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Sample records for environmental symptoms cerebral

  1. Cerebral emboli and depressive symptoms in dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purandare, N.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Hardicre, J.; Byrne, J.; McCollum, C.N.; Burns, A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The vascular depression hypothesis and our recent findings of increased frequency of spontaneous cerebral emboli in dementia suggest that such emboli may be involved in the causation of depressive symptoms in dementia. AIMS: To evaluate the association between spontaneous cerebral emboli

  2. Acute Neurological Symptoms During Hypobaric Exposure: Consider Cerebral Air Embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenink, Robert P.; Hollmann, Markus W.; van Hulst, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    WEENINK RP, HOLLMANN MW, VAN HULST RA. Acute neurological symptoms during hypobaric exposure: consider cerebral air embolism. Aviat Space Environ Med 2012; 83:1084-91. Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is well known as a complication of invasive medical procedures and as a risk in diving and

  3. Clinical Symptoms and Risk Factors in Cerebral Microangiopathy Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okroglic, S.; Widmann, C.N.; Urbach, H.; Scheltens, P.; Heneka, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although the clinical manifestation and risk factors of cerebral microangiopathy (CM) remain unclear, the number of diagnoses is increasing. Hence, patterns of association among lesion topography and severity, clinical symptoms and demographic and disease risk factors were investigated

  4. Symptom correlates of cerebral blood flow following acute concussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan W. Churchill

    Full Text Available Concussion is associated with significant symptoms within hours to days post-injury, including disturbances in physical function, cognition, sleep and emotion. However, little is known about how subjective impairments correlate with objective measures of cerebrovascular function following brain injury. This study examined the relationship between symptoms and cerebral blood flow (CBF in individuals following sport-related concussion. Seventy university level athletes had CBF measured using Arterial Spin Labelling (ASL, including 35 with acute concussion and 35 matched controls and their symptoms were assessed using the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 3 (SCAT3. For concussed athletes, greater total symptom severity was associated with elevated posterior cortical CBF, although mean CBF was not significantly different from matched controls (p=0.46. Examining symptom clusters, athletes reporting greater cognitive symptoms also had lower frontal and subcortical CBF, relative to athletes with greater somatic symptoms. The “cognitive” and “somatic” subgroups also exhibited significant differences in CBF relative to controls (p≤0.026. This study demonstrates objective CBF correlates of symptoms in recently concussed athletes and shows that specific symptom clusters may have distinct patterns of altered CBF, significantly extending our understanding of the neurobiology of concussion and traumatic brain injury. Keywords: Sport concussion, Cerebral blood flow, ASL, Symptoms

  5. Cerebral Palsy Symptoms in Children Decreased Following Massage Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Diego, Miguel; Manigat, Natasha; Seoanes, Jacqueline; Bornstein, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Twenty young children (mean age = 32 months) with cerebral palsy (CP) recruited from early intervention programs received 30 minutes of massage or reading twice weekly for 12 weeks. The children receiving massage therapy showed fewer physical symptoms including reduced spasticity, less rigid muscle tone overall and in the arms, and improved fine…

  6. Clinical symptoms and risk factors in cerebral microangiopathy patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Okroglic

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Although the clinical manifestation and risk factors of cerebral microangiopathy (CM remain unclear, the number of diagnoses is increasing. Hence, patterns of association among lesion topography and severity, clinical symptoms and demographic and disease risk factors were investigated retrospectively in a cohort of CM patients. METHODS: Patients treated at the Department of Neurology, University of Bonn for CM (n = 223; 98m, 125f; aged 77.32±9.09 from 2005 to 2010 were retrospectively enrolled. Clinical symptoms, blood chemistry, potential risk factors, demographic data and ratings of vascular pathology in the brain based on the Wahlund scale were analyzed using Pearson's chi square test and one-way ANOVA. RESULTS: Progressive cognitive decline (38.1%, gait apraxia (27.8%, stroke-related symptoms and seizures (24.2%, TIA-symptoms (22% and vertigo (17% were frequent symptoms within the study population. Frontal lobe WMLs/lacunar infarcts led to more frequent presentation of progressive cognitive decline, seizures, gait apraxia, stroke-related symptoms, TIA, vertigo and incontinence. Parietooccipital WMLs/lacunar infarcts were related to higher frequencies of TIA, seizures and incontinence. Basal ganglia WMLs/lacunar infarcts were seen in patients with more complaints of gait apraxia, vertigo and incontinence. Age (p = .012, arterial hypertension (p<.000, obesity (p<.000 and cerebral macroangiopathy (p = .018 were positively related to cerebral lesion load. For increased glucose level, homocysteine, CRP and D-Dimers there was no association. CONCLUSION: This underlines the association of CM with neurological symptoms upon admission in a topographical manner. Seizures and vertigo are symptoms of CM which may have been missed in previous studies. In addition to confirming known risk factors such as aging and arterial hypertension, obesity appears to increase the risk as well. Since the incidence of CM is increasing, future

  7. Symptom Recognition and Diagnosis of Cerebral Palsy in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Ritesh

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common movement disorder of childhood. Parents recognized the symptoms of CP at mean age of 13 months. However there was a mean delay of going to a doctor by 23 months and the mean age of diagnosis was 5.5 years. Less than half of the CP children were diagnosed by a pediatrician and were receiving treatment methods…

  8. Neonatal cerebral infarction; Symptoms, CT findings and prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Shinji; Togari, Hajime; Sobajima, Hisanori; Suzuki, Shigesumi; Wada, Yoshiro (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Yokochi, Kenji; Nishimura, Yutaka; Inukai, Kazuhisa; Futamura, Masahide

    1992-01-01

    In a retrospective multi-center study, we investigated eighteen infants with unilateral cerebral infarctions confirmed by computed tomography (CT) scans. The initial symptoms were observed in all the patients between 0 and 3 days of age. Convulsions or apneic attacks were the initial symptoms in all but one. Only 4 patients had complicated obstetric histories and none showed polycythemia or electrolyte abnormalities. All of the initial CT scans revealed unilaterally localized hypodense areas. In 10, the initial CT scans were performed within 24 hours after the clinical onset. In 16, the lesions were within the territory of the middle cerebral artery, 9 of which also involved the cortico-spinal tract (CST). In the remaining 2 patients, the lesions were located whithin the territory of the posterior cerebral artery. None of the 9 patients without CST involvement developed hemiplegia, whereas 5 (56%) of the 9 with CST involvement had hemiplegia, which is a fairly low incidence compared with that in adult cases. This difference was thought to be related to neonatal brain plasticity. (author).

  9. Specific cerebral perfusion patterns in three schizophrenia symptom dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmayer, Katharina; Strik, Werner; Federspiel, Andrea; Wiest, Roland; Bohlhalter, Stephan; Walther, Sebastian

    2017-12-01

    Dimensional concepts such as the Research Domain Criteria initiative have been proposed to disentangle the heterogeneity of schizophrenia. One model introduced three neurobiologically informed behavioral dimensions: language, affectivity and motor behavior. To study the brain-behavior associations of these three dimensions, we investigated whether current behavioral alterations were linked to resting state perfusion in distinct brain circuits in schizophrenia. In total, 47 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and 44 healthy controls were included. Psychopathology was assessed with the Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale and the Bern Psychopathology scale (BPS). The BPS provides severity ratings of three behavioral dimensions (language, affectivity and motor). Patients were classified according to the severity of alterations (severe, mild, no) in each dimension. Whole brain resting state cerebral blood flow (CBF) was compared between patient subgroups and controls. Two symptom dimensions were associated with distinct CBF changes. Behavioral alterations in the language dimension were linked to increased CBF in Heschl's gyrus. Altered affectivity was related to increased CBF in amygdala. The ratings of motor behavior instead were not specifically associated with CBF. Investigating behavioral alterations in three schizophrenia symptom dimensions identified distinct regional CBF changes in the language and limbic brain circuits. The results demonstrate a hitherto unknown segregation of pathophysiological pathways underlying a limited number of specific symptom dimensions in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cerebral perfusion in orthostatic hypotensive patients with and without symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balan, K.; Parry-Jones, D.; Puliyel, M.M.; Set, P.; Solanki, C.; Campbell, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Patients with orthostatic hypotension (OH) may be symptomatic or asymptomatic. This study was undertaken to determine whether postural response in cerebral perfusion plays any significant role in causing symptoms of OH. Materials and methods: 5 symptomatic OH patients and 5 asymptomatic OH patients were studied using 99mTc-HMPAO. Two dynamic studies were acquired within an interval of two days, with the patient injected either supine or erect. The brain perfusion index (BPI) was derived from Patlak-Rutland analysis of the aortic arch and the cerebral hemispheres. SPECT images were used to determine regional counts over frontal, temporal, occipital, cerebellar and basal ganglia regions. Paired t-test was used to compare the difference in the ratios between erect and supine studies and unpaired t-test for comparison between the two groups. Results: There was significant improvement in BPI in asymptomatic patients on assuming supine position (10.1±1.9 vs. 11.9±3.2), but not in the symptomatic group (12.9±4.5 vs. 13.1±2.8). No significant difference was noted between the two groups. In the SPECT studies, two areas of difference between the asymptomatic and symptomatic groups were identified: L temporal (0.038±0.018 vs. -0.004±0.025) and L basal ganglia (-0.02±0.043 vs. 0.044±0.035). However, these mean differences were comparable to those of other subsets. Paired t-tests between the erect and supine ratios identified: R frontal in the asymptomatic group (0.884±0.067 vs. 0.918±0.078), L basal ganglia in the symptomatic group (0.946±0.093 vs. 0.990±0.102). Again, these differences were small and only slightly greater than those found in other subsets. Conclusions: 1. Posture-related alterations in global or regional cerebral perfusion do not appear to play a causative role in symptoms of OH and 2. Future studies including larger number of patients may be required for further evaluation

  11. Pain symptoms in patients with severe cerebral palsy: Prevalence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the presence of pain in patients diagnosed with severe cerebral palsy (CP) according to the degree of motor function impairment. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on students of the Association of Parents and Friends of Exceptional Children (APAE) diagnosed with cerebral palsy and ...

  12. How the cerebral serotonin homeostasis predicts environmental changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalbitzer, Jan; Kalbitzer, Urs; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging studies with positron emission tomography have revealed that the availability of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) in the human brain fluctuates over the course of the year. This effect is most pronounced in carriers of the short allele of the 5-HTT promoter region (5-HTTLPR), which...... has in several previous studies been linked to an increased risk to develop mood disorders. We argue that long-lasting fluctuations in the cerebral serotonin transmission, which is regulated via the 5-HTT, are responsible for mediating responses to environmental changes based on an assessment...... of cerebral serotonin transmission to seasonal and other forms of environmental change imparts greater behavioral flexibility, at the expense of increased vulnerability to stress. This model may explain the somewhat higher prevalence of the s-allele in some human populations dwelling at geographic latitudes...

  13. Psychiatric and subjective symptoms and cerebral blood flow in patients with chronic cerebral infarction after treatment with Ca antagonist (nilvadipine). Quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow by the 123IMP-SPECT ARG method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakayori, Osamu; Kitamura, Shin; Mishina, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Mineo; Terashi, Akirou

    1997-01-01

    Psychiatric and subjective symptoms such as headache, dizziness, lack of spontaneity, anxiety, and a depressive state are often found in patients with chronic cerebral infarction. Some Ca antagonists are reported to relieve such symptoms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between psychiatric and subjective symptoms and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in cerebral infarction and to evaluate the clinical effects of Ca antagonists from the standpoint of the cerebral circulation. Nilvadipine was administered to is patients with chronic cerebral infarction and their CBF was measured by the 123 IMP-SPECT ARG method before and at 8 weeks after the nilvadipine treatment. The CBF in patients with hypertension was increased by 11% after giving nilvadipine. Patients without hypertension showed no tendency for elevation of their CBF. Patients who were relieved from some psychiatric symptoms revealed a 14% increase of CBF in all cortical regions, and a significant increase was noted in the frontal and temporal regions. In other patients without changes in psychiatric symptoms, the CBF did not increase in any of the cortical regions. No relationship between symptoms and CBF was observed in any of the patients with subjective symptoms. Our study demonstrated a close correlation between psychiatric symptoms and CBF. We speculate that psychiatric symptoms in chronic cerebral infarction may reflect diffuse brain dysfunctions. We also conclude that nilvadipine is more effective in relieving psychiatric symptoms in patients with hypertensive cerebral infarction. It is inferred that nilvadipine may be more effective in relieving psychiatric symptoms in patients with hypertension. (author)

  14. Relevances between cerebral circulatory disorder and symptom in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Totaro; Shimizu, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    The subjects were shunt-effective idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) 40 patients. Before and one year after surgery, measurements of the cerebral circulatory dynamics (the cerebral blood flow pattern by region of interest (ROI) setting using 123 I-iofetamine (IMP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)), and an evaluation of symptoms (gait disturbance: G, dementia: D, urinary incontinence: U) by grading scale (JNPHGS-R). Preoperative cerebral circulation and symptoms: As for the each symptoms and blood flow patterns, the seventies of G (p=0.017) in whole cortex non-reduction group (thalamus-basal ganglia reduction group) and D (p=0.021) in whole cortex reduction group were obviously high compared with other symptoms particularly. Circulation and symptoms one year after surgery: As the circulatory dynamics at different improvement sites and each symptoms, it was obviously mild for G (p=0.003) in the group with an increased only thalamus-basal ganglia blood flow and increased both whole cortex and thalamus-basal ganglia blood flow and tend to mild for D (p=0.091) in the group with an increased only whole cortex blood flow and increased both whole cortex and thalamus-basal ganglia blood flow compared with other symptoms. (author)

  15. Hyponatraemia as the cause of severe cerebral symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, David P; Overgaard-Steensen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    to increase the plasma [Na+]/reveal the symptoms and 2) coma treated successfully with infusions of hypertonic saline boluses. Effective treatment is simple and involves management of airway, breathing and circulation together with bolus infusions of hypertonic saline to ensure controllable plasma [Na...

  16. Regional cerebral blood flow and the effects of nicardipine, a new cerebral vasodilator, in patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Katsuhiro; Motomura, Naoyasu; Murata, Koen; Sakai, Toshiaki; Yoshioka, Michio; Tsutsumi, Shigetoshi.

    1984-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined by 133 Xe inhalation method in 22 neuropsychiatric patients with an average age of 65.8 years -- 14 patients having cerebrovascular disturbance (Group 1) and 8 patients having endogenous or organic psychosis or neurological lesions (Group 2). Furthermore, nicardipine was orally administered to the patients and its effects on rCBF and on neuropsychiatric symptoms were examined. Regarding the mean and abnormal decrease of rCBF in the bilateral hemispheres and the frequency of ischemic foci, there was no significant difference between the groups. However, regional ischemic focus was more frequently observed in Group 1 than in Group 2. Long-term serial administration of nicardipine increased the rCBF and improved psychiatric symptoms in some of the patients in Group 1. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. Acute neurological symptoms during hypobaric exposure: consider cerebral air embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weenink, Robert P; Hollmann, Markus W; van Hulst, Robert A

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is well known as a complication of invasive medical procedures and as a risk in diving and submarine escape. In the underwater environment, CAGE is caused by trapped air, which expands and leads to lung vessel rupture when ambient pressure decreases during ascent. Pressure decrease also occurs during hypobaric activities such as flying and, therefore, CAGE may theoretically be a risk in hypobaric exposure. We reviewed the available literature on this subject. Identified were 12 cases of CAGE due to hypobaric exposure. Based on these cases, we discuss pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CAGE due to hypobaric exposure. The low and slow pressure decrease during most hypobaric activities (as opposed to diving) account for the low incidence of CAGE during these exposures and suggest that severe air trapping must be present to cause barotrauma. This is also suggested by the large prevalence of air filled cysts in the case reports reviewed. We recommend considering CAGE in all patients presenting with acute central neurological injury during or shortly after pressure decrease such as flying. A CT scan of head and chest should be performed in these patients. Treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy should be initiated as soon as possible in cases of proven or probable CAGE.

  18. [Problems with certification of work capability for people with symptoms of functional and organic diseases of cerebral vessels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polakowska, B

    1993-01-01

    The problems of certifying work capability for people with the symptoms of functional and organic diseases of cerebral vessels were investigated basing on the documentation of 470 medical consultations performed at the Out-Patient Department of Occupational Diseases, the Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland. The certification was most difficult in people with angiogenic headache, symptoms of transient cerebral ischaemia and apoplexy with non-intensive deficiency signs. The certification criteria most appropriate for that group of diseases were formulated.

  19. Abnormal regional cerebral blood flow in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with psychiatric symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Kenji; Matsushima, Eisuke; Okubo, Yoshiro; Ohta, Katsuya; Murata, Yuji; Koike, Ryuji; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Kato, Motoichiro

    2005-07-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies have demonstrated decreased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. However, no study has done voxel-based analysis using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) that can evaluate rCBF objectively, and the relationship between rCBF and psychiatric symptoms has not been well investigated. Using L,L-ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc ECD) SPECT and SPM, we aimed to clarify the association of rCBF changes with psychiatric symptoms in SLE patients whose magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no morphological abnormalities. Twenty SLE patients and 19 healthy volunteers underwent 99mTc ECD SPECT. Data were collected from August 2000 to March 2003. SLE was diagnosed according to American College of Rheumatology criteria, and psychiatric symptoms were diagnosed according to ICD-10 criteria. On the basis of the modified Carbotte, Denburg, and Denburg method, the patients were classified into 3 groups: a group with major psychiatric symptoms (hallucinosis, delusional disorder, and mood disorder), a group with minor psychiatric symptoms (anxiety disorder, dissociative disorder, and emotionally labile disorder), and a group without psychiatric symptoms. Gross organic lesions were ruled out by brain MRI. Group comparisons of rCBF were performed with analysis using SPM99. SLE patients without MRI lesions showed decreased rCBF in the posterior cingulate gyrus and thalamus. The reduction in rCBF was overt in patients with major psychiatric symptoms. Our study indicated that SLE patients may have dysfunction in the posterior cingulate gyrus and thalamus and that this may be associated with the severity of psychiatric symptoms.

  20. Genetic and Environmental Effects on Vocal Symptoms and Their Intercorrelations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nybacka, Ida; Simberg, Susanna; Santtila, Pekka; Sala, Eeva; Sandnabba, N. Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, Simberg et al. (2009) found genetic effects on a composite variable consisting of 6 vocal symptom items measuring dysphonia. The purpose of the present study was to determine genetic and environmental effects on the individual vocal symptoms in a population-based sample of Finnish twins. Method: The sample comprised 1,728 twins…

  1. Environmental determinants of acute respiratory symptoms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-04-20

    Apr 20, 1991 ... The impact of environmental risk factors associated with housing was ... factors identified using the odds ratios (ORs) for diarrhoea ..... 1 cigarette/day. 0 .... Yach D, Mathews C, Buch E. Urbanisation and health: methodological.

  2. Parental Criticism is an Environmental Influence on Adolescent Somatic Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, BN; Marceau, K; Narusyte, J; Ganiban, J; Spotts, EL; Reiss, D; Lichtenstein, P; Neiderhiser, JM

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that parental criticism leads to more somatic symptoms in adolescent children. Yet this research has not assessed the direction of causation or whether genetic and/or environmental influences explain the association between parental criticism and adolescent somatic symptoms. As such, it is impossible to understand the mechanisms that underlie this association. The current study uses the Extended Children of Twins design to examine whether parents’ genes, adolescents’ genes, and/or environmental factors explain the relationship between parental criticism and adolescent somatic symptoms. Participants came from two twin samples, including the Twin and Offspring Study in Sweden (N = 868 pairs of adult twins and each twin’s adolescent child) and from the Twin Study of Child and Adolescent Development (N = 690 pairs of twin children and their parents). Findings showed that environmental influences account for the association between parental criticism and adolescent somatic symptoms. This suggests that parents’ critical behaviors exert a direct environmental effect on somatic symptoms in adolescent children. Results support the use of intervention programs focused on parental criticism to help reduce adolescents’ somatic symptoms. PMID:25844495

  3. Shape and texture analysis of the carotid plaque, and its correlation with cerebral infarctions on CT, and cerebrovascular symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalomiris, Konstantinos; Tegos, Thomas J; Sabetai, Michael; Nicolaides, Andrew N [Irvine Laboratory for Cardiovascular Investigations and Research, Imperial College School of Medicine at St Mary` , Praed Street, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-31

    This work has studied the relationship between ultrasonic texture characteristics, ultrasonic shape characteristics, cerebral infarctions on CT, and cerebrovascular symptoms, in an attempt to identify the unstable carotid plaque, i.e. the plaque associated with high prevalence of ipsilateral cerebral infarctions on CT, and cerebrovascular symptoms. The morphological features used were : the grey scale median (GSM) for the texture, and the bending energy (BE) for the shape. It has been shown that echoluscent plaques (plaques with low GSM) with irregular shape (high BE) are associated with high prevalence of ipsilateral cerebral infarctions on CT and cerebrovascular symptoms, whereas echogenic plaques (high GSM) with smooth shape (low BE) are associated with low prevalence of ipsilateral cerebral infarctions on CT and cerebrovascular symptoms. Previous work has demonstrated the significance of the GSM in identifying the unstable carotid plaques, but no attempt, to our knowledge, has been made to establish the clinical significance of the ultrasonic shape characteristics of the carotid plaque. The importance of the ultrasonic texture and shape characteristics will be established in prospective studies of patients with asymptomatic carotid plaques, aiming at the identification of patients with a high risk for stroke, and therefore for a better selection of asymptomatic patients who might benefit from a carotid endarterectomy. (authors) 5 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Burden Is Associated With Poststroke Depressive Symptoms: A 15-Month Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: All types of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD markers including lacune, white matter hyperintensities (WMH, cerebral microbleeds, and perivascular spaces were found to be associated with poststroke depressive symptoms (PDS. This study explored whether the combination of the four markers constituting an overall SVD burden was associated with PDS.Methods: A cohort of 563 patients with acute ischemic stroke were followed over a 15-month period after the index stroke. A score of ≥7 on the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale was defined as clinically significant PDS. Scores of the four SVD markers ascertained on magnetic resonance imaging were summed up to represent total SVD burden. The association between SVD burden and PDS was assessed with generalized estimating equation models.Results: The study sample had a mean age of 67.0 ± 10.2 years and mild-moderate stroke [National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score: 3, interquartile, 1–5]. PDS were found in 18.3%, 11.6%, and 12.3% of the sample at 3, 9, and 15 months after stroke, respectively. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, vascular risk factors, social support, stroke severity, physical and cognitive functions, and size and locations of stroke, the SVD burden was associated with an increased risk of PDS [odds ratio = 1.30; 95% confidence interval = 1.07–1.58; p = 0.010]. Other significant predictors of PDS were time of assessment, female sex, smoking, number of acute infarcts, functional independence, and social support.Conclusion: SVD burden was associated with PDS examined over a 15-month follow-up in patients with mild to moderate acute ischemic stroke.

  5. Environmental Intolerance, Symptoms and Disability Among Fertile-Aged Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuokko, Aki; Karvala, Kirsi; Lampi, Jussi; Keski-Nisula, Leea; Pasanen, Markku; Voutilainen, Raimo; Pekkanen, Juha; Sainio, Markku

    2018-02-08

    The purpose was to study the prevalence of environmental intolerance (EI) and its different manifestations, including behavioral changes and disability. Fertile-aged women ( n = 680) of the Kuopio Birth Cohort Study were asked about annoyance to 12 environmental factors, symptoms and behavioral changes. We asked how much the intolerance had disrupted their work, household responsibilities or social life. We chose intolerance attributed to chemicals, indoor molds, and electromagnetic fields to represent typical intolerance entities. Of the respondents, 46% reported annoyance to chemicals, molds, or electromagnetic fields. Thirty-three percent reported symptoms relating to at least one of these three EIs, 18% reported symptoms that included central nervous system symptoms, and 15% reported behavioral changes. Indicating disability, 8.4% reported their experience relating to any of the three EIs as at least "somewhat difficult", 2.2% "very difficult" or "extremely difficult", and 0.9% "extremely difficult". Of the latter 2.2%, all attributed their intolerance to indoor molds, and two thirds also to chemicals. As the number of difficulties increased, the number of organ systems, behavioral changes and overlaps of the three EIs also grew. EI is a heterogeneous phenomenon and its prevalence depends on its definition. The manifestations of EI form a continuum, ranging from annoyance to severe disability.

  6. Correlation of regional cerebral blood flow and positive/negative symptoms in schizophrenic patients: covariate SPM analysis

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    Lim, Ki Chun; Kim, J. S.; Kim, C. Y.; Lee, H. K.; Moon, D. H. [Ulsan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    We investigated the relations between rCBF and psychopathology in schizophrenic patients using a SPM99. Thirty-two patients(M/F:22/10, 25{+-}5,6yr) with active symptoms of schizophrenia and 15 age matched normal controls underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT. Psychopathology of all patients were also assessed according to PANSS (positive and negative syndrome scale in schizophrenia). By covariate SPM analysis, specific areas where rCBF correlated with sum scores of positive/negative synptoms were identified. Regional CBF of schizophrenics was different in several cortical regions from normal controls. Sum scores of positive symptoms were positively correlated with rCBF of both rectal and inferior frontal gyri and right transverse temporal gyrus, and negatively correlated with rCBF of left lingual and right middle temporal gyri (p<0.01). Sum scores of negative symptoms were positively correlated with rCBF of both middle temporal gyri and negatively correlated with rCBF of right superior parietal lobule and medial frontal gyrus (p<0.01). Positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia were correlated with rCBF change in different regions of cerebral association cortex.

  7. Correlation of regional cerebral blood flow and positive/negative symptoms in schizophrenic patients: covariate SPM analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Ki Chun; Kim, J. S.; Kim, C. Y.; Lee, H. K.; Moon, D. H.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the relations between rCBF and psychopathology in schizophrenic patients using a SPM99. Thirty-two patients(M/F:22/10, 25±5,6yr) with active symptoms of schizophrenia and 15 age matched normal controls underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT. Psychopathology of all patients were also assessed according to PANSS (positive and negative syndrome scale in schizophrenia). By covariate SPM analysis, specific areas where rCBF correlated with sum scores of positive/negative synptoms were identified. Regional CBF of schizophrenics was different in several cortical regions from normal controls. Sum scores of positive symptoms were positively correlated with rCBF of both rectal and inferior frontal gyri and right transverse temporal gyrus, and negatively correlated with rCBF of left lingual and right middle temporal gyri (p<0.01). Sum scores of negative symptoms were positively correlated with rCBF of both middle temporal gyri and negatively correlated with rCBF of right superior parietal lobule and medial frontal gyrus (p<0.01). Positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia were correlated with rCBF change in different regions of cerebral association cortex

  8. Sex Differences in Genetic and Environmental Influences on Adolescent Depressive Symptoms: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although sex difference in the mean level of depressive symptoms has been well established, the sex difference in genetic and environmental influences on adolescent depressive symptoms is unclear. The current study conducted a meta-analysis of twin studies on sex differences in self- and parent-reported adolescent depressive symptoms. For self-reports, genetic factors influenced adolescent depressive symptoms equally for boys and girls, accounting for 46% of variation, but shared environmental factors had stronger impacts on adolescent girls’ versus boys’ depressive symptoms (13% versus 1% of the variance. For parent-reports, genetic, shared, and nonshared environmental factors influenced adolescent depressive symptoms equally, with separate estimates of 34%, 35%, and 31%. The implications of sex difference in genetic and environmental etiologies of depressive symptoms are discussed.

  9. Depressive symptoms predict cognitive decline and dementia in older people independently of cerebral white matter changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdelho, Ana; Madureira, Sofia; Moleiro, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Depressive symptoms (DS) have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline. Our aim was to evaluate the longitudinal influence of DS on cognition in independent older people, accounting for the severity of white matter changes (WMC).......Depressive symptoms (DS) have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline. Our aim was to evaluate the longitudinal influence of DS on cognition in independent older people, accounting for the severity of white matter changes (WMC)....

  10. Attention to bodily sensations and symptom perception in individuals with idiopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI) is characterized by non-specific symptoms attributed to exposure to environmental odours or chemicals at levels below those known to induce adverse health effects. A clarification of whether psychological processes involved in sensory perceptions...

  11. A patient with cerebral Whipple disease with gastric involvement but no gastrointestinal symptoms: a consequence of local protective immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüss, Harald; Katchanov, Juri; Zschenderlein, Rolf; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Schneider, Thomas; Moos, Verena

    2007-08-01

    Whipple disease is a granulomatous infectious disease caused by Tropheryma whipplei. The bacteria accumulate within macrophages, preferentially in the intestinal mucosa. Disease manifestation seems to be linked to immunological abnormalities of macrophages. We describe a patient with cerebral Whipple disease who presented with changes in mental status, confusion, inverse sleep-wake cycle, bilateral ptosis and vertical gaze palsy. Endoscopic biopsy sampling revealed Whipple disease in the gastric antrum but not in the duodenum. Whole blood stimulation displayed reactivity to T. whipplei that was at the lower end of healthy controls while reactivity of duodenal lymphocytes was not diminished. We propose that in cases of neurological symptoms suspicious of Whipple disease with normal duodenal and jenunal findings, biopsy sampling should be extended to the gastric mucosa. The robust reactivity of duodenal lymphocytes may have prevented our patient from developing small bowel disease, whereas the impaired reactivity in peripheral blood lymphocytes might yet explain the bacterial spreading to the central nervous system leading to the rare case of predominant neurological symptoms without relevant systemic involvement.

  12. The Influence of Environmental Consequences and Internalizing Symptoms on Children's Tic Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Cyd K; Jones, Anna M; Gutierrez-Colina, Ana M; Ivey, Emily K; Carlson, Olivia; Melville, Lauren; Kardon, Patricia; Blount, Ronald L

    2017-04-01

    Although there is evidence that environmental consequences for displaying tics and internalizing symptoms are related to tic severity in children with TS, less is known about the inter-relationships of these variables or how these factors jointly contribute to tic severity. This study included 45 children with Tourette syndrome. Caregivers reported on children's environmental consequences for displaying tics, internalizing symptoms, and tic severity. Results indicated that children with higher levels of internalizing symptoms experienced significantly more environmental consequences for displaying tics. Children with higher levels of separation anxiety symptoms demonstrated significantly greater tic severity. Environmental consequences for displaying tics accounted for significantly more variance in predicting tic severity than anxiety symptoms. This preliminary evidence suggests that environmental consequences for displaying tics, such as receiving accommodations or attention from others, have a greater influence on children's tic severity than emotional factors.

  13. Personal and environmental factors contributing to participation in romantic relationships and sexual activity of young adults with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, D.J.H.G.; Stam, H.J.; Ketelaar, M.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.; Roebroeck, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study determinants of romantic relationships and sexual activity of young adults with cerebral palsy (CP), focusing on personal and environmental factors. Method: A cohort study was performed with 74 young adults (46 men; 28 women) aged 20-25 years (SD 1.4) with CP (49% unilateral CP,

  14. Quantitative MRI shows cerebral microstructural damage in hemolytic-uremic syndrome patients with severe neurological symptoms but no changes in conventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissenborn, Karin; Worthmann, Hans; Heeren, Meike [Hannover Medical School, Clinic for Neurology, Hannover (Germany); Bueltmann, Eva; Donnerstag, Frank; Giesemann, Anja M.; Goetz, Friedrich; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Ding, Xiao-Qi [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hannover (Germany); Kielstein, Jan; Schwarz, Anke [Hannover Medical School, Clinic for Nephrology and Hypertension, Hannover (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Severe neurological symptoms in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome (STEC-HUS) are often accompanied by none or only mild alterations of cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study aims to analyze if quantitative MRI is able to reveal cerebral pathological alterations invisible for conventional MRI. In nine patients with STEC-HUS associated severe neurological symptoms but inconspicuous cerebral MRI findings maps of the parameters T2 relaxation time, relative proton density (PD), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA) were generated. Quantitative values of these parameters were measured at the basal ganglia, thalamus, and white matter of the frontal and parietal lobe and compared to those of nine age- and sex-matched controls. Significant T2 prolongation (p < 0.01) was found in the basal ganglia of all patients compared to controls. PD and ADC were not significantly altered. A significant reduction of FA in patients was seen at caput nuclei caudati (p < 0.01). Prolonged T2 relaxation time indicates cerebral microstructural damages in these patients despite their inconspicuous MRI findings. T2 relaxometry could be used as a complementary tool for the assessment of metabolic-toxic brain syndromes. (orig.)

  15. Safety of Intravenous Thrombolysis within 4.5 h of symptom onset in patients with negative post-treatment stroke imaging for cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Elias A; Khalid, Aisha; Zand, Ramin

    2011-08-01

    Patients with stroke symptoms but negative diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) might have transient ischemic attacks (TIA) or stroke mimics. Brain DWI is important for the diagnosis of cerebral infarction but it is not available before thrombolysis for most patients to avoid treatment delay. This study aimed to evaluate the safety of IV thrombolysis in patients with a negative post-treatment DWI for cerebral infarction. We conducted a retrospective study of 89 patients treated with IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) within 4.5 h after stroke symptom onset. The patients were identified in our acute stroke registry from January 2009 to September 2010. Information on patients' demographics, clinical characteristics, neuroimaging, treatment complications, and outcomes was obtained and analyzed. Out of 89 patients, 23 patients (26%) had a negative DWI on follow-up stroke imaging. Fourteen patients had a TIA and nine patients had a stroke mimic, including Todd's paralysis, complicated migraine, and somatoform disorder. We found significant differences between patients with a positive and a negative DWI in mean age (62 years vs. 52 years; P scale score (11 points versus 6 points; P negative DWI had symptomatic or asymptomatic ICH. Our results suggest that the administration of IV rt-PA within the first 4.5 h of symptom onset in patients with suspected ischemic stroke is safe even when post-treatment DWI does not demonstrate cerebral infarction.

  16. Robust symptom networks in recurrent major depression across different levels of genetic and environmental risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loo, H.M.; Van Borkulo, C.D.; Peterson, R.E.; Fried, E.I.; Aggen, S.H.; Borsboom, D.; Kendler, K.S.

    BACKGROUND: Genetic risk and environmental adversity-both important risk factors for major depression (MD)-are thought to differentially impact on depressive symptom types and associations. Does heterogeneity in these risk factors result in different depressive symptom networks in patients with MD?

  17. The Impact of Environmental Experiences on Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression Across the Life Span

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kendler, Kenneth S.; Eaves, Lindon J.; Loken, Erik K.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Reynolds, Chandra; Boomsma, Dorret; Lichtenstein, Paul; Silberg, Judy; Gardner, Charles O.

    2011-01-01

    Symptoms of anxiety and depression are relatively stable over time. Can this stability be explained by genetic influences, or is it caused by the long-lasting effects of accumulating environmental experiences? To address this question, we analyzed longitudinally assessed symptoms of anxiety and

  18. Investigating Environmental Links between Parent Depression and Child Depressive/Anxiety Symptoms Using an Assisted Conception Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gemma; Rice, Frances; Harold, Gordon T.; Collishaw, Stephan; Thapar, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Links between maternal and offspring depression symptoms could arise from inherited factors, direct environmental exposure, or shared adversity. A novel genetically sensitive design was used to test the extent of environmental links between maternal depression symptoms and child depression/anxiety symptoms, accounting for inherited…

  19. Wind turbines and idiopathic symptoms: The confounding effect of concurrent environmental exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Whether or not wind turbines pose a risk to human health is a matter of heated debate. Personal reactions to other environmental exposures occurring in the same settings as wind turbines may be responsible of the reported symptoms. However, these have not been accounted for in previous studies. We investigated whether there is an association between residential proximity to wind turbines and idiopathic symptoms, after controlling for personal reactions to other environmental co-exposures. We assessed wind turbine exposures in 454 residences as the distance to the closest wind turbine (Dw) and number of wind turbines turbines and agricultural odor exposure, we did not observe a significant relationship between residential proximity to wind turbines and symptoms and the parameter estimates were attenuated toward zero. Wind turbines-health associations can be confounded by personal reactions to other environmental co-exposures. Isolated associations reported in the literature may be due to confounding bias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Microembolism after cerebral angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manaka, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hideki; Nagata, Izumi

    2000-01-01

    Acute microemboli are detected more precisely with the recently developed diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). We happened to obtain 24 DWIs after 350 diagnostic cerebral angiographies in 1999. DWIs after cerebral angiographies showed bright lesions in 7 patients (28%), of whom 6 had no neurological symptoms after cerebral angiography. Seven of the 24 patients had risk factors for arteriosclerosis. Only one patient had embolic events due to angiography. Microemboli related to cerebral angiographies are inevitable in some patients. Most are silent, however, we should investigate the cause of microemboli and should make cerebral angiography safer. (author)

  1. Genetic and environmental influences on the codevelopment among borderline personality disorder traits, major depression symptoms, and substance use disorder symptoms from adolescence to young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornovalova, Marina A; Verhulst, Brad; Webber, Troy; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G; Hicks, Brian M

    2018-02-01

    Although borderline personality disorder (BPD) traits decline from adolescence to adulthood, comorbid psychopathology such as symptoms of major depressive disorder (MDD), alcohol use disorder (AUD), and drug use disorders (DUDs) likely disrupt this normative decline. Using a longitudinal sample of female twins (N = 1,763), we examined if levels of BPD traits were correlated with changes in MDD, AUD, and DUD symptoms from ages 14 to 24. A parallel process biometric latent growth model examined the contributions of genetic and environmental factors to the relationships between developmental components of these phenotypes. Higher BPD trait levels predicted a greater rate of increase in AUD and DUD symptoms, and higher AUD and DUD symptoms predicted a slower rate of decline of BPD traits from ages 14 to 24. Common genetic influences accounted for the associations between BPD traits and each disorder, as well as the interrelationships of AUD and DUD symptoms. Both genetic and nonshared environmental influences accounted for the correlated levels between BPD traits and MDD symptoms, but solely environmental influences accounted for the correlated changes between the two over time. Results indicate that higher levels of BPD traits may contribute to an earlier onset and faster escalation of AUD and DUD symptoms, and substance use problems slow the normative decline in BPD traits. Overall, our data suggests that primarily genetic influences contribute to the comorbidity between BPD features and substance use disorder symptoms. We discuss our data in the context of two major theories of developmental psychopathology and comorbidity.

  2. Genetic and Environmental Influences on the Co-development between Borderline Personality Disorder Traits, Major Depression Symptoms, and Substance Use Disorder Symptoms from Adolescence to Young Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornovalova, Marina A.; Verhulst, Brad; Webber, Troy; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.; Hicks, Brian M.

    2017-01-01

    Although borderline personality disorder (BPD) traits decline from adolescence to adulthood, comorbid psychopathology such as symptoms of major depressive disorder (MDD), alcohol use disorder (AUD), and drug use disorders (DUDs) likely disrupt this normative decline. Using a longitudinal sample of female twins (N = 1,763), we examined if levels of BPD traits were correlated with changes in MDD, AUD, and DUD symptoms from ages 14–24. A parallel process biometric latent growth model examined the contributions of genetic and environmental factors to the relationships between developmental components of these phenotypes. Higher BPD trait-levels predicted a greater rate of increase in AUD and DUD symptoms, and higher AUD and DUD symptoms predicted a slower rate of decline of BPD traits from ages 14–24. Common genetic influences accounted for the associations between BPD traits and each disorder, as well as the interrelationships of AUD and DUD symptoms. Both genetic and nonshared environmental influences accounted for the correlated levels between BPD traits and MDD symptoms, but solely environmental influences accounted for the correlated changes between the two over time. Results indicate that higher levels of BPD traits may contribute to an earlier onset and faster escalation of AUD and DUD symptoms, and substance use problems slow the normative decline in BPD traits. Overall, our data suggests that primarily genetic influences contribute to the comorbidity between BPD features and substance use disorder symptoms. We discuss our data in the context of two major theories of developmental psychopathology and comorbidity. PMID:28420454

  3. Environmental settings and families' socioeconomic status influence mobility and the use of mobility devices by children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria C. R. Cury

    Full Text Available Functional mobility of children with cerebral palsy (CP is influenced by personal and environmental factors, serving as barriers and/or facilitators and impacting on children's strategies and functional outcome. OBJECTIVES: To describe typical mobility methods used by children with CP at home, school and community and to compare them across family's socioeconomic levels (SES. METHODS: The Functional Mobility Scale was used to assess mobility of 113 children with CP of high and low SES at home, school, and community. RESULTS: Differences in mobility methods of participants classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System levels II, III and IV were found between home and community. For levels III and IV, differences were also found between home and school. At home, participants from higher SES used wheelchairs more frequently while those from lower SES used floor mobility (crawling. CONCLUSIONS: Environmental settings and families' socioeconomic status influence mobility and use of mobility devices by children with CP.

  4. Environmental enrichment ameliorates depressive-like symptoms in young rats bred for learned helplessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, S Helene; Zeuch, Benjamin; Riva, Marco A; Gass, Peter; Vollmayr, Barbara

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of major depression is known to be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. In the current study, we therefore set out to investigate depressive-like behavior and its modification by environmental enrichment using rats bred for 'learned helplessness'. 45 males of congenitally helpless (cLH, n=22) and non-helpless (cNLH, n=23) rats of two different generations were used to systematically investigate differential effects of environmental enrichment on learned helpless behavior, anhedonic-like behavior (sweetened condensed milk consumption) and spontaneous behavior in the home cage. While enrichment was found to reduce learned helpless behavior in 14 weeks old, but not 28 weeks old cLH rats, it did not affect the consumption of sweetened condensed milk. Regarding the home cage behavior, no consistent changes between rats of different strains, housing conditions, and ages were observed. We could thus demonstrate that a genetic predisposition for learned helplessness may interact with environmental conditions in mediating some, but not all depressive-like symptoms in congenitally learned helpless rats. However, future efforts are needed to isolate the differential benefits of environmental factors in mediating the different depression-related symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Statistical parametric mapping analysis of the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow and symptom clusters of the depressive mood in patients with pre-dialytic chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong-Jang; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kwak, Ihm Soo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and symptom clusters of depressive mood in pre-dialytic chronic kidney disease (CKD). Twenty-seven patients with stage 4-5 CKD were subjected to statistical parametric mapping analysis of brain single-photon emission computed tomography. Correlation analyses between separate symptom clusters of depressive mood and rCBF were done. The first factor (depressive mood) was negatively correlated with rCBF in the right insula, posterior cingulate gyrus, and left superior temporal gyrus, and positively correlated with rCBF in the left fusiform gyrus. The second factor (insomnia) was negatively correlated with rCBF in the right middle frontal gyrus, bilateral cingulate gyri, right insula, right putamen, and right inferior parietal lobule, and positively correlated with rCBF in left fusiform gyrus and bilateral cerebellar tonsils. The third factor (anxiety and psychomotor aspects) was negatively correlated with rCBF in the left inferior frontal gyms, right superior frontal gyms, right middle temporal gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus, and left superior frontal gyrus, and positively correlated with rCBF in the right ligual gyrus and right parahippocampal gyrus. In this study, the separate symptom clusters were correlated with specific rCBF patterns similar to those in major depressive disorder patients without CKD. However, some areas with discordant rCBF patterns were also noted when compared with major depressive disorder patients. Further larger scale investigations are needed. (author)

  6. Pattern of cerebral glucose metabolism on F-18 FDG brain PET during vomiting and symptom free periods in cyclic vomiting syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Eun Joo; Seo, Jeong Kee; Yeo, Jeong Seok; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome (CVS) is characterized by recurrent, periodic, self-limiting vomiting. However, its pathogenesis is not yet established. We investigated the changes of the cerebral glucose metabolism using F-18 FDG during the vomiting attack and symptom free period in two children with CVS. FDG PET study showed the markedly increased metabolism in both temporal lobes and also in the medulla and cerebellum during the vomiting period. Also, FDG PET showed the decreased metabolism in the parieto-occipital and occipital areas during the in vomiting period. The area with decreased metabolism seemed to be related with the region showing abnormalities in EEG and perfusion SPECT studies. We expect that what we observed would be a helpful finding in clarifying the pathogenesis of the CVS

  7. Working conditions, psychosocial environmental factors, and depressive symptoms among wage workers in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Minsung; Choi, Mankyu; Jung, Minsoo

    2016-07-01

    In South Korea, the number of workers suffering from mental illnesses, such as depression, has rapidly increased. There is growing concern about depressive symptoms being associated with both working conditions and psychosocial environmental factors. To investigate potential psychosocial environmental moderators in the relationship between working conditions and occupational depressive symptoms among wage workers. Data were obtained from the wage worker respondents (n = 4,095) of the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of 2009. First, chi-square tests confirmed the differences in working conditions and psychosocial characteristics between depressive and non-depressive groups. Second, multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the moderating effects of the psychosocial environmental factors between working conditions and depressive symptoms. After adjusting for potential covariates, the likelihood of depressive symptomatology was high among respondents who had dangerous jobs and flexible work hours compared to those who had standard jobs and fixed daytime work hours (OR = 1.66 and 1.59, respectively). Regarding psychosocial factors, respondents with high job demands, low job control, and low social support were more likely to have depressive symptoms (OR = 1.26, 1.58 and 1.61, respectively). There is a need to develop non-occupational intervention programs, which provide workers with training about workplace depression and improve social support, and the programs should provide time for employees to have active communication. Additionally, companies should provide employees with support to access mental healthcare thereby decreasing the occurrence of workplace depression.

  8. Comparing non-specific physical symptoms in environmentally sensitive patients: prevalence, duration, functional status and illness behavior.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baliatsas, C.; Kamp, I. van; Hooiveld, M.; Yzermans, J.; Lebret, E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the potential clinical relevance of non-specific physical symptoms (NSPS) reported by patients with self-reported environmental sensitivities. This study aimed to assess NSPS in people with general environmental sensitivity (GES) and idiopathic environmental

  9. Noise sensitivity: Symptoms, health status, illness behavior and co-occurring environmental sensitivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baliatsas, Christos, E-mail: c.baliatsas@nivel.nl [Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht (Netherlands); Kamp, Irene van, E-mail: irene.van.kamp@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Swart, Wim, E-mail: wim.swart@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Hooiveld, Mariëtte, E-mail: m.hooiveld@nivel.nl [Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht (Netherlands); Yzermans, Joris, E-mail: J.Yzermans@nivel.nl [Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-10-15

    Epidemiological evidence on the symptomatic profile, health status and illness behavior of people with subjective sensitivity to noise is still scarce. Also, it is unknown to what extent noise sensitivity co-occurs with other environmental sensitivities such as multi-chemical sensitivity and sensitivity to electromagnetic fields (EMF). A cross-sectional study performed in the Netherlands, combining self-administered questionnaires and electronic medical records of non-specific symptoms (NSS) registered by general practitioners (GP) allowed us to explore this further. The study sample consisted of 5806 participants, drawn from 21 general practices. Among participants, 722 (12.5%) responded “absolutely agree” to the statement “I am sensitive to noise”, comprising the high noise-sensitive (HNS) group. Compared to the rest of the sample, people in the HNS group reported significantly higher scores on number and duration of self-reported NSS, increased psychological distress, decreased sleep quality and general health, more negative symptom perceptions and higher prevalence of healthcare contacts, GP-registered NSS and prescriptions for antidepressants and benzodiazepines. These results remained robust after adjustment for demographic, residential and lifestyle characteristics, objectively measured nocturnal noise exposure from road-traffic and GP-registered morbidity. Co-occurrence rates with other environmental sensitivities varied between 9% and 50%. Individuals with self-declared sensitivity to noise are characterized by high prevalence of multiple NSS, poorer health status and increased illness behavior independently of noise exposure levels. Findings support the notion that different types of environmental sensitivities partly overlap. - Highlights: • People with self-reported noise sensitivity experience multiple non-specific symptoms. • They also report comparatively poorer health and increased illness behavior. • Co-occurrence with other

  10. Noise sensitivity: Symptoms, health status, illness behavior and co-occurring environmental sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baliatsas, Christos; Kamp, Irene van; Swart, Wim; Hooiveld, Mariëtte; Yzermans, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence on the symptomatic profile, health status and illness behavior of people with subjective sensitivity to noise is still scarce. Also, it is unknown to what extent noise sensitivity co-occurs with other environmental sensitivities such as multi-chemical sensitivity and sensitivity to electromagnetic fields (EMF). A cross-sectional study performed in the Netherlands, combining self-administered questionnaires and electronic medical records of non-specific symptoms (NSS) registered by general practitioners (GP) allowed us to explore this further. The study sample consisted of 5806 participants, drawn from 21 general practices. Among participants, 722 (12.5%) responded “absolutely agree” to the statement “I am sensitive to noise”, comprising the high noise-sensitive (HNS) group. Compared to the rest of the sample, people in the HNS group reported significantly higher scores on number and duration of self-reported NSS, increased psychological distress, decreased sleep quality and general health, more negative symptom perceptions and higher prevalence of healthcare contacts, GP-registered NSS and prescriptions for antidepressants and benzodiazepines. These results remained robust after adjustment for demographic, residential and lifestyle characteristics, objectively measured nocturnal noise exposure from road-traffic and GP-registered morbidity. Co-occurrence rates with other environmental sensitivities varied between 9% and 50%. Individuals with self-declared sensitivity to noise are characterized by high prevalence of multiple NSS, poorer health status and increased illness behavior independently of noise exposure levels. Findings support the notion that different types of environmental sensitivities partly overlap. - Highlights: • People with self-reported noise sensitivity experience multiple non-specific symptoms. • They also report comparatively poorer health and increased illness behavior. • Co-occurrence with other

  11. Does cortisol moderate the environmental association between peer victimization and depression symptoms? A genetically informed twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendgen, Mara; Ouellet-Morin, Isabelle; Lupien, Sonia; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2017-10-01

    Many youths who are victimized by peers suffer from depression symptoms. However, not all bullying victims show depression symptoms and individuals' biological sensitivity may play an important moderating role in this regard. In line with this notion, peer victimization has been associated with increased depressive symptoms in youth with higher basal cortisol secretion. It is unclear, however, whether this moderating effect of cortisol really concerns the environmental effect of peer victimization on depression. Indeed, genetic factors can also influence individuals' environmental experiences, including peer victimization, and part of these genetic factors may be those associated with depression. Using a genetically informed design based on 159 monozygotic and 120 dizygotic twin pairs (52% girls) assessed at age 14 years, this study examined whether cortisol secretion moderates the environmental or the genetic association between peer victimization and depression symptoms. Salivary cortisol at awakening was obtained with buccal swabs during four school week days. Peer victimization and depression were assessed via self-reports. Cholesky modeling revealed that peer victimization was associated with depression symptoms via both genetic and environmental pathways. Moreover, the environmental association between peer victimization and depression symptoms steadily increased with increasing levels of morning cortisol. The genetic association between peer victimization and depression symptoms also varied, albeit less, as a function of individuals' cortisol secretion. These findings support the hypothesis that peer victimization increases internalizing psychopathology mainly in youth with heightened biological reactivity to environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Personal and environmental factors contributing to participation in romantic relationships and sexual activity of young adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegerink, Diana J H G; Stam, Henk J; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Roebroeck, Marij E

    2012-01-01

    To study determinants of romantic relationships and sexual activity of young adults with cerebral palsy (CP), focusing on personal and environmental factors. A cohort study was performed with 74 young adults (46 men; 28 women) aged 20-25 years (SD 1.4) with CP (49% unilateral CP, 76% GMFCS level I, 85% MACS level I). All participants were of normal intelligence. Romantic relationships, sexual activity (outcome measures), personal and environmental factors (associated factors) were assessed. Associations were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. More females than males with CP were in a current romantic relationship. Self-esteem, sexual esteem and feelings of competence regarding self-efficacy contributed positively to having current romantic relationships. A negative parenting style contributed negatively. Age and gross motor functioning explained 20% of the variance in experience with intercourse. In addition, sexual esteem and taking initiative contributed significantly to intercourse experience. For young adults with CP personal factors (20-35% explained variances) seem to contribute more than environmental factors (9-12% explained variances) to current romantic relationships and sexual experiences. We advice parents and professionals to focus on self-efficacy, self-esteem and sexual self-esteem in development of young adults with CP. [ • The severity of gross motor functioning contributed somewhat to sexual activities, but not to romantic relationships.• High self-efficacy, self-esteem and sexual self-esteem can facilitate involvement in romantic and sexual relationships for young adults with CP.

  13. Role of environmental factors and history of low back pain in sciatica symptoms among Finnish adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Ulla; Paananen, Markus; Okuloff, Annaleena; Taimela, Simo; Auvinen, Juha; Männikkö, Minna; Karppinen, Jaro

    2013-06-01

    Cross-sectional study in a subcohort of the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (n = 1987). To investigate the role of environmental factors and LBP history in sciatica symptoms among Finnish young adults. History of low back pain (LBP), smoking, and male sex are associated with sciatica in adult populations. The role of the environmental determinants of sciatica has not been evaluated in populations consisting of only adolescents. Sciatic symptoms and environmental exposures were elicited by a mailed questionnaire and the associations were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression. Female sex was associated with severe sciatica at 18 years (OR, 3.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.6-9.3). Both reported LBP at 16 years and LBP requiring consultation of a health care professional were associated with mild sciatica at 18 years (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.3-4.9; and OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.2-11.9). In addition, LBP at 16 years requiring consultation of a health care professional was associated with severe sciatica at 18 years (OR, 5.0; 95% CI, 1.7-15.3). Smoking, obesity, physical workload, and level of physical activity were not associated with sciatica. Females reported sciatic pain more often than males. LBP at 16 years predicted sciatica at 18 years. 2.

  14. Direct and indirect effects of child abuse and environmental stress: A lifecourse perspective on adversity and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Cindy; Mason, W Alex; Herrenkohl, Todd I; Prince, Dana; Herrenkohl, Roy C; Russo, M Jean

    2018-01-01

    There is a great deal of evidence about the mental health implications of physical child abuse and environmental stressors, or hardships that people experience at the household and neighborhood level (e.g., neighborhood violence; economic hardship, substance abuse, or conflict among family members). Yet, studies often focus on either abuse or environmental stress, not both, or examine abuse and environmental stressors as a combined set of experiences. Less is known, therefore, about how child abuse and environmental stress might work as either distinct or interrelated risks to diminish mental health over time. In this longitudinal study, we used path analyses to examine the cumulative effects of physical child abuse and environmental stressors on adult depressive symptoms among a sample of children followed into adulthood (N = 356). The goal was to assess whether chronic physical child abuse remains an independent predictor of adult outcomes once we accounted for the cumulative effects of household and neighborhood stressors across the lifecourse. Cumulative measures of physical child abuse and environmental stress each independently predicted a higher likelihood of adult depressive symptoms (ß = .122, p < .01 and ß = .283, p < .001, respectively). After accounting for adolescent depressive symptoms, only cumulative environmental stressors independently predicted depressive symptoms (ß = .202, p < .001). Tests of the indirect effect of cumulative environmental stress on the relationship between cumulative physical abuse and adult depressive symptoms were marginally statistically significant. Results add to literature that examines child abuse, adversity, and lifecourse perspectives on health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Relationship between the change of language symptoms and the change of regional cerebral blood flow in the recovery process of two children with acquired aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuka, Junko; Uno, Akira; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Toyoshima, Yoshiya; Hamano, Shin-Ichiro

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the change of language symptoms and the change of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the recovery process of two children with acquired aphasia caused by infarctions from Moyamoya disease with an onset age of 8years. We compared the results for the Standard Language Test of Aphasia (SLTA) with rCBF changes in 7 language regions in the left hemisphere and their homologous regions in the right hemisphere at 4 time points from 3weeks for up to 5years after the onset of aphasia, while controlling for the effect of age. In both cases, strong correlations were seen within a hemisphere between adjacent regions or regions that are connected by neuronal fibers, and between some language regions in the left hemisphere and their homologous regions in the right hemisphere. Conversely, there were differences between the two cases in the time course of rCBF changes during their recovery process. Consistent with previous studies, the current study suggested that both hemispheres were involved in the long-term recovery of language symptoms in children with acquired aphasia. We suggest that the differences between both cases during their recovery process might be influenced by the brain states before aphasia, by which hemisphere was affected, and by the timing of the surgical revascularization procedure. However, the changes were observed in the data obtained for rCBF with strong correlations with the changes in language performance, so it is possible that rCBF could be used as a biomarker for language symptom changes. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluating prevalence and risk factors of building-related symptoms among office workers: Seasonal characteristics of symptoms and psychosocial and physical environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kenichi; Ikeda, Koichi; Kagi, Naoki; Yanagi, U; Osawa, Haruki

    2017-04-12

    Psychosocial and environmental factors at the workplace play a significant role in building-related symptoms (BRSs). Environmental factors change during summer cooling and winter heating using air-conditioning systems. Thus, significant risk factors in each season need to be clarified. A nationwide cross-sectional study was conducted during summer in Japan and seasonal differences between summer and winter were evaluated. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 489 offices. Possible risk factors for BRSs associated with the work environment, indoor air quality, and job stressors were examined by multiple regression analyses. Among people having at least one BRS, the prevalence of BRSs in summer (27.8%) was slightly higher than that in winter (24.9%). High prevalence was observed for eye and nasal symptoms related to dryness and general symptoms related to psychological distress in both seasons. Analyses revealed that dryness of air was an important and significant risk factor associated with BRSs, and job stressors were significantly associated with general symptoms in both seasons. Conversely, humidity was a significant risk factor of general symptoms in summer (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.43). Carpeting, recently painted walls, and unpleasant chemical odors in summer and noise, dust and dirt, and unpleasant odors such as body or food odors in both seasons were significant risk factors for BRSs. Improvements in the physical environmental qualities in an office throughout the year are important along with the reduction in psychological distress related to work.

  17. The feasibility of aromatherapy massage to reduce symptoms of Idiopathic Environmental Intolerance: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Atsuko; Watanabe, Kazuhiko; Eitaki, Yoko; Kawai, Toshio; Kishi, Reiko

    2012-12-01

    Idiopathic Environmental Intolerance (IEI) is an acquired disorder with multiple recurrent symptoms, which is associated with diverse environmental factors that are tolerated by the majority of people. IEI is an illness of uncertain aetiology, making it difficult to treat using conventional medicine. Therefore, there is a need for novel therapies to control the symptoms of IEI. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and impact of aromatherapy massage for individuals with IEI. Non-blinded crossover trial. IEI patients who attended a clinic in Sapporo city were recruited, and sixteen patients were enrolled. Participants were clinically examined by an experienced medical doctor and met the criteria included in the working definition of IEI disorder. During the active period, participants received four one-hour aromatherapy massage sessions every two weeks. During the control period, the participants did not receive any massages. Scores on the IEI-scales trigger checklist, symptoms, life impact, and the State Anxiety Inventory were assessed before and after each period. Short-term mood enhancement was evaluated using the Profiles of Mood Status (POMS) before and after sessions. Due to period effects, evaluation of the results had to be restricted to the first period, and the result showed no effect of intervention. All six sub-scales of the POMS improved after each session (mean score differences: 4.89-1.33, PAromatherapy was well tolerated by subjects with IEI; however, aromatherapy, as applied in this study, did not suggest any specific effects on IEI condition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Responses to environmental smoking in never-smoking children: can symptoms of nicotine addiction develop in response to environmental tobacco smoke exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Kathrin; Kleinjan, Marloes; Otten, Roy; Engels, Rutger C M E; DiFranza, Joseph R

    2013-06-01

    A recent line of studies has brought attention to the question whether repeated exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is capable of producing psycho-physiological effects in non-smokers and whether symptoms of nicotine dependence can develop in the absence of active smoking. Children seem to be particularly vulnerable to the effects of ETS. We examined the occurrence of psycho-behavioural symptoms, designed to assess nicotine addiction and nicotine withdrawal, in a sample of 778 never-smoking children aged 9-12 years using cross-sectional survey data collected in 15 Dutch primary schools. In the present study, 6% of never-smoking children reported symptoms of craving, 8% reported cue-triggered wanting to smoke, and 20% reported subjective symptoms in response to ETS exposure. In never-smoking children, a higher number of smokers in the child's social environment was associated with more symptoms of cue-triggered wanting to smoke and more subjective symptoms in response to ETS. Never-smoking children and children who had initiated smoking were equally likely to report subjective symptoms in response to ETS exposure. In conclusion, environmental smoking is associated with self-reported psycho-behavioural symptoms in never-smoking children. Future research needs to investigate whether symptoms in children exposed to ETS are physiologically based or whether they reflect other characteristics which predispose youth for smoking initiation in the future.

  19. Depressive symptoms predict cognitive decline and dementia in older people independently of cerebral white matter changes: the LADIS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdelho, Ana; Madureira, Sofia; Moleiro, Carla; Ferro, José M; O'Brien, John T; Poggesi, Anna; Pantoni, Leonardo; Fazekas, Franz; Scheltens, Philip; Waldemar, Gunhild; Wallin, Anders; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Inzitari, Domenico

    2013-11-01

    Depressive symptoms (DS) have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline. Our aim was to evaluate the longitudinal influence of DS on cognition in independent older people, accounting for the severity of white matter changes (WMC). The LADIS (Leukoaraiosis And DISability in the elderly) prospective study evaluated the impact of WMC on the transition of independent older subjects into disability. Subjects were evaluated annually over a 3 year period with a comprehensive clinical and neuropsychological evaluation. Previous episodes of depression and current DS were assessed during each interview. Severity of DS was assessed using the self-rated 15 item Geriatric Depression Scale. A neuropsychological battery and clinical criteria for cognitive impairments were applied in all clinical visits, and cognitive compound measures were made based on neuropsychological results. MRI was performed at baseline and at year 3. 639 subjects were included (74.1 ± 5 years old, 55% women, 9.6 ± 3.8 years of schooling). Dementia was diagnosed in 90 patients and cognitive impairment not dementia in 147 patients at the last clinical evaluation. DS were an independent predictor of cognitive impairment (dementia and not dementia) during follow-up, independent of the effect of the severity of WMC, medial temporal lobe atrophy, age, education or global cognitive function at baseline. DS are associated with an increase risk of cognitive decline, independent of the effect of WMC, probably due to an additive or synergistic effect. In this context, DS probably represent a subtle ongoing organic dysfunction.

  20. Headache symptoms and indoor environmental parameters: Results from the EPA BASE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen E Tietjen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this investigation was to determine the prevalence of migraine and headache symptoms in a national sample of US office employees. Also, we explored the association of headache symptoms with indoor environmental parameters of the work place. Background: Sick building syndrome (SBS, which includes headache, is a common global phenomenon, but the underlying environmental cause is uncertain. Materials and Methods: We used data from the 1994-1998 US Environmental Protection Agency′s (EPA Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation, a cross-sectional study of workers employed in 100 public and private office buildings across 25 states. The study used a self-administered questionnaire to assess headache frequency and prevalence of self-reported physician-diagnosed (SRPD migraine. Indoor environmental parameters (IEP were collected per EPA protocol from each building over a 1-week period and included carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, temperature, relative humidity, particulate matter, volatile organic compound, illuminance, and sound level. The standards of American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers were used to categorize IEP as either within- or out-of-comfort range for human dwelling. These limits delineate whether a parameter value is safe for human dwelling. Out-of-comfort range IEPs are associated with SBS and other human diseases. SRPD migraine and headache frequency were the primary outcome measures of the study. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were employed for the purpose of assessing the association between the outcome variable and IEPs. Results: Of the 4326 participants, 66% were females and 60% were between 30 and 49 years. Headache frequency during the last 4 weeks was as follows: None in 31%, 1-3 days in 38%, 1-3 days per week in 18%, and every or almost every workday in 8%. Females had higher SRPD migraine prevalence compared to males (27% vs. 11%, P<0.001 and were more

  1. Cerebral venous angiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnoli, A.L.; Hildebrandt, G.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical symptoms and radiological signs in 15 patients with cerebral venous malformations are presented and the diagnostic problems discussed. The circulation time in combination with cerebral malformations and angiomas of the scalp are described. CT findings in cases of venous malformations of the brain stem are evaluated. Spot-like enhancement, as well as sharply demarcated round shaped enhancement are characteristic for venous angiomas. Cavernous angiomas usually present as homogenous or inhomogenous round shaped enhanced areas. (Author)

  2. Measuring health outcomes of a multidisciplinary care approach in individuals with chronic environmental conditions using an abbreviated symptoms questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Fox

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Roy Fox1, Tara Sampalli1, Jonathan Fox11Nova Scotia Environmental Health Centre, Fall River, NS, CanadaAbstract: The Nova Scotia Environmental Health Centre is a treatment facility for individuals with chronic environmental conditions such as multiple chemical sensitivity, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic respiratory conditions and in some cases chronic pain. The premise of care is to provide a patient-centred multidisciplinary care approach leading to self-management strategies. In order to measure the outcome of the treatment in these complex problems, with overlapping diagnoses, symptoms in many body systems and suspected environmental triggers, a detailed symptoms questionnaire was developed specifically for this patient population and validated. Results from a pilot study in which an abbreviated symptoms questionnaire based on the top reported symptoms captured in previous research was used to measure the efficacy of a multidisciplinary care approach in individuals with multiple chemical sensitivity are presented in this paper. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent, type and patterns of changes over time in the top reported symptoms with treatment measured using the abbreviated symptoms questionnaire. A total of 183 active and 109 discharged patients participated in the study where the health status was measured at different time periods of follow up since the commencement of treatment at the Centre. The findings from this study were successful in generating an initial picture of the nature and type of changes in these symptoms. For instance, symptoms such as difficulty concentrating, sinus conditions and tiredness showed early improvement, within the first 6 months of being in treatment, while others, such as fatigue, hoarseness or loss of voice, took longer while others showed inconsistent changes warranting further enquiry. A controlled longitudinal study is planned to confirm the findings of the pilot study

  3. Indoor environmental and air quality characteristics, building-related health symptoms, and worker productivity in a federal government building complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukcso, David; Guidotti, Tee Lamont; Franklin, Donald E; Burt, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Building Health Sciences, Inc. (BHS), investigated environmental conditions by many modalities in 71 discreet areas of 12 buildings in a government building complex that had experienced persistent occupant complaints despite correction of deficiencies following a prior survey. An online health survey was completed by 7,637 building occupants (49% response rate), a subset of whom voluntarily wore personal sampling apparatus and underwent medical evaluation. Building environmental measures were within current standards and guidelines, with few outliers. Four environmental factors were consistently associated with group-level building-related health complaints: physical comfort/discomfort, odor, job stress, and glare. Several other factors were frequently commented on by participants, including cleanliness, renovation and construction activities, and noise. Low relative humidity was significantly associated with lower respiratory and "sick building syndrome"-type symptoms. No other environmental conditions (including formaldehyde, PM10 [particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter work but at reduced capacity), and increase in reported symptom-days, including symptoms not related to respiratory disease. We found that in buildings without unusual hazards and with environmental and air quality indicators within the range of acceptable indoor air quality standards, there is an identifiable population of occupants with a high prevalence of asthma and allergic disease who disproportionately report discomfort and lost productivity due to symptoms and that in "normal" buildings these outcome indicators are more closely associated with host factors than with environmental conditions. We concluded from the experience of this study that building-related health complaints should be investigated at the work-area level and not at a building-wide level. An occupant-centric medical evaluation should guide environmental investigations, especially when screening results of building

  4. Cerebral malformations without antenatal diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Nadine J. [Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Hopital Timone, Marseille (France)

    2010-06-15

    Cerebral malformations are usually described following the different steps in development. Disorders of neurulation (dysraphisms), or diverticulation (holoprosencephalies and posterior fossa cysts), and total commissural agenesis are usually diagnosed in utero. In contrast, disorders of histogenesis (proliferation-differentiation, migration, organization) are usually discovered in infants and children. The principal clinical symptoms that may be a clue to cerebral malformation include congenital hemiparesis, epilepsy and mental or psychomotor retardation. MRI is the imaging method of choice to assess cerebral malformations. (orig.)

  5. Responses to environmental smoking in never-smoking children: can symptoms of nicotine addiction develop in response to environmental tobacco smoke exposure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuck, K.; Kleinjan, M.; Otten, R.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; DiFranza, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    A recent line of studies has brought attention to the question whether repeated exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is capable of producing psycho-physiological effects in non-smokers and whether symptoms of nicotine dependence can develop in the absence of active smoking. Children seem to

  6. Influence of parental depressive symptoms on adopted toddler behaviors: an emerging developmental cascade of genetic and environmental effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, Caroline K; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Leve, Leslie D; Natsuaki, Misaki N; Shaw, Daniel S; Reiss, David; Ge, Xiaojia

    2010-11-01

    This study examined the developmental cascade of both genetic and environmental influences on toddlers' behavior problems through the longitudinal and multigenerational assessment of psychosocial risk. We used data from the Early Growth and Development Study, a prospective adoption study, to test the intergenerational transmission of risk through the assessment of adoptive mother, adoptive father, and biological parent depressive symptoms on toddler behavior problems. Given that depression is often chronic, we control for across-time continuity and find that in addition to associations between adoptive mother depressive symptoms and toddler externalizing problems, adoptive father depressive symptoms when the child is 9 months of age were associated with toddler problems and associated with maternal depressive symptoms. Findings also indicated that a genetic effect may indirectly influence toddler problems through prenatal pregnancy risk. These findings help to describe how multiple generations are linked through genetic (biological parent), timing (developmental age of the child), and contextual (marital partner) pathways.

  7. Learn More About Cerebral Palsy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-03-30

    This podcast describes the causes, preventions, types, and signs and symptoms of cerebral palsy.  Created: 3/30/2008 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities.   Date Released: 3/21/2008.

  8. Environmental factors predict the severity of delirium symptoms in long-term care residents with and without delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G; Voyer, Philippe; Vu, Minh; Ciampi, Antonio; Monette, Johanne; Champoux, Nathalie; Belzile, Eric; Dyachenko, Alina

    2013-04-01

    To identify potentially modifiable environmental factors (including number of medications) associated with changes over time in the severity of delirium symptoms and to explore the interactions between these factors and resident baseline vulnerability. Prospective, observational cohort study. Seven long-term care (LTC) facilities. Two hundred seventy-two LTC residents aged 65 and older with and without delirium. Weekly assessments (for up to 6 months) of the severity of delirium symptoms using the Delirium Index (DI), environmental risk factors, and number of medications. Baseline vulnerability measures included a diagnosis of dementia and a delirium risk score. Associations between environmental factors, medications, and weekly changes in DI were analyzed using a general linear model with correlated errors. Six potentially modifiable environmental factors predicted weekly changes in DI (absence of reading glasses, aids to orientation, family member, and glass of water and presence of bed rails and other restraints) as did the prescription of two or more new medications. Residents with dementia appeared to be more sensitive to the effects of these factors. Six environmental factors and prescription of two or more new medications predicted changes in the severity of delirium symptoms. These risk factors are potentially modifiable through improved LTC clinical practices. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  9. Environmental adversities and psychotic symptoms: The impact of timing of trauma, abuse, and neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalinski, Inga; Breinlinger, Susanne; Hirt, Vanessa; Teicher, Martin H; Odenwald, Michael; Rockstroh, Brigitte

    2017-11-13

    Trauma and adverse childhood experiences (ACE) occur more often in mental illness, including psychosis, than in the general population. Individuals with psychosis (cases) report a higher number and severity (dose) of adversities than healthy controls. While a dose-dependent increase of adversities has been related to more severe psychopathology, the role of type and timing is still insufficiently understood on the exacerbation of positive and negative psychotic symptoms. Moreover, dissociative symptoms were examined as potential mediator between adversities and severity of psychotic symptoms. Exposure to adversities were assessed by interviews in n=180 cases and n=70 controls. In cases, symptom severities were obtained for psychotic symptoms and dissociation. Conditioned random forest regression determined the importance of type and timing of ACE for positive and negative symptom severity, and mediator analyses evaluated the role of dissociative symptoms in the relationship between adversities and psychotic symptoms. Cases experienced substantially more abuse and neglect than controls. Adversities were related in a dose-dependent manner to psychotic disorder. An array of adversities was associated with more severe positive symptoms, while the conditioned random forest regression depicted neglect at age 10 as the most important predictor. Dissociative symptoms mediated the small relation of trauma load in childhood and positive symptoms. The role of trauma and ACE on psychotic symptoms can be specified by neglect during frontocortical development in the exacerbation of positive symptoms. The mediating role of dissociation is restricted to the relation of childhood trauma and positive symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic and Environmental Influences on the Developmental Course of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms From Childhood to Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Viding, Essi; Galéra, Cédric; Greven, Corina U; Zheng, Yao; Plomin, Robert; Rijsdijk, Frühling

    2015-07-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is conceptualized as a neurodevelopmental disorder that is strongly heritable. However, to our knowledge, no study to date has examined the genetic and environmental influences explaining interindividual differences in the developmental course of ADHD symptoms from childhood to adolescence (ie, systematic decreases or increases with age). The reason ADHD symptoms persist in some children but decline in others is an important concern, with implications for prognosis and interventions. To assess the proportional impact of genes and the environment on interindividual differences in the developmental course of ADHD symptom domains of hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention between ages 8 and 16 years. A prospective sample of 8395 twin pairs from the Twins Early Development Study, recruited from population records of births in England and Wales between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 1996. Data collection at age 8 years took place between November 2002 and November 2004; data collection at age 16 years took place between February 2011 and January 2013. Both DSM-IV ADHD symptom subscales were rated 4 times by participants' mothers. Estimates from latent growth curve models indicated that the developmental course of hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms followed a sharp linear decrease (mean score of 6.0 at age 8 years to 2.9 at age 16 years). Interindividual differences in the linear change in hyperactivity/impulsivity were under strong additive genetic influences (81%; 95% CI, 73%-88%). More than half of the genetic variation was specific to the developmental course and not shared with the baseline level of hyperactivity/impulsivity. The linear decrease in inattention symptoms was less pronounced (mean score of 5.8 at age 8 years to 4.9 at age 16 years). Nonadditive genetic influences accounted for a substantial amount of variation in the developmental course of inattention symptoms (54%; 95% CI, 8%-76%), with more than

  11. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  12. Malaria cerebral Cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Hugo Zapata Zapata

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC. Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia.

  13. Cerebral microangiopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linn, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral microangiopathies are a very heterogenous group of diseases characterized by pathological changes of the small cerebral vessels. They account for 20 - 30 % of all ischemic strokes. Degenerative microangiopathy and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiography represent the typical acquired cerebral microangiopathies, which are found in over 90 % of cases. Besides, a wide variety of rare, hereditary microangiopathy exists, as e.g. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), Fabrys disease and MELAS syndrome (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes). (orig.)

  14. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow correlate with symptoms of depression and severity of fatigue in 99mTc-ECD SPECT study in 45 workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Fumihiko; Hojo, Kei; Otsuki, Kenro; Yamamoto, Haruyoshi

    2008-01-01

    We performed single photon emission computed tomography ( 99m Tc-ECD SPECT) of the brain in 25 workers suffering from major depression (22 males and 3 females at the average age of 47.5±7.7 standard deviation (S.D.) years and all patients were right handed) and identified frontal lobe hypoperfusion in 18 cases using the easy Z-score Imaging System (eZIS). During the remission period, which was within ten months of therapy, we observed normalization of the frontal cerebral perfusion in 75% of the patients. In further evaluation of the cerebral blood flow after the addition of 20 healthy volunteer workers (18 males and 2 females at the average age 47.1±9.8 S.D. years and all were right handed) as a control group, reduced cerebral blood flow in the dorsal area of the frontal lobe, which is supposed to be correlated to the severity of the feeling of fatigue estimated based on the self-rating depression scale (SDS), was demonstrated by statistical parametric mapping (SPM). The severity of the fatigue of all workers was estimated using a self-rating checklist disseminated by the Japan Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare, which pertains to the accumulation of fatigue due to labor. In the SPM analysis, limbic hypoperfusion, which is correlated to the total severity of fatigue in all worker cases, was estimated based on the reduction in the cerebral blood flow in the lower part of the temporal lobe. Accordingly, the accumulation of fatigue due to, for instance, over work may result in easy fatigue and a pre-depressive state, which are associated with a reduction in the cerebral blood flow. This research is a part of the research and development and the dissemination projects related to the 13 fields of occupational injuries and illnesses of the Japan Labor Health and Welfare Organization. (author)

  15. Access to environmental reward mediates the relation between posttraumatic stress symptoms and alcohol problems and craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuff, Samuel F; Luciano, Matthew T; Soltis, Kathryn E; Joyner, Keanan J; McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan; Murphy, James G

    2018-04-01

    Symptoms of posttraumatic stress (PTS) show significant comorbidity with alcohol use, but little is known about the mechanisms that might account for this comorbidity. Deficits in reward functioning have long been implicated in alcohol misuse and more recently in PTS reactions, but no study has examined whether reward deprivation may serve as a transdiagnostic risk factor for comorbid PTS-alcohol misuse. The current cross-sectional study sought to test the behavioral economic hypothesis that reward deprivation would be related to both PTS symptoms and alcohol problems, and would mediate the relation between PTS symptoms and alcohol problems in college students. We recruited a diverse sample of urban college students (N = 203, M age = 21.5 years, SD = 5.5; 79.5% female; 56.8% White, 28.1% Black, .9% Asian, 9.8% Multiracial) who endorsed both alcohol use and PTS symptoms. Reward deprivation (lack of access to, and ability to, experience reward) was related to alcohol problems, and a lack of access to reward was related to PTS symptoms. Furthermore, reward access mediated the relation between PTS symptoms and alcohol problems and craving, after controlling for alcohol use, age, gender, and race. These data provide preliminary support for behavioral economic models of alcohol comorbidity and suggest that treatments for combined PTS and alcohol misuse should attempt to reduce barriers to accessing natural rewards. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Genetic and environmental influences on adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms: a large Swedish population-based study of twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, H; Asherson, P; Chang, Z; Ljung, T; Friedrichs, B; Larsson, J-O; Lichtenstein, P

    2013-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) frequently persists into adulthood. Family and twin studies delineate a disorder with strong genetic influences among children and adolescents based on parent- and teacher-reported data but little is known about the genetic and environmental contribution to DSM-IV ADHD symptoms in adulthood. We therefore aimed to investigate the impact of genetic and environmental influences on the inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive symptoms of ADHD in adults. Twin methods were applied to self-reported assessments of ADHD symptoms from a large population-based Swedish twin study that included data from 15 198 Swedish male and female twins aged 20 to 46 years. The broad heritability [i.e., A + D, where A is an additive genetic factor and D (dominance) a non-additive genetic factor] was 37% (A = 11%, D = 26%) for inattention and 38% (A = 18%, D = 20%) for hyperactivity-impulsivity. The results also indicate that 52% of the phenotypic correlation between inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity (r = 0.43) was explained by genetic influences whereas the remaining part of the covariance was explained by non-shared environmental influences. These results were replicated across age strata. Our findings of moderate broad heritability estimates are consistent with previous literature on self-rated ADHD symptoms in older children, adolescents and adults and retrospective reports of self-rated childhood ADHD by adults but differ from studies of younger children with informant ratings. Future research needs to clarify whether our data indicate a true decrease in the heritability of ADHD in adults compared to children, or whether this relates to the use of self-ratings in contrast to informant data.

  17. Recurrent cerebral thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Abe, Shin-e; Kubo, Hideki; Hanyu, Haruo; Takasaki, Masaru

    1992-01-01

    Neuroradiological techniques were used to elucidate pathophysiology of recurrent cerebral thrombosis. Twenty-two patients with cerebral thrombosis who suffered a second attack under stable conditions more than 22 days after the initial stroke were studied. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia were also seen in 20, 8, and 12 patients, respectively. The patients were divided into three groups according to their symptoms: (I) symptoms differed between the first and second strokes (n=12); (II) initial symptoms were suddenly deteriorated (n=6); and (III) symptoms occurring in groups I and II were seen (n=4). In group I, contralateral hemiparesis or suprabulbar palsy was often associated with the initial hemiparesis. The time of recurrent stroke varied from 4 months to 9 years. CT and MRI showed not only lacunae in both hemispheres, but also deep white-matter ischemia of the centrum semi-ovale. In group II, hemiparesis or visual field defect was deteriorated early after the initial stroke. In addition, neuroimaging revealed that infarction in the posterior cerebral artery was progressed on the contralateral side, or that white matter lesion in the middle artery was enlarged in spite of small lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. All patients in group III had deterioration of right hemiparesis associated with aphasia. CT, MRI, SPECT, and angiography indicated deep white-matter ischemia caused by main trunk lesions in the left hemisphere. Group III seemed to be equivalent to group II, except for laterality of the lesion. Neuroradiological assessment of the initial stroke may help to predict the mode of recurrence, although pathophysiology of cerebral thrombosis is complicated and varies from patient to patient. (N.K.)

  18. Specificity of genetic and environmental risk factors for symptoms of cannabis, cocaine, alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Myers, John; Prescott, Carol A

    2007-11-01

    Although genetic risk factors have been found to contribute to dependence on both licit and illicit psychoactive substances, we know little of how these risk factors interrelate. To clarify the structure of genetic and environmental risk factors for symptoms of dependence on cannabis, cocaine, alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine in males and females. Lifetime history by structured clinical interview. General community. Four thousand eight hundred sixty-five members of male-male and female-female pairs from the Virginia Adult Twin Study of Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders. Main Outcome Measure Lifetime symptoms of abuse of and dependence on cannabis, cocaine, alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine. Controlling for greater symptom prevalence in males, genetic and environmental parameters could be equated across sexes. Two models explained the data well. The best-fit exploratory model contained 2 genetic factors and 1 individual environmental factor contributing to all substances. The first genetic factor loaded strongly on cocaine and cannabis dependence; the second, on alcohol and nicotine dependence. Nicotine and caffeine had high substance-specific genetic effects. A confirmatory model, which also fit well, contained 1 illicit drug genetic factor--loading only on cannabis and cocaine--and 1 licit drug genetic factor loading on alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine. However, these factors were highly intercorrelated (r = + 0.82). Large substance-specific genetic effects remained for nicotine and caffeine. The pattern of genetic and environmental risk factors for psychoactive substance dependence was similar in males and females. Genetic risk factors for dependence on common psychoactive substances cannot be explained by a single factor. Rather, 2 genetic factors-one predisposing largely to illicit drug dependence, the other primarily to licit drug dependence-are needed. Furthermore, a large proportion of the genetic influences on nicotine and particularly caffeine dependence

  19. Neuroimaging of cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wengenroth, M.; Saam, T.; Haehnel, S.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasculitis can have a variety of origins. Furthermore, there are no vasculitis-specific symptoms or imaging signs and vasculitis of the CNS can mimic many other neurological diseases, which require different treatment approaches. Thus, the clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis is challenging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) should be the radiological imaging methods of choice to assess the degree of parenchymal damage and to detect vessel wall changes. If the results are unclear digital subtraction angiography (DSA) should be pursued in order to also detect changes in medium sized vessels. Vasculitis of small vessels cannot be detected by vascular imaging and requires brain or leptomeningeal biopsy. In this review we present the current diagnostic approach and a variety of imaging findings in cerebral vasculitis and discuss the main radiological differential diagnoses. (orig.) [de

  20. Cerebral hemodynamics in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachinski, V C; Olesen, Jes; Norris, J W

    1977-01-01

    Clinical and angiographic findings in migraine are briefly reviewed in relation to cerebral hemodynamic changes shown by regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies. Three cases of migraine studied by the intracarotid xenon 133 method during attacks are reported. In classic migraine, with typical...... prodromal symptoms, a decrease in cerebral blood flow has been demonstrated during the aura. Occasionally, this flow decrease persists during the headache phase. In common migraine, where such prodromata are not seen, a flow decrease has not been demonstrated. During the headache phase of both types...... of migraine, rCBF has usually been found to be normal or in the high range of normal values. The high values may represent postischemic hyperemia, but are probably more frequently secondary to arousal caused by pain. Thus, during the headache phase rCBF may be subnormal, normal or high. These findings do...

  1. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow correlate with symptoms of depression, severity of fatigue, and sleep disorders in 99mTc-ECD SPECT study in 45 workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Fumihiko; Matsuura, Naoyuki; Kageyama, Junichi; Otsuki, Kenro

    2010-01-01

    We performed single photon emission computed tomography ( 99m Tc-ECD SPECT) of the brain in 25 workers suffering from major depression (22 males and 3 females at the average age of 47.5±7.7 standard deviation (S.D.) years and all patients were right handed) and identified frontal lobe hypoperfusion in 18 cases using the easy Z-score Imaging System (eZIS). During the remission period, which was within ten months of therapy, we observed normalization of the frontal cerebral perfusion in 75% of the patients. In further evaluation of the cerebral blood flow after the addition of 20 healthy volunteer workers (18 males and 2 females at the average age 47.1±9.8 S.D. years and all were right handed) as a control group, reduced cerebral blood flow in the dorsal area, which is supposed to be correlated to the severity of the feeling of fatigue estimated based on the self-rating depression scale (SDS), was demonstrated by statistical parametric mapping (SPM). The severity of the fatigue of all workers was estimated using a self-rating checklist disseminated by the Japan Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare, which pertains to the accumulation of fatigue due to labor. In the SPM analysis, limbic hypoperfusion, which is correlated to the total severity of fatigue in all worker cases, was estimated based on the reduction in the cerebral blood flow in the lower part of the temporal lobe. We also estimated the severity of insomnia in 21 cases (8 depressive, the 8 remitted and 5 controls), referred to as the Insomnia Score in this study, using the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (SIGH-D). The severity of the insomnia statistically correlates with frontoparietal hypoperfusion, and this region is situated very close to the region correlated to the feeling of fatigue expressed by the patients in the SDS. Accordingly, prolonged sleep disturbance due to, for instance, overwork may result in easy fatigability and a pre-depressive state which are

  2. Cerebral fat embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Toshihisa; Sawada, Yusuke; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Nishide, Kazuyuki; Yoshioka, Toshiharu

    1982-01-01

    A case of cerebral fat embolism is reported. A 18-year-old patient with multiple bone fractures was in semiconma immediately after an injury. Brain CT showed no brain swelling or intracranial hematoma. Hypoxemia and alcoholemia were noted on admission, which returned to normal without improvement of consciousness level. In addition, respiratory symptoms with positive radiographic changes, tachycardia, pyrexia, sudden drop in hemoglobin level, and sudden thrombocytopenia developed. These symptoms were compatible with Gurd's criteria of systemic fat embolism. Eight days after injury, multiple low density areas appeared on CT and disappeared within the subsequent two weeks, and subdural effusion with cerebral atrophy developed. These CT findings were not considered due to cerebral trauma. Diagnosis of cerebral fat embolism was made. The subdural effusion was drained. Neurologic and pulmonary recoveries took place slowly and one month following the injury the patient became alert and exhibited fully coordinated limb movement. The CT scans of the present case well corresponded with hitherto reported pathological findings. Petechiae in the white matter must have developed on the day of injury, which could not be detected by CT examination. It is suggested that some petechial regions fused to purpuras and then gradually resolved when they were detected as multiple low density areas on CT. CT in the purpuras phase would have shown these lesions as high density areas. These lesions must have healed with formation of tiny scars and blood pigment which were demonstrated as the disappearance of multiple low density areas by CT examination. Cerebral atrophy and subsequent subdural effusion developed as a result of demyelination. The patient took the typical clinical course of cerebral fat embolism and serial CT scans served for its assessment. (author)

  3. Cerebral Vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Khorvash

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vasculitis is an inflammation systems may be involved of blood vessels due to various origins. Vessels of the peripheral and/or central nervous. Vasculitis of the CNS is rare and occurs in the context of systemic diseases or as primary angiitis of the CNS. Epidemiology: The overall incidence of primary vasculitis is about 40/1,000,000 persons [excluding giant cell (temporal arteritis, GCA]. Its incidence increases with age. The incidence of GCA is much higher (around 200/1,000,000 persons in the age group[50 years. Clinical Presentation: Clinical and pathological presentation in CNS vasculitis represents a wide spectrum. Among others, headache, cranial nerve affections, encephalopathy, seizures, psychosis, myelitis, stroke, intracranial haemorrhage and aseptic meningoencephalitis are described. Primary and secondary vasculitides leading more frequently to CNS manifestations are discussed. Primary and secondary Vasculitides: Including Giant Cell (Temporal Arteritis , Takayasu arteritis, Polyarteritis nodosa, Primary angiitis of the CNS, Wegener’s granulomatosis, and Connective tissue diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, mixed connective disease and Sjögren syndrome, are systemic immune-mediated diseases that lead to multiple organ affections. Cerebral Vasculitis: Imaging and Differential Diagnosis: Vasculitides represent a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases that affect blood vessel walls of varying calibers (inflammatory vasculopathy. Since the devastating symptoms of CNS vasculitis are at least partially reversible, early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important. In order to establish a differential diagnosis clinical features, disease progression, age of onset, blood results, as well as CSF examinations have to be taken into consideration. Neuroimaging techniques, such as MRI and DSA, play a central role in the diagnosis and disease monitoring .The diagnostic

  4. Ventilation system type, classroom environmental quality and pupils' perceptions and symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Jie; Wargocki, Pawel; Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated indoor climate and window opening behaviour by pupils, as well as their perceptions and symptoms in classrooms with different types of ventilation systems. Four classrooms were selected in the same school in suburban Denmark. Classroom ventilation was achieved either......-heating and heating seasons; CO2 concentration was used to estimate average classroom ventilation rates. At the end of each measuring period, the pupils were asked to report their perceptions of the indoor environment and their acute health-related symptoms. The classroom in which ventilation was achieved by manually...... operable windows had the highest air temperatures and CO2 concentrations during both non-heating and heating season; the estimated average air-change rate was lowest in this classroom. The classroom with mechanical ventilation had the highest estimated average air-change rate. Windows were frequently...

  5. [Biodiversity and depressive symptoms in Mexican adults: Exploration of beneficial environmental effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Tagles, Héctor; Salinas-Rodríguez, Aarón; Idrovo, Álvaro J; Búrquez, Alberto; Corral-Verdugo, Víctor

    2015-08-01

    Depression is a highly prevalent illness among adults, and it is the second most frequently reported mental disorder in urban settings in México. Exposure to natural environments and its components may improve the mental health of the population. To evaluate the association between biodiversity indicators and the prevalence of depressive symptoms among the adult population (20 to 65 years of age) in México. Information from the Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición 2006 (ENSANUT 2006) and the Compendio de Estadísticas Ambientales 2008 was analyzed. A biodiversity index was constructed based on the species richness and ecoregions in each state. A multilevel logistic regression model was built with random intercepts and a multiple logistic regression was generated with clustering by state. The factors associated with depressive symptoms were being female, self-perceived as indigenous, lower education level, not living with a partner, lack of steady paid work, having a chronic illness and drinking alcohol. The biodiversity index was found to be inversely associated with the prevalence of depressive symptoms when defined as a continuous variable, and the results from the regression were grouped by state (OR=0.71; 95% CI = 0.59-0.87). Although the design was cross-sectional, this study adds to the evidence of the potential benefits to mental health from contact with nature and its components.

  6. Cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenan, T.J.; Grossman, R.I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews retrospectively MR, CT, and angiographic findings in patients with cerebral vasculitis in order to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the various imaging modalities, as well as the spectrum of imaging abnormalities in this disease entity. Studies were retrospectively reviewed in 12 patients with cerebral vasculitis proved by means of angiography and/or brain biopsy

  7. Clinical study on the cardiac hemodynamics and the possibility of demonstration of the left intraatrial thrombi by echocardiography, angiocardiography and computed tomography and the neurological symptoms in patients with heart disorder and cerebral embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Kazuo

    1987-03-01

    In an attempt to elucidate risk factors for developing cerebral embolism (CE) in patients with heart disease, hemodynamic, sonographic or radiologic, and neurologic manifestations of heart disease developing into CE were retrospectively analyzed in 44 patients with CE and 122 patients with mitral valve disease (MVD). The most common underlying disease of CE was valve disease (50 %), followed by myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, and infectious endocarditis. In MVD patients, risk factors for CE were considered to be atrial fibrillation, mitral stenosis, and intraatrial thrombi. Combined use of various imaging modalities revealed the presence of intraatrial thrombi in 65 % of the CE patients. Cranial computed tomography showed hemorrhagic infarction in 22 %, and found the mid-arotic artery to be the commonest responsible region (81 %). The frequent initial neurologic symptom was hemiplegia. Half of the patients had disturbance of consciousness on admission. Prognosis was better in patients with MVD than those with the other types of heart disease. (Namekawa, K.). 117 refs.

  8. Clinical study on the cardiac hemodynamics and the possibility of demonstration of the left intraatrial thrombi by echocardiography, angiocardiography and computed tomography and the neurological symptoms in patients with heart disorder and cerebral embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kazuo

    1987-01-01

    In an attempt to elucidate risk factors for developing cerebral embolism (CE) in patients with heart disease, hemodynamic, sonographic or radiologic, and neurologic manifestations of heart disease developing into CE were retrospectively analyzed in 44 patients with CE and 122 patients with mitral valve disease (MVD). The most common underlying disease of CE was valve disease (50 %), followed by myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, and infectious endocarditis. In MVD patients, risk factors for CE were considered to be atrial fibrillation, mitral stenosis, and intraatrial thrombi. Combined use of various imaging modalities revealed the presence of intraatrial thrombi in 65 % of the CE patients. Cranial computed tomography showed hemorrhagic infarction in 22 %, and found the mid-arotic artery to be the commonest responsible region (81 %). The frequent initial neurologic symptom was hemiplegia. Half of the patients had disturbance of consciousness on admission. Prognosis was better in patients with MVD than those with the other types of heart disease. (Namekawa, K.). 117 refs

  9. [Cerebral aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattevin, P; Jauréguiberry, S; Gangneux, J-P

    2004-05-01

    The brain is almost always a localization of invasive aspergillosis, after hematogenous spread from pulmonary aspergillosis. Brain aspergilosis is not rare and is one of the worst prognosis factors of invasive aspergillosis. The incidence of this severe mycosis is currently on the rise due to the development of major immunosuppressive treatments. Brain aspergillosis is noteworthy for its vascular tropism, leading to infectious cerebral vasculitis, mainly involving thalamoperforating and lenticulostriate arteries, with a high frequency of thalamic or basal nuclei lesions. Extra-neurologic features that suggest this diagnosis are: i) risk factors for invasive aspergillosis (major or prolonged neutropenia, hematologic malignancies, prolonged corticosteroid treatment, bone marrow or solid organ transplant, AIDS); ii) persistent fever not responding to presumptive antibacterial treatment; iii) respiratory signs (brain aspergillosis is associated with pulmonary aspergillosis in 80 to 95 p. 100 of cases). Perspectives. Two recent major improvements in brain aspergillosis management must be outlined: i) for diagnostic purposes, the development of testing for Aspergillus antigenemia (a non-invasive procedure with good diagnostic value for invasive aspergillosis); ii) for therapeutic purposes, the demonstration that voriconazole is better than amphotericin B in terms of clinical response, tolerance and survival, for all types of invasive aspergillosis, the benefit being probably even greater in case of brain aspergillosis because of the good diffusion of voriconazole into the central nervous system. Brain aspergillosis is a severe emerging opportunistic infection for which diagnostic and therapeutic tools have recently improved. Thus, this diagnostic must be suspected early, especially in the immunocompromised patient, in the event of respiratory symptoms and when the brain lesions are localized in the central nuclei and the thalamus.

  10. Noise sensitivity: symptoms, health status, illness behavior and co-occurring environmental sensitivities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baliatsas, C.; Kamp, I. van; Swart, W.; Hooiveld, M.; Yzermans, J.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence on the symptomatic profile, health status and illness behavior of people with subjective sensitivity to noise is still scarce. Also, it is unknown to what extent noise sensitivity co-occurs with other environmental sensitivities such as multi-chemical sensitivity and

  11. MRI of sickle cell cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Goldberg, H.I.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hackney, D.B.; Johnson, M.; Grossman, R.I.; Hecht-Leavitt, C.; Gill, F.; Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia

    1987-01-01

    Eleven patients with sickle cell disease and neurological symptoms underwent MRI examination. Cerebral infarcts of two types were found, those in the vascular distribution of the middle cerebral artery and those in the deep white matter. In the patient whose hydration and whose oxygenation of erythrocytes has been treated, MRI offers diagnostic advantages over arteriography and CT. (orig.)

  12. Neonatal cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Shinji; Togari, Hajime; Sobajima, Hisanori; Suzuki, Shigesumi; Wada, Yoshiro; Yokochi, Kenji; Nishimura, Yutaka; Inukai, Kazuhisa; Futamura, Masahide.

    1992-01-01

    In a retrospective multi-center study, we investigated eighteen infants with unilateral cerebral infarctions confirmed by computed tomography (CT) scans. The initial symptoms were observed in all the patients between 0 and 3 days of age. Convulsions or apneic attacks were the initial symptoms in all but one. Only 4 patients had complicated obstetric histories and none showed polycythemia or electrolyte abnormalities. All of the initial CT scans revealed unilaterally localized hypodense areas. In 10, the initial CT scans were performed within 24 hours after the clinical onset. In 16, the lesions were within the territory of the middle cerebral artery, 9 of which also involved the cortico-spinal tract (CST). In the remaining 2 patients, the lesions were located whithin the territory of the posterior cerebral artery. None of the 9 patients without CST involvement developed hemiplegia, whereas 5 (56%) of the 9 with CST involvement had hemiplegia, which is a fairly low incidence compared with that in adult cases. This difference was thought to be related to neonatal brain plasticity. (author)

  13. CT findings of cerebral fat embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashiyama, Shoji; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Ohtsuki, Taisuke; Ishibashi, Takao.

    1986-01-01

    A case of cerebral fat embolism following multiple bone fractures is presented. A 27-year-old patient was admitted to our clinic 50 minutes after a traffic accident. He was somnolent on admission, but his consciousness level was gradually raised and respiratory symptoms (dyspnea, bloody sputum) appeared with petechiae of his conjunctiva and chest. We diagnosed cerebral fat embolism. On CT scan we found multiple high-density areas, which gradually turned into multiple low-density areas. Subsequent cerebral atrophy and subdural effusion developed one month after the injury. This patient showed a typical clinical course and CT findings of cerebral fat embolism. (author)

  14. Cerebral venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soralova, T.; Sevcikova, H.; Petersky, D.

    2014-01-01

    We decided to process this theme due to its nonspecific clinical features as they often cause diagnostic problems not only to clinicians but also to diagnostic. It is important to think of this disease mainly in young women who administer hormonal contraception. Imaging methods play the crucial role in diagnostic of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The gold standard is a native CT of brain which shows the venous sinus thrombosis as a hyperdense lesion in the locus of the sinus (dense triangle sign), CT venography shows the sinus thrombosis as a defect in a contrast filling of the venous sinus (empty delta sign). Other investigative methods are magnetic resonance imaging or MRA. In short we also mention quite a rare but more serious thrombosis of profound cerebral veins v. cerebri magna-Galeni, vv. cerebri internae). The importance of early diagnostic and non specificity of symptoms is presented in 3 clinical cases that are the part of this work. (author)

  15. Indoor Environmental Risk Factors for Occupant Symptoms in 100U.S. Office Buildings: Summary of Three Analyses from the EPA BASEStudy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Cozen, M.; Brightman, H.S.; Apte,M.; Erdmann, C.A.; Brunner, G.; Girman, J.R.

    2006-02-01

    This paper summarizes three analyses of data on building-related environmental factors and occupant symptoms collected from 100 representative large U.S. office buildings. Using multivariate logistic regression models, we found increased occupant symptoms associated with a number of building-related factors, including lower ventilation rates even at the current guideline levels, lack of scheduled cleaning for air-conditioning drain pans and cooling coils, poor condition of cooling coils, poorly maintained humidification systems, and lower outdoor air intake height. Some expected relationships were not found, and several findings were opposite of expected. Although requiring replication, these findings suggest preventive actions to reduce occupant symptoms in office buildings.

  16. [Cerebral protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, A D

    1993-09-01

    Cerebral protection means prevention of cerebral neuronal damage. Severe brain damage extinguishes the very "human" functions such as speech, consciousness, intellectual capacity, and emotional integrity. Many pathologic conditions may inflict injuries to the brain, therefore the protection and salvage of cerebral neuronal function must be the top priorities in the care of critically ill patients. Brain tissue has unusually high energy requirements, its stores of energy metabolites are small and, as a result, the brain is totally dependent on a continuous supply of substrates and oxygen, via the circulation. In complete global ischemia (cardiac arrest) reperfusion is characterized by an immediate reactive hyperemia followed within 20-30 min by a delayed hypoperfusion state. It has been postulated that the latter contributes to the ultimate neurologic outcome. In focal ischemia (stroke) the primary focus of necrosis is encircled by an area (ischemic penumbra) that is underperfused and contains neurotoxic substances such as free radicals, prostaglandins, calcium, and excitatory neurotransmitters. The variety of therapeutic effort that have addressed the question of protecting the brain reflects their limited success. 1) Barbiturates. After an initial enthusiastic endorsement by many clinicians and years of vigorous controversy, it can now be unequivocally stated that there is no place for barbiturate therapy following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. One presumed explanation for this negative statement is that cerebral metabolic suppression by barbiturates (and other anesthetics) is impossible in the absence of an active EEG. Conversely, in the event of incomplete ischemia EEG activity in usually present (albeit altered) and metabolic suppression and hence possibly protection can be induced with barbiturates. Indeed, most of the animal studies led to a number of recommendations for barbiturate therapy in man for incomplete ischemia. 2) Isoflurane. From a cerebral

  17. Cerebral MR imaging in vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.; Geissler, A.; Peter, H.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for the detection of cerebral involvement in vasculitis. Seventy-six patient with proved systematic vasculitis and two with isolated cerebral vasculitis were examined. Half of them had central nervous system symptoms. T2-weighted sequences were performed at 2 T in most cases. All but two symptomatic and one-third of the asymptomatic patients showed pathologic changes in the white matter. The distribution and shape of lesions depend on the caliber of the involved vessel. In small-vessel vasculitis, the distribution was mostly subcortical, the average size was 0.5--10 mm, and lesions were predominantly round

  18. CT classification and clinical prognosis of cerebral infarction in the area of middle cerebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Jyoji

    1983-01-01

    Computerized tomographies (CT) were repeatedly scanned on 70 patients with cerebral infarction in the middle cerebral artery. Low density area (LDA) was measured with HounFsfield's Unit (HU) and studied on the progressive changes. Classification of LDA was attempted and studied on correlation with mass effect, contrast enhancement, angiographical findings, clinical symptoms and prognosis. It was considered that important points of diagnosis of cerebral infarction were timing of examination of CT and determination of LDA with HUF. It was also thought that CT classification of LDA was usefull to estimate prognosis of the patients with cerebral infarction. (author)

  19. Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy associated with cerebral vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, J M; Bresnick, G H; Bell, C L; Roschmann, R A; Brooks, B R; Strother, C M

    1988-09-01

    Acute multifocal posterior placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) is an unusual self-limited retinal disorder that has been associated with various systemic complications. To our knowledge, three prior cases associated with cerebral vasculitis have been described. This article describes a patient with APMPPE and angiographically documented cerebral vasculitis who was notable because of (a) the presence of two different cerebral ischemic events, occurring 1 month apart, and (b) the long latency (3 months) between the onset of ocular symptoms and the second cerebral ischemic event. Recognition of the association between APMPPE and cerebral vasculitis may permit early treatment of CNS involvement and prevention of morbidity.

  20. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  1. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  2. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Cerebral palsy (also called CP) is a group of conditions ...

  3. Cerebral computerized tomography findings in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hol, P.K.; Dunlop, O.

    1997-01-01

    A cerebral CT was performed in 82 of 525 AIDS patients, with positive findings in 46 cases. These findings included cerebral atrophy in 28 cases, pathological demyelinisation in two, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in one, toxoplasmoses in 11, lymphomas in seven, infarction in one and one subdural haematoma. The radiological findings are correlated to pathology and clinical symptoms. The authors point out the importance of these findings for correct interpretation of the CT scans. 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truwit, C.L.; Barkovich, A.J.; Koch, T.; Ferreiro, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cranial MR findings in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) to clarify and categorize this disorder. The MR images of 40 patients with clinical CP were retrospectively reviewed. All patients suffered either varying spastic plegias, hypotonicity, or choreoathetosis. Concomitantly, the patients suffered from static encephalopathy, developmental delay, and/or microcephaly. Twenty-four patients were born at or near term, 10 were premature, and incomplete birth histories were available in six. The MR images revealed mild to severe degrees of white matter damage in 24 patients (12 term, nine premature, three unknown)

  5. Health symptoms in residents living near shale gas activity: A retrospective record review from the Environmental Health Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Weinberger

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence demonstrates an association between health symptoms and exposure to unconventional natural gas development (UNGD. The purpose of this study is to describe the health of adults in communities with intense UNGD who presented for evaluation of symptoms. Records of 135 structured health assessments conducted between February 2012 and October 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. Publicly available data were used to determine proximity to gas wells. Analysis was restricted to records of adults who lived within 1km of a well in Pennsylvania and denied employment in the gas industry (n=51. Symptoms in each record were reviewed by a physician. Symptoms that could be explained by pre-existing or concurrent conditions or social history and those that began or worsened prior to exposure were excluded. Exposure was calculated using date of well drilling within 1km. The number of symptoms/participant ranged from 0 to 19 (mean=6.2; SD=5.1. Symptoms most commonly reported were: sleep disruption, headache, throat irritation, stress or anxiety, cough, shortness of breath, sinus problems, fatigue, nausea, and wheezing. These results are consistent with findings of prior studies using self-report without physician review. In comparison, our results are strengthened by the collection of health data by a health care provider, critical review of symptoms for possible alternative causes, and confirmation of timing of exposure to unconventional natural gas well relative to symptom onset or exacerbation. Our findings confirm earlier studies and add to the growing body of evidence of the association between symptoms and exposure to UNGD. Keywords: Hydraulic fracturing, Health, Fracking, Shale gas, Unconventional gas

  6. Cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms may include: Learning disabilities are common, but intelligence can be normal Speech problems (dysarthria) Hearing or ... 2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  7. Symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Features and surgical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, Isao

    2010-01-01

    Development of less invasive imaging studies, such as magnetic resonance angiography, has increased the chances that unruptured cerebral aneurysms are found. The rupture risk of 'symptomatic' aneurysms is higher than for 'asymptomatic' aneurysms; so 'symptomatic' aneurysms are more often surgically treated. Many reviews examine 'asymptomatic' unruptured cerebral aneurysms, but few evaluate 'symptomatic' aneurysms. The author has treated many patients with symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms and found that improved cranial nerve signs can be expected if the surgical treatment is performed before the symptoms become irreversible; the critical period is approximately 3 months. It is important to suppress the pulsation of the aneurysms compressing the cranial nerves; both a clipping procedure and endovascular coiling are effective. Cranial nerve signs are more commonly the symptoms of unruptured cerebral aneurysms, but large to giant aneurysms can also be the causes of hemiparesis, hydrocephalus, epilepsy, or even cerebral infarction. This review summarizes the features and surgical outcome of symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms. (author)

  8. Association between environmental factors and current asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema symptoms in school-aged children from Oropeza Province--Bolivia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Soto, María Teresa; Patiño, Armando; Nowak, Dennis; Radon, Katja

    2013-11-05

    In recent years, the prevalence of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema symptoms in childhood has considerably increased in developing countries including Bolivia, possibly due to changes in lifestyle, environmental and domestic factors. This study aimed to assess the association between environmental factors and asthma, rhinoconjuctivitis and eczema symptoms in school-aged children from Oropeza Province in Chuquisaca, Bolivia. A cross-sectional study was performed in 2340 children attending the fifth grade in 36 randomly selected elementary schools in Oropeza province. The prevalence of symptoms was determined using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire. Environmental factors were assessed by the ISAAC environmental questionnaire including questions related to exposure to pets, farm animals, indoor and outdoor pollution, presence of disease vectors at home and precarious household conditions. Generalized linear mixed-effects models were adjusted for age, sex and place of living. Thirty seven percent of children reported that at least one of their parents smoked at home. Wood or coal was used as cooking fuel in 19% of the homes and 29% reported intense truck traffic on the street where they lived. With respect to hygiene conditions, 86% reported exposure to dogs, 59% exposure to cats and 36% regular contact to farm animals. More than one precarious household condition was reported by 8% of children. In the adjusted model exposure to dog (adjusted OR 1.4; CI 95% 1.0-1.9), cat (1.2; 1.0-1.5), farm animals (1.5; 1.2-1.8); intense truck traffic (1.3; 1.0-1.6), parents smoking at home (1.2; 1.0-1.5), presence of disease vectors at home (fourth quartile vs. first quartile: 1.6; 1.2-2.3) and two or more precarious household conditions (1.5; 1.0-2.2) were significantly associated with rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms. The associations were similar for asthma and eczema symptoms; however it did not reach the level of statistical

  9. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Cerebral Palsy What's in this ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  10. GAME (Goals - Activity - Motor Enrichment): protocol of a single blind randomised controlled trial of motor training, parent education and environmental enrichment for infants at high risk of cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Catherine; Novak, Iona; Dale, Russell C; Guzzetta, Andrea; Badawi, Nadia

    2014-10-07

    Cerebral palsy is the most common physical disability of childhood and early detection is possible using evidence based assessments. Systematic reviews indicate early intervention trials rarely demonstrate efficacy for improving motor outcomes but environmental enrichment interventions appear promising. This study is built on a previous pilot study and has been designed to assess the effectiveness of a goal - oriented motor training and enrichment intervention programme, "GAME", on the motor outcomes of infants at very high risk of cerebral palsy (CP) compared with standard community based care. A two group, single blind randomised controlled trial (n = 30) will be conducted. Eligible infants are those diagnosed with CP or designated "at high risk of CP" on the basis of the General Movements Assessment and/or abnormal neuroimaging. A physiotherapist and occupational therapist will deliver home-based GAME intervention at least fortnightly until the infant's first birthday. The intervention aims to optimize motor function and engage parents in developmental activities aimed at enriching the home learning environment. Primary endpoint measures will be taken 16 weeks after intervention commences with the secondary endpoint at 12 months and 24 months corrected age. The primary outcome measure will be the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale second edition. Secondary outcomes measures include the Gross Motor Function Measure, Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Affordances in the Home Environment for Motor Development - Infant Scale, and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Parent well-being will be monitored using the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale. This paper presents the background, design and intervention protocol of a randomised trial of a goal driven, motor learning approach with customised environmental interventions and parental education for young infants at high risk of cerebral palsy. This trial is registered on the Australian

  11. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christ, F.; Steudel, H.; Klotz, D.; Bonn Univ.; Bonn Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1982 (Hauser and co-workers), literature has reported focal cerebral tissue charges in AIDS patients whose diagnosis was unclear at first but which could be identified finally as florid toxoplasmosis encephalitis by biopsy and autopsy. It was found that the value of otherwise reliable serological tests (KBR, Sabin-Feldmann tests, etc.) is questionable in patients with severely impaired or incompetent immune systems, and, in particular, that a negative or uncharacteristic test result may not preclude any opportunistic infection process. Furthermore, isolation of Toxoplasma gondii or specific antibodies from the cerebrospinal fluid will be successful in exceptional cases only. In patients with AIDS or lymphadenopathy syndrome, the differential diagnosis will have to include - first and foremost - reactivated toxoplasma infection (not newly acquired, as a rule) if central neurological symptoms occur. (orig.) [de

  12. Cerebral pathological and compensatory mechanisms in the premotor phase of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 parkinsonism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuenen, B.F.L. van; Helmich, R.C.G.; Ferraye, M.U.; Thaler, A.; Hendler, T.; Orr-Urtreger, A.; Mirelman, A.; Bressman, S.; Marder, K.S.; Giladi, N.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.

    2012-01-01

    Compensatory cerebral mechanisms can delay motor symptom onset in Parkinson's disease. We aim to characterize these compensatory mechanisms and early disease-related changes by quantifying movement-related cerebral function in subjects at significantly increased risk of developing Parkinson's

  13. Serial neuroradiological studies in focal cerebritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatta, S.; Mochizuki, H.; Kuru, Y.; Miwa, H.; Kondo, T.; Mori, H.; Mizuno, Y.

    1994-01-01

    We report serial neuroradiological studies in a patient with focal cerebritis in the head of the left caudate nucleus. On the day after the onset of symptoms, CT showed an ill-defined low density lesion. The lack of contrast enhancement appeared to be the most important finding for differentiating focal cerebritis from an encapsulated brain abscess or a tumour. MRI two days later revealed the centre of the lesion to be of slightly low intensity on T1-weighted inversion recovery (IR) images and very low intensity on T2-weighted spin echo images, which appeared to correspond to the early cerebritis stage of experimentally induced cerebritis and brain abscess. Ten days after the onset of symptoms, CT revealed a thin ring of enhancement in the head of the caudate nucleus, and a similar small ring was seen in the hypothalamus 16 days after the onset, corresponding to the late cerebritis stage. MRI nine days later revealed ill-defined high signal lesions within the involved area on the T1-weighted IR images. To our knowledge, this is the first published MRI documentation of the early cerebritis stage developing into an encapsulated brain abscess. The mechanisms underlying of these radiographic changes are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Prevalence of respiratory symptoms and their correlation to pulmonary function abnormalities in individuals exposed to environmental pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, G.H.; Ali, M.; Ahmed, J.; Abbas, M.N.

    1999-01-01

    To find out the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and their correlation to pulmonary function abnormalities in individuals exposed to polluted air, 438 workers, and their family members were studied at Thermal Power Station (TPS), Sheikhmanda (Quetta). Individuals with a stay of less than three years at TPS and patients with known chronic respiratory infections (tuberculosis and its squelae, bronchiectasis) were excluded from the study. Remaining 175 males (mean age 43.4 years) and 71 females (mean age 34.2 years) were divided into three groups A, B, C on the basis of their exposure time to polluted air per day during the three years. Each groups was further subdivided into smoker and non-smoker members. Prevalence of respiratory symptoms was significantly higher in the individuals exposed to polluted air as compared to non-exposed individuals (P<0.05). A strong positive correlation (r=0.91) exists between respiratory symptoms and respiratory function abnormalities in smoker groups; however, no definite correlation (r=0.06) was found between respiratory symptoms and respiratory function abnormalities in non-smoker groups. Function abnormalities was noted only in smoker groups and non-smokers of even maximally exposed group (group C) had almost no respiratory function abnormalities. (author)

  15. The impact of the environmental and socio-economic factors to the occurrence of symptoms and diseases of the respiratory system in school children from Sosnowiec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Skiba

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Objective of the study was to assess the impact of environmental and socio-economic factors to the occurrence of symptoms and diseases of the respiratory system in school children from Sosnowiec, based on the questionnaire data. Materials and methods: The crosssectional epidemiological questionnaire study was performed in the years 2005–2006. Parents of 709 primary school children aged 7–12 years took part in the study. Questionnaire was completed by parents to collect information on children health status, particularly respiratory symptoms, chronic diseases of respiratory system, allergic diseases, use of medical services, children dietary habits and family socio-economic status. Results: In the study group the statistical significance was found for the incidence of respiratory symptoms in children and housing conditions, i.e.: the number of people sleeping together with a child in the same room and dampness in the dwelling. Results of the study showed, that incidence of whizzing differed statistically significantly in the groups of different professional status of the parents. It is difficult to estimate if this is only the influence of socio-economic conditions or any other environmental factors as well. Conclusions: Results of the study demonstrated statistical significance between the status of respiratory system in children and housing occupancy rate (the number of people sleeping together with a child in the same room and dampness in the dwelling. Relation between respiratory symptoms in children, parents education and professional status was analyzed, but findings of the conducted studies do not give explicit evidence of such a relation.

  16. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery

  17. Cerebral Palsy. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #2

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral palsy--also known as CP--is a condition caused by injury to the parts of the brain that control the body's ability to use muscles effectively. Often the injury happens before birth, sometimes during delivery or soon after birth. The symptoms will differ from person to person and change as children and their nervous systems mature. This…

  18. Treating symptoms or assisting human development: Can different environmental conditions affect personal development for patients with severe mental illness? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauveng, Arnhild; Tveiten, Sidsel; Ekeland, Tor-Johan; Torleif, Ruud

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggests that a basic anomaly in self-experience may be a core factor in patients with severe mental illnesses. Given the importance of sense of self, the traditional treatment of symptoms might not be the most effective for these groups of patients. This qualitative study examines how differences in social environmental conditions, organized as education or treatment, might affect personal development in patients with severe mental illness. A qualitative hermeneutical design was used. Data were collected through qualitative interviews. Informants included 14 patients in psychiatric treatment and 15 students at schools for adults with mental illness. Most informants were interviewed on two occasions, 6-8 months apart, totaling 47 interviews. All participants had been diagnosed with severe mental illness with pronounced impact on daily functioning (most often psychoses or personality disorders) for a minimum of 2 years. Findings and interpretations showed that the students experienced a supportive environment focused mostly on education. They described personal and enduring development in areas such as capacity for relationships, regulation of symptoms, subjective well-being, and integration in society. The patients experienced an environment focused more on treatment of their illness and less on personal development and interests. They described little development, much loneliness, a poor quality of life, an objectifying attitude of themselves and others, and hopelessness. Even if more research is needed, findings indicate that for this group of patients, problems may be closely related to identity development. Therefore, instead of solemnly focusing on specific symptoms, it might be more effective to support patients' personal and social development by offering intensive and lasting social environmental conditions. This includes stable and mutual relationships, intrinsically motivated activities, and an environment that supports personal choices

  19. Origin-related, environmental, sex, and age determinants of immunocompetence, susceptibility to ectoparasites, and disease symptoms in the barn owl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roulin, Alexandre; Christe, Philippe; Dijkstra, Cor; Ducrest, Anne-Lyse; Jungi, Thomas W.

    Knowledge of the role of origin-related, environmental, sex, and age factors on host defence mechanisms is important to understand variation in parasite intensity. Because alternative components of parasite defence may be differently sensitive to various factors, they may not necessarily covary.

  20. Dynamic digitized cerebral parenchymography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, J.; Alachkar, F.; Nelson, M.; Mazia, D.

    1992-01-01

    Aortic arch injections centred on the head have been performed routinely in patients with cerebral ischaemia. Digital angiograms with modified windowing (low and narrow) have been used. This 'cerebral' arch injection allows much improved analysis of the cerebral parenchymal vascularization, giving better understanding of hemispheric ischaemia and making the decision about revascularization more rational. (orig.)

  1. Effects of Milrinone continuous intravenous infusion on global cerebral oxygenation and cerebral vasospasm after cerebral aneurysm surgical clipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Ghanem

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Milrinone improved significantly the global cerebral oxygenation and reduced the incidence of cerebral vasospasm during the dangerous period of cerebral spasm after cerebral aneurysm clipping.

  2. Hyperthyroidism and cerebral venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, S; Nighoghossian, N; Berruyer, M; Derex, L; Philippeau, F; Cakmak, S; Honnorat, J; Hermier, M; Trouillas, P

    2005-01-01

    The demonstration of an underlying prothrombotic condition in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) may have important practical consequences in terms of prevention. Thyrotoxicosis through a hypercoagulable state may be a predisposing factor for CVT. The authors present the cases of 4 patients who developed CVT and hyperthyroidism. At the acute stage, hyperthyroidism was associated with an increase in factor VIII (FVIII). At follow-up, FVIII level remained increased in 2 patients. Hyperthyroidism may have an impact on FVIII level. Accordingly in patients with hyperthyroidism and neurological symptoms, the diagnosis of CVT should be considered and an exhaustive coagulation screening may be appropriate. (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Pathophysiology of muscle contractures in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathewson, Margie A; Lieber, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    Patients with cerebral palsy present with a variety of adaptations to muscle structure and function. These pathophysiologic symptoms include functional deficits such as decreased force production and range of motion, in addition to changes in muscle structure such as decreased muscle belly size, increased sarcomere length, and altered extracellular matrix structure and composition. On a cellular level, patients with cerebral palsy have fewer muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, and altered gene expression. Understanding the nature of these changes may present opportunities for the development of new muscle treatment therapies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Behcet's disease with cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardamaglia, L.; Desmond, P.M.; Gonzales, M.F.; Bendrups, A.; Brodtmann, A.

    2001-01-01

    The case presented illustrates the diagnostic dilemma off neurological involvement in Behcet's disease and other inflammatory diseases. 'Psychiatric' symptoms were present for 2 years without abnormalities on SPECT or MRI and without CSF pleocytosis. Even at the time of fitting, no CSF abnormalities were observed. The preceding psychiatric presentations may have been due to cerebral vasculitis that was exacerbated by withdrawal of steroids. Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the most sensitive imaging modality. Lesions are usually in the brainstem, cerebellum, basal ganglia region or periventricular white matter, and the pons and the mesencephalon are commonly affected. In our patient there was no diencephalic or brainstem involvement. The inflammatory process can appear as a very large lesion, with gadolinium enhancement and significant mass effect, as in our patient. Brain magnetic resonance imaging. Postgadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid, axial image shows two large lesions in the right frontal lobe, with the larger, posterior lesion demonstrating vivid ring enhancement. A central nodule is isodense, with the cerebral white matter within the larger lesion. Surrounding low T 1 signal involves the hemispheric white matter without cortical extension and is consistent with vasogenic oedema. Minor mass effect is demonstrated with bowing of the anterior falx cerebri to the left. Biopsy shows prominent fibrinoid necrosis in small calibre postcapillary venules and cerebral white matter. There are surrounding acute and chronic inflammatory cells and nuclear debris, consistent with vasculitis

  5. Association of Lead Levels and Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Neha; Aggarwal, Anju; Faridi, M. M. A.; Sharma, Tusha; Baneerjee, B. D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cerebral palsy is a common motor disability in childhood. Raised lead levels affect cognition. Children with cerebral palsy may have raised lead levels, further impairing their residual cognitive motor and behavioral abilities. Environmental exposure and abnormal eating habits may lead to increased lead levels. Aims and Objectives: To measure blood lead levels in children with cerebral palsy and compare them with healthy neurologically normal children. To correlate blood lead levels with environmental factors. Material and Methods: Design: Prospective case-control study. Setting: Tertiary care hospital. Participants: Cases comprised 34 children with cerebral palsy, and controls comprised 34 neurologically normal, age- and sex-matched children. Methods: Clinical and demographic details were recorded as per proforma. Detailed environmental history was recorded to know the source of exposure to lead. These children were investigated and treated as per protocol. Venous blood was collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid vials for analysis of blood lead levels. Lead levels were estimated by Schimadzu Flame AA-6800 (atomic absorption spectrophotometer). Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. P pica were 12.33 ± 10.02 µg/dL in comparison to children with no history of pica, 6.70 ± 4.60 µg/dL (P = .029). No correlation was found between hemoglobin and blood lead levels in cases and controls. Conclusion: In our study, blood lead levels are raised in children with cerebral palsy. However, further studies are required to show effects of raised levels in these children. PMID:28491920

  6. Association of Lead Levels and Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Bansal MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral palsy is a common motor disability in childhood. Raised lead levels affect cognition. Children with cerebral palsy may have raised lead levels, further impairing their residual cognitive motor and behavioral abilities. Environmental exposure and abnormal eating habits may lead to increased lead levels. Aims and Objectives: To measure blood lead levels in children with cerebral palsy and compare them with healthy neurologically normal children. To correlate blood lead levels with environmental factors. Material and Methods: Design: Prospective case-control study. Setting: Tertiary care hospital. Participants: Cases comprised 34 children with cerebral palsy, and controls comprised 34 neurologically normal, age- and sex-matched children. Methods: Clinical and demographic details were recorded as per proforma. Detailed environmental history was recorded to know the source of exposure to lead. These children were investigated and treated as per protocol. Venous blood was collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid vials for analysis of blood lead levels. Lead levels were estimated by Schimadzu Flame AA-6800 (atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. P < .05 was taken as significant. Results: Mean blood lead levels were 9.20 ± 8.31 µg/dL in cerebral palsy cases and 2.89 ± 3.04 µg/dL in their controls (P < .001. Among children with cerebral palsy, 19 (55.88% children had blood lead levels ≥5 µg/dL. Lead levels in children with pica were 12.33 ± 10.02 µg/dL in comparison to children with no history of pica, 6.70 ± 4.60 µg/dL (P = .029. No correlation was found between hemoglobin and blood lead levels in cases and controls. Conclusion: In our study, blood lead levels are raised in children with cerebral palsy. However, further studies are required to show effects of raised levels in these children.

  7. Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Ichord

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare but serious cerebrovascular disorder affecting children from the newborn period through childhood and adolescence. The incidence is estimated at 0.6/100,000/year, with 30–50% occurring in newborns. Causes are diverse and are highly age dependent. Acute systemic illness is the dominant risk factor among newborns. In childhood CSVT, acute infections of the head and neck such as mastoiditis are most common, followed by chronic underlying diseases such as nephrotic syndrome, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Signs and symptoms are also age related. Seizures and altered mental status are the commonest manifestations in newborns. Headache, vomiting, and lethargy, sometimes with 6th nerve palsy, are the most common symptoms in children and adolescents. Recent multicenter cohort studies from North America and Europe have provided updated information on risk factors, clinical presentations, treatment practices, and outcomes. While systemic anticoagulation is the most common specific treatment used, there are wide variations and many uncertainties even among experts concerning best practice. The treatment dilemma is especially pronounced for neonatal CSVT. This is due in part to the higher prevalence of intracranial hemorrhage among newborns on the one hand, and the clear evidence that newborns suffer greater long-term neurologic morbidity on the other hand. With the advent of widespread availability and acceptance of acute endovascular therapy for arterial ischemic stroke, there is renewed interest in this therapy for children with CSVT. Limited published evidence exists regarding the benefits and risks of these invasive therapies. Therefore, the authors of current guidelines advise reserving this therapy for children with progressive and severe disease who have failed optimal medical management. As research focused on childhood cerebrovascular disease continues to grow rapidly, the future prospects

  8. Computerized tomographic evaluation of cerebral cysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Young; Lee, Mi Sook; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song [Precbyterian Medical Center, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-08-15

    Cerebral cysticercosis, unfortunately frequent in Korea, is a parastic disease in which man serve as the intermediate host of taenia solium. The larvae have a predilection for the central nervous system and can cause a variety of neurologic symptoms. The authors reviewed 19 cases of surgically proven cerebral cysticercosis and following results were obtained. 1. The most frequent age distribution was 5th and 6th decade and male to female ratio was 14:5. 2. The most frevalent involving site was cerebral parenchyme and following by ventricles. 3. Clinical manifestations were symtom and sign of increased ICP, seizure and focal neurological dificit. 4. It was assumed that computerized tomography was the procedure of choice for the diagnosis of these parasitic brain disease.

  9. Diagnosis of cerebral disorders using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, K [Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1980-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), which makes differential diagnosis of cerebral disorders possible, was applied in the diagnosis of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and cerebrovascular Moyamoya disease. CT findings of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage showed the localization, volume, and direction of hematoma, and the classification of hematoma according to CT findings was highly correlated to the clinical symptoms of the patients. CT findings of cerebral thrombosis showed the extension of the lesion to be a low density area, but there were many cases in which they did not show a low density area immediately after an attack. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage were very useful in the diagnosis of intracerebral hematoma, ventricular hematoma, and intracranial hematoma secondary to this disease. However, it was very difficult to diagnose cerebrovascular Moyamoya disease by means of CT.

  10. Diagnosis of cerebral disorders using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Koichi

    1980-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), which makes differential diagnosis of cerebral disorders possible, was applied in the diagnosis of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and cerebrovascular Moyamoya disease. CT findings of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage showed the localization, volume, and direction of hematoma, and the classification of hematoma according to CT findings was highly correlated to the clinical symptoms of the patients. CT findings of cerebral thrombosis showed the extension of the lesion to be a low density area, but there were many cases in which they did not show a low density area immediately after an attack. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage were very useful in the diagnosis of intracerebral hematoma, ventricular hematoma, and intracranial hematoma secondary to this disease. However, it was very difficult to diagnose cerebrovascular Moyamoya disease by means of CT. (Nishio, M.)

  11. Glaucoma Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up You can help find a cure for glaucoma Give now Signs & Symptoms The most common types ... have completely different symptoms. Symptoms of Open-Angle Glaucoma Most people who develop open-angle glaucoma don’ ...

  12. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, J.; Ohta, Y.; Nakane, Y.; Mori, H.; Hirota, N.; Yonekura, M.

    1987-01-01

    The present study on schizophrenics dealt with the relationship of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) to age, disease duration, and treatment length with chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPZ). Regional cerebral blood flow in 28 cerebral regions of interest was measured by iv injection of /sup 133/X in 54 schizophrenic patients and 39 healthy volunteers. Neither age nor dosage of CPZ significantly influenced rCBF. All patients, including 11 treated for a short period of time (6 months or less), were characterized by having a decreased rCBF over the whole cerebrum. Thirty-four patients treated for a long period of time (2 years or more) had a varied rCBF distribution in the left hemisphere, with the most predominant feature being the decrease in rCBF in the frontal lobe (i.e., hypofrontality); however, there was no linear correlation between rCBF and disease duration. A decreased rCBE in the right occipital region was seen in patients with paranoid schizophrenia, suggesting that manifestations of symptoms may depend on disturbed regions. These results suggest that cerebral dysfunction in schizophrenic patients may not be restricted to the frontal lobe, but cover the whole cerebrum, and that nonuniform dysfunction in various regions of the cerebrum, including the frontal lobe, may be involved in manifestations of symptoms.

  13. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Jun; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Mori, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Noriyoshi; Yonekura, Masahiro.

    1987-01-01

    The present study on schizophrenics dealt with the relationship of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) to age, disease duration, and treatment length with chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPZ). Regional cerebral blood flow in 28 cerebral regions of interest was measured by iv injection of X-133 in 54 schizophrenic patients and 39 healthy volunteers. Neither age nor dosage of CPZ significantly influenced rCBF. All patients, including 11 treated for a short period of time (6 months or less), were characterized by having a decreased rCBF over the whole cerebrum. Thirty-four patients treated for a long period of time (2 years or more) had a varied rCBF distribution in the left hemisphere, with the most predominant feature being the decrease in rCBF in the frontal lobe (i.e., ''hypofrontality''); however, there was no linear correlation between rCBF and disease duration. A decreased rCBE in the right occipital region was seen in patients with paranoid schizophrenia, suggesting that manifestations of symptoms may depend on disturbed regions. These results suggest that cerebral dysfunction in schizophrenic patients may not be restricted to the frontal lobe, but cover the whole cerebrum, and that nonuniform dysfunction in various regions of the cerebrum, including the frontal lobe, may be involved in manifestations of symptoms. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Hypocapnia and cerebral hypoperfusion in orthostatic intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, V; Spies, J M; Novak, P; McPhee, B R; Rummans, T A; Low, P A

    1998-09-01

    Orthostatic and other stresses trigger tachycardia associated with symptoms of tremulousness, shortness of breath, dizziness, blurred vision, and, often, syncope. It has been suggested that paradoxical cerebral vasoconstriction during head-up tilt might be present in patients with orthostatic intolerance. We chose to study middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity (BFV) and cerebral vasoregulation during tilt in patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI). Beat-to-beat BFV from the MCA, heart rate, CO2, blood pressure (BP), and respiration were measured in 30 patients with OI (25 women and 5 men; age range, 21 to 44 years; mean age, 31.3+/-1.2 years) and 17 control subjects (13 women and 4 men; age range, 20 to 41 years; mean age, 30+/-1.6 years); ages were not statistically different. These indices were monitored during supine rest and head-up tilt (HUT). We compared spontaneous breathing and hyperventilation and evaluated the effect of CO2 rebreathing in these 2 positions. The OI group had higher supine heart rates (Presponse to HUT, OI patients underwent a greater heart rate increment (Ppressure (Pdifferent between control subjects and patients with OI. Cerebral vasoconstriction occurs in OI during orthostasis, which is primarily due to hyperventilation, causing significant hypocapnia. Hypocapnia and symptoms of orthostatic hypertension are reversible by CO2 rebreathing.

  15. Regional Cerebral Perfusion in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Yong; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Yoon, Byung Woo; Lee, Sang Bok; Jeon, Beom S. [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Han; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-15

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a Parkinson-plus syndrome characterized clinically by supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, pseudobulbar palsy, axial rigidity, bradykinesia, postural instability and dementia. Presence of dementia and lack of cortical histopathology suggest the derangement of cortical function by pathological changes in subcortical structures in PSP, which is supported by the pattern of behavioral changes and measurement of brain metabolism using positron emission tomography. This study was done to examine whether there are specific changes of regional cerebral perfusion in PSP and whether there is a correlation between severity of motor abnormaility and degree of changes in cerebral perfusion. We measured regional cerebral perfusion indices in 5 cortical and 2 subcortical areas in 6 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PSP and 6 healthy age and sex matched controls using Tc-99m-HMPAO SPECT. Compared with age and sex matched controls, only superior frontal regional perfusion index was significantly decreased in PSP (p<0.05). There was no correlation between the severity of the motor abnormality and any of the regional cerebral perfusion indices (p>0.05). We affirm the previous reports that perfusion in superior frontal cortex is decreased in PSP. Based on our results that there was no correlation between severity of motor abnormality and cerebral perfusion in the superior frontal cortex, nonmotoric symptoms including dementia needs to be looked at whether there is a correlation with the perfusion abnormality in superior frontal cortex

  16. Left Atrium Papillary Fibroelastomas: A Cause of Cerebral Emboli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Ciss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Papillary fibroelastomas are cardiac benign tumours. Among the benign cardiac tumor, papillary fibroelastomas are reported second after myxomas. Most often diagnosed incidentally, papillary fibroelastomas may embolize to cerebral circulation. Valvular locations are predominant; location in left atrium is rare. In this paper, we present a case of papillary fibroelastoma located in left atrium with symptoms of cerebral embolization. Transoesophageal echocardiography diagnosed a mobile mass. The patient was treated with surgical resection without further embolic complication.

  17. Asymptomatic cerebral infarction examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohsawa, Tamiko; Matsubara, Etsuro; Shoji, Mikio; Okamoto, Koichi; Hirai, Shunsaku [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1994-02-01

    To find the real incidence and risk factors in asymptomatic cerebral infarction, a retrospective review was made on magnetic resonance (MR) images, which were obtained from 713 outpatients seen at the Geriatrics Research Institute Hospital between March and November of 1990. The criteria for asymptomatic cerebral infarction are: high signal intensity areas larger than 3 mm in diameter on T2-weighted image; no history of stroke; no neurological and psychological signs or symptoms with or without subjective symptoms. Symptomatic cerebral stroke was defined as stroke episodes associated with neurological signs and infarction lesions on CT or MR imaging. Of a total of 713 patients, 215 (30.2%) had symtomatic cerebral infarction and 384 (53.9%) had no cerebral lesions. The incidence of asymptomatic cerebral infarction increased with aging. Cerebral risk factors, i.e. hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and diabetes mellitus, were more significantly common in both symptomatic and asymptomatic groups than the normal control group. In the group of asymptomatic patients, T2-weighted images showed hyperintensity in the corona radiata in 60.9%, in the frontal lobe in 32.1%, in the semioval center in 28.8%, and in the basal ganglia in 23.7%. Periventricular hyperintensity was present in 124 of all 713 patients (17.4%). Common complaints in asymptomatic patients were headache (40.0%), dizziness (14.4%), and neck muscle contraction (9.8%). In conclusion, MR imaging may contribute to manage asymptomatic patients. (N.K.).

  18. Asymptomatic cerebral infarction examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsawa, Tamiko; Matsubara, Etsuro; Shoji, Mikio; Okamoto, Koichi; Hirai, Shunsaku

    1994-01-01

    To find the real incidence and risk factors in asymptomatic cerebral infarction, a retrospective review was made on magnetic resonance (MR) images, which were obtained from 713 outpatients seen at the Geriatrics Research Institute Hospital between March and November of 1990. The criteria for asymptomatic cerebral infarction are: high signal intensity areas larger than 3 mm in diameter on T2-weighted image; no history of stroke; no neurological and psychological signs or symptoms with or without subjective symptoms. Symptomatic cerebral stroke was defined as stroke episodes associated with neurological signs and infarction lesions on CT or MR imaging. Of a total of 713 patients, 215 (30.2%) had symtomatic cerebral infarction and 384 (53.9%) had no cerebral lesions. The incidence of asymptomatic cerebral infarction increased with aging. Cerebral risk factors, i.e. hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and diabetes mellitus, were more significantly common in both symptomatic and asymptomatic groups than the normal control group. In the group of asymptomatic patients, T2-weighted images showed hyperintensity in the corona radiata in 60.9%, in the frontal lobe in 32.1%, in the semioval center in 28.8%, and in the basal ganglia in 23.7%. Periventricular hyperintensity was present in 124 of all 713 patients (17.4%). Common complaints in asymptomatic patients were headache (40.0%), dizziness (14.4%), and neck muscle contraction (9.8%). In conclusion, MR imaging may contribute to manage asymptomatic patients. (N.K.)

  19. Cerebral venous angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagawa, Tetsuji; Taguchi, Haruyoshi; Kamiya, Kazuko; Yano, Takashi; Nakajima, Reiko

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a 27-year-old male patient who was diagnosed as having cerebral venous angioma in the postero-temporal area by CT scan and cerebral angiography. The patient improved by removing angioma with electrocoagulation of medullary veins. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Cerebral involvement in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestin, G.P.; Juergens, R.; Steinbrich, W.; Diederich, N.; Koeln Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is usually due to opportunistic infections; these frequently offer a difficult differential diagnostic problem. Imaging methods play an important part in the elucidation of symptoms. CT and MR findings were analysed in 13 patients with AIDS and neurological symptoms. Some infections of the central nervous system (encephalitis of unknown aetiology, cytomegalic encephalitis, meningitis) may show cerebral atrophy or even no morphological changes. Toxoplasmosis and PML are the most common opportunistic infections typical changes on CT and MR may lead to diagnosis. MR offers advantages compared with CT in its higher sensitivity for the demonstration even of small lesions. (orig.) [de

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Rabies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the site of bite, progressing within days to symptoms of cerebral dysfunction, anxiety, confusion, agitation. As the disease progresses, the person may experience delirium, abnormal behavior, hallucinations, and insomnia. The acute period ...

  2. Clinical and neuroradiological studies of eclampsia. Cerebral vasospasm and relation to the brain edema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Hisayoshi; Ando, Tetsuo; Yasuda, Takeshi; Yanagi, Tsutomu [Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Aichi (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    Clinical and neuroradiological studies involving cerebral angiography were conducted in four patients with eclampsia. In three cases (case 1, 2 and 4), neurological focal signs, abnormal low density areas on cranial CT and T{sub 2} high intensity areas on cranial MRI disappeared within a month. But in one case (case 3), cerebral infarction occurred and right hemiparesis and aphasia persisted. Cerebral angiography in the acute phase demonstrated vasospasm in all cases and arterial occlusion in the middle cerebral artery due to vasospasm in case 3. Angiography demonstrated several types of spasms, including diffuse, peripheral and multi local. Furthermore, in some cases, diffuse vasospasms were recognized at the siphon and extracranial portions of the internal carotid artery. In one case (Case 4), segmental vasospasms were detected in the bilateral vertebral arteries. Three to four weeks later, follow-up cerebral angiography was performed in three cases. Cerebral vasospasms had partially or completely recovered. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was excluded by lumbar puncture and neuroradiological findings in all cases. We concluded that eclampsia itself causes cerebral vasospasm and that the mechanism of vasospasm is different from that of SAH, since cerebral vasospasm occurred in the extracranial cerebral arteries. We suspected that cerebral vasospasm in eclampsia causes cerebral ischemia, which leads to cytotoxic edema and dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and cerebral autoregulation. With this background, brain edema, especially vasogenic edema, may easily occur and clinical symptoms of eclampsia may appear when the blood pressure rapidly increases. (author).

  3. Clinical and neuroradiological studies of eclampsia. Cerebral vasospasm and relation to the brain edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Hisayoshi; Ando, Tetsuo; Yasuda, Takeshi; Yanagi, Tsutomu

    1995-01-01

    Clinical and neuroradiological studies involving cerebral angiography were conducted in four patients with eclampsia. In three cases (case 1, 2 and 4), neurological focal signs, abnormal low density areas on cranial CT and T 2 high intensity areas on cranial MRI disappeared within a month. But in one case (case 3), cerebral infarction occurred and right hemiparesis and aphasia persisted. Cerebral angiography in the acute phase demonstrated vasospasm in all cases and arterial occlusion in the middle cerebral artery due to vasospasm in case 3. Angiography demonstrated several types of spasms, including diffuse, peripheral and multi local. Furthermore, in some cases, diffuse vasospasms were recognized at the siphon and extracranial portions of the internal carotid artery. In one case (Case 4), segmental vasospasms were detected in the bilateral vertebral arteries. Three to four weeks later, follow-up cerebral angiography was performed in three cases. Cerebral vasospasms had partially or completely recovered. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was excluded by lumbar puncture and neuroradiological findings in all cases. We concluded that eclampsia itself causes cerebral vasospasm and that the mechanism of vasospasm is different from that of SAH, since cerebral vasospasm occurred in the extracranial cerebral arteries. We suspected that cerebral vasospasm in eclampsia causes cerebral ischemia, which leads to cytotoxic edema and dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and cerebral autoregulation. With this background, brain edema, especially vasogenic edema, may easily occur and clinical symptoms of eclampsia may appear when the blood pressure rapidly increases. (author)

  4. Diagnosis of cerebral abscesses by angiography, gammaencephalography and scintigraphy of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitag, J.; Otto, H.J.; Freitag, G.; Abraham, K.; Koch, R.D.; Fendel, K.; Krumbholz, S.; Burger, P.; Remmert, S.

    1981-01-01

    40 patients suspected of suffering from a cerebral abscess were examined by cerebral angiography and in 14 cases moreover by gammaencephalography and cerebral scintigraphy, resp. Angiographically the abcesses appeared mostly as avascular tumors, in radioisotope examination, however the localized increase of the activity concentration suggested pathological findings. The uncharacteristic symptoms could only be attributed to a process of abscess-formation in connection with clinical and paraclinical findings

  5. Environmental investigations. Main road reconstruction Oslo East. Traffic pollution and noise and self reporting symptoms for health and well-being. Total results from the cross section investigations for 1987, 1994 and 1996; Miljoeundersoekelsene hovedveiomlegging Oslo Oest. Trafikkforurensning og stoey og selvrapporterende symptomer paa helse og trivsel. Samlede resultater fra tverrsnittundersoekelsene for 1987, 1994 og 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clench-Aas, Jocelyne; Bartonova, Alena

    1999-07-01

    The report describes the effects of exposure to NO{sub 2}, PM{sub 2}.5 and PM{sub 1}0 -{sub 2}.5 on symptoms of reduced health and well-being in adults living in the Vaalerenga/Gamlebyen area in Oslo. Results for some chronic diseases are also reported. In connection with measures taken in order to reduce the environmental burden in the study area, we show that reduced exposure to air pollutants (NO{sub 2} and PM{sub 2}.5) decreased the reporting of symptoms in the upper and lower airways and symptoms of general bad health. For these symptoms, dose-response functions are quantified. The effect of exposure to coarse particles is small, compared to NO{sub 2} and PM{sub 2}.5. Noise perturbs sleep significantly and leads to fatigue.

  6. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Katsumi [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, 1-2 Higashi-Takada-cho, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, 604-8845 Kyoto (Japan); Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko [Department of Pediatric Neurology, St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, 603-8323 Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  7. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Katsumi; Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  8. Hemodynamic disturbances in cerebral ischemia; Correlation between positron emission tomographic and angiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenjin, Hiroshi; Ueda, Satoshi; Mizukawa, Norihiko; Imahori, Yoshio; Hino, Akihiko; Ohmori, Yoshio [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan); Nakahashi, Hisamitsu

    1993-04-01

    Proper treatment of ischemic stroke requires better understanding of cerebral hemodynamic changes. The hemodynamic changes associated with ischemia were measured using positron emission tomography and related to angiographic findings in the subacute and chronic stages of 17 ischemia patients who showed symptoms of main trunk stenosis of the internal carotid artery system. The hemodynamic factors, cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen, oxygen extraction fraction, and flow/volume ratio, were measured in regions of interest determined from the angiographic stenosis (over 50%) and compared in each stage. The cerebral blood flow and flow/volume ratio in the territory downstream of the main trunk stenosis and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen in the whole cortex were decreased in the subacute stage. In the chronic stage, cerebral blood flow and flow/volume ratio decreased mainly in borderzone areas. (author).

  9. Neuroimaging patterns of cerebral hyperperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, S.; Portnov, Yu; Semenov, A.; Korotkevich, A.; Kokov, A.

    2017-08-01

    Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) after revascularization is a rare phenomenon associated with post-ischemic (reactive) hyperemia and acute pathological hyperperfusion. First described on perfusion CT as a very often moderate CBF increase, MTT/TTP decrease within 30% like a temporary effect, according to a short-time deterioration of neurological symptoms (vestibular ataxia - 58%, vegetative dysfunction - 100%, asthenic syndrome - 100%) in early postoperative period in patients with cardiac ischemia who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery. The acute pathological hyperperfusion carotid revascularization is a casuistic phenomenon with two- or three-fold CBV and MTT/TTP increase and high hemorrhage risk. Besides, we detected similar exchanges via perfusion CT called benign hyperemia, which marks extension of MTT/TTP and an increase of CBV from 27% to 48% (average 30%), but with normal CBF-parameters, indicating that venous stasis in acute venous ischemic stroke due cerebral venous sinus-trombosis (68%), only 6% in cardioembolic stroke and appears never in arterial stroke. Territorial coincidence registered for perifocal of necrosis zones of benign hyperemia and vasogenic edema accompanied on MRI (DWI, ADC). Secondary hemorrhagic transformation registered for primary non-hemorrhagic venous stroke in 27%, only in 9% for arterial stroke and in 60% for cardioembolic stroke. Probably, congestion is an increasingly predisposing factor secondary hemorrhaging than necrosis.

  10. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Going to an Occupational Therapist Scoliosis In the Band: Jens' Story Cerebral ... KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- ...

  12. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contusions and Lacerations Concussion Diffuse Axonal Injury Intracranial Hematomas Skull Fracture Sports-Related Concussion Cerebral contusions are ... Contusions and Lacerations Concussion Diffuse Axonal Injury Intracranial Hematomas Skull Fracture Sports-Related Concussion NOTE: This is ...

  13. Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, VOCS, environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apte, M.G.; Erdmann, C.A.

    2002-10-01

    Using the 100 office-building Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study dataset, we performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the associations between indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} (dCO{sub 2}) concentrations and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (Lresp) Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Using principal components analysis we identified a number of possible sources of 73 measured volatile organic compounds in the office buildings, and assessed the impact of these VOCs on the probability of presenting the SBS symptoms. Additionally we included analysis adjusting for the risks for predisposition of having SBS symptoms associated with the allergic, asthmatic, and environmentally sensitive subpopulations within the office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependant associations (p<0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100-ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average significantly reduce the prevalence of several SBS symptoms, up to 80%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. VOC sources were observed to play an role in direct association with mucous membrane and lower respiratory irritation, and possibly to be indirectly involved in indoor chemical reactions with ozone that produce irritating compounds associated with SBS symptoms. O-xylene, possibly emitted from furniture coatings was associated with shortness of breath (OR at the maximum concentration = 8, p < 0.05). The environmental sensitivities of a large subset of the office building population add to the overall risk of SBS symptoms (ORs

  14. Cerebral cartography and connectomics

    OpenAIRE

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamic...

  15. A study of cerebral circulation, metabolism and MRI findings in patients with chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Susumu

    1995-01-01

    Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency (CCCI) is a recently proposed clinical entity characterized by symptoms such as dizziness, a feeling of heavy-headedness or vague numbness without any neurological signs or organic vascular lesions on CT. In order to elucidate its pathogenesis, ultrasonic quantitative blood flow measurement system, positron emission tomography (PET) and MRI were employed to study three groups of subjects: 60 subjects with CCCI (group A), 44 subjects with risk factors for cerebrovascular disease but without neurological abnormalities (group B), and 40 normal healthy volunteers (group C). The results are summarized as follows: Mean common carotid blood flow decreased with age in all groups. Common carotid blood flow was lowest in group A and second lowest in group B in every decade of patient age. PET study revealed that CBF and CMRO 2 in all regions examined were significantly lower in group A than in group C. The incidence of MR signal abnormalities in the white matter increased with age. Group A had the highest incidence, and group C had the lowest. Reduction in mean common carotid blood flow and cerebral blood flow was associated with increasing incidence and severity of MR signal abnormalities. These findings indicate that CCCI is a pathologic condition closely related to diffuse cerebral low perfusion resulting from cerebral arteriosclerosis. The symptoms seen in this condition, which are apt to be taken lightly, may warn of impending ischemic stroke. (author)

  16. Symptomatic Cerebral Vasospasm and Delayed Cerebral Ischemia Following Transsphenoidal Resection of a Craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricarte, Irapuá Ferreira; Funchal, Bruno F; Miranda Alves, Maramélia A; Gomes, Daniela L; Valiente, Raul A; Carvalho, Flávio A; Silva, Gisele S

    2015-09-01

    Vasospasm has been rarely described as a complication associated with craniopharyngioma surgery. Herein we describe a patient who developed symptomatic vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia after transsphenoidal surgery for a craniopharyngioma. A 67-year-old woman became drowsy 2 weeks after a transsphenoidal resection of a craniopharyngioma. A head computed tomography (CT) was unremarkable except for postoperative findings. Electroencephalogram and laboratory studies were within the normal limits. A repeated CT scan 48 hours after the initial symptoms showed bilateral infarcts in the territory of the anterior cerebral arteries (ACA). Transcranial Doppler (TCD) showed increased blood flow velocities in both anterior cerebral arteries (169 cm/second in the left ACA and 145 cm/second in the right ACA) and right middle cerebral artery (164 cm/second) compatible with vasospasm. A CT angiography confirmed the findings. She was treated with induced hypertension and her level of consciousness improved. TCD velocities normalized after 2 weeks. Cerebral vasospasm should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with altered neurologic status in the postoperative period following a craniopharyngioma resection. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  18. Asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage detected by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Yumi; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Shinohara, Yukito

    1991-01-01

    Detection of previous cerebral infarction on CT films of patients with no history of stroke is a common occurrence. The incidence of silent cerebral infarction was reported to be about 10 to 11 percent, but very few reports concerning asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage available. However, recent clinical application of MRI has resulted in the detection of old asymptomatic hemorrhage in patients with no history known stroke-like episodes. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence, the cause and the character of the asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage among patients who had undergone MRI examinations. From September 1987 through June 1990, 2757 patients have undergone 3474 MR scans of the brain with 1.0 Tesla Siemens Magneton unit in our hospital. Seventeen patients showed no clinical signs or symptoms suggesting a stroke episode corresponding to the detected hemorrhagic lesion. The 17 patients corresponded to 0.6% of the patients who underwent MRI, 1.5% of the patients with cerebrovascular disease and 9.5% of the patients with intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH), which was rather higher than expected. Among the 17 patients, 12 were diagnosed as primary ICH and 5 as secondary ICH. Most of the primary asymptomatic hemorrhage were hypertensive ones and slit-like curvilinear lesions between the putamen and claustrum or external capsule. The secondary asymptomatic hemorrhage were due to AVM and angiomas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and pons. (author)

  19. Asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage detected by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Yumi; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Shinohara, Yukito [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1991-03-01

    Detection of previous cerebral infarction on CT films of patients with no history of stroke is a common occurrence. The incidence of silent cerebral infarction was reported to be about 10 to 11 percent, but very few reports concerning asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage available. However, recent clinical application of MRI has resulted in the detection of old asymptomatic hemorrhage in patients with no history known stroke-like episodes. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence, the cause and the character of the asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage among patients who had undergone MRI examinations. From September 1987 through June 1990, 2757 patients have undergone 3474 MR scans of the brain with 1.0 Tesla Siemens Magneton unit in our hospital. Seventeen patients showed no clinical signs or symptoms suggesting a stroke episode corresponding to the detected hemorrhagic lesion. The 17 patients corresponded to 0.6% of the patients who underwent MRI, 1.5% of the patients with cerebrovascular disease and 9.5% of the patients with intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH), which was rather higher than expected. Among the 17 patients, 12 were diagnosed as primary ICH and 5 as secondary ICH. Most of the primary asymptomatic hemorrhage were hypertensive ones and slit-like curvilinear lesions between the putamen and claustrum or external capsule. The secondary asymptomatic hemorrhage were due to AVM and angiomas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and pons. (author).

  20. Computerized tomographic studies in cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugie, Yoko

    1981-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings in 200 children with cerebral palsy (CP) were analysed from the viewpoint of clinical manifestations, disease complications and etiological factors. CT scans of 135 cases (67.5%) were found to be abnormal and there were 14 (7%) borderline cases. The major abnormality found on CT scans was cerebral atrophy. Other important changes included focal or diffuse low density area in the brain tissue, congenital malformation, and cerebellar atrophy. From the clinical point of view, a large number of patients with spastic tetraplegia and spastic diplegia showed highly abnormal CT scans. On the other hand, in patients with spastic monoplegia, spastic paraplegia, and athetotic type, CT findings were normal or revealed only minor cerebral atrophy. Most children showing asymmetric clinical symptoms had corresponding asymmetric CT abnormalities which included ventricular enlargement, low density area in the brain tissue, and hemispherical volume. There was a significant correlation between the severity of physical impairment and the extent of CT abnormalities. Severely affected children had grossly abnormal CT scans such as hydranencephaly, polycystic change, and extensive cerebral atrophy. In the patients complicated with epilepsy, the incidence and severity of abnormal CT were higher than those of non-epileptic patients. Mentally retarded patients had variable enlargement of the subarachnoidal space depending on the severity of their mental retardation. Patients with suspected postnatal etiology also had high incidence of severe CT abnormality. CT scan is a valuable tool for evaluating patients with CP and in some cases, possible etiology of the disease may be discovered. (author)

  1. Regional Cerebral Perfusion in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Yong; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Yoon, Byung Woo; Lee, Sang Bok; Jeon, Beom S.; Lee, Kyung Han; Lee, Myung Chul

    1996-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a Parkinson-plus syndrome characterized clinically by supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, pseudobulbar palsy, axial rigidity, bradykinesia, postural instability and dementia. Presence of dementia and lack of cortical histopathology suggest the derangement of cortical function by pathological changes in subcortical structures in PSP, which is supported by the pattern of behavioral changes and measurement of brain metabolism using positron emission tomography. This study was done to examine whether there are specific changes of regional cerebral perfusion in PSP and whether there is a correlation between severity of motor abnormaility and degree of changes in cerebral perfusion. We measured regional cerebral perfusion indices in 5 cortical and 2 subcortical areas in 6 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PSP and 6 healthy age and sex matched controls using Tc-99m-HMPAO SPECT. Compared with age and sex matched controls, only superior frontal regional perfusion index was significantly decreased in PSP (p 0.05). We affirm the previous reports that perfusion in superior frontal cortex is decreased in PSP. Based on our results that there was no correlation between severity of motor abnormality and cerebral perfusion in the superior frontal cortex, nonmotoric symptoms including dementia needs to be looked at whether there is a correlation with the perfusion abnormality in superior frontal cortex

  2. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  3. A postural `stressed` cerebral HMPAO case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.C.; Jost, G.M.; Bolitho, L.; Grantham, M. [Wangaratta District Hospital, VIC (Australia)

    1998-03-01

    Full text: This case study represents an example of the utility of postural hypoperfusion stressed HMPAO SPECT. An elderly woman of 78 with a long history of giddiness was referred to our laboratory for examination of possible cerebral ischaemia. She had recurrent dizzy episodes, sometimes posture related, over the past few years and had suffered several falls. Cerebral DSA revealed minimal disease. CT scans were reported as normal. Carotid duplex Doppler studies revealed bilateral plaque disease in the carotid bulbs extending to the origins of the ICAs which were not significant stenoses. Postural symptoms were induced by standing the patient up rapidly and HMPAO was administered at the same time. A SPECT scan of the brain was performed. Quantitative analysis showed a left to right decrease of 10.8% in the temporo-occipital area, 5.6% in the temporo-parietal area and 2.5% in the cerebellar and parietal areas. Images revealed moderately reduced tracer concentration in the left half of the cerebellum and the left occipital region extending as far forward as the temporo-parietal region A repeat HMPAO SPECT scan without stress was normal. This would appear to indicate reversible ischaemia in the left posterior region, and is consistent with the reported symptoms. This case illustrates the usefulness of HMPAO in the diagnosis of reversible cerebral ischaemia.

  4. A postural 'stressed' cerebral HMPAO case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.C.; Jost, G.M.; Bolitho, L.; Grantham, M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: This case study represents an example of the utility of postural hypoperfusion stressed HMPAO SPECT. An elderly woman of 78 with a long history of giddiness was referred to our laboratory for examination of possible cerebral ischaemia. She had recurrent dizzy episodes, sometimes posture related, over the past few years and had suffered several falls. Cerebral DSA revealed minimal disease. CT scans were reported as normal. Carotid duplex Doppler studies revealed bilateral plaque disease in the carotid bulbs extending to the origins of the ICAs which were not significant stenoses. Postural symptoms were induced by standing the patient up rapidly and HMPAO was administered at the same time. A SPECT scan of the brain was performed. Quantitative analysis showed a left to right decrease of 10.8% in the temporo-occipital area, 5.6% in the temporo-parietal area and 2.5% in the cerebellar and parietal areas. Images revealed moderately reduced tracer concentration in the left half of the cerebellum and the left occipital region extending as far forward as the temporo-parietal region A repeat HMPAO SPECT scan without stress was normal. This would appear to indicate reversible ischaemia in the left posterior region, and is consistent with the reported symptoms. This case illustrates the usefulness of HMPAO in the diagnosis of reversible cerebral ischaemia

  5. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hidemichi; Sakurai, Takashi; Hayashi, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Takuo

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of reduction of cerebral circulation in the early phase of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has not yet been clarified. Previous studies have variously indicated that cerebral blood flow (CBF) reduction may be due to cerebral vasospasm, an elevation in intracranial pressure (ICP), constriction of intraparenchymal arterioles, or metabolic reduction. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism. In 36 patients with aneurysmal SAH, the values of mean cerebral blood flow (mCBF), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (GMRO 2 ) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were measured by using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with arterial blood drawing and oxygen saturation of internal jugular bulb blood (SjO 2 ) in the acute stage (1-3 days after onset) and the spasm stage (7-10 days after onset). The patients in our study were selected by using the following criteria: no history of cerebrovascular or cardiopulmonary diseases; under the age of 70; the ruptured aneurysm was treated by clipping or coil embolization within 72 hours after onset; no symptoms of cerebral vasospasm; no signs of cerebral ischemic change on CT scans. These patients were divided into 2 groups according to the World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) grading classification; the mild group (Grades I and II) consisted of 27 cases and the severe group (Grade IV) consisted of 9 cases. We studied differences in mCBF CMRO 2 , and OEF between the mild group and severe group. In the mild group, mCBF, CMRO 2 , and OEF were significantly higher than in the severe group during both the acute and the spasm stage. Also mCBF showed a direct correlation with CMRO 2 . All the patients were kept under the following conditions: the bed was positioned so that the upper body was raised at an angle at 30 deg; blood pressure was maintained at 130-150 mmHg and PaCO 2 of arterial blood was maintained at 35-40 mmHg; ICP

  6. Environmental and phenotype-related risk factors for owner-reported allergic/atopic skin symptoms and for canine atopic dermatitis verified by veterinarian in a Finnish dog population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anturaniemi, Johanna; Uusitalo, Liisa; Hielm-Björkman, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to observe whether environmental factors and phenotypic traits are associated with owner-reported skin problems and with veterinary diagnosed canine atopic dermatitis (CAD). Data were collected using the validated online DOGRISK questionnaire. Out of the data that the questionnaire provides for analysis, focus was first turned towards addressing questions regarding 'Atopy/allergy (skin symptoms)' using a total of 8643 dogs: 1585 dogs with owner-reported allergic/atopic skin symptoms and 7058 dogs without. A subsequent analysis compared dogs with veterinary-verified CAD (n = 322) as a case group against the 7058 dogs without owner-reported skin symptoms. The association between 21 factors related to the environment, canine phenotypes and breed groups within both populations were analysed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression. The environmental factors that showed a significant inverse association with the risk of owner-reported allergic/atopic skin symptoms were as following: whether the dog was living in a detached house, whether there were other dogs in the household, and whether the dog was born in the current household. Having over 50% white colour in the coat and living in an extremely clean household were significantly associated with an increased risk of owner-reported allergic/atopic skin symptoms. The five breeds demonstrating the highest proportion of owner-reported allergic/atopic skin symptoms were West Highland white terrier, Boxer, English bulldog, Dalmatian and French bulldog. The Fédération Cynologique Internationale dog breed groups 3 (Terriers) and 6 (Scent hounds and related breeds) showed a significantly higher risk for owner-reported allergic/atopic skin symptoms than mixed breed dogs. In the second population, the inverse association was observed between the risk of CAD and the presence of other dogs in the household, and whether the dog had been born in the current household. The

  7. Environmental and phenotype-related risk factors for owner-reported allergic/atopic skin symptoms and for canine atopic dermatitis verified by veterinarian in a Finnish dog population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Anturaniemi

    Full Text Available The aim of this cross-sectional study was to observe whether environmental factors and phenotypic traits are associated with owner-reported skin problems and with veterinary diagnosed canine atopic dermatitis (CAD. Data were collected using the validated online DOGRISK questionnaire. Out of the data that the questionnaire provides for analysis, focus was first turned towards addressing questions regarding 'Atopy/allergy (skin symptoms' using a total of 8643 dogs: 1585 dogs with owner-reported allergic/atopic skin symptoms and 7058 dogs without. A subsequent analysis compared dogs with veterinary-verified CAD (n = 322 as a case group against the 7058 dogs without owner-reported skin symptoms. The association between 21 factors related to the environment, canine phenotypes and breed groups within both populations were analysed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression. The environmental factors that showed a significant inverse association with the risk of owner-reported allergic/atopic skin symptoms were as following: whether the dog was living in a detached house, whether there were other dogs in the household, and whether the dog was born in the current household. Having over 50% white colour in the coat and living in an extremely clean household were significantly associated with an increased risk of owner-reported allergic/atopic skin symptoms. The five breeds demonstrating the highest proportion of owner-reported allergic/atopic skin symptoms were West Highland white terrier, Boxer, English bulldog, Dalmatian and French bulldog. The Fédération Cynologique Internationale dog breed groups 3 (Terriers and 6 (Scent hounds and related breeds showed a significantly higher risk for owner-reported allergic/atopic skin symptoms than mixed breed dogs. In the second population, the inverse association was observed between the risk of CAD and the presence of other dogs in the household, and whether the dog had been born in the current

  8. [Analysis of 58 neonatal cases with cerebral infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-hua; Chen, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral infarction (CI) is one of severe diseases of central nervous system in neonates, and some infants with CI could have poor prognosis in the long term. This study aimed to analyze the clinical data and prognosis of all neonatal cases with cerebral infarction in recent years and to help future clinical work. Totally 58 neonatal cases with CI admitted to NICU of the hospital from January 1999 to December 2010 were included in this study. We analyzed all clinical data and prognosis by retrospective analysis. Fifty-two term babies and six preterm babies were included. There were altogether 51 cases with asphyxia and 7 with hemorrhagic cerebral infarction. Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia was the most common high-risk factor and it accounted for 46.6%. Seizure was the most frequent initial symptom and the most common clinical manifestation (accounted for 77.6%), and it was followed by intermittent cyanosis, apnea and lethargy. Cerebral CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging were major methods to help to make the diagnosis and they also had close relation with prognosis. Diffusion weighted imaging was very helpful to diagnose infarction in early stage. Left middle cerebral artery was the most common artery to be involved. Supportive therapy and symptomatic treatment were the main methods in the acute stage of neonatal cerebral infarction. Those babies with poor prognosis mostly had large infarction involving cerebral hemisphere, thalamus and basal ganglia. Neonatal cerebral infarction was a severe brain injury affecting long tern nervous system prognosis. Perinatal hypoxia was the most common high-risk factor and seizure was the most frequent initial symptom. Diffusion weighted imaging was valuable to diagnose infarction in early stage. Most of infants with poor prognosis had large infarction involving hemisphere, thalamus and basal ganglia. Early diagnosis with brain imaging would be helpful for rehabilitation therapy and improving prognosis.

  9. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bindu Balakrishnan,1 Elizabeth Nance,1 Michael V Johnston,2 Rangaramanujam Kannan,3 Sujatha Kannan1 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. Keywords: dendrimer, cerebral palsy, neuroinflammation, nanoparticle, neonatal brain injury, G4OH-PAMAM

  10. Monitoring of cerebral haemodynamics in newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liem, K Djien; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    The most important cerebrovascular injuries in newborn infants, particularly in preterm infants, are cerebral haemorrhage and ischemic injury. The typical cerebral vascular anatomy and the disturbance of cerebral haemodynamics play important roles in the pathophysiology. The term 'cerebral haemod...

  11. Recurrent headache as the main symptom of acquired cerebral toxoplasmosis in nonhuman immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects with no lymphadenopathy: the parasite may be responsible for the neurogenic inflammation postulated as a cause of different types of headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandota, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Headache and/or migraine, a common problem in pediatrics and internal medicine, affect about 5% to 10% children and adolescents, and nearly 30% of middle-aged women. Headache is also one of the most common clinical manifestations of acquired Toxoplasma gondii infection of the central nervous system (CNS) in immunosuppressed subjects. We present 11 apparently nonhuman immunodeficiency virus-infected children aged 7 to 17 years (8 girls, 3 boys) and 1 adult woman with recurrent severe headaches in whom latent chronic CNS T. gondii infection not manifested by enlarged peripheral lymph nodes typical for toxoplasmosis, was found. In 7 patients, the mean serum IgG Toxoplasma antibodies concentration was 189 +/- 85 (SD) IU/mL (range 89 to 300 IU/mL), and in 5 other subjects, the indirect fluorescent antibody test titer ranged from 1:40 to 1:5120 IU/mL (n= metabolic pathways controlled by IDO being a significant contributor to the proinflammatory system. Also, it seems that idiopathic intracranial hypertension, pseudotumor cerebri, and aseptic meningitis, induced by various factors, may result from their interference with IDO and inducible nitric oxide synthase activities, endogenous NO level, and cytokine irregularities which finally affect former T. gondii status 2mo in the brain. All these biochemical disturbances caused by the CNS T. gondii infection/inflammation may also be responsible for the relationship found between neurologic symptoms, such as headache, vertigo, and syncope observed in apparently immunocompetent children and adolescents, and physical and psychiatric symptoms in adulthood. We therefore believe that tests for T. gondii should be performed obligatorily in apparently immunocompetent patients with different types of headaches, even if they have no enlarged peripheral lymph nodes. This may help to avoid overlooking this treatable cause of the CNS disease, markedly reduce costs of hospitalization, diagnosis and treatment, and eventually prevent

  12. Cerebral blood flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamo, H.L.; Meric, P.C.; Ponsin, J.C.; Rey, A.C.; Luft, A.G.; Seylaz, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    A xenon-133 method was used to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) before and after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) removal in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Preliminary results suggested that shunting should be performed on patients whose CBF increased after CSF removal. There was a significant increase in CBF in patients with NPH, which was confirmed by the favorable outcome of 88% of patients shunted. The majority of patients with senile and presenile dementia showed a decrease or no change in CBF after CSF removal. It is suggested that although changes in CBF and clinical symptoms of NPH may have the same cause, i.e., changes in the cerebral intraparenchymal pressure, there is no simple direct relation between these two events. The mechanism underlying the loss of autoregulation observed in NPH is also discussed

  13. Hyperdense middle cerebral artery CT sign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastianello, S.; Pierallini, A.; Colonnese, C.; Brughitta, G.; Angeloni, U.; Antonelli, M.; Fantozzi, L.M.; Fieschi, C.; Bozzao, L.

    1991-01-01

    The early CT finding of an hyperdensity of a portion of the middle cerebral artery Hyperdense Middle Cerebral Artery Sign (HMCAS), in patients with supratentorial stroke, is often indicative of an embolic occlusion. Aim of this study was to verify the incidence and reliability of the HMCAS and its possible correlation with early CT findings and with the extent of late brain damage. We studied 36 patients presenting with symptoms of stroke in the MCA territory, by means of CT and angiography performed respectively within 4 and 6 hours. Follow-up CT scans were then obtained after one week and three months from the ischemic event. The HMCAS was present in 50% of our patients and in this group it always correlated positively with the angiographic finding of occlusion. The same group presented a high incidence of early CT hypodensity (88%). Finally the presence of HMCAS might be considered a negative prognostic sign for the development of extensive brain damage. (orig.)

  14. Transcranial Doppler for detection of cerebral ischaemia during carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L G; Schroeder, T V

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) for the detection of cerebral ischaemia during carotid endarterectomy in 30 male and 14 female patients with ipsilateral focal cerebro-vascular symptoms. Surgery was performed during halothane-nitrous oxide anaesthesia with moderate hypocapnia...

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow in primary degenerative dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakatsu, Shinobu; Totsuka, Shiro; Shinohara, Masao; Koyama, Hideki; Sagawa, Katsuo; Morinobu, Shigeru; Oiji, Arata; Komatani, Akio

    1991-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was examined, using SPECT by Xe-133 inhalation, in patients with primary degenerative dementia who were subgrouped according to predominant symptoms with respect to amnesia, apraxia, agnosia, aphasia, and personality changes. Also the effect of sex and age at dementia onset on the rCBF patterns was assessed. (author). 26 refs.; 1 fig.; 7 tabs

  16. Computed tomographic findings of cerebral paragonimiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Weon Tae; Jung, Min Ki; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chung, Hyon De

    1988-01-01

    Authors analyzed the computed tomographic (CT) findings of 19 cases pathologically and clinically proven cerebral paragonimiasis that were performed at Chonnam University Hospital from April 1983 through March 1987. The results were as follows: 1. Male to female ratio was 15:4 and the most prevalent age group was 3rd decade (7 cases). The common symptoms were epileptic seizure (16 cases) and headache (12 cases). 2. The multiplicity of cerebral paragonimiasis was 7 of 19 cases and the distributions of lesion were occipital (11 cases), temporal (6 cases), frontal (5 cases) and parietal (5 cases) lobe. 3. The calcification on CT scan were single (7 cases) or multiple (7 cases) and the shape of calcification were nodular (10 cases), soap babble of ring (8 cases), and stippled (6 cases). The pattern of contrast enhancement were ring (5 cases) or nodular (1 case), and along the basal cistern (1 case with arachnoiditis). 4. 12 out of 13 cases, had long clinical symptoms over 3 years with calcifications, could be analyzed according to Valentine's vascular territory; 6 cases in PCA territory, 3 in MCA and 3 in ACA. 5. CT findings were noted according to the duration of symptoms; 5 cases, had symptoms less than 1 year, showed abscess (5 cases) and arachnoiditis (1 case) with brain edema, mass effect, hydrocephalus and contrast enhancement but no calcification in all. One case, had symptom of 1 year and 2 months, showed partially calcified granulomatous lesion with perifocal edema and contrast enhancement, 13 cases, had symptoms over 3 years, showed multiple calcification with brain atrophy (10 cases), but no contrast enhancement in all cases.

  17. Hypocapnia and cerebral hypoperfusion in orthostatic intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, V.; Spies, J. M.; Novak, P.; McPhee, B. R.; Rummans, T. A.; Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Orthostatic and other stresses trigger tachycardia associated with symptoms of tremulousness, shortness of breath, dizziness, blurred vision, and, often, syncope. It has been suggested that paradoxical cerebral vasoconstriction during head-up tilt might be present in patients with orthostatic intolerance. We chose to study middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity (BFV) and cerebral vasoregulation during tilt in patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI). METHODS: Beat-to-beat BFV from the MCA, heart rate, CO2, blood pressure (BP), and respiration were measured in 30 patients with OI (25 women and 5 men; age range, 21 to 44 years; mean age, 31.3+/-1.2 years) and 17 control subjects (13 women and 4 men; age range, 20 to 41 years; mean age, 30+/-1.6 years); ages were not statistically different. These indices were monitored during supine rest and head-up tilt (HUT). We compared spontaneous breathing and hyperventilation and evaluated the effect of CO2 rebreathing in these 2 positions. RESULTS: The OI group had higher supine heart rates (Pfailed to show an increment. Among the cerebrovascular indices, all BFVs (systolic, diastolic, and mean) decreased significantly more, and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) was increased in OI patients (Pindices were improved within 2 minutes of CO2 rebreathing. The relationships between CO2 and BFV and heart rate were well described by linear regressions, and the slope was not different between control subjects and patients with OI. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebral vasoconstriction occurs in OI during orthostasis, which is primarily due to hyperventilation, causing significant hypocapnia. Hypocapnia and symptoms of orthostatic hypertension are reversible by CO2 rebreathing.

  18. Duplicated middle cerebral artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion. PMID:22140405

  19. Diaschisis with cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, R.; Reivich, M.; Goldberg, H.; Banka, R.; Greenberg, J.

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen patients admitted to Philadelphia General Hospital with acute strokes had repeated measurements of cerebral blood flow measured by the /sup 133/X inhalation method. A progressive decline in cerebral blood flow in both hemispheres was observed during the first week after infarction in twelve of these patients. This decline could be partially explained by loss of autoregulation, but could not be correlated with level of consciousness, clinical status of PCO2. This progressive decline in flow in the non-ischemic hemisphere indicates a process more complex than a simple destruction of axonal afferants to neurons as implied by the term diaschisis. The flow changes in the non-ischemic hemisphere are likely caused by a combination of the immediate effects of decreased neuronal stimulation modified by loss of autoregulation, release of vasoactive substances, cerebral edema, and other factors.

  20. Variable expression of cerebral cavernous malformations in carriers of a premature termination codon in exon 17 of the Krit1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamero Miguel A

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM present as either sporadic or autosomal dominant conditions with incomplete penetrance of symptoms. Differences in genetic and environmental factors might be minimized among first-degree relatives. We therefore studied clinical expression in a family with several affected members. Methods We studied a three-generation family with the onset of CCM as a cerebral haemorrhage in the younger (four-year-old sibling. Identification and enumeration of CCMs were performed in T2-weighted or gradient-echo MRIs of the whole brains. Genetic analysis comprised SCCP, sequencing and restriction polymorphism of the Krit1 gene in the proband and at risk relatives. Results The phenotypes of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs in carriers of Krit1 mutations were very variable. We identified a novel frameshift mutation caused by a 1902A insertion in exon 17 of the Krit1 gene, which leads to a premature TAA triplet and predicts the truncating phenotype Y634X. A very striking finding was the absence of both clinical symptoms and CCMs in the eldest sibling harbouring the 1902insA. Conclusions Patients in this family, harbouring the same mutation, illustrate the very variable clinical and radiological expression of a Krit1 mutation. The early and critical onset in the proband contrasts with minor clinical findings in affected relatives. This consideration is important in genetic counselling.

  1. Gammagraphy of cerebral perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Important aspects of the gammagraphy of cerebral perfusion and the diverse clinical applications in the neurological diseases are comment in this article. We focus in the usefulness of the photon emission cerebral tomography (SPECT) and its capacity to cross the hemato encephalic barrier through the use of radiopharmacons like 99 mTc-H M-PAO and 99mTc-EDC, thus managing to offer functional data on the captantes neurons of the radiopharmacon. The clinical applications of SPECT are studied; cerebrovascular disease, transient ischemic attacks, dementias, Alzheimer disease, as well as other neurological diseases are referred. (The author)

  2. Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of a major cerebral artery is the cause of ischemic stroke which is a major reason of mortality, morbidity and disability in the populations of the developed countries. In the seven studies summarized in the thesis focal ischemia in rats induced by occlusion...... in the penumbra is recruited in the infarction process leading to a progressive growth of the infarct. The penumbra hence constitutes an important target for pharmacological treatment because of the existence of a therapeutic time window during which treatment with neuroprotective compounds may prevent...

  3. Cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following various cerebral diseases, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kino, Masao; Anno, Izumi; Yano, Yuhiko; Anno, Yasuro.

    1980-01-01

    Patients having cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following hypoglycemia, cerebral contusion, or cerebral hypoxia including cerebrovascular disorders were reported. Description was made as to cerebral changes visualized on CT images and clinical courses of a patient who revived 10 minutes after heart stoppage during neurosurgery, a newborn with asphyxia, a patient with hypoglycemia, a patient who suffered from asphyxia by an accident 10 years before, a patient with carbon monoxide poisoning at an acute stage, a patient who had carbon monoxide poisoning 10 years before, a patient with diffuse cerebral ischemic changes, a patient with cerebral edema around metastatic tumor, a patient with respiration brain, a patient with neurological sequelae after cerebral contusion, a patient who had an operation to excise right parietal lobe artery malformation, and a patient who was shooted by a machine gun and had a lead in the brain for 34 years. (Tsunoda, M.)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging criteria for thrombolysis in hyperacute cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmetgjekaj, Ilir; Kabashi-Muçaj, Serbeze; Lascu, Luana Corina; Kabashi, Antigona; Bondari, A; Bondari, Simona; Dedushi-Hoti, Kreshnike; Biçaku, Ardian; Shatri, Jeton

    2014-01-01

    Selection of patients with cerebral infarction for MRI that is suitable for thrombolytic therapy as an emerging application. Although the efficiency of the therapy with i.v. tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 3 hours after onset of symptoms has been proven in selected patients with CT, now these criteria are determined by MRI, as the data we gather are fast and accurate in the first hours. MRI screening in patients with acute cerebral infarction before application of thrombolytic therapy was done in a UCC Mannheim in Germany. Unlike trials with CT, MRI studies demonstrated the benefits of therapy up to 6 hours after the onset of symptoms. We studied 21 patients hospitalized in Clinic of Neuroradiology at University Clinical Centre in Mannheim-Germany. They all undergo brain MRI evaluation for stroke. This article reviews literature that has followed application of thrombolysis in patients with cerebral infarction based on MRI. We have analyzed the MRI criteria for i.v. application of tPA at this University Centre. Alongside the personal viewpoints of clinicians, survey reveals a variety of clinical aspects and MRI features that are opened for further more exploration: therapeutic effects, the use of the MRI angiography, dynamics, and other. MRI is a tested imaging method for rapid evaluation of patients with hyperacute cerebral infarction, replacing the use of CT imaging and clinical features. MRI criteria for thrombolytic therapy are being applied in some cerebral vascular centres. In Kosovo, the application of thrombolytic therapy has not started yet.

  5. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... immediate symptoms occur and resemble a stroke. These symptoms include: Drowsiness Headache (usually in a certain part of the head) Nervous system changes that may start suddenly, including confusion , delirium , double vision , decreased vision , sensation changes, speech problems, ...

  6. The effects of the interplay of genetics and early environmental risk on the course of internalizing symptoms from late childhood through adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musci, Rashelle J; Masyn, Katherine E; Benke, Kelly; Maher, Brion; Uhl, George; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2016-02-01

    Internalizing symptoms during adolescence and beyond is a major public health concern, particularly because severe symptoms can lead to the diagnosis of a number of serious psychiatric conditions. This study utilizes a unique sample with a complex statistical method in order to explore Gene × Environment interactions found in internalizing symptoms during adolescence. Data for this study were drawn from a longitudinal prevention intervention study (n = 798) of Baltimore city school children. Internalizing symptom data were collected using self-report and blood or saliva samples genotyped using Affymetrix 6.0 microarrays. A major depression polygenic score was created for each individual using information from the major depressive disorder Psychiatric Genetics Consortium and used as a predictor in a latent trait-state-occasion model. The major depressive disorder polygenic score was a significant predictor of the stable latent trait variable, which captures time-independent phenotypic variability. In addition, an early childhood stressor of death or divorce was a significant predictor of occasion-specific variables. A Gene × Environment interaction was not a significant predictor of the latent trait or occasion variables. These findings support the importance of genetics on the stable latent trait portion of internalizing symptoms across adolescence.

  7. Cerebral malaria: susceptibility weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinit Baliyan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria is one of the fatal complications of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Pathogenesis involves cerebral microangiopathy related to microvascular plugging by infected red blood cells. Conventional imaging with MRI and CT do not reveal anything specific in case of cerebral malaria. Susceptibility weighted imaging, a recent advance in the MRI, is very sensitive to microbleeds related to microangiopathy. Histopathological studies in cerebral malaria have revealed microbleeds in brain parenchyma secondary to microangiopathy. Susceptibility weighted imaging, being exquisitely sensitive to microbleeds may provide additional information and improve the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in cerebral malaria.

  8. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    described neuropathological findings of cerebral edema and wi4espread petechial hemorrhages in two HAPE fatalities and later reported (52...lethargy, thirst, indigestion, hysterical outburst o: other behavior disturbances, decreased concentration, fever , couhh and peripheral edema (52...autopsy results from the two fatalities in their series. In both cases multiple, widespread petechial hemorrhages were noted throughout the brain. One

  9. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2...... the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced...... cardiac output brain perfusion becomes jeopardized. Whether, in patients with cardiovascular disease and/or defect, cerebral blood flow cerebral control HV-induced hypocapnia elicits cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to TLOC, remains to be established....

  10. Early CT findings in acute middle cerebral artery ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, M.; Poniatowska, R.; Boguslawska, R.; Krawczyk, R.; Rejnowski, J.; Ryterski, J.; Tarrakowski, J.; Mendel, T.

    2004-01-01

    Stroke is characterized by a sudden onset of focal central neurological deficit, with symptoms lasting more than 24 hours, that can be fatal. The introduction of anti-coagulation treatments, together with continuous advances inneuroimaging techniques, have a positive impact, both on morbidity and mortality in stroke patients. It must be stressed, that 'therapeutic window' for fibrolytic treatment is up to 3 hours. The group consisted of 50 patients with clinical diagnosis of stroke, who met the following criteria: first ever, non-hemorrhagic stroke, middle cerebral artery territory involvement, first CT performed within 12 hours from the onset of symptoms, control CT, performed within 7 days, confirming signs of infarction in the distribution of middle cerebral artery. All CT were performed without contrast administration. First CT examinations were retrospectively studied for early evidence of ischemic changes, subsequently depicted as infarction in the control CT. Hyperdencemiddle cerebral artery sign (HMCAS), hypoattenuation of lentiform nucleus (ALN), loss of insular ribbon (LIR), hemispheric sulcus effacement (HES) were found as early abnormalities CT examinations continue to play a dominant role in the initial diagnosis of acute cerebral ischemia. Signs of early ischemia can be often detected within the first three hours from the onset, in the hyper acute phase. CT is used in evaluation of recent symptoms in acute phase and proper selection of patients for thrombolysis with significant therapeutic results. [author

  11. Evidence for autosomal recessive inheritance in cerebral gigantism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, S.; Zeltzer, M.; Benderly, A.; Levy, J.

    1974-01-01

    Three cases of cerebral gigantism, two sibs and their double first cousin, are described in a large inbred family from Israel. Two of the three were observed and diagnosed at birth and two were followed for two years. They all presented the signs and symptoms considered typical of this syndrome, as well as some of the less frequent findings. Generalized oedema and flexion contractures of the feet were observed in two of the three at birth. This has not hitherto been reported in cases of cerebral gigantism, of whom only a few have been observed and diagnosed at birth. Autosomal recessive inheritance is clearly implied in this family. Images PMID:4841084

  12. Plague Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  13. Recognizing Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful, please consider supporting IFFGD with a small tax- deductible donation. Make Donation Signs and Symptoms Overview ... arises requiring an expert’s care. © Copyright 1998-2018 International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, Inc. (IFFGD). All ...

  14. Rotavirus Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rotavirus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rotavirus Home About Rotavirus Symptoms Transmission Treatment Photos Vaccination ...

  15. Recurrent cerebral thrombosis; With special reference to the neuroradiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Abe, Shin-e; Kubo, Hideki; Hanyu, Haruo; Takasaki, Masaru (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1992-10-01

    Neuroradiological techniques were used to elucidate pathophysiology of recurrent cerebral thrombosis. Twenty-two patients with cerebral thrombosis who suffered a second attack under stable conditions more than 22 days after the initial stroke were studied. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia were also seen in 20, 8, and 12 patients, respectively. The patients were divided into three groups according to their symptoms: (I) symptoms differed between the first and second strokes (n=12); (II) initial symptoms were suddenly deteriorated (n=6); and (III) symptoms occurring in groups I and II were seen (n=4). In group I, contralateral hemiparesis or suprabulbar palsy was often associated with the initial hemiparesis. The time of recurrent stroke varied from 4 months to 9 years. CT and MRI showed not only lacunae in both hemispheres, but also deep white-matter ischemia of the centrum semi-ovale. In group II, hemiparesis or visual field defect was deteriorated early after the initial stroke. In addition, neuroimaging revealed that infarction in the posterior cerebral artery was progressed on the contralateral side, or that white matter lesion in the middle artery was enlarged in spite of small lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. All patients in group III had deterioration of right hemiparesis associated with aphasia. CT, MRI, SPECT, and angiography indicated deep white-matter ischemia caused by main trunk lesions in the left hemisphere. Group III seemed to be equivalent to group II, except for laterality of the lesion. Neuroradiological assessment of the initial stroke may help to predict the mode of recurrence, although pathophysiology of cerebral thrombosis is complicated and varies from patient to patient. (N.K.).

  16. Cerebral Aneurysm in the Evolution of Cardiac Myxoma: Clinical and Physiopathological Interpretations; El aneurisma cerebral en la evolucion del mixoma cardiaco: planteamientos clinicos y fisopatologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, R.; Garcia, M. L. [Hospital General Universitario Morales Meseguer. Murcia (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    We present the case of a patient with stroke, cerebral aneurysms (small distal and large proximal) who had been treated for cardiac myxoma 18 years earlier. We compared the imaging findings (localization, size, density and associated cerebral lesions) with those of other publications. The data obtained from other works and those that we could derive from our patient suggest that the cerebral aneurysms are responsible for neurological symptoms observed some time after removal of the tumor. On the other hand, such aneurysms tend to grow larger and more proximal with increasing time after surgery. (Author) 15 refs.

  17. Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in a nephrotic child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Marcelo Masruha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotic syndrome in infancy and childhood is known to be associated with a hypercoagulable state and thromboembolic complications, but cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CST is a very rare and serious one, with only a few isolated reports in the literature. A case is presented of a 9-year-old boy with nephrotic syndrome that acutely developed signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension syndrome. CST was diagnosed on cranial CT and MRI and he gradually recovered after treatment with anticoagulants. The diagnosis of CST should be considered in any patient with nephrotic syndrome who develops neurologic symptoms. The discussion of this case, coupled with a review of the literature, emphasizes that early diagnosis is essential for institution of anticoagulation therapy and a successful outcome. This report also illustrates the difficulties that may be encountered in managing such a patient.

  18. Cerebral hypoxia and ischemia in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ravarino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Premature birth is a major public health issue internationally affecting 13 million babies worldwide. Hypoxia and ischemia is probably the commonest type of acquired brain damage in preterm infants. The clinical manifestations of hypoxic-ischemic injury in survivors of premature birth include a spectrum of cerebral palsy and intellectual disabilities. Until recently, the extensive brain abnormalities in preterm neonates appeared to be related mostly to destructive processes that lead to substantial deletion of neurons, axons, and glia from necrotic lesions in the developing brain. Advances in neonatal care coincide with a growing body of evidence that the preterm gray and white matter frequently sustain less severe insults, where tissue destruction is the minor component. Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL is the major form of white matter injury and consists classically of focal necrotic lesions, with subsequent cyst formation, and a less severe but more diffuse injury to cerebral white mater, with prominent astrogliosis and microgliosis but without overt necrosis. With PVL a concomitant injury occurs to subplate neurons, located in the subcortical white matter. Severe hypoxic-ischemic insults that trigger significant white matter necrosis are accompanied by neuronal degeneration in cerebral gray and white matter. This review aims to illustrate signs of cerebral embryology of the second half of fetal life and correlate hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the premature infant. This should help us better understand the symptoms early and late and facilitate new therapeutic strategies. Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  19. The symmetrical calcification of the basal cerebral ganglia (SCBG): its clinical importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellamor, V.; Summer, K.; Stellamor, K.

    1984-01-01

    Since CT is has been possible to detect subtle SCBG. Usually they are without any symptoms. Massive calcification is visible in conventional radiogram; it can form the patho-anatomical substrate for neuro-psychiatric defects. Fahr's triad consists of SCBG, typical neuro-psychiatric symptoms, and decreased activity of the parathyroid symptoms, and decreased activity of the parathyroid glands leading to a pathologic calcium-metabolism. In our opinion SCBG is of clinical relevance in each stage. Calcium-metabolism, intoxications and sclerosis of cerebral vessels have to be looked for. The combination of hypoparathyroidism and sclerosis of the cerebral vessels turned out to be fatal with one of our patients. In a case of SCBG the neuro-psychiatric symptoms were progressive. Interventions in the calcium-metabolism e.g. in strumectomy should depend on the status of the cerebral vessels. (Author)

  20. Cerebral localization in antiquity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, F Clifford

    2009-07-01

    Fragments of neurology can be found in the oldest medical writings in antiquity. Recognizable cerebral localization is seen in Egyptian medical papyri. Most notably, the Edwin Smith papyrus describes hemiplegia after a head injury. Similar echoes can be seen in Homer, the Bible, and the pre-Hippocratic writer Alcmaeon of Croton. While Biblical writers thought that the heart was the seat of the soul, Hippocratic writers located it in the head. Alexandrian anatomists described the nerves, and Galen developed the ventricular theory of cognition whereby mental functions are classified and localized in one of the cerebral ventricles. Medieval scholars, including the early Church Fathers, modified Galenic ventricular theory so as to make it a dynamic model of cognition. Physicians in antiquity subdivided the brain into separate areas and attributed to them different functions, a phenomenon that connects them with modern neurologists.

  1. Applications of cerebral SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, C., E-mail: claire.mcarthur@nhs.net [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Jampana, R.; Patterson, J.; Hadley, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide three-dimensional functional images of the brain following the injection of one of a series of radiopharmaceuticals that crosses the blood-brain barrier and distributes according to cerebral perfusion, neurotransmitter, or cell density. Applications include differentiating between the dementias, evaluating cerebrovascular disease, preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci, diagnosing movement disorders, and evaluation of intracerebral tumours, while also proving a useful research tool. Unlike positronemission tomography (PET), SPECT imaging is widely available and can be performed in any department that has access to a rotating gamma camera. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the utility of cerebral SPECT and increase awareness of its role in the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  2. Cerebral ketone body metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A A M

    2005-01-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs) are an important source of energy for the brain. During the neonatal period, they are also precursors for the synthesis of lipids (especially cholesterol) and amino acids. The rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends primarily on the concentration in blood; high concentrations occur during fasting and on a high-fat diet. Cerebral KB metabolism is also regulated by the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which depends on the abundance of monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCT1). The BBB's permeability to KBs increases with fasting in humans. In rats, permeability increases during the suckling period, but human neonates have not been studied. Monocarboxylic acid transporters are also present in the plasma membranes of neurons and glia but their role in regulating KB metabolism is uncertain. Finally, the rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends on the activities of the relevant enzymes in brain. The activities vary with age in rats, but reliable results are not available for humans. Cerebral KB metabolism in humans differs from that in the rat in several respects. During fasting, for example, KBs supply more of the brain's energy in humans than in the rat. Conversely, KBs are probably used more extensively in the brain of suckling rats than in human neonates. These differences complicate the interpretation of rodent studies. Most patients with inborn errors of ketogenesis develop normally, suggesting that the only essential role for KBs is as an alternative fuel during illness or prolonged fasting. On the other hand, in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency, imaging generally shows asymptomatic white-matter abnormalities. The ability of KBs to act as an alternative fuel explains the effectiveness of the ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency, but its effectiveness in epilepsy remains unexplained.

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals for cerebral studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    For obtain good brain scintillation images in nuclear medicine must be used several radiopharmaceuticals. Cerebral studies give a tumors visual image as well as brain anomalities detection and are helpful in the diagnostic diseases . Are described in this work: a cerebrum radiopharmaceuticals classification,labelled compounds proceeding and Tc 99m good properties in for your fast caption, post administration and blood purification for renal way

  4. Neuroimaging of cerebral vasculitis; Bildgebung zerebraler Vaskulitiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengenroth, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Institut fuer Neuroradiologie, Luebeck (Germany); Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institut fuer klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Saam, T. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institut fuer klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Haehnel, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abteilung Neuroradiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Cerebral vasculitis can have a variety of origins. Furthermore, there are no vasculitis-specific symptoms or imaging signs and vasculitis of the CNS can mimic many other neurological diseases, which require different treatment approaches. Thus, the clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis is challenging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) should be the radiological imaging methods of choice to assess the degree of parenchymal damage and to detect vessel wall changes. If the results are unclear digital subtraction angiography (DSA) should be pursued in order to also detect changes in medium sized vessels. Vasculitis of small vessels cannot be detected by vascular imaging and requires brain or leptomeningeal biopsy. In this review we present the current diagnostic approach and a variety of imaging findings in cerebral vasculitis and discuss the main radiological differential diagnoses. (orig.) [German] Die zerebrale Vaskulitis kann viele Ursachen haben. Daher ist die klinische und radiologische Diagnose schwierig, auch weil es etliche vaskulitistypische Symptome und MR-Befunde bei anderen Erkrankungen gibt. Die ZNS-Vaskulitis kann zahlreiche andere neurologische Erkrankungen imitieren, die unterschiedlicher Therapie beduerfen. MRT und MR-Angiographie (MRA) sind die Verfahren der Wahl, mit denen die radiologische Diagnostik begonnen werden sollte, um den Parenchymschaden und den Gefaessbefall zu beurteilen. Bei unklaren Befunden kann eine digitale Subtraktionsangiographie (DSA) ergaenzt werden, um auch mittelgrosse Gefaesse beurteilen zu koennen. Der Befall kleiner Gefaesse kann nur bioptisch nachgewiesen werden. In der folgenden Uebersicht stellen wir das diagnostische Herangehen bei zerebraler Vaskulitis vor, praesentieren zahlreiche Befunde und diskutieren die wichtigsten radiologischen Differenzialdiagnosen. (orig.)

  5. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagawa, Katsuo; Sibuya, Isoo; Oiji, Arata; Kawakatsu, Sinobu; Morinobu, Shigeru; Totsuka, Shiro; Kinoshita, Osami; Yazaki, Mitsuyasu.

    1990-01-01

    Seventy-six schizophrenic patients were examined by a Xe-133 inhalation method to determine regional cerebral blood flow. A decreased blood flow was observed in the frontal lobe, especially in the right inferior part. In a study on the relationship between disease subtypes and regional cerebral blood flow, negative symptoms were found more predominantly associated with dissolution type than delusion type. In the group of dissolution type, a decreased blood flow was observed in both the right inferior frontal lobe and the right upper hemisphere, in comparison to the group of delution type. Patients presenting with auditory hallucination had a significantly higher incidence of both negative and positive symptoms, as compared with those not presenting with it. In such patients, a significantly decreased blood flow was also seen in the left upper frontal lobe and the bilateral parietal lobe. Xe-133 inhalation method should assist in evaluating brain function in schizophrenic patients, thus leading to the likelihood of developing a new treatment modality. (N.K.)

  6. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids...... reduces neurogenesis and cerebral volume, impairs memory and increases the incidence of cerebral palsy. Cerebral effects of glucocorticoids in later childhood have been less thoroughly studied, but apparent brain atrophy, reduced size of limbic structures and neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported....... Glucocortioids affect several cellular structures and functions, which may explain the observed adverse effects. Glucocorticoids can impair neuronal glucose uptake, decrease excitability, cause atrophy of dendrites, compromise development of myelin-producing oligodendrocytes and disturb important cellular...

  7. Cerebral Oximetry in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Shepelyuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the data of numerous current references, the review describes different neuromonitoring methods during cardiac surgery under extracorporeal circulation. It shows that it is important and necessary to make neuromonitoring for the early diagnosis and prevention of neurological complications after cardiac surgery. Particular attention is given to cerebral oximetry; the possibilities and advantages of this technique are described. Correction of cerebral oximetric values is shown to improve survival rates and to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications. Lack of cerebral oximetry monitoring denudes a clinician of important information and possibilities to optimize patient status and to prevent potentially menacing complications, which allows one to conclude that it is necessary to use cerebral oximetry procedures within neu-romonitoring in cardiac surgery. Key words: extracorporeal circulation, cerebral oximetry, neurological dysfunction, cerebral oxygenation.

  8. Quantifying the physical, social and attitudinal environment of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickinson, Heather O; Colver, Allan; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy

    2011-01-01

    To develop an instrument to represent the availability of needed environmental features (EFs) in the physical, social and attitudinal environment of home, school and community for children with cerebral palsy....

  9. Cerebral fat embolism. Case report and its computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Toshihisa; Sawada, Yusuke; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Nishide, Kazuyuki; Yoshioka, Toshiharu (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1982-11-01

    A case of cerebral fat embolism is reported. A 18-year-old patient with multiple bone fractures was in semicoma immediately after an injury. Brain CT showed no brain swelling or intracranial hematoma. Hypoxemia and alcoholemia were noted on admission, which returned to normal without improvement of consciousness level. In addition, respiratory symptoms with positive radiographic changes, tachycardia, pyrexia, sudden drop in hemoglobin level, and sudden thrombocytopenia developed. These symptoms were compatible with Gurd's criteria of systemic fat embolism. Eight days after injury, multiple low density areas appeared on CT and disappeared within the subsequent two weeks, and subdural effusion with cerebral atrophy developed. These CT findings were not considered due to cerebral trauma. Diagnosis of cerebral fat embolism was made. The subdural effusion was drained. Neurologic and pulmonary recoveries took place slowly and one month following the injury the patient became alert and exhibited fully coordinated limb movement. The CT scans of the present case well corresponded with hitherto reported pathological findings. Petechiae in the white matter must have developed on the day of injury, which could not be detected by CT examination. It is suggested that some petechial regions fused to purpuras and then gradually resolved when they were detected as multiple low density areas on CT. CT in the purpuras phase would have shown these lesions as high density areas. These lesions must have healed with formation of tiny scars and blood pigment which were demonstrated as the disappearance of multiple low density areas by CT examination. Cerebral atrophy and subsequent subdural effusion developed as a result of demyelination. The patient took the typical clinical course of cerebral fat embolism and serial CT scans served for its assessment.

  10. Postoperative Cerebral Vasospasm Following Transsphenoidal Pituitary Adenoma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseonu, Chikezie I; ReFaey, Karim; Geocadin, Romergryko G; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral vasospasm following a transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary adenoma is a devastating occurrence that can lead to delayed cerebral ischemia and poor neurologic outcome if not diagnosed and treated in a timely manner. The etiology of this condition is not well understood but can lead to significant arterial vasospasm that causes severe ischemic insults. In this paper, we identify common presenting symptoms and essential management strategies to treat this harmful disease. A retrospective case report and literature review of presentation, treatment, and outcome of cerebral vasospasm following transsphenoidal surgery. We present 1 case and review 12 known cases in the literature on vasospasm following transsphenoidal surgery. Mean age was 48 (±13.8) years. There were 46.2% male patients. Factors associated with vasospasm, such as cerebral spinal fluid leaks following surgery, were seen in 38.5% of cases, and postoperative subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was seen in 84.6% of cases. Hemiparesis was the presenting symptom of delayed cerebral ischemia in 61.5% of cases. For management, maintaining at least a euvolemic volume status was used in 76.9%, induced hypertension was used in 61.5%, and nimodipine was administered in 46.2% of cases. Patients returned to their neurologic baseline in 61.5% of cases, had new permanent deficits in 7.7% of cases, and died in 30.8% of cases. Cerebral vasospasm following transsphenoidal surgery is a dangerous disease that can lead to a high likelihood of mortality if not identified and treated. Early postoperative events, such as peritumoral subarachnoid hemorrhage and hemiparesis, may be factors associated with post-transsphenoidal surgery vasospasm. Effective treatment options used in patients that regained complete neurologic recovery were by inducing hypertension, maintaining euvolemia, and administering nimodipine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  12. Cerebral edema associated to scorpion sting: a two-case sting report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O. Romero

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Scorpionism is a public health problem in some places in Mexico. The clinical symptoms of envenomation by scorpion sting are by sympathetic and parasympathetic stimulation, developing systemic and local symptoms. The Central Nervous System (CNS is one of the organs that are affected. In some cases, cerebral edema develops. In this report we present two pediatric cases with the association of envenomation by scorpion sting and cerebral edema. The first case developed severe cerebral edema, which progressed to a fatal outcome; and the other case developed mild cerebral edema with a satisfactory evolution. The pathophysiology of this complication is not well known and probably is the consequence of hypoxia, secondary to respiratory failure, laryngospasm and seizures that are manifestations of envenomation by scorpion sting.

  13. Norovirus Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... many times a day. This can lead to dehydration, especially in young children, older adults, and people with other illnesses. Symptoms of dehydration— decrease in urination dry mouth and throat feeling dizzy when standing up Children who are dehydrated may cry with few or ...

  14. Genomic analysis identifies masqueraders of full-term cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Atsuo; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Niihori, Tetsuya; Numata-Uematsu, Yurika; Inui, Takehiko; Yamamura-Suzuki, Saeko; Miyabayashi, Takuya; Anzai, Mai; Suzuki-Muromoto, Sato; Okubo, Yukimune; Endo, Wakaba; Togashi, Noriko; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Onuma, Akira; Funayama, Ryo; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Nakayama, Keiko; Aoki, Yoko; Kure, Shigeo

    2018-05-01

    Cerebral palsy is a common, heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder that causes movement and postural disabilities. Recent studies have suggested genetic diseases can be misdiagnosed as cerebral palsy. We hypothesized that two simple criteria, that is, full-term births and nonspecific brain MRI findings, are keys to extracting masqueraders among cerebral palsy cases due to the following: (1) preterm infants are susceptible to multiple environmental factors and therefore demonstrate an increased risk of cerebral palsy and (2) brain MRI assessment is essential for excluding environmental causes and other particular disorders. A total of 107 patients-all full-term births-without specific findings on brain MRI were identified among 897 patients diagnosed with cerebral palsy who were followed at our center. DNA samples were available for 17 of the 107 cases for trio whole-exome sequencing and array comparative genomic hybridization. We prioritized variants in genes known to be relevant in neurodevelopmental diseases and evaluated their pathogenicity according to the American College of Medical Genetics guidelines. Pathogenic/likely pathogenic candidate variants were identified in 9 of 17 cases (52.9%) within eight genes: CTNNB1 , CYP2U1 , SPAST , GNAO1 , CACNA1A , AMPD2 , STXBP1 , and SCN2A . Five identified variants had previously been reported. No pathogenic copy number variations were identified. The AMPD2 missense variant and the splice-site variants in CTNNB1 and AMPD2 were validated by in vitro functional experiments. The high rate of detecting causative genetic variants (52.9%) suggests that patients diagnosed with cerebral palsy in full-term births without specific MRI findings may include genetic diseases masquerading as cerebral palsy.

  15. Pain symptoms in patients with severe cerebral palsy: Prevalence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patterns, ambulation, leisure and mood. Therefore, it is ... caregivers and assessment instruments to detect pain [12]. ... useful tool for the classification of pain in adults. [13,14]. ..... and metabolism in children and adolescents with moderate to ...

  16. Regional cerebral blood flow in SPECT pattern in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenart-Jankowska, D.; Junik, R.; Sowinski, J.; Gembicki, M.; Wender, M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of our work was to compare the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in SPECT examination in Parkinson's disease with (17 cases) and without (7 cases) dementia and in various clinical stages of the disease. The patients underwent SPECT examination 5-40 min after intravenous application of HMPAO (Ceretec, Amersham) with 740 Mbq (20 mCi) pertechnate 99m Tc. SPECT was performed with a Siemens Diacam single-head rotating gamma camera coupled to a high resolution collimator and Icon computer system provided by the manufacturer. The results were defined in relative values of ROI in relation to cerebellum. Patients with Parkinson's disease showed hypoperfusion in cerebral lobes and in deep cerebral structures including the basal ganglia. Regional perfusion deficit in SPECT was seen with and without associated dementia and already in early stage of the disease. Parkinson's disease is provoked by the lesions of dopaminergic neurons of the central nervous system leading to domination of extrapyramidal symptoms. There are many indications that also the neurotransmitters associated with cognitive functions as acetylcholine demonstrate some abnormalities. However, only in some cases of Parkinson's disease dementia is the dominating symptom. Our results of regional cerebral blood flow testify that in Parkinson's disease the dysfunction of the central nervous system is more diffuse than has previously been suggested. (author)

  17. Cerebral computerized tomography findings in AIDS patients; Cerebrale CT-funn ved AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hol, P.K.; Dunlop, O. [Ullevaal Sykehus, Oslo (Norway)

    1997-09-01

    A cerebral CT was performed in 82 of 525 AIDS patients, with positive findings in 46 cases. These findings included cerebral atrophy in 28 cases, pathological demyelinisation in two, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in one, toxoplasmoses in 11, lymphomas in seven, infarction in one and one subdural haematoma. The radiological findings are correlated to pathology and clinical symptoms. The authors point out the importance of these findings for correct interpretation of the CT scans. 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Edip Gürol

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid beta-peptides (Ab in the walls of leptomeningeal arteries, arterioles, and veins. Despite the fact that these pathological changes were first described in 1909, major advancement in our understanding of the clinicoradiological manifestations, neurobiology, and course of CAA has occurred only during the last 30 years. No significant associations have been shown between CAA and other systemic/visceral amyloidoses or vascular risk factors, including hypertension. CAA is well known as the most common cause of spontaneous and anticoagulant-related lobar parenchymal ICH in the elderly. It also causes lobar cerebral microbleeds (CMBs, small dot-like dark susceptibility artifacts visible with gradient recalled echo (GRE-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. CMBs are important markers of disease severity and predictors of CAA progression. Amyloid angiopathy is also a common cause of ischemic microvascular white matter disease (WMD and deep cerebral infarctions. Such WMD is defined as subcortical and periventricular white matter changes without obvious infarction, as well as a dark appearance on computerized tomography (CT and a bright appearance on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR-MRI. CAA-related vascular dysfunction, with its hemorrhagic and ischemic complications, is a recognized contributor to vascular cognitive impairment in the elderly, an independent effect that is synergistically increased by Alzheimer pathologies, such as plaques and tangles. A set of clinicoradiological criteria was established for the accurate diagnosis of CAA. According to the Boston Criteria, patients aged 55 years and older with multiple hemorrhages (on CT or GRE-MRI restricted to the lobar, cortical, or corticosubcortical regions (cerebellar hemorrhage allowed are diagnosed as probable CAA when no other etiology is found; a single hemorrhage in the same region is classified as possible

  19. Clinical experience of cerebral protection with balloon occlusion during carotid artery stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, H.J.; Mathias, K.D.; Drescher, R.; Bockisch, G.; Hauth, E.; Demirel, E.; Gissler, H.M.; Witten/Herdecke Univ.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To asses the technical feasibility and the results of cerebral protection with the GuardWire Plus Temporary Occlusion and Aspiration System during carotid artery stenting for high-grade stenosis. Patients and Methods: In 20 patients 20 carotid artery stenoses were treated with stent placement under cerebral protection. A contralateral carotid occlusion was an exclusion criteria for the use of the protection device. In all cases only aspiration, but no flushing was used before deflation of the occlusion balloon. In 17 of 20 patients diffusion-weighted (DW-)MRT imaging of the brain was performed before and 24 hours after the procedure. Results: The stent implantation was successfully performed in all patients. In 3 patients neurologic symptoms occurred during the occlusion time. In these 3 patients the symptoms immediately disappeared after deflation of the balloon. In one case there was dilatation of the internal carotid artery at the site of the balloon inflation. In 3 of the 17 DW-MR images new ipsilateral cerebral lesions, in one case a new contralateral lesion occurred after the procedure. Conclusions: The cerebral protection procedure is technically feasible. The occlusion of the internal carotid artery was not tolerated by all patients. The DW-MR imaging demonstrated cerebral lesions indicating the occurrence of cerebral microemboli during the procedure. Further investigations are necessary to determine if the use of the cerebral protection device will improve the results of the carotid artery stenting for high-grade stenoses. (orig.) [de

  20. Interfaces para control cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Spinelli, Enrique Mario

    2000-01-01

    La función de una interfaz para control cerebral basada en señales de electroencefalograma (EEG), en forma general denominada BCI (Brain control Interface), es establecer un enlace directo entre el cerebro y una máquina, sin utilizar acciones motoras directas. Una BCI permite realizar operaciones simples a partir de la interpretación de las señales de EEG. Su desarrollo está principalmente orientado hacia la ayuda a personas con discapacidades motoras severas, que poseen deterioros en el sist...

  1. Techniques in cerebral protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Bezzi, Mario; Boatta, Emanuele; Passariello, Roberto

    2006-10-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting is a valid alternative option to conventional carotid endarterectomy in the treatment of carotid artery stenosis. During the stenting process, however, distal embolization can occur with neurological consequences. To avoid this, cerebral protection devices have been introduced. Three principal types of protection system have been developed: distal balloon occlusion, distal filters and proximal protection with or without reversal of flow. As protection devices became the focus of interest by manufactures and physicians, several trials are going on worldwide to analyze the characteristics of each of them and to evaluate their efficacy to reduce the rate of distal embolization.

  2. Environmental medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steneberg, A.

    1996-01-01

    'Environmental medicine' deals with the manifold health problems from environmental factors of chemical, physical and psychosocial origin that are possible or have been observed. The book gives insight into the current state of knowledge of environmental medicine institutions, possibilities of diagnosis and therapeutic methods. It offers a systematic overview of pollutant sources and pollutant effects and points out, inter alia, syndromes that are discussed in connection with environmental factors: not only allergies and carcinogenous diseases but also symptom complexes that are hard to diagnose by ordinary methods such as the sick-building syndrome, multiple sensitivity to chemicals, electrosensitivity, amalgam intoxications, disorders due to wood preservatives and fungal diseases. The lingering course of a disease and a set of symptoms varying from one patient to another are the rule, not the exception, because environmental diseases are due above all to the chronic uptake of low pollutant doses (orig./MG) [de

  3. Cerebral aneurysms – an audit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Abstract. We performed an audit to determine the profile of cerebral aneurysms at the Universitas Hospital Bloem- fontein, the only government hospital with a vascular suite in the Free State and Northern Cape area. Two hun- dred and twenty-three government patients, diagnosed with cerebral aneurysms during the period.

  4. Epilepsy course in cerebral gangliogliomas: a study of 16 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casazza, M; Avanzini, G; Broggi, G; Fornari, M; Franzini, A

    1989-01-01

    From November 1979 to March 1988, 16 patients with cerebral gangliogliomas were investigated and underwent surgery at the Institute Neurologico "C. Besta" of Milan. Their age varied from 11 to 48 years. 15 of these patients presented with a seizure as the first and often the only neurological symptom. This report deals with the epileptologic and neuroradiologic features of these patients before and after surgical treatment.

  5. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy.

  6. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, I.

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics

  7. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, I [London, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics.

  8. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Cerebral Gluconeogenesis and Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, James; Geng, Xiaokun; Shen, Jiamei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    The gluconeogenesis pathway, which has been known to normally present in the liver, kidney, intestine, or muscle, has four irreversible steps catalyzed by the enzymes: pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase. Studies have also demonstrated evidence that gluconeogenesis exists in brain astrocytes but no convincing data have yet been found in neurons. Astrocytes exhibit significant 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 activity, a key mechanism for regulating glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Astrocytes are unique in that they use glycolysis to produce lactate, which is then shuttled into neurons and used as gluconeogenic precursors for reduction. This gluconeogenesis pathway found in astrocytes is becoming more recognized as an important alternative glucose source for neurons, specifically in ischemic stroke and brain tumor. Further studies are needed to discover how the gluconeogenesis pathway is controlled in the brain, which may lead to the development of therapeutic targets to control energy levels and cellular survival in ischemic stroke patients, or inhibit gluconeogenesis in brain tumors to promote malignant cell death and tumor regression. While there are extensive studies on the mechanisms of cerebral glycolysis in ischemic stroke and brain tumors, studies on cerebral gluconeogenesis are limited. Here, we review studies done to date regarding gluconeogenesis to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway is beneficial or detrimental to the brain under these pathological conditions. PMID:28101056

  10. Cerebral Gluconeogenesis and Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, James; Geng, Xiaokun; Shen, Jiamei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    The gluconeogenesis pathway, which has been known to normally present in the liver, kidney, intestine, or muscle, has four irreversible steps catalyzed by the enzymes: pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase. Studies have also demonstrated evidence that gluconeogenesis exists in brain astrocytes but no convincing data have yet been found in neurons. Astrocytes exhibit significant 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 activity, a key mechanism for regulating glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Astrocytes are unique in that they use glycolysis to produce lactate, which is then shuttled into neurons and used as gluconeogenic precursors for reduction. This gluconeogenesis pathway found in astrocytes is becoming more recognized as an important alternative glucose source for neurons, specifically in ischemic stroke and brain tumor. Further studies are needed to discover how the gluconeogenesis pathway is controlled in the brain, which may lead to the development of therapeutic targets to control energy levels and cellular survival in ischemic stroke patients, or inhibit gluconeogenesis in brain tumors to promote malignant cell death and tumor regression. While there are extensive studies on the mechanisms of cerebral glycolysis in ischemic stroke and brain tumors, studies on cerebral gluconeogenesis are limited. Here, we review studies done to date regarding gluconeogenesis to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway is beneficial or detrimental to the brain under these pathological conditions.

  11. [Assessment of maternal cerebral blood flow in patients with preeclampsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandić, Vesna; Miković, Zeljko; Dukić, Milan; Vasiljević, Mladenko; Filimonović, Dejan; Bogavac, Mirjana

    2005-01-01

    Systemic vasoconstriction in preeclamptic patients increases vascular resistance, and is manifested by increased arterial blood flow velocity. The aim of the study is to evaluate if there is a change of Doppler indices in maternal medial cerbral artery (MCA) in severe preeclampsia due to: 1) severity of clinical symptoms, 2) the begining of eclamptic attack and 3) the application of anticonvulsive therapy. A prospective clinical study included 92 pregnant women, gestational age 28-36 weeks. They were divided into three groups: normotensive (n=30), mild preeclampsia (n=33), and severe preeclampsia (n=29). We investigated maternal cerebral circulation by assessing the MCA. We registrated: pulsatility index (Pi), resistance index (Ri), systolic/diastolic ratio (S/D), and the maximum systolic, end diastolic and medium velocity. Patients with severe preeclampsia were divided into two subgroups. subgroup 1 included patients without symptoms of threatening eclampsia (n=18; 62.06%); while subgroup 2 included those with symptoms of preeclampsia (n=11; 37.94%). All patients with severe preeclampsia were treated with magnesium sulfate (MgSO4), and cerebral blood flow was measured before and after the treatment. Statistical analysis was done by oneway ANOVA, Student t-test and t-paired sample test. The difference was considered to be significant if ppreclampsia we found increased velocity values, Pi and Ri, especially in patients with signs of threatened eclampsia, suggesting that blood vessels changes are most prominent in severe preeclampsia. Cerebral blood flow meassurements can be used as a clinical test for the prediction of eclampsia. Magnesium-sulfate (MgSO4) has a signifficant role in prophylaxis and treatment of eclampsia, and, therefore, positive influence on reduction of cerebral ishemic lesions can be expected. We can conclude that changes of the cerebral blood flow can be evaluated by evaluating blood flow velocities in the medial cerebral artery. Velocities tend

  12. Clinical studies of cerebral arteriosclerosis in diabetic subjects. Analysis with brain MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Makoto; Tanahashi, Hideo; Nomura, Makoto; Yamada, Yoshio; Abe, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    In order to investigate the clinical characteristics of cerebral arteriosclerosis in diabetic subjects, brain MRI studies were conducted in diabetic patients and healthy subjects. The subjects were 93 diabetic patients without symptoms and signs of cerebral infarction (49 males and 44 females) with a mean age of 59 years and 73 healthy subjects (43 males and 30 females) with a mean age of 57 years. The MRI studies were performed on a General Electric 1.5-T signa system. The spin-echo technique (T2-weighted image) was used with a pulse repetition time (TR) of 2,500 msec and echo time (TE) of 80 msec. The quantitative evaluation of cerebral infarction was assessed using personal computer and image-scanner. By MRI, the incidence of cerebral infarction in diabetic patients was significantly higher than that in healthy subjects (30.1% vs. 13.7%, respectively, p<0.05). The mean age of the diabetic patients with cerebral infarctions was higher than that of those without cerebral infarctions. Hypertension and diabetic nephropathy were present more frequently in the subjects with cerebral infarctions. These data suggest that it is important to delay the onset and slow the progression of cerebral infarction in diabetic patients by strict blood glucose control and management of blood pressure. (author)

  13. Environmental Design for End-of-Life Care: An Integrative Review on Improving the Quality of Life and Managing Symptoms for Patients in Institutional Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagha Zadeh, Rana; Eshelman, Paul; Setla, Judith; Kennedy, Laura; Hon, Emily; Basara, Aleksa

    2018-03-01

    The environment in which end-of-life (EOL) care is delivered can support or detract from the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs of patients, their families, and their caretakers. This review aims to organize and analyze the existing evidence related to environmental design factors that improve the quality of life and total well-being of people involved in EOL care and to clarify directions for future research. This integrated literature review synthesized and summarized research evidence from the fields of medicine, environmental psychology, nursing, palliative care, architecture, interior design, and evidence-based design. This synthesis analyzed 225 documents, including nine systematic literature reviews, 40 integrative reviews, three randomized controlled trials, 118 empirical research studies, and 55 anecdotal evidence. Of the documents, 192 were peer-reviewed, whereas 33 were not. The key environmental factors shown to affect EOL care were those that improved 1) social interaction, 2) positive distractions, 3) privacy, 4) personalization and creation of a home-like environment, and 5) the ambient environment. Possible design interventions relating to these topics are discussed. Examples include improvement of visibility and line of sight, view of nature, hidden medical equipment, and optimization of light and temperature. Studies indicate several critical components of the physical environment that can reduce total suffering and improve quality of life for EOL patients, their families, and their caregivers. These factors should be considered when making design decisions for care facilities to improve physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs at EOL. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Improvement of cerebral hypometabolism after resection of radiation-induced necrotic lesion in a patient with cerebral arteriovenous malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Yae; Hirata, Kenji; Nakayama, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Yoshida, Michiharu; Onodera, Shunsuke; Manabe, Osamu; Shiga, Tohru; Terae, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki; Tamaki, Nagara

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman underwent radiosurgery for a left cerebral hemisphere arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and developed radiation-induced necrosis causing a massive edema in the surrounding brain tissues. Despite various therapies, the edema expanded to the ipsilateral hemisphere and induced neurological symptoms. The radiation-induced necrotic lesion was surgically removed 4 years after radiosurgery. While the preoperative FDG PET revealed severe hypometabolism in the left cerebrum, the necrotomy significantly ameliorated the brain edema, glucose metabolism (postoperative FDG PET), and symptoms. This case indicates that radiation necrosis-induced neurological deficits may be associated with brain edema and hypometabolism, which could be reversed by appropriate necrotomy

  15. Wind turbines and idiopathic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Whether or not wind turbines pose a risk to human health is a matter of heated debate. Personal reactions to other environmental exposures occurring in the same settings as wind turbines may be responsible of the reported symptoms. However, these have not been accounted for in previous studies. We...... investigated whether there is an association between residential proximity to wind turbines and idiopathic symptoms, after controlling for personal reactions to other environmental co-exposures. We assessed wind turbine exposures in 454 residences as the distance to the closest wind turbine (Dw) and number...... of wind turbines

  16. New screening system for unruptured cerebral aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Hirotsugu; Ushikubo, Yukio; Mizokami, Toru

    1990-01-01

    We have designed a screening system to diagnose unruptured aneurysms, including the use of digital subtraction angiography (DSA). We surveyed 115 patients who had undergone clipping procedures after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and questioned them with regard to the subjective symptoms. Sixty-eight of 92 patients who returned the questionnaire reported, prior to rupture, headache,eye pain, and neck pain most frequently, and also impairment of extraocular movements, ptosis, visual field defects, and motor and sensory disturbances. Nineteen (47.5%) of 40 patients who had complete pain relief after surgery complained of headache from 1 week to 1 month before SAH. In addition, nine patients (22.5%) complained of headache for several years, and were also pain-free after surgery. For the indication of DSA, we employed an expert system based on fuzzy set theory. Seven groups of parameters are: Group 1, a basic questionnaire concerning age, sex, and past and family histories; Group 2, 15 warning signs selected on the basis of retrospective study; and Groups 3-7, detailed questions concerning each sign. Scoring weights assigned to each condition based on the results of the retrospective study, and threshold values were determined by several neurosurgeons. The certainty factors for intermediate hypotheses were calculated from these weights and threshold values and summed up, from which the conclusion was obtained. Twelve new cases of unruptured cerebral aneurysm were diagnosed using this screening system. This system may improve the ability to diagnose cerebral aneurysms before rupture. (author)

  17. Sleep disorders in children with cerebral palsy: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lélis, Ana Luíza P A; Cardoso, Maria Vera L M; Hall, Wendy A

    2016-12-01

    Sleep disorders are more prevalent in children with cerebral palsy. The review aimed to identify and synthesize information about the nature of sleep disorders and their related factors in children with cerebral palsy. We performed an electronic search by using the search terms sleep/child*, and sleep/cerebral palsy in the following databases: Latin American literature on health sciences, SCOPUS, medical publications, cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature, psycinfo, worldcat, web of science, and the Cochrane library. The selection criteria were studies: available in Portuguese, English or Spanish and published between 2004 and 2014, with results addressing sleep disorders in children (ages 0-18 y) with a diagnosis of cerebral palsy. 36,361 abstracts were identified. Of those, 37 papers were selected, and 25 excluded. Twelve papers were incorporated in the study sample: eight quantitative studies, three reviews, and one case study. Eleven types of sleep disorders were identified, such as difficult morning awakening, insomnia, nightmares, difficulties in initiating and maintaining nighttime sleep (night waking), and sleep anxiety. Twenty-one factors were linked to sleep disorders, which we classified as intrinsic factors associated with common comorbidities accompanying cerebral palsy, and extrinsic aspects, specifically environmental and socio-familial variables, and clinical-surgical and pharmacological interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cerebral white matter hypoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, R.B.; Shields, W.D.; Sankar, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the MR imaging findings in children with cerebral white matter hypoplasia (CWMH). The MR studies of four children, aged 3-7 y (mean age, 2.3 y) with a diagnosis of CWMH were reviewed. In all cases multiplanar T1-weighted and T2-weighted spin-echo images were obtained. All children had similar histories of severe developmental delay and nonprogressive neurologic deficits despite normal gestational and birth histories. In two cases there was a history of maternal cocaine abuse. Autopsy correlation was available in one child. The MR images of all four children demonstrated diffuse lack of white matter and enlarged ventricles but normal-appearing gray matter. The corpus callosum, although completely formed, was severely thinned. There was no evidence of gliosis or porencephaly, and the distribution of myelin deposition was normal for age in all cases. Autopsy finding in one child correlated exactly with the MR finding

  19. Multiple cerebral hydatid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banzo, J.; Pina, J.I.; Abos, M.D.; Rios, G.; Garcia, D.; Marin, F.; Diaz, F.J.

    1984-12-01

    A 39-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with headaches, vomiting, psychic impairment and diplopia. Three hydatid cysts of the lung had been previously removed. An avascular mass in the left hemisphere with left-to-right displacement of the anterior cerebral arteries was noted during a brain angioscintigraphy. A cerebralthrombosis (CT) brain scan showed two cystic lesions situated in the left-frontal and occipital regions. A CT abdominal scan showed multiple cysts in the liver, spleen and both kidneys. At operation, two brain cysts were totally extirpated without rupture. The definite pathological diagnosis was secondry hydatid cysts. The headaches, vomiting and diplopia were persistent in the post-operative period. Seven days after the operation, a CT brain scan showed an infratenrorial cyst. The patient rejected any surgical intervention.

  20. Efficacy of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on Depressed Mothers with Cerebral Palsy Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sedaghati Barogh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Findings Demonstrated that Parent of Children With Cerebral Palsy Experience Elevated Level of Distress, Depression, Anxiety, Posttraumatic Stress Symptom and Subjective Symptom of Stress. Depression is a common condition that typically has a relapsing course. Effective interventions targeting relapse have the potential to dramatically reduce the point prevalence of the condition. Many of studies have shown that Mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT is an intervention that has shown efficacy in reducing Depression syndrome and depressive relapse. In This Study, Effectiveness of Mindfulness–Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT on Reduction of Depression in Mothers of Children with Cerebral Palsy was examined. Methods: Three Mothers Whose Children Had Cerebral Palsy Were Diagnosed to Have Depression Symptoms, Using Beck Depression Inventory II, Structured Clinical in This Experimental Signal–Case Study. After The Baseline was Determined, Subject Attended on Eight–Session Program of Mindfulness–Based Cognitive Therapy. Results: The Comparison of Baseline and Post–Test was Showed That Depression Symptom has decreased through MBC. Improvement Quotient for Depression of each Subject was good. Discussion: Data Showed that MBCT Reduced Depression Symptoms in Mothers of Children With Cerebral Palsy.

  1. Asthma and asthma related symptoms in 23,326 Chinese children in relation to indoor and outdoor environmental factors: The Seven Northeastern Cities (SNEC) Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fan, E-mail: liufan-sky@163.com [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110001 (China); Zhao, Yang, E-mail: zhaoyang_cmu@126.com [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110001 (China); Liu, Yu-Qin, E-mail: xinxin_lyq@163.com [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110001 (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: liuyang071506@126.com [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110001 (China); Sun, Jing, E-mail: sunjingjl_2007@126.com [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110001 (China); Huang, Mei-Meng, E-mail: gghuangmeimeng@163.com [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110001 (China); Liu, Yi, E-mail: liuyi256@126.com [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110001 (China); Dong, Guang-Hui, E-mail: donggh5@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510080 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Background: Both the levels and patterns of outdoor and indoor air pollutants have changed dramatically during the last decade in China. However, few studies have evaluated the effects of the present air pollution on the health of Chinese children. This study examines the association between outdoor and indoor air pollution and respiratory diseases among children living in Liaoning, a heavy industrial province of China. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 23,326 Chinese children aged 6 to 13 years was conducted in 25 districts of 7 cities in Northeast China during 2009. Three-year (2006–2008) average concentrations of particles with an aerodynamic diameter of ≤ 10 μm (PM{sub 10}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen dioxides (NO{sub 2}), and ozone (O{sub 3}) were calculated from monitoring stations in each of the 25 districts. We used two-level logistic regression models to examine the effects of yearly variations in exposure to each pollutant, controlling for important covariates. Results: The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was higher for those dwelling close to a busy road, those living near smokestacks or factories, those living with smokers, those living in one-story houses typically with small yards, and those with home renovation, bedroom carpet or pets. Ventilation device use was associated with decreased odds of asthma in children. The adjusted odds ratio for diagnosed-asthma was 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24–1.45) per 31 μg/m{sup 3} increase in PM{sub 10}, 1.23 (95%CI, 1.14–1.32) per 21 μg/m{sup 3} increase in SO{sub 2}, 1.25 (95%CI, 1.16–1.36) per 10 μg/m{sup 3} increase in NO{sub 2}, and 1.31 (95%CI, 1.21–1.41) per 23 μg/m{sup 3} increase in O{sub 3}, respectively. Conclusion: Outdoor and indoor air pollution was associated with an increased likelihood of respiratory morbidity among Chinese children. - Highlights: • We studied air pollution and respiratory health in 23,326 Chinese children. • Home renovation, carpet

  2. Asthma and asthma related symptoms in 23,326 Chinese children in relation to indoor and outdoor environmental factors: The Seven Northeastern Cities (SNEC) Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Fan; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Yu-Qin; Liu, Yang; Sun, Jing; Huang, Mei-Meng; Liu, Yi; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Background: Both the levels and patterns of outdoor and indoor air pollutants have changed dramatically during the last decade in China. However, few studies have evaluated the effects of the present air pollution on the health of Chinese children. This study examines the association between outdoor and indoor air pollution and respiratory diseases among children living in Liaoning, a heavy industrial province of China. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 23,326 Chinese children aged 6 to 13 years was conducted in 25 districts of 7 cities in Northeast China during 2009. Three-year (2006–2008) average concentrations of particles with an aerodynamic diameter of ≤ 10 μm (PM 10 ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen dioxides (NO 2 ), and ozone (O 3 ) were calculated from monitoring stations in each of the 25 districts. We used two-level logistic regression models to examine the effects of yearly variations in exposure to each pollutant, controlling for important covariates. Results: The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was higher for those dwelling close to a busy road, those living near smokestacks or factories, those living with smokers, those living in one-story houses typically with small yards, and those with home renovation, bedroom carpet or pets. Ventilation device use was associated with decreased odds of asthma in children. The adjusted odds ratio for diagnosed-asthma was 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24–1.45) per 31 μg/m 3 increase in PM 10 , 1.23 (95%CI, 1.14–1.32) per 21 μg/m 3 increase in SO 2 , 1.25 (95%CI, 1.16–1.36) per 10 μg/m 3 increase in NO 2 , and 1.31 (95%CI, 1.21–1.41) per 23 μg/m 3 increase in O 3 , respectively. Conclusion: Outdoor and indoor air pollution was associated with an increased likelihood of respiratory morbidity among Chinese children. - Highlights: • We studied air pollution and respiratory health in 23,326 Chinese children. • Home renovation, carpet, and pet were associated with increased ORs of asthma

  3. Cerebral Laterality and Verbal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Jay L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Research suggests that we process information by way of two distinct and functionally separate coding systems. Their location, somewhat dependent on cerebral laterality, varies in right- and left-handed persons. Tests this dual coding model. (Editor/RK)

  4. Hydrocephalus in cerebral venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M.; van den Berg, René; Troost, Dirk; Majoie, Charles B.; Stam, Jan; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure is common in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), but hydrocephalus is rarely reported in these patients. We examined the frequency, pathophysiology and associated clinical manifestations of hydrocephalus in patients with CVT admitted to our hospital between 2000 and

  5. Cerebral infarcts resulting from trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, G.

    1985-01-01

    Vascular occlusions due to cerebral trauma have always been regarded as great rarities. However, we have found hypo-dense foci of vascular distribution in 3.5% of 3500 CT examinations for trauma during the late phase. Lesions in the vascular territory of the posterior cerebral artery are usually the result of supratentorial pressure rise from epidural and subdural haematomas, leading to compression of the vessels against the edge of the tentorium. Typical infacts in the territory of the medial and anterior cerebral arteries were found only rarely by CT after cerebral trauma. Infarcts at the watersheds between the three vascular territories were found with surprising frequency and small infarcts were found in the basal ganglia. It is assumed that these were due to ischaemic or hypoxic events due to cardiac or pulmonary complications during the initial phase. (orig.) [de

  6. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation and Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: SMALL • LARGE Cerebral Cavernous Angioma and Hemorrhage By Jack Hoch; Reviewed by Dr. Issam Awad ... for years, the mechanism by which these lesions hemorrhage remains poorly understood. Hemorrhage Types Since cavernous angiomas ...

  7. MRI of cerebral alveolar echinococcosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunaci, M.; Tunaci, A.; Engin, G.; Oezkorkmaz, B.; Ahishali, B.; Rozanes, I.

    1999-01-01

    Cerebral alveolar echinococcosis is rare. We report a case with multiple intracranial masses which show cauliflower-like contrast enhancement pattern on MRI. The lesions originated from hepatic involvement with invasion of the inferior vena cava. (orig.)

  8. Parálisis cerebral :

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrero Izquierdo, María del Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Se aborda el tema de la parálisis cerebral definiendo qué es, clasificando los tipos de parálisis dependiendo de la afectación y las características principales. Se explican algunos de sus tratamientos, se dan sistemas alternativos y/o aumentativos de comunicación para un alumno con PC (parálisis cerebral).

  9. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-01-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.)

  10. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-07-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.).

  11. Benzodiazepine receptor imaging with iomazenil SPECT in aphasic patients with cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshi, Yasuhiko; Kitamura, Shin; Ohyama, Masashi [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)] (and others)

    1999-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between prognosis of aphasia and neuronal damage in the cerebral cortex, we evaluated the distribution of central-type benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) binding in post-stroke aphasics with [{sup 123}I]iomazenil and SPECT. We performed iomazenil SPECT in six aphasic patients (aged from 45 to 75 years; all right-handed) with unilateral left cerebral infarction. Three patients showed signs of Broca's aphasia and the other three Wernicke's aphasia. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging was performed with [{sup 123}I]iodoamphetamine (IMP). The regions of interest (ROIs) on both images were set in the cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex and language relevant area in both hemispheres. Three patients were classified in the mild prognosis group and the other three in the moderate prognosis group. The left language-relevant area was more closely concerned with the difference in aphasic symptoms than the right one in both BZR and CBF distribution, but the ipsilateral to the contralateral ratio (I/C ratio) in the language-relevant areas in the BZR distribution was significantly lower in the moderate prognosis group than in the mild prognosis group, although no difference was seen for these values between the two groups in the CBF distribution. These results suggest that BZR imaging, which makes possible an increase in neuronal cell viability in the cerebral cortex, is useful not only for clarifying the aphasic symptoms but also for evaluating the prognosis of aphasia in patients with cerebral infarction. (author)

  12. Benzodiazepine receptor imaging with iomazenil SPECT in aphasic patients with cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshi, Yasuhiko; Kitamura, Shin; Ohyama, Masashi

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between prognosis of aphasia and neuronal damage in the cerebral cortex, we evaluated the distribution of central-type benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) binding in post-stroke aphasics with [ 123 I]iomazenil and SPECT. We performed iomazenil SPECT in six aphasic patients (aged from 45 to 75 years; all right-handed) with unilateral left cerebral infarction. Three patients showed signs of Broca's aphasia and the other three Wernicke's aphasia. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging was performed with [ 123 I]iodoamphetamine (IMP). The regions of interest (ROIs) on both images were set in the cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex and language relevant area in both hemispheres. Three patients were classified in the mild prognosis group and the other three in the moderate prognosis group. The left language-relevant area was more closely concerned with the difference in aphasic symptoms than the right one in both BZR and CBF distribution, but the ipsilateral to the contralateral ratio (I/C ratio) in the language-relevant areas in the BZR distribution was significantly lower in the moderate prognosis group than in the mild prognosis group, although no difference was seen for these values between the two groups in the CBF distribution. These results suggest that BZR imaging, which makes possible an increase in neuronal cell viability in the cerebral cortex, is useful not only for clarifying the aphasic symptoms but also for evaluating the prognosis of aphasia in patients with cerebral infarction. (author)

  13. Diagnosing cerebral visual impairment in children with good visual acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genderen, Maria; Dekker, Marjoke; Pilon, Florine; Bals, Irmgard

    2012-06-01

    To identify elements that could facilitate the diagnosis of cerebral visual impairment (CVI) in children with good visual acuity in the general ophthalmic clinic. We retrospectively investigated the clinical characteristics of 30 children with good visual acuity and CVI and compared them with those of 23 children who were referred with a suspicion of CVI, but proved to have a different diagnosis. Clinical characteristics included medical history, MRI findings, visual acuity, crowding ratio (CR), visual field assessment, and the results of ophthalmologic and orthoptic examination. We also evaluated the additional value of a short CVI questionnaire. Eighty-three percent of the children with an abnormal medical history (mainly prematurity and perinatal hypoxia) had CVI, in contrast with none of the children with a normal medical history. Cerebral palsy, visual field defects, and partial optic atrophy only occurred in the CVI group. 41% of the children with CVI had a CR ≥2.0, which may be related to dorsal stream dysfunction. All children with CVI, but also 91% of the children without CVI gave ≥3 affirmative answers on the CVI questionnaire. An abnormal pre- or perinatal medical history is the most important risk factor for CVI in children, and therefore in deciding which children should be referred for further multidisciplinary assessment. Additional symptoms of cerebral damage, i.e., cerebral palsy, visual field defects, partial optic atrophy, and a CR ≥2 may support the diagnosis. CVI questionnaires should not be used for screening purposes as they yield too many false positives.

  14. [Behavioural problems and personality change related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahr, Maximilian; Connemann, Bernhard J; Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) belongs to the group of amyloidoses that are characterized by the deposition of insoluble and tissue-damaging amyloid proteins. Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage is the common clinical presentation of CAA resulting from the degenerative effect of beta amyloid on the cerebral vascular system. Though CAA is rather a neurological disease psychiatric symptoms can occur and even dominate the clinical picture. A case report is presented in order to illustrate the association between CAA and psychiatric symptoms. We report the case of a 54-year-old female patient with radiologic references to a probable CAA and mild cognitive impairment who developed behavioural difficulties and personality change that necessitated a psychiatric treatment. Psychiatric symptoms were most likely due to CAA. CAA can be associated with psychiatric symptoms and hence should be considered in the treatment of elderly patients with behavioural problems or personality changes. Diagnostic neuroimaging and examination of cerebrospinal fluid is recommended. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Cerebral hypometabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy studied with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, N.L.; Gilman, S.; Berent, S.; Morin, E.M.; Brown, M.B.; Koeppe, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is characterized by supranuclear palsy of gaze, axial dystonia, bradykinesia, rigidity, and a progressive dementia. Pathological changes in this disorder are generally restricted to subcortical structures, yet the type and range of cognitive deficits suggest the involvement of many cerebral regions. We examined the extent of functional impairment to cerebral cortical and subcortical structures as measured by the level of glucose metabolic activity at rest. Fourteen patients with PSP were compared to 21 normal volunteers of similar age using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose metabolism was reduced in the caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, pons, and cerebral cortex, but not in the cerebellum in the patients with PSP as compared to the normal subjects. Analysis of individual brain regions revealed significant declines in cerebral glucose utilization in most regions throughout the cerebral cortex, particularly those in the superior half of the frontal lobe. Declines in the most affected regions of cerebral cortex were greater than those in any single subcortical structure. Although using conventional neuropathological techniques the cerebral cortex appears to be unaffected in PSP, significant and pervasive functional impairments in both cortical and subcortical structures are present. These observations help to account for the constellation of cognitive symptoms in individual patients with PSP and the difficulty encountered in identifying a characteristic psychometric profile for this group of patients

  16. Multiple Thromboembolic Cerebral Infarctions from the Aorta in a Patient with Churg-Strauss Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hideo

    2017-02-01

    Ischemic stroke is a rare complication of Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) and its pathogenesis has not been well clarified yet. We report a case of cerebral infarction in a patient with CSS due to embolism from a thrombus on the wall of the aorta. A 39-year-old man had multiple cerebral infarctions with symptoms of mild left hemiparesis and reduced vision. He was clinically diagnosed to have CSS based on remarkable eosinophilia, history of asthma, sinusitis, pulmonary infiltrates, and histologically proven extravascular eosinophilic infiltrates in the specimen of gastric mucosa. Cerebral angiography did not show any stenotic lesions in cerebral arteries. A thrombus was detected on the wall of the aorta by transesophageal echocardiography, which was considered as the source of embolism. The thrombus resolved on follow-up examination 3 months after the onset of the stroke. This is the first case report on cerebral infarction caused by aortogenic thromboembolism in a CSS patient. Other than cerebral vasculitis, embolism from cardiovascular system, including the wall of the aorta, is a possible cause of cerebral infarctions in a CSS patient. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Therapeutic efficiency of decimeter range waves and their effect on cerebral circulation in patients during recovery period after surgery performed on intracranial arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilova, D.P.; Strelkova, N.I.; Streltsova, E.N.

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of an electromagnetic field in the decimeter range on focal neurologic symptoms and cerebral circulation in patients recovering from surgery on intracranial arteries. This treatment led to regression of focal neurologic symptoms and improved cerebral circulation in 86.3% of patients who tolerated this procedure rather well. This approach was recommended as a method of choice for rehabilitative treatment during the postsurgical period. 7 references, 1 figure.

  18. Malignant Hemispheric Cerebral Infarction Associated with Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Miyata

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome (ISCLS is a rare condition that is characterized by unexplained episodic capillary hyperpermeability due to a shift of fluid and protein from the intravascular to the interstitial space. This results in diffuse general swelling, fetal hypovolemic shock, hypoalbuminemia, and hemoconcentration. Although ISCLS rarely induces cerebral infarction, we experienced a patient who deteriorated and was comatose as a result of massive cerebral infarction associated with ISCLS. In this case, severe hypotensive shock, general edema, hemiparesis, and aphasia appeared after serious antecedent gastrointestinal symptoms. Progressive life-threatening ischemic cerebral edema required decompressive hemicraniectomy. The patient experienced another episode of severe hypotension and limb edema that resulted in multiple extremity compartment syndrome. Treatment entailed forearm and calf fasciotomies. Cerebral edema in the ischemic brain progresses rapidly in patients suffering from ISCLS. Strict control of fluid volume resuscitation and aggressive diuretic therapy may be needed during the post-leak phase of fluid remobilization.

  19. Cerebral metabolic abnormalities in congestive heart failure detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C W; Lee, J H; Kim, J J; Park, S W; Hong, M K; Kim, S T; Lim, T H; Park, S J

    1999-04-01

    Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we investigated cerebral metabolism and its determinants in congestive heart failure (CHF), and the effects of cardiac transplantation on these measurements. Few data are available about cerebral metabolism in CHF. Fifty patients with CHF (ejection fraction OGM) and parietal white matter (PWM). Absolute levels of the metabolites (N-acetylaspartate, creatine, choline, myo-inositol) were calculated. In PWM only creatine level was significantly lower in CHF than in control subjects, but in OGM all four metabolite levels were decreased in CHF. The creatine level was independently correlated with half-recovery time and duration of heart failure symptoms in PWM (r = -0.56, p OGM (r = 0.58, p < 0.05). Cerebral metabolic abnormalities were improved after successful cardiac transplantation. This study shows that cerebral metabolism is abnormally deranged in advanced CHF and it may serve as a potential marker of the disease severity.

  20. Effect of adrenomedullin on the cerebral circulation: relevance to primary headache disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K A; Birk, S; Kitamura, K

    2009-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (ADM) is closely related to calcitonin gene-related peptide, which has a known causative role in migraine. Animal studies have strongly suggested that ADM has a vasodilatory effect within the cerebral circulation. For these reasons, ADM is also likely to be involved in migraine....... However, the hypothetical migraine-inducing property and effect on human cerebral circulation of ADM have not previously been investigated. Human ADM (0.08 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) or placebo (saline 0.9%) was administered as a 20-min intravenous infusion to 12 patients suffering from migraine without aura...... in a crossover double-blind study. The occurrence of headache and associated symptoms were registered regularly 24 h post infusion. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by (133)Xenon single-photon emission computed tomography, mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (V(MCA)) by transcranial...

  1. Call-Fleming Syndrome (Reversible Cerebral Artery Vasoconstriction and Aneurysm Associated with Multiple Recreational Drug Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doniel Drazin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse represents a significant health issue. Evidence suggests that recreational drug use has a direct effect on the cerebral vasculature and is of greater concern in those with undiagnosed aneurysms or vascular malformations. The authors report a case of thunderclap headache with a negative head CT and equivocal lumbar puncture after a drug-fueled weekend. The patient underwent diagnostic cerebral angiogram which demonstrated multisegmental, distal areas of focal narrowing of the middle, anterior, posterior, and posterior inferior cerebral artery and an incidental aneurysm. It is often difficult to determine the exact origin of symptoms; thus we were left with a bit of a chicken or the egg debate, trying to decipher which part came first. Either the aneurysm ruptured with associated concomitant vasospasm or it is a case of Call-Fleming syndrome (reversible cerebral artery vasoconstriction with an incidental aneurysm. The authors proposed their management and rationale of this complex case.

  2. Cerebral trypanosomiasis and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes Apio Claudio Martins

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36 year-old black female, complaining of headache of one month's duration presented with nausea, vomiting, somnolence, short memory problems, loss of weight, and no fever history. Smoker, intravenous drugs abuser, promiscuous lifestyle. Physical examination: left homonimous hemianopsia, left hemiparesis, no papilledema, diffuse hyperreflexia, slowness of movements. Brain CT scan: tumor-like lesion in the splenium of the corpus calosum, measuring 3.5 x 1.4 cm, with heterogeneous enhancing pattern, sugesting a primary CNS tumor. Due to the possibility of CNS infection, a lumbar puncture disclosed an opening pressure of 380 mmH(20; 11 white cells (lymphocytes; glucose 18 mg/dl (serum glucose 73 mg/dl; proteins 139 mg/dl; presence of Trypanosoma parasites. Serum Elisa-HIV tests turned out to be positive. Treatment with benznidazole dramatically improved clinical and radiographic picture, but the patient died 6 weeks later because of respiratory failure. T. cruzi infection of the CNS is a rare disease, but we have an increasing number of cases in HIV immunecompromised patients. Diagnosis by direct observation of CSF is uncommon, and most of the cases are diagnosed by pathological examination. It is a highly lethal disease, even when properly diagnosed and treated. This article intends to include cerebral trypanosomiasis in the differential diagnosis of intracranial space-occupying lesions, especially in immunecompromised patients from endemic regions.

  3. Pseudotumoral delayed cerebral radionecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciaudo-Lacroix, C.; Lapresle, J.

    1985-01-01

    A 60 year-old woman with a scalp epithelioma underwent radiotherapy, the dose being 57 Gray. A first epileptic seizure occurred twenty months later. Neurological examination revealed signs of left hemisphere involvement. γEG, angiography, CT scans, demonstrated a pseudotumoral avascular process. On account of the localisation, the patient being right-handed, no surgical procedure was performed. In spite of corticotherapy and anticonvulsive treatment, seizures recurred and neurological signs slowly progressed. The patient died, 22 months after the first seizure, of an associated disseminated carcinoma with cachexia. Neuropathological examination showed a massive lesion presenting all the features of delayed radionecrosis in the left hemisphere: situated mainly in the white matter; numerous vascular abnormalities; wide-spread demyelination; disappearance of oligoglial cells. The Authors recall the clinical and anatomical aspects of this condition for which the only successful treatment is surgical removal when location and size of the lesion permit. Finally, the mechanisms which have been proposed to explain this delayed cerebral radionecrosis are discussed [fr

  4. Pseudotumoral delayed cerebral radionecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaudo-Lacroix, C; Lapresle, J [Centre Hospitalier de Bicetre, 94 - Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    1985-01-01

    A 60 year-old woman with a scalp epithelioma underwent radiotherapy, the dose being 57 Gray. A first epileptic seizure occurred twenty months later. Neurological examination revealed signs of left hemisphere involvement. ..gamma..EG, angiography, CT scans, demonstrated a pseudotumoral avascular process. On account of the localisation, the patient being right-handed, no surgical procedure was performed. In spite of corticotherapy and anticonvulsive treatment, seizures recurred and neurological signs slowly progressed. The patient died, 22 months after the first seizure, of an associated disseminated carcinoma with cachexia. Neuropathological examination showed a massive lesion presenting all the features of delayed radionecrosis in the left hemisphere: situated mainly in the white matter; numerous vascular abnormalities; wide-spread demyelination; disappearance of oligoglial cells. The Authors recall the clinical and anatomical aspects of this condition for which the only successful treatment is surgical removal when location and size of the lesion permit. Finally, the mechanisms which have been proposed to explain this delayed cerebral radionecrosis are discussed.

  5. Psychological problems in children with cerebral palsy: a cross-sectional European study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkes, Jackie; White-Koning, Melanie; Dickinson, Heather O

    2008-01-01

    /borderline (TDS abnormal (TDS > 16). STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Multilevel, multivariable logistic regression to relate the presence of psychological symptoms to child and family characteristics. RESULTS: About a quarter of the children had TDS > 16 indicating significant psychological symptoms, most......OBJECTIVES: To describe psychological symptoms in 8-12-year-old children with cerebral palsy; to investigate predictors of these symptoms and their impact on the child and family. DESIGN: A cross-sectional multi-centre survey. PARTICIPANTS: Eight hundred and eighteen children with cerebral palsy...... and others; OR = 1.8 (95% CI: 1.1 to 2.8) comparing children resident in a town and others. Among parents who reported their child to have psychological problems, 95% said they had lasted over a year, 37% said they distressed their child and 42% said they burdened the family at least 'quite a lot...

  6. Gene-environment interplay in depressive symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkus, A. J.; Beam, C. R.; Johnson, W.

    2017-01-01

    that genetic factors play a larger part in the association between depressive symptoms and physical illness for men than for women. For both sexes, across all ages, physical illness may similarly trigger social and health limitations that contribute to depressive symptoms.......Background Numerous factors influence late-life depressive symptoms in adults, many not thoroughly characterized. We addressed whether genetic and environmental influences on depressive symptoms differed by age, sex, and physical illness. Method The analysis sample included 24 436 twins aged 40......-90 years drawn from the Interplay of Genes and Environment across Multiple Studies (IGEMS) Consortium. Biometric analyses tested age, sex, and physical illness moderation of genetic and environmental variance in depressive symptoms. Results Women reported greater depressive symptoms than men. After age 60...

  7. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanoh, Masayuki

    1989-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured at rest using the 133 Xe inhalation technique in 40 DSM-III-diagnosed schizophrenics (22 males, 18 females: mean age 35.0 years, range 20-49 years) and 31 age-and sex-matched normal controls (16 males, 15 females: mean age 34.3 years, range 21-49 years). The absolute value (AV) and the percent value (PV) of the rCBF in schizophrenics were compared with those in controls. Correlations between rCBF and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores or the performance of Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) were examined in schizophrenics. Schizophrenics showed significantly lower AVs in all brain regions examined and a significantly lower PV in the left superior frontal region than controls. The hyperfrontal rCBF distribution which was found in both hemispheres in controls, was absent in the left hemisphere in schizophrenics. In schizophrenics, superior frontal blood flows were significantly negatively correlated with the negative symptom scores of the BPRS but not with the total scores and the positive symptom scores of the BPRS. In schizophrenics, inferior frontal blood flows were significantly correlated with the number of sorting categories achieved. These results indicate that rCBF in schizophrenia is reduced in the whole brain and especially in the left superior frontal region. These findings suggest a frontal lobe dysfunction in schizophrenia. (author)

  8. Cerebral infarct eight months after primary Varicella-zoster virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Maja Carsting; Nielsen, Jens Erik Klint; Nordling, Mette Maria

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a recognised complication of Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections. We report on an otherwise healthy four-year-old boy who presented with acute neurological symptoms due to cerebral infarction eight months after primary VZV infection. Magnetic resonance imaging showed...

  9. Regulation of cerebral blood flow in patients with autonomic dysfunction and severe postural hypotension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, Birger; Mehlsen, Jesper; Boesen, Finn

    2002-01-01

    Whether cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation is maintained in autonomic dysfunction has been debated for a long time, and the rather sparse data available are equivocal. The relationship between CBF and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was therefore tested in eight patients with symptoms...

  10. Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-related neuropathologic changes and compromised cognitive status : Window of treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farkas, E; de Wilde, MC; Kiliaan, AJ; Luiten, PGM

    Neurodegenerative disorders, and dementia in particular, have been shown to have a cerebrovascular pathogenic component often in the form of reduced cerebral blood flow. The debate whether such a reduced brain perfusion is a primary trigger or a secondary symptom in the neuropathological progression

  11. Delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage : the role of coagulation and fibrinolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergouwen, M.D.I.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are at risk to develop complications, especially within the first two weeks after the hemorrhage. Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a complication which occurs in about 30% of SAH patients, leading to symptoms such as aphasia, hemiparesis, or

  12. Cerebral blood flow in acute and chronic ischemic stroke using xenon-133 inhalation tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Paulson, O B; Lassen, N A

    1986-01-01

    Serial measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were performed in 12 patients with acute symptoms of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. CBF was measured by xenon-133 inhalation and single photon emission computer tomography. Six patients had severe strokes and large infarcts on the CT scan...

  13. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure

  14. Influence of cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis on cerebral oxygenation during exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagayama, Osamu; Koike, Akira; Hoshimoto, Masayo; Yamaguchi, Kaori; Tajima, Akihiko; Goda, Ayumi; Uejima, Tokuhisa; Aizawa, Tadanori; Itoh, Haruki

    2007-01-01

    Although it is assumed that cerebral oxygenation during exercise is influenced by both cardiopulmonary function and cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis, the latter factor has not been fully clarified. In the present study the relationship between the degree of cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis and cerebral oxygenation during exercise was investigated. A total of 109 patients (69 patients with coronary artery disease, 40 patients with hypertensive heart disease) (61.7±9.7 years) performed a symptom-limited exercise test with respiratory gas measurements (CPX). From the respiratory gas analysis, peak O 2 uptake (VO 2 ), the slope of the increase in VO 2 to the increase in work rate (ΔVO 2 /ΔWR), and the slope of the increase in ventilation to the increase in CO 2 output (VE/VCO 2 slope) were calculated. Oxyhemoglobin (O 2 Hb) at the forehead was monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy. The brain ischemic score was counted based upon fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images of magnetic resonance imaging and expressed from 0 to 4. When compared with patients with a lower ischemic score ( 2 Hb during exercise (-1.08±2.7 vs 0.77±4.1 μmol/L, p=0.011). Of brain ischemic score, left ventricular ejection fraction, peak VO 2 , ΔVO 2 /ΔWR, and the VE/VCO 2 slope, ΔVO 2 /ΔWR was found to be the sole independent index determining cerebral O 2 Hb during exercise. The CPX parameters were also significantly related to the degree of cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis. Although cerebral oxygenation during exercise is mainly related to cardiopulmonary function, the degree of cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis partly influences cerebral oxygenation in patients with risk factors for atherosclerosis. (author)

  15. 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Button Past Emails 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disability in ...

  16. Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation after Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Claus Behrend; Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral hemodynamic disturbances in the peri- or postoperative period may contribute to postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We therefore examined dynamic cerebral autoregulation (d...

  17. Cerebral oximetry in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Gorm; Andresen, Bjørn; Plomgaard, Anne Mette

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth constitutes a major cause of death before 5 years of age and it is a major cause of neurodevelopmental impairment across the world. Preterm infants are most unstable during the transition between fetal and newborn life during the first days of life and most brain damage occurs...... in this period. The brain of the preterm infant is accessible for tissue oximetry by near-infrared spectroscopy. Cerebral oximetry has the potential to improve the long-term outcome by helping to tailor the support of respiration and circulation to the individual infant's needs, but the evidence is still lacking....... The goals for research include testing the benefit and harms of cerebral oximetry in large-scale randomized trials, improved definition of the hypoxic threshold, better understanding the effects of intensive care on cerebral oxygenation, as well as improved precision of oximeters and calibration among...

  18. NEYROPSYCHOLOGICAL CONSECUENCES OF CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARÍA NAVARRO MELENDRO

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Palsy is defined as a movement alteration result of a non progressive damage witch is permanent in anencephalon that has not acquired its final maturation. Patients that suffer cerebral palsy present learning disabilities,that varies between being completely normal to severe as a consequence of memory, gnosis, praxis, perceptive andlanguage impairments. Nevertheless the consequences of this disease are not always predictable. This paper pretendsto make a description of the cognitive and behavioral deficits that overcomes along with the manifestation of thecerebral palsy and its possible treatment. We used a complete neuropsychological battery to evaluate a 7 years oldpatient who was diagnosed of cerebral palsy and spastic diplegia finding some cognitive impairment in fields such asmnesic, gnosic and attention processes.

  19. Natriuretic peptides and cerebral hemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Barringer, Filippa; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides have emerged as important diagnostic and prognostic tools for cardiovascular disease. Plasma measurement of the bioactive peptides as well as precursor-derived fragments is a sensitive tool in assessing heart failure. In heart failure, the peptides are used as treatment...... in decompensated disease. In contrast, their biological effects on the cerebral hemodynamics are poorly understood. In this mini-review, we summarize the hemodynamic effects of the natriuretic peptides with a focus on the cerebral hemodynamics. In addition, we will discuss its potential implications in diseases...... where alteration of the cerebral hemodynamics plays a role such as migraine and acute brain injury including stroke. We conclude that a possible role of the peptides is feasible as evaluated from animal and in vitro studies, but more research is needed in humans to determine the precise response...

  20. Cerebral edema associated with acute hepatic failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, Masachika; Watanabe, Akiharu; Yamauchi, Yasuhiko; Hashimoto, Makoto; Nakatsukasa, Harushige; Kobayashi, Michio; Higashi, Toshihiro; Nagashima, Hideo

    1985-01-01

    The clinicopathological findings of cerebral edema were investigated in patients with acute hepatic failure autopsied at Okayama University Hospital between 1970 and 1980 retrospectively. Nine (64%) of 14 hepatic failure cases were found to have cerebral edema during a post-mortem examination of the brain. Clinical features of the patients with cerebral edema were not significantly different from those of the patients without cerebral edema. However, general convulsions were observed more fre...

  1. Ictus cerebral e ingreso en el hogar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Raisa Vera Miyar

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo prospectivo en pacientes que egresaron con el diagnóstico de ictus cerebral de la unidad de cuidados intermedios de adultos del hospital Clinicoquirúrgico Docente "Mártires del 9 de abril" de Sagua la Grande, en el período comprendido de enero de 1999 a enero de 2000. Fueron ingresados en el hogar después de encontrarse estabilizados, se analizaron datos generales y epidemiológicos, y se concluyó que en la muestra existió un predominio de ictus isquémico. La hipertensión arterial, el hábito de fumar y los ictus previos, fueron los factores de riesgo más frecuentes, y las parálisis y los trastornos del lenguaje y esfinterianos los síntomas invalidantes predominantes al ser egresados del hospital. No hubo diferencias significativas entre los isquémicos y los hemorrágicos, con una evolución satisfactoria en su mayoría al ser ingresados en el hogar y con un ahorro de $ 10 932.A descriptive and prospective study was conducted among patients with the diagnosis of cerebral ictus that were discharged from the unit of intermediate care of "Mártires del 9 de Abril" Clinical and Surgical Teaching Hospital from January, 1999, to January, 2000. They were admitted at home after being stabilized. General and epidemiological data were analyzed and it was concluded that there was a predominance of ischemic ictus in the sample. Arterial hypertension, smoking and previous ictus were the most common risk factors whereas paralysis and speech and sphincter disorders were the prevailing disabling symptoms on discharge. There were no significant differences between the ischemic and the hemorrhagic ictus. A satisfactory evolution was observed in most of the patients on being admitted at home, which represented a saving of $10 932.

  2. Features to validate cerebral toxoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina da Cunha Correia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neurotoxoplasmosis (NT sometimes manifests unusual characteristics. Methods We analyzed 85 patients with NT and AIDS according to clinical, cerebrospinal fluid, cranial magnetic resonance, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR characteristics. Results In 8.5%, focal neurological deficits were absent and 16.4% had single cerebral lesions. Increased sensitivity of PCR for Toxoplasma gondii DNA in the central nervous system was associated with pleocytosis and presence of >4 encephalic lesions. Conclusions Patients with NT may present without focal neurological deficit and NT may occur with presence of a single cerebral lesion. Greater numbers of lesions and greater cellularity in cerebrospinal fluid improve the sensitivity of PCR to T gondii.

  3. Recent Experiences with Severe and Cerebral Malaria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-06-29

    Jun 29, 1974 ... Malaria admissions. Cerebral malaria ... Cerebral signs. Haemoglobin below 10 g/100 ml (not all tested). Enlarged tender liver or jaundice, or both ... articl~ by H. Smitskamp and F. H. Wolthuis entitled 'New concepts in treatment of malaria with malignant tertian cerebral involvement' which appeared in the ...

  4. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-01-01

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis

  5. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  6. Cerebral toksoplasmose primaert diagnosticeret som tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortsen, M E; Skøt, J; Skriver, E B

    1992-01-01

    Three cases of cerebral toxoplasmosis as the presenting manifestation of AIDS are reported. The initial diagnoses were brain tumors because of the cerebral mass lesions which resembled glioblastoma. In the light of the increasing occurrence of AIDS, attention is drawn to cerebral toxoplasmosis...

  7. Fenestration of the anterior cerebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, J.; Washiyama, K.; Hong Kim, C.; Ibuchi, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Three cases of angiographically demonstrated fenestration of the anterior cerebral artery are reported. Fenestration occurred at the medial half of the horizontal segment of the anterior cerebral artery in all cases. Its embryology and clinical significance are briefly discussed, and the anatomical and radiological literature on fenestration of the anterior cerebral artery is reviewed. (orig.)

  8. Psychological problems in children with cerebral palsy: a cross-sectional European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Jackie; White-Koning, Melanie; Dickinson, Heather O; Thyen, Ute; Arnaud, Catherine; Beckung, Eva; Fauconnier, Jerome; Marcelli, Marco; McManus, Vicki; Michelsen, Susan I; Parkinson, Kathryn; Colver, Allan

    2008-04-01

    To describe psychological symptoms in 8-12-year-old children with cerebral palsy; to investigate predictors of these symptoms and their impact on the child and family. A cross-sectional multi-centre survey. Eight hundred and eighteen children with cerebral palsy, aged 8-12 years, identified from population-based registers of cerebral palsy in eight European regions and from multiple sources in one further region. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ)(P4-16) and the Total Difficulties Score (TDS) dichotomised into normal/borderline (TDS abnormal (TDS > 16). Multilevel, multivariable logistic regression to relate the presence of psychological symptoms to child and family characteristics. About a quarter of the children had TDS > 16 indicating significant psychological symptoms, most commonly in the domain Peer Problems. Better gross motor function, poorer intellect, more pain, having a disabled or ill sibling and living in a town were independently associated with TDS > 16. The risk of TDS > 16 was odds ratio (OR) = .2 (95% CI: .1 to .3) comparing children with the most and least severe functional limitations; OR = 3.2 (95%CI: 2.1 to 4.8) comparing children with IQ psychological problems, 95% said they had lasted over a year, 37% said they distressed their child and 42% said they burdened the family at least 'quite a lot'. A significant proportion of children with cerebral palsy have psychological symptoms or social impairment sufficiently severe to warrant referral to specialist services. Care must be taken in the assessment and management of children with cerebral palsy to ensure psychological problems are not overlooked and potentially preventable risk factors like pain are treated effectively. The validity of the SDQ for children with severe disability warrants further assessment.

  9. What is cerebral small vessel disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    An accumulating amount of evidence suggests that the white matter hyperintensities on T 2 weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging predict an increased risk of dementia and gait disturbance. This state has been proposed as cerebral small vessel disease, including leukoaraiosis, Binswanger's disease, lacunar stroke and cerebral microbleeds. However, the concept of cerebral small vessel disease is still obscure. To understand the cerebral small vessel disease, the precise structure and function of cerebral small vessels must be clarified. Cerebral small vessels include several different arteries which have different anatomical structures and functions. Important functions of the cerebral small vessels are blood-brain barrier and perivasucular drainage of interstitial fluid from the brain parenchyma. Cerebral capillaries and glial endfeet, take an important role for these functions. However, the previous pathological investigations on cerebral small vessels have focused on larger arteries than capillaries. Therefore little is known about the pathology of capillaries in small vessel disease. The recent discoveries of genes which cause the cerebral small vessel disease indicate that the cerebral small vessel diseases are caused by a distinct molecular mechanism. One of the pathological findings in hereditary cerebral small vessel disease is the loss of smooth muscle cells, which is an also well-recognized finding in sporadic cerebral small vessel disease. Since pericytes have similar character with the smooth muscle cells, the pericytes should be investigated in these disorders. In addition, the loss of smooth muscle cells may result in dysfunction of drainage of interstitial fluid from capillaries. The precise correlation between the loss of smooth muscle cells and white matter disease is still unknown. However, the function that is specific to cerebral small vessel may be associated with the pathogenesis of cerebral small vessel disease. (author)

  10. Multiple cerebral infarctions following a snakebite by Bothrops caribbaeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numeric, Patrick; Moravie, Victor; Didier, Martin; Chatot-Henry, Didier; Cirille, Sylvia; Bucher, Bernard; Thomas, Laurent

    2002-09-01

    Bothrops caribbaeus, a species of the Bothrops complex, is found only in the island of Saint Lucia, West Indies. Snakebite from this pitviper is very rare. We report the case of a healthy 32-year-old Saint Lucian man who developed multiple cerebral infarctions following envenoming by this snake. This patient developed signs and symptoms very similar to those observed in patients envenomed by Bothrops lanceolatus, a snake found only in Martinique, the neighbor island of Saint Lucia. This clinical presentation differs dramatically from coagulopathies and systemic bleeding observed with the Central and South American bothropic envenomings. The exact mechanism of this thrombogenic phenomenon, leading to a unique envenoming syndrome, remains unknown.

  11. Seasonal difference in brain serotonin transporter binding predicts symptom severity in patients with seasonal affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mc Mahon, Brenda; Andersen, Sofie B.; Madsen, Martin K.

    2016-01-01

    controls with low seasonality scores and 17 patients diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder were scanned in both summer and winter to investigate differences in cerebral serotonin transporter binding across groups and across seasons. The two groups had similar cerebral serotonin transporter binding...... between summer and winter (Psex-(P = 0.02) and genotype-(P = 0.04) dependent. In the patients with seasonal affective disorder, the seasonal change in serotonin transporter binding was positively associated with change in depressive symptom...

  12. Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum and cerebral anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrander-Stumpel, C. T.; de Die-Smulders, C. E.; Hennekam, R. C.; Fryns, J. P.; Bouckaert, P. X.; Brouwer, O. F.; da Costa, J. J.; Lommen, E. J.; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    We report on three Dutch children with a clinical diagnosis of oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS) and hydrocephalus. The clinical features are compared to 15 published cases of OAVS and hydrocephalus. Several other cerebral abnormalities were present in the whole group. About half of the cases

  13. CT of cerebral hydatid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudwan, M.A.; Khaffaji, S.

    1988-12-01

    Six cases of cerebral hydatid disease (CHD) were seen in Kuwait over a period of 8 years. The typical CT appearance of a large well-defined spherical nonenhanced unilocular cyst was seen in four cases. Two unusual but characteristic types of calcification were seen, one in each of the remaining two cases.

  14. CT of cerebral hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudwan, M.A.; Khaffaji, S.

    1988-01-01

    Six cases of cerebral hydatid disease (CHD) were seen in Kuwait over a period of 8 years. The typical CT appearance of a large well-defined spherical nonenhanced unilocular cyst was seen in four cases. Two unusual but characteristic types of calcification were seen, one in each of the remaining two cases. (orig.)

  15. MR imaging of cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saginoya, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Kuniyoshi, Kazuhide

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated 35 patients with cerebral palsy on the basis of MR imaging findings in the brain. The types of palsy were spastic quadriplegia (n=11), spastic diplegia (n=9), spastic hemiplegia (n=2), double hemiplegia (n=1), athetosis (n=10) and mixed (n=2). Of all patients, 28 (80%) generated abnormal findings. In spastic quadriplegia, although eight cases revealed severe brain damage, two cases showed no abnormal findings in the brain. One of the three had cervical cord compression caused by atlanto-axial subluxation. In spastic diplegia, the findings were divided according to whether the patient was born at term or preterm. If the patient had been born prematurely, the findings showed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormally high intensity in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule on T2-weighted images. MR imaging in spastic hemiplegia revealed cerebral infarction. In the athetoid type, half of all cases showed either no abnormal findings or slight widening of the lateral ventricle. Three cases showed abnormal signals of the basal ganglia. The reason why athetoid-type palsy did not show severe abnormality is unknown. We believe that MR imaging is a useful diagnostic modality to detect damage in the brain in cerebral palsy and plays an important role in the differentiation of cerebral palsy from the spastic palsy disease. (author)

  16. MR imaging of cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saginoya, Toshiyuki [Urasoe General Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Kuniyoshi, Kazuhide [and others

    1996-06-01

    We evaluated 35 patients with cerebral palsy on the basis of MR imaging findings in the brain. The types of palsy were spastic quadriplegia (n=11), spastic diplegia (n=9), spastic hemiplegia (n=2), double hemiplegia (n=1), athetosis (n=10) and mixed (n=2). Of all patients, 28 (80%) generated abnormal findings. In spastic quadriplegia, although eight cases revealed severe brain damage, two cases showed no abnormal findings in the brain. One of the three had cervical cord compression caused by atlanto-axial subluxation. In spastic diplegia, the findings were divided according to whether the patient was born at term or preterm. If the patient had been born prematurely, the findings showed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormally high intensity in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule on T2-weighted images. MR imaging in spastic hemiplegia revealed cerebral infarction. In the athetoid type, half of all cases showed either no abnormal findings or slight widening of the lateral ventricle. Three cases showed abnormal signals of the basal ganglia. The reason why athetoid-type palsy did not show severe abnormality is unknown. We believe that MR imaging is a useful diagnostic modality to detect damage in the brain in cerebral palsy and plays an important role in the differentiation of cerebral palsy from the spastic palsy disease. (author)

  17. Cerebral gigantism with West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Munni; Malhi, P; Bhalla, A K; Singhi, P D

    2003-07-01

    A case of cerebral gigantism (Sotos syndrome) with West syndrome in a one-year-old male child is reported. The case had a large stature, typical facies and neurodevelopmental delay along with infantile spasms, which were refractory to treatment with valproate and clonazepam.

  18. Cerebral imaging revealing Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral imaging is the only non-invasive means of examining the brain and is essential in studying Alzheimer's disease. As a tool for early diagnosis, evaluation and treatment monitoring, this technology is at the heart of the research being done to further improve its reliability and sensitivity. (authors)

  19. Ocular defects in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoch Sabita

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a high prevalence of ocular defects in children with developmental disabilities. This study evaluated visual disability in a group of 200 cerebral palsy (CP patients and found that 68% of the children had significant visual morbidity. These findings emphasize the need for an early ocular examination in patients with CP.

  20. Computerized tomography of cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, K; Mihara, T; Kobayashi, E; Yamamoto, K; Kusumoto, K [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1978-12-01

    In 120 cases of patients with cerebral infarction, the affected areas in the CT images were analyzed with special reference to the site, the size, and the extension. Moreover, on 39 scans of 34 cases examined with 8 weeks after the onset of strokes, the CT images were analyzed from the viewpoint of the presence of a mass effect, edema, contrast enhancement, and the accompanying hemorrhage. From these investigations, the authors have obtained the following results; 1) The greatest incidence of infarcts was in the area supplied by the middle cerebral artery (57% of the cases), and, among those, the area of the lenticulostriate arteries showed the highest incidence (53%). Even in the posterior fossa, infarcts were found in 6% of the cases. These findings are coincident with those in autopsied cases. 2) Putaminal infarcts and infarctions occurring in the area supplied by the calcarine artery seemed to be uniformity of the arcuate pattern. 3) Most of the infarcts in the perfusion area of the anterior cerebral artery and the basal ganglia were found to be small and multifocal; they were thought to correspond with water-shed and/or lacunar infarcts. 4) In approximately 25% of the cases examined within 8 weeks after the onset of strokes, the CT images revealed mass effects which had never been observed after more than 3 weeks. In conclusion, the presence of a mass effect, accompanying hemorrhage, and contrast enhancement detected by CT should lead us to reconsider the conventional management of cerebral infarction.

  1. Comparing patients with spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction: clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naess H

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Halvor Naess, Fredrik RomiDepartment of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, NorwayBackground: To compare the clinical characteristics, and short-term outcome of spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction.Methods: Risk factors, concomitant diseases, neurological deficits on admission, and short-term outcome were registered among 28 patients with spinal cord infarction and 1075 patients with cerebral infarction admitted to the Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Multivariate analyses were performed with location of stroke (cord or brain, neurological deficits on admission, and short-term outcome (both Barthel Index [BI] 1 week after symptom onset and discharge home or to other institution as dependent variables.Results: Multivariate analysis showed that patients with spinal cord infarction were younger, more often female, and less afflicted by hypertension and cardiac disease than patients with cerebral infarction. Functional score (BI was lower among patients with spinal cord infarctions 1 week after onset of symptoms (P < 0.001. Odds ratio for being discharged home was 5.5 for patients with spinal cord infarction compared to cerebral infarction after adjusting for BI scored 1 week after onset (P = 0.019.Conclusion: Patients with spinal cord infarction have a risk factor profile that differs significantly from that of patients with cerebral infarction, although there are some parallels to cerebral infarction caused by atherosclerosis. Patients with spinal cord infarction were more likely to be discharged home when adjusting for early functional level on multivariate analysis.Keywords: spinal cord infarction, cerebral infarction, risk factors, short-term outcome

  2. Cerebral edema in drug addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daruši Dragana J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The effect of drugs leaves permanent consequences on the brain, organic in type, followed by numerous manifestations, and it significantly affects the development of mental dysfunctions. The clinicians are often given a task to estimate a patient’s personality during treatment or during experts estimate of a drug addict. The aim of this research was to determine the differences, if any, in characteristics of addicts experience and personality traits in drug addicts with or without cerebral edema. Methods. The research was conducted on a sample of 252 male drug addicts, the average age of 23.3 (SD = 4.3 years. Cerebral edema was confirmed on magnetic resonance (MR images of the brain performed during the treatment of the addicts. The participants were tested by the psychologists using Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-201 test, and the data were processed using canonical discriminate analysis within the SPSS program. The dependent variable in the study was cerebral edema. A block of independent variables, designed for the requirements of this study, consisted of two subgroups. The first one consisted of 12 variables describing the relevant characteristics of drug abuse. The second subgroup consisted of 8 psychopathological tendencies in the personality defined by the mentioned test. Results. Cerebral edema was confirmed in 52 (20.63% of the drug addicts. The differences between the groups of drug addicts with and without cerebral edema were determined in the following: the time span of taking drugs (0.301, use of alcohol parallel with drugs (0.466, and treatment for addiction (0.603. In the drug addicts with a cerebral edema, MMPI-201 confirmed the increase in the scales for hypochondria, psychopathic deviations and psychastenia, and the decrease in the scales for schizophrenia and depression. Conclusion. Our study confirmed a possible connection between cerebral edema and personality traits in a number of the

  3. MR angiography of cerebral aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Hitoshi; Tanada, Shuji; Sakaki, Saburo; Hamamoto, Ken; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko.

    1992-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) and phase-contrast (PC) MRA are examined clinically for evaluating cerebral aneurysms. In the morphological diagnosis of cerebral aneurysms, three-dimensional (3D) MRA is superior to two-dimensional (2D) MRA because 3D MRA has a higher S/N ratio and a higher spatial resolution. However, it is difficult to decide which, 3D TOF MRA or 3D PC MRA, is superior, for both methods have many scan parameters. In our study, 3D PC MRA was performed using two methods; one had the same acquisition time as 3D TOF MRA, while the other had the same spatial resolution as 3D TOF MRA. The detectability of aneurysms by each MRA method was evaluated in comparison with 3D TOF MRA. In fifteen patients (6 males and 9 females), a total of 16 cerebral aneurysms (3 ruptured and 13 unruptured) were studied. The lesion sizes ranged from 2.5 to 18 mm. All the 16 lesions were examined by means of 3D TOF MRA, 3D PC MRA, and conventional angiography. MR imaging was performed with a 1.5 tesla MRI system (Signa). All of the 16 cerebral aneurysms were detected by 3D TOF MRA, while only 11 of them were detected by 3D PC MRA. When 3D PC MRA was performed with the same acquisition time as 3D TOF MRA, 3D PC MRA was superior in showing one of the 7 aneurysms. When 3D PC MRA was performed with same spatial resolution as 3D TOF MRA, 3D PC MRA was superior in showing two of the 10 aneurysms. 3D TOF MRA was superior to 3D PC MRA in the detection of cerebral aneurysms because of the long acquisition times and the different flow velocity, which induced different signal intensities between the aneurysms and parent arteries in 3D PC MRA. 3D PC MRA was superior to 3D TOF MRA in patients with large thrombotic aneurysms of the internal carotid artery. We consider that 3D TOF MRA should be the first choice for screening and following-up cerebral aneurysms. 3D PC MRA should then be performed for large cerebral aneurysms in addition to 3D TOF MRA. (author)

  4. Headache as a crucial symptom in the etiology of convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, María; Benavente, Lorena; Para, Marta; Santamarta, Elena; Pascual, Julio; Calleja, Sergio

    2014-03-01

    Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been associated with different diseases, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and cerebral amyloid angiopathy being the 2 main causes. To investigate whether headache at onset is determinant in identifying the underlying etiology for convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage. After searching in the database of our hospital, 24 patients were found with convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the last 10 years. The mean age of the sample was 69.5 years. We recorded data referring to demographics, symptoms and neuroimaging. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy patients accounted for 46% of the sample, 13% were diagnosed with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, 16% with several other etiologies, and in 25%, the cause remained unknown. Mild headache was present only in 1 (9%) of the 11 cerebral amyloid angiopathy patients, while severe headache was the dominant feature in 86% of cases of the remaining etiologies. Headache is a key symptom allowing a presumptive etiological diagnosis of convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage. While the absence of headache suggests cerebral amyloid angiopathy as the more probable cause, severe headache obliges us to rule out other etiologies, such as reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  5. Anestesia e paralisia cerebral Anestesia y parálisis cerebral Anesthesia and cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Március Vinícius M Maranhão

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A paralisia cerebral (PC é uma doença não progressiva decorrente de lesão no sistema nervoso central, levando a um comprometimento motor do paciente. O portador de PC freqüentemente é submetido a procedimentos cirúrgicos devido a doenças usuais e situações particulares decorrentes da paralisia cerebral. Foi objetivo deste artigo revisar aspectos da paralisia cerebral de interesse para o anestesiologista, permitindo um adequado manuseio pré, intra e pós-operatório neste tipo de paciente. CONTEÚDO: O artigo aborda aspectos da paralisia cerebral como etiologia, classificação, fatores de risco, fisiopatologia, quadro clínico, diagnóstico, terapêuticas utilizadas bem como avaliação pré-operatória, medicação pré-anestésica, manuseio intra e pós-operatório, analgesia pós-operatória e dor crônica. CONCLUSÕES: O anestesiologista desempenha um papel importante na diminuição da morbidade e mortalidade anestésico-cirúrgica em pacientes portadores de paralisia cerebral. O conhecimento da fisiopatologia dos diferentes tipos de paralisia cerebral bem como das doenças associadas e suas terapêuticas é imprescindível, pois permite ao anestesiologista antecipar e prevenir complicações intra e pós-operatórias neste tipo de paciente.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: La parálisis cerebral (PC es una enfermedad no progresiva consecuente de una lesión en el sistema nervioso central, llevando a un comprometimiento motor del paciente. El portador de PC, frecuentemente es sometido a procedimientos quirúrgicos debido a enfermedades usuales y situaciones particulares consecuentes de la parálisis cerebral. El objetivo de este artículo, fue revisar aspectos de la parálisis cerebral de interés para el anestesista, permitiendo un adecuado manoseo pre, intra y posoperatorio en este tipo de paciente. CONTENIDO: El artículo aborda aspectos de la parálisis cerebral como etiología, clasificación, factores de

  6. [Advances in genetic research of cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang-Fang; Luo, Rong; Qu, Yi; Mu, De-Zhi

    2017-09-01

    Cerebral palsy is a group of syndromes caused by non-progressive brain injury in the fetus or infant and can cause disabilities in childhood. Etiology of cerebral palsy has always been a hot topic for clinical scientists. More and more studies have shown that genetic factors are closely associated with the development of cerebral palsy. With the development and application of various molecular and biological techniques such as chromosome microarray analysis, genome-wide association study, and whole exome sequencing, new achievements have been made in the genetic research of cerebral palsy. Chromosome abnormalities, copy number variations, susceptibility genes, and single gene mutation associated with the development of cerebral palsy have been identified, which provides new opportunities for the research on the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy. This article reviews the advances in the genetic research on cerebral palsy in recent years.

  7. NMR imaging of cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takusagawa, Yoshihiko; Yamaoka, Naoki; Doi, Kazuaki; Okada, Keisei

    1987-01-01

    One hundred and five patients with cerebral infarction were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) CT (resistive type of magnet with strength of 0.1 tesla) and X-ray CT. Pulse sequences used saturation recovery (Tr = 600 mSec), Inversion recovery (Tr = 500 mSec, Td = 300 mSec) and spin echo (Tr = 1500 mSec, Te = 40, 80, 120, 160 mSec). Fifteen cases were examined by NMR-CT within 24 hours from onset. Proton NMR imaging could not detect cerebral ischemia as early as 2 hours after onset, but except could detect the lesions in Se image the area of cerebral infarct 3 hours after onset. After 5 hours from onset image changes in SE were evident and corresponded to the area of cerebral infarct, but image changes in IR could not fully delineate the infarcted area. NMR images of 41 year-old woman with cerebral embolism by MCA trunck occlusion associated with mitral stenosis were presented, and NMR-CT was examined 10 hours, 9th and 43th days after episode of MCA occlusion. Sixty patents (64 times) with lacunar infarction were studied by NMR-CT and X-ray CT. The inversion recovery images were used mainly for detection of lesions and comparison with X-ray CT. In 160 lesions which were detected by NMR-CT or X-ray CT, could 156 lesions be detected by NMR-CT and 78 lesions by X-ray CT. Inversion recovery images were more useful for detection of lacunes than X-ray CT. Calculated T1 and T2 values prolonged with time course from onset. (author)

  8. Normal diffusion-weighted imaging in cerebral air embolism complicating angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayama, T.; Inamura, T.; Fukui, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan); Mitani, M.; Yagi, H. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Yagi Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    We report a case of cerebral air embolism resulting from accidental air infection during cerebral angiography. A 60-year-old man was accidentally injected with air via the left subclavian artery. Angiography demonstrated air within the basilar artery. The patient showed signs of posterior circulation ischaemia (confusion, blindness, gaze palsy and hemiparesis). However, MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging, showed no abnormality 4 h later. The patient was treated with hyperbaric oxygen within 5 h of the embolism. All symptoms and signs resolved completely within a week. (orig.)

  9. A rare cause of headache: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis due to hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekdemir, Murat; Yilmaz, Serkan; Ersel, Murat; Sarisoy, Hasan Tahsin

    2008-03-01

    Headache represents up to 4% of all emergency department (ED) visits. Emergency physicians generally are concerned with identifying those patients whose headaches are caused by life-threatening conditions. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be difficult to diagnose clinically because of its various and nonspecific manifestations. The most frequent but least specific symptom of sinus thrombosis is severe headache, which is present in more than 90% of adult patients. In the case report we present, a patient had severe headache and was diagnosed until third ED visit at different hospitals. He had one of the most unusual causes of headache, that is, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis due to hyperthyroidism.

  10. Posttherapeutic cerebral radionecrosis: a complication of head and neck tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araoz, C.; Weems, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    Patients with treated head and neck cancer may have focal neurologic symptoms and personality changes due to delayed cerebral radionecrosis. A history of past treatment should direct the physician to consider these lesions in the differential diagnosis. Craniotomy is the management recommended. Histopathologic changes include fibrotic response of the meninges with pleomorphic and vacuolated fibroblasts, capillary hyperplasia, reactive astrocytes, and fibrosis of the blood vessels. Amyloid is deposited in the arteriolar walls and extracellular space. Ischemic, autoimmune, or vascular mechanisms, and glial alterations have all been considered in the pathogensis of delayed cerebral radionecrosis. Some researchers have concluded that chemotherapeutic agents, such as methotrexate, may contribute to its production

  11. Cerebral blood flow in acute and chronic ischemic stroke using xenon-133 inhalation tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Paulson, O B; Lassen, N A

    1986-01-01

    . They showed in the acute phase (Days 1-3) very large low-flow areas, larger than the hypodense areas seen on the CT scan. The cerebral vasoconstrictor and vasodilator capacity was tested in the acute phase following aminophylline and acetazolamide, respectively. A preserved but reduced reactivity was seen......Serial measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were performed in 12 patients with acute symptoms of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. CBF was measured by xenon-133 inhalation and single photon emission computer tomography. Six patients had severe strokes and large infarcts on the CT scan...

  12. A case with post-irradiation cerebral vascular disease accompanied by Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinoda, Keiichi; Kuriyama, Takanobu; Kimura, Fumiharu; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Takamatsu, Junta; Mozai, Toshiji

    1986-01-01

    A 37-year-old man with Cushing's disease developed cerebral infarction 13 years after Co-60 irradiation of a total dose of 60 Gy for pituitary adenoma. Cerebral angiography showed stenosis or occlusion of the bilateral carotid arteries and basilar artery which were in the radiation fields. A basophilic adenoma was resected, and symptoms of Cushing's disease have resolved. The vascular lesions are likely to be not only radiation-induced, but also stimulated by hyperlipemia and hypertension associated with Cushing's disease. It is recommended to eliminate factors, such as hyperlipemia and hypertension, stimulatig vascular damage in the management of patients treated with radiation therapy. The relevant literature is reviewed. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in childhood moyamoya syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, R.L.; Chavali, R.V.; Robson, C.D.; Barnes, P.D.; Burrows, P.E. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Eldredge, E.A. [Department of Anesthesia, Children`s Hospital Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Scott, R.M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Children`s Hospital Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in children with moyamoya syndrome (MMS) as compared to children without MMS. Materials and methods. One-hundred-ninety consecutive cerebral angiograms obtained in 152 children were evaluated. Sixty of these angiograms were obtained in 40 children with MMS. Patients underwent neurologic evaluation prior to and after the procedure. For this study, a neurologic complication was defined as any new focal neurologic deficit or alteration in mental status occurring during the procedure or within the ensuing 24 hours. Results. There were 2 neurologic complications within 24 hours of angiography, one in the MMS group and one in the non-MMS group. One patient with MMS became mute following angiography. The symptom resolved within 12 hours. One patient without MMS being examined postoperatively for residual arteriovenous malformation developed intracranial hemorrhage requiring reexploration 12 hours after the angiogram. Using a two-tail Fisher`s exact test, there was no significant statistical difference in the ischemic (P = 0.3) or hemorrhagic (P = 1.0) complication rates between the group of patients with MMS and the non-MMS groups. Conclusion. The risk of a neurologic complication from cerebral angiography in children with MMS is low and not statistically different from the risk in children with other cerebrovascular disorders. (orig.) With 8 tabs., 37 refs.

  14. Neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in childhood moyamoya syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.L.; Chavali, R.V.; Robson, C.D.; Barnes, P.D.; Burrows, P.E.; Eldredge, E.A.; Scott, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in children with moyamoya syndrome (MMS) as compared to children without MMS. Materials and methods. One-hundred-ninety consecutive cerebral angiograms obtained in 152 children were evaluated. Sixty of these angiograms were obtained in 40 children with MMS. Patients underwent neurologic evaluation prior to and after the procedure. For this study, a neurologic complication was defined as any new focal neurologic deficit or alteration in mental status occurring during the procedure or within the ensuing 24 hours. Results. There were 2 neurologic complications within 24 hours of angiography, one in the MMS group and one in the non-MMS group. One patient with MMS became mute following angiography. The symptom resolved within 12 hours. One patient without MMS being examined postoperatively for residual arteriovenous malformation developed intracranial hemorrhage requiring reexploration 12 hours after the angiogram. Using a two-tail Fisher's exact test, there was no significant statistical difference in the ischemic (P = 0.3) or hemorrhagic (P = 1.0) complication rates between the group of patients with MMS and the non-MMS groups. Conclusion. The risk of a neurologic complication from cerebral angiography in children with MMS is low and not statistically different from the risk in children with other cerebrovascular disorders. (orig.)

  15. MRI in human immunodeficiency virus-associated cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkefeld, J.; Lanfermann, H.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral ischaemia caused by inflammatory vasculopathies has been described as complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Imaging studies have shown ischaemic lesions and changes of the vascular lumen, but did not allow demonstration of abnormalities within the vessel wall itself. Two HIV-infected men presented with symptoms of a transient ischaemic attack. Initial MRI of the first showed no infarct; in the second two small lacunar lesions were detected. In both cases, multiplanar 3-mm slice contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images showed aneurysmal dilatation, with thickening and contrast enhancement of the wall of the internal carotid and middle cerebral (MCA) arteries. These findings were interpreted as indicating cerebral vasculitis. In the first patient the vasculopathy progressed to carotid artery occlusion, and he developed an infarct in the MCA territory, but then remained neurologically stable. In the second patient varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection was the probable cause of vasculitis. The clinical deficits and vasculitic MRI changes regressed with antiviral and immunosuppressive therapy. (orig.)

  16. MRI in human immunodeficiency virus-associated cerebral vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkefeld, J.; Lanfermann, H. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Enzensberger, W. [Klinik fuer Neurologie, Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Cerebral ischaemia caused by inflammatory vasculopathies has been described as complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Imaging studies have shown ischaemic lesions and changes of the vascular lumen, but did not allow demonstration of abnormalities within the vessel wall itself. Two HIV-infected men presented with symptoms of a transient ischaemic attack. Initial MRI of the first showed no infarct; in the second two small lacunar lesions were detected. In both cases, multiplanar 3-mm slice contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images showed aneurysmal dilatation, with thickening and contrast enhancement of the wall of the internal carotid and middle cerebral (MCA) arteries. These findings were interpreted as indicating cerebral vasculitis. In the first patient the vasculopathy progressed to carotid artery occlusion, and he developed an infarct in the MCA territory, but then remained neurologically stable. In the second patient varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection was the probable cause of vasculitis. The clinical deficits and vasculitic MRI changes regressed with antiviral and immunosuppressive therapy. (orig.)

  17. Safety of adenosine in stress cerebral perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Pengcheng; Gu Yushen; Liu Wenguan; Xiu Yan; Zhu Weimin; Chen Shuguang; Shi Hongcheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety of adenosine as pharmacological stress agents in stress cerebral perfusion imaging. Methods: Eighty patients under investigation for suspected cerebral vessel disease were recruited. Each had a resting scan and a stress scan on different days. The adenosine stress protocol was as same as the protocol used in adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging. Subjective and objective side-effects were investigated during pharmacological stress procedure. Results: All patients completed the 6 min infusion protocol without premature termination on safety criteria or due to intolerable symptoms. 46 patients had mild side effects. 20 patients (25%) had dizziness, 12 patients (15%) had palpitation, 1 patient (1%) was hypotensive, 7 patients (9%) had dyspnoea, 4 patients (5%) felt hot, 3 patients (4%) had sweat, 4 patients (5%) had nausea, 6 patients (8%) had flushing, 19 patients (24%) had chest pain, 6 patients (8%) had abdomen pain, 3 patients (4%) had abnormal taste and 1 patient (1%) were thirsty. Transient ST change occurred in only 1 patient. Conclusion: Adenosine stress cerebral perfusion imaging is a safe diagnostic method with mild side effects. (authors)

  18. Bladder and Bowel Control in Children with Cerebral Palsy: Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Mustafa; Oktem, Faruk; Kisioglu, Nesimi; Demirci, Mustafa; Altuntas, Irfan; Kutluhan, Suleyman; Dogan, Malik

    2006-01-01

    Aim To determine the age of development of bladder and bowel control and the frequency of enuresis, encopresis, and urinary infections in children with cerebral palsy. Methods The study included 45 children with cerebral palsy who regularly attended a rehabilitation center in Isparta, Turkey, and two groups of age- and sex-matched children, 37 siblings of the children with cerebral palsy and 37 healthy children. Demographic data and information on the age of development of total bladder and bowel control and presence of possible urinary symptoms in children were collected from their caregivers by use of a questionnaire. Frequency of enuresis and encopresis was estimated among the children aged ≥5 years. A mid-way urinary sample was obtained from 40, 22, and 21 children in the cerebral palsy, siblings, and healthy children, respectively. Results The mean age of nighttime bladder and bowel control development was 47 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 35-58) and 45 (36-55) months, respectively, for the children with cerebral palsy, 35 months (95% CI, 24-46) and 26 months (95% CI, 24-28), respectively, for their siblings, and 27 months (95% CI, 22-33) and 25 months (95% CI, 23-27) months, respectively, for the healthy children. Among the children aged ≥5 years, enuresis was present in 11 of 34 children with cerebral palsy, 7 of 30 siblings, and 4 of 30 healthy children (P = 0.200), whereas encopresis was present in 5 children with cerebral palsy, one sibling, and one healthy child. Constipation was significantly more present in chidlren with cerebral palsy than in other two groups (P<0.001). Urine culture was positive in 13 children with cerebral palsy, 1 sibling, and 2 healthy chidlren (P = 0.024). There were no significant differences in other urinary symptoms and laboratory findings among the three groups. Conclusion The children with cerebral palsy gained bladder and bowel control at older age in comparison with their siblings and healthy children

  19. Clinical significance of posterior cerebral artery stenosis/occlusion in moyamoya disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Houkin, Kiyohiro [Sapporo Medical Univ. (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    The present study was aimed at clarifying the clinical significance of posterior cerebral artery (PCA) stenosis/occlusion in pediatric and adult moyamoya disease. This study included a total of 132 patients (52 children and 80 adults) who were diagnosed as by cerebral angiography having moyamoya disease. CT or MRI was performed to examine the location of cerebral infarction in all subjects. Cerebral blood flow and vasoreactivity to acetazolamide were measured in 80 patients before surgery, using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Three-dimensional MR angiography (3D-MRA) was repeated in 32 pediatric patients after surgery in order to clarify the natural course of the PCA stenosis/occlusion. Of 264 sides in 132 patients, PCA stenosis/occlusion was observed in 50 sides of 40 patients (30.3%). Its incidence was significantly higher in ischemic-type patients than in hemorrhagic-type and asymptomatic patients, and was higher in patients in the advanced stage of the disease. The hemisphere ipsilateral to PCA stenosis/occlusion had higher incidence of ischemic symptoms, cerebral infarction, and impaired cerebral hemodynamics. Transient ischemic attack (TIA) (hemianopsia) or cerebral infarction in the occipital lobe was noted in 4 (10%) of 40 patients during follow-up periods after bypass surgery for anterior circulation. Of 32 pediatric patients, none showed progression of PCA stenosis on 3D-MRA during follow-up periods. The present study showed that the involvement of PCA could increase the risk of TIA and/or cerebral infarction in both anterior and posterior circulation areas, suggesting that the PCA plays an important collateral role in moyamoya disease. (author)

  20. Genetic modification of cerebral arterial wall: implications for prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Anantha; Santhanam, R; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2006-10-01

    Genetic modification of cerebral vessels represents a promising and novel approach for prevention and/or treatment of various cerebral vascular disorders, including cerebral vasospasm. In this review, we focus on the current understanding of the use of gene transfer to the cerebral arteries for prevention and/or treatment of cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We also discuss the recent developments in vascular therapeutics, involving the autologous use of progenitor cells for repair of damaged vessels, as well as a cell-based gene delivery approach for the prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

  1. Cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen metabolism in thalamic hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Nobuyuki; Asakura, Ken

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO 2 ), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) were studied in 20 cases of thalamic hemorrhage using positron CT and 15 O labeled gas steady-state inhalation method. CBF reduction was limited around the thalamus in the small sized hematoma. CBF were significantly diminished in the mean cortical, parietal, temporal, basal ganglia and thalamic area ipsilateral and cerebellar cortex contralateral to the medium sized hematoma. There was bilateral and diffuse CBF reduction in the large sized hematoma which was caused by increased intracranial pressure. CMRO 2 value were similary changed as CBF. OEF change showed within normal limit. Diffuse CBV reduction was observed in the large sized hematoma. This reduction was the result of decreased vascular bed caused by mass effect of the hematoma and hydrocephalus. Effect of surgical treatment such as ventricular drainage and hematoma evacuation were also discussed in correlation to CBF in some case using positron and single photon ECT. (author)

  2. Cerebral blood flow changes in Parkinson's disease associated with dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derejko, M.; Lass, P.; Slawek, J.; Nyka, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    Dementia is one of the main non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and it is diagnosed in about 30% of cases. Its aetiology remains unclear and contributing factors are controversial. Dementia may be more common in old patients with severe motor symptoms and mild cognitive impairment. Clinico-pathological studies show the association between dementia in PD and the age-related group of dementias, such as AD and VaD. A valuable aid in the assessment of dementia in PD is cerebral blood flow (CBF) brain SPECT scanning. It shows three different patterns of rCBF reduction, including frontal lobe hypoperfusion, iu Alzheimer-likel type of hypoperfusion and multiple, vascular defects. The heterogeneity of rCBF reduction may reflect the multifactorial pathophysiology of dementia in PD. It may result from concomitant AD pathology, cerebrovascular disease, destruction of nigro-striato-frontal projection or may be a distinct disease of different aetiology. (author)

  3. Clinical application of cerebral dynamic perfusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLand, F.H.

    1975-01-01

    Radionuclide cerebral perfusion studies are assuming a far greater importance in the detection and differential diagnosis of cerebral lesions. Perfusion studies not only contribute to the differential diagnosis of lesions but in certain cases are the preferred methods by which more accurate clinical interpretations can be made. The characteristic blood flow of arterio-venous malformations readily differentiates this lesion from neoplasms. The decreased perfusion or absent perfusion observed in cerebral infarctions is diagnostic without concurrent evidence from static images. Changes in rates and direction of blood flow contribute fundamental information to the status of stenosis and vascular occlusion and, in addition, offer valuable information on the competency and routes of collateral circulation. The degree of cerebral perfusion after cerebral vascular accidents appears to be directly related to patient recovery, particularly muscular function. Cerebral perfusion adds a new parameter in the diagnosis of subdural haematomas and concussion and in the differentiation of obscuring radioactivity from superficial trauma. Although pictorial displays of perfusion blood flow will offer information in most cerebral vascular problems, the addition of computer analysis better defines temporal relationships of regional blood flow, quantitative changes in flow and the detection of the more subtle increases or decreases in cerebral blood flow. The status of radionuclide cerebral perfusion studies has taken on an importance making it the primary modality for the diagnosis of cerebral lesions. (author)

  4. Cerebral basis of posttraumatic stress disorder following the Chernobyl disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganovsky, Konstantin N; Zdanevich, Nataliya A

    2013-04-01

    Whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following radiation emergency has psychopathological, neurocognitive, and neurophysiological peculiarities is at issue. The goal was to explore the features and cerebral basis of "radiation" PTSD in the survivors of the Chernobyl accident. Subjects and Methods The cross-sectional study included 241 people, 219 of whom have been diagnosed with PTSD according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) criteria, among them 115 clean-up workers of the Chernobyl accident (34 with acute radiation sickness), 76 evacuees from the Chernobyl exclusion zone, 28 veterans of the war in Afghanistan, and 22 healthy unexposed individuals. Psychometric examinations, neurocognitive assessments, computerized electroencephalography, and cerebral vascular Doppler were used. "Radiation" PTSD includes "flashforward" phenomena and anticipating stress (projection of fear and danger to the future); somatoform disorders (depression, trait and state anxiety); and neurocognitive deficit (impaired memory and attention, auditory-verbal memory and learning, proactive and retroactive interference, cerebellar and stem symptoms, intellectual changes). The intima-media component, thickness of common carotid arteries, and common and left internal carotid arteries stenosis rates are increased in the liquidators. Changes of bioelectrical brain activity as a decrease of beta- and theta-power, together with an increase of alpha-power, were found in the Chernobyl accident survivors with PTSD. PTSD following radiation emergency is characterized by comorbidity of psychopathology, neurocognitive deficit, and cerebrovascular pathology with increased risk of cerebral atherosclerosis and stroke. The cerebral basis of this PTSD is proposed to be an abnormal communication between the pyramidal cells of the neocortex and the hippocampus, and deep brain structures. It is recommended that a system of emergency and long-term psychological

  5. TREATMENT OF THE SPASTICITY IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meholjić-Fetahović, Ajša

    2007-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a natural purified protein and one of the strongest biological poisons - neurotoxin. It is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Its medical usage started in USA in 1981 and in Europe in 1992. There are seven different immune types of the toxin: A, B, C1, D, E, F and G. Toxin types A and B are used to decrease muscular spasticity. Botulinum toxin prevents the formation of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve tissues in muscles, which in the end irreversibly destroys neuromuscular synapses. It is called temporary local chemodenervation. It does not affect the synthesis of acetylcholine. As it affects neuromuscular bond it also affects one of the symptoms of cerebral palsy - spasticity Decreasing the spasticity of children with cerebral palsy leads to the improvement of conscious movements, muscles are less toned, passive mobility is improved, orthosis tolerance is also improved, and the child is enabled to perform easier and better motor functions such as crawling, standing and walking. Since the action of Botulinum toxin is limited to 2-6 months, new neural collaterals are formed and neuromuscular conductivity is reestablished which in the end once again develops a muscular spasm. This leads to a conclusion that botulinum toxin should again be applied into spastic muscles. It is very important for good effect of Botulinum toxin to set the goals of the therapy in advance. The goals include improvement of a function, prevention of contractions and deformities, ease of care and decrease of pain for children with cerebral palsy. After application of botulinum toxin, it is necessary to perform adequate and intensive physical treatment with regular monitoring of effects. This work shows a case of a boy with spastic form of cerebral palsy. After being habilitated using Vojta therapy and Bobath concept and the conduct of certain physical procedures, botulinum toxin is administered into his lower limbs’ muscles and kinezitherapy intensified

  6. Treatment of the Spasticity in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajša Meholjić-Fetahović

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin is a natural purified protein and one of the strongest biological poisons - neurotoxin. It is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Its medical usage started in USA in 1981 and in Europe in 1992. There are seven different immune types of the toxin: A, B, C1, D, E, F and G. Toxin types A and B are used to decrease muscular spasticity. Botulinum toxin prevents the formation of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve tissues in muscles, which in the end irreversibly destroys neuromuscular synapses. It is called temporary local chemodenervation. It does not affect the synthesis of acetylcholine.As it affects neuromuscular bond it also affects one of the symptoms of cerebral palsy - spasticity Decreasing the spasticity of children with cerebral palsy leads to the improvement of conscious movements, muscles are less toned, passive mobility is improved, orthosis tolerance is also improved, and the child is enabled to perform easier and better motor functions such as crawling, standing and walking. Since the action of Botulinum toxin is limited to 2-6 months, new neural collaterals are formed and neuromuscular conductivity is reestablished which in the end once again develops a muscular spasm. This leads to a conclusion that botulinum toxin should again be applied into spastic muscles.It is very important for good effect of Botulinum toxin to set the goals of the therapy in advance. The goals include improvement of a function, prevention of contractions and deformities, ease of care and decrease of pain for children with cerebral palsy. After application of botulinum toxin, it is necessary to perform adequate and intensive physical treatment with regular monitoring of effects.This work shows a case of a boy with spastic form of cerebral palsy. After being habilitated using Vojta therapy and Bobath concept and the conduct of certain physical procedures, botulinum toxin is administered into his lower limbs’ muscles and

  7. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy: diagnosis and potential therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stewart A; Patel, Ranish K; Lutsep, Helmi L

    2018-06-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by the pathologic deposition of amyloid-beta within cortical and leptomeningeal arteries, arterioles, capillaries and, in rare cases, the venules of the brain. It is often associated with the development of lobar intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) but may cause other neurologic symptoms or be asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics, such as lobar microbleeds, support a diagnosis of CAA and assist with hemorrhage risk assessments. Immunosuppressants are used to treat rarer inflammatory forms of CAA. For the more common forms of CAA, the use of antihypertensive medications can prevent ICH recurrence while the use of antithrombotics may increase hemorrhage risk. Anti-amyloid approaches to treatment have not yet been investigated in phase 3 trials. Areas covered: A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE on the topics of imaging, biomarkers, ICH prevention and treatment trials in CAA, focusing on its current diagnosis and management and opportunities for future therapeutic approaches. Expert commentary: There is likely a significant unrecognized burden of CAA in the elderly population. Continued research efforts to discover biomarkers that allow the early diagnosis of CAA will enhance the opportunity to develop treatment interventions.

  8. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  9. MR of experimental cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLaPaz, R.; Steinberg, G.; Rocklage, S.; Glover, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on MR imaging of cerebral ischemia and treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists in an animal model. Forty-four New Zealand white rabbits underwent 1-hour transorbital ICA-MCA-ACA occlusion and pretreatment or immediate posttreatment with systemic dextromethorphan (DM, n = 14), dextrorphan (DX, n = 14), or normal saline (NS, n = 16). Serial MR studies (1.5 T) were performed 1--6 hours after occlusion with T1- and T2-weighted spinecho, IVIM (b = 1,352), gradient recalled acquisition in a steady-state, and chemical shift sequences (for magnetic susceptibility, T2* and T2') and DyDTPA-BMA intravenous contrast material (Salutar). Spatial correlation between MR findings, histologic findings (ischemic neuronal damage), and regional cerebral blood flow (microspheres) was done

  10. Primary cerebral lymphoma: radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, J.C.; Grandse, D.; Equidazu, J.; Elizagaray, E.; Grande, J.; Carrandi, J.

    1990-01-01

    We present four cases of primary cerebral lymphoma in non-immunodepressed adult patients. All cases were dsemonstrated with pathological study. CAT study showed solitary or multiple isodense lesions, which incorporated avidly and homoneneously the contrast. Arteriography performed in three patients and magnetic resonance, performed in one did not help for diagnosis. We also review the radiological findings obtained with different imaging methods, and suggest the criteria which could be useful for early diagnosis (Author)

  11. Cerebral hyperperfusion following carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Sillesen, H; Sørensen, O

    1987-01-01

    , occurred in the low pressure ratio group, while the hemispheric asymmetry on average was unchanged in the high pressure ratio group. This relative hyperemia was most pronounced 2 to 4 days following reconstruction. The marked hyperemia, absolute as well as relative, in patients with a low ICA/CCA pressure...... ratio suggests a temporary impairment of autoregulation. Special care should be taken to avoid postoperative hypertension in such patients, who typically have preoperative hypoperfusion, to avoid the occurrence of cerebral edema or hemorrhage....

  12. Pathological Laughter as a Symptom of Midbrain Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabby, Ron; Watemberg, Nathan; Lampl, Yair; Eilam, Anda; Rapaport, Abraham; Sadeh, Menachem

    2004-01-01

    Pathological laughter is an uncommon symptom usually caused by bilateral, diffuse cerebral lesions. It has rarely been reported in association with isolated cerebral lesions. Midbrain involvement causing pathological laughter is extremely unusual. We describe three patients who developed pathological laughter after midbrain and pontine-midbrain infarction. In two patients a small infarction in the left paramedian midbrain was detected, whereas the third one sustained a massive bilateral pontine infarction extending to the midbrain. Laughter heralded stroke by one day in one patient and occurred as a delayed phenomenon three months after stroke in another. Pathological laughter ceased within a few days in two patients and was still present at a two year follow-up in the patient with delayed-onset laughter. Pathological laughter can herald midbrain infarction or follow stroke either shortly after onset of symptoms or as a delayed phenomenon. Furthermore, small unilateral midbrain infarctions can cause this rare complication. PMID:15706050

  13. Statistical image analysis of cerebral blood flow in moyamoya disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masaru; Yuzawa, Izumi; Suzuki, Sachio; Kurata, Akira; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Asano, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The Summary of this study was to investigate pathophysiology of moyamoya disease, we analyzed brain single photon emission tomography (SPECT) images of patients with this disease by using interface software for a 3-dimensional (3D) data extraction format. Presenting symptoms were transient ischemic attack (TIA) in 21 patients and hemorrhage in 6 patients. All the patients underwent brain SPECT scan of 123 I-iofetamine (IMP) at rest and after acetazolamide challenge (17 mg/kg iv, 2-day method). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was quantitatively measured using arterial blood sampling and an autoradiography model. The group of the patients who presented with TIAs showed decreased CBF in the frontal lobe at rest compared to that of patients with hemorrhage, but Z-score ((mean-patient data)/ standard deviation (SD)) did not reach statistical significance. Significant CBF decrease after acetazolamide challenge was observed in a wider cerebral cortical area in the TIA group than in the hemorrhagic group. The brain region of hemodynamic ischemia (stage II) correlated well with the responsible cortical area for clinical symptoms of TIA. A hemodynamic ischemia stage image clearly represented recovery of reserve capacity after bypass surgery. Statistical evaluation of SPECT may be useful to understand and clarify the pathophysiology of this disease. (author)

  14. Cerebral venous thrombosis: Update on clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leys Didier

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that may mimic many other neurological disorders and lead to misdiagnoses. Headache is the most common symptom and may be associated with other symptoms or remain isolated. The other frequent manifestations are focal neurological deficits and diffuse encephalopathies with seizures. The key to the diagnosis is the imaging of the occluded vessel or of the intravascular thrombus, by a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance venography (MRV. Causes and risk factors include medical, surgical and obstetrical causes of deep vein thrombosis, genetic and acquired prothrombotic disorders, cancer and hematological disorders, inflammatory systemic disorders, pregnancy and puerperium, infections and local causes such as tumors, arteriovenous malformations, trauma, central nervous system infections and local infections. The breakdown of causes differs in different parts of the world. A meta-analysis of the most recent prospectively collected series showed an overall 15% case-fatality or dependency rate. Heparin therapy is the standard therapy at the acute stage, followed by 3-6 months of oral anticoagulation. Patients with isolated intracranial hypertension may require a lumbar puncture to remove cerebrospinal fluid before starting heparin when they develop a papilloedema that may threaten the visual acuity or decompressive hemicraniectomy. Patients who develop seizures should receive antiepileptic drugs. Cerebral venous thrombosis - even pregnancy-related - should not contraindicate future pregnancies. The efficacy and safety of local thrombolysis and decompressive hemicraniectomy should be tested

  15. Clinico-anatomical correlations of left posterior cerebral artery occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isono, Osamu; Shiota, Junichi; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Hirayama, Keizou; Maki, Toshiyuki.

    1988-01-01

    The relation between neurological signs and symptoms and computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was examined in 11 cases of occlusion of the left posterior cerebral artery. All the patients were righthanded. Right homonimous hemianopia was noted in 8 cases, right upper quadrantanopia in 2 cases, and right lower quadrantanopia in 1 case. Of the 11 cases, alexia without agraphia was noted in 9 cases, all 9 of which showed lesions of inferior occipital cortex (lingual and fusiform gyri) and subjacent white matter. Lesions of splenium were found in only 5 of the cases of alexia without agraphia. In 2 cases with neither alexia nor agraphia, lesions were seen in the medial occipital cortex and the subjacent white matter but not in the inferior occipital lobe. Three patients had color anomia which was accompanied by memory disturbances and alexia without agraphia. In 2 of these 3, lesions were widespread in the region of the left posterior cerebral artery. Memory disturbances were observed in 6 cases, all of which also showed alexia without agraphia. The lesions extended not only of the inferior surface of the occipital lobe and along the interhemispheric fissure, but also of hippocampal and parahippocampal gyri. In 3 cases of alexia without agraphia in which no memory distrubance was found, the symptoms of alexia were slight and disappeared at an early stage. (J.P.N.)

  16. MR findings of cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Hum; Chang, Seung Kuk; Cho, Mee Young; Park, Dong Woo; Kim, Jong Deok; Eun, Choong Ki

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the MR findings of brain damage in cerebral palised patients and to correlate it with gestational age and the time of damage. A retrospective analysis was performed in 40 patients who underwent MR scanning for evaluation of brain lesion in clinically diagnosed cerebral palsy. Authors classified the patients into two groups as premature and full-term and compared MR findings of the two groups. Abnormal MR findings were noted in 28 cases (70%). Five out of 6 patients who had been born prematurely showed isolate periventricular white matter lesions. Twenty-three out of 34 patients who had been born at full-term showed abnormal MR findings. Of these 23 patients, migration anomalies in 7 patients, isolate periventricular white matter lesions in 3 patients, and other combined periventricular subcortical white matter and deep gray matter lesions in 14 patients were seen. At least, 10 patients(43%) of full term group showed abnormal MRI findings reflecting intrauterine brain damage and all 5 patients of premature group showed isolate periventricular white matter lesions suggesting immaturity of brain. MRI is thought to be very useful in the assessment of brain damage for the patients with cerebral palsy by recognizing the location of the lesion and estimating the time of damage

  17. MR findings of cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Hum; Chang, Seung Kuk; Cho, Mee Young; Park, Dong Woo; Kim, Jong Deok; Eun, Choong Ki [Pusan Paik Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-15

    To evaluate the MR findings of brain damage in cerebral palised patients and to correlate it with gestational age and the time of damage. A retrospective analysis was performed in 40 patients who underwent MR scanning for evaluation of brain lesion in clinically diagnosed cerebral palsy. Authors classified the patients into two groups as premature and full-term and compared MR findings of the two groups. Abnormal MR findings were noted in 28 cases (70%). Five out of 6 patients who had been born prematurely showed isolate periventricular white matter lesions. Twenty-three out of 34 patients who had been born at full-term showed abnormal MR findings. Of these 23 patients, migration anomalies in 7 patients, isolate periventricular white matter lesions in 3 patients, and other combined periventricular subcortical white matter and deep gray matter lesions in 14 patients were seen. At least, 10 patients(43%) of full term group showed abnormal MRI findings reflecting intrauterine brain damage and all 5 patients of premature group showed isolate periventricular white matter lesions suggesting immaturity of brain. MRI is thought to be very useful in the assessment of brain damage for the patients with cerebral palsy by recognizing the location of the lesion and estimating the time of damage.

  18. Cerebral blood flow response to hypoglycemia is altered in patients with type 1 diabetes and impaired awareness of hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegers, Evita C; Becker, Kirsten M; Rooijackers, Hanne M; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Federico C; Tack, Cees J; Heerschap, Arend; de Galan, Bastiaan E; van der Graaf, Marinette

    2017-06-01

    It is unclear whether cerebral blood flow responses to hypoglycemia are altered in people with type 1 diabetes and impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hypoglycemia on both global and regional cerebral blood flow in type 1 diabetes patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, type 1 diabetes patients with normal awareness of hypoglycemia and healthy controls ( n = 7 per group). The subjects underwent a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic-hypoglycemic glucose clamp in a 3 T MR system. Global and regional changes in cerebral blood flow were determined by arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging, at the end of both glycemic phases. Hypoglycemia generated typical symptoms in patients with type 1 diabetes and normal awareness of hypoglycemia and healthy controls, but not in patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. Conversely, hypoglycemia increased global cerebral blood flow in patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, which was not observed in the other two groups. Regionally, hypoglycemia caused a redistribution of cerebral blood flow towards the thalamus of both patients with normal awareness of hypoglycemia and healthy controls, consistent with activation of brain regions associated with the autonomic response to hypoglycemia. No such redistribution was found in the patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. An increase in global cerebral blood flow may enhance nutrient supply to the brain, hence suppressing symptomatic awareness of hypoglycemia. Altogether these results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow during hypoglycemia contribute to impaired awareness of hypoglycemia.

  19. Twelve years nuclear medicine - results and outlook - illustrated by 7414 cerebral scintigrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaeger, R.

    1981-01-01

    It is a fact that until the invention of computerized tomography, scintiscanning was an excellent method for diagnosing tumours, metastases, vascular processes, inflammations and traumatic lesions. Now even the differential diagnosis is possible, and also follow-up examinations are often carried out. On the basis of the 7414 considered and studied scintigrams we came to the positive result that in most cases with deliberate questions directed to specific facts, this examination procedure was applied. Scintigraphy can be considered as the predecessor of computerized tomography. With respect to differential diagnostics the following can be said: Cerebral scintigraphy measures in cases of cerebral lesions only masses, whereas the computerized tomograph permits within certain limits even the differentiation between lesion and perifocal oedema. The tomographs of the last generation even differentiate between white and grey cerebral substance. Nevertheless, the residual domaine of scintigraphy remains untouched: the patients with non-focal symptoms, including headaches, general behaviour disorders and psychiatric processes. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Physical activity as a prescription for the children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghavan Shariat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available After so many years devoted to practicing medicine as children physiotherapists, the therapists finally found the importance of balance training exercises in children who suffer from cerebral palsy. It is only through controlling balance that we can achieve improvement in body movement and position that will culminate into performance independence in a child. Formerly, working over controlling balance in cerebral palsy children has been very difficult, because contracture and spasticity did not let us to have an effective balance training exercise. In this respect, we have summarized the results of previous authors that specify the level of effectiveness of exercise therapy. The results of different studies showed that level of effectiveness of exercise therapy on alleviating the symptoms of spastic cerebral palsy is average in accordance with Cohen's effect size Interpretation table.

  1. Cerebral gumma mimicking a brain tumor in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Hye Jin; Kim, Woo Jin

    2013-01-01

    Syphilis has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, and the cerebral gumma is a kind of neurosyphilis which is rare and can be cured by appropriate antibiotic treatments. However, in clinical practices, diagnosis of cerebral syphilitic gumma is often difficult because imaging and laboratory findings revealed elusive results. Herein, we present a rare case of neurosyphilis presenting as cerebral gumma confirmed by histopathological examination, and positive serologic and cerebrospinal fluid analyses. This case report suggests that cerebral gumma should be considered as possible diagnosis for human immunodeficiency virus-negative patients with space-occupying lesion of the brain. And this case also provides importance of clinical suspicions in diagnosing neurosyphilis because syphilis serology is not routinely tested on patients with neurologic symptoms.

  2. Cerebral gumma mimicking a brain tumor in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Hye Jin; Kim, Woo Jin [Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Syphilis has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, and the cerebral gumma is a kind of neurosyphilis which is rare and can be cured by appropriate antibiotic treatments. However, in clinical practices, diagnosis of cerebral syphilitic gumma is often difficult because imaging and laboratory findings revealed elusive results. Herein, we present a rare case of neurosyphilis presenting as cerebral gumma confirmed by histopathological examination, and positive serologic and cerebrospinal fluid analyses. This case report suggests that cerebral gumma should be considered as possible diagnosis for human immunodeficiency virus-negative patients with space-occupying lesion of the brain. And this case also provides importance of clinical suspicions in diagnosing neurosyphilis because syphilis serology is not routinely tested on patients with neurologic symptoms.

  3. Cerebral energy metabolism during induced mitochondrial dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Bindslev, TT; Pedersen, S M

    2013-01-01

    In patients with traumatic brain injury as well as stroke, impaired cerebral oxidative energy metabolism may be an important factor contributing to the ultimate degree of tissue damage. We hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction can be diagnosed bedside by comparing the simultaneous changes...... in brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) and cerebral cytoplasmatic redox state. The study describes cerebral energy metabolism during mitochondrial dysfunction induced by sevoflurane in piglets....

  4. Cerebral blood flow response to functional activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, Olaf B; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rostrup, Egill

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate are normally coupled, that is an increase in metabolic demand will lead to an increase in flow. However, during functional activation, CBF and glucose metabolism remain coupled as they increase in proportion, whereas oxygen metabolism only inc...... the cerebral tissue's increased demand for glucose supply during neural activation with recent evidence supporting a key function for astrocytes in rCBF regulation....

  5. Cerebral perfusion inhomogeneities in schizophrenia demonstrated with single photon emission computed tomography and Tc99m-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajc, M.; Basic, M.; Topuzovic, N.; Babic, C.; Medved, V.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured in relative terms with Tc99m-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxim (HMPAO) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in 28 female schizophrenic patients (20 acute and 8 chronic) classified according to DSM-III. Eleven normals served as controls. The acute patients were classified according to positive and negative symptoms. Patients with predominantly positive symptoms showed by and large normal and homogeneous cerebral isotope uptake. Those with negative symptoms, and the chronic patients, showed inhomogeneous tracer uptake with multiple regions of hypoperfusion in slices 4-6 cm above the orbitomeatal line. The findings support in principle the notion that schizophrenia with negative or chronic symptoms does not affect the whole brain homogeneously. Brain imaging with Tc99m-HMPAO and SPECT might be used to distinguish various types of schizophrenia. (author)

  6. Cerebral Palsy. Fact Sheet = La Paralisis Cerebral. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is written in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition of cerebral palsy and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy:…

  7. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow in man during light sleep (stage 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S

    1991-01-01

    . They differ in respect of arousal threshold as a stronger stimulus is required to awaken a subject from deep sleep as compared to light sleep. Our results suggest that during non-rapid eye movement sleep cerebral metabolism and thereby cerebral synaptic activity is correlated to cerebral readiness rather than...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral cavernous malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Educational Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Cavernous Malformations Disease InfoSearch: Cerebral Cavernous Malformation ...

  9. Acute cerebral vascular accident associated with hyperperfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soin, J.S.; Burdine, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Cerebral radionuclide angiography can demonstrate decreased or normal radioactivity in the affected region during the arterial phase in patients who have sustained a cerebral vascular accident and thus enhances the diagnostic specificity of the static brain image. In an occasional patient, however, a seemingly paradoxical pattern of regional hyperperfusion with a return to normal or subnormal perfusion following the acute phase has been observed. This phenomenon, called luxury perfusion, has been defined using intra-arterial 133 Xe for semiquantitative cerebral blood flow measurements and should be kept in mind as a potentially misleading cerebral imaging pattern

  10. Early treatment for IgG4-related disease may prevent cognitive impairment caused by cerebral vasculitis: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Usami

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD is a recently recognized disease entity. A 74-year-old male presented with transient headache. He was diagnosed IgG4-RD by pancreatic biopsy at the age of 72. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI showed disseminated cerebral microbleeds and microinfarctions in time and space. It suggested cerebral vasculitis, however any causative factor were not confirmed. IgG4-RD rarely causes cerebral vasculitis. This might be a first case of an asymptomatic cerebral vasculitis due to IgG4-RD. Patient was started on oral prednisolone, and no neurological or neuropsychological symptom was clinically observed. The MRI findings improved after treatment, and revealed no indication of newly lesions at 6-months follow-up. Early treatment for IgG4-RD may be recommended to prevent irreversible cognitive dysfunction. Keywords: IgG4-related disease, Treatment, Cerebral vasculitis

  11. Context Therapy: A New Intervention Approach for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Johanna; Law, Mary C.; Pollock, Nancy; Wilson, Brenda; Russell, Dianne J.; Walter, Stephen D.; Rosenbaum, Peter; Galuppi, Barb

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To describe the development of context therapy, a new intervention approach designed for a randomized controlled trial. Method: Therapists were trained to change task and environmental factors to achieve parent-identified functional goals for children with cerebral palsy. Therapists did not provide any remediation strategies to change the…

  12. Exploring Communication Technology Behaviour of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    rasid, Nadia natasha binte mohamed; Nonis, Karen P.

    2015-01-01

    Communication among adolescents with cerebral palsy can be restricted with traditional Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) device coupled with environmental and social barriers. The advance of communication technology offer solutions to reduce such barriers. Given that there is limited research in communication behaviours of…

  13. Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Glaucoma Symptoms, Treatment and Research Past Issues / Spring 2015 ... vision, without any pain. Photo courtesy of NEI Glaucoma Symptoms At first, open-angle glaucoma has no ...

  14. Assessing regional cerebral blood flow in depression using 320-slice computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Wang

    Full Text Available While there is evidence that the development and course of major depressive disorder (MDD symptomatology is associated with vascular disease, and that there are changes in energy utilization in the disorder, the extent to which cerebral blood flow is changed in this condition is not clear. This study utilized a novel imaging technique previously used in coronary and stroke patients, 320-slice Computed-Tomography (CT, to assess regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF in those with MDD and examine the pattern of regional cerebral perfusion. Thirty nine participants with depressive symptoms (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 24 (HAMD24 score > 20, and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS score > 53 and 41 healthy volunteers were studied. For all subjects, 3 ml of venous blood was collected to assess hematological parameters. Transcranial Doppler (TCD ultrasound was utilized to measure parameters of cerebral artery rCBFV and analyse the Pulsatility Index (PI. 16 subjects (8 =  MDD; 8 =  healthy also had rCBF measured in different cerebral artery regions using 320-slice CT. Differences among groups were analyzed using ANOVA and Pearson's tests were employed in our statistical analyses. Compared with the control group, whole blood viscosity (including high\\middle\\low shear rateand hematocrit (HCT were significantly increased in the MDD group. PI values in different cerebral artery regions and parameters of rCBFV in the cerebral arteries were decreased in depressive participants, and there was a positive relationship between rCBFV and the corresponding vascular rCBF in both gray and white matter. rCBF of the left gray matter was lower than that of the right in MDD. Major depression is characterized by a wide range of CBF impairments and prominent changes in gray matter blood flow. 320-slice CT appears to be a valid and promising tool for measuring rCBF, and could thus be employed in psychiatric settings for biomarker and treatment response purposes.

  15. Intra-Carotid Urokinase thrombolytic therapy in acute cerebral infarction: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hee Kyung; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Dong Ik; Suh, Jung Ho; Lee, Byung In; Lee, Byung Chul

    1990-01-01

    We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the possibility that the intraarterial thrombolytic therapy might lead to recanalization of the acutely occluded cerebral arteries and subsequent clinical improvement in patients with acute cerebral infarction. Mean time from the onset of symptoms to the start of treatment and mean dosage of thrombolytic agent, Urokinase, were 6.4 hours and 1,260,000 units, respectively. Seven of 12 cases (58%) with acute cerebral infarction demonstrated successful recanalization. Neurological evaluation at one week and three months after the onset of symptoms suggested better outcome in the cases with recanalization. Repeat CT scan at 24 hours and one week after the procedure demonstrated the evidence of hemorrhagic infarction in the infarcted territories in five cases (41%), but clinical deteriorations were observed in only 2 cases. Though statistical analysis could not be done because the limited number of cases, these results suggest that the intraarterial thrombolytic therapy had a role in the management of acute cerebral infarction

  16. Simultaneous and sequential hemorrhage of multiple cerebral cavernous malformations: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Nundia; Marsh, Robert

    2016-02-09

    The etiology of cerebral cavernous malformation hemorrhage is not well understood. Causative physiologic parameters preceding hemorrhagic cavernous malformation events are often not reported. We present a case of an individual with sequential simultaneous hemorrhages in multiple cerebral cavernous malformations with a new onset diagnosis of hypertension. A 42-year-old white man was admitted to our facility with worsening headache, left facial and tongue numbness, dizziness, diplopia, and elevated blood pressure. His past medical history was significant for new onset diagnosis of hypertension and chronic seasonal allergies. Serial imaging over the ensuing 8 days revealed sequential hemorrhagic lesions. He underwent suboccipital craniotomy for resection of the lesions located in the fourth ventricle and right cerebellum. One month after surgery, he had near complete resolution of his symptoms with mild residual vertigo but symptomatic chronic hypertension. Many studies have focused on genetic and inflammatory mechanisms contributing to cerebral cavernous malformation rupture, but few have reported on the potential of hemodynamic changes contributing to cerebral cavernous malformation rupture. Systemic blood pressure changes clearly have an effect on angioma pressures. When considering the histopathological features of cerebral cavernous malformation architecture, changes in arterial pressure could cause meaningful alterations in hemorrhage propensity and patterns.

  17. Investigations of the cerebral blood flow by means of nuclear medicine in polycythemia vera rubra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, W.G.; Unger, L.; Mueller, J.

    1993-01-01

    P.v. represents a ''clinical model'' of diagnostic radionuclide application to evaluate the total and regional perfusion of brain. 107 polycythemians treated by or provided for radiophosphorus were studied by neurologic methods as EEG e.g. and with XCT if necessary. These studies were accomplished repeatedly in 62% of the surveyed patients. We found disturbed perfusion in brain: 32, diminuation of blood flow in vertebral-basilar region: 8, polyneuropathies: 27, psychic abnormalities: 60. Therapeutic effects became ascertained in 34% of hemipareses. The majority of polycythemic patients let recognize a regression of subjective complaints. The diagnostic informations obtained by radionuclide methods were compared to clinical and neurologic results as mentioned above. A good correlation could observed from radionuclide angiography, 133 Xe-studies of total and regional cerebral perfusion and HMPAO-SPECT to neurologic and radiological findings. 66% of studied patients showed abnormal radioactivity distribution at static scintigrams. Disturbances of cerebral perfusion were seen in 20 from 26 patients if radionuclide angiography was used. Especially the inflow to cerebral vessels was found retarded by this method. Even in 3 neurologically inconspicuous persons the cerebral perfusion was restricted. Only 5 patients without signs of decreased flow could be seen. In 9 of 10 cases studied using 133 Xenon referred to diminuation of cerebral perfusion. Both dynamic methods showed changes in perfusion depending from time course. Numerous localized defects of vascularization were detected by SPECT in some corresponding with neurologic symptoms in other patients differing from these ones. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Clinical study of correlation of pre-senile and senile depressive stage with silent cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujikawa, Tokumi; Yamawaki, Shigeto; Fujita, Yasunobu; Shibata, Youko; Touhouda, Yoshikuni.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between the pre-senile/senile depressive state and silent cerebral infarction was examined by MRI. Consecutive 56 depressive patients aged 50 years or older underwnt MRI. MRI revealed silent cerebral infarction in 60.3% of patients in whom depression occurred at the age of less than 65 years. The complication rate was significantly higher in these patients than the younger patients (60.9% vs 20%). Complications of silent cerebral infarction were found in 53.6% for patients in whom depression occurred at the age of less than 65 years and symptoms were deteriorated at the age of 65 years or older and in 100% for patients in whom it occurred at the age of 65 years or older and hospitalization was simultaneously required. These figures were remarkably higher than the age-related complication rate of silent cerebral infarction in non-depressive normal persons. This suggested that approximately half of depressive patients of pre-senile onset and majority of depressive patients of senile onset might have parenchymal involvement due to silent cerebral infarction. Both perforating-type and cortical-type infarcts were found. This has a implication for the involvement of multiple infarct-related foci in depressive state. For cortical-type infarcts, partial lesions were predominant, followed by frontal and temporal lesions. The incidence of left frontal infarcts was significanly higher than that of right frontal infarcts. Infarcts in both the parietal and left frontal lobes may be responsible for depressive state. (N.K.)

  19. Frequency of cerebral infarction and haemorrhage in the patients of stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A.N.; Ataullah, S.

    2009-01-01

    Stroke is rapidly developing phenomena of symptoms and signs of focal, and at times global, loss of cerebral function with no apparent cause other than that of vascular origin. The Objective was to know the frequency of cerebral infarction and haemorrhage in one hundred patients of stroke in a period of one year. Data was collected by consecutive sampling technique. Total one hundred patients of stroke were collected for the study. They were assessed through a detailed history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, previous stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), previous myocardial infarction, angina, atrial fibrillation, alcohol intake, drugs used for hypertension/diabetes mellitus. Blood pressure was recorded at arrival and 24 hours after admission. There were 70% males and 30% females. Twenty percent of the patients were in the age range of 51-60 years, 26% of the patients were in the age range of 61-70 years and 18% were in the age range of 71-80 years. Cerebral infarction was present in 72% patients while cerebral haemorrhage was present in 28% patients. Hypertension was the most common risk factor among these stroke patients. Average blood pressure was 180/100 mmHg. Cerebral infarction is the commonest form of stroke. Hypertension is the leading risk factor in stroke patients. (author)

  20. Management of somatic symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Andreas; Dimsdale, Joel

    2014-01-01

    on the recognition and effective management of patients with excessive and disabling somatic symptoms. The clinical presentation of somatic symptoms is categorized into three groups of patients: those with multiple somatic symptoms, those with health anxiety, and those with conversion disorder. The chapter provides...

  1. Measuring bothersome menopausal symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Kamma Sundgaard; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The experience of menopausal symptoms is common and an adequate patient-reported outcome measure is crucial in studies where women are treated for these symptoms. The aims of this study were to identify a patient-reported outcome measure for bothersome menopausal symptoms and, in the ...

  2. [CADASIL with clinical manifestations of baldness, lumbago and Parkinson's symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhixia; Chen, Shuai; Shi, Yingying; Zhang, Yuanxing; Wang, Wan; Chen, Zuzhi; Xia, Mingrong; Shi, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jiewen

    2017-12-10

    To investigate a cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with the subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) case with clinical manifestations of baldness, lumbago and Parkinson's symptoms. Clinical and imaging data of the patient were analyzed. The patient and his family members were also subjected to genetic testing. The symptoms of the patient included recurrent stroke, dementia, and mood disturbance, in addition with lumbago, baldness and Parkinson's symptoms but no migraine. Cranial MRI of the patient showed bilateral symmetric leukoencephalopathy and multiple small subcortical lacunar infarcts. A point mutation in exon 11 of the NOTCH3 gene (R558C) was discovered in the proband and four asymptomatic relatives. CADASIL is characterized by recurrent subcortical ischemic stroke, dementia, pseudobulbar palsy, and mood disturbance. Baldness, lumbago and Parkinson's symptoms may also be seen in such patients.

  3. Evidence for developmental programming of cerebral laterality in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Jones

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Adverse fetal environments are associated with depression, reduced cognitive ability and increased stress responsiveness in later life, but underlying mechanisms are unknown. Environmental pressures on the fetus, resulting from variations in placental function and maternal nutrition, health and stress might alter neurodevelopment, promoting the development of some brain regions over others. As asymmetry of cerebral activity, with greater right hemisphere activity, has been associated with psychopathology, we hypothesized that regional specialization during fetal life might be reflected persistently in the relative activity of the cerebral hemispheres. We tested this hypothesis in 140 healthy 8-9 year-old children, using tympanic membrane temperature to assess relative blood flow to the cerebral hemispheres at rest and following psychosocial stress (Trier Social Stress Test for Children. Their birth weight and placental weight had already been measured when their mothers took part in a previous study of pregnancy outcomes. We found that children who had a smaller weight at birth had evidence of greater blood flow to the right hemisphere than to the left hemisphere (r = -.09, P = .29 at rest; r = -.18, P = .04 following stress. This finding was strengthened if the children had a relatively low birth weight for their placental weight (r = -.17, P = .05 at rest; r = -.31, P = .0005 following stress. Our findings suggest that lateralization of cerebral activity is influenced persistently by early developmental experiences, with possible consequences for long-term neurocognitive function.

  4. Multiple cerebral aneurysms of middle cerebral artery. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Nica1, Tatiana Rosca1, A. Dinca2, M. Stroi3, Mirela Renta4, A.V. Ciurea5

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cerebral aneurysms present awide variation in incidence with averages of13% at angiographic studies and 22.7% atautopsy.High blood pressue, cigarette smoking,stress and possible also age and female sexseem to be risk factors for multipleintracranial aneurysms (MIAn in patientsof working age who have suffered asubarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH.Aneurysms were situated on the same sidein one-third of the patients with twoaneurysms and the most common site wasthe middle cerebral artery (MCA. Tomanage these challenging lesionsneurosurgeons must use all availableinnovations and advances, includingdiagnostic, technical and perioperativeadjuncts. The author presents a case ofmiddle age female, with two saccularaneurysms situated on the same side (rightMCA, who was operated in our clinic, 20days after first SAH episode, I grade onHunt/Hess scale. The angio MRI wasperformed before, and control DSangiography after operation. After pterionalapproach, the author used themagnification, microsurgical technics,temporal clip, and two permanent Yasargilcurved clips. A postoperative good recoveryenable the patient go to work and drive onemonth later.

  5. A twin study of perfume-related respiratory symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, J; Lerbaek, A; Kyvik, K O

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory symptoms from environmental perfume exposure are main complaints in patients with multiple chemical sensitivities and often coincide with asthma and or eczema. In this population-based twin study we estimate the heritability of respiratory symptoms related to perfume and if co......-occurrences of the symptoms in asthma, atopic dermatitis, hand eczema or contact allergy are influenced by environmental or genetic factors common with these diseases. In total 4,128 twin individuals (82%) responded to a questionnaire. The heritability of respiratory symptoms related to perfume is 0.35, 95%CI 0.......14-0.54. Significant associations (prespiratory symptoms and asthma, atopic dermatitis, hand eczema or contact allergy are not attributable to shared genetic or shared environmental/familial factors, except possibly for atopic dermatitis where genetic pleiotropy with respiratory symptoms...

  6. A twin study of perfume-related respiratory symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elberling, J; Lerbaek, A; Kyvik, K O; Hjelmborg, J

    2009-11-01

    Respiratory symptoms from environmental perfume exposure are main complaints in patients with multiple chemical sensitivities and often coincide with asthma and or eczema. In this population-based twin study we estimate the heritability of respiratory symptoms related to perfume and if co-occurrences of the symptoms in asthma, atopic dermatitis, hand eczema or contact allergy are influenced by environmental or genetic factors common with these diseases. In total 4,128 twin individuals (82%) responded to a questionnaire. The heritability of respiratory symptoms related to perfume is 0.35, 95%CI 0.14-0.54. Significant associations (pperfume-related respiratory symptoms and asthma, atopic dermatitis, hand eczema or contact allergy are not attributable to shared genetic or shared environmental/familial factors, except possibly for atopic dermatitis where genetic pleiotropy with respiratory symptoms to perfume is suggested by an estimated genetic correlation of 0.39, 95%CI 0.09-0.72.

  7. Dominant inheritance of cerebral gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonana, J; Sotos, J F; Romshe, C A; Fisher, D A; Elders, M J; Rimoin, D L

    1977-08-01

    Cerebral gigantism is a syndrome consisting of characteristic dysmorphic features, accelerated growth in early childhood, and variable degrees of mental retardation. Its etiology and pathogenesis have not been defined. Three families are presented with multiple affected members. The vertical transmission of the trait and equal expression in both sexes in these families indicates a genetic etiology with a dominant pattern of inheritance, probably autosomal. As in previously reported cases, extensive endocrine evaluation failed to define the pathogenesis of the accelerated growth present in this disorder.

  8. Models of Cerebral System Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-20

    elements CBV and C,, are added between the brain tissue and the venous compartments, and between the cerebro - spinal fluid and the venous sinus...impact and whiplash in primates . J. Biomech., 4, 13-21. RYDER, H. W., ESPEY, F. F., KIMBELL, F. D., PENKA, E. J., ROSENAUER, A., PODOLSKY, B. and EVANS...Hirsch, A.E. (1971) Tolerances for cerebral concussion from head impact and whiplash in primates . J. Biomech. 4:13-21. Pamidi, M.R. and Advani, S.H. (1978

  9. Schizencephaly/congenital cerebral clefts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, H.; Naidich, T.P.

    1987-01-01

    Schizencephaly (from the Greek meaning ''split brain''), is a term developed in the 1940s to explain symmetric clefts in the brain seen at autopsy in children with histories of severe neurologic defects. Use of the term has been expanded to include a variety of cerebral clefts. A review of the experience at Children's Memorial Hospital as well as case materials made available to the authors are presented, including CT, MR imaging, and US findings. Theories of etiology and pathogenesis of these congenital clefts, associated anomalies, and the spectrum of appearance of these clefts are discussed

  10. Understanding medical symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti; Guassora, Ann Dorrit Kristiane; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov

    2015-01-01

    is a social and relational phenomenon of containment, and regulating the situation where the symptoms originate implies adjusting containment. Discourse analysis, as presented by Jonathan Potter and Margaret Wetherell, provides a tool to notice the subtle ways in which language orders perceptions and how...... to the bodily messages. Symptom management is then determined by the meaning of a symptom. Dorte E. Gannik’s concept “situational disease” explains how situations can be reviewed not just in terms of their potential to produce signs or symptoms, but also in terms of their capacity to contain symptoms. Disease...

  11. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyngeraa, T. S.; Pedersen, L. M.; Mantoni, T.; Belhage, B.; Rasmussen, L. S.; van Lieshout, J. J.; Pott, F. C.

    2013-01-01

    Running induces characteristic fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) of unknown consequence for organ blood flow. We hypothesized that running-induced BP oscillations are transferred to the cerebral vasculature. In 15 healthy volunteers, transcranial Doppler-determined middle cerebral artery (MCA)

  12. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  13. OCULAR FINDINGS IN CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral palsy is commonly associated with ocular abnormalities which often impact on their development and education. There is paucity of studies on this in Nigeria. We decided to study/ determine the prevalence of ocular abnormalities among children with cerebral palsy that attended the neurology clinic of University of ...

  14. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mark Bitsch; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance im...

  15. Animal models of cerebral arterial gas embolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenink, Robert P.; Hollmann, Markus W.; van Hulst, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism is a dreaded complication of diving and invasive medical procedures. Many different animal models have been used in research on cerebral arterial gas embolism. This review provides an overview of the most important characteristics of these animal models. The properties

  16. Cerebral fat embolism after bilateral total knee replacement arthroplasty -A case report-

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Ri-Na; Kim, Jong-Hak; Lee, Heeseung; Baik, Hee-Jung; Chung, Rack Kyung; Kim, Chi Hyo; Hwang, Tae-Hu

    2010-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome is a rare and potentially lethal complication most commonly seen in long bone fractures and intramedullary manipulation. The clinical triad of fat embolism syndrome consists of mental confusion, respiratory distress, and petechiae. This study reports a case of cerebral fat embolism syndrome following elective bilateral total knee replacement. After an uneventful anesthesia and initial recovery, the patient developed neurologic symptoms nine hours postoperatively.

  17. Does Reducing the Duration from Symptom Onset to Recanalization Improve the Results of Intracranial Mechanical Thrombectomy in the Elderly?

    OpenAIRE

    KOMATSUBARA, Koichiro; DEMBO, Tomohisa; SATO, Eishi; SASAMORI, Hiroki; TORII, Masataka; SHIOKAWA, Yoshiaki; HIRANO, Teruyuki

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular recanalization for acute major cerebral artery occlusion is effective within a short time after symptom onset. However, its efficacy in the elderly remains unknown. We assessed the efficacy of our comprehensive stroke center?s reduction of this time in 28 consecutive patients for elderly patients (defined as patients aged ?75 years) with acute major cerebral artery occlusion treated with intravenous injection of tissue plasminogen activator, followed by thrombus retrieval by endo...

  18. Non operative management of cerebral abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batubara, C. A.

    2018-03-01

    Cerebral abscess is a focal intracerebral infection that begins as a localized area of cerebritis and develops into a collection of pus surrounded by a well-vascularized capsule. Patients typically present with varying combinations of aheadache, progressive neurologic deficits, seizures, and evidence of infection. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imagingare the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosing cerebral abscess. The treatment of cerebral abscess has been a challenge. Small cerebralabscesses (managed by the use of intravenous mannitol (or hypertonic saline) and dexamethasone. Acute seizures should be terminated with the administration of intravenous benzodiazepines or by intravenous fosphenytoin. Anticonvulsants prophylaxis must be initiated immediately and continued at least one year due to high risk in the cerebral abscesses. Easier detection of underlying conditions, monitoring of the therapeutic progress, and recognition of complications have probably contributed to the improved prognosis.

  19. CT findings in patients with cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Kimiichi

    1982-01-01

    Clinical findings and CT findings in 73 cases of cerebral palsy were studied. The causes of cerebral palsy were presumed to be as follows: abnormal cerebral development (36%), asphyxial delivery (34%), and immature delivery (19%), etc. CT findings were abnormal in 58% of the 73 cases, 83% of the spastic tetraplegia patients and all of the spastic hemiplegia patients showed abnormal CT findings. All the patients with spastic monoplegia presented normal CT findings. In 75% of the spastic hemiplegia cases, the CT abnormalities were due to cerebral parenchymal abnormality such as porencephaly and regional low absorption. In cases of spastic tetraplegia, cerebral parenchymal abnormality was found only in 10%. Cortical atrophy was found only in 15 of the 73 cases, whereas central atrophy was found in 36 cases. (Ueda, J.)

  20. Evaluation of cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolism and cerebral function by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Chuzo; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Umeda, Masahiro; Naruse, Shoji; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Ueda, Satoshi; Furuya, Seiichi.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) method has the unique potentiality of detecting cerebral metabolites, cerebral blood flow and brain functions in a noninvasive fashion. We have developed several MR techniques to detect these cerebral parameters with the use of clinical MRI scanners. By modifying the MR spectroscopy (MRS) technique, both 31 P- and 1 H-MRS data can be obtained from multiple, localized regions (multi-voxel method) of the brain, and the distribution of each metabolite in the brain can be readily visualized by metabolite mapping. The use of diffusion weighted images (DWI) permits visualization of the anisotropy of water diffusion in white matter, and based on the difference of diffusion coefficiency, the differential diagnosis between epidermoid tumor and arachnoid cyst can be made. By employing dynamic-MRI (Dyn-MRI) with Gd-DTPA administration, it is possible to examine the difference in blood circulation between brain tumor tissue and normal tissue, as well as among different types of brain tumors. By using magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) imaging, it has become possible to detect brain tumors, and with a small dose of Gd-DTPA, to visualize the vascular system. Functional MRI (fMRI) visualizes the activated brain by using conventional gradient echo technique on conventional MRI scanners. This method has the unique characteristic of detecting a brain function with high spatial and temporal resolution by using the intrinsic substance. Moreover, the localization of motor and sensory areas was detected by noninvasive means within few minutes. The fMRI procedure will be used in the future to analyze the higher and complex brain functions. In conclusion, multi-modality MR is a powerful technique that is useful for investigating the pathogenesis of many diseases, and provides a noninvasive analytic modality for studying brain function. (author)

  1. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs....... social care costs and productivity costs associated with CP point to a potential gain from labour market interventions that benefit individuals with CP.......This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs...... in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about euro860 000 for men and about euro800 000 for women. The largest component was social care costs...

  2. Radiotherapy in primary cerebral lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legros, L.; Benezery, K.; Lagrange, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Primary cerebral lymphoma is a rare disease with an unfavorable prognosis. Whole brain radiotherapy has been the standard treatment, but neither the optimal radiation fields nor optimal dose level of the regimen are as yet firmly establisheD. From this review of the literature, it seems that the whole brain must be treated, and a boost to the area of the primary site must be discussed. With regard to dose, the radiation dose-response relationship is not clearly proven. Yet, a minimum dose of 40 Gy is necessary, and the maximum dose is set at 50 Gy because of late neurological sequelae. Because of the poor prognosis of this disease and the risk of late sequelae, other avenues have been explored. Chemotherapy has been studied, seem to have a survival advantage and combinations of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, especially with high-dose methotrexate. Because primary cerebral lymphoma is an uncommon disease, randomized clinical trials that compare radiotherapy alone to chemotherapy plus radiotherapy may not be feasible. Finally, even if chemotherapy seems to have a survival advantage, the regimen of chemotherapy is still a matter of debate. (authors)

  3. Cerebral cortex modulation of pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-feng XIE; Fu-quan HUO; Jing-shi TANG

    2009-01-01

    Pain is a complex experience encompassing sensory-discriminative, affective-motivational and cognitiv e-emotional com-ponents mediated by different mechanisms. Contrary to the traditional view that the cerebral cortex is not involved in pain perception, an extensive cortical network associated with pain processing has been revealed using multiple methods over the past decades. This network consistently includes, at least, the anterior cingulate cortex, the agranular insular cortex, the primary (SⅠ) and secondary somatosensory (SⅡ) cortices, the ventrolateral orbital cortex and the motor cortex. These corti-cal structures constitute the medial and lateral pain systems, the nucleus submedius-ventrolateral orbital cortex-periaque-ductal gray system and motor cortex system, respectively. Multiple neurotransmitters, including opioid, glutamate, GABA and dopamine, are involved in the modulation of pain by these cortical structures. In addition, glial cells may also be in-volved in cortical modulation of pain and serve as one target for pain management research. This review discusses recent studies of pain modulation by these cerebral cortical structures in animals and human.

  4. Cerebral infarction attributable to cerebrovascular fibromuscular dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazaki, Haruo

    2008-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a noninflammatory, nonatheromatous segmental angiopathy. The renal arteries are affected most commonly, followed by the internal carotid and vertebral arteries. FMD of the internal carotid and vertebral arteries usually occurs in the extracranial portions and is mostly observed at the level of the second cervical vertebra. FMD of the intracranial arteries is rare, but tends to occur in children and young adults. FMD is more common in females than in males, and it is often observed in middle-aged women. Although the etiology of FMD is not well understood, several mechanisms have been proposed, such as genetic predisposition, hormonal factors, and arterial wall ischemia. The pathology of FMD is characterized by smooth muscle hyperplasia or thinning, elastic fiber destruction, fibrous tissue proliferation, and arterial wall disorganization. Cerebrovascular fibromuscular dysplasia (cFMD) is relatively rare in Japan but is regarded as one of the cardinal causes of stroke in the younger population. cFMD without complications causes nonspecific symptoms such as headache or vertigo, but when it results in an arterial dissection or aneurysm, it leads to cerebral infarction or subarachnoid hemorrhage. Conventional angiographic findings mostly reveal a pattern called the 'string of beads', which is pathologically correlated to medial fibromuscular dysplasia. Doppler echography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) may be useful for detecting cFMD lesions in some cases. MRA should be performed to rule out the presence of intracranial aneurysms. Antiplatelet and anticoagulation agents are prophylactics against cFMD complications. Surgical treatments such as graduated intraluminal dilatation had previously been the mainstays for treating cFMD. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with or without stenting has now become the preferred invasive treatment for symptomatic cFMD. (author)

  5. Treating cerebral palsy with aculaser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Shahzad; Nazir Khan, Malik M.; Nadeem Khan, Malik M.; Qazi, Faiza M.; Awan, Abid H.; Dar, Irfan

    2008-03-01

    A single, open and non comparative study was conducted at Anwar Shah Trust for C.P. & Paralysis in collaboration with the Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Children Hospital Lahore, Pakistan to evaluate the effects of ACULASER THERAPY in childern suffering from Cerebral Palsy (C.P.) and associated Neurological Disorders like epilepsy, cortical blindness, spasticity, hemiplegia, paraplegia, diplegia, quadriplegia, monoplegia, sensory-neural deafness and speech disorders. In all 250 childern were treated and the data was gathered during a period of 3 years from December 2003 till December 2006. These children were further classified according to the type of C.P. (spastic, athetoid, mixed) they suffered from and associated Neurological Disorders. This article shows results in C.P. childern who were treated with ACULASER THERAPY for minimum 6 weeks and more or had minimum of 15 treatment sessions and more. This article also shows that those childern who were given a break in the treatment for 1 month to 1 year did not show any reversal of the signs and symptoms. Analysis of the data showed that out of 171 children with Spasticity and Stiffness 147 showed marked improvement showing 87% success rate, out of 126 children with Epileptic fits, there was a significant reduction in the intensity, frequency and duration of Epileptic fits in 91 children showing 72% success rate, out of 48 children with Cortical Blindness 30 children showed improvement accounting for 63% efficacy rate, out of 105 children with Hearing Difficulties, 63 showed marked improvement accounting for 60% improvement rate, out of 190 children with Speech Disorders 122 showed improvement reflecting 64% improvement rate, out of 96 children with Hemiplegia 71 showed improvement in movement, tone and power accounting for 74% improvement rate, out of 76 children with Quadriplegia 52 showed improvement in gross and fine motor functions showing 69% success rate and out of 58 children with Paraplegia of

  6. Central Nervous System Symptoms Due to Transient Methemoglobinemia in a Child With G6PD Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shreya; Srinivasaraghavan, Rangan; Krishnamurthy, Sriram

    2017-01-01

    The authors herein report a 5-year-old child who presented with massive hemolysis, irritability, and cyanosis. The final diagnosis was glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency with associated central nervous system symptoms probably because of concomitantly acquired methemoglobinemia following oxidant drug exposure. The associated acute-onset anemia would have contributed to the development of cerebral anoxia-related seizures and encephalopathy.

  7. Neurological signs and morphological cerebral changes in schizophrenia: An analysis of NSS subscales in patients with first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Mark; Thomann, Philipp A; Essig, Marco; Bachmann, Silke; Schröder, Johannes

    2011-05-31

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) comprise a broad range of minor motor and sensory deficits which are frequently found in schizophrenia. However, the cerebral changes underlying NSS are only partly understood. We therefore investigated the cerebral correlates of NSS by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 102 patients with first episode schizophrenia. NSS were assessed after remission of acute psychotic symptoms using the Heidelberg scale (HS), which consists of five NSS subscales ("motor coordination", "complex motor tasks", "orientation", "integrative functions", and "hard signs"). Correlations between NSS scores and cerebral changes were established by optimized voxel-based morphometry. NSS total scores were significantly associated with reduced gray matter densities in the precentral and postcentral gyri, the inferior parietal lobule and the inferior occipital gyrus. Both of the NSS subscales "motor coordination" and "complex motor tasks", referred to motor strip changes but showed differential correlations with parietal, insular, cerebellar or frontal sites, respectively. The NSS subscales "orientation" and "integrative functions" were associated with left frontal, parietal, and occipital changes or bihemispheric frontal changes, respectively. The NSS subscale "hard signs" was associated with deficits in the right cerebellum and right parastriate cortex. Repeated analyses for white matter changes revealed similar results. These findings confirm the associations between NSS and cerebral changes in areas important for motor and sensory functioning. This variety of cerebral sites corresponds to the heterogeneity of NSS and are consistent with the hypothesis that NSS reflect both a rather generalized cerebral dysfunction and localized deficits specific for particular signs. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Attacks of common migraine or hortons headache may not be accompanied by changes in regional cerebral blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, L.; Aebelholt Krabbe, A.; Tfelt-Hansen, P.; Olesen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Vasospasm and cerebral ischemia, followed by cerebral and extracerebral vasodilation and hyperemia, are generally believed to form the common pathophysiology of the various subtypes of migraine. Mild forms of reactions are thought to result in common migraine (no neurological prodromes or accompaniments), and more severe reactions are thought to induce classical migraine. 8 induced common migraine attacks in 6 patients do not support this unitarian view, as no regional cerebral blood flow changes was found, but suggests a different pathophysiology in common migraine compaired to classical migraine. There are few features in Hortons headache to incriminate the cerebral vessels, and generally patients do not have symptoms attributable to cerebral involvement. In 6 out of 14 patients with known Hortons headache we succesfully induced an attack after alcohol alone or in combination with sublingual nitroglycerine. A slight hyperventilation occurred during the attack, correcting cerebral blood flow for these changes left mean CBF totally unchanged. No regional abnormalities occurred in any of the about 700 regions measured from during each investigation in neither the group with common migraine, nor in the patients with Hortons headache. (Author)

  9. Neuroimpairment, activity limitation, and participation restriction among children with cerebral palsy in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H S S; Lau, P H B; Fong, K H; Poon, D; Lam, C C C

    2005-10-01

    To study children with cerebral palsy in Hong Kong, their neuroimpairment, activity limitation, and participation restriction in society. Parents' opinion on current medical and rehabilitation services was also sought. Systematic survey using questionnaires. Four associations in Hong Kong: Child Assessment Service, Hong Kong Association for Parents of Children with Physical Disabilities, Association of Parents of the Severely Mentally Handicapped, and Hong Kong Physically Handicapped and Able-Bodied Association. Parents of children with cerebral palsy. Neuroimpairment, activity limitation, and participation restriction. Information from 181 children with cerebral palsy was analysed. Among them, 56% were boys. The mean age was 7 years 6 months (standard deviation, 3 years 11 months). The most common diagnostic type was spastic cerebral palsy. Co-morbidities in children with cerebral palsy were common. Limitation in daily activities including mobility and self-care tasks was considerable and this posed great stress to parents when taking care of their children. Children's participation in both social and leisure activities was regarded as a low priority. A high percentage (70%) of parents reported difficulty in travelling. The reasons involved problems in transportation, building access (entry and exit), and attitudes of the general public. These environmental factors restricted the social participation of the children and their families. Over 75% of parents were satisfied with the current medical and rehabilitation services. Children with cerebral palsy have multiple and complex needs. The findings of this study may serve as a reference for parents, service providers, and policy makers to work in partnership to achieve a more comprehensive health-care service for children with cerebral palsy and to facilitate better integration into the community.

  10. Early psychosis symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, H.A.; Hussain, S.; Islam, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia in the pathways to help-seeking. Study Design: A cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The Department of Psychiatry, the Aga Khan University, Karachi, from 2008 to 2009. Methodology: A total of 93 patients were interviewed in the pathways to care of schizophrenia. The diagnosis was based on ICD-10 criteria. The pathways to care were assessed through a semi-structured questionnaire. The onset, course and symptoms of psychosis were assessed through Interview for Retrospective Assessment at Age at Onset of Psychosis (IROAS). Results: Fifty five (59%) participants were male while 41% (n=38%) were female. Using IROAS, 108 symptoms were identified as concerning behaviour. Alternatively, 60 (55%) concerning behaviours were reported in the open-ended inquiry of the reasons for help seeking as assessed by the pathways to care questionnaire with a statistically significant difference between most symptoms category. The difference was most pronounced (p < 0.001) for depressed mood (66%), worries (65%), tension (63%), withdrawal/mistrust (54%) and loss of self-confidence (53%). Thought withdrawal (22%) and passivity (15%) were elicited only through structured interview (IROAS). When symptoms were categorized together, about 83% of the subjects presented with affective and non-specific prodromal symptoms. Roughly, 10% of the subjects presented with positive symptoms and 3% presented with the negative symptoms of psychosis. The non-specific, affective symptoms appear to predominate the prodromal phase of the illness. Conclusion: Prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia include non-specific, affective symptoms. Attention needs to be paid on identifying the prodromal symptoms and change in social functioning in order to identify those who are at risk of long term psychosis. (author)

  11. Cerebral vasculitis associated with Schistosoma mansoni infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camuset Guillaume

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral involvement in schistosomiasis is not rare, but it is underdiagnosed because of the lack of clinical suspicion and the frequency of asymptomatic forms. Neurologic complications are generally supported by granuloma formation around ectopic eggs which have migrated to the brain. Moreover, vascular lesions and cerebral arteritis have been well documented in histopathological studies. Nevertheless, cerebral vasculitis in later stages of the Schistosoma mansoni infection have not yet been described in living subjects. Case presentation A 28-year-old french woman had a stroke linked with cerebral vasculitis, 6 monthes after returning from Burkina-Faso. At the same time, a S. mansoni disseminated infection was diagnosed. She suffered from a new stroke after undertaking praziquantel therapy, which lead us to associate the S. mansoni infection and cerebral vasculitis. Conclusion This is the first report of such association, since cerebral vasculitis has never been described in later stages of the S. mansoni infection. Although the causal link between the two pathologies could not be proved, we suggest that S. mansoni is able to cause severe vascular damage in cerebral vessels. Schistosomiasis must be investigated in the event of a brain infarct in young people, particularly in patients originating or returning from an endemic area.

  12. Cerebral intolerance during flow arrested carotid angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Louis, Myron; Park, Brian D; Dahn, Michael; Bozeman, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The use of flow arrest as a means of providing cerebral protection during carotid angioplasty offers the advantages of improved efficiency of debris removal and the ability to provide protection under unfavorable (tortuous) anatomic circumstances. However, in contrast to the filtration methods of cerebral protection, this modality requires complete interruption of antegrade carotid artery flow during balloon angioplasty and stent deployment. We report our experience with 9 patients undergoing carotid angioplasty with the Mo.Ma device, which utilizes common and external carotid artery balloon occlusion during the angioplasty procedure. We assessed the clinical outcomes and intraprocedural hemodynamic data. The average duration of carotid occlusion was 8.3 minutes. Of the 9 patients, 2 patients (22%) experienced cerebral intolerance. No stroke occurred in this patient cohort. There appeared to be a poor relationship between procedure intolerance and the presence of significant contralateral stenosis or low carotid back pressure. Furthermore, the incidence of postangioplasty hypotension was not clearly related to cerebral intolerance. Carotid angioplasty with stenting can be safely conducted with flow arrest as an alternative to filter-type cerebral protection devices. However, because cerebral intolerance is not an infrequent occurrence with this approach, clinicians must be cognizant of management strategies for transient cerebral intolerance.

  13. Cerebellar malformations alter regional cerebral development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Marie-Eve; Du Plessis, Adre J; Evans, Alan; Guizard, Nicolas; Zhang, Xun; Robertson, Richard L; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare total and regional cerebral volumes in children with isolated cerebellar malformations (CBMs) with those in typically developing children, and to examine the extent to which cerebellar volumetric reductions are associated with total and regional cerebral volumes. This is a case-control study of children diagnosed with isolated CBMs. Each child was matched on age and sex to two typically developing children. Using advanced three-dimensional volumetric magnetic resonance imaging, the cerebrum was segmented into tissue classes and partitioned into eight regions. Analysis of variance was used to compare cerebral volumes between children with CBMs and control children, and linear regressions to examine the impact of cerebellar volume reduction on cerebral volumes. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at a mean age of 27 months in 20 children (10 males, 10 females) with CBMs and 40 typically developing children. Children with CBMs showed significantly smaller deep grey matter nuclei (p developing children. Greater cerebellar volumetric reduction in children with CBMs was associated with decreased total cerebral volume and deep grey matter nuclei (p = 0.02), subgenual white/grey matter (p = 0.001), midtemporal white (p = 0.02) and grey matter (p = 0.01), and parieto-occipital grey matter (p = 0.004). CBMs are associated with impaired regional cerebral growth, suggesting deactivation of principal cerebello-cerebral pathways. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  14. Somatic symptom disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related disorders; Somatization disorder; Somatiform disorders; Briquet syndrome; Illness anxiety disorder References American Psychiatric Association. Somatic symptom disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . ...

  15. Clinical studies on cerebral blood flow in chronic subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Atsuhiro; Akagi, Katsuhito; Horibe, Kunio; Yamasaki, Mami; Yuguchi, Takamichi

    1988-11-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and clinical symptoms were examined between pre- and post-operations in twenty-four patients with unilateral chronic subdural hematoma. The following results were obtained by intravenous /sup 133/Xe method : 1. There was a reducing tendency of the CBF (hemisphere) on hematoma side, in most cases. While, the groups of headache and disturbances of consciousness did not give a laterality between hematoma and opposite side without the group of hemiparesis. 2. The absolute values of the CBF in the groups of headache and disturbances of consciousness were correlated with the clinical symptoms. In the group of hemiparesis, the laterality between hematoma and opposite side was correlated with the clinical symptoms. 3. In the group of hemiparesis, the F-flow (fast-flow) had sensitive reaction more than the ISI (initial slope index) with symptomatic improvement. 4. It was found that there was not an increase in the absolute value of the CBF, which was under the normal limit between pre- and post-operations in the case without improvement. By SPECT (Method of IMP), the following results were obtained : 1. There was the area of defect at the location of hematoma and the CBF tended to reduce at the subcortical white matter and at the basal ganglia of hematoma side. 2. The CBF of the contralateral hematoma side in the hemisphere of cerebellum was also tended to reduce.

  16. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  17. Cerebral lactic acidosis correlates with neurological impairment in MELAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, P; Shungu, D C; Sano, M C; Jhung, S; Engelstad, K; Mitsis, E; Mao, X; Shanske, S; Hirano, M; DiMauro, S; De Vivo, D C

    2004-04-27

    To evaluate the role of chronic cerebral lactic acidosis in mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). The authors studied 91 individuals from 34 families with MELAS and the A3243G point mutation and 15 individuals from two families with myoclonus epilepsy and ragged red fibers (MERRF) and the A8344G mutation. Subjects were divided into four groups. Paternal relatives were studied as controls (Group 1). The maternally related subjects were divided clinically into three groups: asymptomatic (no clinical evidence of neurologic disease) (Group 2), oligosymptomatic (neurologic symptoms but without the full clinical picture of MELAS or MERRF) (Group 3), and symptomatic (fulfilling MELAS or MERRF criteria) (Group 4). The authors performed a standardized neurologic examination, neuropsychological testing, MRS, and leukocyte DNA analysis in all subjects. The symptomatic and oligosymptomatic MELAS subjects had significantly higher ventricular lactate than the other groups. There was a significant correlation between degree of neuropsychological and neurologic impairment and cerebral lactic acidosis as estimated by ventricular MRS lactate levels. High levels of ventricular lactate, the brain spectroscopic signature of MELAS, are associated with more severe neurologic impairment.

  18. Altered Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Chronic Whiplash Associated Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vállez García

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of central hyperexcitability in chronic whiplash-associated disorders (cWAD. However, little is known about how an apparently simple cervical spine injury can induce changes in cerebral processes. The present study was designed (1 to validate previous results showing alterations of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF in cWAD, (2 to test if central hyperexcitability reflects changes in rCBF upon non-painful stimulation of the neck, and (3 to verify our hypothesis that the missing link in understanding the underlying pathophysiology could be the close interaction between the neck and midbrain structures. For this purpose, alterations of rCBF were explored in a case-control study using H215O positron emission tomography, where each group was exposed to four different conditions, including rest and different levels of non-painful electrical stimulation of the neck. rCBF was found to be elevated in patients with cWAD in the posterior cingulate and precuneus, and decreased in the superior temporal, parahippocampal, and inferior frontal gyri, the thalamus and the insular cortex when compared with rCBF in healthy controls. No differences in rCBF were observed between different levels of electrical stimulation. The alterations in regions directly involved with pain perception and interoceptive processing indicate that cWAD symptoms might be the consequence of a mismatch during the integration of information in brain regions involved in pain processing.

  19. Walking drawings and walking ability in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jimmy; Mackey, Anna H; Stott, N Susan; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    To investigate whether drawings of the self walking by children with cerebral palsy (CP) were associated with walking ability and illness perceptions. This was an exploratory study in 52 children with CP (M:F = 28:24), mean age 11.1 years (range 5-18), who were attending tertiary level outpatient clinics. Children were asked to draw a picture of themselves walking. Drawing size and content was used to investigate associations with clinical walk tests and children's own perceptions of their CP assessed using a CP version of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. Larger drawings of the self were associated with less distance traveled, higher emotional responses to CP, and lower perceptions of pain or discomfort, independent of age. A larger self-to-overall drawing height ratio was related to walking less distance. Drawings of the self confined within buildings and the absence of other figures were also associated with reduced walking ability. Drawing size and content can reflect walking ability, as well as symptom perceptions and distress. Drawings may be useful for clinicians to use with children with cerebral palsy to aid discussion about their condition. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Use of Botulinum toxin in 55 children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi M

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A (BTA inhibits presynaptic release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction and has reportedly been successful in the treatment of spastic disorders.To evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin on cerebral palsied children with spastic or mixed type of the disease, especially those patiens having spasticity as a cardinal symptom without joint contracture, we designed the following study. Ninety-one cases (55 of referred patients to pediatic Neurology outpatient clinics of children’s Medical Center were given BTA injections in affected muscles of the lower limb. They were reevaluating 3 to 5 weeks and 3 months later for type of walking and range of affected joints’ movement. The study showed a clinically significant gait improvement in 71.2% of patients (P<0.0005 and also an overall increased range of motion in affected limbs after BTA injection (P<0.04. Side effects occurred only in two cases as transient generalized weakness, gent recurvatum and ptosis. Drug effectiveness was time-limited, lasting abot 3 months in all patients ( a golden time for rehabilitation therapists to improve the patients’ condition. Overall, BTA has improved both the type of walking as well as the range of joints motion in our patients. So its’ administration is suggested in cerebral palsied children if the spasticity is a major and disabling sign

  1. Contrast enhancement pattern in MR imaging of acute cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Deok; Cho, Mee Young; Lee, Chae Guk; Song, Dong Hoon

    1994-01-01

    To present the enhancement pattern of acute cerebral or cerebellar cortical infarctions aged 1-3 days on MR. Contrast-enhanced MR images of 26 patients with acute cerebral or cerebellar ischemic events were retrospectively reviewed. MR was performed within 3 days after ictus. Contrast enhancement in the area of infarction was observed in 61.5% (16/26) on MR. Of these 50% (13/26) showed non-parenchymal enhancement (NPE) representing either vascular or leptomeningeal enhancement, 7.7% (2/26) showed parenchymal enhancement (PE), and 2.8% (1/26) showed both NPE and PE. The earliest enhancement was seen in images obtained 12 hours after the onset of symptoms and appeared as NPE. One patient showed NPE without apparent high signal intensity at the corresponding area on T2-weighted images. In 38.5% (10/26), there was no enhancement. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging may be needed in acute ischemic infarction, because NPE may be seen as the earliest MR finding of acute cortical infraction aged 1-3 days

  2. Contrast enhancement pattern in MR imaging of acute cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Deok; Cho, Mee Young; Lee, Chae Guk; Song, Dong Hoon [Inje University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-08-15

    To present the enhancement pattern of acute cerebral or cerebellar cortical infarctions aged 1-3 days on MR. Contrast-enhanced MR images of 26 patients with acute cerebral or cerebellar ischemic events were retrospectively reviewed. MR was performed within 3 days after ictus. Contrast enhancement in the area of infarction was observed in 61.5% (16/26) on MR. Of these 50% (13/26) showed non-parenchymal enhancement (NPE) representing either vascular or leptomeningeal enhancement, 7.7% (2/26) showed parenchymal enhancement (PE), and 2.8% (1/26) showed both NPE and PE. The earliest enhancement was seen in images obtained 12 hours after the onset of symptoms and appeared as NPE. One patient showed NPE without apparent high signal intensity at the corresponding area on T2-weighted images. In 38.5% (10/26), there was no enhancement. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging may be needed in acute ischemic infarction, because NPE may be seen as the earliest MR finding of acute cortical infraction aged 1-3 days.

  3. Excessive Daytime Sleepiness Is a Common Symptom in Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Duning

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease (FD is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder characterized by a deficient activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A, resulting in a vasculopathic involvement of various organ systems, e.g. cerebral structures. Marked cerebral vasculopathy with subsequent white matter lesions (WML are a frequent finding in FD patients. Recent studies discussed an association between cerebral white matter changes and sleep-related disturbances of breathing, which may lead to excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS. A 56-year-old Caucasian female FD patient with EDS was admitted to our sleep laboratory. Overnight polysomnography showed a Cheyne-Stokes respiration pattern with significant O2 desaturation. MR imaging revealed confluent WML including the brain stem, but no renal or cardiac involvement. We then evaluated the clinical data of 49 genetically proven FD patients (27 males; mean age 43 years from our FD centre. With a frequency of 68%, EDS exceeds the prevalence of other common symptoms of FD (angiokeratomas 61%; acroparaesthesia 51%; renal involvement 29%; cardiac involvement 27%, and the prevalence of chronic fatigue (48%. EDS was independently associated with the physical component summary of the SF-36 data (corrected R2 =–0.323, p 2 = –0.253, p < 0.001. We conclude that EDS is a common and underdiagnosed symptom in FD patients, accompanied by a significant impact on quality of life. EDS might be caused by central breathing disorders due to an affection of brain regions associated with respiratory control in FD.

  4. Prevalence of symptoms associated with mental illness in Salvadorians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gutiérrez

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study arises the purpose of describing and explaining some behaviors considered abnormal, that with Salvadorans present, which in many occasions are the result of greater conflicts; for example, social violence, familiar violence, delinquency, homicides, depression and anxiety, among others. The specific objectives that were considered at the beginning of the project were to identify the incidence of symptoms of mental upheavals; to establish the difference of symptoms in relation to the sex of the population; to determine if sex affects the mental upheavals; and to establish the prevalence of symptoms of the mental upheavals in each geographic zone of the country. In the methodology of the study, the following strategies were used: It was determined that it was a descriptive study, the design of investigation was transactional descriptive; the random sampling by conglomerates was used; the technique used was the survey directed to 1.668 people distributed in the 31 more important cities of El Salvador; the instrument used was the Illustrated Questionnaire of Symptoms (designed by the PAHO/WHO that measures the presence of symptoms of ten mental upheavals and behavior. The results can be synthesized in percentages of prevalence of symptoms and some of these are the following: 50% of the interviewed people presented symptoms of compulsive obsessive upheaval, 47,7% presented anxiety symptoms and distresses, 36,8% presented somatization characteristics. Also, 29,1% presented some symptoms of depression; 33,2% of the evaluated population declared to have symptoms of the convulsive Syndrome. 35,8% demonstrated some suspicions of symptoms of an organic cerebral Syndrome. The final part of the study contains the conclusions and a set of solution strategies.

  5. Embodying Investigations of Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Kristian Møller Moltke

    to understand what it means for persons to live with CP and then figure out how we should help them . Based on his method of open - minded cognitive science, Martiny presents data on neuro - physiological, psychological and social aspects of living with CP. From this theoretical work, Martiny develops......The main question of Kristian Martiny’s dissertation is: how do we help persons living with the brain damage, cerebral palsy (CP)? This question is as complex and difficult to answer as any healthcare question. Martiny argues that we need to ‘open up’ how we do ( cognitive ) science in order...... an embodied - based model of intervention for CP, focusing on the experience of self control as a way to help people with CP. In addition, a theatre performance, Humane Liquidation , and a documentary film, Natural Disorder, are developed so as to both communicate what it means to live with CP and empower...

  6. Cerebral hemisphere astrocytoma: Treatment results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyages, J.; Tiver, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    Eighty two adult patients with histologically proven cerebral astrocytomas of grades I to IV received post-operative radiotherapy at Westmead Hospital between January 1980 and February 1985. Seventy one patients completed a course of megavoltage irradiation, the majority having received a tumour dose of at least 60 Gy. Patients who underwent surgical resection had a greater median survival than those undergoing biopsy, but the difference was not statistically significant. By grade, the difference reached statistical significance only for grade III tumours. Patients with high grade tumours had a significantly lower survival than those patients with tumours of low grade. After adjustment for grade, various dosage levels did not significantly affect survival, although there was a trend towards improved median survival with higher doses in grade III tumours. When included in a multivariate analysis, the extent of surgery did not significantly influence survival, but increasing tumour grade and increasing age were significant adverse prognostic factors. (Auth.)

  7. Environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.; Lieskovska, Z.

    1998-01-01

    In this chapter environmental protection in the Slovak Republic in 1997 are reviewed. The economics of environmental protection, state budget, Slovak state environmental fund, economic instruments, environmental laws, environmental impact assessment, environmental management systems, and environmental education are presented

  8. The serpentine mitral valve and cerebral embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ker James

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Valvular strands, well-delineated filiform masses, attached to cardiac valve edges are associated with cerebral embolism and stroke. Strokes, caused by emboli from valvular strands, tend to occur among younger persons. In this case report a valvular strand, giving a peculiar serpentine appearance to the mitral valve is described. This mitral valvular strand was the only explanation for an episode of cerebral embolism, presenting with a transient right sided hemiparesis. It is proposed that a randomized study involving combined treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel is warranted in young patients with valvular strands, presenting with a first episode of cerebral embolism.

  9. Validation of a Cerebral Palsy Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Monica; Langhoff-Roos, Jens; Uldall, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse completeness and validity of data in the Cerebral Palsy Register in Denmark, 1979-1982. METHODS: Completeness has been assessed by comparing data from The Danish National Patient Register (DNPR) with the cases included in the Cerebral Palsy Register (CPR). Agreement between......, but gestational age was subject to a systematic error, and urinary infections in pregnancy (kappa = 0.43) and placental abruption (kappa = 0.52) were seriously under-reported in the CPR. CONCLUSIONS: Completeness of the Cerebral Palsy Register in Denmark, 1979-1982, has been assessed to maximal 85%, emphasizing...

  10. Cerebral palsy in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeši-Drljan Čila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cerebral palsy (CP is one of the leading causes of neurological impairment in childhood. Preterm birth is a significant risk factor in the occurrence of CP. Clinical outcomes may include impairment of gross motor function and intellectual abilities, visual impairment and epilepsy. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among gestational age, type of CP, functional ability and associated conditions. Methods. The sample size was 206 children with CP. The data were obtained from medical records and included gestational age at birth, clinical characteristics of CP and associated conditions. Clinical CP type was determined according to Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe (SCPE and topographically. Gross motor function abilities were evaluated according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS. Results. More than half of the children with CP were born prematurely (54.4%. Statistically significant difference was noted with respect to the distribution of various clinical types of CP in relation to gestational age (p < 0.001. In the group with spastic bilateral CP type, there is a greater proportion of children born preterm. Statistically significant difference was noted in the functional classification based on GMFCS in terms of gestational age (p = 0.049, children born at earlier gestational age are classified at a higher GMFCS level of functional limitation. The greatest percentage of children (70.0% affected by two or more associated conditions was found in the group that had extremely preterm birth, and that number declined with increasing maturity at birth. Epilepsy was more prevalent in children born at greater gestational age, and this difference in distribution was statistically significant (p = 0.032. Conclusion. The application of antenatal and postnatal protection of preterm children should be a significant component of the CP prevention strategy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike

  11. Cerebral cysticercosis. A case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuch, P.S.; Saffer, D. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Neurology)

    1984-02-11

    Two cases of histologically proven cerebral cysticercosis are presented. In both cases subcutaneous tissue nodules, a rare feature, were present. Several disease patterns are apparent - meningeal, parenchymatous and ventricular, spinal cord lesions and mixed patterns. Epilepsy is by far the major presenting symptom of cysticercosis, which in turn plays a significant role in the causation of adult-onset epilepsy in Blacks. Despite its drawbacks, the haemag-glutination inhibition test remains the most satisfactory serological method at present available for the diagnosis of cysticercosis; it is positive in up to 85% of cases of proven cysticercosis. With the advent of computed tomography many cases of unsuspected cysticercosis (symptomatic or asymptomatic) are being discovered.

  12. Inherited neurovascular diseases affecting cerebral blood vessels and smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Christine; Li, Fei-Feng; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2015-10-01

    Neurovascular diseases are among the leading causes of mortality and permanent disability due to stroke, aneurysm, and other cardiovascular complications. Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) and Marfan syndrome are two neurovascular disorders that affect smooth muscle cells through accumulation of granule and osmiophilic materials and defective elastic fiber formations respectively. Moyamoya disease, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II), and Fabry's disease are disorders that affect the endothelium cells of blood vessels through occlusion or abnormal development. While much research has been done on mapping out mutations in these diseases, the exact mechanisms are still largely unknown. This paper briefly introduces the pathogenesis, genetics, clinical symptoms, and current methods of treatment of the diseases in the hope that it can help us better understand the mechanism of these diseases and work on ways to develop better diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Cerebral and non-cerebral coenurosis: on the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Taenia multiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulopoulos, Georgios; Dinkel, Anke; Romig, Thomas; Ebi, Dennis; Mackenstedt, Ute; Loos-Frank, Brigitte

    2016-12-01

    We characterised the causative agents of cerebral and non-cerebral coenurosis in livestock by determining the mitochondrial genotypes and morphological phenotypes of 52 Taenia multiceps isolates from a wide geographical range in Europe, Africa, and western Asia. Three studies were conducted: (1) a morphological comparison of the rostellar hooks of cerebral and non-cerebral cysts of sheep and goats, (2) a morphological comparison of adult worms experimentally produced in dogs, and (3) a molecular analysis of three partial mitochondrial genes (nad1, cox1, and 12S rRNA) of the same isolates. No significant morphological or genetic differences were associated with the species of the intermediate host. Adult parasites originating from cerebral and non-cerebral cysts differed morphologically, e.g. the shape of the small hooks and the distribution of the testes in the mature proglottids. The phylogenetic analysis of the mitochondrial haplotypes produced three distinct clusters: one cluster including both cerebral isolates from Greece and non-cerebral isolates from tropical and subtropical countries, and two clusters including cerebral isolates from Greece. The majority of the non-cerebral specimens clustered together but did not form a monophyletic group. No monophyletic groups were observed based on geography, although specimens from the same region tended to cluster. The clustering indicates high intraspecific diversity. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that all variants of T. multiceps can cause cerebral coenurosis in sheep (which may be the ancestral phenotype), and some variants, predominantly from one genetic cluster, acquired the additional capacity to produce non-cerebral forms in goats and more rarely in sheep.

  14. Clinical significance of determination of plasma NPY levels and serum lipid profile in patients with cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Fujuan; Shen Airong; Yang Yongqing

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of plasma NPY levels and serum lipid profile in patients with cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction. Methods: Plasma NPY levels (with RIA) and serum lipid profile (with biochemistry) were determined in (1) 48 patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage (2) 46 patients with acute cerebral infarction and (3) controls.Results Plasma NPY levels in both patients with cerebral hemorrhage and patients with cerebral infarction were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: NPY played important roles in the development and pathogenesis of cerebral vascular accidents. Lipid profile changes was the basic etiological factor. (authors)

  15. Ocular Surface Symptoms in Veterans Returning From Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

    OpenAIRE

    Modi, Yasha S.; Qurban, Qirat; Zlotcavitch, Leonid; Echeverri, Roberto J.; Feuer, William; Florez, Hermes; Galor, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were associated with an increased risk of dry eye symptoms in veterans while overseas. On return, PTSD remained a significant risk factor for persistent symptoms.

  16. Endovascular treatment of posterior cerebral artery aneurysms using detachable coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Hong Gee [Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Chuncheon, Kangwon-do (Korea); Konkuk University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Sam Soo; Han, Heon [Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Chuncheon, Kangwon-do (Korea); Kang, Hyun-Seung [Konkuk University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea); Moon, Won-Jin [Konkuk University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Byun, Hong Sik [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-03-15

    Aneurysms of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) are rare, and most of the studies reported in the literature in which the endovascular approach was applied were carried out on a limited number of patients with PCA aneurysms. We retrospectively reviewed our cases of PCA aneurysms - at various locations and of differing shapes - that received endovascular treatment and evaluated the treatment outcome. From January 1996 to December 2006, 13 patients (eight females and five males) with 17 PCA aneurysms (nine fusiform and eight saccular) were treated using the endovascular approach. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 67 years, with a mean age of 44 years. Of the 13 patients, ten presented with intracranial hemorrhage, and one patient, with a large P2 aneurysm, presented with trigeminal neuralgia; the aneurysms were asymptomatic in the remaining two patients. All 13 patients were successfully treated, with only one procedure-related symptomatic complication. Seven patients were treated by occlusion of the aneurysm and parent artery together; five patients, by selective embolization of the aneurysm; one patient, by partial coiling. Although infarctions were found in two patients treated with selective embolization and in three patients treated with parent artery occlusion, only one patient with a ruptured P2 aneurysm treated with parent artery occlusion developed transient amnesia as an ischemic symptom. Posterior cerebral artery aneurysms can be treated safely with either occlusion of the aneurysm together with the PCA or with a selective coil embolization. Infarctions may occur after endovascular treatment, but they are rarely the cause of a disabling symptom. (orig.)

  17. Bell's Palsy Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bell's Palsy Sections What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Symptoms Bell's Palsy Treatment Bell's Palsy Symptoms Leer en Español: Síntomas de la parálisis ...

  18. Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story: Leukemia/Lymphoma Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia Symptoms Frequent infections Fever and chills Anemia Easy ...

  19. Cerebral Magnesium Levels in Preeclampsia; A Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelander, Maria; Weis, Jan; Bergman, Lina; Larsson, Anders; Wikström, Anna-Karin; Wikström, Johan

    2017-07-01

    Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is used as a prophylaxis for eclamptic seizures. The exact mechanism of action is not fully established. We used phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) to investigate if cerebral magnesium (Mg2+) levels differ between women with preeclampsia, normal pregnant, and nonpregnant women. This cross-sectional study comprised 28 women with preeclampsia, 30 women with normal pregnancies in corresponding gestational week (range: 23-41 weeks) and 11 nonpregnant healthy controls. All women underwent 31P-MRS from the parieto-occipital region of the brain and were interviewed about cerebral symptoms. Differences between groups were assessed by analysis of variance and Tukey's post-hoc test. Correlations between Mg2+ levels and specific neurological symptoms were estimated with Spearman's rank test. Mean maternal cerebral Mg2+ levels were lower in women with preeclampsia (0.12 mM ± 0.02) compared to normal pregnant controls (0.14 mM ± 0.03) (P = 0.04). Nonpregnant and normal pregnant women did not differ in Mg2+ levels. Among women with preeclampsia, lower Mg2+ levels correlated with presence of visual disturbances (P = 0.04). Plasma levels of Mg2+ did not differ between preeclampsia and normal pregnancy. Women with preeclampsia have reduced cerebral Mg2+ levels, which could explain the potent antiseizure prophylactic properties of MgSO4. Within the preeclampsia group, women with visual disturbances have lower levels of Mg2+ than those without such symptoms. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Treatment of Pusher Syndrome in a patient after extensive cerebral infarction caused by cerebral embolism - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Porzych

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pusher Syndrome is defined as a disorder of perception of body orientation in the frontal plane. It is mainly observed in patients after stroke in consequence to damage to the right or left hemisphere of the brain. Characteristic clinical symptoms in people affected by this syndrome are leaning towards the paralyzed side of the body and building massive resistance during passive correction. The consequence of such behavior are falls in the direction of the affected side. The paper presents the case of a patient who, after extensive right hemisphere cerebral hemorrhage, was admitted to the Chair and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine of the Dr Antoni Jurasz University Hospital No.1 in Bydgoszcz to improve. During treatment the patient was used the neurorehabilitation based on the Bobath concept.

  1. Cerebral cysticercosis in a cat : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Schwan

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The metacestode of Taenia solium, Cysticercus cellulosae, was recovered from the brain of a cat showing central nervous clinical signs ante mortem. This is the first record of cerebral cysticercosis in a cat in South Africa.

  2. CEREBRAL CORTEX DAMAGE INDUCED BY ACUTE ORAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... This study examines alcohol-induced cerebral cortex damage and the association with oxidative ... alcohol has profound effects on the function ... Chronic use of ..... Alcohol induced brain damage and liver damage in young.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral folate transport deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R. Cerebral folate deficiency syndromes in childhood: clinical, analytical, and etiologic aspects. Arch Neurol. 2011 May;68( ... 2009.08.005. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Toelle SP, Wille D, Schmitt ...

  4. Gluconeogenesis and fasting in cerebral malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thien, H.; Ackermans, M. T.; Weverling, G. J.; Dang Vinh, T.; Endert, E.; Kager, P. A.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In healthy subjects after an overnight fast, glucose production is for approximately 50% derived from glycogenolysis. If the fast is prolonged, glucose production decreases due to a decline in glycogenolysis, while gluconeogenesis remains stable. In cerebral malaria, glucose production

  5. [Functional electric stimulation (FES) in cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, M H; Lourenção, M I; Ribeiro Sobrinho, J B; Battistella, L R

    1992-01-01

    Our study concerns a patient with cerebral palsy, submitted to conventional occupational therapy and functional electrical stimulation. The results as to manual ability, spasticity, sensibility and synkinesis were satisfactory.

  6. Somatosensory discrimination deficits following pediatric cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugbartey, A T; Spellacy, F J; Dugbartey, M T

    1998-09-01

    Pathologic studies of central nervous system damage in human falciparum malaria indicate primary localization in the cerebral white matter. We report a sensory-perceptual investigation of 20 Ghanaian children with a recent history of cerebral malaria who were age-, gender-, and education-matched with 20 healthy control subjects. Somatosensory examinations failed to show any evidence of hemianesthesia, pseudohemianesthesia, or extinction to double simultaneous tactile stimulation. While unilateral upper limb testing revealed intact unimanual tactile roughness discrimination, bimanual tactile discrimination, however, was significantly impaired in the cerebral malaria group. A strong negative correlation (r = -0.72) between coma duration and the bimanual tactile roughness discrimination test was also found. An inefficiency in the integrity of callosal fibers appear to account for our findings, although alternative subcortical mechanisms known to be involved in information transfer across the cerebral hemispheres may be compromised as well.

  7. Cerebral blood flow: Physiologic and clinical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 46 chapters divided among nine sections. The section titles are: Historical Perspectives; Cerebrovascular Anatomy; Cerebrovascular Physiology; Methods of Clinical Measurement; Experimental Methods; Imaging of Cerebral Circulation; Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology; Cerebrovascular Pharmacology; and Surgical and Interventional Augmentation

  8. Cerebral oxygen desaturation during beach chair position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerman, Annelies T.; de Hert, Stefan G.; Jacobs, Tom F.; de Wilde, Lieven F.; Wouters, Patrick F.

    2012-01-01

    Cases of ischaemic brain damage have been reported in relatively healthy patients undergoing shoulder surgery in the beach chair position. Unrecognised cerebral hypoperfusion may have contributed to these catastrophic events, indicating that routine anaesthesia monitoring may not suffice.

  9. Airway contractility and remodeling : Links to asthma symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    West, Adrian R.; Syyong, Harley T.; Siddiqui, Sana; Pascoe, Chris D.; Murphy, Thomas M.; Maarsingh, Harm; Deng, Linhong; Maksym, Geoffrey N.; Bosse, Ynuk

    Respiratory symptoms are largely caused by obstruction of the airways. In asthma, airway narrowing mediated by airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction contributes significantly to obstruction. The spasmogens produced following exposure to environmental triggers, such as viruses or allergens, are

  10. Storytelling: Enhancing Vocabularies For Cerebral Palsy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Aprilina, Raita Gina

    2015-01-01

    This paper reported on a study concerned with teaching vocabulary using storytelling technique in one of SLBs in Bandung. This study aimed to find out the cerebral palsy students' ability in English vocabulary before and after the treatment, and to find out whether storytelling significantly improved English vocabulary of students with cerebral palsy. This study used an experimental method with single subject research with A-B-A design which involved two participants. This study revealed that...

  11. Applications of cerebral MRI in neonatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) has become the most important method in the workup of infantile cerebral complications after primary sonography. Cerebral MR examination and image interpretation during the infantile period require extensive knowledge of morphological manifestations, their pathophysiological background, and frequency. The choice of imaging parameters and image interpretation is demonstrated in infarctions and hemorrhages of the mature and immature brain. A review of the main differential diagnoses is also given. The relevance of MR spectroscopy and fetal MRI is discussed. (orig.) [de

  12. Cerebral microcirculation during experimental normovolaemic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eBellapart

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaemia is accepted amongst critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anaemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anaemia. Experimental studies suggest that anaemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion amongst critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anaemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anaesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anaemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anaemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anaemia does not result in short term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain.

  13. Hyperdense lesions in CT of cerebral toxoplasmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinones Tapia, D.; Ramos Amador, A.; Monereo Alonso, A.

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with stage IV C 1 AIDS who presented hyperdense CT images 13 days after beginning antitoxoplasma treatment. These lesions could be caused by calcifications or blood. The attenuation values lead us to believe that they are calcium. Intracranial calcification in adult cerebral toxoplasmosis is an uncommon finding. Its presence in AIDS patients should not suggest any etiology other than toxoplasmosis. (Author) 16 refs

  14. Purine Metabolism in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V. Oreshnikov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of purine metabolism in clinically significant acute cerebral ischemia. Subjects and materials. Three hundred and fifty patients with the acutest cerebral ischemic stroke were examined. The parameters of gas and electrolyte composition, acid-base balance, the levels of malonic dialdehyde, adenine, guanine, hypox-anthine, xanthine, and uric acid, and the activity of xanthine oxidase were determined in arterial and venous bloods and spinal fluid. Results. In ischemic stroke, hyperuricemia reflects the severity of cerebral metabolic disturbances, hemodynamic instability, hypercoagulation susceptiility, and the extent of neurological deficit. In ischemic stroke, hyperuri-corachia is accompanied by the higher spinal fluid levels of adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine and it is an indirect indicator of respiratory disorders of central genesis, systemic acidosis, hypercoagulation susceptibility, free radical oxidation activation, the intensity of a stressor response to cerebral ischemia, cerebral metabolic disturbances, the depth of reduced consciousness, and the severity of neurological deficit. Conclusion. The high venous blood activity of xanthine oxidase in ischemic stroke is associated with the better neurological parameters in all follow-up periods, the better early functional outcome, and lower mortality rates. Key words: hyperuricemia, stroke, xanthine oxidase, uric acid, cerebral ischemia.

  15. CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Choi, Woo Suk; Ryu, Kyung Nam

    1992-01-01

    The CT findings of the acute cerebral infarction are well known. However the CT findings of early stroke within 24 hours of the onset have not been sufficiently reported. The purpose of this study is to evaluate early acute cerebral infarction on CT within 24 hours after ictus. The early and accurate CT diagnosis could lead to the appropriate therapy and improved outcome of the patients. Authors retrospectively analyzed 16 patients with early acute cerebral infarction. Acute cerebral infarction was confirmed by follow-up CT in 11 patients, SPECT in 4 patients, and MRI in 1 patient. The CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction include effacement of cortical sulci or cistern (n = 16, 100%), hyperattenuation of MCA (n = 3), obscuration of lentiform nucleus (n = 6), loss of insular ribbon (n = 6) and subtle low density in hemisphere (n = 5). The most frequent finding was effacement of cortical sulci in our study, and it was thought to be the most important sign of early acute cerebral infarction

  16. CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Choi, Woo Suk; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    The CT findings of the acute cerebral infarction are well known. However the CT findings of early stroke within 24 hours of the onset have not been sufficiently reported. The purpose of this study is to evaluate early acute cerebral infarction on CT within 24 hours after ictus. The early and accurate CT diagnosis could lead to the appropriate therapy and improved outcome of the patients. Authors retrospectively analyzed 16 patients with early acute cerebral infarction. Acute cerebral infarction was confirmed by follow-up CT in 11 patients, SPECT in 4 patients, and MRI in 1 patient. The CT findings of early acute cerebral infarction include effacement of cortical sulci or cistern (n = 16, 100%), hyperattenuation of MCA (n = 3), obscuration of lentiform nucleus (n = 6), loss of insular ribbon (n = 6) and subtle low density in hemisphere (n = 5). The most frequent finding was effacement of cortical sulci in our study, and it was thought to be the most important sign of early acute cerebral infarction.

  17. Is fasting necessary for elective cerebral angiography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O-K; Oh, C W; Park, H; Bang, J S; Bae, H-J; Han, M K; Park, S-H; Han, M H; Kang, H-S; Park, S-K; Whang, G; Kim, B-C; Jin, S-C

    2011-05-01

    In order to prevent unexpected events such as aspiration pneumonia, cerebral angiography has been performed under fasting in most cases. We investigated prospectively the necessity of fasting before elective cerebral angiography. The study is an open-labeled clinical trial without random allocation. In total, 2554 patients who underwent elective cerebral angiography were evaluated on development of nausea, vomiting, and pulmonary aspiration during and after angiography. Potential risks and benefits associated with fasting were provided in written documents and through personal counseling to patients before the procedure. The patients chose their fasting or nonfasting option. No restriction in diet was given after angiography. The patients were observed for 24 hours. Nausea and vomiting during and within 1 hour after angiography was considered as a positive event associated with cerebral angiography. The overall incidence of nausea and vomiting during and within 1 hour after angiography was 1.05% (27/2554 patients). There was no patient with pulmonary aspiration. No statistical difference in nausea and vomiting development between the fasting and the diet groups was found. The incidence of nausea and vomiting associated with cerebral angiography is low and not affected by diet or fasting. Pulmonary aspiration had no difference between the diet and the fasting group. Our study suggests that fasting may not be necessary for patients who undergo elective cerebral angiography.

  18. Psycho-Rehabilitation Method (Dohsa-Hou and Quality of Life in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Poursadoughi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of psycho-rehabilitation (Dohsa-hou on improving the quality of life of 4-12 year old children with cerebral palsy. Methods: The present research is a semi-experimental study with a pre-test - post-test design, follow-up and control group. The statistical population fully consists of children with cerebral palsy in Yazd. 30 male patients were selected using a convenience sampling method and were divided into the experiment and control groups. Before beginning treatment, parents filled out the quality of life questionnaire and at the end of the treatment period in the post-test and follow-up phase the same assessment was done. The treatment period in the experiment group was 12 sessions (three sessions per week and the follow-up phase was done 50 days after the test. Results: The results obtained from the analysis of covariance showed that psychological rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy improves their quality of life and that this difference was persistent in the follow-up phase (P<0.001. Discussion: Since the rate of cerebral palsy is rising and the symptoms are wide, patients may have an increased need for rehabilitation in the future. Dohsa-hou as a psychological rehabilitation approach is an effective treatment to improve the quality of life of these patients

  19. Forensic applications of cerebral single photon emission computed tomography in mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortzel, Hal S; Filley, Christopher M; Anderson, C Alan; Oster, Timothy; Arciniegas, David B

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a substantial source of mortality and morbidity world wide. Although most such injuries are relatively mild, accurate diagnosis and prognostication after mild TBI are challenging. These problems are complicated further when considered in medicolegal contexts, particularly civil litigation. Cerebral single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) may contribute to the evaluation and treatment of persons with mild TBI. Cerebral SPECT is relatively sensitive to the metabolic changes produced by TBI. However, such changes are not specific to this condition, and their presence on cerebral SPECT imaging does not confirm a diagnosis of mild TBI. Conversely, the absence of abnormalities on cerebral SPECT imaging does not exclude a diagnosis of mild TBI, although such findings may be of prognostic value. The literature does not demonstrate consistent relationships between SPECT images and neuropsychological testing or neuropsychiatric symptoms. Using the rules of evidence shaped by Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and its progeny to analyze the suitability of SPECT for forensic purposes, we suggest that expert testimony regarding SPECT findings should be admissible only as evidence to support clinical history, neuropsychological test results, and structural brain imaging findings and not as stand-alone diagnostic data.

  20. Prominent cerebral veins on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeztoprak, Bilge [Cumhuriyet University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sivas (Turkey)

    2017-07-15

    Clinical applications of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) are increasing steadily. The aim of this study is to investigate the appearance of cerebral veins on SWI, which is very sensitive to the deoxyhaemoglobin level in vessels, in pulmonary embolism (PE). The cranial SWI images of 19 patients with PE and 22 controls from September 2013 through March 2016 were retrospectively examined for the presence of prominent cerebral veins. MRI findings were correlated with blood oxygen levels. 12 of 19 patients with PE had hypoxemia and SWI images of 11 of these hypoxemic patients depicted prominent cerebral veins in the form of increased number, diameter, and elongation. The mean PaO{sub 2} and SaO{sub 2} in these patients were 48.5 ± 9.1 mmHg and 75.2 ± 8.0 %, respectively. There was a significant correlation between the presence of prominent veins on SWI and hypoxemia (p < 0.05). Of the 7 patients with normal blood oxygen pressure and saturation, 1 also showed an augmented appearance of cerebral veins on SWI. In the presence of neurological symptoms suggestive of an intracranial pathology in patients with PE, a SWI added to the conventional MRI sequences may predict hypoxemia and exclude other intracranial pathologies. (orig.)

  1. Frequency of joined disabilities of children with cerebral palsy in Tuzla canton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Babajić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral palsy (CP connotes a group of non-progressive, but often variable symptoms of motor impairment of movement and posture, as well as other impairments which are a consequenceof anomalies or brain impairment in different phases of its development. CP is a pathological condition characterised in the fi rst place by motor function impairment to which other disorders such as: visual andhearing impairment, intellectual defi cit, emotional problems, behaviour disorder, speech disorder, epileptic seizure and similar can join. The aim of this study is to determine frequency of joined disabilities ofchildren with cerebral palsy in Tuzla Canton.Methods: The research covers a total sample of 48 examinees, chronological age from 2-19 years, in Tuzla Canton. Research instrument was a Structural Questionnaire for the parents of children and adolescentswith cerebral palsy. Research data were processed by nonparametric statistics method. Basic statistical parameters of frequency and percentages were calculated, and tabular presentation was made.Results: After classification of examinees as per frequency of joined disabilities was done, work results have shown that speech impairment occurred with 35.4 % of children, visual impairment 33.3 %, epilepsy29.3 %, whereas hearing impairment occurred with 2 % of children.Conclusion: In research of frequency of joined disabilities of children with cerebral palsy in Tuzla Canton, most expressed are speech and visual disorders with children, then epilepsy, whereas a small percentageof children are with hearing disorder.

  2. Relationship between manic state after presenile onset and silent cerebral infarction; MRI findings and its distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujikawa, Tokumi; Yamawaki, Shigeto (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Touhouda, Yoshikuni

    1993-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 12 patients who incurred manic state after the age of 50 (manic group). Twelve other age- and sex-matched patients who incurred emotional disturbance at the young age served as controls. Patients with a history of cerebral stroke and local neurologic symptoms were excluded. Silent cerebral infarction (SCI) were concomitantly seen on MR images in 66.7% in the manic group, which was significantly higher than the control group (16.7%). Approximately half of the patients in the manic group seemed to be in the parenchymal manic state associated with SCI. Patients in the manic state associated with SCI was at a risk for developing cerebral stroke. Therefore, the treatment such as antithrombin therapy for cerebrovascular disorder was considered important, from the viewpoint of early treatment of cerebral infarction. Since lesions were frequently observed in the right frontal lobe and basal nucleus in manic patients with the associated SCI, these sites may be in part involved in the occurrence of manic state. (N.K.).

  3. Sleep Duration and Depressive Symptoms: A Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Harden, Kathryn Paige; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V.; Pack, Allan I.; Strachan, Eric; Goldberg, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We used quantitative genetic models to assess whether sleep duration modifies genetic and environmental influences on depressive symptoms. Method: Participants were 1,788 adult twins from 894 same-sex twin pairs (192 male and 412 female monozygotic [MZ] pairs, and 81 male and 209 female dizygotic [DZ] pairs] from the University of Washington Twin Registry. Participants self-reported habitual sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Data were analyzed using quantitative genetic interaction models, which allowed the magnitude of additive genetic, shared environmental, and non-shared environmental influences on depressive symptoms to vary with sleep duration. Results: Within MZ twin pairs, the twin who reported longer sleep duration reported fewer depressive symptoms (ec = -0.17, SE = 0.06, P sleep duration interaction effect on depressive symptoms (a'c = 0.23, SE = 0.08, P sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Among individuals with sleep duration within the normal range (7-8.9 h/night), the total heritability (h2) of depressive symptoms was approximately 27%. However, among individuals with sleep duration within the low (sleep duration extremes (5 h/night: h2 = 53%; 10 h/night: h2 = 49%). Conclusion: Genetic contributions to depressive symptoms increase at both short and long sleep durations. Citation: Watson NF; Harden KP; Buchwald D; Vitiello MV; Pack AI; Stachan E; Goldberg J. Sleep duration and depressive symptoms: a gene-environment interaction. SLEEP 2014;37(2):351-358. PMID:24497663

  4. Linac-based radiosurgery of cerebral melanoma metastases. Analysis of 122 metastases treated in 64 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herfarth, K.K.; Pirzkall, A.; Izwekowa, O.; Wannenmacher, M.; Thilmann, C.; Debus, J.; Delorme, S.; Hofmann, U.; Schadendorf, D.; Zierhut, D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative option to neurosurgical excision in the management of patients with brain metastases. We retrospectively analyzed patients with brain metastases of malignant melanoma who were treated at our institution for outcome and prognostic factors. Patients and Methods: 64 patients with 122 cerebral metastases were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery between 1986 and 2000. Twelve patients (19%) showed neurologic symptoms at the time of treatment, and 46 patients (72%) had extracerebral tumor manifestation at that time. The median dose to the 80% isodose line, prescribed to encompass the tumor margin, was 20 Gy (range, 15-22 Gy). Results: Neurologic symptoms improved in five of twelve symptomatic patients. 41 patients remained asymptomatic or unchanged in their neurologic symptoms. Only five patients (8%) temporarily worsened neurologically after therapy despite no signs of tumor progression. With a mean follow-up time of 9.4 months, actuarial local control was 81% after 1 year. There was a statistically significant dose and size dependency of local tumor control. Median actuarial survival after treatment was 10.6 months. Patients without extracerebral tumor manifestation showed a superior survival (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Despite high local tumor control rates, the prognosis of patients with cerebral metastases of malignant melanoma remains poor. Stereotactic radiosurgery has the potential of stabilizing or improving neurologic symptoms in these patients in a palliative setting. (orig.)

  5. Cranio-cerebral gunshot wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Majer1, G. Iacob2

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cranio-cerebral gunshots wounds(CCGW are the most devastating injuriesto the central nervous system, especiallymade by high velocity bullets, the mostdevastating, severe and usually fatal type ofmissile injury to the head.Objective: To investigate and compare,using a retrospective study on five cases theclinical outcomes of CCGW. Predictors ofpoor outcome were: older age, delayedmode of transportation, low admissionCGS score with haemodynamic instability,CT visualization of diffuse brain damage,bihemispheric, multilobar injuries withlateral and midline sagittal planestrajectories made by penetrating highvelocity bullets fired from a very closerange, brain stem and ventricular injurywith intraventricular and/or subarachnoidhemorrhage, mass effect and midline shift,evidence of herniation and/or hematomas,high ICP and/or hypotension, abnormalcoagulation states on admission ordisseminated intravascular coagulation. Lessharmful effects were generated by retainedmissiles, bone fragments with CNSinfection, DAI lesions and neuronaldamages associated to cavitation, seizures.Material and methods: 5 patients (4 maleand 1 female, age ranged 22-65 years, withCCGW, during the period 2004-2009,caused by military conflict and accidentalfiring. After initial resuscitation all patientswere assessed on admission by the GlasgowComa Scale (GCS. After investigations: Xrayskull, brain CT, Angio-CT, cerebralMRI, SPECT; baseline investigations,neurological, haemodynamic andcoagulability status all patients underwentsurgical treatment following emergencyintervention. The survival, mortality andfunctional outcome were evaluated byGlasgow Outcome Scale (GOS score.Results: Referring on five cases weevaluate on a retrospective study the clinicaloutcome, imagistics, microscopic studies onneuronal and axonal damage generated bytemporary cavitation along the cerebralbullet’s track, therapeutics, as the review ofthe literature. Two patients with anadmission CGS 9 and 10

  6. The Developmental Association between Eating Disorders Symptoms and Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety in Juvenile Twin Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberg, Judy L.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the role of genetic and environmental factors in the developmental association among symptoms of eating disorders, depression, and anxiety syndromes in 8-13-year-old and 14-17-year-old twin girls. Methods: Multivariate genetic models were fitted to child-reported longitudinal symptom data gathered from clinical interview…

  7. Mental Symptoms in Huntington's Disease and a Possible Primary Aminergic Neuron Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, J. John; Stanley, Michael; Gershon, Samuel; Rossor, M.

    1980-12-01

    Monoamine oxidase activity was higher in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia of patients dying from Huntington's disease than in controls. Enzyme kinetics and multiple substrate studies indicated that the increased activity was due to elevated concentrations of monoamine oxidase type B. Concentrations of homovanillic acid were increased in the cerebral cortex but not in the basal ganglia of brains of patients with Huntington's disease. These changes may represent a primary aminergic lesion that could underlie some of the mental symptoms of this disease.

  8. Cerebral blood measurements in cerebral vascular disease: methodological and clinical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieschi, C.; Lenzi, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is devoted mainly to studies performed on acute cerebral vascular disease with the invasive techniques for the measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The principles of the rCBF method are outlined and the following techniques are described in detail: xenon-133 inhalation method, xenon-133 intravenous method and emission tomography methods. (C.F.)

  9. The early markers for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy are different from those for spastic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einspieler, C; Cioni, G; Paolicelli, PB; Bos, AF; Dressler, A; Ferrari, F; Roversi, MF; Prechtl, HFR

    Qualitative abnormalities of spontaneous motor activity in new-borns and young infants are early predictive markers for later spastic cerebral palsy. Aim of this research was to identify which motor patterns may be specific for later dyskinetic cerebral palsy. In a large, prospectively performed

  10. Development and face validity of a cerebral visual impairment motor questionnaire for children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salavati, Masoud; Waninge, Aly; Rameckers, E.A.A.; van der Steen, J; Krijnen, W.P.; van der Schans, C.P.; Steenbergen, B.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The objectives of this study were (i) to develop two cerebral visual impairment motor questionnaires (CVI-MQ's) for children with cerebral palsy (CP): one for children with Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I, II and III and one for children with GMFCS levels IV and V;

  11. Low cerebral blood flow after cardiac arrest is not associated with anaerobic cerebral metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.; Ainslie, Philip N.; Hinssen, S.; Aries, M.J.; Bisschops, Laurens L.; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; van der Hoeven, J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study Estimation of cerebral anaerobic metabolism in survivors and non-survivors after cardiac arrest. Methods We performed an observational study in twenty comatose patients after cardiac arrest and 19 healthy control subjects. We measured mean flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery

  12. A clinical study of cerebral vaso paralysis during a period of cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Toshiichi; Sasaki, Takehiko; Nakagawara, Jyoji

    2011-01-01

    We employ the 123 I-infinitum (Imp) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) dual table autoradiography (Arg) method and stereotactic extraction estimation (SEE) analysis 7 or 8 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) onset to predict cerebral vasospasm. We report new findings of cerebral vasoparalysis during a period of cerebral vasospasm after SAH. From January 1, 2005 to April 30, 2008, we encountered 330 cases of aneurysmal SAH, and treated 285 cases. Of these, 65 were excluded as unsuitable for this study, for reasons such as lack of SPECT data, external decompression, admission over 7 days from SAH onset. We studied 220 cases treated by microsurgical clipping (n=178) or endovascular coil embolization (n=42). Vasoparalysis was defined as a rise in resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and a loss of vascular reserve on SEE analysis of CBF-SPECT. Vasoparalysis occurred in 15 cases (6.8%). Of these, 9 cases (60.0%) had cerebral hematoma, temporary clips had been used in the operation for 8 cases (53.3%), 9 cases (60.0%) experienced postoperative cerebral infarction, and 3 cases (20.0%) had postoperative convulsions. Vasoparalysis occurs in relation to perioperative cerebral damage. In terms of the loss of vascular reserve following SAH, vasoparalysis resembles hemodynamic cerebral ischemia, although the conditions are quite different. Differentiating between these 2 conditions is important, as different forms of management are required. Dual table ARG and SEE analysis are very useful for the evaluating these 2 conditions. (author)

  13. Development and face validity of a cerebral visual impairment motor questionnaire for children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salavati, M.; Waninge, A.; Rameckers, E. A. A.; van der Steen, J.; Krijnen, W. P.; van der Schans, C. P.; Steenbergen, B.

    Aim The objectives of this study were (i) to develop two cerebral visual impairment motor questionnaires (CVI-MQ's) for children with cerebral palsy (CP): one for children with Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I, II and III and one for children with GMFCS levels IV and V;

  14. Social Sensations of Symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Lotte; Whyte, Susan Reynolds

    2017-01-01

    The interpretation of sensations and the recognition of symptoms of a sickness, as well as the movement to seek treatment, have long been recognized in medical anthropology as inherently social processes. Based on cases of HIV and trauma (PTSD) in Uganda, we show that even the first signs....../symptoms; differential recognition of symptoms; and the embodied sociality of treatment....... and sensations of sickness can be radically social. The sensing body can be a ‘social body’ – a family, a couple, a network – a unit that transcends the individual body. In this article we focus on four aspects of the sociality of sensations and symptoms: mode of transmission; the shared experience of sensations...

  15. Flu Symptoms & Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Flu Symptoms & Complications Language: English (US) Español Recommend on ... not everyone with flu will have a fever. Flu Complications Most people who get influenza will recover ...

  16. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms and Signs Prostate Cancer Basics Risk Factors ... earlier. So what are the warning signs of prostate cancer? Unfortunately, there usually aren’t any early warning ...

  17. Medically Unexplained Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview of three specific MUS’s: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome and discusses things you can do to minimize the symptoms and improve your quality of life. It is possible that these syndromes can all ...

  18. Cholera Illness and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Compartir Cholera is an acute, diarrheal illness caused by infection of the intestine with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and is spread by ingestion of contaminated food or water. The infection is often mild or without symptoms, ...

  19. Premonitory symptoms in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Katarina; Artto, Ville; Bendtsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the frequency and number of premonitory symptoms (PS) in migraine, the co-occurrence of different PS, and their association with migraine-related factors. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, a validated questionnaire was sent to Finnish migraine families between 2002 and 2013...... to obtain data on 14 predefined PS, migraine diagnoses, demographic factors, and migraine characteristics. The estimated response rate was 80%. RESULTS: Out of 2714 persons, 2223 were diagnosed with migraine. Among these, 77% reported PS, with a mean number of 3.0 symptoms compared to 30% (p ....5 symptoms (p migraine headaches. Yawning was the most commonly reported symptom (34%) among migraineurs. Females reported PS more frequently than males (81 versus 64%, p 

  20. Gynecological cancer alarm symptoms:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasubramaniam, Kirubakaran; Ravn, Pernille; dePont Christensen, René

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To determine the proportion of patients who were referred to specialist care after reporting gynecological cancer alarm symptoms to their general practitioner. To investigate whether contact with specialist care was associated with lifestyle factors or socioeconomic status. MATERIAL...... and odds ratios (ORs) for associations between specialist care contact, lifestyle factors and socioeconomic status. RESULTS: The study included 25 866 non-pregnant women; 2957 reported the onset of at least one gynecological cancer alarm symptom, and 683 of these (23.1%) reported symptoms to their general......: Educational level influence contact with specialist care among patients with gynecological cancer alarm symptoms. Future studies should investigate inequalities in access to the secondary healthcare system. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  1. Cerebral CT of ischaemic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aulich, A

    1981-11-25

    The diagnosis of stroke must first be established by clinical examination. CT has proved useful for confirmation of the diagnosis and provides a global intracranial picture of morphological changes in cerebral vascular diseases. A hemorrhage can be recognized with certainty at the first CT examination as the cause of the stroke, but in the detection of a lesion due to ischemia an important role is played by the correct choice of the time of examination, and in some cases also of the check-up with contrast medium. The differential diagnosis between infarct in the acute stage and encephalitis or gliomas of low-grade malignity can be difficult. A decision can often only be made after a series of examinations. Postmalacial conditions are often difficult to differentiate from defects due to other causes, such as hemorrhage, head injury, postoperative states and after encephalitis. A knowledge of the anamnesis and the clinical findings is indispensable for CT evaluation. In assessing the prognosis before vascular surgery on the extracranial brain-supplying vessels the performance of a CT examination should be advised. A warning is given against the use of CT as a screening method.

  2. Cerebral sino-venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayama, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Tsunesaburo; Nakajima, Kenji

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of cerebral sino-venous thrombosis were reported. Repeated CT findings were studied and discussed on account of the treatments for those pathologic conditions. Those of studied cases are; a 22-year-old postpartum woman, a 42-year-old woman with irregular vaginal bleeding, and a 26-year-old man with severe reactive emesis after drinking alcohol. They were treated conservatively. Case 1 died in its acute stage. In the remaining ones, each had an uneventful recovery. CT scan findings of them manifested their exact clinical conditions. These findings were devided into two categories, one was direct signs expressed sino-venous occlusion, the other was indirect signs which appeared as a result of these occlusion. Direct signs cannot always get in every cases with sino-venous occlusion, but as for indirect signs, we can get various changes corresponding to the time taken CT photoes, and they are useful to decide appropriate treatments at that time. Considering suitable treatments for this disease, it is necessary to select most suitable ones according to their pathologic conditions, which may be precisely drawn with CT scans. (J.P.N.)

  3. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow in man during light sleep (stage 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Schmidt, J F; Holm, S

    1991-01-01

    We measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during light sleep (stage 2) in 8 young healthy volunteers using the Kety-Schmidt technique with 133Xe as the inert gas. Measurements were performed during wakefulness and light sleep as verified by standard...... polysomnography. Unlike our previous study in man showing a highly significant 25% decrease in CMRO2 during deep sleep (stage 3-4) we found a modest but statistically significant decrease of 5% in CMRO2 during stage 2 sleep. Deep and light sleep are both characterized by an almost complete lack of mental activity....... They differ in respect of arousal threshold as a stronger stimulus is required to awaken a subject from deep sleep as compared to light sleep. Our results suggest that during non-rapid eye movement sleep cerebral metabolism and thereby cerebral synaptic activity is correlated to cerebral readiness rather than...

  4. Cerebral perfusion studies using Au-195: Investigations into their clinical usefulness and comparisons with the xenon-133 inhalation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draws, J.

    1989-01-01

    Au-195m cerebral perfusion studies in the diagnosis of blood supply disorders of the brain have only recently leaped into currency. Au-195m is not capable of diffusing. This particular property permits first-pass times of vascular transfer to be determined for cerebral tissues that correlate with the degree of cerebral circulation. In the study described here, attempts were made to shed more light on the clinical usefulness of the method. For this purpose, the record sheets of two cohorts of patients were analysed on a retrospective basis. 1. In 23 patients, where the cerebrovascular disorders were strictly confined to the cerebral hemispheres, the blood supply of the brain was examined on the basis of both Au-195m cerebral perfusion studies and the xenon-133 inhalation method. In the evaluation of the findings based on the Au-195m study the investigator was blinded to the neurological manifestations of the disease and the results from other studies. In 82% of the patients the perfusion mapping using Au-195m was consistent with the clinical symptoms. 2. In a second group of patients, the probable results of the Au-195m perfusion study were forecasted on the basis of the medical history, clinical symptoms and preliminary diagnosis and subsequently compared to those actually obtained. Expected and actual results were found to be in agreement for 88% of cases. The results provided evidence of the suitability of Au-195m cerebral perfusion studies to examine the blood suply of the brain. In view of the fact that the examinations and measurements are relatively uncomplicated, this newly developed method is most likely to be used on a broader basis in the future. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Cerebral asymmetry in a selected Chinese population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.X.; He, G.X.; Tong, G.H.; Wang, D.B.; Xu, K.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated anatomical differences between the two cerebral hemispheres and ethnic differences in cerebral asymmetry. This study examined asymmetry of Chinese living in Shanghai. Measurements were taken across the frontal, mid-cerebral and occipital regions from normal head computed tomography (CT) scans of 200 Chinese Shanghai residents (100 male and 100 female, aged 6-73 years, average 48.7 years). The results were compared with reported data in the literature. The following results were found: (i) In the frontal region the right side was larger than the left in 57.5% of cases, equal in 10.5% and smaller in 32% of cases; in the mid-cerebral region the right side was larger than the left in 65.5% of cases, equal in 12.5% and smaller in 22% of cases; in the occipital regions the right side was larger than the left in 34.5% of cases, equal in 8.5% and smaller in 57% of cases. The average right-left differences between the frontal, mid-cerebral and occipital regions were 0.43 mm, 0.9 mm and 0.4 mm respectively. No difference in cerebral asymmetry existed between males and females. The occipital lobes showed the greatest individual asymmetry. The distribution of cerebral asymmetry of Chinese in Shanghai showed similarity to North American Whites rather than North American Blacks, but the average right-left differences were smaller than those of Whites. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  6. Determinants of participation in leisure activities in children and youth with cerebral palsy: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Majnemer, Annette; Law, Mary; Lach, Lucyna

    2008-05-01

    Children and youth with cerebral palsy (CP) experience difficulties in their ability to move, problem solve, socialize, and communicate, associated with limitations in activities in all environments. They are at risk for lower participation in social and leisure activities critical in fostering friendships, developing interests, and promoting well-being. Little is known about involvement in leisure activities and their determinants. This systematic review aims to describe participation in leisure activities by children with CP and identify personal and environmental factors that influence participation. The following databases were reviewed--CINAHL, Medline, Cochrane, Web of Science, OT-seeker, and REHABDATA--using the keywords participation, cerebral palsy, leisure, and recreation. The literature to date suggests that children with physical disabilities are less involved in leisure activities than their peers; activities are more passive, home based, and lack variety. Several factors influence participation in leisure activities, including age, gender, activity limitations, family preferences and coping, motivation, and environmental resources and supports.

  7. Late radiation encephalopathy in the dog. A model for cerebral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelson, S.M.; Kramer, M.W.

    The Research Group on Industrial and Environmental Neurology has suggested that assessment of cerebral atherosclerosis should be considered as part of its purview of problems of interest. Although the present study is not related to the ordinary environmental or industrial situation, it can apply to accidental over-exposure to external ionizing radiation or radiation therapy and describes an animal model that can be used for fundamental study of cerebral vascular conditions and encephalomalacia. Ionizing radiation damage to nervous tissue may be apparent early after irradiation or may become evident after a variable latent period. The concept of late ionizing radiation-induced neuropathy, the subject of this study, is characterized by a long latent period between exposure and initial clinical signs, an inverse relationship between radiation dose and latency of appearance of late radiation encephalopathy, and an apparent lack of demonstrable physiological, biochemical, and morphological alterations until necrosis becomes manifest. (U.S.)

  8. Endotoxemia reduces cerebral perfusion but enhances dynamic cerebrovascular autoregulation at reduced arterial carbon dioxide tension*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Kim, Yu-Sok; van Lieshout, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: The administration of endotoxin to healthy humans reduces cerebral blood flow but its influence on dynamic cerebral autoregulation remains unknown. We considered that a reduction in arterial carbon dioxide tension would attenuate cerebral perfusion and improve dynamic cerebral autoreg...

  9. [A Case of Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis Presented with Limb-Shaking TIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Junji; Mineta, Haruyuki; Ren, Nice; Takagishi, Sou; Nagaoka, Shintarou; Kameda, Katsuharu; Maeda, Kazushi; Ikai, Yoshiaki; Gi, Hidefuku

    2016-07-01

    Involuntary movement is a rare clinical manifestation of transient ischemic attack (TIA). However, limb-shaking TIA is well described presentation of carotid occlusive disease. We present the case of a patient who developed limb-shaking TIA associated with high-grade stenosis of middle cerebral artery (M1), which was treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). The procedure was performed successfully without complication and the symptom disappeared immediately after the procedure. The patient remained free of symptoms at the 38-month follow-up. There was no tendency of restenosis of M1. In this case, PTA was technically feasible and beneficial for limb-shaking TIA with M1 stenosis. Limb-shaking TIA can be a symptom of high-grade stenosis of M1.

  10. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Utah Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... more slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  11. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis and Headache--A Case-Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparaco, Marco; Feleppa, Michele; Bigal, Marcelo E

    2015-06-01

    Headache happens in the majority of patients with Cerebral Venous Thrombosis (CVT) being sometimes the sole manifestation of the disease. Herein we report a case-series of CVT, focusing on headache characteristics. Etiological, clinical, and radiological features of 25 consecutive adult patients with CVT were compiled from August 2005 to December 2013. Diagnosis of CVT was confirmed by brain magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography. All patients underwent extensive systematic etiological and genetic work-up at admission. A structured questionnaire about the characteristics of headache was responded by all participants. Headache was reported by 23 out of 25 (92%) of participants, being by far the most frequent symptom. It was the sole manifestation in nearly one third of the patients (8/25, 32.0%). Headache was typically severe (19/23, 82.6%) and throbbing (16/23, 69.5%), with sudden onset (13/23, 56.5%) and non-remitting (20/23, 86.9%) characteristics. The sinus most frequently involved was the transverse sinus (24/25, 96.0%), either alone or in association with other sinuses. Headache is the most frequent symptom and sometimes the sole presentation of CVT. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea in children with cerebral palsy and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, John; Wical, Beverly; Wical, William; Schaffer, Leah; Wical, Thomas; Wendorf, Heather; Roiko, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    To examine the risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and/or epilepsy. This cross-sectional study employs the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ), the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), and chart review to identify symptoms of OSA in children presenting to a multi-specialty pediatric healthcare institution. Two-hundred and fifteen patients were grouped into those with epilepsy (n=54), CP (n=18), both (n=55), and neither (comparison group, n=88). The comparison group comprised children with developmental disabilities but not children with typical development. Significantly increased PSQ scores (indicating increased risk of OSA) were found among children with CP (58%) and CP with epilepsy (67%) than among the comparison group (27%; pChildren with both CP and epilepsy had a greater number of increased PSQ scores compared with CP alone (pchildren at risk of OSA (46%) than did the medical record review for symptoms of OSA (8.2%, pChildren with CP of greater severity or comorbid epilepsy are at increased risk of OSA. This study supports the routine questionnaire-based assessment for OSA as a regular part of the care of all children with CP, especially in those with more severe CP and those with epilepsy. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  13. Cerebral blood flow in acute and chronic ischemic stroke using xenon-133 inhalation tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Paulson, O B; Lassen, N A

    1986-01-01

    Serial measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were performed in 12 patients with acute symptoms of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. CBF was measured by xenon-133 inhalation and single photon emission computer tomography. Six patients had severe strokes and large infarcts on the CT scan....... They showed in the acute phase (Days 1-3) very large low-flow areas, larger than the hypodense areas seen on the CT scan. The cerebral vasoconstrictor and vasodilator capacity was tested in the acute phase following aminophylline and acetazolamide, respectively. A preserved but reduced reactivity was seen...... had occlusion of the relevant internal carotid artery. In all 6 patients, CBF studies at 2 and 6 months resembled the acute phase, showing large areas with reduced flow. At the 6 months follow-up, the vasodilatory stress test was repeated, and all but one showed a preserved but reduced vasoreactivity...

  14. Autopsy case of undiagnosed gangliocytoma in the medulla oblongata complicated with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Motonori; Kondo, Takeshi; Morichika, Mai; Kuse, Azumi; Nakagawa, Kanako; Asano, Migiwa; Ueno, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    A Japanese man in his 30s who had congenital cerebral palsy was found unresponsive in bed. His death was confirmed after resuscitation attempts. He had a history of occasional falling (despite the use of walking sticks and a wheelchair) owing to a slowly progressive gait disturbance, and had a medical examination without full neurological re-examination. Autopsy revealed gangliocytoma in the medulla oblongata, which was diagnosed as the cause of death. Although gangliocytoma is a well-differentiated benign tumor, the almost total replacement of the medulla oblongata by the tumor cells was assumed to result in ataxia via the olivocerebellar tract and secondary cerebellar atrophy, followed by central hypoventilation and death of the patient. The symptoms caused by gangliocytoma may be overlooked owing to long-standing cerebral palsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased cerebral output of free radicals during hypoxia: implications for acute mountain sickness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Damian M; Taudorf, Sarah; Berg, Ronan M G

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether hypoxia causes free radical-mediated disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and impaired cerebral oxidative metabolism and whether this has any bearing on neurological symptoms ascribed to acute mountain sickness (AMS). Ten men provided internal jugular vein...... paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and ozone-based chemiluminescence were employed for direct detection of spin-trapped free radicals and nitric oxide metabolites. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE), S100beta, and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) were determined by ELISA. Hypoxia increased the arterio-jugular venous...... concentration difference (a-v(D)) and net cerebral output of lipid-derived alkoxyl-alkyl free radicals and lipid hydroperoxides (P

  16. Cerebral Embolic Activity in a Patient during Acute Crisis of Takayasu's Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Ricardo de Carvalho; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Marchiori, Paulo Eurípedes; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2012-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis is a disease that affects large vessels and may cause neurological symptoms either by stenoses/occlusions or embolisms from vessels with an inflammatory process. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound can provide useful information for diagnosis and monitoring during the active phase of the disease. Cerebral embolic signals can be detected by TCD and have been considered a risk factor for vascular events. We report a patient in whom TCD ultrasound was used to monitor cerebral embolic signals during the active phase of the disease. This case report suggests that embolic activity in Takayasu's arteritis may represent disease activity, and its monitoring may be useful for evaluating the response to therapy. PMID:22379479

  17. MR angiographic and parenchymal evaluation of cerebral infaraction in sickle cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaryk, T.J.; Masaryk, A.M.; Ross, J.S.; Modic, M.T.; Wiznitzer, M.; Berman, B.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral infarction is an important complication of sickle cell anemia, believed to be related to large-vessel stenoses/occlusion and/or capillary/venous sickling resulting in thrombosis. Identification of these complications (especially large-vessel arterial disease) is important in selecting patients for transfusion therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine the suitability of combined three-dimensional Fourier transform time-of-flight MR angiographic and parenchymal T2-weighted spin-echo examinations for evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) complications of sickle cell anemia. Seven patients (age range, 5-14 years) were evaluated. Five had documented strokes while two had symptoms resembling those of transient ischemic attack. The preliminary data indicate that combined MR angiographic and parenchymal studies are capable of identifying those patients with sickle cell anemia complicated by large-vessel CNS occlusive disease and cerebral infarction and can be used as a noninvasive guide to therapy

  18. Positron emission tomography in cerebrovascular disease: The relationship between regional cerebral blood flow, blood volume and oxygen metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herold, S.

    1985-03-01

    Positron emission tomography in cerebrovascular disease has demonstrated the importance of the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow and the cerebral metabolic activity. In acute stroke it has been found that within the first hours after the onset of symptoms cerebral blood flow in the affected area is more depressed than cerebral oxygen utilisation. This relative preservation of oxygen utilisation results from an increase in the oxygen extraction ratio far above its normal value. However, the oxygen extraction fraction subsequently falls in the following days indicating the transition from a situation of possibly reversible ischaemia to irreversible infarction. In patients with carotid occlusive disease an increase in the oxygen extraction ratio has been observed only in very few cases. It has been shown, however, that at an earlier stage the relationship between CBF and CBV (as CBF/CBV-ratio) provides a sensitive measure of diminished perfusion pressure which could be helpful for the selection of patients for EC-IC bypass surgery. In patients with sickle cell anaemia it has been found that oxygen delivery to the brain is maintained by an increase in cerebral blood flow, whereas the oxygen extraction ratio is not increased despite the presence of a low oxygen affinity haemoglobin. Preliminary observations in classical migraine suggest an ischaemic situation during the attack.

  19. MRI diagnosis of the cerebral schistosomiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hanqiu; Chen Yuanjun

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To discuss MRI appearance of the cerebral schistosomiasis and its clinical value through analyzing the MRI features and post-surgery pathological findings. Methods: MRI features of the cerebral schistosomiasis in 16, pathologically (n = 6) or clinically (n = 10) proved cases were analyzed retrospectively, and compared with the post-surgery pathological findings in 6 cases. Results: Single masses were found in 11 cases (11/16), and multiple masses in 5 eases (5/16), amounting to 23 masses . fifteen masses (15/23) were located in right cerebral hemisphere, including frontal lobe (n = 2), frontoparietal lobe (n = 5) , and occipitoparietal lobe (n 8), while 8 masses (8/23) in left cerebral hemisphere, including frontal lobe (n = 1), frontoparietal lobe (n = 3), and occipitoparietal lobe (n = 4). The nodular masses were isointense with the gray mass like 'island', and 12 cases (12/16) show the 'gigantic hand' form of edema around them. After IV administration of Gd-DTPA, 15 cases (15/16) revealed multiple closely spaced, intensely enhancing modules, 1-3 mm in diameter, distributed throughout the mass. Seven cases misdiagnosed by CT were revised by MRl. Conclusion: The MRI appearance of the cerebral schistosomiasis is characteristic, and MRI is the most valuable tool to diagnose it without injury

  20. Cerebral Vascular Injury in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Kimbra; Amyot, Franck; Haber, Margalit; Pronger, Angela; Bogoslovsky, Tanya; Moore, Carol; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic cerebral vascular injury (TCVI) is a very frequent, if not universal, feature after traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is likely responsible, at least in part, for functional deficits and TBI-related chronic disability. Because there are multiple pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies that promote vascular health, TCVI is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention after TBI. The cerebral microvasculature is a component of the neurovascular unit (NVU) coupling neuronal metabolism with local cerebral blood flow. The NVU participates in the pathogenesis of TBI, either directly from physical trauma or as part of the cascade of secondary injury that occurs after TBI. Pathologically, there is extensive cerebral microvascular injury in humans and experimental animal, identified with either conventional light microscopy or ultrastructural examination. It is seen in acute and chronic TBI, and even described in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Non-invasive, physiologic measures of cerebral microvascular function show dysfunction after TBI in humans and experimental animal models of TBI. These include imaging sequences (MRI-ASL), Transcranial Doppler (TCD), and Near InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS). Understanding the pathophysiology of TCVI, a relatively under-studied component of TBI, has promise for the development of novel therapies for TBI. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Pathological review of late cerebral radionecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Late cerebral radionecrosis may be considered to be a specific chronic inflammatory response, although it is unknown whether the initial damage by brain irradiation is to an endothelial cell or a glial cell. I discuss the pathological specificity of late cerebral radionecrosis by studying the published literature and a case that I experienced. In late cerebral radionecrosis, there are typical coagulation necrosis areas containing fibrinoid necrosis with occlusion of the lumina and poorly active inflammatory areas with many inflammatory ghost cells, focal perivascular lymphocytes, hyalinized vessels, and telangiectatic vascularization near and in the necrotic tissue, and more active inflammatory areas formed as a partial rim of the reactive zone by perivascular lymphocytes, much vascularization, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes at the corticomedullary border adjacent to necrotic tissue in the white matter. It is difficult to believe that coagulation necrosis occurs without first disordering the vascular endothelial cells because fibrinoid necrosis is a main feature and a diffusely multiple lesion in late cerebral radionecrosis. Because various histological findings do develop, progress, and extend sporadically at different areas and times in the irradiated field of the brain for a long time after radiation, uncontrolled chronic inflammation containing various cytokine secretions may also play a key role in progression of this radionecrosis. Evaluation of the mechanism of the development/aggravation of late cerebral radionecrosis requires a further study for abnormal cytokine secretions and aberrant inflammatory reactions. (author)

  2. ABCD2 score and BNP level in patients with TIA and cerebral stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezabeigi, H R; Taghizadeh, A; Talebi, M; Amini, K; Goldust, M

    2013-11-01

    Scoring systems have been designed to help physicians in early prediction of cerebral stroke following Transitional Ischemic Attack (TIA). ABCD2 system is one of these scoring systems. Considering increase of brain natriuretic peptide following cerebral ischemic stroke, BNP level may be associated with incidence of ischemic stroke following TIA. The present study evaluates ABCD2 score, BNP level in patients with TIA and incidence of cerebral stroke. This cross sectional-analytical study evaluated 78 patients with TIA. ABCD2 score was calculated for all patients based on some criteria including age, blood pressure, clinical manifestations (speech/motor disorder), symptoms duration and diabetes. BNP level was measured at the reference laboratory when the patient referred to the treatment center. The patients were followed up for 6 months considering incidence of cerebral stroke and TIA. Mean age of the patients was 66.53 +/- 13.08 years and the sample was consisted of 62.8% male and 37.2% female patients. Mean BNP level and mean ABCD2 score was 611.31 +/- 125.61 and 4.61 +/- 10.99 in all patients, respectively. During follow-up period, TIA recurrence and cerebral stroke were, respectively seen in 11.5 and 3.8% of cases. Mortality was reported in 5.1% of the patients. BNP was significantly higher in cases with recursive TIA (p = 0.03). But, there was not any difference considering ABCD2 score (p = 0.38). BNP is capable of predicting TIA recurrence following first TIA and it can be used in this case.

  3. Cerebral amyloidosis associated with cognitive decline in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Gordon, Brian A; Ryman, Davis C; Ma, Shengmei; Xiong, Chengjie; Hassenstab, Jason; Goate, Alison; Fagan, Anne M; Cairns, Nigel J; Marcus, Daniel S; McDade, Eric; Ringman, John M; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Ghetti, Bernardino; Farlow, Martin R; Sperling, Reisa; Salloway, Steve; Schofield, Peter R; Masters, Colin L; Martins, Ralph N; Rossor, Martin N; Jucker, Mathias; Danek, Adrian; Förster, Stefan; Lane, Christopher A S; Morris, John C; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Bateman, Randall J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the associations of cerebral amyloidosis with concurrent cognitive performance and with longitudinal cognitive decline in asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD). Two hundred sixty-three participants enrolled in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network observational study underwent neuropsychological evaluation as well as PET scans with Pittsburgh compound B. One hundred twenty-one participants completed at least 1 follow-up neuropsychological evaluation. Four composite cognitive measures representing global cognition, episodic memory, language, and working memory were generated using z scores from a battery of 13 standard neuropsychological tests. General linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate the relationship between baseline cerebral amyloidosis and baseline cognitive performance and whether baseline cerebral amyloidosis predicts cognitive change over time (mean follow-up 2.32 years ± 0.92, range 0.89-4.19) after controlling for estimated years from expected symptom onset, APOE ε4 allelic status, and education. In asymptomatic mutation carriers, amyloid burden was not associated with baseline cognitive functioning but was significantly predictive of longitudinal decline in episodic memory. In symptomatic mutation carriers, cerebral amyloidosis was correlated with worse baseline performance in multiple cognitive composites and predicted greater decline over time in global cognition, working memory, and Mini-Mental State Examination. Cerebral amyloidosis predicts longitudinal episodic memory decline in presymptomatic ADAD and multidomain cognitive decline in symptomatic ADAD. These findings imply that amyloidosis in the brain is an indicator of early cognitive decline and provides a useful outcome measure for early assessment and prevention treatment trials. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Hypercapnic cerebral edema presenting in a woman with asthma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee William T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Common causes of non-traumatic acute cerebral edema include malignant hypertension, hyponatremia, anoxia, and cerebral vascular accident. The computed tomographic images and data obtained during care of the patient described in this case report provide evidence that hypercarbia can cause increased intracranial pressure and coma without permanent brain injury. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide evaluation for coma is essential to provide faster diagnosis and therapeutic correction in certain common critical disease states. We present the case of a patient in a coma associated with cerebral edema during a typical asthma exacerbation with hypercapnic respiratory failure. Case presentation An obese 63-year-old African American woman with asthma presented to our hospital with facial swelling and shortness of breath. Immediately following intubation for hypercapnic respiratory failure, she was noted to have a dilated, unresponsive right pupil. An emergent computed tomographic head scan revealed that she had increased intracranial pressure. A neurosurgeon agreed with the computed tomography interpretation and recommended no surgical intervention. The patient's respiratory acidosis was corrected with ventilatory management over several hours in the intensive care unit. Nine and one-half hours later a follow-up head computed tomographic scan was read as normal without cerebral edema. At 12 hours, the patient's right pupil was 5 mm in diameter and reactive. By 24 hours, her pupils were symmetrically equal and reactive. Her symptoms had improved, and she was extubated. A brain magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed no abnormalities. Conclusion Alteration of consciousness related to hypercapnia during respiratory failure is not generally thought to be related to cerebral edema. Respiratory acidosis resulting from hypercarbia is known to produce carbon dioxide narcosis and coma, but no current treatment algorithm suggests that rapid

  5. Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation in Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Yu-Sok; Nur, Erfan; van Beers, Eduard J.; Truijen, Jasper; Davis, Shyrin C. A. T.; Biemond, Bart J.; van Lieshout, Johannes J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with cerebral hyperperfusion and an increased risk of stroke. Also, both recurrent microvascular obstruction and chronic hemolysis affect endothelial function, potentially interfering with systemic and cerebral blood flow control. We

  6. Gastrostomy tube feeding of children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlseng, Magnus O; Andersen, Guro L; DA Graca Andrada, Maria

    2012-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries.......To compare the prevalence of gastrostomy tube feeding (GTF) of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in six European countries....

  7. Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Babies & Preschoolers (Birth to age 5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Babies & Preschoolers KidsHealth / For Parents / Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Babies & Preschoolers What's in this article? Step ...

  8. Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young Adult (13 to 21)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young Adults KidsHealth / For Parents / Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young Adults What's in this article? ...

  9. Cerebral near infrared spectroscopy oximetry in extremely preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Pellicer, Adelina; Alderliesten, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if it is possible to stabilise the cerebral oxygenation of extremely preterm infants monitored by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) oximetry. DESIGN: Phase II randomised, single blinded, parallel clinical trial. SETTING: Eight tertiary neonatal intensive care unit...

  10. Cerebral vascular control and metabolism in heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bain, Anthony R; Nybo, Lars; Ainslie, Philip N

    2015-01-01

    implications and pathologies known to confound cerebral functioning during hyperthermia. A reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), derived primarily from a respiratory-induced alkalosis, underscores the cerebrovascular changes to hyperthermia. Arterial pressures may also become compromised because of reduced...

  11. Association between type of cerebral palsy and the cognitive levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Dewi Kusumaningrum

    2009-07-01

    Conclusion Our data showed that most patients with cerebral palsy had mental retardation of several cognitive level but there was no significant association between each type of cerebral palsy with cognitive levels.

  12. Admission Hyperglycemia and Clinical Outcome in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M.; Hiltunen, Sini; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Peters, Guusje M.; Silvis, Suzanne M.; Haapaniemi, Elena; Kruyt, Nyika D.; Putaala, Jukka; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Admission hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcome in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Admission hyperglycemia has not been investigated in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis. Methods-Consecutive adult patients with cerebral venous thrombosis were included

  13. The effects of 'Oren-gedoku-to' and quantitative evaluation of cerebral blood flow for cerebrovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushikubo, Yukio; Sakurai, Takatoshi; Yokouchi, Tetuya

    1998-01-01

    Fifty-seven patients with sequela of cerebrovascular diseases were treated with 'Oren-gedoku-to' for 8 weeks to examine the possibilities of improvements in subjective symptom, motive deterioration, mental disorder, unusual behaviors and intellectual malfunction. These symptoms showed improvement of 41.6%, 54.2%, 75.0%, 63.0%, 21.3%, respectively. For 21 patients, amount of regional cerebral blood flow were measured with SPECT. Results showed an increase of 1.7ml/100g/min. at average. However, there was no statistical difference observed among 'improved' cases, 'slightly improved' cases and 'no change or deteriorated' cases. 'Oren-gedoku-to' worked effectively for cerebrovascular diseases with the exception of intellectual malfunction. Results of the SPECT suggest though, it is uncertain whether these improvements were brought about by the increase of cerebral blood flow. (author)

  14. Hypothermia reduces cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in newborn pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busija, D.W.; Leffler, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    The authors examined effects of hypothermia on cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral blood flow in anesthetized, newborn pigs (1-4 days old). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined with 15-μm radioactive microspheres. Regional CBF ranged from 44 to 66 ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 , and cerebral metabolic rate was 1.94 ± 0.23 ml O 2 ·100 g -1 ·min -1 during normothermia (39 degree C). Reduction of rectal temperature to 34-35 degree C decreased CBF and cerebral metabolic rate 40-50%. In another group of piglets, they examined responsiveness of the cerebral circulation to arterial hypercapnia during hypothermia. Although absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic CBF were reduced by hypothermia and absolute values for normocapnic and hypercapnic cerebrovascular resistance were increased, the percentage changes from control in these variables during hypercapnia were similar during normothermia and hypothermia. In another group of animals that were maintained normothermic and exposed to two episodes of hypercapnia, there was no attenuation of cerebrovascular dilation during the second episode. They conclude that hypothermia reduces CBF secondarily to a decrease in cerebral metabolic rate and that percent dilator responsiveness to arterial hypercapnia is unaltered when body temperature is reduced

  15. Sodium transport through the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter exacerbates neuron damage during cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yui; Harada, Shinichi; Wada, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Shigeru; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-07-01

    We recently demonstrated that the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT) is involved in postischaemic hyperglycaemia-induced exacerbation of cerebral ischaemia. However, the associated SGLT-mediated mechanisms remain unclear. Thus, we examined the involvement of cerebral SGLT-induced excessive sodium ion influx in the development of cerebral ischaemic neuronal damage. [Na+]i was estimated according to sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate fluorescence. In the in vitro study, primary cortical neurons were prepared from fetuses of ddY mice. Primary cortical neurons were cultured for 5 days before each treatment with reagents, and these survival rates were assessed using biochemical assays. In in vivo study, a mouse model of focal ischaemia was generated using middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). In these experiments, treatment with high concentrations of glucose induced increment in [Na+]i, and this phenomenon was suppressed by the SGLT-specific inhibitor phlorizin. SGLT-specific sodium ion influx was induced using a-methyl-D-glucopyranoside (a-MG) treatments, which led to significant concentration-dependent declines in neuronal survival rates and exacerbated hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal cell death. Moreover, phlorizin ameliorated these effects. Finally, intracerebroventricular administration of a-MG exacerbated the development of neuronal damage induced by MCAO, and these effects were ameliorated by the administration of phlorizin. Hence, excessive influx of sodium ions into neuronal cells through cerebral SGLT may exacerbate the development of cerebral ischaemic neuronal damage. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Tomonaga, Masanori; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Hiroyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy was studied clinicopathologically, with special attention given to the CT images. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy is characterized, by a lobar-type hemorrhage involving the cortex, with direct extension into the subarachnoid space. Multiple hemorrhages are frequent, and cortical infarctions are present as complications in elderly patients without risk factors. CT scans taken in 5 cases demonstrated lobar hemorrhages in superficial locations, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently, with surrounding edema and mass effect. A subarachnoid extension of the hemorrhage through the superficial cortex, proven pathologically in all cases, was noted by CT in 4 of the 5 cases. However, cortical infarction was not detected by CT in any case. Therefore, CT is of value in the diagnosis of cerebral hemorrhage due to amyloid angiopathy based on distinctive findings such as a lobar hemorrhage in superficial regions, with extension into the subarachnoid space, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently. (author)

  17. Neurociências, neurocultura e autoajuda cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ortega

    Full Text Available Este artigo pretende analisar o fenômeno denominado de neuroascese, ou autoajuda cerebral no contexto do crescente impacto das neurociências e do surgimento da neurocultura e do sujeito cerebral. Para tanto, é importante compreender o âmbito sóciocultural mais amplo no qual a neuroascese se insere e que corresponde ao que vem se chamando de 'cultura somática' ou, mais especificamente, de biossociabilidade. O objetivo do artigo é explorar como uma forma de subjetividade reducionista, o sujeito cerebral, dá lugar à aparição de práticas de si cerebrais, isto é, práticas de como agir sobre o cérebro para maximizar a sua performance, que levam a formação de novas formas de sociabilidade.

  18. Contrast MR imaging of acute cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogame, Saeko; Syakudo, Miyuki; Inoue, Yuichi (Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-04-01

    Thirty patients with acute and subacute cerebral infarction (13 and 17 deep cerebral infarction) were studied with 0.5 T MR unit before and after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA. Thirteen patients were studied within 7 days after neurological ictus, 17 patients were studied between 7 and 14 days. Two types of abnormal enhancement, cortical arterial and parenchymal enhancement, were noted. The former was seen in 3 of 4 cases of very acute cortical infarction within 4 days after clinical ictus. The latter was detected in all 7 cases of cortical infarction after the 6th day of the ictus, and one patient with deep cerebral infarction at the 12th day of the ictus. Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging seems to detect gyral enhancement earlier compared with contrast CT, and depict intra-arterial sluggish flow which was not expected to see on contrast CT scans. (author).

  19. Cerebral venography and flow quantification with MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattle, H.; Elelman, R.R.; Reis, H.H.; O'Reilly, G.V.; Wentz, K.V.; O'Leary, D.H.; Finn, J.P.; Longmaid, H.E.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe an approach for creating projection venograms of the head and quantifying flow in the cerebral veins and sinuses. A series of two- dimensional flow-compensated gradient-echo images were acquired. Signal from arteries was eliminated by application of a 5-cm-thick presaturation slab to the neck. The images were postprocessed with use of a maximum intensity projection algorithm to produce projection venograms. In addition, flow directionally, flow velocity, and, in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), flow volume was assessed by means of a dynamic bolus tracking technique. Flow velocities in the SSS ranged from 20.1 to 45.5 cm/sec, and flow volumes from 269 to 612 mL/min. This technique was able to identify cerebral venous thrombosis and partial SSS obstruction, cerebral venous angiomas, and venous drainage of arteriovenous malformations and to demonstrate patency of the SSS with falx meningiomas

  20. Training model for cerebral aneurysm clipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tenjin, M.D., Ph.D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clipping of cerebral aneurysms is still an important skill in neurosurgery. We have made a training model for the clipping of cerebral aneurysms. The concepts for the model were 1: training model for beginners, 2: three dimensional manipulation using an operating microscope, 3: the aneurysm model is to be perfused by simulated blood causing premature rupture. The correct relationship between each tissue, and softness of the brain and vessels were characteristics of the model. The skull, brain, arteries, and veins were made using a 3D printer with data from DICOM. The brain and vessels were made from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA. One training course was held and this model was useful for training of cerebral aneurysm surgery for young neurosurgeons.