated in gout and hypertension in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Anyachukwu Irondi

    2016-06-01

    50 of 38.24 ± 2.32 μg/mL, 21.06 ± 2.04 μg/mL and 27.52 ± 1.72 μg/mL against XO, ACE and Fe2+-induced lipid peroxidation, respectively. The extract also strongly scavenged DPPH* and ABTS*+. Conclusion: Guava leaves extract could serve as functional food for managing gout and hypertension and attenuating the oxidative stress associated with both diseases. [J Complement Med Res 2016; 5(2.000: 122-130

  6. The synthesis of glutamic acid in the absence of enzymes: Implications for biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morowitz, Harold; Peterson, Eta; Chang, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the non-enzymatic aqueous phase synthesis of amino acids from keto acids, ammonia and reducing agents. The facile synthesis of key metabolic intermediates, particularly in the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and the first step of amino acid synthesis, lead to new ways of looking at the problem of biogenesis.

  7. Structure and dynamics of lipid monolayers: Implications for enzyme catalysed lipolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Toxværd, S.; Larsen, N.B.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the substrate on the interfacial activation of Upases by an interdisciplinary study of the structure and dynamics of 1,2-sn dipalmitoylglycerol monolayers at distinct surface pressures. The diglyceride Langmuir film undergoes two phase transitions occurring at 38......, the alkyl chains pack in an hexagonal structure relaxing to a distorted-hexagonal lattice in the lowest pressure phase with the alkyl chains tilted by approx 14° in a direction close to a nearest neighbour direction....

  8. Multiple Conformations of Phosphodiesterase-5: Implications for Enzyme Function and Drug Developement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang,H.; Liu, Y.; Huai, Q.; Cai, J.; Zoraghi, R.; Francis, S.; Corbin, J.; Robinson, H.; Xin, Z.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) is the target for sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil, which are drugs for treatment of erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. We report here the crystal structures of a fully active catalytic domain of unliganded PDE5A1 and its complexes with sildenafil or icarisid II. These structures together with the PDE5A1-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine complex show that the H-loop (residues 660-683) at the active site of PDE5A1 has four different conformations and migrates 7 to 35 Angstroms upon inhibitor binding. In addition, the conformation of sildenafil reported herein differs significantly from those in the previous structures of chimerically hybridized or almost inactive PDE5. Mutagenesis and kinetic analyses confirm that the H-loop is particularly important for substrate recognition and that invariant Gly659 which immediately precedes the H-loop is critical for optimal substrate affinity and catalytic activity.

  9. High activity of fatty acid oxidation enzymes in human placenta: implications for fetal-maternal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oey, N. A.; den Boer, M. E. J.; Ruiter, J. P. N.; Wanders, R. J. A.; Duran, M.; Waterham, H. R.; Boer, K.; van der Post, J. A. M.; Wijburg, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    As the human fetus and placenta are considered to be primarily dependent on glucose oxidation for energy metabolism, the cause of the remarkable association between severe maternal pregnancy complications and the carriage of a fetus with an inborn error of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid

  10. Dynamic relationships between microbial biomass, respiration, inorganic nutrients and enzyme activities: informing enzyme based decomposition models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl L Moorhead

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We re-examined data from a recent litter decay study to determine if additional insights could be gained to inform decomposition modeling. Rinkes et al. (2013 conducted 14-day laboratory incubations of sugar maple (Acer saccharum or white oak (Quercus alba leaves, mixed with sand (0.4% organic C content or loam (4.1% organic C. They measured microbial biomass C, carbon dioxide efflux, soil ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate concentrations, and β-glucosidase (BG, β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG, and acid phosphatase (AP activities on days 1, 3, and 14. Analyses of relationships among variables yielded different insights than original analyses of individual variables. For example, although respiration rates per g soil were higher for loam than sand, rates per g soil C were actually higher for sand than loam, and rates per g microbial C showed little difference between treatments. Microbial biomass C peaked on day 3 when biomass-specific activities of enzymes were lowest, suggesting uptake of litter C without extracellular hydrolysis. This result refuted a common model assumption that all enzyme production is constitutive and thus proportional to biomass, and/or indicated that part of litter decay is independent of enzyme activity. The length and angle of vectors defined by ratios of enzyme activities (BG/NAG versus BG/AP represent relative microbial investments in C (length, and N and P (angle acquiring enzymes. Shorter lengths on day 3 suggested low C limitation, whereas greater lengths on day 14 suggested an increase in C limitation with decay. The soils and litter in this study generally had stronger P limitation (angles > 45˚. Reductions in vector angles to < 45˚ for sand by day 14 suggested a shift to N limitation. These relational variables inform enzyme-based models, and are usually much less ambiguous when obtained from a single study in which measurements were made on the same samples than when extrapolated from separate studies.

  11. Monovalent Cation Activation of the Radical SAM Enzyme Pyruvate Formate-Lyase Activating Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shisler, Krista A; Hutcheson, Rachel U; Horitani, Masaki; Duschene, Kaitlin S; Crain, Adam V; Byer, Amanda S; Shepard, Eric M; Rasmussen, Ashley; Yang, Jian; Broderick, William E; Vey, Jessica L; Drennan, Catherine L; Hoffman, Brian M; Broderick, Joan B

    2017-08-30

    Pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme (PFL-AE) is a radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzyme that installs a catalytically essential glycyl radical on pyruvate formate-lyase. We show that PFL-AE binds a catalytically essential monovalent cation at its active site, yet another parallel with B 12 enzymes, and we characterize this cation site by a combination of structural, biochemical, and spectroscopic approaches. Refinement of the PFL-AE crystal structure reveals Na + as the most likely ion present in the solved structures, and pulsed electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) demonstrates that the same cation site is occupied by 23 Na in the solution state of the as-isolated enzyme. A SAM carboxylate-oxygen is an M + ligand, and EPR and circular dichroism spectroscopies reveal that both the site occupancy and the identity of the cation perturb the electronic properties of the SAM-chelated iron-sulfur cluster. ENDOR studies of the PFL-AE/[ 13 C-methyl]-SAM complex show that the target sulfonium positioning varies with the cation, while the observation of an isotropic hyperfine coupling to the cation by ENDOR measurements establishes its intimate, SAM-mediated interaction with the cluster. This monovalent cation site controls enzyme activity: (i) PFL-AE in the absence of any simple monovalent cations has little-no activity; and (ii) among monocations, going down Group 1 of the periodic table from Li + to Cs + , PFL-AE activity sharply maximizes at K + , with NH 4 + closely matching the efficacy of K + . PFL-AE is thus a type I M + -activated enzyme whose M + controls reactivity by interactions with the cosubstrate, SAM, which is bound to the catalytic iron-sulfur cluster.

  12. Progress of Mimetic Enzymes and Their Applications in Chemical Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Li, Jianping; Deng, Huan; Zhang, Lianming

    2016-11-01

    The need to develop innovative and reformative approaches to synthesize chemical sensors has increased in recent years because of demands for selectivity, stability, and reproducibility. Mimetic enzymes provide an efficient and convenient method for chemical sensors. This review summarizes the application of mimetic enzymes in chemical sensors. Mimetic enzymes can be classified into five categories: hydrolases, oxidoreductases, transferases, isomerases, and induced enzymes. Potential and recent applications of mimetic enzymes in chemical sensors are reviewed in detail, and the outlook of profound development has been illustrated.

  13. Detection of enzyme activity in decontaminated spices of industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, R.; Theobald, R.

    1995-01-01

    A range of decontaminated spices of industrial use have been examinated for their enzymes (catalase, peroxidase, amylase, lipase activity). The genuine enzymes remain fully active in irradiated spices, whereas the microbial load is clearly reduced. In contrast steam treated spices no longer demonstrate enzyme activities. Steam treatment offers e.g. black pepper without lipase activity, which can no longer cause fat deterioration. Low microbial load in combination with clearly detectable enzyme activity in spices is an indication for irradiation, whereas, reduced microbial contamination combined with enzyme inactivation indicate steam treatment of raw material [de

  14. Enzyme loading dependence of cellulose hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Martín

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic hydrolysis of steam-pretreated sugarcane bagasse, either delignified or non-delignified, was studied as a function of enzyme loading. Hydrolysis experiments were carried out using five enzyme loadings (2.5 to 20 FPU/g cellulose and the concentration of solids was 2% for both materials. Alkaline delignification improved cellulose hydrolysis by increasing surface area. For both materials, glucose concentrations increased with enzyme loading. On the other hand, enzyme loadings higher than 15 FPU/g did not result in any increase in the initial rate, since the excess of enzyme adsorbed onto the substrate restricted the diffusion process through the structure.

  15. Biotechnological production of vanillin using immobilized enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Toshiki; Kuroiwa, Mari; Kino, Kuniki

    2017-02-10

    Vanillin is an important and popular plant flavor, but the amount of this compound available from plant sources is very limited. Biotechnological methods have high potential for vanillin production as an alternative to extraction from plant sources. Here, we report a new approach using immobilized enzymes for the production of vanillin. The recently discovered oxygenase Cso2 has coenzyme-independent catalytic activity for the conversion of isoeugenol and 4-vinylguaiacol to vanillin. Immobilization of Cso2 on Sepabeads EC-EA anion-exchange carrier conferred enhanced operational stability enabling repetitive use. This immobilized Cso2 catalyst allowed 6.8mg yield of vanillin from isoeugenol through ten reaction cycles at a 1mL scale. The coenzyme-independent decarboxylase Fdc, which has catalytic activity for the conversion of ferulic acid to 4-vinylguaiacol, was also immobilized on Sepabeads EC-EA. We demonstrated that the immobilized Fdc and Cso2 enabled the cascade synthesis of vanillin from ferulic acid via 4-vinylguaiacol with repetitive use of the catalysts. This study is the first example of biotechnological production of vanillin using immobilized enzymes, a process that provides new possibilities for vanillin production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Enzymes and Inhibitors in Neonicotinoid Insecticide Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xueyan; Dick, Ryan A.; Ford, Kevin A.; Casida, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticide metabolism involves considerable substrate specificity and regioselectivity of the relevant CYP450, aldehyde oxidase, and phase II enzymes. Human CYP450 recombinant enzymes carry out the following conversions: CYP3A4, 2C19 and 2B6 for thiamethoxam (TMX) to clothianidin (CLO); 3A4, 2C19 and 2A6 for CLO to desmethyl-CLO; 2C19 for TMX to desmethyl-TMX. Human liver aldehyde oxidase reduces the nitro substituent of CLO to nitroso much more rapidly than that of TMX. Imidacloprid (IMI), CLO and several of their metabolites do not give detectable N-glucuronides but 5-hydroxy-IMI, 4,5-diol-IMI and 4-hydroxy-thiacloprid are converted to O-glucuronides in vitro with mouse liver microsomes and UDP-glucuronic acid or in vivo in mice. Mouse liver cytosol with S-adenosylmethionine converts desmethyl-CLO to CLO but not desmethyl-TMX to TMX. Two organophosphorus CYP450 inhibitors partially block IMI, thiacloprid and CLO metabolism in vivo in mice, elevating the brain and liver levels of the parent compounds while reducing amounts of the hydroxylated metabolites. PMID:19391582

  17. Flavin-Dependent Enzymes in Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Wojcieszyńska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Statistical studies have demonstrated that various agents may reduce the risk of cancer’s development. One of them is activity of flavin-dependent enzymes such as flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMOGS-OX1, FAD-dependent 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and flavin-dependent monoamine oxidase. In the last decade, many papers concerning their structure, reaction mechanism and role in the cancer prevention were published. In our work, we provide a more in-depth analysis of flavin-dependent enzymes and their contribution to the cancer prevention. We present the actual knowledge about the glucosinolate synthesized by flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMOGS-OX1 and its role in cancer prevention, discuss the influence of mutations in FAD-dependent 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase on the cancer risk, and describe FAD as an important cofactor for the demethylation of histons. We also present our views on the role of riboflavin supplements in the prevention against cancer.

  18. Potential enzyme toxicity of oxytetracycline to catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi Zhenxing; Liu Rutao; Zhang Hao

    2010-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a kind of widely used veterinary drugs. The residue of OTC in the environment is potentially harmful. In the present work, the non-covalent toxic interaction of OTC with catalase was investigated by the fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at physiological pH 7.4. OTC can interact with catalase to form a complex mainly by van der Waals' interactions and hydrogen bonds with one binding site. The association constants K were determined to be K 293K = 7.09 x 10 4 L mol -1 and K 311K = 3.31 x 10 4 L mol -1 . The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH o , ΔG o and ΔS o ) of the interaction were calculated. Based on the Foerster theory of non-radiative energy transfer, the distance between bound OTC and the tryptophan residues of catalase was determined to be 6.48 nm. The binding of OTC can result in change of the micro-environment of the tryptophan residues and the secondary structure of catalase. The activity of catalase was also inhibited for the bound OTC. This work establishes a new strategy to probe the enzyme toxicity of veterinary drug residues and is helpful for clarifying the molecular toxic mechanism of OTC in vivo. The established strategy can be used to investigate the potential enzyme toxicity of other small organic pollutants and drugs.

  19. Enzymes improve ECF bleaching of pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachenal, D.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The delignification efficiency of different laccase enzymes was examined on the eucalyptus Kraft pulp. The laccase enzyme from Trametes versicolor showing the highest delignification efficiency was selected and used in the elemental chlorine-free bleaching sequence for improving the pulp bleachability. An appreciable reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was also obtained. Further reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was obtained when the same laccase treated pulp was subjected to an acid treatment after the extraction stage followed by the DEPD sequence. Elemental-chlorine free bleaching was also performed using the xylanase-laccase treated pulp. Xylanase treatment was incorporated to the laccase mediator system in the elemental-chlorine free bleaching both sequentially and simultaneously. The bleaching sequence DEPD followed and in both the cases, the reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was greater in comparison to the control. The chlorine dioxide consumption was reduced further when xylanase-laccase treated pulp was given an additional acid treatment. The final pulp properties of the treated pulps were comparable to the control pulp.

  20. RELATION BETWEEN PREECLAMPSIA AND CARDIAC ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Aziz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract    INTRODUCTION: Preeclampsia affects about 5-10% of all pregnancies and is a major cause of maternal, fetal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. The cardiovascular system undergoes a host of changes in association with development of preeclampsia. LDH is a useful biochemical marker that reflects the severity of the occurrence of preeclampsia.    METHOD AND MATERIALS: One hundred pregnant women were selected for this study, 50 normal pregnant women as controls and 50 preeclamptic women as the study group.  Cardiac enzymes (serum LDH, serum AST, serum CK and serum CKMB of these women were analyzed.    RESULTS: Mean Serum LDH and mean serum AST concentrations were significantly higher in preeclamptic patients compared to normal pregnant women (348.34 ± 59.17 vs. 255.92 ± 43.26, P < 0.01 and (34.32 ± 10.37 vs. 22.06 ± 5.10, P < 0.01 respectively.     CONCLUSION: LDH and AST may be increased due to liver damage. This endothelial vascular damage is the main cause in the occurrence of preeclampsia. Higher levels of LDH and AST are very useful markers to identify the occurrence of preeclampsia.      Keywords: LDH, Preeclampsia, AST, Cardiac Enzymes.